WorldWideScience

Sample records for lowering specific barriers

  1. Doping enhanced barrier lowering in graphene-silicon junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintong; Zhang, Lining; Chan, Mansun

    2016-06-01

    Rectifying properties of graphene-semiconductor junctions depend on the Schottky barrier height. We report an enhanced barrier lowering in graphene-Si junction and its essential doping dependence in this paper. The electric field due to ionized charge in n-type Si induces the same type doping in graphene and contributes another Schottky barrier lowering factor on top of the image-force-induced lowering (IFIL). We confirm this graphene-doping-induced lowering (GDIL) based on well reproductions of the measured reverse current of our fabricated graphene-Si junctions by the thermionic emission theory. Excellent matching between the theoretical predictions and the junction data of the doping-concentration dependent barrier lowering serves as another evidence of the GDIL. While both GDIL and IFIL are enhanced with the Si doping, GDIL exceeds IFIL with a threshold doping depending on the as-prepared graphene itself.

  2. Lower-Temperature Invert Design For Diffusion Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Stanley

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to advance the state of the subsurface facilities design to primarily support the ''Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report'' (DOE 2001) and to also support the preparation and revision of System Description Document's Section 2 system descriptions (CRWMS M and O 2001, pp. 9 and 11). The results may also eventually support the License Application (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 3). The Performance Assessment Department will be the primary user of the information generated and will be used in abstraction modeling for the lower-temperature scenario (CRWMS M and O 200 1, p. 27). This analysis will evaluate the invert relative to the lower- and higher-temperature conditions in accordance with the primary tasks below. Invert design is a major factor in allowing water entering the drift to pass freely and enter the drift floor without surface ponding and in limiting diffusive transport into the host rock. Specific cost effective designs will be conceptualized under the new lower-temperature conditions in this analysis. Interfacing activities and all aspects of Integrated Safety Management and Nuclear Culture principles are included in this work scope by adhering to the respective principles during this design activity and by incorporating safety into the design analysis (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 8). Primary tasks of this analysis include identifying available design information from existing sources on the invert as a diffusive barrier, developing concepts that reduce the amount steel, and developing other design features that accommodate both lower- and higher-temperature operating modes (CRWMS M and O 2001, p.16)

  3. Lowering Entry Barriers for Multidisciplinary Cyber(e)-Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    Multidisciplinarity is more and more important to study the Earth System and address Global Changes. To achieve that, multidisciplinary cyber(e)-infrastructures are an important instrument. In the last years, several European, US and international initiatives have been started to carry out multidisciplinary infrastructures, including: the Spatial Information in the European Community (INSPIRE), the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES), the Data Observation Network for Earth (DataOne), and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The majority of these initiatives are developing service-based digital infrastructures asking scientific Communities (i.e. disciplinary Users and data Producers) to implement a set of standards for information interoperability. For scientific Communities, this has represented an entry barrier which has proved to be high, in several cases. In fact, both data Producers and Users do not seem to be willing to invest precious resources to become expert on interoperability solutions -on the contrary, they are focused on developing disciplinary and thematic capacities. Therefore, an important research topic is lowering entry barriers for joining multidisciplinary cyber(e)-Infrastructures. This presentation will introduce a new approach to achieve multidisciplinary interoperability underpinning multidisciplinary infrastructures and lowering the present entry barriers for both Users and data Producers. This is called the Brokering approach: it extends the service-based paradigm by introducing a new a Brokering layer or cloud which is in charge of managing all the interoperability complexity (e.g. data discovery, access, and use) thus easing Users' and Producers' burden. This approach was successfully experimented in the framework of several European FP7 Projects and in GEOSS.

  4. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  5. Editorial Challenging barriers to surgical access in lower and middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unmet surgical needs globally.2 Barriers to surgical access lead to delayed presentation of ... educational constraints (First Delay). Once the decision to ... Day of surgery cancellations have implications in both high- and low- income countries.

  6. Subsurface barrier demonstration test strategy and performance specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    This document was developed to help specify a major demonstration test project of subsurface barrier systems supporting the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The document focuses discussion on requirements applicable to demonstration of three subsurface barrier concepts: (1) Injected Material, (2) Cryogenic, and (3) Desiccant. Detailed requirements are provided for initial qualification of a technology proposal followed by the pre-demonstration and demonstration test requirements and specifications. Each requirement and specification is accompanied by a discussion of the rationale for it. The document also includes information on the Hanford Site tank farms and related data; the related and currently active technology development projects within the DOE's EM-50 Program; and the overall demonstration test strategy. Procurement activities and other preparations for actual demonstration testing are on hold until a decision is made regarding further development of subsurface barriers. Accordingly, this document is being issued for information only

  7. Studying the place of technology to lower financial barriers for dietary change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, K A; Maitland, J

    2010-01-01

    Current dietary self-monitoring systems assume users have access to healthy foods and resources to effectively implement and monitor dietary behavioral change. The purpose of this qualitative study is to understand the specific financial-related barriers that caregivers of low socioeconomic status encounter when attempting to make dietary behavior change. In this qualitative study, we conducted a focus group and 14 in-person interviews with the primary caregivers of low socioeconomic families. Participants were recruited from a community considered to be 'at risk' through high levels of exposure to multiple modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. All participants were English-speaking caregivers, who had children under eight years old. The families lived in an urban, public housing community. The focus group and interviews were transcribed and coded during data analysis sessions, then analyzed for emergent themes. We abstracted three main themes from the data. The caregivers of 17 families: 1) feared trying healthier food alternatives because of possibly wasting the food; 2) planned meals only when they had enough time, space, and financial security; and 3) defined produce as luxury items and often could only afford staple food items, such as meat and grains. We challenge the community to design technological interventions to lower the financial barriers presented with existing information and communication technology available to low socioeconomic populations. In addition, we encourage interventions to foster a community's social capital to decrease feelings of isolation and increase opportunities for cooperation.

  8. Rigorous analysis of image force barrier lowering in bounded geometries: application to semiconducting nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Mendels, Dan; Epstein, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Bounded geometries introduce a fundamental problem in calculating the image force barrier lowering of metal-wrapped semiconductor systems. In bounded geometries, the derivation of the barrier lowering requires calculating the reference energy of the system, when the charge is at the geometry center. In the following, we formulate and rigorously solve this problem; this allows combining the image force electrostatic potential with the band diagram of the bounded geometry. The suggested approach is applied to spheres as well as cylinders. Furthermore, although the expressions governing cylindrical systems are complex and can only be evaluated numerically, we present analytical approximations for the solution, which allow easy implementation in calculated band diagrams. The results are further used to calculate the image force barrier lowering of metal-wrapped cylindrical nanowires; calculations show that although the image force potential is stronger than that of planar systems, taking the complete band-structure into account results in a weaker effect of barrier lowering. Moreover, when considering small diameter nanowires, we find that the electrostatic effects of the image force exceed the barrier region, and influence the electronic properties of the nanowire core. This study is of interest to the nanowire community, and in particular for the analysis of nanowire I−V measurements where wrapped or omega-shaped metallic contacts are used. (paper)

  9. Phenomena and characteristics of barrier river reaches in the middle and lower Yangtze River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xingying; Tang, Jinwu

    2017-06-01

    Alluvial river self-adjustment describes the mechanism whereby a river that was originally in an equilibrium state of sediment transport encounters some disturbance that destroys the balance and results in responses such as riverbed deformation. A systematic study of historical and recent aerial photographs and topographic maps in the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR) shows that river self-adjustment has the distinguishing feature of transferring from upstream to downstream, which may affect flood safety, waterway morphology, bank stability, and aquatic environmental safety over relatively long reaches downstream. As a result, it is necessary to take measures to control or block this transfer. Using the relationship of the occurrence time of channel adjustments between the upstream and downstream, 34 single-thread river reaches in the MLYR were classified into four types: corresponding, basically corresponding, basically not corresponding, not corresponding. The latter two types, because of their ability to prevent upstream channel adjustment from transferring downstream, are called barrier river reaches in this study. Statistics indicate that barrier river reaches are generally single thread and slightly curved, with a narrow and deep cross-sectional morphology, and without flow deflecting nodes in the upper and middle parts of reaches. Moreover, in the MLYR, barrier river reaches have a hydrogeometric coefficient of {}1.2‱, a silty clay content of the concave bank {>}{9.5}%, and a median diameter of the bed sediment {>}{0.158} mm. The barrier river reach mechanism lies in that can effectively centralise the planimetric position of the main stream from different upstream directions, meaning that no matter how the upper channel adjusts, the main stream shows little change, providing relatively stable inflow conditions for the lower reaches. Regarding river regulation, it is necessary to optimise the benefits of barrier river reaches; long river

  10. Physical activity barriers and enablers in older Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Alyson J; Boyko, Edward J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Arterburn, David E

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the types of physical activities that older individuals with lower-limb loss perform, correlates of regular physical activity (PA), and barriers and facilitators to PA. We conducted an exploratory study in 158 older Veterans from the Pacific Northwest with a partial foot (35%), below-knee (39%) and above-knee (26%) amputation. Ninety-eight percent of survey respondents were male, on average 65 yr of age and 15 yr postamputation; 36% of amputations were trauma-related. The most commonly reported physical activities were muscle strengthening (42%), yard work and/or gardening (30%), and bicycling (11%). Forty-three percent were classified as physically active based on weekly moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA. History of vigorous preamputation PA was positively associated with being active, while low wealth and watching ≥5 h/d of television/videos were inversely associated. While pain- and resource-related barriers to PA were most frequently reported, only knowledge-related and interest/motivation-related barriers were inversely associated with being active. Family support and financial assistance to join a gym were the most commonly reported factors that would facilitate PA. To increase PA in the older amputee population, interventions should address motivational issues, knowledge gaps, and television watching; reduce financial barriers to exercising; and consider involving family members.

  11. Investigation of the potential barrier lowering for quasi-ballistic transport in short channel MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Kwon, Yongmin; Ji, Junghwan; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the quasi-ballistic carrier transport in short channel MOSFETs is investigated from the point of potential barrier lowering. To investigate the ballistic characteristic of transistors, we extracted the channel backscattering coefficient and the ballistic ratio from experimental data obtained by RF C-V and DC I-V measurements. Two factors that modulate the potential barrier height, besides the gate bias, are considered in this work: the drain bias (V DS ) and the channel doping concentration (N A ). We extract the critical length by calculating the potential drop in the channel region and conclude that the drain bias and the channel doping concentration affect the quasi-ballistic carrier transport.

  12. Preliminary engineering specifications for a test demonstration multilayer protective barrier cover system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Gilbert, T.W.; Adams, M.R.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents preliminary engineering specifications for a test protective barrier cover system and support radiohydrology facility to be constructed at the Hanford Protective Barrier Test Facility (PBTF). Construction of this test barrier and related radiohydrology facility is part of a continuing effort to provide construction experience and performance evaluation of alternative barrier designs used for long-term isolation of disposed radioactive waste materials. Design specifications given in this report are tentative, based on interim engineering and computer simulation design efforts. Final definitive design specifications and engineering prints will be produced in FY 1986. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  13. Barriers to participation in mental health research: are there specific gender, ethnicity and age related barriers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Louise

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the incidence, prevalence and presentation of mental disorders differ by gender, ethnicity and age, and there is evidence that there is also differential representation in mental health research by these characteristics. The aim of this paper is to a review the current literature on the nature of barriers to participation in mental health research, with particular reference to gender, age and ethnicity; b review the evidence on the effectiveness of strategies used to overcome these barriers. Method Studies published up to December 2008 were identified using MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE using relevant mesh headings and keywords. Results Forty-nine papers were identified. There was evidence of a wide range of barriers including transportation difficulties, distrust and suspicion of researchers, and the stigma attached to mental illness. Strategies to overcome these barriers included the use of bilingual staff, assistance with travel, avoiding the use of stigmatising language in marketing material and a focus on education about the disorder under investigation. There were very few evaluations of such strategies, but there was evidence that ethnically matching recruiters to potential participants did not improve recruitment rates. Educational strategies were helpful and increased recruitment. Conclusion Mental health researchers should consider including caregivers in recruitment procedures where possible, provide clear descriptions of study aims and describe the representativeness of their sample when reporting study results. Studies that systematically investigate strategies to overcome barriers to recruitment are needed.

  14. Specific Gravity Variation in a Lower Mississippi Valley Cottonwood Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Farmer; J. R. Wilcox

    1966-01-01

    Specific gravity varied from 0,32 to 0.46, averaging 0.38. Most of the variation was associated with individual trees; samples within locations accounted for a smaller, but statistically significant, portion of the variation. Variation between locatians was not significant. It was concluded that individual high-density trees' should be sought throughout the...

  15. Study on lowering the specific radioactivity of rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinhuor, Y.; Jyuung, J.; Shyuerjung, T.; Xiangping, L.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the source of radioactivity in rare earth chlorides and the chemical behaviour of its main radionuclides in metallurgy processing are investigated. It is pointed out that the radioactivity in rare earths comes from the long-life radionuclides in three natural radioactive series. Nine of them (/sup 238/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 210/Po, /sup 232/Th, /sup 228/Th, /sup 235/U, /sup 231/Pa) are alpha-emitters, three of them (/sup 228/Ra, /sup 227/Ac, /sup 210/Pb) are beta-emitters. Among them alpha-emitters contribute the total specific activity of rare earths directly. The rare earths are easily purified in preferential dissolution, radium elimination, and other processes

  16. Lowering the Barrier to Reproducible Research by Publishing Provenance from Common Analytical Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. B.; Slaughter, P.; Walker, L.; Jones, C. S.; Missier, P.; Ludäscher, B.; Cao, Y.; McPhillips, T.; Schildhauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific provenance describes the authenticity, origin, and processing history of research products and promotes scientific transparency by detailing the steps in computational workflows that produce derived products. These products include papers, findings, input data, software products to perform computations, and derived data and visualizations. The geosciences community values this type of information, and, at least theoretically, strives to base conclusions on computationally replicable findings. In practice, capturing detailed provenance is laborious and thus has been a low priority; beyond a lab notebook describing methods and results, few researchers capture and preserve detailed records of scientific provenance. We have built tools for capturing and publishing provenance that integrate into analytical environments that are in widespread use by geoscientists (R and Matlab). These tools lower the barrier to provenance generation by automating capture of critical information as researchers prepare data for analysis, develop, test, and execute models, and create visualizations. The 'recordr' library in R and the `matlab-dataone` library in Matlab provide shared functions to capture provenance with minimal changes to normal working procedures. Researchers can capture both scripted and interactive sessions, tag and manage these executions as they iterate over analyses, and then prune and publish provenance metadata and derived products to the DataONE federation of archival repositories. Provenance traces conform to the ProvONE model extension of W3C PROV, enabling interoperability across tools and languages. The capture system supports fine-grained versioning of science products and provenance traces. By assigning global identifiers such as DOIs, reseachers can cite the computational processes used to reach findings. And, finally, DataONE has built a web portal to search, browse, and clearly display provenance relationships between input data, the software

  17. Lower Mesophotic Coral Communities (60-125 m Depth of the Northern Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Englebert

    Full Text Available Mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific remain relatively unexplored, particularly at lower mesophotic depths (≥60 m, despite their potentially large spatial extent. Here, we used a remotely operated vehicle to conduct a qualitative assessment of the zooxanthellate coral community at lower mesophotic depths (60-125 m at 10 different locations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and the Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve. Lower mesophotic coral communities were present at all 10 locations, with zooxanthellate scleractinian corals extending down to ~100 metres on walls and ~125 m on steep slopes. Lower mesophotic coral communities were most diverse in the 60-80 m zone, while at depths of ≥100 m the coral community consisted almost exclusively of the genus Leptoseris. Collections of coral specimens (n = 213 between 60 and 125 m depth confirmed the presence of at least 29 different species belonging to 18 genera, including several potential new species and geographic/depth range extensions. Overall, this study highlights that lower mesophotic coral ecosystems are likely to be ubiquitous features on the outer reefs of the Great Barrier Reef and atolls of the Coral Sea, and harbour a generic and species richness of corals that is much higher than thus far reported. Further research efforts are urgently required to better understand and manage these ecosystems as part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve.

  18. Lowering the Cost Barrier to Higher Education for Undocumented Students: A Promising University-Level Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangasamy, Andrew; Horan, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Undocumented students, many of Hispanic origin, face among the strictest cost barriers to higher education in the United States. Lack of legal status excludes them from most state and all federal financial aid programs. Furthermore, most states require them to pay out-of-state tuition rates at publicly supported institutions. In a new direction,…

  19. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizayaga, Francisco; Scorticati, Camila; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Romay, Salvador; Fernandez, Maria A; Castro, José L; Lemberg, Abraham; Perazzo, Juan C

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Sham14d , sham operated; Group II: PH14d , portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group III: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group IV: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups II and IV used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded. RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high, and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished. When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished. CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment. PMID:16552803

  20. The effects of revised barrier and dummy specification in the side impact test procedure or EuroNCAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waagmeester, C.D.; Versmissen, T.; Ratingen, M.R. van; Zuljar, R. [TNO Automotive, Crash Safety Center, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper the effects of potential changes to the side impact test in EuroNCAP are studied. Research in Europe has come to the point that enhanced alternatives will soon become available for the test tools used, in the form of the EUROSID-2 (ES-2), Q child dummies and the progressive MDB barrier. The objective of this study is to illustrate the effect that introduction of the new test tools could have in terms of injury outcome and rating for a typical mid-size family saloon vehicle. For this, a full-scale test, previously carried out as part of the EuroNCAP programme, has been repeated three times replacing the current barrier and/or dummies by the new alternatives. Even though these new tools are designed to meet the existing specifications, the comparison of old and new results show that the end result, i.e. the car rating, may be substantially influenced. For the car tested in this study, the added effect of dummy and barrier change would lower the rating from 14.56 to 11.62 points (91% to 73%). Some small, not critical, values measured with EUROSID-1 (V*C's) increased 500 to 600% by using the new tools. However, the car used in this study would still meet the ECE R95 criteria. Cars that are designed closer to the legislation limits may fail to comply. Comparing the 'New dummies - Old barrier' test with equivalent tests performed in the ES-2 evaluation program show a substantial variation in injury parameter results. Based on the four tests with one car type in this study it can be illustrated that the new barrier may show an undesired increase of crash test results. (orig.)

  1. Mediating Effects of Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Verloigne

    Full Text Available The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls.In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0±1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active. Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon's product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses.Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05. Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls' physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%.This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls' physical activity both directly and indirectly through the internalisation of several personal

  2. Core and Complementary Chiropractic: Lowering Barriers to Patient Utilization of Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; McGregor, Marion

    2016-12-01

    The use of chiropractic services has stalled while interest in accessing manipulation services is rising. The purpose of this paper is to consider this dilemma in the context of the dynamics of professional socialization, surveys of public attitudes, and a potential strategic action. This is a reflection work grounded in the literature on professional socialization and the attitudes held regarding chiropractic in modern society, to include its members, and in original data on training programs. Data were interpreted on the background of the authors' cross-cultural experiences spanning patient care, research, education, and interprofessional collaboration. Recommendation on a strategic action to counter barriers in patient referrals was synthesized. Professional socialization is the process by which society enables professional privilege. Illustration of typical and divergent professional socialization models emerged that explain cognitive dissonance toward the profession. Questions of trust are commensurate with the experiences during patient encounters rather than with a common identity for the profession. Diversity among encounters perpetuates the uncertainty that affects referral sources. Commonality as an anchor for consistent professional identity and socialization through the content of core chiropractic, defined by training and practice, offers a means to offset uncertainty. Complementary chiropractic, analogous to complementary medicine, provides an outlet under professional socialization for the interests to explore additional methods of care. The practice workplace is an effective lever for altering barriers to the use of services. Clarifying rhetoric through conceptualization of core and complementary practices simplifies the socialization dynamic. Further, it takes advantage of accepted cultural semantics in meaningful analogy while continuing to empower practical diversity in care delivery in response to evolving scientific evidence.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen lowering effect of metabolic syndrome is influenced by prostate volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Heo, Nam Ju; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen levels by considering prostate volume and plasma volume. We retrospectively analyzed 4111 men who underwent routine check-ups including prostate-specific antigen and transrectal ultrasonography. The definition of metabolic syndrome was based on the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Prostate-specific antigen mass density (prostate-specific antigen × plasma volume / prostate volume) was calculated for adjusting plasma volume and prostate volume. We compared prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen mass density levels of participants with metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome group, n = 1242) and without metabolic syndrome (non-prostate-specific antigen metabolic syndrome group, n = 2869). To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen, linear regression analysis for the natural logarithm of prostate-specific antigen was used. Patients in the metabolic syndrome group had significantly older age (P prostate volume (P prostate-specific antigen (non-metabolic syndrome group vs metabolic syndrome group; 1.22 ± 0.91 vs 1.15 ± 0.76 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Prostate-specific antigen mass density in the metabolic syndrome group was still significantly lower than that in the metabolic syndrome group (0.124 ± 0.084 vs 0.115 ± 0.071 μg/mL, P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, prostate volume and plasma volume using linear regression model, the presence of metabolic syndrome was a significant independent factor for lower prostate-specific antigen (prostate-specific antigen decrease by 4.1%, P = 0.046). Prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with metabolic syndrome seem to be lower, and this finding might be affected by the prostate volume. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Barrier lowering effect and dark current characteristics in asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs multi quantum well structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altin, E. [Inonu University, Scientific and Technological Research Center, Malatya (Turkey); Anadolu University, Department of Physics, Eskisehir (Turkey); Hostut, M. [Akdeniz University, Department of Secondary Education of Science and Maths., Division of Physics Education, Antalya (Turkey); Ergun, Y. [Anadolu University, Department of Physics, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2011-12-15

    In this study, we investigate dark current voltage characteristics of GaAs/AlGaAs staircase-like asymmetric multiquantum well structure at various temperatures experimentally. The activation energy is calculated by using Arrhenius plots at different voltages. It is found that the activation energy decreased with increasing electric field. This result is evaluated using a barrier lowering effect which is a combination of geometrical and Poole-Frenkel effects. Measured dark current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics compared with the Levine model, 3D carrier drift model and the emission capture model. The best agreement with the experimental results of dark current densities is obtained by the Levine model. (orig.)

  5. Enterocyte-specific epidermal growth factor prevents barrier dysfunction and improves mortality in murine peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jessica A; Gan, Heng; Samocha, Alexandr J; Fox, Amy C; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-09-01

    Systemic administration of epidermal growth factor (EGF) decreases mortality in a murine model of septic peritonitis. Although EGF can have direct healing effects on the intestinal mucosa, it is unknown whether the benefits of systemic EGF in peritonitis are mediated through the intestine. Here, we demonstrate that enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF is sufficient to prevent intestinal barrier dysfunction and improve survival in peritonitis. Transgenic FVB/N mice that overexpress EGF exclusively in enterocytes (IFABP-EGF) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to either sham laparotomy or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Intestinal permeability, expression of the tight junction proteins claudins-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -7, and -8, occludin, and zonula occludens-1; villus length; intestinal epithelial proliferation; and epithelial apoptosis were evaluated. A separate cohort of mice was followed for survival. Peritonitis induced a threefold increase in intestinal permeability in WT mice. This was associated with increased claudin-2 expression and a change in subcellular localization. Permeability decreased to basal levels in IFABP-EGF septic mice, and claudin-2 expression and localization were similar to those of sham animals. Claudin-4 expression was decreased following CLP but was not different between WT septic mice and IFABP-EGF septic mice. Peritonitis-induced decreases in villus length and proliferation and increases in apoptosis seen in WT septic mice did not occur in IFABP-EGF septic mice. IFABP-EGF mice had improved 7-day mortality compared with WT septic mice (6% vs. 64%). Since enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF is sufficient to prevent peritonitis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction and confers a survival advantage, the protective effects of systemic EGF in septic peritonitis appear to be mediated in an intestine-specific fashion.

  6. Autism and Overcoming Job Barriers: Comparing Job-Related Barriers and Possible Solutions in and outside of Autism-Specific Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Timo; Frischling, Cora; Cuadros, Raphael; Heinitz, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover how individuals with autism succeed in entering the job market. We therefore sought to identify expected and occurred barriers, keeping them from taking up and staying in employment as well as to identify the solutions used to overcome these barriers. Sixty-six employed individuals with autism–17 of them with autism-specific employment–participated in an online survey. Results showed a variety of possible barriers. Individuals in autism-specific employment named formality problems–problems with organizational and practical process-related aspects of the job entry–most frequently while individuals in non-autism-specific employment mentioned social problems–obstacles concerning communication and human interaction–most. In terms of solutions, both groups used their own resources as much as external help, but differed in their specific strategies. In addition, correlations of an autism-specific employment with general and occupational self-efficacy as well as life and job satisfaction were examined. Possible implications of the results are discussed with regard to problem solving behavior and the use of strengths. PMID:26766183

  7. Autism and Overcoming Job Barriers: Comparing Job-Related Barriers and Possible Solutions in and outside of Autism-Specific Employment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Lorenz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to discover how individuals with autism succeed in entering the job market. We therefore sought to identify expected and occurred barriers, keeping them from taking up and staying in employment as well as to identify the solutions used to overcome these barriers. Sixty-six employed individuals with autism--17 of them with autism-specific employment--participated in an online survey. Results showed a variety of possible barriers. Individuals in autism-specific employment named formality problems--problems with organizational and practical process-related aspects of the job entry--most frequently while individuals in non-autism-specific employment mentioned social problems--obstacles concerning communication and human interaction--most. In terms of solutions, both groups used their own resources as much as external help, but differed in their specific strategies. In addition, correlations of an autism-specific employment with general and occupational self-efficacy as well as life and job satisfaction were examined. Possible implications of the results are discussed with regard to problem solving behavior and the use of strengths.

  8. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock ® 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus...... as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications....

  10. Non-specific Inflammatory Disease Showed Abnormal FDG Uptake in Lower Extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kong, Eun Jung; Cho, Ihn Ho; Hong, Young Hoon; Lee, Choong Ki

    2008-01-01

    Including malignancy, various disease can show abnormal uptake in bone marrow. 1,2) We report a case of non-specific inflammatory FDG uptake in bone marrow mimicking malignancy. A 35-year old woman with fever of unknown origin (FUO) underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT to find out fever focus and unknown malignancy. 18 F-FDG was injected and imaged 1hr after injection with Discovery ST (GE, USA). 18 F-FDG PET/CT whole body image showed abnormal uptake in lower extremities. MRI and biopsy was also done in the sites of abnormal uptake. PET and MRI suspect malignancy, but biopsy result was non-specific inflammatory process. The patient was improved her clinical condition after antibiotics therapy

  11. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    Background: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to prioritize the children´s perceived barriers. This was verified...... barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the children´s perceptions of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly for those boys who played ballgames. Girls said they would like to have...

  12. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-06-23

    Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools) with in total 111 children (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to rank the children's perceived barriers. This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said they would like to have more secluded areas added to the school playground, even in large schoolyards where lack of space was not a barrier. This aligned with girls' requests for more "hanging-out" facilities, whereas boys primarily wanted activity promoting facilities. Based on the results from this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and organizational environment.

  13. Modeling of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and parametric instability (PI) for high performance internal transport barriers (ITBs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Paoletti, F.; Challis, C.; Mailloux, J.; Mazon, D.

    2003-01-01

    ITBs (internal transport barrier) with high performance in time duration (4 seconds) were produced at Jet in plasma discharges operating at the plasma current of 2,4 MA and toroidal magnetic field of 3,45 T using lower hybrid (LH) radiofrequency power (2,3 MW) for heating and current drive. The first results of the modeling devoted to calculate the LH power deposition and current density profiles for ITB plasmas are presented. The LH power density profile was first calculated considering the nominal LH power n / spectrum launched by the antenna, a substantially centrally deposition is obtained, many passes (> 10) are necessary for producing a significant fraction of the coupled LH power to be absorbed. In a second step some broadening (20%) of the launched n / power spectrum was considered to simulate the effect of a non-linear wave scattering. Most of the LH power is deposited at the first pass, mainly in the outer half of plasma. The simulation gives a moderate amount (60%) of non-inductive current, including 30% of LHCD fraction. The q-profiles from polarization and from MSE (motional Stark effect) at the beginning and during the main heating phase were analysed. Non-linear plasma edge phenomena allow propagation of some LH power with large n / . Such effect should be retained for a realistic LHCD modeling of ITB plasmas. The consequent enhanced off-axis LHCD is consistent with the observed large ITBs and the obtained large region with low magnetic shear. The LH power might provide a powerful tool for controlling the q-profile for ITB at high plasma current, for potential application to the advanced tokamak regimes

  14. Modeling of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and parametric instability (PI) for high performance internal transport barriers (ITBs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascadi (Italy); Paoletti, F. [PPPL Pinceton (United States); Challis, C.; Mailloux, J. [Euratom-UKAEA fusion association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Mazon, D. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    ITBs (internal transport barrier) with high performance in time duration (4 seconds) were produced at Jet in plasma discharges operating at the plasma current of 2,4 MA and toroidal magnetic field of 3,45 T using lower hybrid (LH) radiofrequency power (2,3 MW) for heating and current drive. The first results of the modeling devoted to calculate the LH power deposition and current density profiles for ITB plasmas are presented. The LH power density profile was first calculated considering the nominal LH power n{sub /} spectrum launched by the antenna, a substantially centrally deposition is obtained, many passes (> 10) are necessary for producing a significant fraction of the coupled LH power to be absorbed. In a second step some broadening (20%) of the launched n{sub /} power spectrum was considered to simulate the effect of a non-linear wave scattering. Most of the LH power is deposited at the first pass, mainly in the outer half of plasma. The simulation gives a moderate amount (60%) of non-inductive current, including 30% of LHCD fraction. The q-profiles from polarization and from MSE (motional Stark effect) at the beginning and during the main heating phase were analysed. Non-linear plasma edge phenomena allow propagation of some LH power with large n{sub /}. Such effect should be retained for a realistic LHCD modeling of ITB plasmas. The consequent enhanced off-axis LHCD is consistent with the observed large ITBs and the obtained large region with low magnetic shear. The LH power might provide a powerful tool for controlling the q-profile for ITB at high plasma current, for potential application to the advanced tokamak regimes.

  15. Host-specific interactions with environmental factors shape the distribution of symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tonk

    Full Text Available The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST. To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR were compiled.The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions.Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding of the drivers behind the complexity of Symbiodinium

  16. Sex-specific signaling in the blood-brain barrier is required for male courtship in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valbona Hoxha

    Full Text Available Soluble circulating proteins play an important role in the regulation of mating behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. However, how these factors signal through the blood-brain barrier (bbb to interact with the sex-specific brain circuits that control courtship is unknown. Here we show that male identity of the blood-brain barrier is necessary and that male-specific factors in the bbb are physiologically required for normal male courtship behavior. Feminization of the bbb of adult males significantly reduces male courtship. We show that the bbb-specific G-protein coupled receptor moody and bbb-specific Go signaling in adult males are necessary for normal courtship. These data identify sex-specific factors and signaling processes in the bbb as important regulators of male mating behavior.

  17. Devaluation, crowding or skill specificity? Exploring the mechanisms behind the lower wages in female professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Anne; Magnusson, Charlotta

    2013-07-01

    A conspicuous finding in research on the gender wage gap is that wages are related to the percentage females in an occupation (percent F). Three mechanisms have been suggested to explain this relationship: a devaluation of women's work, a crowding of women into a limited number of occupations, and a female disadvantage in the accumulation of specific human capital. In this analysis, based on data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey of 2000 (n=2915), we distinguish between these mechanisms using measures of devaluation (Treiman's prestige scale), crowding (employee dependence on current employer) and specific human capital (on-the-job training). The results show that all the indicators are related to percent F, but not in a linear fashion, and that the percent F-effect on wages is overstated and misspecified. Female-dominated occupations stand out with lower wages than both male-dominated and gender-integrated occupations and this is not explained by any of our measures. Thus, if the hypotheses on segregation and wages should be sustained, they must be further specified and new measures must be found to prove their worth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in a Randomized Trial of a Specific Probiotic Composition in Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Renooij, Willem; de Smet, Martin B.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Timmerman, Harro M.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Cirkel, Geert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Witteman, Ben J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; van Goor, Harry; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Tan, Adriaan C.; Brink, Menno A.; van der Harst, Erwin; Wahab, Peter J.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Akkermans, Louis M.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relation between intestinal barrier dysfunction, bacterial translocation, and clinical outcome in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis and the influence of probiotics on these processes. Summary of Background data: Randomized, placebo-controlled,

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of fluorescence microlymphography for detecting lymphedema of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, Hong H; Schilling, Marianne; Büchel, Roland; Gröchenig, Ernst; Engelberger, Rolf P; Willenberg, Torsten; Baumgartner, Iris; Gretener, Silvia B

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescence microlymphography (FML) is used to visualize the lymphatic capillaries. A maximum spread of the fluorescence dye of ≥ 12 mm has been suggested for the diagnosis of lymphedema. However, data on sensitivity and specificity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FML for diagnosing lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. Patients with lower extremity swelling were clinically assessed and separated into lymphedema and non-lymphatic edema groups. FML was studied in all affected legs and the maximum spread of lymphatic capillaries was measured. Test accuracy and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess possible threshold values that predict lymphedema. Between March 2008 and August 2011 a total of 171 patients (184 legs) with a median age of 43.5 (IQR 24, 54) years were assessed. Of those, 94 (51.1%) legs were diagnosed with lymphedema. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and positive and negative predictive value were 87%, 64%, 2.45, 0.20, 72% and 83% for the 12-mm cut-off level and 79%, 83%, 4.72, 0.26, 83% and 79% for the 14-mm cut-off level, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.88). Sensitivity was higher in the secondary versus primary lymphedema (95.0% vs 74.3%, p = 0.045). No major adverse events were observed. In conclusion, FML is a simple and safe technique for detecting lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. A cut-off level of ≥ 14-mm maximum spread has a high sensitivity and high specificity of detecting lymphedema and should be chosen.

  20. Specific fission J-window and angular momentum dependence of the fission barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto; Yokoyama, Akihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Shinohara, Atsushi

    1997-04-01

    A method to determine a unique J-window in the fission process was devised and the fissioning nuclide associated with thus extracted J-window was identified for each of the heavy-ion reaction systems. Obtained fission barriers at the resulting J-window were compared with the calculated values by the rotating finite range model (RFRM). The deduced barriers for individual nuclides were compared with the RFRM barriers to reproduce more or less the angular momentum dependence the RFRM prediction. The deduced systematic behavior of the fission barrier indicates no even-odd and shell corrections are necessary. The nuclear dissipation effect based on Kramer`s model revealed substantial reduction of the statistically deduced barrier heights and brought a fairly large scattering from the RFRM J-dependence. However, introduction of the temperature-dependent friction coefficient ({gamma} = 2 for T {>=} 1.0 MeV and 0.5 for T < 1.0 MeV) was found to bring about satisfactory agreement with both RFRM fission barriers and the pre-fission neutron multiplicity systematics. (author). 81 refs.

  1. Specific features of waveguide recombination in laser structures with asymmetric barrier layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polubavkina, Yu. S., E-mail: polubavkina@mail.ru; Zubov, F. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University (Russian Federation); Semenova, E. S.; Yvind, K. [Technical University of Denmark, DTU Fotonik (Denmark); Asryan, L. V. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (United States); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The spatial distribution of the intensity of the emission caused by recombination appearing at a high injection level (up to 30 kA/cm{sup 2}) in the waveguide layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure with GaInP and AlGaInAs asymmetric barrier layers is studied by means of near-field scanning optical microscopy. It is found that the waveguide luminescence in such a laser, which is on the whole less intense as compared to that observed in a similar laser without asymmetric barriers, is non-uniformly distributed in the waveguide, so that the distribution maximum is shifted closer to the p-type cladding layer. This can be attributed to the ability of the GaInP barrier adjoining the quantum well on the side of the n-type cladding layer to suppress the hole transport.

  2. Specific features of waveguide recombination in laser structures with asymmetric barrier layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polubavkina, Yu; Zubov, F. I.; Moiseev, E.

    2017-01-01

    microscopy. It is found that the waveguide luminescence in such a laser, which is on the whole less intense as compared to that observed in a similar laser without asymmetric barriers, is non-uniformly distributed in the waveguide, so that the distribution maximum is shifted closer to the p-type cladding......The spatial distribution of the intensity of the emission caused by recombination appearing at a high injection level (up to 30 kA/cm2) in the waveguide layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure with GaInP and AlGaInAs asymmetric barrier layers is studied by means of near-field scanning optical...... layer. This can be attributed to the ability of the GaInP barrier adjoining the quantum well on the side of the n-type cladding layer to suppress the hole transport....

  3. Drain-induced barrier lowering effect for short channel dual material gate 4H silicon carbide metal—semiconductor field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Jun; Yang, Yin-Tang; Duan, Bao-Xing; Chai, Chang-Chun; Song, Kun; Chen, Bin

    2012-09-01

    Sub-threshold characteristics of the dual material gate 4H-SiC MESFET (DMGFET) are investigated and the analytical models to describe the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) effect are derived by solving one- and two-dimensional Poisson's equations. Using these models, we calculate the bottom potential of the channel and the threshold voltage shift, which characterize the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) effect. The calculated results reveal that the dual material gate (DMG) structure alleviates the deterioration of the threshold voltage and thus suppresses the DIBL effect due to the introduced step function, which originates from the work function difference of the two gate materials when compared with the conventional single material gate metal—semiconductor field-effect transistor (SMGFET).

  4. Drain-induced barrier lowering effect for short channel dual material gate 4H silicon carbide metal—semiconductor field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xian-Jun; Yang Yin-Tang; Duan Bao-Xing; Chai Chang-Chun; Song Kun; Chen Bin

    2012-01-01

    Sub-threshold characteristics of the dual material gate 4H-SiC MESFET (DMGFET) are investigated and the analytical models to describe the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) effect are derived by solving one- and two-dimensional Poisson's equations. Using these models, we calculate the bottom potential of the channel and the threshold voltage shift, which characterize the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) effect. The calculated results reveal that the dual material gate (DMG) structure alleviates the deterioration of the threshold voltage and thus suppresses the DIBL effect due to the introduced step function, which originates from the work function difference of the two gate materials when compared with the conventional single material gate metal—semiconductor field-effect transistor (SMGFET)

  5. Specific barriers to the conduct of randomised clinical trials on medical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Rath, Ana; Antoine, Sunya-Lee

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Research Infrastructure Network (ECRIN) communications taking place during face-to-face meetings and telephone conferences from 2013 to 2017 within the context of the ECRIN Integrating Activity (ECRIN-IA) project. RESULTS: In addition to the barriers that exist for all trials, we identified three...

  6. Safety, efficacy, and molecular mechanism of claudin-1-specific peptides to enhance blood-nerve-barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Reine-Solange; Krug, Susanne M; Hackel, Dagmar; Staat, Christian; Konasin, Natalia; Yang, Shaobing; Niedermirtl, Benedikt; Bosten, Judith; Günther, Ramona; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Doppler, Kathrin; Sommer, Claudia; Blasig, Ingolf E; Brack, Alexander; Rittner, Heike L

    2014-07-10

    The blood-nerve barrier consists of the perineurium and endoneurial vessels. The perineurial barrier is composed of a basal membrane and a layer of perineurial cells sealed by tight junction proteins preventing e.g. application of analgesics for selective regional pain control. One of the barrier-sealing proteins in the blood-nerve barrier is claudin-1. Therefore, the claudin-1-peptidomimetics (C1C2), derived from the first extracellular loop (ECL1) on claudin-1 was developed. In this study, we further evaluated the expression of tight junction proteins in the perineurium in Wistar rats and characterized the specificity, in vivo applicability, mechanism of action as well as the biocompatibility of C1C2. In the perineurium, claudin-19, tricellulin and ZO-1, but no claudin-2, 3, 8 and -11 were expressed. C1C2 specifically bound to the ECL1 of claudin-1 and fluorescent 5,6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine-C1C2 was rapidly internalized. Opening the perineurium with C1C2 reduced the mRNA and protein expression of claudin-1 and increased small and macromolecule permeability into the peripheral nerve. Application of C1C2 facilitated regional analgesia using μ-opioid receptor agonists like DAMGO or morphine without motor impairment in naïve rats as well as rats with hind paw inflammation. In contrast the control peptide C2C2 derived from ECL1 on claudin-2 did neither open the barrier nor facilitated opioid-mediated regional analgesia. C1C2 delivery was well tolerated and caused no morphological and functional nerve damage. C1C2 effects could be reversed by interference with the wnt-signal-transduction pathway, specifically the homeobox transcription factor cdx2, using a glycogen-synthase-kinase-3 inhibitor. In summary, we describe the composition of and a pathway to open the perineurial barrier employing a peptide to deliver hydrophilic substances to the peripheral nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Schlotz, Wolff; Crozier, Sarah; Skinner, Timothy C; Haslam, Cheryl; Robinson, Sian; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Barker, Mary

    2011-02-01

    Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women of lower educational attainment, the effect of general self-efficacy on quality of diet was mediated through perceptions of control and through food involvement, but that there were also direct effects of social support for healthy eating and having positive outcome expectancies. There was no effect of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control-related factors are more important in determining dietary quality in women of lower educational attainment than in women of higher educational attainment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical Modeling of Gate-Controlled Schottky Barrier Lowering of Metal-Graphene Contacts in Top-Gated Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, Huansheng; Huo, Zong-Liang; Wang, Jin-Yan

    2015-12-01

    A new physical model of the gate controlled Schottky barrier height (SBH) lowering in top-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) under saturation bias condition is proposed based on the energy conservation equation with the balance assumption. The theoretical prediction of the SBH lowering agrees well with the experimental data reported in literatures. The reduction of the SBH increases with the increasing of gate voltage and relative dielectric constant of the gate oxide, while it decreases with the increasing of oxide thickness, channel length and acceptor density. The magnitude of the reduction is slightly enhanced under high drain voltage. Moreover, it is found that the gate oxide materials with large relative dielectric constant (>20) have a significant effect on the gate controlled SBH lowering, implying that the energy relaxation of channel electrons should be taken into account for modeling SBH in GFETs.

  9. Physical Modeling of Gate-Controlled Schottky Barrier Lowering of Metal-Graphene Contacts in Top-Gated Graphene Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, Huansheng; Huo, Zong-Liang; Wang, Jin-Yan

    2015-12-17

    A new physical model of the gate controlled Schottky barrier height (SBH) lowering in top-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) under saturation bias condition is proposed based on the energy conservation equation with the balance assumption. The theoretical prediction of the SBH lowering agrees well with the experimental data reported in literatures. The reduction of the SBH increases with the increasing of gate voltage and relative dielectric constant of the gate oxide, while it decreases with the increasing of oxide thickness, channel length and acceptor density. The magnitude of the reduction is slightly enhanced under high drain voltage. Moreover, it is found that the gate oxide materials with large relative dielectric constant (>20) have a significant effect on the gate controlled SBH lowering, implying that the energy relaxation of channel electrons should be taken into account for modeling SBH in GFETs.

  10. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-04-07

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither Tof1-dependent nor counteracted by the Rrm3 helicase. Although the yeast replisome can overcome RF pausing at Tus-Ter modules, this event triggers site-specific homologous recombination that requires the RecQ helicase, Sgs1, for its timely resolution. We propose that Tus-Ter can be utilized as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications.

  11. Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Schlotz, Wolff; Crozier, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions......, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women...... of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control...

  12. Specific tolerance induction across a xenogeneic barrier: Production of mixed rat/mouse lymphohematopoietic chimeras using a nonlethal preparative regimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabi, Y.; Aksentijevich, I.; Sundt, T.M. III; Sachs, D.H.; Sykes, M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of safe methods for inducing donor-specific tolerance across xenogeneic barriers could potentially relieve the critical shortage of allograft donors that currently limits the applicability of organ transplantation. We report here that such tolerance can be induced in a xenogeneic combination (rat----mouse) using a nonmyeloablative and nonlethal preparative regimen. Successful induction of chimerism and donor-specific transplantation tolerance required pretreatment of recipients with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against NK1.1, Thy-1.2, CD4 and CD8, followed by administration of 3 Gy whole body radiation (WBI), 7 Gy thymic irradiation, and infusion of T cell-depleted rat bone marrow cells (BMC). Rat cells appeared among peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of such recipients by 2-3 wk, and rat T cells by 2-5 wk following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Donor-type rat skin grafts placed 4 mo after BMT were accepted, while simultaneously placed non-donor-type rat skin grafts were promptly rejected. In addition to its clinical potential, the ability to induce donor-specific tolerance across xenogeneic barriers using such a nonlethal preparative regimen provides a valuable model for the study of mechanisms of xenogeneic transplantation tolerance

  13. Investigations regarding the lowering of specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakocs Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to decrease the emergence of specific intellectual property risks within the production process as well as increasing risk management performance of IP by preventing them. In order to achieve this, previous studies regarding the main specific intellectual property risks from industrial companies were analyzed together with their managerial methods as well as the possibility of reducing their emergence. As a result of the research conducted were identified five types of intellectual property risks that have a high potential of emergence in the production process, namely: the risk of production of goods in violation of IP rights; the know-how, production knowledge and trade secret disclosure risk; the technological risk of unprotected utility models; the technological risk of unprotected integrated circuits topographies and finally the risk of product counterfeit. In order to achieve the main purpose of our investigation, we have proposed new formulas for estimating the specific intellectual property risks identified in the production process. Their purpose was to minimalize the risk’s negative effects on industrial companies and to increase the managerial performance from the intellectual property domain through a new type of management appropriately named: intellectual property management. The research is finalized with a case study regarding the lapse of rights of a patented invention. Based on a case analysis, it was proved that the exploitation of an invention without a contract represents a counterfeit.

  14. Age-specific survival of tundra swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixell, Brandt W.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Conn, Paul B.; Dau, Christian P.; Sarvis, John E.; Sowl, Kristine M.

    2013-01-01

    The population of Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) breeding on the lower Alaska Peninsula represents the southern extremity of the species' range and is uniquely nonmigratory. We used data on recaptures, resightings, and recoveries of neck-collared Tundra Swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula to estimate collar loss, annual apparent survival, and other demographic parameters for the years 1978–1989. Annual collar loss was greater for adult males fitted with either the thinner collar type (0.34) or the thicker collar type (0.15) than for other age/sex classes (thinner: 0.10, thicker: 0.04). The apparent mean probability of survival of adults (0.61) was higher than that of immatures (0.41) and for both age classes varied considerably by year (adult range: 0.44–0.95, immature range: 0.25–0.90). To assess effects of permanent emigration by age and breeding class, we analyzed post hoc the encounter histories of swans known to breed in our study area. The apparent mean survival of known breeders (0.65) was generally higher than that of the entire marked sample but still varied considerably by year (range 0.26–1.00) and indicated that permanent emigration of breeding swans was likely. We suggest that reductions in apparent survival probability were influenced primarily by high and variable rates of permanent emigration and that immigration by swans from elsewhere may be important in sustaining a breeding population at and near Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.

  15. Lowering the Barriers to Using Data: Enabling Desktop-based HPD Science through Virtual Environments and Web Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, K. A.; Trenham, C. E.; Steer, A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Richards, C. J.; Smillie, J.; Allen, C.; Pringle, S.; Wang, J.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) provides access to petascale data in climate, weather, Earth observations, and genomics, and terascale data in astronomy, geophysics, ecology and land use, as well as social sciences. The data is centralized in a closely integrated High Performance Computing (HPC), High Performance Data (HPD) and cloud facility. Despite this, there remain significant barriers for many users to find and access the data: simply hosting a large volume of data is not helpful if researchers are unable to find, access, and use the data for their particular need. Use cases demonstrate we need to support a diverse range of users who are increasingly crossing traditional research discipline boundaries. To support their varying experience, access needs and research workflows, NCI has implemented an integrated data platform providing a range of services that enable users to interact with our data holdings. These services include: - A GeoNetwork catalog built on standardized Data Management Plans to search collection metadata, and find relevant datasets; - Web data services to download or remotely access data via OPeNDAP, WMS, WCS and other protocols; - Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) built on a highly integrated on-site cloud with access to both the HPC peak machine and research data collections. The VDI is a fully featured environment allowing visualization, code development and analysis to take place in an interactive desktop environment; and - A Learning Management System (LMS) containing User Guides, Use Case examples and Jupyter Notebooks structured into courses, so that users can self-teach how to use these facilities with examples from our system across a range of disciplines. We will briefly present these components, and discuss how we engage with data custodians and consumers to develop standardized data structures and services that support the range of needs. We will also highlight some key developments that have

  16. Numerical simulation of magnetic nano drug targeting in patient-specific lower respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Flavia; Boghi, Andrea; Gori, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic nano drug targeting, with an external magnetic field, can potentially improve the drug absorption in specific locations of the body. However, the effectiveness of the procedure can be reduced due to the limitations of the magnetic field intensity. This work investigates this technique with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. A single rectangular coil generates the external magnetic field. A patient-specific geometry of the Trachea, with its primary and secondary bronchi, is reconstructed from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) formatted images, throughout the Vascular Modelling Tool Kit (VMTK) software. A solver, coupling the Lagrangian dynamics of the magnetic nanoparticles with the Eulerian dynamics of the air, is used to perform the simulations. The resistive pressure, the pulsatile inlet velocity and the rectangular coil magnetic field are the boundary conditions. The dynamics of the injected particles is investigated without and with the magnetic probe. The flow field promotes particles adhesion to the tracheal wall. The particles volumetric flow rate in both cases has been calculated. The magnetic probe is shown to increase the particles flow in the target region, but at a limited extent. This behavior has been attributed to the small particle size and the probe configuration.

  17. Role of posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization versus thermotherapy in non specific lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Aftab Ahmed Mirza; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Ali, Syed Shahzad; Rahmani, Asim; Siddiqui, Faizan

    2018-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is the foremost cause to hamper an individual's functional activities in Pakistan. Its impact on the quality of life and work routine makes it a major reason for therapeutic consultations. About 90% of the cases with LBP are non-specific. Various options are available for the treatment of LBP. Posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization, a manual therapy technique; and thermotherapy are used in clinical practice, however evidence to gauge their relative efficacy is yet to be synthesised. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization versus thermotherapy in the management of non-specific low back pain along with general stretching exercises. A randomised controlled trial with two-group pretest-posttest design was conducted at IPM&R, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS). A total of 60 Non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) patients with ages from 18 to 35 years were inducted through non-probability and purposive sampling technique. Baseline screening was done using an assessment form (Appendix-I). Subjects were allocated into two groups through systematic random sampling. Group-A (experimental group) received posterior-anterior vertebral mobilization with general stretching exercises while group B (control group) received thermotherapy with general stretching exercises. Pain and functional disability were assessed using NPRS and RMDQ respectively. Pre & post treatment scores were documented. A maximum drop-out rate of 20% was assumed. Recorded data were entered into SPSS V-19. Frequency and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. Intragroup and intergroup analyses were done using Wilcoxon signed ranked test and Mann-Whitney Test respectively. A P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Pre and post treatment analysis revealed that P-values for both pain and disability were less than 0.05, suggesting significant difference in NPRS and RMDQ scores. Whereas, median scores for

  18. Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane A Liddelow

    Full Text Available To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse and exogenous (human albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA, and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub

  19. Increase in specific density of levobupivacaine and fentanyl solution ensures lower incidence of inadequate block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeno, Ivana Tudorić; Duzel, Viktor; Ajduk, Marko; Oremus, Zrinka Safarić; Zupcić, Miroslav; Dusper, Silva; Jukić, Dubravko; Husedzinović, Ino

    2012-06-01

    The clinical presentation of a subarachnoid block (SAB) is dependent upon the intrathecal spread of local anesthetic (LA). Intrathecal distribution depends on the chemical and physical characteristics of LA, puncture site, technique used, patient anatomical characteristics and hydrodynamic properties of cerebrospinal fluid. We tried to determine whether a combined glucose/LA solution can render a clinically significant difference in sensory block distribution and motor block intensity.This was a controlled, randomized and double blinded study. The surgical procedures were stripping of the great or small saphenous vein and extirpation of remaining varicose veins. The study included 110 patients distributed into two groups: Hyperbaric (7.5 mg levobupivacaine (1.5 ml 0.5% Chirocaine) + 50 microg Fentanyl (0.5 ml Fentanil) and 1 ml 10% glucose (Pliva)) vs. Hypobaric (7.5 mg levobupivacaine (1.5 ml 0.5% Chirocaine) + 50 microg Fentanyl (0.5 ml Fentanil) and 1 ml 0.9% NaCl (Pliva, Zagreb)) adding to a total volume of 3.5 ml per solution. Spinal puncture was at L3-L4 level. Spinal block distribution was assessed in five minute intervals and intensity of motor block was assessed according to the modified Bromage scale. Pain was assessed with the Visual Analogue Scale. A statistically significant difference in sensory block distribution, motor block intensity and recovery time was established between hyperbaric and hypobaric solutions. By increasing the specific density of anesthetic solution, a higher sensory block, with lesser variability, a diminished influence of Body Mass Index, decreased motor block intensity and faster recovery time may be achieved.

  20. Lowering the Barrier to Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Data Access via a Brokering Service Built Around a Unified Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The steps many scientific data users go through to use data (after discovering it) can be rather tedious, even when dealing with datasets within their own discipline. Accessing data across domains often seems intractable. We present here, LaTiS, an Open Source brokering solution that bridges the gap between the source data and the user's code by defining a unified data model plus a plugin framework for "adapters" to read data from their native source, "filters" to perform server side data processing, and "writers" to output any number of desired formats or streaming protocols. A great deal of work is being done in the informatics community to promote multi-disciplinary science with a focus on search and discovery based on metadata - information about the data. The goal of LaTiS is to go that last step to provide a uniform interface to read the dataset into computer programs and other applications once it has been identified. The LaTiS solution for integrating a wide variety of data models is to return to mathematical fundamentals. The LaTiS data model emphasizes functional relationships between variables. For example, a time series of temperature measurements can be thought of as a function that maps a time to a temperature. With just three constructs: "Scalar" for a single variable, "Tuple" for a collection of variables, and "Function" to represent a set of independent and dependent variables, the LaTiS data model can represent most scientific datasets at a low level that enables uniform data access. Higher level abstractions can be built on top of the basic model to add more meaningful semantics for specific user communities. LaTiS defines its data model in terms of the Unified Modeling Language (UML). It also defines a very thin Java Interface that can be implemented by numerous existing data interfaces (e.g. NetCDF-Java) such that client code can access any dataset via the Java API, independent of the underlying data access mechanism. LaTiS also provides a

  1. Barriers to undergraduate peer-physical examination of the lower limb in the health sciences and strategies to improve inclusion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Gordon James

    2013-10-01

    Peer-physical examination is a widely adopted and an integral component of the undergraduate curriculum for many health science programs. Unwillingness or perceived inability to participate in peer-physical examination classes may have a negative impact upon students' abilities to competently conduct physical examinations of patients in future as registered health professionals. A literature review on the perceptions and attitudes of peer-physical examination of the lower limb amongst medical and health science students was conducted to identify potential barriers to participation, and to review strategies to improve participation in classes designed to develop clinical examination skills. A pragmatic search strategy of the literature from PubMed and Google Scholar published prior to June 2012 yielded 23 relevant articles. All articles were concerned with the views of medical students' education and there were no articles explicitly addressing the role of peer-physical examination in health science disciplines. Several ethical issues were identified including feelings of coercion, embarrassment, and perceptions of a lack of consideration for cultural and religious beliefs. The available evidence suggests that barriers to participation may be overcome by implementing standard protocols concerned with obtaining informed written consent, adequate choice of peer-examiner, changing facilities and garment advice, and possible alternative learning methods.

  2. Effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment for non-specific lower back pain: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jungtae; Lee, Seunghoon; Park, Yeoncheol; Seo, Byung-Kwan; Cho, Yeeun; Kang, Jung Won; Lee, Yoon Jae; Ha, In-Hyuk; Lee, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sanghoon; Nam, Dongwoo

    2017-06-23

    Many patients experience acute lower back pain that becomes chronic pain. The proportion of patients using complementary and alternative medicine to treat lower back is increasing. Even though several moxibustion clinical trials for lower back pain have been conducted, the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion intervention is controversial. The purpose of this study protocol for a systematic review is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment for non-specific lower back pain patients. We will conduct an electronic search of several databases from their inception to May 2017, including Embase, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Wanfang Database, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, Korean Medical Database, Korean Studies Information Service System, National Discovery for Science Leaders, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System, the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, and KoreaMed. Randomised controlled trials investigating any type of moxibustion treatment will be included. The primary outcome will be pain intensity and functional status/disability due to lower back pain. The secondary outcome will be a global measurement of recovery or improvement, work-related outcomes, radiographic improvement of structure, quality of life, and adverse events (presence or absence). Risk ratio or mean differences with a 95% confidence interval will be used to show the effect of moxibustion therapy when it is possible to conduct a meta-analysis. This review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be presented at an international academic conference for dissemination. Our results will provide current evidence of the effectiveness and safety of moxibustion treatment in non-specific lower back pain patients, and thus will be beneficial to patients, practitioners, and policymakers

  3. Inclusive Education for Children with Specific Learning Difficulties: Analysis of Opportunities and Barriers in Inclusive Education in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kavkler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education allows for universal inclusion, participation and achievement of all children, including children with specific learning difficulties (SpLD. Children with SpLD form a heterogeneous group with diverse cognitive deficits, special educational needs (SEN and strengths, and have a legislated right to the continuum of both assistance and support programmes. Although their intellectual capacity is average or above average, their learning achievements in some learning domains are modest, and they are poorly integrated into their social environment, which often results in their discrimination. Barriers and opportunities in the area of SpLD were analysed with the aid of Ball’s model (1994, with factors and conditions being analysed within the contexts of policy influence, text production and practice. The contexts of policy influence and text production provide the basic conditions for the in clusive education of children with SpLD. The context of influence on in clusive policy for children with SpLD represents a systematic approach to policy initiation and to the prerequisites for its implementation in practice. The context of policy text production focuses on professionals and their impact on the enactment of the rights of children with severe SpLD. The context of practice concerns barriers and opportunities for implementing inclusion in practice. Early identification and diagnosis of pupils’ strengths, deficits and SEN, together with intensified treatment corresponding to the SEN of children with SpLD, could significantly influence the efficiency of the educational process. Barriers, primarily of an immaterial nature, are mainly encountered in those schools that do not implement the five-tier Response to Intervention (RTI approach. This approach enables children with SpLD a continuum of team-based diagnostic evaluation, effective adaptations and assistance. The main reasons for the unfavourable situation concern education

  4. Overall and specific migration from multilayer high barrier food contact materials - kinetic study of cyclic polyester oligomers migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, Sara; Aznar, Margarita; Vera, Paula; Nerín, Cristina; Henríquez, Luis; Taborda, Laura; Restrepo, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    Most multilayer high barrier materials used in food packaging have a polyurethane adhesive layer in their structures. In order to assess the safety of these materials, it is important to determine the compounds intentionally added to the adhesives (IAS) as well as those non-intentionally added substances (NIAS). During the manufacture of polyurethane adhesives, some by-products can be formed, such as cyclic polyester oligomers coming from the reaction between dicarboxylic acids and glycols. Since these compounds are not listed in the Regulation 10/2011/EU, they should not be found in migration above 0.01 mg/kg of simulant. In this study two flexible multilayer packaging materials were used and migration was evaluated in simulant A (ethanol 10% v/v), simulant B (acetic acid 3% w/v) and simulant ethanol 95% v/v during 10 days at 60ºC. Identification and quantification of non-volatile compounds was carried out by UPLC-MS-QTOF. Most of migrants were oligomers such as cyclic polyesters and caprolactam oligomers. Overall migration and specific migration of adipic acid-diethylene glycol and phthalic acid-diethylene glycol were monitored over time and analysed by UPLC-MS-TQ. In most cases, ethanol 95% v/v was the simulant with the highest concentration values. Overall migration kinetics followed a similar pattern than specific migration kinetics.

  5. Lowering the barriers to computational modeling of Earth's surface: coupling Jupyter Notebooks with Landlab, HydroShare, and CyberGIS for research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaragoda, C.; Castronova, A. M.; Phuong, J.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Strauch, R. L.; Nudurupati, S. S.; Tarboton, D. G.; Wang, S. W.; Yin, D.; Barnhart, K. R.; Tucker, G. E.; Hutton, E.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Adams, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ability to test hypotheses about hydrology, geomorphology and atmospheric processes is invaluable to research in the era of big data. Although community resources are available, there remain significant educational, logistical and time investment barriers to their use. Knowledge infrastructure is an emerging intellectual framework to understand how people are creating, sharing and distributing knowledge - which has been dramatically transformed by Internet technologies. In addition to the technical and social components in a cyberinfrastructure system, knowledge infrastructure considers educational, institutional, and open source governance components required to advance knowledge. We are designing an infrastructure environment that lowers common barriers to reproducing modeling experiments for earth surface investigation. Landlab is an open-source modeling toolkit for building, coupling, and exploring two-dimensional numerical models. HydroShare is an online collaborative environment for sharing hydrologic data and models. CyberGIS-Jupyter is an innovative cyberGIS framework for achieving data-intensive, reproducible, and scalable geospatial analytics using the Jupyter Notebook based on ROGER - the first cyberGIS supercomputer, so that models that can be elastically reproduced through cloud computing approaches. Our team of geomorphologists, hydrologists, and computer geoscientists has created a new infrastructure environment that combines these three pieces of software to enable knowledge discovery. Through this novel integration, any user can interactively execute and explore their shared data and model resources. Landlab on HydroShare with CyberGIS-Jupyter supports the modeling continuum from fully developed modelling applications, prototyping new science tools, hands on research demonstrations for training workshops, and classroom applications. Computational geospatial models based on big data and high performance computing can now be more efficiently

  6. Dysfunctional elimination syndromes--how closely linked are constipation and encopresis with specific lower urinary tract conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Andrew J; Van Batavia, Jason P; Chan, Jennifer; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-09-01

    It is recognized that there is a strong association between bladder and bowel dysfunction. We determined the association of constipation and/or encopresis with specific lower urinary tract conditions. We reviewed our database of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and divided cases into 3 categories of bowel dysfunction (constipation, encopresis and constipation plus encopresis) and 4 lower urinary tract conditions (dysfunctional voiding, idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder, detrusor underutilization disorder and primary bladder neck dysfunction). Associations between bowel dysfunction types and each lower urinary tract condition were determined. Of 163 males and 205 females with a mean age of 8.5 years constipation was the most common bowel dysfunction (27%). Although encopresis is generally thought to reflect underlying constipation, only half of children with encopresis in this series had constipation. Dysfunctional voiding was associated with the highest incidence of bowel dysfunction. All but 1 patient with encopresis had associated urgency and detrusor overactivity, and the encopresis resolved in 75% of patients after initiation of anticholinergic therapy. Constipation was significantly more common in girls (27%) than in boys (11%, p encopresis was more common in boys (9%) than in girls (3%, p = 0.02), likely reflecting the higher incidence of dysfunctional voiding in girls and idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder in boys. Active bowel dysfunction was seen in half of the children with a lower urinary tract condition. Constipation was more common in patients with dysfunctional voiding, while encopresis was significantly increased in those with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder and in those with dysfunctional voiding, severe urgency and detrusor overactivity. Anticholinergics, despite their constipating effect, given for treatment of detrusor overactivity resolved encopresis in most children with this bowel dysfunction. Copyright

  7. Congener-specific polychlorinated biphenyl patterns in eggs of aquatic birds from the lower Laguna Madre, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Miguel A.

    1996-01-01

    Eggs from four aquatic bird species nesting in the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas, were collected to determine differences and similarities in the accumulation of congener-specific polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and to evaluate PCB impacts on reproduction. Because of the different toxicities of PCB congeners, it is important to know which congeners contribute most to total PCBs. The predominant PCB congeners were 153, 138, 180, 110, 118, 187, and 92. Collectively, congeners 153, 138, and 180 accounted for 26 to 42% of total PCBs. Congener 153 was the most abundant in Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) and great blue herons (Ardea herodias) and congener 138 was the most abundant in snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and tricolored herons (Egretta tricolor). Principal component analysis indicated a predominance of higher chlorinated biphenyls in Caspian terns and great blue herons and lower chlorinated biphenyls in tricolored herons. Snowy egrets had a predominance of pentachlorobiphenyls. These results suggest that there are differences in PCB congener patterns in closely related species and that these differences are more likely associated with the species' diet rather than metabolism. Total PCBs were significantly greater (p birds from the Lower Laguna Madre were below concentrations known to affect bird reproduction.

  8. Simulations of the Boreal Winter Upper Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere With Meteorological Specifications in SD-WACCM-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Siskind, David E.; Tate, Jennifer L.; Liu, Han-Li; Randall, Cora E.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the benefit of high-altitude nudging in simulations of the structure and short-term variability of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (UMLT) dynamical meteorology during boreal winter, specifically around the time of the January 2009 sudden stratospheric warming. We compare simulations using the Specified Dynamics, Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, extended version, nudged using atmospheric specifications generated by the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System, Advanced Level Physics High Altitude. Two sets of simulations are carried out: one uses nudging over a vertical domain from 0 to 90 km; the other uses nudging over a vertical domain from 0 to 50 km. The dynamical behavior is diagnosed from ensemble mean and standard deviation of winds, temperature, and zonal accelerations due to resolved and parameterized waves. We show that the dynamical behavior of the UMLT is quite different in the two experiments, with prominent differences in the structure and variability of constituent transport. We compare the results of our numerical experiments to observations of carbon monoxide by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer to show that the high-altitude nudging is capable of reproducing with high fidelity the observed variability, and traveling planetary waves are a crucial component of the dynamics. The results of this study indicate that to capture the key physical processes that affect short-term variability (defined as the atmospheric behavior within about 10 days of a stratospheric warming) in the UMLT, specification of the atmospheric state in the stratosphere alone is not sufficient, and upper atmospheric specifications are needed.

  9. Specific association of growth-associated protein 43 with calcium release units in skeletal muscles of lower vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Caprara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43, is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes, and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species.

  10. The influence of acculturation and breast cancer-specific distress on perceived barriers to genetic testing for breast cancer among women of African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussner, Katarina M; Thompson, Hayley S; Jandorf, Lina; Edwards, Tiffany A; Forman, Andrea; Brown, Karen; Kapil-Pair, Nidhi; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Schwartz, Marc D; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B

    2009-09-01

    Rising health disparities are increasingly evident in relation to use of genetic services (including genetic counseling and testing) for breast cancer risk, with women of African descent less likely to use genetic services compared with Whites. Meanwhile, little is known regarding potential within-group acculturation and psychological differences underlying perceived barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. Hypothesized contributions of acculturation factors and breast cancer-specific distress to perceived barriers to genetic testing were examined with a statistical analysis of baseline data from 146 women of African descent (56% US born and 44% foreign born) meeting genetic breast cancer risk criteria and participating in a larger longitudinal study that included the opportunity for free genetic counseling and testing. Perceived barriers assessed included: (1) anticipation of negative emotional reactions, (2) stigma, (3) confidentiality concerns, (4) family-related worry, and (5) family-related guilt associated with genetic testing. In multivariate analyses, being foreign born was a significant predictor of anticipated negative emotional reactions about genetic testing (beta=0.26; SE=0.11; p=0.01). Breast cancer-specific distress scores (avoidance symptoms) were positively related to anticipated negative emotional reactions (beta=0.02; SE=0.005; p=barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. The potential utility of culturally tailored genetic counseling services taking into account such influences and addressing emotional and psychological concerns of women considering genetic testing for breast cancer should be investigated.

  11. 1: Mass asymmetric fission barriers for 98Mo; 2: Synthesis and characterization of actinide-specific chelating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeck, A.C.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1996-08-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for complex fragment emission from the compound nucleus 98 Mo, produced by the reaction of 86 Kr with 12 C. Mass asymmetric fission barriers have been obtained by fitting the excitation functions with a transition state formalism. The extracted barriers are ∼ 5.7 MeV higher, on average, than the calculations of the Rotating Finite Range Model (RFRM). These data clearly show an isospin dependence of the conditional barriers when compared with the extracted barriers from 90 Mo and 94 Mo. Eleven different liquid/liquid extractants were synthesized based upon the chelating moieties 3,2-HOPO and 3,4-HOPO; additionally, two liquid/liquid extractants based upon the 1,2-HOPO chelating moiety were obtained for extraction studies. The Pu(IV) extractions, quite surprisingly, yielded results that were very different from the Fe(III) extractions. The first trend remained the same: the 1,2-HOPOs were the best extractants, followed closely by the 3,2-HOPOs, followed by the 3,4-HOPOs; but in these Pu(IV) extractions the 3,4-HOPOs performed much better than in the Fe(III) extractions. 129 refs

  12. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    Scope: Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on

  13. 1: Mass asymmetric fission barriers for {sup 98}Mo; 2: Synthesis and characterization of actinide-specific chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeck, A.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

    1996-08-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for complex fragment emission from the compound nucleus {sup 98}Mo, produced by the reaction of {sup 86}Kr with {sup 12}C. Mass asymmetric fission barriers have been obtained by fitting the excitation functions with a transition state formalism. The extracted barriers are {approximately} 5.7 MeV higher, on average, than the calculations of the Rotating Finite Range Model (RFRM). These data clearly show an isospin dependence of the conditional barriers when compared with the extracted barriers from {sup 90}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Eleven different liquid/liquid extractants were synthesized based upon the chelating moieties 3,2-HOPO and 3,4-HOPO; additionally, two liquid/liquid extractants based upon the 1,2-HOPO chelating moiety were obtained for extraction studies. The Pu(IV) extractions, quite surprisingly, yielded results that were very different from the Fe(III) extractions. The first trend remained the same: the 1,2-HOPOs were the best extractants, followed closely by the 3,2-HOPOs, followed by the 3,4-HOPOs; but in these Pu(IV) extractions the 3,4-HOPOs performed much better than in the Fe(III) extractions. 129 refs.

  14. Detection rate of prostate cancer using prostate specific antigen in patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavan P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Need for undertaking prostate biopsies for detection of prostate cancer is often decided on the basis of serum levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA. Aim: To evaluate the case detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS on the basis of PSA levels and to assess the scope of prostate biopsy in these patients. Setting and Design: A retrospective study from a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The clinical and histopathological data of 922 patients presenting with LUTS in the last five years was obtained from the medical record section. They had been screened for prostate cancer using PSA and /or digital rectal examination examination followed by confirmation with prostate biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used: Detection rate and receiver operating characteristic curve were performed using SPSS 16 and Medcalc softwares. Results: The detection rate of prostate cancer according to the PSA levels was 0.6%, 2.3%, 2.5%, 34.1% and 54.9% in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10, 10-20, 20-50 and> 50 ng/ml, respectively. Maximum prostate cancer cases were detected beyond a PSA value of 20 ng/ml whereas no significant difference in the detection rate was observed in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10 and 10-20 ng/ml. Conclusion: A low detection rate of prostate cancer observed in the PSA range of 4-20 ng/ml in LUTS patients indicates the need for use of higher cutoff values of PSA in such cases. Therefore we recommend a cutoff of 20 ng/ml of PSA for evaluation of detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with LUTS.

  15. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    2017-08-01

    Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on T1D development in nonobese diabetic mice. Female nonobese diabetic mice were weaned to long- and short-chain ITFs [ITF(l) and ITF(s), 5%] supplemented diet up to 24 weeks. T1D incidence, pancreatic-gut immune responses, gut barrier function, and microbiota composition were analyzed. ITF(l) but not ITF(s) supplementation dampened the incidence of T1D. ITF(l) promoted modulatory T-cell responses, as evidenced by increased CD25 + Foxp3 + CD4 + regulatory T cells, decreased IL17A + CD4 + Th17 cells, and modulated cytokine production profile in the pancreas, spleen, and colon. Furthermore, ITF(l) suppressed NOD like receptor protein 3 caspase-1-p20-IL-1β inflammasome in the colon. Expression of barrier reinforcing tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-2, antimicrobial peptides β-defensin-1, and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as short-chain fatty acid production were enhanced by ITF(l). Next-generation sequencing analysis revealed that ITF(l) enhanced Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio to an antidiabetogenic balance and enriched modulatory Ruminococcaceae and Lactobacilli. Our data demonstrate that ITF(l) but not ITF(s) delays the development of T1D via modulation of gut-pancreatic immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  17. The intestinal barrier in irritable bowel syndrome: subtype-specific effects of the systemic compartment in an in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samefko Ludidi

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a disorder with multifactorial pathophysiology. Intestinal barrier may be altered, especially in diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D. Several mediators may contribute to increased intestinal permeability in IBS.We aimed to assess effects of tryptase and LPS on in vitro permeability using a 3-dimensional cell model after basolateral cell exposure. Furthermore, we assessed the extent to which these mediators in IBS plasma play a role in intestinal barrier function.Caco-2 cells were grown in extracellular matrix to develop into polarized spheroids and were exposed to tryptase (10 - 50 mU, LPS (1 - 50 ng/mL and two-fold diluted plasma samples of 7 patients with IBS-D, 7 with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C and 7 healthy controls (HC. Barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-dextran (FD4 using live cell imaging. Furthermore, plasma tryptase and LPS were determined.Tryptase (20 and 50 mU and LPS (6.25 - 50 ng/mL significantly increased Caco-2 permeability versus control (all P< 0.05. Plasma of IBS-D only showed significantly elevated median tryptase concentrations (7.1 [3.9 - 11.0] vs. 4.2 [2.2 - 7.0] vs. 4.2 [2.5 - 5.9] μg/mL; P<0.05 and LPS concentrations (3.65 [3.00 - 6.10] vs. 3.10 [2.60-3.80] vs. 2.65 [2.40 - 3.40] EU/ml; P< 0.05 vs. IBS-C and HC. Also, plasma of IBS-D increased Caco-2 permeability versus HC (0.14450 ± 0.00472 vs. 0.00021 ± 0.00003; P < 0.001, which was attenuated by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS (P< 0.05.Basolateral exposure of spheroids to plasma of IBS-D patients resulted in a significantly increased FD4 permeation, which was partially abolished by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS. These findings point to a role of systemic tryptase and LPS in the epithelial barrier alterations observed in patients with IBS-D.

  18. Down-regulation of selected Blood-brain Barrier Specific Genes from Capillaries to Bovine In Vitro Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldeman, Charlotte; Saaby, Lasse; Brodin, Birger

    Cultures of primary bovine brain endothelial cells (BECs) grown, often together with astrocytes, on permeable supports in two-compartment culture systems are commonly used as an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While trans-endothelial electrical resistance, restriction...... the in vivo gene expression of brain capillary endothelial cells. Primary bovine endothelial cells and rat astrocytes were cultured in different culture configurations and the mRNA expression of selected genes (vWF, Glut-1, P-gp, claudin-1,-5, occludin, JAM-1, LAT-1, SLC16A1, MRP-1,-4, BCRP, ZO-1, AP, TPA...

  19. The Relationship between Listening Comprehension of Text and Sentences in Preschoolers: Specific or Mediated by Lower and Higher Level Components?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florit, Elena; Roch, Maja; Levorato, M. Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Two studies explored the relation between listening comprehension of text and listening comprehension of sentences in preschoolers aged 4 to 5 years, 11 months. The first study analyzed this relationship taking into account the role of lower level components, namely, word knowledge and verbal working memory, as possible mediators. These components…

  20. Spanish for You: Student-Centered and Languages for Specific Purposes Methods in Lower-Division Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Rob A.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates a project that used student-centered teaching and languages for specific purposes to increase university students' motivation to study Spanish and willingness to communicate. After reflecting on their personal goals and interests, students were required to choose a purpose or context in which they might use Spanish in…

  1. The integration of physiologically-targeted skin care in the management of atopic dermatitis: focus on the use of a cleanser and moisturizer system incorporating a ceramide precursor, filaggrin degradation products, and specific "skin-barrier-friendly" excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Kircik, Leon H

    2013-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) may be considered the "poster disease" for exemplifying the significance of abnormalities of the epidermal barrier that occur predominantly within the stratum corneum (SC) and upper epidermis. Specifically, impairments of the SC permeability barrier, antimicrobial barrier, and immunologic barrier contribute markedly to the fundamental pathophysiology of AD. The multiple clinical sequelae associated with epidermal barrier impairments inherent to AD include dry skin, pruritus, increased skin sensitivity to irritants and allergens, eczematous skin changes, staphylococcal skin and anterior nares colonization, and increase in some cutaneous infections (ie, molluscum contagiosum). This article addresses the pathophysiology of AD with clinically relevant correlations, and discusses the scientific basis of a specially designed cleanser and moisturizer system that incorporates ceramide technology and filaggrin degradation products along with other "barrier-friendly" excipients.

  2. Re-engineering therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease as blood-brain barrier penetrating bi-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, drug development of therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires that these molecules be re-engineered to enable BBB delivery. This is possible by joining the therapeutic antibody with a transporter antibody, resulting in the engineering of a BBB-penetrating bispecific antibody (BSA). Areas covered: The manuscript covers transporter antibodies that cross the BBB via receptor-mediated transport systems on the BBB, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. Furthermore, it highlights therapeutic antibodies for AD that target the Abeta amyloid peptide, beta secretase-1, or the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1. BSAs are comprised of both the transporter antibody and the therapeutic antibody, as well as IgG constant region, which can induce immune tolerance or trigger transport via Fc receptors. Expert opinion: Multiple types of BSA molecular designs have been used to engineer BBB-penetrating BSAs, which differ in valency and spatial orientation of the transporter and therapeutic domains of the BSA. The plasma pharmacokinetics and dosing regimens of BSAs differ from that of conventional therapeutic antibodies. BBB-penetrating BSAs may be engineered in the future as new treatments of AD, as well as other neural disorders.

  3. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  4. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Sevy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD, on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON. The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes.

  5. Bacteria in the vaginal microbiome alter the innate immune response and barrier properties of the human vaginal epithelia in a species-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis increases the susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and negatively affects women's reproductive health. To investigate host-vaginal microbiota interactions and the impact on immune barrier function, we colonized 3-dimensional (3-D) human vaginal epithelial cells with 2 predominant species of vaginal microbiota (Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus crispatus) or 2 prevalent bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (Atopobium vaginae and Prevotella bivia). Colonization of 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates with vaginal microbiota was observed with direct attachment to host cell surface with no cytotoxicity. A. vaginae infection yielded increased expression membrane-associated mucins and evoked a robust proinflammatory, immune response in 3-D vaginal epithelial cells (ie, expression of CCL20, hBD-2, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α) that can negatively affect barrier function. However, P. bivia and L. crispatus did not significantly upregulate pattern-recognition receptor-signaling, mucin expression, antimicrobial peptides/defensins, or proinflammatory cytokines in 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates. Notably, L. iners induced pattern-recognition receptor-signaling activity, but no change was observed in mucin expression or secretion of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. We identified unique species-specific immune signatures from vaginal epithelial cells elicited by colonization with commensal and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. A. vaginae elicited a signature that is consistent with significant disruption of immune barrier properties, potentially resulting in enhanced susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections during bacterial vaginosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Renal transplantation across the donor-specific antibody barrier: Graft outcome and cancer risk after desensitization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Yao; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Tsai, Meng-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Desensitization regimens including use of intravenous immune globulin and rituximab have been reported to overcome renal transplant hyperacute rejection. A retrospective case-control study was performed to assess the results and complications of renal transplantation with desensitization therapy for donor-specific antibody (DSA) in a transplant center in Asia, where donor exchange was usually not allowed. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 22 patients with DSA received live-donor renal transplantation after desensitization (DSA group). During the same period, the DSA group was compared to the NSA group (152 renal transplants) who had no specific antibody to the donors (66 from deceased donors and 86 from living relatives). Rejection, renal function, graft and patient survival rates, infection, and cancer incidence were reviewed and analyzed from medical records. The DSA group (46.8%) had significantly higher acute rejection rates than the NSA group (13.7%) at the 1-year follow-up. The estimated renal function, 5-year graft, and patient survival rates were comparable between the groups. The DSA group (19.6%) had significantly higher 5-year de novo cancer incidence than the NSA group (8.5%; p = 0.028); three patients of the DSA group developed urothelial carcinoma 17.0 ± 3.0 months after transplantation. By using stepwise Cox regression analysis, desensitization therapy was identified as the sole independent risk factor for post-transplant urothelial carcinoma. When compared to renal transplantation without DSA, desensitization therapy for DSA resulted in equivalent renal transplant outcome but potentially increased risk of urothelial carcinoma after transplantation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73 competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively. After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90°s-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  8. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  9. The acute glucose lowering effect of specific GPR120 activation in mice is mainly driven by glucagon-like peptide 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Sundström

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the glucose lowering effect occurring after specific activation of GPR120 is not completely understood. In this study, a potent and selective GPR120 agonist was developed and its pharmacological properties were compared with the previously described GPR120 agonist Metabolex-36. Effects of both compounds on signaling pathways and GLP-1 secretion were investigated in vitro. The acute glucose lowering effect was studied in lean wild-type and GPR120 null mice following oral or intravenous glucose tolerance tests. In vitro, in GPR120 overexpressing cells, both agonists signaled through Gαq, Gαs and the β-arrestin pathway. However, in mouse islets the signaling pathway was different since the agonists reduced cAMP production. The GPR120 agonists stimulated GLP-1 secretion both in vitro in STC-1 cells and in vivo following oral administration. In vivo GPR120 activation induced significant glucose lowering and increased insulin secretion after intravenous glucose administration in lean mice, while the agonists had no effect in GPR120 null mice. Exendin 9-39, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the GPR120 induced effects on glucose and insulin following an intravenous glucose challenge. In conclusion, GLP-1 secretion is an important mechanism behind the acute glucose lowering effect following specific GPR120 activation.

  10. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Neve

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leon Neve1, John Orchard2, Nathan Gibbs3, Willem van Mechelen4, Evert Verhagen4, Ken Sesel5, Ian Burgess6, Brett Hines61VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3South Sydney Sports Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4EMGO, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Sydney X-ray Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Mater Imaging, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2. These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT, even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis.Objectives: To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain.Study design: Retrospective case series.Methods: Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N.Results: 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60. Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43. Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the

  11. Prognostic factors for specific lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries identified through medical screening and training load monitoring in professional football (soccer): a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Jamie C; Parkes, Matthew J; Callaghan, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background Medical screening and load monitoring procedures are commonly used in professional football to assess factors perceived to be associated with injury. Objectives To identify prognostic factors (PFs) and models for lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries in professional/elite football players from medical screening and training load monitoring processes. Methods The MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, SPORTDiscus and PubMed electronic bibliographic databases were searched (from inception to January 2017). Prospective and retrospective cohort studies of lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injury incidence in professional/elite football players aged between 16 and 40 years were included. The Quality in Prognostic Studies appraisal tool and the modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation synthesis approach was used to assess the quality of the evidence. Results Fourteen studies were included. 16 specific lower extremity injury outcomes were identified. No spinal injury outcomes were identified. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and study quality. All evidence related to PFs and specific lower extremity injury outcomes was of very low to low quality. On the few occasions where multiple studies could be used to compare PFs and outcomes, only two factors demonstrated consensus. A history of previous hamstring injuries (HSI) and increasing age may be prognostic for future HSI in male players. Conclusions The assumed ability of medical screening tests to predict specific musculoskeletal injuries is not supported by the current evidence. Screening procedures should currently be considered as benchmarks of function or performance only. The prognostic value of load monitoring modalities is unknown. PMID:29177074

  12. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audí-Miró, Carme, E-mail: carmeaudi@ub.edu [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Cretnik, Stefan [Institute of Groundwater Ecology, Helmholtz Zentrum München-National Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Shouakar-Stash, Orfan [Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, 200 University Ave. W, N2L 3G1 Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Otero, Neus [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Martí Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Palau, Jordi [Université de Neuchâtel, CHYN - Centre d' Hydrogéologie, Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethenes biodegradation. • {sup 13}C to evaluate the efficiency of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier. • {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl to discriminate biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene. • {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl-{sup 2}H of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. - Abstract: Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using {sup 13}C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl-{sup 2}H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the {sup 13}C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element {sup 13}C-{sup 37}Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. {sup 2}H combined with {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ{sup 2}H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  13. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 13 C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethenes biodegradation. • 13 C to evaluate the efficiency of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier. • 13 C- 37 Cl to discriminate biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene. • 13 C- 37 Cl- 2 H of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. - Abstract: Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using 13 C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element 13 C- 37 Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using 13 C- 37 Cl- 2 H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the 13 C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element 13 C- 37 Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. 2 H combined with 13 C and 37 Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ 2 H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  14. Fertility of Czech Females Could Be Lower than Expected: Trends in Future Development of Age-Specific Fertility Rates up to the Year 2050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Šimpach

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fertility is an essential aspect of reproduction or population replacement of each country. The challenge for demographers is to model fertility and also to estimate its potential future level for the purposes of population projections. In the case of the Czech Republic we have the population projections provided by the Czech Statistical Office (CZSO with overlooking of the total fertility rate in low, medium and high variant. These estimates despite being based on expert judgments, seem to be too positive compared to the past development of the time series of age-specific fertility rates. The aim of this paper is to assess the situation of fertility in the Czech Republic, to analyse the past development of the time series of age-specific fertility rates using one-dimensional Box-Jenkins models and multidimensional stochastic Lee-Carter approach. Together with found trend in time series and principal components estimated by Lee-Carter’s model a forecasts of age-specific fertility rates up to the year 2050 is constructed. Th ese rates are lower than those provided by CZSO in its three variants of the Czech Republic’s population projection, and therefore we discuss the causes at the end of the paper. We would like to point out that the potential future development of Czech females fertility could be lower than which are currently expected.

  15. Serum complexed and free prostate specific antigen levels are lower in female elite athletes in comparison to control women [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Eklund

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesize that prostate specific antigen (PSA, a protein that it is under regulation by androgens, may be differentially expressed in female elite athletes in comparison to control women. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 106 female athletes and 114 sedentary age-matched controls.  Serum from these women was analyzed for complexed prostate specific antigen (cPSA and free prostate specific antigen (fPSA, by fifth generation assays with limits of detection of around 6 and 140 fg/mL, respectively.  A panel of estrogens, androgens and progesterone in the same serum was also quantified by tandem mass spectrometry.  Results: Both components of serum PSA (cPSA and fPSA were lower in the elite athletes vs the control group (P=0.033 and 0.013, respectively.  Furthermore, estrone (p=0.003 and estradiol (p=0.004 were significantly lower, and dehydroepiandrosterone  (p=0.095 and 5-androstene-3β, 17β-diol (p=0.084 tended to be higher in the athletes vs controls. Oral contraceptive use was similar between groups and significantly associated with increased cPSA and fPSA in athletes (p= 0.046 and 0.009, respectively.  PSA fractions were not significantly associated with progesterone changes. The Spearman correlation between cPSA and fPSA in both athletes and controls was 0.75 (P < 0.0001 and 0.64 (P < 0.0001, respectively.  Conclusions: Elite athletes have lower complexed and free PSA, higher levels of androgen precursors and lower levels of estrogen in their serum than sedentary control women. Abbreviations: cPSA, complexed PSA; fPSA, free PSA; PCOS, polycystic ovarian syndrome; E1, estrone; E2, estradiol; DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone, Testo, testosterone; DHT, dihydrotestosterone; PROG, progesterone; Delta 4, androstenedione; Delta 5, androst-5-ene-3β, 17β-diol; BMD, body mineral density; LLOQ, lower limit of quantification; ULOQ, upper limit of quantification; LOD, limit of detection; ACT, α1-antichymotrypsin

  16. Sex-specific relationships of physical activity, body composition, and muscle quality with lower-extremity physical function in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Chad R; Brady, Anne O; Evans, Ellen

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to determine the sex-specific relationships of physical activity, body composition, and muscle quality with lower-extremity physical function in older men and women. Seventy-nine community-dwelling men (n = 39; mean [SD] age, 76.1 [6.2] y; mean [SD] body mass index, 27.3 [3.8] kg/m(2)) and women (n = 40; mean [SD] age, 75.8 [5.5] y; mean [SD] body mass index, 27.0 [3.8] kg/m(2)) were assessed for physical activity via questionnaire, body composition via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning, leg extension power using the Nottingham power rig, and muscle quality (W/kg; the ratio of leg extension power [W] to lower-body mineral-free lean mass [kg]). A composite measure of physical function was obtained by summing Z scores from the 6-minute walk, 8-ft up-and-go test, and 30-second chair-stand test. As expected, men had significantly greater levels of physical activity, lower adiposity, greater lean mass, higher leg extension power, and greater muscle quality compared with women (all P physical activity were the strongest predictors of lower-extremity physical function in men and independently explained 42% and 29% of the variance, respectively. In women, muscle quality (16%) and percent body fat (12%) were independent predictors after adjustment for covariates. Muscle quality is the strongest predictor of lower-extremity physical function in men and women, but sex impacts the importance of physical activity and adiposity. These findings suggest that older men and women may benefit from different intervention strategies for preventing physical disability and also highlight the importance of weight management for older women to preserve physical function.

  17. Bifidobacterium longum CCM 7952 Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function and Prevents Acute DSS-Induced Colitis in Strictly Strain-Specific Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Srutkova

    Full Text Available Reduced microbial diversity has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and probiotic bacteria have been proposed for its prevention and/or treatment. Nevertheless, comparative studies of strains of the same subspecies for specific health benefits are scarce. Here we compared two Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains for their capacity to prevent experimental colitis.Immunomodulatory properties of nine probiotic bifidobacteria were assessed by stimulation of murine splenocytes. The immune responses to B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 (Bl 7952 and CCDM 372 (Bl 372 were further characterized by stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cell, HEK293/TLR2 or HEK293/NOD2 cells. A mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS-induced colitis was used to compare their beneficial effects in vivo.The nine bifidobacteria exhibited strain-specific abilities to induce cytokine production. Bl 372 induced higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in spleen and dendritic cell cultures compared to Bl 7952. Both strains engaged TLR2 and contain ligands for NOD2. In a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis, Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, reduced clinical symptoms and preserved expression of tight junction proteins. Importantly, Bl 7952 improved intestinal barrier function as demonstrated by reduced FITC-dextran levels in serum.We have shown that Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, protected mice from the development of experimental colitis. Our data suggest that although some immunomodulatory properties might be widespread among the genus Bifidobacterium, others may be rare and characteristic only for a specific strain. Therefore, careful selection might be crucial in providing beneficial outcome in clinical trials with probiotics in IBD.

  18. Recent results from TMX-U thermal barrier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Allen, S.; Barter, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) device was designed to study plasma confinement in a tandem mirror with thermal barriers. Previously the author reported improved axial confinement with high end-plug potentials, consistent with thermal barrier operation. Now, the existence of thermal barriers in TMX-U confirmed by measuring the axial potential profile. Specifically, measured the change in energy of a 5-keV deuterium neutral beam that is injected nearly parallel to the axis and is ionized between the barrier and the central cell. The authors found that the barrier potential is lower than the central cell potential, as required for a thermal barrier. The peak potential is at least 2.4 keV, as determined from the minimum energy of end loss ions. In addition, radial transport is reduced by the use of floating and electrodes that map to concentric cylinders in the central cell. Sloshing ions continue to be microstable

  19. Whole-grain products and whole grain types are associated with lower all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Nina Føns; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Christensen, Jane

    2015-01-01

    No study has yet investigated the intake of different types of whole grain (WG) in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a healthy population. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intake of WG products and WG types in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortali......%CI 0·86, 0·91) for a doubling of intake). In particular, intake of breakfast cereals and non-white bread was associated with lower mortality. We also found lower all-cause mortality with total intake of different WG types (women: MRR 0·88 (95%CI 0·86, 0·92); men: MRR 0·88 (95%CI 0·86, 0...... quartile compared with the lowest for breakfast cereals, non-white bread, total WG products, oat, rye (only men), wheat and total WG types. The MRR for highest v. lowest quartile of intake of total WG products was 0·68 (95% CI 0·62, 0·75, P for trend over quartiles , 0·0001) for women and 0·75 (95%CI 0...

  20. A regional composite-face effect for species-specific recognition: Upper and lower halves play different roles in holistic processing of monkey faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Quinn, Paul C; Jin, Haiyang; Sun, Yu-Hao P; Tanaka, James W; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang

    2018-04-25

    Using a composite-face paradigm, we examined the holistic processing induced by Asian faces, Caucasian faces, and monkey faces with human Asian participants in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to judge whether the upper halves of two faces successively presented were the same or different. A composite-face effect was found for Asian faces and Caucasian faces, but not for monkey faces. In Experiment 2, participants were asked to judge whether the lower halves of the two faces successively presented were the same or different. A composite-face effect was found for monkey faces as well as for Asian faces and Caucasian faces. Collectively, these results reveal that own-species (i.e., own-race and other-race) faces engage holistic processing in both upper and lower halves of the face, but other-species (i.e., monkey) faces engage holistic processing only when participants are asked to match the lower halves of the face. The findings are discussed in the context of a region-based holistic processing account for the species-specific effect in face recognition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither...

  2. A common polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNFSF4 gene is associated with lower allele-specific expression and risk of myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TNFSF4/TNFRSF4 system, along with several other receptor-ligand pairs, is involved in the recruitment and activation of T-cells and is therefore tentatively implicated in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. We have previously shown that genetic variants in TNFSF4 are associated with myocardial infarction (MI in women. This prompted functional studies of TNFSF4 expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on a screening of the TNFSF4 genomic region, a promoter polymorphism (rs45454293 and a haplotype were identified, conceivably involved in gene regulation. The rs45454293T-allele, in agreement with the linked rs3850641G-allele, proved to be associated with increased risk of MI in women. Haplotype-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation of activated polymerase II, as a measure of transcriptional activity in vivo, suggested that the haplotype including the rs45454293 and rs3850641 polymorphisms is functionally important, the rs45454293T- and rs3850641G-alleles being associated with lower transcriptional activity in cells heterozygous for both polymorphisms. The functional role of rs45454293 on transcriptional levels of TNFSF4 was clarified by luciferase reporter assays, where the rs45454293T-allele decreased gene expression when compared with the rs45454293C-allele, while the rs3850641 SNP did not have any effect on TNFSF4 promoter activity. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs45454293 polymorphism, but not rs3850641, affects the binding of nuclear factors, thus suggesting that the lower transcriptional activity is attributed to binding of one or more transcriptional repressor(s to the T-allele. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the TNFSF4 rs45454293T-allele is associated with lower TNFSF4 expression and increased risk of MI.

  3. Can evidence-based health policy from high-income countries be applied to lower-income countries: considering barriers and facilitators to an organ donor registry in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vania, Diana K; Randall, Glen E

    2016-01-13

    Organ transplantation has become an effective means to extend lives; however, a major obstacle is the lack of availability of cadaveric organs. India has one of the lowest cadaver organ donation rates in the world. If India could increase the donor rate, the demand for many organs could be met. Evidence from high-income countries suggests that an organ donor registry can be a valuable tool for increasing donor rates. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the implementation of an organ donor registry is a feasible and appropriate policy option to enhance cadaver organ donation rates in a lower-income country. This qualitative policy analysis employs semi-structured interviews with physicians, transplant coordinators, and representatives of organ donation advocacy groups in Mumbai. Interviews were designed to better understand current organ donation procedures and explore key informants' perceptions about Indian government health priorities and the likelihood of an organ donor registry in Mumbai. The 3-i framework (ideas, interests, and institutions) is used to examine how government decisions surrounding organ donation policies are shaped. Findings indicate that organ donation in India is a complex issue due to low public awareness, misperceptions of religious doctrines, the need for family consent, and a nation-wide focus on disease control. Key informants cite social, political, and infrastructural barriers to the implementation of an organ donor registry, including widely held myths about organ donation, competing health priorities, and limited hospital infrastructure. At present, both the central government and Maharashtra state government struggle to balance international pressures to improve overall population health with the desire to also enhance individual health. Implementing an organ donor registry in Mumbai is not a feasible or appropriate policy option in India's current political and social environment, as the barriers, identified through

  4. Genome sequences of lower Great Lakes Microcystis sp. reveal strain-specific genes that are present and expressed in western Lake Erie blooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Anthony Meyer

    Full Text Available Blooms of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis are increasing worldwide. In the Laurentian Great Lakes they pose major socioeconomic, ecological, and human health threats, particularly in western Lake Erie. However, the interpretation of "omics" data is constrained by the highly variable genome of Microcystis and the small number of reference genome sequences from strains isolated from the Great Lakes. To address this, we sequenced two Microcystis isolates from Lake Erie (Microcystis aeruginosa LE3 and M. wesenbergii LE013-01 and one from upstream Lake St. Clair (M. cf aeruginosa LSC13-02, and compared these data to the genomes of seventeen Microcystis spp. from across the globe as well as one metagenome and seven metatranscriptomes from a 2014 Lake Erie Microcystis bloom. For the publically available strains analyzed, the core genome is ~1900 genes, representing ~11% of total genes in the pan-genome and ~45% of each strain's genome. The flexible genome content was related to Microcystis subclades defined by phylogenetic analysis of both housekeeping genes and total core genes. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that the flexible genome is linked to the core genome of the Microcystis species complex. The majority of strain-specific genes were present and expressed in bloom communities in Lake Erie. Roughly 8% of these genes from the lower Great Lakes are involved in genome plasticity (rapid gain, loss, or rearrangement of genes and resistance to foreign genetic elements (such as CRISPR-Cas systems. Intriguingly, strain-specific genes from Microcystis cultured from around the world were also present and expressed in the Lake Erie blooms, suggesting that the Microcystis pangenome is truly global. The presence and expression of flexible genes, including strain-specific genes, suggests that strain-level genomic diversity may be important in maintaining Microcystis abundance during bloom events.

  5. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to both stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. This pattern is observed even in the absence of hepatic encephalopathy suggesting that blood-CSF barrier impairment is manifest even in absence of overt

  6. Programmer's description of the Barrier Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, D.W.; Jones, R.E.; Worrell, R.B.

    1976-12-01

    The Barrier Data Base is a body of information concerning different kinds of barriers that are used in safeguarding nuclear materials and installations. The two programs written for creating, updating, and manipulating the Barrier Data Base are discussed. The BARRIER program is used to add, delete, modify, display, or search for specific data in the data base. A utility program named NUMBER is used to compress and renumber the barrier and threat tables

  7. Patient-Specific Instruments Based on Knee Joint Computed Tomography and Full-Length Lower Extremity Radiography in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tian

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of PSIs based on knee joint CT and standing full-length lower extremity radiography in TKR resulted in acceptable alignment compared with the use of conventional instruments, although the marginal advantage was not statistically different. Surgical time and clinical results were also similar between the two groups. However, the PSI group had less postoperative drainage.

  8. The 7B-1 mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) confers a blue light-specific lower sensitivity to coronatine, a toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bergougnoux, V.; Hlaváčková, V.; Plotzová, R.; Novák, Ondřej; Fellner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2009), s. 1219-1230 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Blue light-specific response * COI1 * coronatine Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.271, year: 2009

  9. Discordance of epstein-barr virus (ebv) specific humoral and cellular immunity in patients with malignant lymphomas : Elevated antibody titers and lowered invitro lymphocyte-reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Napel, C. H. H.; The, T. Hauw; van Egten-Bijker, J; de Gast, G. C.; Halie, M. R.; Langenhuysen, M. M. A. C.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between specific viral cellular and humoral immunity to the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) was investigated in thirty-one untreated patients with malignant lymphoma (ML) and sex- and age-matched controls. In vitro reactivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes to heatinactivated purified EBV,

  10. A Population-based Survey of the Prevalence, Potential Risk Factors, and Symptom-specific Bother of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Adult Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Lan; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jinghe; Li, Zhaoai; Gong, Jian; Liu, Qing; Liu, Xiaochun

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are few in China, and none has been conducted nationwide. To estimate the prevalence and potential risk factors of LUTS and the bother they impose on adult women in China. This is the second analysis of a population-based cross-sectional survey on urinary incontinence conducted between February and July 2006 in six regions of China. Cluster samples were randomly selected for interviews. No intervention was implemented. A modified Chinese Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire was administered. The participants were asked about the presence of individual LUTS and rated their symptom bother. Descriptive statistics, χ(2) tests, receiver operating characteristic curves, and multivariate logistic regressions were used for data analysis. A total of 18 992 respondents (94.96%) were included. The prevalence of any LUTS, storage symptoms, or voiding symptoms was 55.5%, 53.9%, and 12.9%, respectively, and increased with age. Nocturia was the most common symptom (23.4%), followed by urgency (23.3%) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI; 18.9%). Nocturia was most frequently rated as bothersome (93.0%) but was generally minor (80.5%). Urgency and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) were most frequently reported as severe (11.5% and 10.8%) or moderate (18.5% and 16.8%) bothers. Any LUTS were more prevalent in urban women (57.1% vs 53.9%). Multiple factors increased the odds of bother and individual LUTS, and older age and coexisting pelvic organ prolapse were strong predictors (pfactors influenced bother and individual LUTS. The prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms is high and increases with age in adult women in China. Urgency and urgency urinary incontinence were most frequently regarded as severe or moderate bothers and should be targeted for medical intervention. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  12. Diabetes is associated with lower tuberculosis antigen-specific interferon gamma release in Tanzanian tuberculosis patients and non-tuberculosis controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Aabye, Martine Grosos; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    in diabetes patients and therefore the validity of interferon gamma release assays (IGRA) may be compromised. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between diabetes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release in a TB endemic area among culture......-confirmed TB patients and non-TB controls. Methods: Culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients (n = 187) and healthy non-TB neighbourhood controls (n = 190) from Mwanza, Tanzania were tested for the presence of circulating T cells recognizing Mtb antigens using an IGRA. The diabetes status of all participants...

  13. Information barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.L.; Wolford, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: An information barrier (IB) consists of procedures and technology that prevent the release of sensitive information during a joint inspection of a sensitive nuclear item, and provides confidence that the measurement system into which it has been integrated functions exactly as designed and constructed. Work in the U.S. on radiation detection system information barriers dates back at least to 1990, even though the terminology is more recent. In January 1999 the Joint DoD-DOE Information Barrier Working Group was formed in the United States to help coordinate technical efforts related to information barrier R and D. This paper presents an overview of the efforts of this group, by its Chairs, as well as recommendations for further information barrier R and D. Progress on the demonstration of monitoring systems containing IBs is also provided. From the U.S. perspective, the basic, top-level functional requirements for the information barrier portion of an integrated radiation signature-information barrier inspection system are twofold: The host must be assured that his classified information is protected from disclosure to the inspecting party; and The inspecting party must be confident that the integrated inspection system measures, processes, and presents the radiation-signature-based measurement conclusion in an accurate and reproducible manner. It is the position of the United States that in the absence of any agreement to share classified nuclear weapons design information in the conduct of an inspection regime, the requirement to protect host country classified warhead design information is paramount and admits no tradeoff versus the confidence provided to the inspecting party in the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The U.S. has reached an internal consensus on several critical design elements that define a general standard for radiation signature information barrier design. These criteria have stood the test of time under intense

  14. Floating barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-05-06

    This floating barrier consists of relatively long elements which can be connected to form a practically continuous assembly. Each element consists of an inflatable tube with an apron of certain height, made of impregnated fabric which is resistant to ocean water and also to hydrocarbons. Means for connecting one element to the following one, and means for attaching ballast to the apron are also provided.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of self-report and subjective history in the diagnosis of low back pain with non-specific lower extremity symptoms: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Susan; Averell, Kristina; Eickelman, Angela; Sanker, Holly; Donaldson, Megan Burrowbridge

    2015-02-01

    Subjective history questions/self-report items are commonly used to triage the patient with low back pain and related leg symptoms. However the value of the history taking process for decision-making to identify common classifications/diagnosis for patients presenting with low back related leg pain (LBRLP) have not been considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of self-report items/history-taking questions used to identify patients with LBRLP. Eligible studies included: 1)subjects with low back pain AND related lower extremity pain, 2)details of subjective examination/self-report items, 3)cohort, prospective/longitudinal studies, and randomized control trials, 4)use of statistical reporting, 5)an acceptable reference standard. Quality was evaluated using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2. A synthesis of history items that met the threshold for at least a small shift in the likelihood of the condition with a +LR ≥ 2 or -LR ≤ 0.5 were reported. Conditions commonly reported in the literature: lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbosacral nerve root compression/radiculopathy, disc herniation and neurophysiological low back pain ± leg pain. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. This is the first systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies that examined only the history-taking items for their ability to identify LBRLP conditions. Clustering key items may provide a more precise clinical picture necessary to detect and treat a patient's presentation. History questions formed within the interview and their contributing value for decision-making remain understudied. There is a need for better designs to determine a more accurate diagnostic power to identify conditions with LBRLP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The breadth and titer of maternal HIV-1-specific heterologous neutralizing antibodies are not associated with a lower rate of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillon, Antoine; Wack, Thierry; Braibant, Martine; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Blanche, Stéphane; Warszawski, Josiane; Barin, Francis

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) should have broad specificity to be effective in protection against diverse HIV-1 variants. The mother-to-child transmission model of HIV-1 provides the opportunity to examine whether the breadth of maternal NAbs is associated with protection of infants from infection. Samples were obtained at delivery from 57 transmitting mothers (T) matched with 57 nontransmitting mothers (NT) enrolled in the multicenter French perinatal cohort (ANRS EPF CO1) between 1990 and 1996. Sixty-eight (59.6%) and 46 (40.4%) women were infected by B and non-B viruses, respectively. Neutralization assays were carried out with TZM-bl cells, using a panel of 10 primary isolates of 6 clades (A, B, C, F, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG), selected for their moderate or low sensitivity to neutralization. Neutralization breadths were not statistically different between T and NT mothers. However, a few statistically significant differences were observed, with higher frequencies or titers of NAbs toward several individual strains for NT mothers when the clade B-infected or non-clade B-infected mothers were analyzed separately. Our study confirms that the breadth of maternal NAbs is not associated with protection of infants from infection.

  17. The effect of specific solvent-solute interactions on complexation of alkali-metal cations by a lower-rim calix[4]arene amide derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Gordan; Stilinović, Vladimir; Kaitner, Branko; Frkanec, Leo; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2013-11-04

    the results of MD simulations, the probability of such orientation of the benzonitrile molecule included in the ligand cone was by far the largest in the case of LiL(+) complex. Because of the favorable PhCN-Li(+) interaction, L was proven to have the highest affinity toward the lithium ion in benzonitrile, which was not the case in the other solvents examined (in acetonitrile, sodium complex was the most stable, whereas in methanol, complexation of lithium was not even observed). That could serve as a remarkable example showing the importance of specific solvent-solute interactions in determining the equilibrium in solution.

  18. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-01-01

    positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking

  19. Cell-penetrating anti-GFAP VHH and corresponding fluorescent fusion protein VHH-GFP spontaneously cross the blood-brain barrier and specifically recognize astrocytes: application to brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengfei; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Celli, Susanna; Glacial, Fabienne; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; Mecheri, Salah; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Rougeon, François; Lafaye, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies normally do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cannot bind an intracellular cerebral antigen. We demonstrate here for the first time that a new class of antibodies can cross the BBB without treatment. Camelids produce native homodimeric heavy-chain antibodies, the paratope being composed of a single-variable domain called VHH. Here, we used recombinant VHH directed against human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a specific marker of astrocytes. Only basic VHHs (e.g., pI=9.4) were able to cross the BBB in vitro (7.8 vs. 0% for VHH with pI=7.7). By intracarotid and intravenous injections into live mice, we showed that these basic VHHs are able to cross the BBB in vivo, diffuse into the brain tissue, penetrate into astrocytes, and specifically label GFAP. To analyze their ability to be used as a specific transporter, we then expressed a recombinant fusion protein VHH-green fluorescent protein (GFP). These "fluobodies" specifically labeled GFAP on murine brain sections, and a basic variant (pI=9.3) of the fusion protein VHH-GFP was able to cross the BBB and to label astrocytes in vivo. The potential of VHHs as diagnostic or therapeutic agents in the central nervous system now deserves attention.

  20. Shottky-barrier formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guines, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J.; Flores, F.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper a realistic selfconsistent calculation of an abrupt metal-semiconductor junction is presented by means of a tight-binding approach. A specific Si-Ag junction has been considered, and the charge neutrality level as well as the barrier height have been determined in good agreement with experiments. For a generaljunction it is shown that the interface properties depend essentially on the characteristics of the first metal layer and its interaction with the semiconductor. (Author) [pt

  1. Barrier island facies models and recognition criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier island outcrops record transgressive shoreline motion at geologic timescales, providing integral clues to understanding how coastlines respond to rising sea levels. However, barrier island deposits are difficult to recognize. While significant progress has been made in understanding the modern coastal morphodynamics, this insight is not fully leveraged in existing barrier island facies models. Excellent outcrop exposures of the paralic Upper Cretaceous Straight Cliffs Formation of southern Utah provide an opportunity to revise facies models and recognition criteria for barrier island deposits. Preserved barrier islands are composed of three main architectural elements (shorefaces, tidal inlets, and tidal channels) which occur independently or in combination to create larger-scale barrier island deposits. Barrier island shorefaces record progradation, while barrier island tidal inlets record lateral migration, and barrier island tidal channels record aggradation within the tidal inlet. Four facies associations are used to describe and characterize these barrier island architectural elements. Barrier islands occur in association with backarrier fill and internally contain lower and upper shoreface, high-energy upper shoreface, and tidal channel facies. Barrier islands bound lagoons or estuaries, and are distinguished from other shoreface deposits by their internal facies and geometry, association with backbarrier facies, and position within transgressive successions. Tidal processes, in particular tidal inlet migration and reworking of the upper shoreface, also distinguish barrier island deposits. Existing barrier island models highlight the short term heterogeneous and dynamic nature of barrier island systems, yet overlook processes tied to geologic time scales, such as multi-directional motion, erosion, and reworking, and their expressions in preserved barrier island strata. This study uses characteristic outcrop expressions of barrier island successions to

  2. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Simonen, E.P.; Kalinen, G.; Terlain, A.

    1994-06-01

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments

  3. Regulatory analysis for the use of underground barriers at the Hanford Site tank farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampsten, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-seven of the single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, are assumed to have leaked in the past. Some of the waste retrieval options being considered, such as past-practice sluicing (a process that uses hot water to dislodge waste for subsequent removal by pumping), have the potential for increasing releases of dangerous waste from these tanks. Underground barrier systems are being evaluated as a method to mitigate releases of tank waste to the soil and groundwater that may occur during retrieval activities. The following underground barrier system options are among those being evaluated to determine whether their construction at the Single-Shell Tank Farms is viable. (1) A desiccant barrier would be created by circulating air through the subsurface soil to lower and then maintain the water saturation below the levels required for liquids to flow. (2) An injected materials barrier would be created by injecting materials such as grout or silica into the subsurface soils to form a barrier around and under a given tank or tank farm. (3) A cryogenic barrier would be created by freezing subsurface soils in the vicinity of a tank or tank farm. An analysis is provided of the major regulatory requirements that may impact full scale construction and operation of an underground barrier system and a discussion of factors that should be considered throughout the barrier selection process, irrespective of the type of underground barrier system being considered. However, specific barrier systems will be identified when a given regulation will have significant impact on a particular type of barrier technology. Appendix A provides a matrix of requirements applicable to construction and operation of an underground barrier system

  4. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the barriers'' literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  5. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the ``barriers`` literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  6. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  7. Ethnic differences in cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niksic, Maja; Rachet, Bernard; Warburton, Fiona G; Forbes, Lindsay J L

    2016-06-28

    Ethnic differences in cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in the English population are not fully understood. We aimed to quantify these differences, to help develop more effective health campaigns, tailored to the needs of different ethnic groups. Using a large national data set (n=38 492) of cross-sectional surveys that used the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure, we examined how cancer symptom awareness and barriers varied by ethnicity, controlling for socio-economic position, age and gender. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression. Awareness of cancer symptoms was lower in minority ethnic groups than White participants, with the lowest awareness observed among Bangladeshis and Black Africans. Ethnic minorities were more likely than White British to report barriers to help-seeking. South Asians reported the highest emotional barriers, such as lack of confidence to talk to the doctor, and practical barriers, such as worry about many other things. The Irish were more likely than the White British to report practical barriers, such as being too busy to visit a doctor. White British participants were more likely than any other ethnic group to report that they would feel worried about wasting the doctor's time. Overall, Black Africans had the lowest barriers. All differences were statistically significant (Pcancer symptoms among ethnic minorities. Campaigns should tackle the specific barriers prevalent in each ethnic group.

  8. Mass-specific respiration of mesozooplankton and its role in the maintenance of an oxygen-deficient ecological barrier (BEDOX) in the upwelling zone off Chile upon presence of a shallow oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Katty; Escribano, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    A shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the coastal upwelling zone off Chile may vertically confine most zooplankton to a narrow (oxygen consumption of the mesozooplankton community obtained in Bay of Mejillones, northern Chile (23°S) in May 2010, December 2010 and August 2011. Mass-specific respiration rates were in the range of 8.2-24.5 μmol O2 mg dry mass- 1 day- 1, at an average temperature of 12 °C. Estimates of the mesozooplankton biomass in the water column indicated that its aerobic respiration may remove daily a maximum of about 20% of oxygen available at the base of the oxycline. Since previous work indicates that zooplankton aggregate near the base of the oxycline, the impact of aerobic respiration on oxygen content might be even stronger at this depth. Mesozooplankton respiration, along with community respiration by microorganisms near the base of the oxycline and a strongly stratified condition (limiting vertical flux of O2), are suggested as being critical factors causing and maintaining a persistent subsurface oxygen-deficient ecological barrier (BEDOX) in the upwelling zone. This BEDOX layer can have a major role in affecting and regulating zooplankton distribution and their dynamics in the highly productive coastal upwelling zone of the Humboldt Current System.

  9. Factors related to environmental barriers experienced by persons with and without disabilities in diverse African settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surona Visagie

    Full Text Available This paper explores differences in experienced environmental barriers between individuals with and without disabilities and the impact of additional factors on experienced environmental barriers. Data was collected in 2011-2012 by means of a two-stage cluster sampling and comprised 400-500 households in different sites in South Africa, Sudan Malawi and Namibia. Data were collected through self-report survey questionnaires. In addition to descriptive statistics and simple statistical tests a structural equation model was developed and tested. The combined file comprised 9,307 participants. The Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors was used to assess the level of environmental barriers. Transportation, the natural environment and access to health care services created the biggest barriers. An exploratory factor analysis yielded support for a one component solution for environmental barriers. A scale was constructed by adding the items together and dividing by number of items, yielding a range from one to five with five representing the highest level of environmental barriers and one the lowest. An overall mean value of 1.51 was found. Persons with disabilities scored 1.66 and persons without disabilities 1.36 (F = 466.89, p < .001. Bivariate regression analyses revealed environmental barriers to be higher among rural respondents, increasing with age and severity of disability, and lower for those with a higher level of education and with better physical and mental health. Gender had an impact only among persons without disabilities, where women report more barriers than men. Structural equation model analysis showed that socioeconomic status was significantly and negatively associated with environmental barriers. Activity limitation is significantly associated with environmental barriers when controlling for a number of other individual characteristics. Reducing barriers for the general population would go some way to reduce the impact

  10. Replacement of lumpy chrome ore by agglomerated ore concentrates and lowering of specific power consumption and improvement of Cr-yield by means of improved slag composition in the production of H.C. Ferrochrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retelsdorf, H.J.; Fichte, R.; Breuer, F.; Zimmermann, H.

    1982-06-01

    Work on this project is finished, but further work on the use of Cr-ore briquettes seems necessary. It was the aim of the project to develop improved slag compositions for the FeCr 4-6% C-process resulting in higher Cr-yield and lower specific power consumption. Furthermore, replacement of lumpy ore in the charge by agglomerated Cr-ore-fines or concentrates in the form of pellets and briquettes was to be tested. Experimentals were performed in a 70 kW and a 300 kW arc furnace. Two different slag compositions were tested. The high-MgO slag type proved suitable. The specific power consumption and the Cr-yield depend to a large extent on the type of Cr-ore and on the agglomeration process. Cr-ore pellets can be used up to 65% in the ore charge but briquettes can be used only up to 25% to replace lumpy ores without causing higher Cr-losses in the slag. (orig.) [de

  11. Prescribed Renoprotective Chinese Herbal Medicines Were Associated with a Lower Risk of All-Cause and Disease-Specific Mortality among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Fa Hsieh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs containing aristolochic acid (AA are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but some prescribed CHMs have been shown to possess renoprotective effects. We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study to delineate the role of prescribed CHMs on the CKD progression. Renoprotective CHM (RPCHM was defined if a CHM contained dong chong xia cao (Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., da huang (Rheum palmatum L, huang qi (Astragalus membranaceus, dan shen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., and dong quai (Angelica sinensis (Oliv. Diels or belonged to specific mixture herbal formulations (Yishen capsule, Saireito, or Wen Pi Tang. Subjects who had ever used AA-containing CHMs, had cancer or HIV prior to CKD diagnosis, or died within the first month of CKD diagnosis were excluded. A total of 11,625 patients were eligible subjects. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR for all-cause mortality was 0.6 (p < 0.001 and 0.6 (p = 0.013 among subjects receiving RPCHMs containing Angelica sinensis and those receiving other RPCHMs, respectively. For CKD-related mortality, the aHR among subjects receiving RPCHMs containing Angelica sinensis was 0.6 (p = 0.025. The use of specific RPCHMs, especially those that contained Angelica sinensis, was associated with a lower risk of mortality among CKD patients.

  12. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  13. Barriers Approach to Innovation in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsuan Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in academic libraries is not a brand new issue. Academic libraries can benefit from successful innovation, since innovation is a key contributor to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage for survival. Building on two case studies, 28 participants from leadership teams to practitioners are involved, the qualitative findings identified the specific two types of barriers that academic libraries face by applying a barriers approach to innovation, that’s, environmental and organizational barriers. Especially, seven dimensions of two types of barriers to innovation are found.

  14. The role of cooperatives in overcoming the barriers to adoption of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viardot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Recently, cooperatives have been created to promote the use of renewable energy (RE) most notably in Canada, the US, UK, Denmark or Germany. In order to develop the adoption of RE, the cooperatives have to seek to influence the behaviour of their members so that they switch from the use of traditional fossil energy to RE. This paper examines the various barriers to adoption of RE and the way cooperatives are circumventing those obstacles in order to develop the use of RE. This study surveyed a sample of 9 cooperatives from countries where governments are subsidizing the use of RE. The paper identifies a set of specific barriers to the adoption of RE by consumers. It also reveals that cooperatives effectively contribute to the uptake of RE with community-based social marketing initiatives that are lowering those barriers successfully. Those initiatives are related to educational communication, low prices, local offers with complementary services, and cooperative distribution. The paper put forwards a framework for the assessment of how each of those initiatives contributes to the diminishing of each of the barriers to adoption of RE. - Highlights: • We examine the barriers to adoption of renewable energy by RE cooperatives. • We have identified the main significant barriers to adoption of RE by consumers. • Cooperatives apply community-based marketing initiatives to ease the uptake of RE. • We evaluate how each marketing initiatives diminish the barriers to adoption of RE

  15. Fusion barriers in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Long; Su Jun; Xie Wenjie; Guo Chenchen; Zhang Donghong; Zhang Fengshou

    2014-01-01

    Study of fusion barrier is very important for people to better understand fusion reactions. In this paper the Improved Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (ImIQMD) model is introduced firstly. Then the shell correction effects, energy dependence, isospin effects and orientation effects of fusion barrier are studied. The fusion barriers for the fusion reactions "4"0Ca + "4"0Ca, "4"8Ca + "2"0"8Pb, "4"8Ca + "2"0"4Pb and "1"6O + "1"5"4Sm are extracted. The negative shell correction energies lower potential barriers of a certain reaction. A complex phenomenon of energy dependence is observed. It is also found that incident energy dependence of the barrier radius and barrier height shows opposite behaviors. The Coulomb potential shows weak energy dependence when distance of two colliding nuclei is lower than the touching distance. The isospin effects of the potential barrier are investigated. The orientation effects of the potential barrier are also discussed for the system "1"6O + "1"5"4Sm. (authors)

  16. Does self-compassion mitigate the relationship between burnout and barriers to compassion? A cross-sectional quantitative study of 799 nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Vinayak; Fernando, Antonio T; Lim, Anecita Gigi; Consedine, Nathan S

    2018-05-01

    Burnout has numerous negative consequences for nurses, potentially impairing their ability to deliver compassionate patient care. However, the association between burnout and compassion and, more specifically, barriers to compassion in medicine is unclear. This article evaluates the associations between burnout and barriers to compassion and examines whether dispositional self-compassion might mitigate this association. Consistent with prior work, the authors expected greater burnout to predict greater barriers to compassion. We also expected self-compassion - the ability to be kind to the self during times of distress - to weaken the association between burnout and barriers to compassion among nurses. Registered nurses working in New Zealand medical contexts were recruited using non-random convenience sampling. Following consent, 799 valid participants completed a cross-sectional survey including the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the Barriers to Physician Compassion scale, and a measure of dispositional self-compassion. As expected, greater burnout predicted greater barriers to compassion while self-compassion predicted fewer barriers. However, self-compassion mitigated the association between burnout and burnout related barriers to compassion (but not other barriers). The interaction suggested that suggested that the association was stronger (rather than weaker) among those with greater self-compassion. Understanding the lack of compassion and the effects of burnout in patient care are priorities in health. This report extends evidence on the association between burnout and compassion-fatigue to show that burnout also predicts the experience of specific barriers to compassion. While self-compassion predicted lower burnout and barriers, it may not necessarily reduce the extent to which burnout contributes to the experience of barriers to compassion in medicine. Implications for understanding how burnout manifests in barriers to clinical compassion, interventions

  17. Barriers to physical activity among working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Jill J

    2011-04-01

    Working mothers experience several barriers to physical activity. If these barriers can be identified by occupational health nurses and they can partner with working mothers to reduce these perceived barriers, the health of these workers can be improved and chronic disease risk prevented. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of self-regulatory efficacy on physical activity among working mothers and to describe specific barriers to physical activity. The Barriers Specific Self-Efficacy Scale (BARSE) and the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) were used to measure the variables. Self-regulatory efficacy was found to be a strong predictor of physical activity in a diverse sample of working mothers who did not meet current recommendations for physical activity. Occupational health nurses can use these findings to design programs for groups and for counseling individuals. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  19. Barriers to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The fusion barrier is formed by the combination of the repulsive Coulomb and attractive nuclear forces. Recent research at the Australian National University has shown that when heavy nuclei collide, instead of a single fusion barrier, there is a set of fusion barriers. These arise due to intrinsic properties of the interacting nuclei such deformation, rotations and vibrations. Thus the range of barrier energies depends on the properties of both nuclei. The transfer of matter between nuclei, forming a neck, can also affect the fusion process. High precision data have been used to determine fusion barrier distributions for many nuclear reactions, leading to new insights into the fusion process

  20. Extremal surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy

  1. Safety- barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2008-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called 'bow-tie' diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation of safety-barrier diagrams to other methods such as fault...... trees and Bayesian networks is discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  2. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk...... analysis with operational safety management....

  3. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  4. Effect of a gap opening on the conductance of graphene with magnetic barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailpour, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In the present study Klein tunneling in a single-layer gapped graphene was investigated by transfer matrix method under normal magnetic field for one and two magnetic barriers. Calculations show that electron transmission through a magnetic barrier is deflected to positive angles and reduces as the magnitude of magnetic field and especially the energy gap increases. This reduction is even more significant in larger fields so that after reaching a specific value of energy gap, an effective confinement for fermions and suppression of Klein tunneling is reached particularly in normal incidence and the conductance becomes zero. Unlike one barrier, the process of tunneling through two magnetic barriers induces symmetric transmission probability versus the incident angle; even, for lower energy gaps, electron transmission probability increases which in turn reduces total conductance via proper changes in the value of the magnetic field and energy gap. In general, it is concluded that confining electrons in asymmetric transmission through one barrier is conducted better than two barriers.

  5. Multilayer moisture barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  6. Barrier penetration database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainberg, A.; Bieber, A.M. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    This document is intended to supply the NRC and nuclear power plant licensees with basic data on the times required to penetrate forcibly the types of barriers commonly found in nuclear plants. These times are necessary for design and evaluation of the physical protection system required under 10CFR73.55. Each barrier listed is described in detail. Minor variations in basic barrier construction that result in the same penetration time, are also described

  7. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  8. Development of engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and 316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  9. Transport barriers in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, I L; Szezech, J D Jr; Kroetz, T; Marcus, F A; Roberto, M; Viana, R L; Lopes, S R

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the creation of transport barriers in magnetically confined plasmas with non monotonic equilibrium radial profiles. These barriers reduce the transport in the shearless region (i.e., where the twist condition does not hold). For the chaotic motion of particles in an equilibrium electric field with a nonmonotonic radial profile, perturbed by electrostatic waves, we show that a nontwist transport barrier can be created in the plasma by modifying the electric field radial profile. We also show non twist barriers in chaotic magnetic field line transport in the plasma near to the tokamak wall with resonant modes due to electric currents in external coils.

  10. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    The BWIP Engineered Barrier Program has been developed to provide an integrated approach to the development of site-specific Engineered Barrier assemblages for a repository located in basalt. The goal of this program is to specify engineered and natural barriers which will ensure that nuclear and non-radioactive hazardous materials emplaced in a repository in basalt do not exceed acceptable rates of release to the biosphere. A wide range of analytical and experimental activities related to the basalt repository environment, waste package environment, waste/barrier/rock interactions, and barrier performance assessment provide the basis for selection of systems capable of meeting licensing requirements. Work has concentrated on specifying and testing natural and man-made materials which can be used to plug boreholes in basalt and which can be used as multiple barriers to surround nuclear waste forms and containers. The Engineered Barriers Program is divided into two major activities: multiple barrier studies and borehole plugging. 8 figures, 4 tables

  11. Application of polycrystalline diffusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, V.A.; Kolupaev, I.N.

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of contacts of the electronic equipment at the raised temperatures is connected with active diffusion redistribution of components contact - metalized systems (CMS) and phase production on interphase borders. One of systems diffusion barriers (DB) are polycrystalline silicide a film, in particular silicides of the titan. Reception disilicide the titan (TiSi 2 ) which on the parameters is demanded for conditions of microelectronics from known silicides of system Ti-Si, is possible as a result of direct reaction of a film of the titan and a substrate of silicon, and at sedimentation of layer Ti-Si demanded stoichiometric structure. Simultaneously there is specific problem polycrystalline diffusion a barrier (PDB): the polycrystalline provides structural balance and metastability film disilicide, but leaves in it borders of grains - easy local ways of diffusion. In clause the analysis diffusion permeability polycrystalline and polyphase DB is made and recommendations for practical methods of increase of blocking properties PDB are made.

  12. Understanding Motivators and Barriers to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patay, Mary E.; Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Fahey, Kathleen; Sinclair, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors that influence physical activity among year-round residents in an isolated summer resort community. Specifically, we explored the personal, environmental, social, and culture-specific perceived motivators and barriers to physical activity. Participants were formally interviewed about their…

  13. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  14. Barriers to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, C T

    1986-09-01

    Opportunities for the British coal industry seem vast yet there are still barriers to progress. Seven areas are identified and discussed: mining mobility (for example, longwall mining systems are rigid and inflexible compared with American stall and pillar working); mine structure (many mines are more suitable to pit ponies than to large pieces of equipment); financial barriers (Government requires the industry to break even in 1987/88); personnel barriers (less specialization, better use of skills); safety barriers (increased use of remote control, ergonomics and robotics to protect workers); microelectronic management (nationalization has cushioned management from the market place; there is a need for a more multidisciplinary approach to the industry); and legal barriers (most legislation in the past has been in response to accidents; legislation external to the industry but affecting it is more fundamental).

  15. Vehicle barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper

  16. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  17. RF Current Drive in Internal Transport Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Basiuk, V.; Huysmans, G. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Decker, J.; Bers, A.; Ram, A.K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The current drive problem in regimes with internal transport barrier is addressed using a fast solver of the electron drift kinetic equation which may be used for arbitrary tokamak plasma magnetic equilibrium and any type of electron radio-frequency wave. Parametric studies are performed for the Lower Hybrid and Electron Cyclotron waves. (authors)

  18. Guidelines in lower-middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayemi, Edeghonghon; Asare, Eugenia V; Benneh-Akwasi Kuma, Amma A

    2017-06-01

    Guidelines include recommendations intended to optimize patient care; used appropriately, they make healthcare consistent and efficient. In most lower-middle income countries (LMICs), there is a paucity of well-designed guidelines; as a result, healthcare workers depend on guidelines developed in Higher Income Countries (HICs). However, local guidelines are more likely to be implemented because they are applicable to the specific environment; and consider factors such as availability of resources, specialized skills and local culture. If guidelines developed in HICs are to be implemented in LMICs, developers need to incorporate local experts in their development. Involvement of local stakeholders may improve the rates of implementation by identifying and removing barriers to implementation in LMICs. Another option is to encourage local experts to adapt them for use in LMICs; these guidelines may recommend strategies different from those used in HICs, but will be aimed at achieving the best practicable standard of care. Infrastructural deficits in LMICs could be improved by learning from and building on the successful response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pandemic through interactions between HICs and LMICs. Similarly, collaborations between postgraduate medical colleges in both HICs and LMICs may help specialist doctors training in LMICs develop skills required for guideline development and implementation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fourth-year dental students' perceived barriers to providing tobacco intervention services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Bhagyashree; Levy, Steven M; McQuistan, Michelle R; Qian, Fang; Squier, Christopher A; Slach, Nancy A; Aquilino, Mary L

    2010-10-01

    In order to facilitate effective tobacco cessation services within dental school clinics, it is necessary to understand the perceived barriers encountered by dental students while providing these services. The aim of this study was to identify which factors fourth-year dental students perceive to be associated with barriers to providing tobacco intervention services. A written survey was developed and completed by incoming fourth-year dental students (a convenience sample of seventy students) at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry in 2008. The survey assessed the perceived barriers to providing tobacco intervention services and related factors. Descriptive, bivariate, and linear regression analyses were conducted. The response rate was 97 percent. The most frequently reported barriers were patients' resistance to tobacco intervention services (96 percent), inadequate time available for tobacco intervention services (96 percent), and forgetting to give tobacco intervention advice (91 percent). The following variables were significantly (p<0.05) related to greater perceived barriers in providing tobacco intervention services: lower "adequacy of tobacco intervention curriculum coverage of specific topics covered over the previous three years" and greater "perceived importance of incorporating objective structured clinical examination teaching method for learning tobacco intervention." Students probably could benefit from additional didactic training, but most important may be enhanced clinical experiences and faculty reinforcement to facilitate effective practical student learning and adaptation for future delivery of intervention services in private practice settings.

  20. Information barriers and authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolford, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  1. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  2. Protective barrier development: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, N.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    Protective barrier and warning marker systems are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth's surface at the Hanford Site. The barrier is designed to function in an arid to semiarid climate, to limit infiltration and percolation of water through the waste zone to near-zero, to be maintenance free, and to last up to 10,000 yr. Natural materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, clay, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity and to create an integrated structure with redundant features. These materials isolate wastes by limiting water drainage; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling emission of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion. Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory efforts to assess the performance of various barrier and marker designs will be discussed

  3. Engineered barriers: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Marsh, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarises the current state of research relevant to assessing the performance of engineered barriers made of steel and concrete in radioactive waste repositories. The objective of these barriers is to contain the radionuclides within them by providing both physical and chemical impediment to their release. The physical barriers are of most value for highly soluble isotopes with relatively short half-lives (eg 137 Cs), since they can provide containment until a large fraction of the activity has decayed. In addition they can facilitate retrievability for some period after disposal. The chemical barriers operate by beneficial conditioning of the near field groundwater and providing sites for sorption of radionuclides. Both of these reduce the aqueous concentration of radionuclides in the near field. (author)

  4. SOLUTIONS TO OVERCOME BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION OF TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    To make treatment a viable option for remediation you must first identify the barriers to implementing treatment. The primary barrier is economics. Treatment options are relatively expensive and there is a lack of funds for treatment. The cost of technologies can be lowered by 1)...

  5. Skin barrier composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osburn, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    A skin barrier composition comprises a mixture of a copolymer resin of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA), and a water-insoluble dry tack-providing elastomer such as polyisobutylene. The composition after mixing and molding, is subjected to ionizing irradiation to form cross-linked polymer networks of the EVA. The compositions have exceptional properties for use as barrier sheets, rings, or strips in ostomy, wound drainage, and incontinence devices. (author)

  6. Skin barrier composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osburn, F G

    1985-06-12

    A skin barrier composition comprises a mixture of a copolymer resin of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA), and a water-insoluble dry tack-providing elastomer such as polyisobutylene. The composition after mixing and molding, is subjected to ionizing irradiation to form cross-linked polymer networks of the EVA. The compositions have exceptional properties for use as barrier sheets, rings, or strips in ostomy, wound drainage, and incontinence devices.

  7. The blood-tendon barrier: identification and characterisation of a novel tissue barrier in tendon blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lehner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue barriers function as “gate keepers” between different compartments (usually blood and tissue and are formed by specialised membrane-associated proteins, localising to the apicolateral plasma membrane domain of epithelial and endothelial cells. By sealing the paracellular space, the free diffusion of solutes and molecules across epithelia and endothelia is impeded. Thereby, tissue barriers contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a distinct internal and external environment, which is crucial during organ development and allows maintenance of an organ-specific homeostatic milieu. So far, various epithelial and endothelial tissue barriers have been described, including the blood-brain barrier, the blood-retina barrier, the blood-testis barrier, the blood-placenta barrier, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-brain barrier, which are vital for physiological function and any disturbance of these barriers can result in severe organ damage or even death. Here, we describe the identification of a novel barrier, located in the vascular bed of tendons, which we term the blood-tendon barrier (BTB. By using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and tracer studies we demonstrate the presence of a functional endothelial barrier within tendons restricting the passage of large blood-borne molecules into the surrounding tendon tissue. We further provide in vitro evidence that the BTB potentially contributes to the creation of a distinct internal tissue environment impacting upon the proliferation and differentiation of tendon-resident cells, effects which might be fundamental for the onset of tendon pathologies.

  8. The exposure of the Great Barrier Reef to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Mongin, Mathieu; Baird, Mark E.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Matear, Richard J.; Lenton, Andrew; Herzfeld, Mike; Wild-Allen, Karen; Skerratt, Jenny; Margvelashvili, Nugzar; Robson, Barbara J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Gustafsson, Malin S. M.; Ralph, Peter J.; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is founded on reef-building corals. Corals build their exoskeleton with aragonite, but ocean acidification is lowering the aragonite saturation state of seawater (Ωa). The downscaling of ocean acidification projections

  9. Arterial mapping of lower limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna Allen, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    A bibliographic review is realized in the arterial mapping of lower limbs by ultrasonographic. The physical properties of the Doppler effect applied to diagnostic ultrasound are described. The anatomical characteristics of the general arterial system and specifically of the lower limbs arterial system are mentioned. Pathologies of the ischemic arterial disease of lower limbs are explained. The study characteristics of lower limbs arterial mapping are documented to determine its importance as appropriate method for the assessment of lower limb ischemia. An adequate arterial mapping of lower limbs is recognized in atherosclerotic ischemic disease as a reliable initial method alternative to arteriography. Arteriography is considered as reference pattern for therapeutic decision making in patients with critical ischemia of the lower limbs. Non-invasive methods to assess the arterial system of lower limbs has evidenced the advantages of the arterial mapping with Doppler, according to the consulted literature. The combination morphological and hemodynamic information has been possible and a map of the explored zone is made. The arterial mapping by ultrasonography has offered similar reliability to angiography [es

  10. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  11. Fuzzy barrier distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piasecki, E.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions often produce a fusion barrier distribution with structures displaying a fingerprint of couplings to highly collective excitations [1]. Basically the same distribution can be obtained from large-angle quasi-elastic scattering, though here the role of the many weak direct-reaction channels is unclear. For 2 0N e + 9 0Z r we have observed the barrier structures expected for the highly deformed neon projectile, but for 2 0N e + 9 2Z r we find completely smooth distribution (see Fig.1). We find that transfer channels in these systems are of similar strength but single particle excitations are significantly stronger in the latter case. They apparently reduce the 'resolving power' of the quasi-elastic channel, what leads to smeared out, or 'fuzzy' barrier distribution. This is the first case when such a phenomenon has been observed.(author)

  12. Health Barriers to Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delaney Gracy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the results from a 2013 online survey with 408 principals and assistant principals in New York City public elementary and middle schools. The survey assessed three primary areas: health issues in the school, health issues perceived as barriers to learning for affected students, and resources needed to address these barriers. Eighteen of the 22 health conditions listed in the survey were considered a moderate or serious issue within their schools by at least 10% of respondents. All 22 of the health issues were perceived as a barrier to learning by between 12% and 87% of the respondents. Representatives from schools that serve a higher percentage of low-income students reported significantly higher levels of concern about the extent of health issues and their impact on learning. Respondents most often said they need linkages with organizations that can provide additional services and resources at the school, especially for mental health.

  13. Constructing bottom barriers with met grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibazaki, M.; Yoshida, H.

    1997-01-01

    Installing a bottom barrier using conventional high pressure jetting technology and ensuring barrier continuity is challenging. This paper describes technology that has been developed and demonstrated for the emplacement of bottom barriers using pressures and flow rates above the conventional high pressure jetting parameters. The innovation capable of creating an improved body exceeding 5 meters in diameter has resulted in the satisfying connection and adherence between the treated columns. Besides, the interfaces among the improved bodies obtain the same strength and permeability lower than 1 x 10 -7 cm/sec as body itself. A wide variety of the thickness and the diameter of the improved mass optimizes the application, and the method is nearing completion. The paper explains an aspect and briefs case histories

  14. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  15. Systematic review and meta-analysis shows a specific micronutrient profile in people with Down Syndrome: Lower blood calcium, selenium and zinc, higher red blood cell copper and zinc, and higher salivary calcium and sodium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amene Saghazadeh

    Full Text Available Different metabolic profiles as well as comorbidities are common in people with Down Syndrome (DS. Therefore it is relevant to know whether micronutrient levels in people with DS are also different. This systematic review was designed to review the literature on micronutrient levels in people with DS compared to age and sex-matched controls without DS. We identified sixty nine studies from January 1967 to April 2016 through main electronic medical databases PubMed, Scopus, and Web of knowledge. We carried out meta-analysis of the data on four essential trace elements (Cu, Fe, Se, and Zn, six minerals (Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Na, and P, and five vitamins (vitamin A, B9, B12, D, and E. People with DS showed lower blood levels of Ca (standard mean difference (SMD = -0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI: -1.16 to -0.09, Se (SMD = -0.99; 95% CI: -1.55 to -0.43, and Zn (SMD = -1.30; 95% CI: -1.75 to -0.84, while red cell levels of Zn (SMD = 1.88; 95% CI: 0.48 to 3.28 and Cu (SMD = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.57 were higher. They had also higher salivary levels of Ca (SMD = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.33 and Na (SMD = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.39 to 1.69. Our findings that micronutrient levels are different in people with DS raise the question whether these differences are related to the different metabolic profiles, the common comorbidities or merely reflect DS.

  16. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies from a rural Uganda prospective clinical cohort. ... Journal Home > Vol 13, No 2 (2013) > ... should target specific personal barriers to ART adherence like: lack of family support, health and sexual life concerns, desire to have children and family instability.

  17. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    among women in Kumasi, Ghana using a mixed methods approach. *Williams M1 ... Conclusion: The results of this study can be used to inform the development of culturally relevant cervical cancer education ... psychological barriers, and specific cultural barriers to ... Technology reviewed the interview guide to establish.

  18. Empirical investigation of energy efficiency barriers in Italian manufacturing SMEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trianni, Andrea; Cagno, Enrico; Worrell, Ernst; Pugliese, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The paper identifies and evaluates barriers to industrial energy efficiency through the investigation of 48 manufacturing Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) in Northern Italy. The research provides interesting suggestions both for enterprises and energy policy-makers. Firstly, economic and information barriers are perceived as the major obstacles to the adoption of energy-efficient technologies, whilst behavioural barriers do not seem to affect enterprises very much. Nonetheless, despite what declared, the most relevant barriers are the lack of interest in energy efficiency and the existence of other priorities, thus showing that decision-makers tend to downgrade energy efficiency to a marginal issue. Furthermore, perceived barriers do not take place exclusively in implementing energy-efficient technologies, but, with comparable importance, also in generating the interest and knowledge of the opportunities. Moreover, the study highlights that relevant differences can be appreciated for both perceived and real barriers even among SMEs, that thus should not be bundled together. In addition to that, other factors affect barriers, stimulating future research: indeed, lower real barriers can be observed with higher complexity of the production, high variability of the demand and strong competitors. -- Highlights: ► Evidence of existing misalignments between perceived and real barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient technologies. ► Relevance of barriers to the generation of interest towards energy efficiency. ► Evidence of firm's size (within SMEs) and energy expenditures on barriers to energy efficiency. ► Importance, for energy efficiency barriers, of avoid bundling SMEs as a whole. ► Preliminary evidence of factors related to supply chain complexity affecting barriers to energy efficiency.

  19. Barriers to HIV testing in Cote d'Ivoire: the role of individual characteristics and testing modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin Jean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expanding HIV testing requires a better understanding of barriers to its uptake. We investigated barriers to HIV testing in Côte d'Ivoire, taking into account test circumstances (client vs. provider-initiated. METHODS: We used data from the 2005 nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey conducted in Côte d'Ivoire. Socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS associated with recent (<2 years HIV testing were identified using gender-specific univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Among women, differential effects of barriers to testing according to test circumstance (whether they have been offered for a prenatal test or not were assessed through interaction tests. RESULTS: Recent HIV testing was reported by 6.1% of men and 9.5% of women (including 4.6% as part of antenatal care. Among men, having a low socioeconomic status, having a low HIV-related knowledge level and being employed [compared to those inactive: adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.25-0.87] were associated with lower proportions of recent HIV testing. Among women without a prenatal HIV testing offer, living outside the capital (aOR 0.38; CI 0.19-0.77 and reporting a unique lifetime sexual partner constituted additional barriers to HIV testing. By contrast, among women recently offered to be tested in prenatal care, none of these variables was found to be associated with recent HIV testing. CONCLUSIONS: Various dimensions of individuals' characteristics constituted significant barriers to HIV testing in Côte d'Ivoire in 2005, with gender specificities. Such barriers are substantially reduced when testing was proposed in the framework of antenatal care. This suggests that provider-initiated testing strategies may help overcome individual barriers to HIV testing.

  20. Barriers to innovation in human rabies prophylaxis and treatment: A causal analysis of insights from key opinion leaders and literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Burgwal, L H M; Neevel, A M G; Pittens, C A C M; Osterhaus, A D M E; Rupprecht, C E; Claassen, E

    2017-12-01

    Rabies is an essentially 100% fatal, zoonotic disease, caused by Lyssaviruses. Currently, the disease is vaccine-preventable with pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and PEP). Still, rabies virus is estimated to cause up to 60,000 human deaths annually, of which the vast majority occurs in rural Asia and Africa, due to the inaccessibility of prophylaxis and non-existence of treatment. Despite these unmet clinical needs, rabies control mainly focuses on the sylvatic reservoir and drug innovation receives relatively little attention compared to other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). As such, the lag of innovation in human rabies prophylaxis and treatment cannot be explained by limited return on investment alone. Strategies countering rabies-specific innovation barriers are important for the acceleration of innovation in human rabies prophylaxis and treatment. Barriers throughout society, science, business development and market domains were identified through literature review and 23 semi-structured interviews with key opinion leaders worldwide. A subsequent root cause analysis revealed causal relations between innovation barriers and a limited set of root causes. Finally, prioritization by experts indicated their relative importance. Root causes, which are fundamental to barriers, were aggregated into four types: market and commercial, stakeholder collaboration, public health and awareness, and disease trajectory. These were found in all domains of the innovation process and thus are relevant for all stakeholders. This study identifies barriers that were not previously described in this specific context, for example the competition for funding between medical and veterinary approaches. The results stress the existence of barriers beyond the limited return on investment and thereby explain why innovation in human rabies medication is lagging behind NTDs with a lower burden of disease. A re-orientation on the full spectrum of barriers that hinder innovation in

  1. Barrier Data Base user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrell, R.B.; Gould, D.J.; Wall, D.W.

    1977-06-01

    A special purpose data base for physical security barriers has been developed. In addition to barriers, the entities accommodated by the Barrier Data Base (BDB) include threats and references. A threat is established as a configuration of people and equipment which has been employed to penetrate (or attempt to penetrate) a barrier. References are used to cite publications pertinent to the barriers and threats in the data base. Utilization and maintenance of the Barrier Data Base is achieved with LIST, QUERY, ENTER, DELETE, and CHANGE commands which are used to manipulate the data base entities

  2. Transculturalization and validation of a Spanish translation of the specific lower limb osteoarthritis and quality of life questionnaire AMICAL: Arthrose des Membres Inférieurs et Qualité de vie AMIQUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cuervo, Gisela; Guillermin, Francis; Rat, Anne-Christine; Duarte-Salazar, Carolina; Alemán-Hernández, Sylvia-I; Vergara-Álvarez, Yuriria; Goycochea-Robles, María-Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Several generic questionnaires have been used to measure quality of life in patients with Osteoarthritis (OA) since few instruments have been developed specifically for OA and none was developed for Spanish speaking patients. The purpose of the study was to validate and adapt to Spanish the French questionnaire AMICAL to measure quality of life in patients with hip and knee OA. Transversal, analytical study. The validation process was performed in phases: translation from French to Spanish, translated version analysis by a multidisciplinary expert team, application of a pilot test to patients to evaluate grammatical and content equivalence, blind back translation, and analysis. The questionnaire was applied to hip and knee OA patients, together with the SF-36 questionnaire, as well as the WOMAC and the Lequesne indexes. The reproducibility was evaluated applying the questionnaire after 72hours. The clinimetric analysis was calculated with SPSS 16.0. One hundred patients with hip OA and 100 patients with knee OA, radiological stages ii-iii, were included to evaluate homogeneity. Sixty-five patients with hip OA and 65 patients with knee OA were included to evaluate consistency. The final sample included 100 hip and 100 patients knee OA patients to estimate homogeneities and 65 patients were evaluated to estimate consistency. Mean (SD) age of patients with hip and knee OA, was 56.34 ± 13 and 60.1 ± 9.2, respectively. Sixty seven percent and 79.8% were female, respectively. Cronbach' alpha for AMICAL was 0.946 and 0.999, for hip OA and knee OA, respectively; and test-retest reliability using the intraclass correlation coefficients was 0.979 and 0.998, respectively. There was also a significant correlation with all the instruments (P<.05), except with the Lequesne index (r-0.383). The Spanish version of AMICAL questionnaire keep the clinimetric properties, homogeneity, and consistency, and has a good correlation with other instruments. Consequently, it is reliable

  3. Barriers to treatment for older adults seeking psychological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, Viviana M; Frei, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Older adults with mental health disorders underutilize mental health services more than other adults. While there are well known general barriers to help seeking across the population, specific barriers for older adults include difficulties with transportation, beliefs that it is normal to be anxious and depressed in old age, and beliefs by referrers that psychological therapy is less likely to be effective. This study examined barriers related to identifying the need for help, seeking help and participating in therapy in a clinical population of older adults. Sixty older adults (aged 60-79 years) with comorbid anxiety and unipolar mood disorders completed barriers to treatment questionnaires before and after psychological group treatment, as well as measures of cognitive ability, anxiety, depression, and quality of life at baseline. The greatest barriers to help seeking related to difficulties identifying the need for help, with 50% of the sample reporting their belief that their symptoms were normal as a major barrier. Other major barriers identified were related to: self-reliance, cost of treatment, and fear of medication replicating previous findings. The main barriers reported for difficulties in continuing therapy included not finding therapy helpful, cost of treatment, and thinking that the therapist did not understand their issues. The main barriers identified related to issues with identifying the need to seek help. More attention is needed to educate older adults and professionals about the need for, and effectiveness of, psychological therapies for older adults with anxiety and depression to reduce this barrier to help seeking.

  4. Study of the dynamical potential barriers in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Long; Su, Jun; Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus–nucleus interaction potentials for the fusion reactions 16 O + 208 Pb, 64 Ni + 64 Ni, 58 Ni + 58 Ni and 16 O + 154 Sm are extracted from the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The shell correction effects are discussed. The negative shell correction energies lower potential barriers of a certain reaction. The incident energy dependence of the potential barrier is investigated for each system. A complex phenomenon of energy dependence is observed. It is also found that incident energy dependence of the barrier radius and barrier height shows opposite behaviors. The Coulomb potential shows weak energy dependence when distance of two colliding nuclei is lower than the touching distance. The isospin effects of the potential barrier are investigated. The orientation effects of the potential barrier is also discussed for the system 16 O + 154 Sm. The fusion cross sections that correspond to the equatorial orientation of 154 Sm are very low in sub-barrier region because of the high fusion barriers and the shallow potential pockets

  5. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  6. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  7. Barrier performance researches for the safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibori, Yuichi

    2004-01-01

    So far, many researches were conducted to propose a scientific evidence (a safety case) for the realization of geological disposal in Japan. In order to regulate the geological disposal system of radioactive wastes, on the other hand, we need also a holistic approach to integrate various data related for the performance evaluations of the engineered barrier system and the natural barrier system. However, the scientific bases are not sufficient to establish the safety regulation for such a natural system. For example, we often apply the specific probability density function (PDF) to the uncertainty of barrier system due to the essential heterogeneity. However, the applicability is not clear in the regulation point of view. A viewpoint to understand such an applicability of PDFs has been presented. (author)

  8. Membrane barriers for radon gas flow restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Research was performed to assess the feasibility of barrier membrane substances, for use within mining or associated high risk environments, in restricting the diffusion transport of radon gas quantities. Specific tests were conducted to determine permeability parameters of a variety of membrane materials with reference to radon flow capabilities. Tests were conducted both within laboratory and in-situ emanation environments where concentrations and diffusion flows of radon gas were known to exist. Equilibrium radon gas concentrations were monitored in initially radon-free chambers adjacent to gas sources, but separated by specified membrane substances. Membrane barrier effectiveness was demonstrated to result in reduced emanation concentrations of radon gas within the sampling chamber atmosphere. Minimum gas concentrations were evidenced where the barrier membrane material was shown to exhibit lowest radon permeability characteristics

  9. Efficient sound barrier calculations with the BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2018-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method has been used for calculating the effect of introducing sound barriers for some decades. The method has also been used for optimizing the shape of the barrier and in some cases the effects of introducing sound absorption. However, numerical calculations are still quite...... time consuming and inconvenient to use, which is limiting their use for many practical problems. Moreover, measurements are mostly taken in one-third or full octave bands opposed to the numerical computations at specific frequencies, which then has to be conducted using a fine density in frequencies....... This paper addresses some of the challenges and possible solutions for developing BEM into a more efficient tool for sound barrier calculations....

  10. Opportunities and barriers for international bioenergy trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, Martin; Dam, Jinke van; Zarrilli, Simonetta; Ali Mohamed, Fatin; Marchal, Didier; Faaij, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the international trade of various bioenergy commodities has grown rapidly, yet this growth is also hampered by some barriers. The aim of this paper is to obtain an overview of what market actors currently perceive as major opportunities and barriers for the development of international bioenergy trade. The work focuses on three bioenergy commodities: bioethanol, biodiesel and wood pellets. Data were collected through an internet-based questionnaire. The majority of the 141 respondents had an industrial background. Geographically, two-thirds were from (mainly Western) Europe, with other minor contributions from all other continents. Results show that import tariffs and the implementation of sustainability certification systems are perceived as (potentially) major barriers for the trade of bioethanol and biodiesel, while logistics are seen mainly as an obstacle for wood pellets. Development of technical standards was deemed more as an opportunity than a barrier for all commodities. Most important drivers were high fossil fuel prices and climate change mitigation policies. Concluding, to overcome some of the barriers, specific actions will be required by market parties and policy makers. Import tariffs for biofuels could be reduced or abolished, linked to multinational trade agreements and harmonization (including provisions on technical standards and sustainability requirements). - Research highlights: → We analyze main barriers for global trade of wood pellets, ethanol and biodiesel. → Import tariffs can be a major barrier for liquid biofuels trade. → Implementation of sustainability certification systems may hamper biofuels trade. → Logistics are seen mainly as an obstacle for the trade of wood pellets. → Development of technical standards are deemed an opportunity for bioenergy trade.

  11. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbaldestin, A H; Adamson, L N C

    2013-01-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation. (paper)

  12. Lower Churchill project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, B. [Nalcor Energy, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses the Lower Churchill Hydroelectric Generation Project in Newfoundland Labrador. The project is of national interest as it creates jobs and benefits across Canada. It provides inter provincial electricity grid integration, provides significant contribution to lower emissions and enables development of other renewable generation.

  13. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Barrier properties of cultured retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2014-09-01

    The principal function of an epithelium is to form a dynamic barrier that regulates movement between body compartments. Each epithelium is specialized with barrier functions that are specific for the tissues it serves. The apical surface commonly faces a lumen, but the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) appears to be unique by a facing solid tissue, the sensory retina. Nonetheless, there exists a thin (subretinal) space that can become fluid filled during pathology. RPE separates the subretinal space from the blood supply of the outer retina, thereby forming the outer blood-retinal barrier. The intricate interaction between the RPE and sensory retina presents challenges for learning how accurately culture models reflect native behavior. The challenge is heightened by findings that detail the variation of RPE barrier proteins both among species and at different stages of the life cycle. Among the striking differences is the expression of claudin family members. Claudins are the tight junction proteins that regulate ion diffusion across the spaces that lie between the cells of a monolayer. Claudin expression by RPE varies with species and life-stage, which implies functional differences among commonly used animal models. Investigators have turned to transcriptomics to supplement functional studies when comparing native and cultured tissue. The most detailed studies of the outer blood-retinal barrier have focused on human RPE with transcriptome and functional studies reported for human fetal, adult, and stem-cell derived RPE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of engineered sorbent barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.O.; Freeman, H.D.

    1988-08-01

    A sorbent barrier uses sorbent material such as activated carbon or natural zeolites to prevent the migration of radionuclides from a low-level waste site to the aquifer. The sorbent barrier retards the movement of radioactive contaminants, thereby providing time for the radionuclides to decay. Sorbent barriers can be a simple, effective, and inexpensive method for reducing the migration of radionuclides to the environment. Designing a sorbent barrier consists of using soil and sorbent material properties and site conditions as input to a model which will determine the necessary sorbent barrier thickness to meet contaminant limits. The paper will cover the following areas: techniques for measuring sorption properties of barrier materials and underlying soils, use of a radionuclide transport model to determine the required barrier thickness and performance under a variety of site conditions, and cost estimates for applying the barrier. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Design of engineered sorbent barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.O.; Freeman, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    A sorbent barrier uses sorbent material such as activated carbon or natural zeolites to prevent the migration of radionuclides from a low-level waste site to the aquifer. The sorbent barrier retards the movement of radioactive contaminants, thereby providing time for the radionuclides to decay. Sorbent barriers can be a simple, effective, and inexpensive method for reducing the migration of radionuclides to the environment. Designing a sorbent barrier consists of using soil and sorbent material properties and site conditions as input to a model which will determine the necessary sorbent barrier thickness to meet contaminant limits. The paper covers the following areas: techniques for measuring sorption properties of barrier materials and underlying soils, use of a radionuclide transport model to determine the required barrier thickness and performance under a variety of site conditions, and cost estimates for applying the barrier

  17. Removing barriers to women entrepreneurs’ engagement in decentralized sustainable energy solutions for the poor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Glemarec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available  Rapidly falling renewable technology costs and new business models mean that decentralized energy solutions hold great promise to accelerate universal sustainable energy access. Across developing countries, women are typically the primary household energy managers. Close to their customers, women entrepreneurs have the potential to lower customer acquisition and servicing costs and drive these new decentralized solutions. However, they remain under-represented in the industry. This paper attempts to understand the root causes of this gender gap. It formulates the research hypothesis that market transformation policies intended to reduce investment risks to accelerate energy access may not benefit men and women entrepreneurs equally because of the existing structural barriers that women face. To test this hypothesis, the paper conducts a gender sensitive investment barrier and risk analysis, overlaid onto an existing gender neutral taxonomy of investment barriers and risks for decentralized sustainable energy solutions. A key finding is that for women entrepreneurs, existing structural impediments to gender equality translate into additional investment barriers as well as increased likelihood of occurrence and severity of the financial impact of generic investment risks. The paper offers an illustrative theory of change to facilitate a dialogue on the specific interventions needed to address these gender differentiated risks locally. It concludes that market transformation efforts for universal sustainable energy access must include targeted policy measures to ensure equal benefits to men and women entrepreneurs, and optimize the use of public resources to catalyze private investment and reduce poverty.

  18. Politics and patriarchy: barriers to health screening for socially disadvantaged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kathleen

    2012-10-01

    Health screening and early detection of cancer results in significantly better health outcomes and lower mortality. However barriers to such screening are multiple and complex. This paper specifically addresses barriers to women's health screening for socially disadvantaged women in an economically and service disadvantaged area. In this qualitative study, women's healthcare workers and consumers of women's health screening were interviewed and data related to issues for women who had special needs were analysed. Findings indicate there is a lack of access to appropriate services for socially disadvantaged women which affects their screening uptake rates. This study also highlights the difficulties socially disadvantaged women encountered when they were able to access these services which also influenced their decisions regarding subsequent health screening. Implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals are manifold and include advocating for greater access to services and more sensitive care in the delivery of health screening services for socially disadvantaged women.

  19. Energy barrier to decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizel, Ari; Mitchell, M. W.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a ground-state approach to realizing quantum computers. This scheme is time-independent and inherently defends against decoherence by possessing an energy barrier to excitation. We prove that our time-independent qubits can perform the same algorithms as their time-dependent counterparts. Advantages and disadvantages of the time-independent approach are described. A model involving quantum dots is provided for illustration

  20. Performance of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, V.; Dean, P.V.; McLellan, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Engineered barriers, both vertical and horizontal, have been used to isolate hazardous wastes from contact, precipitation, surface water and groundwater. The primary objective of this study was to determine the performance of subsurface barriers installed throughout the U.S. over the past 20 years to contain hazardous wastes. Evaluation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C or equivalent caps was a secondary objective. A nationwide search was launched to select hazardous waste sites at which vertical barrier walls and/or caps had been used as the containment method. None of the sites selected had an engineered floor. From an initial list of 130 sites, 34 sites were selected on the basis of availability of monitoring data for detailed analysis of actual field performance. This paper will briefly discuss preliminary findings regarding the design, construction quality assurance/construction quality control (CQA/CQC), and monitoring at the 34 sites. In addition, the short-term performance of these sites (less than 5 years) is presented since very little long-term performance data was available

  1. Fluctuations in Schottky barrier heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    A double Schottky barrier is often formed at the grain boundary in polycrystalline semiconductors. The barrier height is shown to fluctuate in value due to the random nature of the impurity positions. The magnitude of the fluctuations is 0.1 eV, and the fluctuations cause the barrier height measured by capacitance to differ from the one measured by electrical conductivity

  2. Barriers to medication error reporting among hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Dana N; Retrosi, Tina; Ostrowski, Gary

    2018-03-01

    The study purpose was to report medication error reporting barriers among hospital nurses, and to determine validity and reliability of an existing medication error reporting barriers questionnaire. Hospital medication errors typically occur between ordering of a medication to its receipt by the patient with subsequent staff monitoring. To decrease medication errors, factors surrounding medication errors must be understood; this requires reporting by employees. Under-reporting can compromise patient safety by disabling improvement efforts. This 2017 descriptive study was part of a larger workforce engagement study at a faith-based Magnet ® -accredited community hospital in California (United States). Registered nurses (~1,000) were invited to participate in the online survey via email. Reported here are sample demographics (n = 357) and responses to the 20-item medication error reporting barriers questionnaire. Using factor analysis, four factors that accounted for 67.5% of the variance were extracted. These factors (subscales) were labelled Fear, Cultural Barriers, Lack of Knowledge/Feedback and Practical/Utility Barriers; each demonstrated excellent internal consistency. The medication error reporting barriers questionnaire, originally developed in long-term care, demonstrated good validity and excellent reliability among hospital nurses. Substantial proportions of American hospital nurses (11%-48%) considered specific factors as likely reporting barriers. Average scores on most barrier items were categorised "somewhat unlikely." The highest six included two barriers concerning the time-consuming nature of medication error reporting and four related to nurses' fear of repercussions. Hospitals need to determine the presence of perceived barriers among nurses using questionnaires such as the medication error reporting barriers and work to encourage better reporting. Barriers to medication error reporting make it less likely that nurses will report medication

  3. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  4. Transport barriers in bootstrap-driven tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, G. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Pan, C.; McClenaghan, J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Lao, L. L.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments have demonstrated improved energy confinement due to the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier in high bootstrap fraction discharges. Gyrokinetic analysis, and quasilinear predictive modeling, demonstrates that the observed transport barrier is caused by the suppression of turbulence primarily from the large Shafranov shift. It is shown that the Shafranov shift can produce a bifurcation to improved confinement in regions of positive magnetic shear or a continuous reduction in transport for weak or negative magnetic shear. Operation at high safety factor lowers the pressure gradient threshold for the Shafranov shift-driven barrier formation. Two self-organized states of the internal and edge transport barrier are observed. It is shown that these two states are controlled by the interaction of the bootstrap current with magnetic shear, and the kinetic ballooning mode instability boundary. Election scale energy transport is predicted to be dominant in the inner 60% of the profile. Evidence is presented that energetic particle-driven instabilities could be playing a role in the thermal energy transport in this region.

  5. Students' benefits and barriers to mental health help-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Nabors, Laura A.; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is recognized as a potential barrier to seeking help for a mental health disorder. The present study assessed college students' perceived benefits and barriers to obtaining mental health treatment and stigma-related attitudes via a four-page survey. A total of 682 students at one Midwestern university participated in the study. Findings indicated that females perceived a greater number of benefits to having participated in mental health services and held significantly lower stigma-rela...

  6. Surface barrier research at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, G.W.; Ward, A.L.; Fayer, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    At the DOE Hanford Site, a field-scale prototype surface barrier was constructed in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a CERCLA treatability test. The above-grade barrier consists of a fine-soil layer overlying coarse layers of sands, gravels, basalt rock (riprap), and a low permeability asphalt layer. Two sideslope configurations, clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope, were built and are being tested. Design considerations included: constructability; drainage and water balance monitoring, wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation and biotic intrusion; subsidence and sideslope stability, and durability of the asphalt layer. The barrier is currently in the final year of a three-year test designed to answer specific questions related to stability and long-term performance. One half of the barrier is irrigated such that the total water applied, including precipitation, is 480 mm/yr (three times the long-term annual average). Each year for the past two years, an extreme precipitation event (71 mm in 8 hr) representing a 1,000-yr return storm was applied in late March, when soil water storage was at a maximum. While the protective sideslopes have drained significant amounts of water, the soil cover (2-m of silt-loam soil overlying coarse sand and rock) has never drained. During the past year there was no measurable surface runoff or wind erosion. This is attributed to extensive revegetation of the surface. In addition, the barrier elevation has shown a small increase of 2 to 3 cm that is attributed to a combination of root proliferation and freeze/thaw activity. Testing will continue through September 1997. Performance data from the prototype barrier will be used by DOE in site-closure decisions at Hanford

  7. Barriers to accessing urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Michael J; Syed, Kirin K; Robison, Christopher; McFadden, Jacob; Shalowitz, David I; Brown, Gordon A; Sussman, David O; Figler, Bradley D

    2016-01-01

    Urethroplasty is an effective treatment for men with anterior urethral strictures, but is utilized less frequently than ineffective treatments such as internal urethrotomy. We sought to identify provider-level barriers to urethroplasty. An anonymous online survey was emailed to all Mid-Atlantic American Urological Association members. Six scenarios in which urethroplasty was the most appropriate treatment were presented. Primary outcome was recommendation for urethroplasty in ≥ three clinical scenarios. Other factors measured include practice zip code, urethroplasty training, and proximity to a urethroplasty surgeon. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors associated with increased likelihood of urethroplasty recommendation. Of 670 members emailed, 109 (16%) completed the survey. Final analysis included 88 respondents. Mean years in practice was 17.2. Most respondents received formal training in urethroplasty: 43 (49%) in residency, 5 (6%) in fellowship, and 10 (11%) in both; 48 respondents (55%) had a urethroplasty surgeon in their practice, whereas 18 (20%) had a urethroplasty surgeon within 45 minutes of his or her primary practice location. The only covariate that was associated with an increased likelihood of recommending urethroplasty in ≥ three scenarios was formal urethroplasty training. Most members (68%) reported no barriers to referring patients for urethroplasty; the most common barriers cited were long distance to urethroplasty surgeon (n 5 13, 15%) and concern about complications (n 5 8, 9%). Urethroplasty continues to be underutilized in men with anterior urethral strictures, potentially due to lack of knowledge dissemination and access to a urethroplasty surgeon. Appropriate urethroplasty utilization may increase with greater exposure to urethroplasty in training.

  8. Racial Trade Barriers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jacob Halvas

    . This paper analyzes the racial policies pursued in the foreign trade and argues that we need to recognize Aryanization as a world-wide policy in order to fully understand its character and possible consequences. I focus on the pre-war period and analyze the case of Denmark from three different perspectives......: perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The analysis will show that race, economy and foreign trade were combined in an attempt to raise racial trade barriers. This forced the question of German racial policies on the Danish government, Danish-Jewish businesses, and German companies involved in foreign trade...

  9. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  10. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 5 mediates the immune quiescence of the human brain endothelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Doorn Ruben

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptor modulator FTY720P (Gilenya® potently reduces relapse rate and lesion activity in the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis. Although most of its efficacy has been shown to be related to immunosuppression through the induction of lymphopenia, it has been suggested that a number of its beneficial effects are related to altered endothelial and blood–brain barrier (BBB functionality. However, to date it remains unknown whether brain endothelial S1P receptors are involved in the maintenance of the function of the BBB thereby mediating immune quiescence of the brain. Here we demonstrate that the brain endothelial receptor S1P5 largely contributes to the maintenance of brain endothelial barrier function. Methods We analyzed the expression of S1P5 in human post-mortem tissues using immunohistochemistry. The function of S1P5 at the BBB was assessed in cultured human brain endothelial cells (ECs using agonists and lentivirus-mediated knockdown of S1P5. Subsequent analyses of different aspects of the brain EC barrier included the formation of a tight barrier, the expression of BBB proteins and markers of inflammation and monocyte transmigration. Results We show that activation of S1P5 on cultured human brain ECs by a selective agonist elicits enhanced barrier integrity and reduced transendothelial migration of monocytes in vitro. These results were corroborated by genetically silencing S1P5 in brain ECs. Interestingly, functional studies with these cells revealed that S1P5 strongly contributes to brain EC barrier function and underlies the expression of specific BBB endothelial characteristics such as tight junctions and permeability. In addition, S1P5 maintains the immunoquiescent state of brain ECs with low expression levels of leukocyte adhesion molecules and inflammatory chemokines and cytokines through lowering the activation of the transcription factor NFκB. Conclusion Our

  11. Selecting Lower Priced Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Harold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program used to teach moderately to severely mentally handicapped students to select the lower priced items in actual shopping activities is described. Through a five-phase process, students are taught to compare prices themselves as well as take into consideration variations in the sizes of containers and varying product weights. (VW)

  12. Horizontal Acoustic Barriers for Protection from Seismic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Kuznetsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic idea of a seismic barrier is to protect an area occupied by a building or a group of buildings from seismic waves. Depending on nature of seismic waves that are most probable in a specific region, different kinds of seismic barriers can be suggested. Herein, we consider a kind of a seismic barrier that represents a relatively thin surface layer that prevents surface seismic waves from propagating. The ideas for these barriers are based on one Chadwick's result concerning nonpropagation condition for Rayleigh waves in a clamped half-space, and Love's theorem that describes condition of nonexistence for Love waves. The numerical simulations reveal that to be effective the length of the horizontal barriers should be comparable to the typical wavelength.

  13. Stability of barrier buckets with zero RF-barrier separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    A barrier bucket with very small separation between the rf barriers (relative to the barrier widths) or even zero separation has its synchrotron tune decreasing rather slowly from a large value towards the boundary of the bucket. As a result, large area at the bucket edges can become unstable under the modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. In addition, chaotic regions may form near the bucket center and extend outward under increasing modulation. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in the process of momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  14. Greatest barrier is retaining young scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mark; Hopper, John

    The National Science Foundation's top priorities as listed by director Neal Lane in Eos (November 9) are to strengthen NSF and its support of scientific research and education, to better articulate to the public why it is so important that support of science and engineering be strengthened, and to continue to lower barriers that discourage young people from choosing careers in science.While we firmly support the first two priorities, we are concerned about the underlying assumptions and implications of the third. Barriers discouraging women and minorities from considering careers in math and science do exist within our educational system, and there is now abundant statistical evidence showing these groups are under-represented in most fields of science. However, as stated in the Eos article, solving these problems and leveling the playing field is not the primary goal of the NSF policy.

  15. Transport Barriers in Bootstrap Driven Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, Gary

    2017-10-01

    Maximizing the bootstrap current in a tokamak, so that it drives a high fraction of the total current, reduces the external power required to drive current by other means. Improved energy confinement, relative to empirical scaling laws, enables a reactor to more fully take advantage of the bootstrap driven tokamak. Experiments have demonstrated improved energy confinement due to the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier in high bootstrap fraction discharges. Gyrokinetic analysis, and quasilinear predictive modeling, demonstrates that the observed transport barrier is due to the suppression of turbulence primarily due to the large Shafranov shift. ExB velocity shear does not play a significant role in the transport barrier due to the high safety factor. It will be shown, that the Shafranov shift can produce a bifurcation to improved confinement in regions of positive magnetic shear or a continuous reduction in transport for weak or negative magnetic shear. Operation at high safety factor lowers the pressure gradient threshold for the Shafranov shift driven barrier formation. The ion energy transport is reduced to neoclassical and electron energy and particle transport is reduced, but still turbulent, within the barrier. Deeper into the plasma, very large levels of electron transport are observed. The observed electron temperature profile is shown to be close to the threshold for the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode. A large ETG driven energy transport is qualitatively consistent with recent multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations showing that reducing the ion scale turbulence can lead to large increase in the electron scale transport. A new saturation model for the quasilinear TGLF transport code, that fits these multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations, can match the data if the impact of zonal flow mixing on the ETG modes is reduced at high safety factor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-FC02

  16. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  17. Performing a local barrier operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  18. Predictors of physical activity and barriers to exercise in nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Mcgill, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    To investigate physical activity levels of nursing and medicine students, examine predictors of physical activity level and examine the most influential benefits and barriers to exercise. Healthcare professionals have low levels of physical activity, which increases their health risk and may influence their health promotion practices with patients. We surveyed 361 nursing (n = 193) and medicine (n = 168) students studying at a UK medical school. Questionnaire survey, active over 12 months in 2014-2015. Measures included physical activity level, benefits and barriers to exercise, social support, perceived stress and self-efficacy for exercise. Many nursing and medicine students did not achieve recommended levels of physical activity (nursing 48%; medicine 38%). Perceived benefits of exercise were health related, with medicine students identifying additional benefits for stress relief. Most notable barriers to exercise were as follows: lack of time, facilities having inconvenient schedules and exercise not fitting around study or placement schedules. Nursing students were less active than medicine students; they perceived fewer benefits and more barriers to exercise and reported lower social support for exercise. Physical activity of nursing and medicine students was best predicted by self-efficacy and social support, explaining 35% of the variance. Physical activity should be promoted in nursing and medicine students. Interventions should aim to build self-efficacy for exercise and increase social support. Interventions should be developed that are targeted specifically to shift-working frontline care staff, to reduce schedule-related barriers to exercise and to increase accessibility to workplace health and well-being initiatives. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Chandra M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications

  20. Tunnel superpenetrability of potential barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhariev, B N.

    1982-01-01

    The transmission of two particles through the same barrier is considered. The limiting cases are compared when the particles are joined together in a single particle with double mass-energy and potential and when they pass the barrier independently. As an intermediate case a pair of particles bound in a quasideuteron of a finite size is considered. It is shown that long-range collective correlations of particles (of the superfluidity type and others) simplify very much for them passing through high potential barriers. This happens due to the transfer of the additional energy from the particles outside the barriers to those inside it

  1. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools...... this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and organizational environment....

  2. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... groups, the sociology of work needs to develop a better understanding of the way in which linguistic diversity influences the formation of social capital, i.e. resources such as the trust and reciprocity inherent in social relations in such workplaces. Drawing on theories about intergroup contact...... and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst...

  3. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  4. Countermeasures and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  5. Thames barrier (flood protection barriers on the Thames)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the flood protection barriers on the Thames are presented. The flood protection system on the Thames in 1984 was commissioned. During two decades this barrier was used 54 times against to the high water and 34 times against storm-sewage. There is installed buttress type hydroelectric power plant

  6. Barriers to Participation in Parenting Programs: The Relationship between Parenting Stress, Perceived Barriers, and Program Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Whitney L; Moreland, Angela D; Valle, Linda Anne; Chaffin, Mark J

    2018-04-01

    Families experiencing child maltreatment or risk factors for child maltreatment often receive referrals to interventions focused on changing parenting practices. Compliance with specific parenting programs can be challenging as many of the stressors that place families at-risk may also interfere with program participation. Because families may receive limited benefit from programs they do not fully receive, it is critical to understand the relationship between parenting stress and barriers to program completion. We used structural equation modeling to examine the relationship among parenting stress, perceived barriers to program participation, and program completion in two datasets involving low-income parents. Data were collected at two time points from a sample of parents involved with child welfare services and a sample of parents considered at-risk of future involvement (total study n = 803). Direct paths from parenting stress at time 1 to barriers to participation and parenting stress at time 2, and from parenting stress at time 2 to program completion were significant. Interestingly, increased barriers to participation were related to increased parenting stress at time 2, and greater parenting stress was related to increased program completion. Results suggest that with increasing levels of parenting stress, parents have an increased likelihood of completing the program. Assessing and addressing the influence of perceived barriers and parenting stress on program participation may decrease the likelihood of treatment attrition.

  7. Barriers to the adoption of low carbon production: A multiple-case study of Chinese industrial firms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This study employs a multiple-case study method, identifies barriers to the adoption of low carbon production, and categorizes these barriers into four domains: structural, regulatory, cultural, and contextual. The two most frequently mentioned barriers were “lack of financial incentives to stimulate low carbon innovation” and “lack of a common definition of low carbon production”. The two least frequently mentioned barriers were “silos exist between planning and production” and “operational staff are often physically separated from planning staff, which isolates them from planning decisions”. Furthermore, contextual barriers were significantly related to structural and regulatory barriers, while regulatory barriers were significantly related to structural barriers. Larger firms tend to have a more structured organization and lower perceptions of the employment term barrier. However, larger structured organizations have been affected by a long history of a planning-oriented economy and hence tend to have inflexible hierarchical systems. In contrast, small firms have hierarchical systems with less effect on low carbon production than those of large enterprises. Another interesting trend is the direct size effect on cultural barriers, which is evident in a culture of risk aversion, as well as the lack of low carbon technology and the existence of silos between planning and production. - Highlights: • Barriers were categorized as structural, regulatory, cultural and contextual. • Contextual barriers were significantly related to structural and regulatory barriers. • Regulatory barriers were significantly related to structural barriers. • Firm size directly affected firm hierarchical systems and cultural barriers

  8. Fluoride barriers in Nb/Pb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, H.; Tanabe, K.; Michikami, O.; Igarashi, M.; Beasley, M. R.

    1985-03-01

    Josephson tunnel junctions are fabricated using a new class of artificial barriers, metal fluorides (Al fluoride and Zr fluoride). These fluoride barriers are deposited on the surface of a Nb base electrode, which are previously cleaned using a CF4 cleaning process, and covered by a Pb counterelectrode. The junctions with both Al fluoride and Zr fluoride barriers exhibit good tunneling characteristics and have low specific capacitance. In the case of Zr fluoride, it is observed that reasonable resistances are obtained even at thickness greater than 100 A. This phenomenon might be explained by tunneling via localized states in Zr fluoride.

  9. The Neanderthal lower arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Neanderthal forearms have been described as being very powerful. Different individual features in the lower arm bones have been described to distinguish Neanderthals from modern humans. In this study, the overall morphology of the radius and ulna is considered, and morphological differences among Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens and recent H. sapiens are described. Comparisons among populations were made using a combination of 3D geometric morphometrics and standard multivariate methods. Comparative material included all available complete radii and ulnae from Neanderthals, early H. sapiens and archaeological and recent human populations, representing a wide geographical and lifestyle range. There are few differences among the populations when features are considered individually. Neanderthals and early H. sapiens fell within the range of modern human variation. When the suite of measurements and shapes were analyzed, differences and similarities became apparent. The Neanderthal radius is more laterally curved, has a more medially placed radial tuberosity, a longer radial neck, a more antero-posteriorly ovoid head and a well-developed proximal interosseous crest. The Neanderthal ulna has a more anterior facing trochlear notch, a lower M. brachialis insertion, larger relative mid-shaft size and a more medio-lateral and antero-posterior sinusoidal shaft. The Neanderthal lower arm morphology reflects a strong cold-adapted short forearm. The forearms of H. sapiens are less powerful in pronation and supination. Many differences between Neanderthals and H. sapiens can be explained as a secondary consequence of the hyper-polar body proportions of the Neanderthals, but also as retentions of the primitive condition of other hominoids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Thinnes, G.L.; Allison, C.M.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a lower vessel head research program to investigate plausible modes of reactor vessel failure in order to determine (a) which modes have the greatest likelihood of occurrence during a severe accident and (b) the range of core debris and accident conditions that lead to these failures. This paper presents the methodology and preliminary results of an investigation of reactor designs and thermodynamic conditions using analytic closed-form approximations to assess the important governing parameters in non-dimensional form. Preliminary results illustrate the importance of vessel and tube geometrical parameters, material properties, and external boundary conditions on predicting vessel failure. Thermal analyses indicate that steady-state temperature distributions will occur in the vessel within several hours, although the exact time is dependent upon vessel thickness. In-vessel tube failure is governed by the tube-to-debris mass ratio within the lower head, where most penetrations are predicted to fail if surrounded by molten debris. Melt penetration distance is dependent upon the effective flow diameter of the tube. Molten debris is predicted to penetrate through tubes with a larger effective flow diameter, such as a boiling water reactor (BWR) drain nozzle. Ex-vessel tube failure for depressurized reactor vessels is predicted to be more likely for a BWR drain nozzle penetration because of its larger effective diameter. At high pressures (between ∼0.1 MPa and ∼12 MPa) ex-vessel tube rupture becomes a dominant failure mechanism, although tube ejection dominates control rod guide tube failure at lower temperatures. However, tube ejection and tube rupture predictions are sensitive to the vessel and tube radial gap size and material coefficients of thermal expansion

  11. Barriers to innovation in service SMEs: Evidence from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado Guzman, G.; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Pinzón-Castro, S. Y.; Kumar, V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – Specific research related to the study of innovation barriers in service SMEs in the Latin American region is limited. This study thus investigates the effects that external environmental, financial and human barriers have on innovation activities, particularly, within the context of Mexican service SMEs.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach – Three hypotheses were formulated and tested using structural equation modelling (SEM). Data were collected through an instrument that was devel...

  12. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identifying and overcoming barriers to technology implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.; Warren, S.; McCune, M.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent General Accounting Office report, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management was found to be ineffective in integrating their environmental technology development efforts with the cleanup actions. As a result of these findings, a study of remediation documents was performed by the Technology Applications Team within DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) to validate this finding and to understand why it was occurring. A second initiative built on the foundation of the remediation document study and evaluated solutions to the ineffective implementation of improved technologies. The Technology Applications Team examined over 50 remediation documents (17 projects) which included nearly 600 proposed remediation technologies. It was determined that very few technologies are reaching the Records of Decision documents. In fact, most are eliminated in the early stages of consideration. These observations stem from regulators' and stakeholders' uncertainties in cost and performance of the technology and the inability of the technology to meet site specific conditions. The Technology Applications Team also set out to identify and evaluate solutions to barriers to implementing innovative technology into the DOE's environmental management activities. Through the combined efforts of DOE and the Hazardous Waste Action Coalition (HWAC), a full day workshop was conducted at the annual HWAC meeting in June 1995 to solve barriers to innovative technology implementation. Three barriers were identified as widespread throughout the DOE complex and industry. Identified barriers included a lack of verified or certified cost and performance data for innovative technologies; risk of failure to reach cleanup goals using innovative technologies; and communication barriers that are present at virtually every stage of the characterization/remediation process from development through implementation

  14. Overcoming barriers to exercise among parents: A social cognitive theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailey, Emily L.; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Conroy, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Parents face numerous barriers to exercise and exhibit high levels of inactivity. Examining theory-based determinants of exercise among parents may inform interventions for this population. The purpose of this study was to test a social-cognitive model of parental exercise participation over a 12-month period. Mothers (n=226) and fathers (n=70) of children exercise, barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers, and exercise planning at baseline and one year later. Panel analyses were used to test the hypothesized relationships. Barriers self-efficacy was related to exercise directly and indirectly through perceived barriers and prioritization/planning. Prioritization and planning also mediated the relationship between perceived barriers and exercise. These paths remained significant at 12 months. These results suggest efforts to increase exercise in parents should focus on improving confidence to overcome exercise barriers, reducing perceptions of barriers, and helping parents make specific plans for prioritizing and engaging in exercise. PMID:27108160

  15. Qualitative Comparison of Barriers to Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among Perinatally and Behaviorally HIV-Infected Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Errol L; Bogart, Laura M; Thurston, Idia B; Hu, Caroline H; Skeer, Margie R; Safren, Steven A; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2017-07-01

    Medication adherence among youth living with HIV (28%-69%) is often insufficient for viral suppression. The psychosocial context of adherence barriers is complex. We sought to qualitatively understand adherence barriers among behaviorally infected and perinatally infected youth and develop an intervention specific to their needs. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 youth living with HIV (aged 14-24 years) and analyzed transcripts using the constant comparative method. Barriers were influenced by clinical and psychosocial factors. Perinatally infected youth barriers included reactance, complicated regimens, HIV fatigue, and difficulty transitioning to autonomous care. Behaviorally infected youth barriers included HIV-related shame and difficulty initiating medication. Both groups reported low risk perception, medication as a reminder of HIV, and nondisclosure, but described different contexts to these common barriers. Common and unique barriers emerged for behaviorally infected and perinatally infected youth reflecting varying HIV experiences and psychosocial contexts. We developed a customizable intervention addressing identified barriers and their psychosocial antecedents.

  16. Barriers to Electronic Health Record Adoption: a Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Kristof, Caitlin; Jones, Beau; Mitchell, Erica; Martinez, Angelica

    2016-12-01

    Federal efforts and local initiatives to increase adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) continue, particularly since the enactment of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Roughly one in four hospitals not adopted even a basic EHR system. A review of the barriers may help in understanding the factors deterring certain healthcare organizations from implementation. We wanted to assemble an updated and comprehensive list of adoption barriers of EHR systems in the United States. Authors searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and accepted only articles relevant to our primary objective. Reviewers independently assessed the works highlighted by our search and selected several for review. Through multiple consensus meetings, authors tapered articles to a final selection most germane to the topic (n = 27). Each article was thoroughly examined by multiple authors in order to achieve greater validity. Authors identified 39 barriers to EHR adoption within the literature selected for the review. These barriers appeared 125 times in the literature; the most frequently mentioned barriers were regarding cost, technical concerns, technical support, and resistance to change. Despite federal and local incentives, the initial cost of adopting an EHR is a common existing barrier. The other most commonly mentioned barriers include technical support, technical concerns, and maintenance/ongoing costs. Policy makers should consider incentives that continue to reduce implementation cost, possibly aimed more directly at organizations that are known to have lower adoption rates, such as small hospitals in rural areas.

  17. Energy barriers in patterned media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Due to the fact that thermal activation aids in overcoming the energy barrier, the required field for reversal varies from instance to instance for the same island. This thermally induced switching field distribution can be used to determine the difference in energy barrier of magneticallyweak and

  18. Simulating complex noise barrier reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Lutgendorf, D.; Roo, F. de

    2011-01-01

    Within the EU FP7 QUIESST project, QUIeting the Environment for a Sustainable Surface Transport, a test method is being developed for the reflectivity of noise barriers. The method needs to account for a complex shape of barriers and the use of various types of absorbing materials. The performance

  19. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  20. Students' benefits and barriers to mental health help-seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Nabors, Laura A.; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is recognized as a potential barrier to seeking help for a mental health disorder. The present study assessed college students' perceived benefits and barriers to obtaining mental health treatment and stigma-related attitudes via a four-page survey. A total of 682 students at one Midwestern university participated in the study. Findings indicated that females perceived a greater number of benefits to having participated in mental health services and held significantly lower stigma-related attitudes than did males. Students who had ever received mental health services reported significantly more barriers to treatment than did students who had never received services. Health professionals should target students with educational programs about positive outcomes related to receiving mental health services and work with treatment centers to reduce barriers for receiving services. PMID:25750831

  1. Crossing the Salt Barrier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    either the sea or freshwater (rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.), or brackish ... by use of the term osmol (Osm) where, for ... much lower than EE and a fresh water fish lives in an environment where just ..... than prophyropsin, vision is greatly improved.

  2. Lower dimensional gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book addresses the subject of gravity theories in two and three spacetime dimensions. The prevailing philosophy is that lower dimensional models of gravity provide a useful arena for developing new ideas and insights, which are applicable to four dimensional gravity. The first chapter consists of a comprehensive introduction to both two and three dimensional gravity, including a discussion of their basic structures. In the second chapter, the asymptotic structure of three dimensional Einstein gravity with a negative cosmological constant is analyzed. The third chapter contains a treatment of the effects of matter sources in classical two dimensional gravity. The fourth chapter gives a complete analysis of particle pair creation by electric and gravitational fields in two dimensions, and the resulting effect on the cosmological constant

  3. Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    This year saw the completion of three accelerator improvement projects (AIP) and two capital equipment projects pertaining to the Tevatron cryogenic system. The projects result in the ability to operate the Tevatron at lower temperature, and thus higher energy. Each project improves a subsystem by expanding capabilities (refrigerator controls), ensuring reliability (valve box, subatmospheric hardware, and compressor D), or enhancing performance (cold compressors and coldbox II). In January of 1994, the Tevatron operated at an energy of 975 GeV for the first time. This was the culmination, of many years of R ampersand D, power testing in a sector (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation during the summer of 1993. Although this is a modest increase in energy, the discovery potential for the Top quark is considerably improved

  4. Vitiligo Lateral Lower Lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Antaryami

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo characteristically affecting the lateral lower lip (LLL is a common presentation in South Orissa. This type of lesion has rarely been described in literature. One hundred eighteen such cases were studied during the period from October 1999 to September, 2000. LLL vitiligo constituted 16.39% of all vitiligo patients. Both sexes were affected equally. The peak age of onset was in the 2nd decade, mean duration of illness 21.46 months. Fifty six patients had unilateral lesion (38 on the left and 18 on the right. Among the 62 patients having bilateral lesions, the onset was more frequent on the left (38 than either the right (8 or both sides together (16. All the patients were right handed. Association with local factors like infection, trauma, cheilitis, FDE etc were associated in 38.98% of cases, but systemic or autoimmune diseases were not associated. Positive family history was found in 22% of cases.

  5. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  6. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  7. Tunnelling without barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution in flat and curved space-time of quantum fields in theories with relative flat potential and its consequences are considered. It is shown that bubble nucleation, a quantum mechanical tunnelling process, may occur in flat space-time, having a bounce solution, even if V(phi) has no barrier. It is shown that bubble nucleation can also occur in curved space-time even though there is no bounce solution in the standard formalism for the bubble nucleation rate in curved space-time. Additionally, bubbles can nucleate during the slow rolling period on the potential in flat and curved space-time, in this case also there is no bounce solution. It is known in the new inflationary scenario that energy density perturbations caused by quantum fluctuations of the scalar field can satisfy the presently observed bounds on density perturbations. Bubble nucleation during the slow rolling period also gives rise to density perturbations. For a model potential density perturbations by bubbles are calculated at the horizon reentering. By applying the bound from the almost isotropic microwave black body radiation on these density perturbations, a constraint on the model potential is obtained. Finally, some further implications on the galaxy formation and applications in more realistic potential are discussed

  8. Omnidirectional ventilated acoustic barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-long; Zhu, Yi-fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-11-01

    As an important problem in acoustics, sound insulation finds applications in a great variety of situations. In the existing schemes, however, there has always been a trade-off between the thinness of sound-insulating devices and their ventilating capabilities, limiting their potentials in the control of low-frequency sound in high ventilation environments. Here, we design and experimentally implement an omnidirectional acoustic barrier with a planar profile, subwavelength thickness ( 0.18 λ ), yet high ventilation. The proposed mechanism is based on the interference between the resonant scattering of discrete states and the background scattering of continuous states which induces a Fano-like asymmetric transmission profile. Benefitting from the binary-structured design of the coiled unit and hollow pipe, it maximally simplifies the design and fabrication while ensuring the ventilation for all the non-resonant units with open tubes. The simulated and measured results agree well, showing the effectiveness of our proposed mechanism to block low frequency sound coming from various directions while allowing 63% of the air flow to pass. We anticipate our design to open routes to design sound insulators and to enable applications in traditionally unattainable cases such as those calling for noise reduction and cooling simultaneously.

  9. Alternative geochemical barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Previous investigations of the effects of neutralization and reduction on uranium mill tailings pore fluids by the Technical Support Contractor indicated that arsenic, selenium, and molybdenum continue to remain in solution in all but reducing conditions. These hazardous constituents are present in groundwaters as oxyanions and, therefore, are not expected to be removed by adsorption into clays and most other soil constituents. It was decided to investigate the attenuation capacity of two commonly available crystalline iron oxides, taconite and scoria, and a zeolite, a network aluminosilicate with a cage structure. Columns of the candidate materials were exposed to solutions of individual constituents, including arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and, uranium, and to the spiked tailings pore fluid from the Bodo Canyon disposal cell near Durango, Colorado. In addition to the single material columns, a homogeneous blend of the three materials and layers of the materials were exposed to spiked tailings pore fluids. The results of these experiments indicate that with the exception of molybdenum, the constituents of concern are attenuated by the taconite; however, they are not sufficiently attenuated to meet the groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project. Therefore, the candidate barrier materials did not prove to be useful to the UMTRA Project for the cleanup of groundwaters

  10. Mobilitet, barrierer & muligheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mimi

    2011-01-01

    stereotypering. På den ene side peger udsagn fra de unge drenge på en oplevelse af at blive kriminaliseret i kraft af deres køn (det maskuline kombineret med at have en anden hudfarve). Og de unge piger oplever, at de udover at blive kategoriseret som ”indvandrere” også bliver kategoriseret som passive, umyndige...... som en vej ud af irakiske Kurdistan, men ikke tilbage til Danmark. Drengene fra familier med bedre økonomiske ressourcer giver udtryk for, ønske om at rejse til andre lande. På grund af begrænsede sproglige kompetencer oplever hovedparten af de unge (både i Danmark og i irakiske Kurdistan) barrierer i...... har planer for at flytte fra Kurdistan. De har dansk statsborgerskab, men de vil ikke tilbage til Danmark. I de fortællinger, som afhandlingen bygger på, er det tydeligt at samspillet mellem flere sociale dimensioner, spiller ind på de unges selvforståelse, tilhørsforhold, erfaringer og deres valg af...

  11. Safety indicators used to prove the role of natural barrier for Saligny near surface disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculae, Ortenzia; Durdun, I.; Ionita, Gh.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The siting process for a near surface repository suitable for the radioactive waste resulted from Cernavoda NPP operation and decommissioning (low level radioactive waste with small amounts of long lived radionuclides) started in 1992 and it included the collection of data from specific field and laboratory works for each site selection stage as well as different safety performance evaluation. According to the IAEA standards (Safety Guide No.111-G-3.1, 1994), the purpose of the siting process is not to get the best solution but to find out 'an acceptable solution, with sufficient safety reserves'. Since 1996, detailed field and investigation works were performed in Saligny preferred site including an experimental area to test the improvement method proposed for the foundation ground of repository, as well as detailed performance assessments using specific computer codes. The paper presents the results of recent performance assessments for the natural barrier of disposal system. The calculations were done using HYDRUS 2D, FEHM and AMBER computer codes. The endpoint of the Safety Report for Siting a Near Surface Repository at Saligny Site [CITON and SCN, Safety Report for Siting a Near Surface Repository at Saligny Site, 2007, pages 8.2.1-1 to 8.2.1-22 and 8-63 to 8-70] was the assessment of safety indicators. Individual annual effective dose for exposed peoples (both workers and general public) was the main safety indicator. In the same document, the radionuclide concentration in the disposal system compartments has been evaluated, as supplementary safety indicator of repository barriers (especially to confirm the natural barrier performance). The results confirmed the performance of natural barrier: the maximum extension of H-3 and Co-60 contaminant plume after repository closure remains more above underground water level. In the aquifer, iodine concentration reaches a value of 10 -15 mol/l, at the same magnitude order with the admitted limit from CFR

  12. Comfort and microbial barrier properties of garments worn next to the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, D.; Rogina-Car, B.; Skenderi, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Compared with viscose fibre, modal fibre is characterized by some advantageous properties such as higher dry and wet tenacities, higher wet modulus, lower water retention capacity and lower level of swelling. Impact of different knitted fabric structure made of cotton and 97 % CMD/3 % EL fibres on thermo-physiological comfort and microbial barrier properties were investigated. All knitted fabrics have very good physiological properties. The microbial barrier permeability of knitted fabric after extreme contamination with bacterial spores in dry state showed that double jersey offered more effective microbial barrier than the single jersey knitted fabrics respectively the greater thickness of double jersey knitted fabric provide more difficult barrier to bacterial spores to pass. In wet state all knitted fabrics have more effective microbial barrier which could be explained by cellulose fibres swelling. In wet state 97 % CMD/3 % EL single jersey knitted fabric have more effective microbial barrier then cotton double and single jersey knitted fabrics.

  13. Enershield : energy saving air barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallihan, D. [Enershield Industries Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Enershield Industries is a leader in air barrier technology and provides solution for the Canadian climate. This presentation described the advantages of air barriers and the impact of rising energy costs. An air barrier is used to separate areas of differing environments and makes existing building systems more efficient. This presentation discussed how an air barrier works. It also identified how Enershield Industries calculates energy savings. It described air barrier applications and those who use barrier technology. These include the commercial and industrial sector as well as the personnel and retail sector. Barrier technology can be used for cold storage; vehicle and equipment washes; food processing; and environmental separation. Features and benefits such as the ability to create seal, acoustic insulation, and long term durability were also discussed. Last, the presentation addressed model selection and design criteria issues. Design criteria that were presented included a discussion of acoustic installation, articulating nozzles, scroll cased fans, and structural frame. Other design criteria presented were galvanized frames, telescopic sliders, and off the shelf parts. It was concluded that the ability to reduce energy consumption and enhance employee/client comfort is beneficial to the employer as well as to the employee. figs.

  14. Exercises in Heavy Lowering

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Driving up to Point 5, one can't help but notice the impressively enormous red structure climbing up and over Building 3585. This unusual bridge-like construction is CMS'new crane, otherwise known as 'the gantry'. CMS'impressive "gantry" was recently installed at Building 3585. The 'gantry'was constructed by VSL, a Swiss company that is used to building such uniquely designed cranes used for major construction jobs, including lifting the roofs of various stadiums and the huge Airbus A380 assembly hall in Toulouse or bridge foundation caissons. CMS's crane was custom-built to sustain up to 2000 tonnes of machinery and detectors and slowly lower them down into the experimental cavern. The feature of two towers, one on either side of the building, each 24 m high, is the reason behind the nickname of this amazing crane. Two large beams, 28 m long and 3.4 m high, run along the width of the roof and four openings, each 5 m long, in the ceiling will allow the cables to pass through into the gallery. Unlike typic...

  15. Information barriers for the protection of sensitive information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, A.D.; Dunn, J.; Seager, K.; Smith, M.; Beach, D.; Clinton, J.; Vanier, P.

    2013-01-01

    An Information Barrier is a combination of technology and procedures that prevent the release of a host country's sensitive information to a monitoring party during an inspection of a sensitive item, while enabling assurance of an accurate assessment of host country declarations regarding the item. Information barriers, as a concept, arose from the need to balance two competing requirements - specifically, certification of information protection by a host country and authentication of measurement and information accuracy by a monitoring party. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, in conjunction with several U.S. National Laboratories, has explored information barrier development in detail, and has continued the evolution of essential work done by the U.S. Information Barrier Working Group beginning in the late 1990's, and other international efforts, including the U.S.-Russia-IAEA Trilateral Initiative. This paper explains the rationale for information barriers, and explores the development and application of information barrier concepts for potential future arms control initiatives, including recent work and advances in capabilities. It also considers applications of information barrier concepts applied in other fields.The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  16. Nested barriers to low-carbon infrastructure investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granoff, Ilmi; Hogarth, J. Ryan; Miller, Alan

    2016-12-01

    Low-carbon, 'green' economic growth is necessary to simultaneously improve human welfare and avoid the worst impacts of climate change and environmental degradation. Infrastructure choices underpin both the growth and the carbon intensity of the economy. This Perspective explores the barriers to investing in low-carbon infrastructure and some of the policy levers available to overcome them. The barriers to decarbonizing infrastructure 'nest' within a set of barriers to infrastructure development more generally that cause spending on infrastructure--low-carbon or not--to fall more than 70% short of optimal levels. Developing countries face additional barriers such as currency and political risks that increase the investment gap. Low-carbon alternatives face further barriers, such as commercialization risk and financial and public institutions designed for different investment needs. While the broader barriers to infrastructure investment are discussed in other streams of literature, they are often disregarded in literature on renewable energy diffusion or climate finance, which tends to focus narrowly on the project costs of low- versus high-carbon options. We discuss how to overcome the barriers specific to low-carbon infrastructure within the context of the broader infrastructure gap.

  17. Barriers to pediatric pain management: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Simon, Katherine; Thompson, Jamie J; Armus, Cheryl L; Hanson, Tom C; Berg, Kristin A; Petrie, Jodie L; Xiang, Qun; Malin, Shelly

    2011-09-01

    This study describes strategies used by the Joint Clinical Practice Council of Children's Hospital of Wisconsin to identify barriers perceived as interfering with nurses' (RNs) ability to provide optimal pain management. A survey was used to ascertain how nurses described optimal pain management and how much nurses perceived potential barriers as interfering with their ability to provide that level of care. The survey, "Barriers to Optimal Pain management" (adapted from Van Hulle Vincent & Denyes, 2004), was distributed to all RNs working in all patient care settings. Two hundred seventy-two surveys were returned. The five most significant barriers identified were insufficient physician (MD) orders, insufficient MD orders before procedures, insufficient time to premedicate patients before procedures, the perception of a low priority given to pain management by medical staff, and parents' reluctance to have patients receive pain medication. Additional barriers were identified through narrative comments. Information regarding the impact of the Acute Pain Service on patient care, RNs' ability to overcome barriers, and RNs' perception of current pain management practices is included, as are several specific interventions aimed at improving or ultimately eliminating identified barriers. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates......-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous...

  19. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  20. Big Data as Information Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ya. Tsvetkov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article covers analysis of ‘Big Data’ which has been discussed over last 10 years. The reasons and factors for the issue are revealed. It has proved that the factors creating ‘Big Data’ issue has existed for quite a long time, and from time to time, would cause the informational barriers. Such barriers were successfully overcome through the science and technologies. The conducted analysis refers the “Big Data” issue to a form of informative barrier. This issue may be solved correctly and encourages development of scientific and calculating methods.

  1. ITER lower port systems integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B., E-mail: bruno.levesy@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Baker, D.; Boussier, B.; Bryan, S.; Cordier, J.J.; Dremel, M.; Dell' Orco, G.; Daly, E.; Doshi, B.; Jeannoutot, T.; Friconneau, J.P.; Gliss, C.; Le Barbier, R.; Lachevre, F.; Loughlin, M.; Martin, A.; Martins, J.P.; Maruyama, S.; Palmer, J.; Reichle, R. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    The lower port systems are installed inside the vacuum vessel lower ports and in the adjacent port cells. The vacuum vessel ports and penetrations are allocated as follow: -4 ports dedicated to remote handling of the divertor cassettes, contain diagnostics racks and divertor cooling pipes. -5 ports connecting the main vessel to the torus cryopumps, contain divertor cooling pipes, pellet and gas injection pipes and vertical stabilization coil feeders. -3 penetrations connecting torus cryopumps are connected to the vacuum vessel by branch pipes. -Specific penetrations for divertor cooling lines, in-vessel viewing and glow discharge systems. The general layout of the port systems has been revised recently to improve the cryopump (8 t weight, 1.8 m diameter and 2.5 m long) maintenance scheme with remote handling tools and integrate the in-vessel vertical stabilization coil feeders. The port allocation, the pumping ports design, and interfaces in-between ports and cryostat and in-between cryopumps and cryostat have been up-dated. The integration inside the 18 port cells (11 m x 4 m each) has been reviewed to avoid clashes in between systems and to fix the openings in the port cell concrete walls. The new layout integrates safety and neutron-shielding requirements as well as remote handling and maintenance compatibility for the different systems. The paper presents the up-dated integration of the lower port systems inside the ports and the port cells. Interfaces of the port systems with the vacuum vessel, the cryostat and the port cells are described.

  2. Emotional Barriers to Successful Reemployment: Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindon, Mary H.; Smith, Barrett

    2002-01-01

    Common responses to job loss include stress reactions, depression and anxiety, and lowered self-esteem. This article describes these common reactions to job loss and unemployment, explains how to recognize their symptoms, and discusses ways counselors can address these emotional barriers to finding meaningful employment. (Contains 50 references.)…

  3. Budesonide and fluticasone propionate differentially affect the airway epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, I. H.; Jonker, M.R.; Vries, de Maaike; van Oosterhout, A. J. M.; Telenga, E.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Postma, D. S.; van den Berge, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: COPD patients have a higher risk of pneumonia when treated with fluticasone propionate (FP) than with placebo, and a lower risk with budesonide (BUD). We hypothesized that BUD and FP differentially affect the mucosal barrier in response to viral infection and/or cigarette smoke. Methods:

  4. The Significance of Barriers to Entry in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard de Valence

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This research looks at the significance of barriers that firms considering entry into the construction industry might face. Drawing on the microeconomic characteristics of imperfectly competitive and oligopolistic markets the analysis finds that there are a dozen barriers to entry that affect the industry, but their significance depends on the product type. The discussion covers the question of product homogeneity in construction and evidence for the existence of barriers to entry in concentration levels. Barriers to entry specific to construction are then identified, which leads to an analysis of how they operate and their significance (high, medium or low in different market types, thus increasing our understanding of construction industry dynamics.

  5. Trends in drug delivery through tissue barriers containing tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheik, Christian; Blasig, Ingolf E; Winkler, Lars

    2013-04-01

    A limitation in the uptake of many drugs is the restricted permeation through tissue barriers. There are two general ways to cross barriers formed by cell layers: by transcytosis or by diffusion through the intercellular space. In the latter, tight junctions (TJs) play the decisive role in the regulation of the barrier permeability. Thus, transient modulation of TJs is a potent strategy to improve drug delivery. There have been extensive studies on surfactant-like absorption enhancers. One of the most effective enhancers found is sodium caprate. However, this modulates TJs in an unspecific fashion. A novel approach would be the specific modulation of TJ-associated marvel proteins and claudins, which are the main structural components of the TJs. Recent studies have identified synthetic peptidomimetics and RNA interference techniques to downregulate the expression of targeted TJ proteins. This review summarizes current progress and discusses the impact on TJs' barrier function.

  6. Emotional functioning, barriers, and medication adherence in pediatric transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick King, Megan L; Mee, Laura L; Gutiérrez-Colina, Ana M; Eaton, Cyd K; Lee, Jennifer L; Blount, Ronald L

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed relationships among internalizing symptoms, barriers to medication adherence, and medication adherence in adolescents with solid organ transplants. The sample included 72 adolescents who had received solid organ transplants. Multiple mediator models were tested via bootstrapping methods. Bivariate correlations revealed significant relationships between barriers and internalizing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, as well as between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Barriers indicative of adaptation to the medication regimen (e.g., forgetting, lack of organization) were related to medication adherence and mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. These findings indicate that barriers may serve as a more specific factor in the relationship between more general, pervasive internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Results may help guide areas for clinical assessment, and the focus of interventions for adolescent transplant recipients who are experiencing internalizing symptoms and/or who are nonadherent to their medication regimen.

  7. Fruit and vegetable consumption: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclellan, Debbie L; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Larsen, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    Few people on Prince Edward Island meet the goal of consuming five or more servings of vegetables and fruit a day. The main objective of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of the nutritional benefits and barriers to vegetable and fruit intake among adult women in Prince Edward Island. Participants were 40 women aged 20-49, with or without children at home, who were or were not currently meeting the objective of eating five or more fruit and vegetable servings a day. In-home, one-on-one interviews were used for data collection. Thematic analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. Data were examined for trustworthiness in the context of credibility, transferability, and dependability. Most participants identified one or more benefits of eating fruit and vegetables; however, comments tended to be non-specific. The main barriers that participants identified were effort, lack of knowledge, sociopsychological and socioenvironmental factors, and availability. Internal influences, life events, and food rules were identified as encouraging women to include vegetables and fruit in their diets. Given the challenges of effecting meaningful dietary change, dietitians must look for broader dietary behavioural interventions that are sensitive to women's perceptions of benefits and barriers to fruit and vegetable intake.

  8. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  9. Barriers and enablers to academic health leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharwani, Aleem; Kline, Theresa; Patterson, Margaret; Craighead, Peter

    2017-02-06

    Purpose This study sought to identify the barriers and enablers to leadership enactment in academic health-care settings. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews ( n = 77) with programme stakeholders (medical school trainees, university leaders, clinical leaders, medical scientists and directors external to the medical school) were conducted, and the responses content-analysed. Findings Both contextual and individual factors were identified as playing a role in affecting academic health leadership enactment that has an impact on programme development, success and maintenance. Contextual factors included sufficient resources allocated to the programme, opportunities for learners to practise leadership skills, a competent team around the leader once that person is in place, clear expectations for the leader and a culture that fosters open communication. Contextual barriers included highly bureaucratic structures, fear-of-failure and non-trusting cultures and inappropriate performance systems. Programmes were advised to select participants based on self-awareness, strong communication skills and an innovative thinking style. Filling specific knowledge and skill gaps, particularly for those not trained in medical school, was viewed as essential. Ineffective decision-making styles and tendencies to get involved in day-to-day activities were barriers to the development of academic health leaders. Originality/value Programmes designed to develop academic health-care leaders will be most effective if they develop leadership at all levels; ensure that the organisation's culture, structure and processes reinforce positive leadership practices; and recognise the critical role of teams in supporting its leaders.

  10. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life

  11. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  12. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarek, R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  13. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  14. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  15. Fusion barrier characteristics of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Sridhar, K. N.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied fusion barrier characteristics of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations. After the calculation of fusion barrier heights and positions, we have searched for their parameterization. We have achieved the empirical formula for fusion barrier heights (VB), positions (RB), curvature of the inverted parabola (ħω) of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations (6 projectile target combinations. The values produced by the present formula are also compared with experiments. The present pocket formula produces fusion barrier characteristics of actinides with the simple inputs of mass number (A) and atomic number (Z) of projectile-targets.

  16. Transport barrier in Helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on the transport barrier in Helical plasmas are reviewed. There are two mechanisms of transport improvement, that results in the formation of the transport barrier. One is the improvement of neoclassical transport by reducing the ripple loss with radial electric field, which exist only in helical plasma. The other is the improvement of anomalous transport due to the suppression of fluctuations associated with a radial electric field shear both in tokamak and helical plasma. The formation of the transport barrier can be triggered by the radial electric field shear associated with the transition of the radial electric field (L/H transition or ion-electron root transition) or the peaked density or the optimization of magnetic field shear. The mechanisms of transport barrier formation are also discussed. (author). 60 refs

  17. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  18. Engineered barriers: current status 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Marsh, G.B.

    1989-06-01

    This report summarises the current state of research relevant to assessing the performance of engineered barriers made of steel and concrete in radioactive waste repositories. The objective of these barriers is to contain substantially the radionuclides within them by providing both physical and chemical impediment to their release. The physical barriers are of most value for highly soluble isotopes with relatively short half-lives (eg 137 Cs), since they can provide a measure of containment until a large fraction of the activity has decayed. In addition they can facilitate retrievability for some period after disposal. The chemical barriers operate by beneficial conditioning of the near field groundwater and providing sites for sorption of radionuclides. Both of these reduce the aqueous concentration of radionuclides in the near field. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of flood barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srb, Pavel; Petrů, Michal; Kulhavý, Petr

    This paper deals with testing and numerical simulating of flood barriers. The Czech Republic has been hit by several very devastating floods in past years. These floods caused several dozens of causalities and property damage reached billions of Euros. The development of flood measures is very important, especially for the reduction the number of casualties and the amount of property damage. The aim of flood control measures is the detention of water outside populated areas and drainage of water from populated areas as soon as possible. For new flood barrier design it is very important to know its behaviour in case of a real flood. During the development of the barrier several standardized tests have to be carried out. Based on the results from these tests numerical simulation was compiled using Abaqus software and some analyses were carried out. Based on these numerical simulations it will be possible to predict the behaviour of barriers and thus improve their design.

  20. Neighborhood disadvantage, physical activity barriers, and physical activity among African American breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antwan Jones

    2015-01-01

    Higher renter rates and individual barriers both contribute to lower levels of physical activity in African American breast cancer survivors. These data suggest that the potential for constant residential turnover (via rentership and perceived barriers may increase physical inactivity even where facilities may be available.

  1. Barriers to outdoor physical activity in wintertime among Somali youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Elizabeth; Holt, Christina; Kuhn, Celine; McAteer, Timothy; Askari, Isabella; O'Meara, Mary; Sharif, Abdimajid; Dexter, William

    2010-10-01

    To identify barriers to outdoor physical activity in winter among Somali youth in Maine. Despite the many proven health benefits of physical activity among children, such as cardiovascular fitness and health status as an adult, there has been a decrease in physical activity among children in recent years. Specifically, children who are of low socio-economic status or are from communities where many immigrants are at increased risk for developing obesity. Immigrants are also less likely to be physically active. There are many potential barriers to wintertime physical activity among Somali youth in Maine, such as lack of financial resources, transportation, proper winter clothing, and appropriate knowledge of winter safety, and language and cultural barriers. For females, different attire required for outdoor activity may be a barrier. Somali parents and children were recruited from Portland, Maine to participate in focus groups led by a trained facilitator with a Somali translator and cultural broker. Transcripts were coded using NVIVO software to identify barriers to physical activity among Somali youth outside in winter. Eight focus groups were conducted. Sixty-one Somali community members were recruited. Participants felt outdoor physical activity is important, but note that it is decreased in winter. Barriers to outdoor activity in winter cited by focus group participants were lack of resources, health concerns, gender barriers for females, and knowledge barriers. Concern over lack of supervision while children play outside was also cited. This study revealed many of the underlying beliefs, barriers and cultural issues that impact Somali families' intention to be active and ability to be active outdoors in winter. These findings can be used to generate research hypotheses and public health interventions regarding outdoor physical activity among Somali youth.

  2. Ethics case reflection sessions: Enablers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Molewijk, Bert; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2018-03-01

    In previous research on ethics case reflection (ECR) sessions about specific cases, healthcare professionals in childhood cancer care were clarifying their perspectives on the ethical issue to resolve their main concern of consolidating care. When perspectives were clarified, consequences in the team included 'increased understanding', 'group strengthening' and 'decision grounding'. Additional analysis of the data was needed on conditions that could contribute to the quality of ECR sessions. The aim of this study was to explore conditions for clarifying perspectives during ECR sessions. Data were collected from observations and interviews and the results emerged from an inductive analysis using grounded theory. Participants and research context: Six observations during ECR sessions and 10 interviews were performed with healthcare professionals working in childhood cancer care and advanced paediatric homecare. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Participants were informed about their voluntary involvement and that they could withdraw their participation without explaining why. Two categories emerged: organizational enablers and barriers and team-related enablers and barriers. Organizational enablers and barriers included the following sub-categories: the timing of the ECR session, the structure during the ECR session and the climate during the ECR session. Sub-categories to team-related enablers and barriers were identified as space for inter-professional perspectives, varying levels of ethical skills and space for the patient's and the family's perspectives. Space for inter-professional perspectives included the dominance of a particular perspective that can result from hierarchical positions. The medical perspective is relevant for understanding the child's situation but should not dominate the ethical reflection. Conditions for ECR sessions have been explored and the new knowledge can be used when training

  3. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  4. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  5. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.; Gadbury, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  6. Influence of solid noise barriers on near-road and on-road air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Richard W.; Isakov, Vlad; Deshmukh, Parikshit; Venkatram, Akula; Yang, Bo; Zhang, K. Max

    2016-03-01

    Public health concerns regarding adverse health effects for populations spending significant amounts of time near high traffic roadways has increased substantially in recent years. Roadside features, including solid noise barriers, have been investigated as potential methods that can be implemented in a relatively short time period to reduce air pollution exposures from nearby traffic. A field study was conducted to determine the influence of noise barriers on both on-road and downwind pollutant concentrations near a large highway in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ultrafine particles, and black carbon were measured using a mobile platform and fixed sites along two limited-access stretches of highway that contained a section of noise barrier and a section with no noise barrier at-grade with the surrounding terrain. Results of the study showed that pollutant concentrations behind the roadside barriers were significantly lower relative to those measured in the absence of barriers. The reductions ranged from 50% within 50 m from the barrier to about 30% as far as 300 m from the barrier. Reductions in pollutant concentrations generally began within the first 50 m of the barrier edge; however, concentrations were highly variable due to vehicle activity behind the barrier and along nearby urban arterial roadways. The concentrations on the highway, upwind of the barrier, varied depending on wind direction. Overall, the on-road concentrations in front of the noise barrier were similar to those measured in the absence of the barrier, contradicting previous modeling results that suggested roadside barriers increase pollutant levels on the road. Thus, this study suggests that noise barriers do reduce potential pollutant exposures for populations downwind of the road, and do not likely increase exposures to traffic-related pollutants for vehicle passengers on the highway.

  7. Material Barriers to Diffusive Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, George; Karrasch, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Transport barriers, as zero-flux surfaces, are ill-defined in purely advective mixing in which the flux of any passive scalar is zero through all material surfaces. For this reason, Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) have been argued to play the role of mixing barriers as most repelling, attracting or shearing material lines. These three kinematic concepts, however, can also be defined in different ways, both within rigorous mathematical treatments and within the realm of heuristic diagnostics. This has lead to a an ever-growing number of different LCS methods, each generally identifying different objects as transport barriers. In this talk, we examine which of these methods have actual relevance for diffusive transport barriers. The latter barriers are arguably the practically relevant inhibitors in the mixing of physically relevant tracers, such as temperature, salinity, vorticity or potential vorticity. We demonstrate the role of the most effective diffusion barriers in analytical examples and observational data. Supported in part by the DFG Priority Program on Turbulent Superstructures.

  8. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control

  9. Air barrier systems: Construction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrault, J.C

    1989-01-01

    An examination is presented of how ordinary building materials can be used in an innovative manner to design, detail, and construct effective air barrier systems for common types of walls. For residential construction, the air drywall approach uses the interior gypsum board as the main component of the wall air barrier system. Joints between the gypsum board and adjacent materials or assemblies are sealed by gaskets. In commercial construction, two different techniques are employed for using gypsum board as air barrier material: the accessible drywall and non-accessible drywall approaches. The former is similar to the air drywall approach except that high performance sealants are used instead of gaskets. In the latter approach, exterior drywall sheathing is the main component of the air barrier system; joints between boards are taped and joints between boards and other components are sealed using elastomeric membrane strips. For various types of commercial and institutional buildings, metal air barrier systems are widely used and include pre-engineered curtain walls or sheet metal walls. Masonry wall systems are regarded as still the most durable, fireproof, and soundproof wall type available but an effective air barrier system has typically been difficult to implement. Factory-made elastomeric membranes offer the potential to provide airtightness to masonry walls. These membranes are applied on the entire masonry wall surface and are used to make airtight connections with other building components. Two types of product are available: thermofusible and peel-and-stick membranes. 5 figs.

  10. Hydrothermal alkaline stability of bentonite barrier by concrete interstitial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey Jimenez, S.; Cuevas Rodriguez, J.; Ramirez Martin, S.; Vigil de la villa Mencia, R.; Martin Barca, M.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all the steps of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR) based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the waste is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barriers. Two of the engineering barriers in the Spanish design of DGR in granitic rock are compacted bentonite and concrete. The bentonite barrier is the backfilling and sealing material for the repository gallery, because of its mechanical and physico-chemical properties. The main qualities of concrete as a component of a multi barrier system are its low permeability, mechanical resistance and chemical properties. With regard to chemical composition of concrete, the alkaline nature of cement pore water lowers the solubility of many radioactive elements. However, structural transformation in smectite, dissolution or precipitation of minerals and, consequently, changes in the bentonite properties could occurs in the alkaline conditions generated by the cement degradation. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the effect of concrete in the stability of Spanish reference bentonite (La Serrata of Nijar, Almeria, Spain) in conditions similar to those estimated in a DGR in granitic rock. Because of the main role of bentonite barrier in the global performance of the repository, the present study is essential to guarantee its security. (Author)

  11. Cervical cancer screening and psychosocial barriers perceived by patients. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska-Durawa, Alicja; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at integrating research discussing the role of perceived psychosocial barriers in cervical cancer screening (CCS) uptake. In particular, we analyzed the evidence for the associations between CCS uptake and perceived psychosocial barriers and frequency of psychosocial barriers identified by women. A systematic search of peer-reviewed papers published until 2011 in 8 databases yielded 48 original studies, analyzing data obtained from 155 954 women. The majority of studies (k = 43) applied correlational design, while 5 had experimental design. Experimental research indicated a positive effect of 75% of psychosocial interventions targeting barriers. The interventions resulted in a significant increase of CCS uptake. Overall 100% of correlational studies indicated that perceiving lower levels of barriers significantly predicted higher CCS uptake. 53 psychosocial barriers were listed in at least 2 original correlational studies: 9.5% of barriers were related to CCS facilities/environment, 67.9% dealt with personal characteristics of the patient, and 22.6% addressed social factors. As many as 35.9% of perceived barriers referred to negative emotions related to CCS examination procedures and collecting CCS results, whereas 25.7% of barriers referred to prior contacts with health professionals. Leaflets or discussion on psychosocial barriers between patients and health professionals involved in CCS might increase CCS uptake and thus reduce cervical cancer mortality rates. Communication skills training for health professionals conducting CCS might focus on the most frequently reported barriers, referring to emotions related to CCS examination and collecting CCS results.

  12. Comparison of Edge and Internal Transport Barriers in Drift Wave Predictive Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, J.; Crombe, K.; Mantica, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only p...... for the internal barrier. For the edge barrier the edge density was varied and it turned out that a lower edge density gave a stronger barrier. Electromagnetic and nonlocal effects were important for both types of barriers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]......We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum. Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only...... polodal momentum and the temperatures were simulated. The internal barrier included an anomalous spinup of poloidal momentum similar to that in the experiment. Also the edge barrier was accompanied by a spinup of poloidal momentum. The experimental density (with no barrier) was used and kept fixed...

  13. Focused feasibility study of engineered barriers for waste management units in the 200 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) evaluates a total of four conceptual barrier designs for different types of waste sites. The Hanford Barrier, the Modified RCRA Subtitle C Barrier, and the Modified RCRA Subtitle D Barrier are being considered as the baseline design for the purpose of the FFS evaluation. A fourth barrier design, the Standard RCRA Subtitle C Barrier, is also evaluated in this FFS; it is commonly applied at other waste sites across the country. These four designs provide a range of cover options to minimize health and environmental risks associated with a site and specific waste categories for active design life periods of 30, 100, 500, and 1,000 years. Design criteria for the 500 and 1,000-year design life barriers include design performance to extend beyond active institutional control and monitoring periods

  14. Overcoming barriers to exercise among parents: a social cognitive theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailey, Emily L; Phillips, Siobhan M; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Conroy, David E

    2016-08-01

    Parents face numerous barriers to exercise and exhibit high levels of inactivity. Examining theory-based determinants of exercise among parents may inform interventions for this population. The purpose of this study was to test a social-cognitive model of parental exercise participation over a 12-month period. Mothers (n = 226) and fathers (n = 70) of children self-efficacy, perceived barriers, and exercise planning at baseline and 1 year later. Panel analyses were used to test the hypothesized relationships. Barriers self-efficacy was related to exercise directly and indirectly through perceived barriers and prioritization/planning. Prioritization and planning also mediated the relationship between perceived barriers and exercise. These paths remained significant at 12 months. These results suggest efforts to increase exercise in parents should focus on improving confidence to overcome exercise barriers, reducing perceptions of barriers, and helping parents make specific plans for prioritizing and engaging in exercise.

  15. Barriers to care for women with breast cancer symptoms in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiness, Heather Story; Villegas-Gold, Michelle; Parveen, Homaira; Ferdousy, Tahmina; Ginsburg, Ophira

    2018-05-01

    Breast cancer survival rates in lower-income countries like Bangladesh are approximately 50%, versus over 80% in high income countries. Anecdotal reports suggest that, beyond economic and health system barriers, sociocultural factors may influence a woman's care-seeking behavior and resultant early stage diagnoses. To understand these barriers, we conducted 63 interviews (43 women with breast cancer symptoms and 20 men) in Khulna, Bangladesh. We identified socio-cultural barriers like neglect and indifference toward women, women's lack of power to use resources, and reduced support from family due to stigma. Interventions must address these barriers and improve the status of women in Bangladesh.

  16. Investigation of anodizing parameter effect on barrier layer of anodic zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Eh.P.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of fluoride concentration and forming direction upon kinetics of barrier layer transformations in the process of preparation of phase anodic zirconium oxide in acid fluorine-containing solutions is considered. Suppositions are made on the mechanism of barrier layer transformation under the effect of the parameters mentioned. The thickness of the barrier layer is determined by two methods and it is shown that coefficient of the layer thickess growth at the voltage increase by 1 V is much lower than during formation of the barrier films in non-agressive electrolytes

  17. Masculinity and barriers to seeking counseling: The buffering role of self-compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Patrick J; Brenner, Rachel E; Vogel, David L; Lannin, Daniel G; Strass, Haley A

    2017-01-01

    Less than 1/3 of college men seek psychological help per year when experiencing mental health concerns. Many believe this is because socialized masculine norms are incongruent with help-seeking decisions. In line with this, adherence to masculine norms, like emotional control and self-reliance, is consistently linked to factors associated with lower use of counseling. Identifying constructs that buffer, or reduce, the relationship between masculine norm adherence and common barriers to seeking help, like help-seeking self-stigma and resistance to self-disclosing, could shed light on mechanisms through which effective interventions could be developed. As such, this study examined whether self-compassion, or the ability to show oneself kindness and understanding in the face of challenges, moderated the relationship between masculine norm adherence and both help-seeking self-stigma and the risks associated with self-disclosing to a counselor in a sample of 284 undergraduate men (Mage = 19.68, range = 18-30). Results indicate that self-compassion is associated with lower levels of help-seeking self-stigma and disclosure risks. Additionally, and perhaps more importantly, self-compassion buffered the relationship between overall masculine norm adherence and each of these barriers. Furthermore, when specific masculine norms were examined, self-compassion buffered the relationship between emotional control and disclosure risks. These results support the need for future research focused on the development and assessment of self-compassion based interventions aimed at decreasing the barriers undergraduate men experience toward seeking psychological help. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Physical activity and exercise after stoma surgery: overcoming the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sarah

    2017-03-09

    This article presents the results from a large nationwide survey completed in 2016 that investigated the physical health and wellbeing of people living with stomas in the UK. In particular, the survey looked at physical activity and exercise, general attitudes and opinions about exercise, whether or not advice about physical activity had been received and other general questions about parastomal hernia and quality of life. There were 2631 respondents making it one of the largest known surveys to date. The findings were concerning yet unsurprising, highlighting a trend toward inactivity after stoma surgery and a fear of exercise in general. People also seem to have poor knowledge about appropriate activities, with many suggesting that the fear of developing a parastomal hernia is a major barrier to activity. Unsurprisingly, those who have a stoma owing to cancer seem to fare worse, reporting even lower levels of physical activity and worse quality of life compared to those with other conditions. This indicates that people who have a combination of a cancer diagnosis and also a stoma may need more specific or additional support in the longer term. The most concerning finding, however, was that the majority of patients could not recall being given any advice about exercise or physical activity by their nurse or surgeon. While this survey presents some initial findings, it raises questions for further research and work. It also highlights a significantly neglected area in both research and support for stoma patients and the health professionals caring for them.

  19. Diabetes and diet : managing dietary barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of

  20. 24 CFR 574.645 - Coastal barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coastal barriers. 574.645 Section....645 Coastal barriers. In accordance with the Coastal Barrier Resources Act, 16 U.S.C. 3501, no financial assistance under this part may be made available within the Coastal Barrier Resources System. ...

  1. Exploring Clothing as a Barrier to Workplace Participation Faced by People Living with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kerri McBee-Black; Jung Ha-Brookshire

    2018-01-01

    In response to research which argues that people living with a disability (PLWD) face societal barriers including workplace participation, this study explored how the barriers to social participation, specifically workplace participation, faced by PLWD are exacerbated by the lack of appropriate clothing and the role that stigma, self-efficacy, and clothing have in workplace participation. Finding appropriate clothing is a significant barrier to social participation for many PLWD. The social m...

  2. Recent experimental studies of edge and internal transport barriers in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohil, P; Baylor, L R; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; Doyle, E J; Greenfield, C M; Jernigan, T C; Kinsey, J E; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Murakami, M; Rhodes, T L; Rudakov, D L; Staebler, G M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Zeng, L

    2003-01-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes, but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines an internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) does not need to attain a critical value for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E r , at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport whilst maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high-performance plasmas with β N H 89 values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis electron cyclotron heating

  3. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    An important component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier is the use of a two-layer composite asphalt system, which provides backup water diversion capabilities if the primary capillary barrier fails to meet infiltration goals. Because of asphalt's potential to perform to specification over the 1000-year design life criterion, a composite asphalt barrier (HMAC/fluid-applied polymer-modified asphalt) is being considered as an alternative to the bentonite clay/high density poly(ethylene) barriers for the low-permeability component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier. The feasibility of using asphalt as a long-term barrier is currently being studied. Information that must be known is the ability of asphalt to retain desirable physical properties over a period of 1000 years. This paper presents the approach for performing accelerated aging tests and evaluating the performance of samples under accelerated conditions. The results of these tests will be compared with asphalt artifact analogs and the results of modeling the degradation of the selected asphalt composite to make life-cycle predictions

  4. Barriers to the collaborative care of patients with orofacial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eunice C; Marshall, Grant N

    2010-05-01

    Collaborative care interventions show significant promise in facilitating integrative care, which addresses the physical and mental health needs of patients with orofacial trauma. Ensuring the successful implementation of collaborative care interventions depends on having an adequate understanding of the potential barriers to the provision and receipt of mental health services within specific clinical settings. This article reviews recent findings on the patients' and providers' perceptions of barriers to psychosocial aftercare services in oral and maxillofacial trauma care settings. These findings indicate that although patients and providers recognize the need for psychosocial aftercare, they report substantial barriers to these services. Structural barriers, such as not knowing where to obtain services and financial cost, are the major obstacles among patients. Among providers, structural barriers also serve as significant impediments to the provision of psychosocial services. Some of the most common structural barriers reported by providers include a shortage of financial resources, trained clinical staff, and space. Although collaborative care interventions may be well suited to capitalize on patients' and providers' interests in psychosocial aftercare programs, further research is needed to determine the viability of this promising aftercare model within oral and maxillofacial trauma care settings.

  5. Barriers to the Adoption and Use of an Electronic Medication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Hertzum, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians’ adoption of the information systems deployed at hospitals is crucial to achieving the intended effects of the systems, yet many systems face substantial adoption barriers. In this study we analyse the adoption and use of an electronic medication record (EMR) 2-4 years after its...... deployment. We investigate mid-and-lower-level managers’ perception of (a) the extent to which clinicians have adopted the EMR and the work procedures associated with its use and (b) possible barriers toward adopting the EMR and work procedures, including the managers’ perception of the usefulness and ease...... obtained. Eleven categories of barrier are identified with uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are as the prime barrier. This prime barrier is particularly noteworthy because the respondents are formally responsible for the adoption of the EMR. It is apparent that time alone has not led...

  6. It is not the barriers, but the disorganised learning that holds us backexclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Hans (FourFact AB (Sweden)); Wene, Clas-Otto (Wenergy AB (Sweden))

    2011-07-01

    Since the first oil-crisis many studies examined the barriers preventing energy efficiency opportunities to be fully realised and exploited. There are several typologies and many attempts to quantify the impediment that the barriers constitute. These studies mostly end with recommendations on how these barriers should be eradicated, or at least lowered. Numerous policies have been based on the barrier concept and designed with measures to reduce those barriers. And still, very little improvement has happened. There are, however, alternatives to explain the problems and to design the solutions. This paper gives an overview of the most commonly-mentioned barriers, explains why they are insufficient as a concept, and indicates a different foundation for policymaking in behavioural economics. It also advocates focused deployment programmes that make use of technology learning

  7. Modelization and simulation of capillary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisbona Cortes, F.; Aguilar Villa, G.; Clavero Gracia, C.; Gracia Lozano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Among the different underground transport phenomena, that due to water flows is of great relevance. Water flows in infiltration and percolation processes are responsible of the transport of hazardous wastes towards phreatic layers. From the industrial and geological standpoints, there is a great interest in the design of natural devices to avoid the flows transporting polluting substances. This interest is increased when devices are used to isolate radioactive waste repositories, whose life is to be longer than several hundred years. The so-called natural devices are those based on the superimposition of material with different hydraulic properties. In particular, the flow retention in this kind stratified media, in unsaturated conditions, is basically due to the capillary barrier effect, resulting from placing a low conductivity material over another with a high hydraulic conductivity. Covers designed from the effect above have also to allow a drainage of the upper layer. The lower cost of these covers, with respect to other kinds of protection systems, and the stability in time of their components make them very attractive. However, a previous investigation to determine their effectivity is required. In this report we present the computer code BCSIM, useful for easy simulations of unsaturated flows in a capillary barrier configuration with drainage, and which is intended to serve as a tool for designing efficient covers. The model, the numerical algorithm and several implementation aspects are described. Results obtained in several simulations, confirming the effectivity of capillary barriers as a technique to build safety covers for hazardous waste repositories, are presented. (Author)

  8. Barriers to pediatric cochlear implantation: A parental survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles Q; Reilly, Brian K; Preciado, Diego A

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to (1) determine barriers in the pediatric cochlear implantation process specific to publicly insured patients, wherein delayed implantation has been reported, and (2) compare the perceived barriers between publicly and privately insured patients. Tertiary care cochlear implantation center at academic pediatric hospital. Cross-sectional survey, retrospective chart review. The validated, 39 item Barriers to Care Questionnaire was administered to the parents of 80 recipients of cochlear implantation by two surgeons between 2013 and 2016. Survey results and diagnosis to implant interval were compared based on public or private insurance status. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Of 110 cochlear implants, 27 of 80 (34%) English-speaking parents completed the survey. 15 were privately insured and 12 were publicly insured. 23 of 27 respondents received cochlear implantation for pre-lingual sensorineural hearing loss. Publicly insured patients had significantly longer median time from diagnosis to implant than privately insured (19 vs. 8 mo, p = 0.01). The three worst scoring barrier categories for privately insured families in order were Pragmatics, Expectations, and Marginalization, whereas for publicly insured families it was Pragmatics, Skills, and Expectations. The worst scoring question for privately insured patients was "Having to take time off work". For the publicly insured, it was "Lack of communication." Privately insured patients reported more barriers on the Barriers to Care Questionnaire than publicly insured patients did. Although pragmatics was the worst-scoring barrier category for both groups, difficulties found on the survey ranked differently for each group. This information can help providers address disparities and access barriers for vulnerable patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    the thickness of the failure layer and the width of the possible failure are essential for the required barrier design parameter height and width. First results of the calculated drag coefficients of dynamic impact pressure measurements showed that the dynamic coefficient cw is much lower than 1.0 which is contradictory to most of existing dimensioning property protection guidelines. It appears to us that special adaptation to the system like smaller mesh sizes and special ground-barrier interface compared to normal rock-fall barriers and channelised debris flow barriers are necessary to improve the retention behavior of shallow landslide barriers. Detailed analysis of the friction coefficient in relationship with pore water pressure measurements gives interesting insights into the dynamic of fluid-solid mixed flows. Impact pressures dependencies on flow features are analyzed and discussed with respect to existing models and guidelines for shallow landslides.

  10. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due......) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen...

  11. Optical Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Mark Steven

    The high temperature properties of ceramic materials make them suitable for the extreme environments of gas combustion powered turbines. They are instrumental in providing thermal insulation for the metallic turbine components from the combustion products. Also, the addition of specific rare earth elements to ceramics creates materials with temperature diagnostic applications. Laser based methods have been applied to these ceramic coatings to predict their remaining thermal insulation service life and to explore their high temperature diagnostic capabilities. A method for cleaning thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) contaminated during engine operation has been developed using laser ablation. Surface contamination on the turbine blades hinders nondestructive remaining life prediction using photo luminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS). Real time monitoring of the removed material is employed to prevent damage to the underlying coating. This method relies on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to compute the cross correlation coefficient between the spectral emissions of a sample TBC that is contaminated and a reference clean TBC. It is possible to remove targeted contaminants and cease ablation when the top surface of the TBC has been reached. In collaboration with this work, Kelley's thesis [1] presents microscopy images and PLPS measurements indicating the integrity of the TBC has been maintained during the removal of surface contaminants. Thermographic phosphors (TGP) have optical emission properties when excited by a laser that are temperature dependent. These spectral and temporal properties have been investigated and utilized for temperature measurement schemes by many previous researchers. The compounds presented in this dissertation consist of various rare earth (Lanthanide) elements doped into a host crystal lattice. As the temperature of the lattice changes, both the time scale for vibrational quenching and the distribution of energy among atomic energy

  12. [Blood-brain barrier part III: therapeutic approaches to cross the blood-brain barrier and target the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Miller, F; Cazaubon, S; Couraud, P-O

    2010-03-01

    Over the last few years, the blood-brain barrier has come to be considered as the main limitation for the treatment of neurological diseases caused by inflammatory, tumor or neurodegenerative disorders. In the blood-brain barrier, the close intercellular contact between cerebral endothelial cells due to tight junctions prevents the passive diffusion of hydrophilic components from the bloodstream into the brain. Several specific transport systems (via transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells) are implicated in the delivery of nutriments, ions and vitamins to the brain; other transporters expressed on cerebral endothelial cells extrude endogenous substances or xenobiotics, which have crossed the cerebral endothelium, out of the brain and into the bloodstream. Recently, several strategies have been proposed to target the brain, (i) by by-passing the blood-brain barrier by central drug administration, (ii) by increasing permeability of the blood-brain barrier, (iii) by modulating the expression and/or the activity of efflux transporters, (iv) by using the physiological receptor-dependent blood-brain barrier transport, and (v) by creating new viral or chemical vectors to cross the blood-brain barrier. This review focuses on the illustration of these different approaches. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Parkinson's disease in Jordan: Barriers and motivators to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Nazzal, Mohammad; Al-Sheyab, Nihaya

    2016-10-01

    Perceived barriers to engaging in exercise in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are becoming more defined in countries such as the UK and the US. This, however, may vary by culture and environment. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of exercise and barriers that may affect participation in people with PD from Jordan. Two focus groups and seven individual interviews were conducted with people with PD. Additionally, individual interviews were conducted with two neurologists. Conversations were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis and validated via researcher triangulation and peer checking. Most of the PD participants lacked previous participation in any disease-specific exercises. Several barriers were perceived by PD participants for such lack of participation. Barriers included difficulty of diagnosis, lack of informational support provided by neurologists, lack of referral to physiotherapy services, disease-specific issues, and setting-related issues. Neurologists indicated a number of barriers in counseling their PD patients on exercise including lack of time and lack of health system resources. Motivators to participate in future exercise included outcome expectations and family support. Findings of the study shed light into large areas of unmet needs of supporting exercise and physiotherapy for people with PD in developing countries as per Jordan. For better patient outcomes, findings of the study suggest that it is crucial to raise awareness among all PD-related stakeholders on the benefits of early referrals to physiotherapy and early engagement in exercise programs.

  14. Effects of synbiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xue

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Probiotics can improve the concentration of colonic probiotics, while synbiotics can improve probiotics concentration and mucosa thickness in colon, decrease L/M ratio and bacterial translocation. Synbiotics shows more protective effects on intestinal mucosal barrier in rats after cecectomy and gastrostomy and the intervention of specific antibiotics.

  15. Barriers to timely initiation of breastfeeding among mothers of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine labour ward and delivery table, specific assignment to the staff in the delivery/ labour rooms help newly delivered mothers initiate breastfeeding early, and empowering the to request for babies are recommended. Keywords: breastfeeding, initiation, barriers. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice Vol. 9(1) 2006: 57-64 ...

  16. Status epilepticus, blood-brain barrier disruption, inflammation, and epileptogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, Jan A.; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, attention has been focused on dysfunction of the cerebral vasculature and inflammation as important players in epileptogenic processes, with a specific emphasis on failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB; Fig. 1) (Seiffert et al., 2004; Marchi et al., 2007; Oby and Janigro,

  17. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care: views of parents and adolescents in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2016-01-01

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers regarding psychosocial care for the child, along with associated child and family characteristics. We obtained data on an age-stratified random sample of school children/pupils aged 4-18 via questionnaires (N = 666; response rate 70.3 %). Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care were measured with the "Barriers to Treatment Participation Scale-Expectancies" questionnaire (BTPS-exp). Results showed that 64 % of the parents of children below age 12, 59 % of the parents of adolescents (age 12-18), and 84 % of the adolescents expected one or more barriers. Parents and adolescents expected barriers most frequently with respect to irrelevance of treatment. Mainly parents with low educational level and their adolescents expected barriers regarding treatment, and quite a few characteristics of parents of adolescents were associated with expecting multiple barriers regarding treatment demands and issues, for example, single parents, parents of lower educational level and of adolescent boys, and parents of adolescents with psychosocial problems. We conclude that adolescents especially, but also their parents and parents of younger children, expect major barriers to psychosocial care, which may greatly hinder appropriate care seeking. This evidence may support professionals and policymakers in their attempts to improve access to psychosocial care.

  18. Money is Brain: Financial Barriers and Consequences for Canadian Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Aravind; King-Shier, Kathryn; Manns, Braden J; Hill, Michael D; Campbell, David J T

    2017-03-01

    Stroke patients of lower socioeconomic status have worse outcomes. It remains poorly understood whether this is due to illness severity or personal or health system barriers. We explored the experiences of stroke patients with financial barriers in a qualitative descriptive pilot study, seeking to capture perceived challenges that interfere with their poststroke health and recovery. We interviewed six adults with a history of stroke and financial barriers in Alberta, Canada, inquiring about their: (1) experiences after stroke; (2) experience of financial barriers; (3) perceived reasons for financial barriers; (4) health consequences of financial barriers; and (5) mechanisms for coping with financial barriers. Two reviewers analyzed data using inductive thematic analysis. The participants developed new or worsened financial circumstances as a consequence of stroke-related disability. Poststroke impairments and financial barriers took a toll on their mental health. They struggled to access several aspects of long-term poststroke care, including allied health professional services, medications, and proper nutrition. They described opportunity costs and tradeoffs when accessing health services. In several cases, they were unaware of health resources available to them and were hesitant to disclose their struggles to their physicians and even their families. Some patients with financial barriers perceive challenges to accessing various aspects of poststroke care. They may have inadequate knowledge of resources available to them and may not disclose their concerns to their health care team. This suggests that providers themselves might consider asking stroke patients about financial barriers to optimize their long-term poststroke care.

  19. Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Morante

    2005-12-31

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and

  20. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Bainton, Roland J

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through G-protein coupled receptor signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate BBB has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many BBB mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the BBB can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of BBB gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of BBB secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate BBB anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  1. Communication barriers in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBARA KOC-KOZŁOWIEC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The art of communication – listening and speaking – is a major life skill, with a thorough influence on every human life. Remaining silent while the interlocutor speaks is not all that there is to the act of listening to messages. True listening is based on an intention to get involved in understanding of the other person, enjoying his or her presence, learning something from the conversation, giving assistance, or comforting the interlocutor. In the article the author describes obstacles (barriers, which render true listening impossible. These barriers have been identified by a group of young adults.

  2. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L.; Ivlev, B.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented

  3. Hydraulic hammer acting during lowering of casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, N A; Bondarev, V I; Lebedev, O A

    1968-11-01

    The Berzheron method is used to determine the pressure generated in a well when casing is being lowered. The generated pressure is caused by flow of liquid displaced by the casing. Such liquid flow is transient and is described by unsteady-state type of equations, which are solved graphically. The graphical solution is rapid and relatively simple. Application of the solution to a specific example is shown. Conclusions from this study are: (1) collapse of casing can occur during the lowering operation, previous to time of landing; (2) both casing collapse and breakage of the check valve in the casing are caused by excessive lowering speed of large-diameter casing and the resulting high pressure; and (3) during the lowering operation, pressure varies in the well and such pressure variation can cause wall damage, water-gas appearance, and formation fracturing.

  4. Impedance-based cell monitoring: barrier properties and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In multicellular organisms epithelial and endothelial cells form selective permeable interfaces between tissue compartments of different chemical compositions. Tight junctions which connect adjacent cells, control the passage of molecules across the barrier and, in addition, facilitate active transport processes. The cellular barriers are not static but can be deliberately modulated by exposure to specific external stimuli. In vitro models representing the essential absorption barriers of the body are nowadays available, thus allowing investigation of the parameters that control permeability as well as transport processes across those barriers. Independent of the origin of the barrier forming cells, techniques are needed to quantify their barrier integrity. One simple assay is to measure the permeability for given hydrophilic substrates possessing different molecular weights like sucrose or dextrans. However, this technique is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Moreover, radioactive or fluorescently-labeled substrates are needed to allow easy analytical detection. Finally, if transport processes are investigated, the standard permeant may interfere with the transport process under investigation or might even alter the barrier integrity by itself. Thus, independent, non-invasive techniques are needed to quantify the barrier integrity continuously during the experiment. Such techniques are available and are mainly based on the measurement of the transendothelial or transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER of barrier forming cells grown on porous membranes. Simple devices using two sets of electrodes (so-called Voltohmeters are widely used. In addition, an easy-to-use physical technique called impedance spectroscopy allows the continuous analysis of both the TEER and the electrical capacitance giving additional information about the barrier properties of cells grown on permeable membranes. This technique is useful as a quality control

  5. Barrier-relevant crash modification factors and average costs of crashes on arterial roads in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaotian; Tarko, Andrew P

    2018-02-01

    among all the studied barriers due to the smaller increase in the crash frequency caused by these barriers and the less severe injury outcomes. More specifically, the occupants of vehicles colliding with near-side cable barriers tended to have less severe injuries than occupants of vehicles entering the median from median's farther side. The near-side cable barriers provided protection against rollover inside the median and against a potentially dangerous collision with or running over the median drain; therefore, the greatest safety benefit can be expected where cable barriers are installed at both edges of the median. The CMFs and unit crash costs for 48 road-barrier scenarios produced in this study are included in this paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The relative importance of patient-reported barriers to colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Resa M; Woolf, Steven H; Cunningham, Tina D; Johnson, Robert E; Krist, Alex H; Rothemich, Stephen F; Vernon, Sally W

    2010-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are suboptimal. The most important barriers identified by patients are poorly understood. A comprehensive assessment of barriers to all recommended modalities is needed. In 2007, a questionnaire was mailed to 6100 patients, aged 50-75 years, from 12 family medicine practices in the Virginia Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network. People aged 65-75 years and African Americans were oversampled. Patients were asked to rate 19-21 barriers to each of four recommended tests. In 2008, responses were coded on a 5-point scale; higher scores reflected stronger barrier endorsement. The response rate was 55% (n=3357). Approximately 40% of respondents were aged >/=65 years, 30% were African-American, and 73% were adherent to screening. A clinician's failure to suggest screening and not knowing testing was necessary received the highest mean scores as barriers. Financial concerns and misconceptions were also cited. Barrier scores differed depending on whether respondents were never screened, overdue for screening, or adherent to guidelines. The top five barriers for each modality included test-specific barriers (e.g., handling stool, bowel preparation), which often outranked generic barriers to screening. Not knowing testing was necessary was a top barrier for all tests but colonoscopy. Although physician advice and awareness of the need for screening are important, barriers to screening are not homogenous across tests, and test-specific barriers warrant consideration in designing strategies to improve screening rates. Barrier scores differ by screening status, highlighting the need to address prior screening experience. Evidence that patients are more familiar with colonoscopy than with other modalities suggests an opportunity to improve screening rates by educating patients about alternative tests. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed

  8. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  9. Barriers to Physical Activity in East Harlem, New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Fox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. East Harlem is an epicenter of the intertwining epidemics of obesity and diabetes in New York. Physical activity is thought to prevent and control a number of chronic illnesses, including diabetes, both independently and through weight control. Using data from a survey collected on adult (age 18+ residents of East Harlem, this study evaluated whether perceptions of safety and community-identified barriers were associated with lower levels of physical activity in a diverse sample. Methods. We surveyed 300 adults in a 2-census tract area of East Harlem and took measurements of height and weight. Physical activity was measured in two ways: respondents were classified as having met the weekly recommended target of 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity (walking per week (or not and reporting having engaged in at least one recreational physical activity (or not. Perceived barriers were assessed through five items developed by a community advisory board and perceptions of neighborhood safety were measured through an adapted 7-item scale. Two multivariate logistic regression models with perceived barriers and concerns about neighborhood safety were modeled separately as predictors of engaging in recommended levels of exercise and recreational physical activity, controlling for respondent weight and sociodemographic characteristics. Results. The most commonly reported perceived barriers to physical activity identified by nearly half of the sample were being too tired or having little energy followed by pain with exertion and lack of time. Multivariate regression found that individuals who endorsed a greater number of perceived barriers were less likely to report having met their weekly recommended levels of physical activity and less likely to engage in recreational physical activity controlling for covariates. Concerns about neighborhood safety, though prevalent, were not associated with physical activity levels. Conclusions. Although

  10. Acculturation, Enculturation, Gender, and College Environment on Perceived Career Barriers among Latino/A College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway-Friesen, Holly

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the role culture and college environment had on the perception of ethnic and gender career barriers of 138 Latino/a college students. Specifically, background characteristics (i.e., parent education, immigration status, and sex), acculturation, enculturation, and college environment on perceived ethnic/gender barriers were…

  11. Flexible barrier technology for enabling rollable AMOLED displays and upscaling flexible OLED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.M.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Weijer, P. van de; Assche, F. van; Shen, J.; Ellis, T.; Manders, W.; Akkerman, H.; Bouten, P.; Mol, A.M.B. van

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a high performance thin-film barrier is the most critical challenge in upscaling and commercializing flexible OLED products. We report a flexible thin-film-barrier technology that meets lifetime specifications for OLED lighting, and demonstrate it in rollable QVGA a-IGZO AMOLED

  12. Adaptation of innate lymphoid cells to nutrient deprivation promotes type 2 barrier immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survival of the host relies on the establishment of site-specific barrier defense tailored to constrain pressures imposed by commensal and parasitic exposures. The host is confronted with the additional challenge of maintaining barrier immunity in fluctuating states of dietary availability, yet how ...

  13. An Insight into Communication Barriers between Bank Managers and their Customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golen, Steven

    1987-01-01

    The study attempted to identify specific industry-related communication problems of bank managers. A questionnaire was completed by 193 managers identifying perceived communication barriers and relative importance of each. Resistance to change and tendency not to listen were considered serious barriers. (CH)

  14. 77 FR 36231 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...-0004] RIN 3014-AA39 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA... (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Guidelines to specifically address emergency... ensure that newly constructed and altered emergency transportable housing units covered by the ADA or ABA...

  15. A composite vacuum barrier for the LHC short straight section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenny, B.; Rohmig, P.; Uriarte, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The lattice of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will contain 384 Short Straight Section (SSS) units, one in every 53 m half-cell. The SSS is composed of a twin aperture high-field superconducting quadrupole and of two combined-function corrector magnets operating in pressurized helium at 1.9 K. The SSS cryostat contains also a barrier for sectorisation of the insulation vacuum. The vacuum barrier is mounted between the helium vessel and the vacuum enclosure. Its functions are to limit the extent of eventual helium leaks and to facilitate the leak detection and the pumping-down from atmospheric pressure. During installation of the LHC, the vacuum barrier permits independent testing of the half-cells, thus enabling higher installation rates. In parallel to a conventional barrier made out of austenitic stainless steel, a barrier of composite material was developed, taking advantage of the lower thermal conductivity of glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, and with the aim of reducing costs for LHC. The thermo-mechanical design together with the conception and the moulding techniques used for the manufacture of the prototype are described. Bonding techniques for the leak tight stainless steel composite interfaces are presented and test results shown. Results on the mechanical performance and on the helium tests carried out on the prototype are given

  16. Mine flooding and barrier pillar hydrology in the Pittsburgh basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Pennsylvania began requiring barrier pillars between mines as early as 1930. The Ashley formula, resulting from a early commission on the problem, requires 20 feet of coal plus a thickness of coal equal to four times the seam height plus an additional thickness of coal equal to one tenth of the overburden thickness, or the maximum potential hydraulic head. For a 6-foot thick coal seam under 400 feet of cover, the barrier would be 20+24+40=84 feet. The Ashley formula is intended to protect coal miners from a catastrophic failure of a barrier pillar which has a high head of water impounded behind it. The paper gives several examples of flooded and unflooded mines and the performance of their barrier pillars with respect to acid mine drainage. It is concluded that for all practical purposes, barrier pillars designed with the Ashley formula are able to hydrologically isolate mines from one another. This hydrologic isolation promotes the inundation of closed mines. Inundation effectively stops acid formation, thus, fully inundated mines do not represent a perpetual source of acid mine drainage. Infiltrating ground water improves the mine water chemistry resulting in a net alkaline discharge which has greatly lowered iron concentrations. The best locations for acid mine drainage treatment plants is at the lowest surface elevation above the mine with mine flooded to near that elevation

  17. Barriers against psychosocial communication: oncologists' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlind, Hanna; Kettis, Åsa; Glimelius, Bengt; Ring, Lena

    2013-10-20

    To explore oncologists' psychosocial attitudes and beliefs and their perceptions regarding barriers against psychosocial communication. A questionnaire was distributed to oncologists in Sweden (n = 537). Questions covered demography, the Physician Psychosocial Beliefs Scale (PPBS), and barriers against psychosocial communication. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine what factors contribute the most to the PPBS score and the total number of barriers and barriers affecting clinical practice, respectively. Spearman rank-order correlation was used to determine correlation between PPBS score and number of barriers. Questionnaire response rate was 64%. Mean PPBS value was 85.5 (range, 49 to 123; SD, 13.0). Most oncologists (93%) perceived one or more barriers in communicating psychosocial aspects with patients. On average, five different communication barriers were perceived, of which most were perceived to affect clinical practice. These barriers included insufficient consultation time, lack of resources for taking care of problems discovered, and lack of methods to evaluate patients' psychosocial health in clinical practice. There was a positive correlation (rs = 0.490; P barriers (ie, less psychosocially oriented oncologists perceived more barriers). Oncologists with supplementary education with a psychosocial focus perceived fewer barriers/barriers affecting clinical practice (P barriers affecting psychosocial communication in clinical practice. Interventions aiming to improve psychosocial communication must therefore be multifaceted and individualized to clinics and individual oncologists. It is important to minimize barriers to facilitate optimal care and treatment of patients with cancer.

  18. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function.

  19. Communication Barriers in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Dabaj, Fahme; Altinay, Fahriye; Altinay, Zehra

    2003-01-01

    Communication is a key concept as being the major tool for people in order to satisfy their needs. It is an activity which refers as process and effective communication requires qualified communication with the elimination of communication barriers. As it is known, distance education is a new trend by following contemporary facilities and tools…

  20. Functional barriers: Properties and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Dole, P.; Aucejo, S.; Dainelli, D.; Cruz Garcia, C. de la; Hankemeier, T.; N'Gono, Y.; Papaspyrides, C.D.; Paseiro, P.; Pastorelli, S.; Pavlidou, S.; Pennarun, P.Y.; Saillard, P.; Vidal, L.; Vitrac, O.; Voulzatis, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of

  1. Overcoming Barriers: Women in Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire M.

    2009-01-01

    Women currently represent the largest number of teachers in the United States but remain underrepresented in the superintendent position. This suggests that the superintendency has been influenced by patriarchy. If women are to break through the barriers that prevent them from attaining a superintendency, we will need to understand the social…

  2. Seasonal breaching of coastal barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, Thieu Quang

    2007-01-01

    Natural or unintended breaching can be catastrophic, causing loss of human lives and damage to infrastructures, buildings and natural habitats. Quantitative understand-ing of coastal barrier breaching is therefore of great importance to vulnerability as-sessment of protection works as well as to

  3. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K.; Muller, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification

  4. Pharmacogenetics in Europe: barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, D; Zika, E; Hopkins, M M; Gaisser, S; Ibarreta, D

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation in the field of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics (PGx) in Europe. High expectations surrounding the clinical application of PGx remain largely unmet, as only a limited number of such applications have actually reached the market and clinical practice. Thus, the potential impact of PGx-based diagnostics on healthcare and its socio-economic implications are still unclear. With the aim of shedding some light on these uncertainties, the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has conducted a review of the 'state of the art' and a further analysis on the use of pharmacogenetics diagnostics for preventing toxic drug reactions and improving drug efficacy in Europe. The paper presents highlights from the JRC-IPTS studies and discusses possibilities for improving translation of PGx research in Europe by comparing some experiences in the USA. We also illustrate the related barriers for the clinical uptake of PGx in Europe with specific case-studies. Most of the barriers identified extend beyond the European context. This reflects the global problems of scarcity of data demonstrating proven clinical validity or utility and favorable cost-effectiveness studies to support the clinical application of PGx diagnostic tests in the clinical setting. Another key barrier is the lack of incentives for the private sector to invest in the development and licensing of PGx diagnostic tests for improving the safety and efficacy of out-of-patent drugs. It therefore seems that one key aspect where policy can affect the clinical uptake of PGx is via sustaining large-scale industry-academia collaborations for developing and proving the utility of PGx diagnostics. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Effect of breakup on near barrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Unstable neutron-rich nuclei having very weakly bound neutrons exhibit characteristic features such as a neutron halo extending to large radii, and a low energy threshold for breakup. These features may dramatically affect fusion and other reaction processes. It is well accepted that the extended nuclear matter distribution will lead to an enhancement in fusion cross-sections over those for tightly bound nuclei. The effect of couplings to channels which act as doorways to breakup is, however, controversial, with model predictions differing in the relative magnitudes of enhancement and suppression. To investigate the effect on fusion of couplings specific to unstable neutron-rich nuclei, it is necessary to understand (and then predict) the cross-sections expected for their stable counterparts. This requires knowledge of the energy of the average fusion barrier, and information on the couplings. Experimentally all this information can be obtained from precisely measured fusion cross-sections. Such precision measurements of complete fusion cross-sections for 9 Be + 208 Pb and 6 Li, 7 Li + 209 Bi systems have been done at the Australian National University. The distribution of fusion barriers extracted from these data were used to reliably predict the expected fusion cross-sections. Comparison of the theoretical expectations with the experimentally measured cross-sections show conclusively that complete fusion, at above barrier energies, for all three systems is suppressed (by about 30%) compared with the fusion of more tightly bound nuclei. These measurements, in conjunction with incomplete fusion cross-sections, which were also measured, should encourage a complete theoretical description of fusion and breakup

  6. CONTRIBUTION OF QUADRATIC RESIDUE DIFFUSERS TO EFFICIENCY OF TILTED PROFILE PARALLEL HIGHWAY NOISE BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Monazzam ، P. Nassiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation on the acoustic performance of tilted profile parallel barriers with quadratic residue diffuser (QRD tops and faces. A 2D boundary element method (BEM is used to predict the barrier insertion loss. The results of rigid and with absorptive coverage are also calculated for comparisons. Using QRD on the top surface and faces of all tilted profile parallel barrier models introduced here is found to improve the efficiency of barriers compared with rigid equivalent parallel barrier at the examined receiver positions. Applying a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz on 5 degrees tilted parallel barrier improves the overall performance of its equivalent rigid barrier by 1.8 dB(A. Increase in the treated surfaces with reactive elements shifts the effective performance toward lower frequencies. It is found that by tilting the barriers from 0 to 10 degrees in parallel set up, the degradation effects in parallel barriers is reduced but the absorption effect of fibrous materials and also diffusivity of the quadratic residue diffuser is reduced significantly. In this case all the designed barriers have better performance with 10 degrees tilting in parallel set up. The most economic traffic noise parallel barrier which produces significantly high performance, is achieved by covering the top surface of the barrier closed to the receiver by just a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz and tilting angle of 10 degrees. The average A-weighted insertion loss in this barrier is predicted to be 16.3 dB (A.

  7. Contribution of diffuser surfaces to efficiency of tilted T shape parallel highway noise barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Javid Rouzi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsThe paper presents the results of an investigation on the acoustic  performance of tilted profile parallel barriers with quadratic residue diffuser tops and faces.MethodsA2D boundary element method (BEM is used to predict the barrier insertion loss. The results of rigid and with absorptive coverage are also calculated for comparisons. Using QRD on the top surface and faces of all tilted profile parallel barrier models introduced here is found to  improve the efficiency of barriers compared with rigid equivalent parallel barrier at the examined  receiver positions.Results Applying a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz on 5 degrees tilted parallel barrier  improves the overall performance of its equivalent rigid barrier by 1.8 dB(A. Increase the treated surfaces with reactive elements shifts the effective performance toward lower frequencies. It is  found that by tilting the barriers from 0 to 10 degrees in parallel set up, the degradation effects in  parallel barriers is reduced but the absorption effect of fibrous materials and also diffusivity of thequadratic residue diffuser is reduced significantly. In this case all the designed barriers have better  performance with 10 degrees tilting in parallel set up.ConclusionThe most economic traffic noise parallel barrier, which produces significantly  high performance, is achieved by covering the top surface of the barrier closed to the receiver by  just a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz and tilting angle of 10 degrees. The average Aweighted  insertion loss in this barrier is predicted to be 16.3 dB (A.

  8. Barriers to lifestyle changes for prevention of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Leppin, Anja; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elimination of modifiable risk factors including unhealthy lifestyle has the potential for prevention of 80% of cardiovascular disease cases. The present study focuses on disclosing barriers for maintaining specific lifestyle changes by exploring associations between perceiving...... inequality even in populations with equal and cost-free access to health care. Our study suggests supplementing traditional public campaigns to counter cardiovascular disease by using individualized and targeted initiatives....... these barriers and various sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. METHODS: Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire survey and included 962 respondents who initially accepted treatment for a hypothetical cardiovascular risk, and who subsequently stated that they preferred lifestyle...

  9. Specifying Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    This paper tackles the accusation that applied ethics is no serious academic enterprise because it lacks theoretical bracing. It does so in two steps. In the first step I introduce and discuss a highly acclaimed method to guarantee stability in ethical theories: Henry Richardson's specification. The discussion shows how seriously ethicists take the stability of the connection between the foundational parts of their theories and their further development as well as their "application" to particular problems or cases. A detailed scrutiny of specification leads to the second step, where I use insights from legal theory to inform the debate around stability from that point of view. This view reveals some of specification's limitations. I suggest that, once specification is sufficiently specified, it appears astonishingly similar to deduction as used in legal theory. Legal theory also provides valuable insight into the functional range of deduction and its relation to other forms of reasoning. This leads to a richer understanding of stability in normative theories and to a smart division of labor between deduction and other forms of reasoning. The comparison to legal theory thereby provides a framework for how different methods such as specification, deduction, balancing, and analogy relate to one another.

  10. Keep it simple – lowering the barrier for authoring serious games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Ternier, Stefaan; Westera, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the continuous and abundant growth of the game market the uptake of serious games in education has been limited. Games require complex technologies and are difficult to organise and to embed in the curriculum. Aim. This article explores to what extent game templates and game

  11. Lowering the Barriers to Programming: A Survey of Programming Environments and Languages for Novice Programmers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelleher, Caitlin; Pausch, Randy

    2003-01-01

    .... The systems are organized by their primary goal, either to teach programming or to use programming to empower their users, and then by the authors' approach to making learning to program easier for novice programmers...

  12. Lowering the Barrier for Standards-Compliant and Discoverable Hydrological Data Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, J.

    2013-12-01

    The growing need for sharing and integration of hydrological and climate data across multiple organizations has resulted in the development of distributed, services-based, standards-compliant hydrological data management and data hosting systems. The problem with these systems is complicated set-up and deployment. Many existing systems assume that the data publisher has remote-desktop access to a locally managed server and experience with computer network setup. For corporate websites, shared web hosting services with limited root access provide an inexpensive, dynamic web presence solution using the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (LAMP) software stack. In this paper, we hypothesize that a webhosting service provides an optimal, low-cost solution for hydrological data hosting. We propose a software architecture of a standards-compliant, lightweight and easy-to-deploy hydrological data management system that can be deployed on the majority of existing shared internet webhosting services. The architecture and design is validated by developing Hydroserver Lite: a PHP and MySQL-based hydrological data hosting package that is fully standards-compliant and compatible with the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (CUAHSI) hydrologic information system. It is already being used for management of field data collection by students of the McCall Outdoor Science School in Idaho. For testing, the Hydroserver Lite software has been installed on multiple different free and low-cost webhosting sites including Godaddy, Bluehost and 000webhost. The number of steps required to set-up the server is compared with the number of steps required to set-up other standards-compliant hydrologic data hosting systems including THREDDS, IstSOS and MapServer SOS.

  13. Lowering Barriers to Achieving Multiple Environmental Goals in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recognition of past unsuccessful restoration strategies for the Chesapeake Bay, President Obama signed Executive Order (EO) 13508 “Strategy for Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed” in 2009.

  14. Supporting involvement of electric vehicles in distribution grids: Lowering the barriers for a proactive integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knezovic, Katarina; Marinelli, Mattia; Zecchino, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Increasing environmental concerns are driving an evolution of the energy system in which electric vehicles (EVs) play an important role. Still, as the EV number increases, the adverse impact of charging is observed more widely, especially at the low-voltage level where high EV concentrations cause...

  15. Long distance coupling of lower hybrid waves in JET plasmas with edge and coretransport barriers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ekedahl, A.; Granucci, G.; Mailloux, J.; Baranov, Y.; Erents, S. K.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Loarte, A.; Lomas, P. J.; McDonald, D.; Petržílka, Václav; Rantamäki, K.; Rimini, F.G.; Silva, C.; Stamp, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2005), s. 351-359 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : LH grill * plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  16. Lower tract neoplasm: Update of imaging evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Robert; Kawashima, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Cancers of the lower urinary tract can arise from the bladder, urachus or urethra. Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is the most common of these. The presentation of bladder, urachal and urethral cancers can differ but many result in hematuria as an initial indication. The diagnosis and staging of these cancers often necessitate radiologic imaging often in the form of cross-section CT urography or MR urography. The following article reviews the specific nature of lower tract cancers and their imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Weaning stress and gastrointestinal barrier development: Implications for lifelong gut health in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Moeser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI barrier serves a critical role in survival and overall health of animals and humans. Several layers of barrier defense mechanisms are provided by the epithelial, immune and enteric nervous systems. Together they act in concert to control normal gut functions (e.g., digestion, absorption, secretion, immunity, etc. whereas at the same time provide a barrier from the hostile conditions in the luminal environment. Breakdown of these critical GI functions is a central pathophysiological mechanism in the most serious GI disorders in pigs. This review will focus on the development and functional properties of the GI barrier in pigs and how common early life production stressors, such as weaning, can alter immediate and long-term barrier function and disease susceptibility. Specific stress-related pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for driving GI barrier dysfunction induced by weaning and the implications to animal health and performance will be discussed.

  18. Quasibound states in graphene quantum-dot nanostructures generated by concentric potential barrier rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhao-Tan; Yu Cheng-Long; Dong Quan-Li

    2012-01-01

    We study the quasibound states in a graphene quantum-dot structure generated by the single-, double-, and triple-barrier electrostatic potentials. It is shown that the strongest quasibound states are mainly determined by the innermost barrier. Specifically, the positions of the quasibound states are determined by the barrier height, the number of the quasibound states is determined by the quantum-dot radius and the angular momentum, and the localization degree of the quasibound states is influenced by the width of the innermost barrier, as well as the outside barriers. Furthermore, according to the study on the double- and triple-barrier quantum dots, we find that an effective way to generate more quasibound states with even larger energy level spacings is to design a quantum dot defined by many concentric barriers with larger barrier-height differences. Last, we extend our results into the quantum dot of many barriers, which gives a complete picture about the formation of the quasibound states in the kind of graphene quantum dot created by many concentric potential barrier rings. (rapid communication)

  19. Safety barriers on oil and gas platforms. Means to prevent hydrocarbon releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklet, Snorre

    2005-12-15

    /operational safety barriers are considered. The initiating events are divided into five main categories; (1) human and operational errors, (2) technical failures, (3) process upsets, (4) external events, and (5) latent failures from design. The development of the hydrocarbon release scenarios has generated new knowledge about causal factors of hydrocarbon releases and safety barriers introduced to prevent the releases. Collectively, the release scenarios cover the most frequent initiating events and the most important safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases. BORA-Release is a new method for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis of the hydrocarbon release frequency on oil and gas platforms. BORA-Release combines use of barrier block diagrams/event trees, fault trees, and risk influence diagrams in order to analyse the risk of hydrocarbon release from a set of hydrocarbon release scenarios. Use of BORA-Release makes it possible to analyse the effect on the hydrocarbon release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases. Further, BORA-Release may be used to analyse the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors. Thus, BORA-Release may improve today's quantitative risk analyses on two weak points; i) analysis of causal factors of the initiating event hydrocarbon release (loss of containment), and ii) analysis of the effect on the risk of human and organisational factors. The main focus of this thesis is safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases on offshore oil and gas production platforms. Thus, the results are primarily useful for the oil and gas industry in their effort to control and reduce the risk of hydrocarbon releases. The Norwegian oil and gas industry can use the results in their work to fulfil the requirements to safety barriers and risk analyses from the Petroleum Safety Authority. However, the concepts

  20. Enablers of and barriers to abortion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiahi, Maryam; Lim, Sahnah; Westover, Corey; Gold, Marji; Westhoff, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    Since the legalization of abortion services in the United States, provision of abortions has remained a controversial issue of high political interest. Routine abortion training is not offered at all obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) training programs, despite a specific training requirement by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Previous studies that described Ob-Gyn programs with routine abortion training either examined associations by using national surveys of program directors or described the experience of a single program. We set out to identify enablers of and barriers to Ob-Gyn abortion training in the context of a New York City political initiative, in order to better understand how to improve abortion training at other sites. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 22 stakeholders from 7 New York City public hospitals and focus group interviews with 62 current residents at 6 sites. Enablers of abortion training included program location, high-capacity services, faculty commitment to abortion training, external programmatic support, and resident interest. Barriers to abortion training included lack of leadership continuity, leadership conflict, lack of second-trimester abortion services, difficulty obtaining mifepristone, optional rather than routine training, and antiabortion values of hospital personnel. Supportive leadership, faculty commitment, and external programmatic support appear to be key elements for establishing routine abortion training at Ob-Gyn residency training programs.

  1. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Mascalzoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  2. Investigation of a natural geochemical barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Groundwater data from lysimeters and monitor wells in the vicinity of the Bowman, North Dakota, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site indicated that there is a mechanism in the subsurface which cleans up downward-percolating fluids. It was hypothesized that clays and organic materials in the sediments sequestered hazardous constituents from infiltrating fluids. A program was designed to collect sediment cores from various locations on and around the site and to analyze the sediments to determine whether there has been a build up of hazardous constituents in any specific type of sedimentary material. Materials that concentrate the hazardous constituents would be potential candidates to be used in constructed geochemical barriers. The water quality of the groundwater contained within the sedimentary section indicates that there is a transport of contaminants down through the sediments and that these contaminants are removed from solution by the iron-bearing minerals in the organic-rich lignite beds. The data gathered during the course of this investigation indicate that the lignite ashing operations have added very little of the hazardous constituents of concern--arsenic, chromium, molybdenum, selenium, or uranium--to the sediments beneath the UMTRA Project site. At both locations, the hazardous constituents are concentrated in the upper most lignite bed. These data offer a natural analog for laboratory tests in which sphagnum peat was used to sequester hazardous constituents. Constructed geochemical barriers are a viable mechanism for the clean-up of the majority of hazardous constituents from uranium mill tailings in groundwater

  3. Psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence among PLWH in China: role of self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangyu; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong

    2017-12-01

    Globally, optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is insufficient despite it is critical for maximum clinical benefits and treatment success among people living with HIV (PLWH). Many factors have been evidenced to influence medication adherence, including perceived barriers and self-efficacy. However, limited data are available regarding to psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence in China. Moreover, few studies have examined the mechanism of these two factors underlying HIV medication adherence. The aim of the current study is to examine the mediating role of adherence self-efficacy between perceived barriers and ART adherence among PLWH. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 2095 PLWH in Guangxi China who provided data on ART adherence. Participants reported their medication adherence, self-efficacy, barriers to ART adherence, as well as background characteristics. Results indicated a significant indirect effect from perceived barriers to medication adherence through adherence self-efficacy. Higher perceived psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence were related to lower adherence self-efficacy, which in turn was related to lower ART adherence. Self-efficacy could buffer the negative effects of perceived barriers on ART adherence. Future interventions to promote HIV medication adherence are recommended to focus on eliminating psychological and behavioral barriers, as well as increasing adherence self-efficacy.

  4. Socialisation into Organised Sports of Young Adolescents with a Lower Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Niek; Verbeek, Jan; van der Zwan, Joris; van Hilvoorde, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating sport socialisation often focussed on the barriers for youngsters from lower socio-economic status (SES) families to participate in sport. In the present study, the socialisation into sports of young adolescents from lower SES families that "do" participate in organised sports was investigated. A total of 9 girls…

  5. Financial Inclusion, Entry Barriers, and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaobin Fan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating the relationship between financial inclusion and the formation of entrepreneurs, both theoretically and empirically. We first construct a theoretical model to examine how the development of financial inclusion affects the formation of entrepreneurs. The model suggests that the development of financial inclusion can mitigate credit constraints on entrepreneurial activities by reducing information asymmetry in financial transactions, and in addition this effect is greater in industries with lower barriers to entry. Then, using data from 31 provinces and 19 industries in China during the period 2005–2014, we test the impact of financial inclusion on the formation of entrepreneurs. The estimation results confirm the positive effect of financial inclusion development on the formation of entrepreneurs, and indicate that this effect is heterogeneous across industries. Moreover, the development of financial inclusion is often beneficial to the formations of entrepreneurs in sectors with lower entry barriers.

  6. Facilitators & Barriers to the Adoption of Ergonomic Solutions in Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Ann Marie; Jaegers, Lisa; Welch, Laura; Barnidge, Ellen; Weaver, Nancy; Evanoff, Bradley A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Rates of musculoskeletal disorders in construction remain high. Few studies have described barriers and facilitators to the use of available ergonomic solutions. This paper describes these barriers and facilitators and their relationship to the level of adoption. Methods Three analysts rated 16 proposed ergonomic solutions from a participatory ergonomics study and assessed the level of adoption, six adoption characteristics, and identified the category of adoption from a theoretical model. Results Twelve solutions were always or intermittently used and were rated positively for characteristics of relative advantage, compatibility with existing work processes, and trialability. Locus of control (worker vs. contractor) was not related to adoption. Simple solutions faced fewer barriers to adoption than those rated as complex. Conclusions Specific adoption characteristics can help predict the use of new ergonomic solutions in construction. Adoption of complex solutions must involve multiple stakeholders, more time, and shifts in culture or work systems. PMID:28195660

  7. Barriers Against Adoption of Electronic Health Record in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bonacina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to expose the barriers which work against the satisfactory adoption and utilization of Electronic Health Records (EHRs in Italy. Experts from six operating areas were involved where barriers associated with practical daily use of EHRs might arise. Experts disclosed different barriers in their operating areas: the low interoperability of healthcare system infrastructures in diagnostic services; the lack of systems able to represent complex processes characterized by uncertainties in hospital wards; the unsatisfactory information exchange between heterogeneous healthcare providers in territorial healthcare; the lack of models and guidelines for administration process management; the lack of Health Information engineers who are recognized as professionals in Italian hospitals; the lack of domain vocabularies and ontologies for conceptual integration in clinical communication. Our findings suggest how future solutions must be designed considering the environment of specific areas.

  8. Aptamer nanomedicine for cancer therapeutics: barriers and potential for translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Phua, Kyle K L; Leong, Kam W

    2015-03-24

    Aptamer nanomedicine, including therapeutic aptamers and aptamer nanocomplexes, is beginning to fulfill its potential in both clinical trials and preclinical studies. Especially in oncology, aptamer nanomedicine may perform better than conventional or antibody-based chemotherapeutics due to specificity compared to the former and stability compared to the latter. Many proof-of-concept studies on applying aptamers to drug delivery, gene therapy, and cancer imaging have shown promising efficacy and impressive safety in vivo toward translation. Yet, there remains ample room for improvement and critical barriers to be addressed. In this review, we will first introduce the recent progress in clinical trials of aptamer nanomedicine, followed by a discussion of the barriers at the design and in vivo application stages. We will then highlight recent advances and engineering strategies proposed to tackle these barriers. Aptamer cancer nanomedicine has the potential to address one of the most important healthcare issues of the society.

  9. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  10. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  11. Effects of breakup of weakly bound projectile and neutron transfer on fusion reactions around Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.J.; Zhang, H.Q.; Yang, F.; Ruan, M.; Liu, Z.H.; Wu, Y.W.; Wu, X.K.; Zhou, P.; Zhang, C.L.; Zhang, G.L.; An, G.P.; Jia, H.M.; Xu, X.X.

    2007-01-01

    The excitation functions of quasielastic and elastic scattering at backward angles have been measured for the systems of 16 O+ 152 Sm, 6,7 Li+ 208 Pb and 32 S+ 90,96 Zr. The barrier distributions are extracted from these measured excitation functions and compared with the corresponding fusion barrier distributions. Except some details, the barrier distributions derived from the data of fusion and quasielastic/elastic scattering are almost the same for the tightly bound reaction systems. For the reaction systems with weakly bound projectile, the barrier distributions extracted from quasielastic scattering are obviously different from the fusion barrier distributions. However, the barrier distributions extracted from the excitation functions of the quasielastic scattering plus breakup are almost the same as the one extracted from the complete fusion data. This result means that barrier distribution not only bears the information of nuclear structures but also contains the knowledge of reaction mechanisms. Our results show that the complete fusion of the weakly bound projectile with heavy target is suppressed at the above barrier energies as compared with the model predictions. In addition, the measured barrier distribution of 32 S+ 96 Zr is broaden and extends to lower energy than in the case of 32 S+ 90 Zr due to the coupling of neutron transfer with positive Q-values, which result in a significant enhancement of fusion cross sections at the subbarrier energies

  12. Barriers and Solutions to Fieldwork Education in Hand Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Nathan; Sample, Shelby; Murphy, Malachi; Austin, Brittany; Glass, Jillian

    2017-08-09

    Survey. Fieldwork education is a vital component of training the next generation of CHTs. Barriers and solutions to fieldwork rotations in hand therapy are examined, as well as proposed solutions, including recommendations for student preparation. This descriptive study examined barriers for certified hand therapist clinicians to accept students for clinical rotations and clinicians' preferences for student preparation before a rotation in a hand setting. A survey was developed, peer reviewed, and distributed using the electronic mailing list of the Hand Therapy Certification Commission via SurveyMonkey. Aggregate responses were analyzed to identify trends including barriers to student clinical rotations and recommendations for students to prepare for hand rotations. A total of 2080 participants responded to the survey, representing a 37% response rate. Common logistical barriers were identified for accepting students such as limited clinical time and space. Many clinicians (32% agree and 8% strongly agree) also felt that the students lack the clinical knowledge to be successful. Areas of knowledge, skill set, and experience were surveyed for development before a clinical rotation in a hand setting. Most respondents (74%) reported increased likelihood of accepting a student with the recommended preparation. Novel qualitative responses to improve clinical experiences are presented as well. Student preparation before a clinical rotation in a hand setting appears to be a significant barrier based on the survey results. Areas of recommended knowledge, skill set, and experience may serve to guide both formal and informal methods of student preparation before a hand-specific clinical rotation to facilitate knowledge translation from experienced certified hand therapists to the next generation. Although logistical barriers may be difficult to overcome, hand-specific preparation based on clinician' recommendations may facilitate student acceptance and success in hand

  13. A survey to identify barriers of implementing an antibiotic checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daalen, F V; Geerlings, S E; Prins, J M; Hulscher, M E J L

    2016-04-01

    A checklist is an effective implementation tool, but addressing barriers that might impact on the effectiveness of its use is crucial. In this paper, we explore barriers to the uptake of an antibiotic checklist that aims to improve antibiotic use in daily hospital care. We performed an online questionnaire survey among medical specialists and residents with various professional backgrounds from nine Dutch hospitals. The questionnaire consisted of 23 statements on anticipated barriers hindering the uptake of the checklist. Furthermore, it gave the possibility to add comments. We included 219 completed questionnaires (122 medical specialists and 97 residents) in our descriptive analysis. The top six anticipated barriers included: (1) lack of expectation of improvement of antibiotic use, (2) lack of expected patients' satisfaction by checklist use, (3) lack of feasibility of the checklist, (4) negative previous experiences with other checklists, (5) the complexity of the antibiotic checklist and (6) lack of nurses' expectation of checklist use. Remarkably, 553 comments were made, mostly (436) about the content of the checklist. These insights can be used to improve the specific content of the checklist and to develop an implementation strategy that addresses the identified barriers.

  14. Community pharmacists' perceptions of barriers to communication with migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer A; Watson, Margaret C; Walker, Leighton; Denison, Alan; Vanes, Neil; Moffat, Mandy

    2012-06-01

    Effective communication by pharmacists is essential to ensure patient safety in terms of provision and use of medications by patients. Global migration trends mean community pharmacists increasingly encounter patients with a variety of first languages. The aim of this study was to explore community pharmacists' perceptions of communication barriers during the provision of care to A8 (nationals from central/Eastern European states) migrants. A qualitative face-to-face interview study of purposively sampled community pharmacists, North East Scotland. Participants (n = 14) identified a number of barriers to providing optimal care to A8 migrants including: communication (information gathering and giving); confidentiality when using family/friends as translators; the impact of patient healthcare expectations on communication and the length of the consultation; and frustration with the process of the consultation. Several barriers were specific to A8 migrants but most seemed pertinent to any group with limited English proficiency and reflect those found in studies of healthcare professionals caring for more traditional UK migrant populations. Further research is needed using objective outcome measures, such as consultation recordings, to measure the impact of these perceived barriers on pharmacist-patient consultations. Language and cultural barriers impact on the quality of pharmacist-patient communication and thus may have patient safety and pharmacist training implications. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Barriers related to physical activity practice in adolescents. A focus-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Romélio Rodriguez Añez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to identify barriers to physical activity in adolescents. Focus group interviews were conducted with subjects aged 15 to 18 years (n=59, 50.8% girls and divided according to gender. Content analysis was used to classify the reports into specific dimensions. Descriptive statistics employing relative and absolute frequencies of similar reports was performed using the SPSS 11.0 software. The most frequent barriers among adolescents were those associated with “psychological, cognitive and emotional” and “cultural and social” dimensions. For boys, the most frequently reported barriers were “feeling lazy”, “lack of company” and “lack of time”. For girls, “feeling lazy”, “lack of com-pany” and “occupation” were the most common barriers. In conclusion, the perception of barriers by adolescents varies according to gender, a fact requiring specific actions for the promotion of physical activity in this group.

  16. Prototype Hanford Surface Barrier: Design basis document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.; Duranceau, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized in 1985 to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site and other arid sites. This document provides the basis of the prototype barrier. Engineers and scientists have momentarily frozen evolving barrier designs and incorporated the latest findings from BDP tasks. The design and construction of the prototype barrier has required that all of the various components of the barrier be brought together into an integrated system. This integration is particularly important because some of the components of the protective barreir have been developed independently of other barreir components. This document serves as the baseline by which future modifications or other barrier designs can be compared. Also, this document contains the minutes of meeting convened during the definitive design process in which critical decisions affecting the prototype barrier's design were made and the construction drawings

  17. Highway renewable energy : photovoltaic noise barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Highway photovoltaic noise barriers (PVNBs) represent the combination of noise barrier systems and photovoltaic systems in order to mitigate traffic noise while simultaneously producing renewable energy. First deployed in Switzerland in 1989, PVNBs a...

  18. Physical Environmental Barriers to School Attendance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment were the major barriers to school attendance. Conclusion: To ... Key words: Parents/caregivers, children with disabilities, barriers. Introduction .... It is not safe to walk ... feeling, learning, behaviour, and fits or convulsions. [19] The ...

  19. Perceived barriers and enablers to participation in a community-tailored physical activity program with Indigenous Australians in a regional and rural setting: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushames, Ashleigh; Engelberg, Terry; Gebel, Klaus

    2017-09-18

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have higher rates of chronic disease and a lower life expectancy than non-Indigenous Australians. In non-urban areas these health disparities are even larger. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore perceived barriers and enablers to attending an eight-week physical activity program in a rural and regional setting which aimed to improve health outcomes, but had a low attendance rate. Thirty-four Indigenous Australians participated in the intervention from the rural (n = 12) and the regional (n = 22) community. Qualitative semi-structured individual interviews were conducted at the follow-up health assessments with 12 participants. A thematic network analysis was undertaken to examine the barriers and enablers to participation in the program. Overall, there were positive attitudes to, and high levels of motivation towards, the physical activity program. Enablers to participation were the inclusion of family members, no financial cost and a good relationship with the principal investigator, which was strengthened by the community-based participatory approach to the program design. Barriers to program attendance were mostly beyond the control of the individuals, such as 'sorry business', needing to travel away from the community and lack of community infrastructure. More consideration is needed prior to implementation of programs to understand how community-specific barriers and enablers will affect attendance to the program. ACTRN12616000497404 . Registered 18 April 2016.

  20. Patient-related barriers to pain management: the Barriers Questionnaire II (BQ-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Donovan, Heidi S; Serlin, Ronald C; Voge, Catherine; Ward, Sandra

    2002-10-01

    lower scores on the BQ-II than did patients who used inadequate analgesics. The BQ-II is a reliable and valid measure of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management.

  1. Prevention of Lower Extremity Injuries in Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B.; Ford, Kevin R.; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Terry, Lauren N.; Hegedus, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lower extremity injuries are common in basketball, yet it is unclear how prophylactic interventions affect lower extremity injury incidence rates. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of current lower extremity injury prevention programs in basketball athletes, focusing on injury rates of (1) general lower extremity injuries, (2) ankle sprains, and (3) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Data Sources: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials were searched in January 2015. Study Selection: Studies were included if they were randomized controlled or prospective cohort trials, contained a population of competitive basketball athletes, and reported lower extremity injury incidence rates specific to basketball players. In total, 426 individual studies were identified. Of these, 9 met the inclusion criteria. One other study was found during a hand search of the literature, resulting in 10 total studies included in this meta-analysis. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Details of the intervention (eg, neuromuscular vs external support), size of control and intervention groups, and number of injuries in each group were extracted from each study. Injury data were classified into 3 groups based on the anatomic diagnosis reported (general lower extremity injury, ankle sprain, ACL rupture). Results: Meta-analyses were performed independently for each injury classification. Results indicate that prophylactic programs significantly reduced the incidence of general lower extremity injuries (odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.85; P basketball athletes. Conclusion: In basketball players, prophylactic programs may be effective in reducing the risk of general lower extremity injuries and ankle sprains, yet not ACL injuries. PMID:26502412

  2. Lower GI Series (Barium Enema)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses x-rays and a chalky liquid called barium to view your large intestine . The barium will make your large intestine more visible on ... single-contrast lower GI series, which uses only barium a double-contrast or air-contrast lower GI ...

  3. Assertive community treatment: facilitators and barriers to implementation in routine mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Anthony D; Moser, Lorna L; Whitley, Rob; McHugo, Gregory J; Bond, Gary R; Finnerty, Molly T; Burns, Barbara J

    2009-02-01

    This study identified barriers and facilitators to the high-fidelity implementation of assertive community treatment. As part of a multistate implementation project for evidence-based practices, training and consultation were provided to 13 newly implemented assertive community treatment teams in two states. Model fidelity was assessed at baseline and at six, 12, 18, and 24 months. Key informant interviews, surveys, and monthly on-site visits were used to monitor implementation processes related to barriers and facilitators. Licensing processes of the state mental health authority provided critical structural supports for implementation. These supports included a dedicated Medicaid billing structure, start-up funds, ongoing fidelity monitoring, training in the model, and technical assistance. Higher-fidelity sites had effective administrative and program leadership, low staff turnover, sound personnel practices, and skilled staff, and they allocated sufficient resources in terms of staffing, office space, and cars. Lower-fidelity sites were associated with insufficient resources, prioritization of fiscal concerns in implementation, lack of change culture, poor morale, conflict among staff, and high staff turnover. In cross-state comparisons, the specific nature of fiscal policies, licensing processes, and technical assistance appeared to influence implementation. State mental health authorities can play a critical role in assertive community treatment implementation but should carefully design billing mechanisms, promote technical assistance centers, link program requirements to fidelity models, and limit bureaucratic requirements. Successful implementation at the organizational level requires committed leadership, allocation of sufficient resources, and careful hiring procedures.

  4. Overcoming immunological barriers in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative therapies that use allogeneic cells are likely to encounter immunological barriers similar to those that occur with transplantation of solid organs and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Decades of experience in clinical transplantation hold valuable lessons for regenerative medicine, offering approaches for developing tolerance-induction treatments relevant to cell therapies. Outside the field of solid-organ and allogeneic HSC transplantation, new strategies are emerging for controlling the immune response, such as methods based on biomaterials or mimicry of antigen-specific peripheral tolerance. Novel biomaterials can alter the behavior of cells in tissue-engineered constructs and can blunt host immune responses to cells and biomaterial scaffolds. Approaches to suppress autoreactive immune cells may also be useful in regenerative medicine. The most innovative solutions will be developed through closer collaboration among stem cell biologists, transplantation immunologists and materials scientists.

  5. Security barriers with automated reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James O; Baird, Adam D; Tullis, Barclay J; Nolte, Roger Allen

    2015-04-07

    An intrusion delaying barrier includes primary and secondary physical structures and can be instrumented with multiple sensors incorporated into an electronic monitoring and alarm system. Such an instrumented intrusion delaying barrier may be used as a perimeter intrusion defense and assessment system (PIDAS). Problems with not providing effective delay to breaches by intentional intruders and/or terrorists who would otherwise evade detection are solved by attaching the secondary structures to the primary structure, and attaching at least some of the sensors to the secondary structures. By having multiple sensors of various types physically interconnected serves to enable sensors on different parts of the overall structure to respond to common disturbances and thereby provide effective corroboration that a disturbance is not merely a nuisance or false alarm. Use of a machine learning network such as a neural network exploits such corroboration.

  6. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus in infants: the role played by specific antibodies Infecção por virus sincicial respiratório: o papel dos anticorpos séricos específicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E. Vieira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major etiological agent of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Genotypes of this virus and the role of the infants' serum antibodies have yet to be fully clarified. This knowledge is important for the development of effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the types and genotypes of RSV causing respiratory tract infection in infants, to analyze the association of subtype-specific serum antibodies with the occurrence of infection and to evaluate the presence of subtype-specific antibodies in the infants' mothers and their association with the profile of the childrens' serum antibodies. METHODS: This was a prospective study on infants hospitalized with respiratory infection. Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for viral investigation using indirect immunofluorescence and viral culture and blood was collected to test for antibodies using the Luminex Multiplex system. RESULTS: 192 infants were evaluated, with 60.9% having RSV (73.5%- A and 20.5% B. Six genotypes of the virus were identified: A5, A2, B3, B5, A7 and B4. The seroprevalence of the subtype-specific serum antibodies was high. The presence and levels of subtype-specific antibodies were similar, irrespective of the presence of infection or the viral type or genotype. The mothers' antibody profiles were similar to their infants'. CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of subtype-specific antibodies was elevated, these antibodies did not provide protection independently of virus type/genotype. The similarity in the profiles of subtype-specific antibodies presented by the mothers and their children was consistent with transplacental passage.INTRODUÇÃO: O vírus sincicial respiratório é um dos principais agentes etiológicos das infecções do aparelho respiratório inferior em lactentes. Os genótipos deste vírus e o papel dos anticorpos séricos ainda não estão esclarecidos. Este

  7. Sea sand for reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.; Ordonez R, E.; Ordonez R, En.

    2002-01-01

    Some phosphates have the property to suck in radioactive metals in solution, what it is taken in advance to make reactive barriers which are placed in the nuclear waste repositories. In an effort for contributing to the study of this type of materials, it has been obtained the zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ) and the alpha zirconium hydrogen phosphate (Zr(HPO 4 ) 2H 2 O) starting from sea sand in an easy and economic way. (Author)

  8. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems

  9. Identification of Barriers to Stroke Awareness and Risk Factor Management Unique to Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to risk factor control may differ by race/ethnicity. The goal of this study was to identify barriers to stroke awareness and risk factor management unique to Hispanics as compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs. We performed a prospective study of stroke patients from an academic Stroke Center in Arizona and surveyed members of the general community. Questionnaires included: the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC Scale, a stroke barriers questionnaire, and a Stroke Awareness Test. Of 145 stroke patients surveyed (72 Hispanic; 73 NHW, Hispanics scored lower on the Stroke Awareness Test compared to NHWs (72.5% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.029. Hispanic stroke patients also reported greater barriers related to medical knowledge, medication adherence, and healthcare access (p < 0.05 for all. Hispanics scored higher on the “powerful others” sub-scale (11.3 vs. 10, p < 0.05 of the MHLC. Of 177 members of the general public surveyed, Hispanics had lower stroke awareness compared to NHWs and tended to have lower awareness than Hispanic stroke patients. These results suggest that Hispanic stroke patients perceive less control over their health, experience more healthcare barriers, and demonstrate lower rates of stroke literacy. Interventions for stroke prevention and education in Hispanics should address these racial/ethnic differences in stroke awareness and barriers to risk factor control.

  10. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  11. Filamentary and diffuse barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelschatz, U.

    2001-01-01

    Barrier discharges, sometimes also referred to as dielectric-barrier discharges or silent discharges, are characterized by the presence of at least one insulating layer in contact with the discharge between two planar or cylindrical electrodes connected to an ac power supply. The main advantage of this type of electrical discharge is, that non-equilibrium plasma conditions in atmospheric-pressure gases can be established in an economic and reliable way. This has led to a number of important applications including industrial ozone generation, surface modification of polymers, plasma chemical vapor deposition, excitation of CO 2 lasers, excimer lamps and, most recently, large-area flat plasma display panels. Depending on the application, the width of the discharge gap can range from less than 0.1 mm to about 100 mm and the applied frequency from below line frequency to several gigahertz. Typical materials used for the insulating layer (dielectric barrier) are glass, quartz, ceramics but also thin enamel or polymer layers

  12. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, C.H.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Dijkstra, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  13. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, Clemens H. M.; Kemp, Ron G. M.; Dijkstra, S. Gerhard

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  14. Faculty Perceptions about Barriers to Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Faculty may perceive many barriers to active learning in their classrooms. Four groups of participants in a faculty development workshop were asked to list their perceived barriers to active learning. Many of the problems identified were present on more than one list. The barriers fall into three categories: student characteristics, issues…

  15. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  16. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price

  17. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  18. Converse Theorems for Safety and Barrier Certificates

    OpenAIRE

    Ratschan, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    An important tool for proving safety of dynamical systems is the notion of a barrier certificate. In this paper we prove that every robustly safe ordinary differential equation has a barrier certificate. Moreover, we show a construction of such a barrier certificate based on a set of states that is reachable in finite time.

  19. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  20. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...... and Rosenberg's theorem), are also hard for dynamic range searching in the group model. This theorem allows us to reuse decades of research on range reporting lower bounds to immediately obtain a range of new group model lower bounds. Amongst others, this includes an improved lower bound for the fundamental...

  1. Scaffold translation: barriers between concept and clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2011-12-01

    Translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapies to clinical use remains, bluntly, a failure. This dearth of translated tissue engineering therapies (including scaffolds) remains despite 25 years of research, research funding totaling hundreds of millions of dollars, over 12,000 papers on BTE and over 2000 papers on BTE scaffolds alone in the past 10 years (PubMed search). Enabling scaffold translation requires first an understanding of the challenges, and second, addressing the complete range of these challenges. There are the obvious technical challenges of designing, manufacturing, and functionalizing scaffolds to fill the Form, Fixation, Function, and Formation needs of bone defect repair. However, these technical solutions should be targeted to specific clinical indications (e.g., mandibular defects, spine fusion, long bone defects, etc.). Further, technical solutions should also address business challenges, including the need to obtain regulatory approval, meet specific market needs, and obtain private investment to develop products, again for specific clinical indications. Finally, these business and technical challenges present a much different model than the typical research paradigm, presenting the field with philosophical challenges in terms of publishing and funding priorities that should be addressed as well. In this article, we review in detail the technical, business, and philosophical barriers of translating scaffolds from Concept to Clinic. We argue that envisioning and engineering scaffolds as modular systems with a sliding scale of complexity offers the best path to addressing these translational challenges. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  2. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  3. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  4. Barriers to implementing infection prevention and control guidelines during crises: experiences of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timen, Aura; Hulscher, Marlies E J L; Rust, Laura; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Akkermans, Reinier P; Grol, Richard P T M; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2010-11-01

    Communicable disease crises can endanger the health care system and often require special guidelines. Understanding reasons for nonadherence to crisis guidelines is needed to improve crisis management. We identified and measured barriers and conditions for optimal adherence as perceived by 4 categories of health care professionals. In-depth interviews were performed (n = 26) to develop a questionnaire for a cross-sectional survey of microbiologists (100% response), infection preventionists (74% response), public health physicians (96% response), and public health nurses (82% response). The groups were asked to appraise barriers encountered during 4 outbreaks (severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS], Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, rubella, and avian influenza) according to a 5-point Likert scale. When at least 33% of the participants responded "strongly agree," "agree," or "rather agree than disagree," a barrier was defined as "often experienced." The common ("generic") barriers were included in a univariate and multivariate model. Barriers specific to the various groups were studied as well. Crisis guidelines were found to have 4 generic barriers to adherence: (1) lack of imperative or precise wording, (2) lack of easily identifiable instructions specific to each profession, (3) lack of concrete performance targets, and (4) lack of timely and adequate guidance on personal protective equipment and other safety measures. The cross-sectional study also yielded profession-specific sets of often-experienced barriers. To improve adherence to crisis guidelines, the generic barriers should be addressed when developing guidelines, irrespective of the infectious agent. Profession-specific barriers require profession-specific strategies to change attitudes, ensure organizational facilities, and provide an adequate setting for crisis management. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  5. TCGA_LowerGradeGliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    TCGA researchers analyzed nearly 300 cases of diffuse low- and intermediate-grade gliomas, which together comprise lower-grade gliomas. LGGs occur mainly in adults and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas.

  6. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  7. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information Everyone needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt ...

  8. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure

  9. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer

  10. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolman, M Charl; Tiruvadi Krishnan, Sriram; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; de Leeuw, Roy; Lorent, Vincent; Sherratt, David J; Dekker, Nynke H

    2016-07-27

    Protein-DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus-ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these Tus-ter barriers in the cell are poorly understood. By performing quantitative fluorescence microscopy with microfuidics, we investigate the effect on the replisome when encountering these barriers in live Escherichia coli cells. We make use of an E. coli variant that includes only an ectopic origin of replication that is positioned such that one of the two replisomes encounters a Tus-ter barrier before the other replisome. This enables us to single out the effect of encountering a Tus-ter roadblock on an individual replisome. We demonstrate that the replisome remains stably bound after encountering a Tus-ter complex from the non-permissive direction. Furthermore, the replisome is only transiently blocked, and continues replication beyond the barrier. Additionally, we demonstrate that these barriers affect sister chromosome segregation by visualizing specific chromosomal loci in the presence and absence of the Tus protein. These observations demonstrate the resilience of the replication fork to natural barriers and the sensitivity of chromosome alignment to fork progression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Design and performance evaluation of a 1000-year evapotranspiration-capillary surface barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhuanfang Fred; Strickland, Christopher E.; Link, Steven O.

    2017-02-01

    Surface barrier technology is used to isolate radioactive waste and to reduce or eliminate recharge water to the waste zone for 1000 years or longer. However, the design and evaluation of such a barrier is challenging because of the extremely long design life. The Prototype Hanford Barrier (PHB) was designed as a 1000-year barrier with pre-determined design and performance objectives and demonstrated in field from 1994 to present. The barrier was tested to evaluate surface-barrier design and performance at the field scale under conditions of enhanced and natural precipitation and of no vegetation. The monitoring data demonstrate that the barrier satisfied nearly all key objectives. The PHB far exceeded the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act criteria, functioned in Hanford’s semiarid climate, limited drainage to well below the 0.5 mm yr-1 performance criterion, limited runoff, and minimized erosion. Given the two-decade record of successful performance and consideration of all the processes and mechanisms that could degrade the stability and hydrology in the future, the results suggest the PHB is very likely to perform for its 1000-year design life. This conclusion is based on two assumptions: (1) the exposed subgrade receives protection against erosion and (2) institutional controls prevent inadvertent human activity at the barrier. The PHB design can serve as the base for site-specific barriers over waste sites containing underground nuclear waste, uranium mine tailings, and hazardous mine waste.

  12. Reliability and Validity of a Treatment Barriers Scale for Individuals With Alcohol Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemato, Kyle; Funderburk, Jennifer; Spinola, Suzanne; Hutchison, Dezarie; Maisto, Stephen A; Lantinga, Larry J; Oslin, David W

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have measured addiction-specific barriers to treatment. A measurement of barriers with psychometric support that has been tested in diverse samples and that assesses multiple components of addiction treatment barriers is needed to inform providers and treatment programs. This paper aims to provide an initial psychometric investigation of a measure of barriers to seeking addictions treatment. Data were collected from 196 Veterans Affairs primary care patients with Alcohol Use Disorder that participated in a randomized clinical trial. A Principal Components Analysis revealed that the 32-item Treatment Barriers Scale (TBS) can be reduced to 14 items, measuring 4 factors: stigma, dislike of the treatment process, alcohol problem identification, and logistical concerns. Acceptable internal consistent reliability (α = .64-.76) and excellent precision of alpha (α = 0.001-0.009) was found for each subscale. Support for the measure's concurrent validity was found, for example, participants who reported more motivation to reduce their drinking perceived significantly fewer barriers to care. Support for the measure's predictive validity was also found, including that more barriers were related to future drinking among all participants and less mental health and addictions treatment visits among participants in one treatment condition. Conclusions/ Importance: Our results provide initial support for the utility of the TBS-14 among primary care patients with Alcohol Use Disorder. Use of the TBS-14 could enable healthcare providers to better understand patient-specific treatment barriers, provide corrective information on treatment misconceptions, and inform individualized treatment plans that increase patient engagement in addiction services.

  13. Chemical barriers for controlling groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical barriers are being explored as a low-cost means of controlling groundwater contamination. The barrier can intercept a contaminant plume and prevent migration by transferring contaminants from the groundwater to immobile solids. A chemical barrier can be emplaced in a landfill liner or in an aquifer cutoff wall or can be injected into a contaminant plume. Chemical barriers can be classified as either precipitation barriers or sorption barriers depending upon the dominant mode of contaminant extraction. In a precipitation barrier, contaminants are bound in the structures of newly formed phases; whereas, in a sorption barrier, contaminants attach to the surfaces of preexisting solids by adsorption or some other surface mechanism. Sorption of contaminants is pH dependent. A precipitation barrier can control the pH of the system, but alkaline groundwater may dominate the pH in a sorption barrier. A comparison is made of the characteristics of precipitation and sorption barriers. Experimental data on the extraction of uranium and molybdenum from simulated groundwater are used to demonstrate these concepts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  14. Physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension--insights into motivations and barriers from the MOBILE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Martine; Dejager, Sylvie; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; di Nicola, Sylvie; Quéré, Stéphane; Fiquet, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is key in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hypertension, it is difficult to implement in practice. Cross-sectional, observational study. Participating physicians were asked to recruit two active and four inactive patients, screened with the Ricci-Gagnon (RG) self-questionnaire (active if score ≥16). Patients subsequently completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The objective was to assess the achievement of individualized glycated hemoglobin and blood pressure goals (active vs inactive cohort, to explore the correlates for meeting both targets by multivariate analysis, and to examine the barriers and motivations to engage in PA. About 1,766 patients were analyzed. Active (n=628) vs. inactive (n=1,138) patients were more often male, younger, less obese, had shorter durations of diabetes, fewer complications and other health issues, such as osteoarticular disorders (Pactive vs inactive patients was the percentage who declared engaging in regular leisure-type PA (97.9% vs. 9.6%), also reflected in the percentage with vigorous activities in International Physical Activity Questionnaire (59.5% vs. 9.6%). Target control was achieved by 33% of active and 19% of inactive patients (PActive patients, those with fewer barriers to PA, with lower treatment burden, and with an active physician, were more likely to reach targets. The physician's role emerged in the motivations (reassurance on health issues, training on hypoglycemia risk, and prescription/monitoring of the PA by the physician). A negative self-image was the highest ranked barrier for the inactive patients, followed by lack of support and medical concerns. Physicians should consider PA prescription as seriously as any drug prescription, and take into account motivations and barriers to PA to tailor advice to patients' specific needs and reduce their perceived constraints.

  15. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, W

    2015-01-01

    .05), and the final phase of the SJ (P AI in the CMJ concentric phase (r = 0.57, P Future research is required to assess the role of the CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI......-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs......) for kinetic impulse (CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI). Dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning was used to assess asymmetry in lower body muscle mass. Compared with controls, ACL-R skiers had increased AI in muscle mass (P AI in the CMJ concentric phase (P 

  16. Magneto-transport in CdTe/CdMnTe dilute magnetic semiconductor single barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, V.R.

    1999-03-01

    This thesis presents work done on electrical transport through dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) single barriers in both zero and non-zero magnetic fields. The fields are applied either perpendicular or parallel to the DMS layers. The main samples under investigation consist of 100 A and 200 A CdTe/Cd 0.8 Mn 0.2 Te/CdTe single barrier heterostructures. In addition electrical characterisation of the non magnetic layers is performed. Current through the barrier is measured as a function of voltage, magnetic field and temperature. A theoretical model is derived in order to calculate the current as a function of barrier height, barrier width, emitting layer carrier concentration, applied bias and temperature. These variables are then treated as fitting parameters and comparisons are made between the calculated and the experimental currents. The barriers are shown to produce non-Ohmic transport. The roles of quantum mechanical tunnelling and thermal activation across the barrier are investigated and shown to be highly mixed. An unexpectedly high degree of tunnelling is found to occur at high temperatures, within the region previously assumed to be dominated by thermal activation. Moreover the barrier height is found to be lower and the width greater than expected. These observations suggest that a high level of Mn diffusion occurs, possibly due to In dopant related effects. This suggestion is validated by the high emitting layer carrier concentration suggested by the fitting. At low temperatures and voltages the thicker barrier sample is shown to contain a parasitic leak path which short-circuits the barrier. This leak may exist in both samples but only becomes dominant where the barriers are sufficiently opaque to the incident carriers. Changes in a magnetic field are expected to be due to sp-d exchange induced giant Zeeman splitting in the barrier and either normal spin splitting or sp-d exchange effects in the emitter regions. The application of a magnetic field is

  17. Statistical analysis of internal transport barriers in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maget, P [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Esposito, B [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hawkes, N [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mazon, D [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Baranov, Y [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fourment, C [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hoang, G T [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-08-01

    The potential role of magnetic shear, rational safety factor surfaces and shearing rate on the confinement is investigated on the basis of a database analysis of JET internal transport barriers (ITBs). The ITB is quantified using the JET ITB criterion (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520). The relation between the shearing rate and the magnetic shear, already established for positive magnetic shear barrier (Tala T J J et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 507), is investigated at low and negative magnetic shear, where the threshold in shearing rate is found to be lower than for positive magnetic shear barriers. Defining the ITB from the departure from profile stiffness is found to be consistent with the database results, and the critical gradient length is found to be minimum at low magnetic shear. Finally, ITBs are found to be localized in the vicinity of integer safety factor surfaces in positive magnetic shear plasmas, whereas no correlation is found with integer values when the barrier is localized in negative magnetic shear regions.

  18. HRT Specification

    CERN Document Server

    Möller, M

    1996-01-01

    In the context of the AIS Project (Advanced Informatics Systems for administration and management) a study has been conducted that resulted in the definition of a high level information systems model. Thirteen proposed systems were defined for detailed analysis. The Finance, Foundation, Human Resources, Logistics and Purchasing areas have been studied in detail. These studies have lead to the purchase and implementation of the ORIAC and SIRIAC packages, the Foundation database, the Oracle HR package, the Triton package and EDH and BHT. This specification describes the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) intended to be used for accessing data in the HR and Foundation systems. This toolkit should help the divisions carry out their Human Resource management, planning and follow-up. It will have extensive report generation capabilities and offer a variety of standard graphs. It should have an easy-to-use graphical user interface and run on the CERN standard desktop platforms.

  19. Contaminant Flux Reduction Barriers for Managing Difficult-to-Treat Source Zones in Unconsolidated Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-20

    estimated viscosity of 3-4 cP.  Solutions-IES Novel Silica Gel/Veg-Oil Grout: 5 wt- % of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO), 10 wt-% of sodium...site must have a lower low permeability unit such as a clay to prevent up flow; and a four sided barrier is recommended (three sided barriers are...depth to groundwater (ង ft)  Transmissive zone preferably with an underlying clay layer  Good accessibility to source zone  Availability of

  20. Pharmacists' perceptions of facilitators and barriers to lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Alan L; Bruskiewitz, Ruth H; Demuth, James E

    2007-08-15

    To reevaluate facilitators of and barriers to pharmacists' participation in lifelong learning previously examined in a 1990 study. A survey instrument was mailed to 274 pharmacists who volunteered to participate based on a prior random sample survey. Data based on perceptions of facilitators and barriers to lifelong learning, as well as self-perception as a lifelong learner, were analyzed and compared to a similar 1990 survey. The response rate for the survey was 88%. The top 3 facilitators and barriers to lifelong learning from the 2003 and the 1990 samples were: (1) personal desire to learn; (2) requirement to maintain professional licensure; and (3) enjoyment/relaxation provided by learning as change of pace from the "routine." The top 3 barriers were: (1) job constraints; (2) scheduling (location, distance, time) of group learning activities; and (3) family constraints (eg, spouse, children, personal). Respondents' broad self-perception as lifelong learners continued to be highly positive overall, but remained less positive relative to more specific lifelong learning skills such as the ability to identify learning objectives as well as to evaluate learning outcomes. Little has changed in the last decade relative to how pharmacists view themselves as lifelong learners, as well as what they perceive as facilitators and barriers to lifelong learning. To address factors identified as facilitators and barriers, continuing education (CE) providers should focus on pharmacists' time constraints, whether due to employment, family responsibilities, or time invested in the educational activity itself, and pharmacists' internal motivations to learn (personal desire, enjoyment), as well as external forces such as mandatory CE for relicensure.

  1. Schizophrenia: breaking down the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, R

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the key issues presented during the Fourth International Conference on Schizophrenia, which was held in October 1996 in Vancouver, Canada. The main emphasis was placed on the problem of stigma, loneliness and work as well as on the necessity to further elucidate the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Some of the barriers discussed are unlikely to disappear from human societies in the short term with any possible cure for schizophrenia as they are part of any major long-term illness, of which there is a long and ever increasing list.

  2. Fission barriers of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burvenich, T.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Self consistent microscopic mean-field models are powerful tools for the description of nuclear structure phenomena in the region of known elements, where they have reached a good quality. Especially the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) method and the Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) model will be considered in the discussion of the properties of these models. When it comes to extrapolation to the region of superheavy elements, though there is agreement concerning the global trends, these model exhibit significant differences in their predictions concerning fission barrier heights and structures. (Author)

  3. Cervical cancer screening and psychosocial barriers perceived by patients. A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska-Durawa, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aimed at integrating research discussing the role of perceived psychosocial barriers in cervical cancer screening (CCS) uptake. In particular, we analyzed the evidence for the associations between CCS uptake and perceived psychosocial barriers and frequency of psychosocial barriers identified by women. Material and methods A systematic search of peer-reviewed papers published until 2011 in 8 databases yielded 48 original studies, analyzing data obtained from 155 954 women. The majority of studies (k = 43) applied correlational design, while 5 had experimental design. Results Experimental research indicated a positive effect of 75% of psychosocial interventions targeting barriers. The interventions resulted in a significant increase of CCS uptake. Overall 100% of correlational studies indicated that perceiving lower levels of barriers significantly predicted higher CCS uptake. 53 psychosocial barriers were listed in at least 2 original correlational studies: 9.5% of barriers were related to CCS facilities/environment, 67.9% dealt with personal characteristics of the patient, and 22.6% addressed social factors. As many as 35.9% of perceived barriers referred to negative emotions related to CCS examination procedures and collecting CCS results, whereas 25.7% of barriers referred to prior contacts with health professionals. Conclusions Leaflets or discussion on psychosocial barriers between patients and health professionals involved in CCS might increase CCS uptake and thus reduce cervical cancer mortality rates. Communication skills training for health professionals conducting CCS might focus on the most frequently reported barriers, referring to emotions related to CCS examination and collecting CCS results. PMID:25520573

  4. Experimental study of fire barriers preventing vertical fire spread in ETISs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the external thermal insulation system (ETIS has been applied increasingly in a large amount of buildings for energy conservation purpose. However, the increase use of combustible insulation materials in the ETIS has raised serious fire safety problems. Fires involving this type of ETIS have caused severe damage and loss. In order to improve its fire safety, fire barriers were suggested to be installed. This paper introduces fire experiments that have been done to study the effects of fire barriers on preventing vertical fire spread along the ETIS. The experiments were performed according to BS 8414-1:2002 “Fire performance of external cladding systems – Part 1: Test method for non-loadbearing external cladding systems applied to the face of the building”. The test facility consists of a 9 m high wall. The fire sources were wood cribs with a fire size of 3 ± 0.5 MW. The insulation materials were expanded polystyrene foam (EPS. The fire barrier was a horizontal strip of rockwool with a width of 300 mm. Thermocouples were used to measure temperatures outside and inside the ETIS. A series of experiments with different fire scenarios were done: no fire barrier, two fire barriers and three fire barriers at different heights. Test results were compared. The results show that the ETIS using EPS without fire barriers almost burned out, while the ETIS with fire barriers performed well in preventing fire spread. The temperatures above the fire barrier were much lower than those below the fire barrier, and most of the insulation materials above the top fire barrier stayed in place.

  5. Roads and bats: a meta-analysis and review of the evidence on vehicle collisions and barrier effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensome, Amy Grace; Mathews, Fiona

    2016-10-01

    Roads are a potential threat to bat conservation. In addition to the direct risk of collision of bats with vehicles, roads could pose a threat to bat populations as a result of habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, and could act as barriers to movements of bats between habitats.We performed a systematic review of the literature and conducted meta-analyses to assess the threat posed by roads to bats as a result of 1) collisions between bats and vehicles and 2) roads acting as barriers to movements of bats.Based on collated records of 1207 bat road casualties in Europe, we found that low-flying species are more prone to collisions than high-flying species, and that juveniles are more vulnerable to collisions than adults. In addition, meta-analysis identified a significant bias towards male casualties. Casualties included rare species such as Barbastella barbastellus and geographically restricted species such as Rhinolophus species.The bias towards male casualties could be indicative of greater natal philopatry or lower dispersal among females, or of sexual segregation in habitats of varying quality, i.e. females may occupy better quality habitats than males, and road density may be lower in better quality habitats.Whether or not roads act as barriers to the movement of bats depends on a complex interplay of habitat and species-specific behaviour. For example, the presence of favourable habitat for bats - notably woodland - was found in this review to be linked with significantly reduced barrier effects but a heightened risk of collision.Our data suggest that roads do pose a threat to bats. Future research should assess the contribution of traffic noise and street lighting to the barrier effect of roads. Where new road schemes are monitored by ecological practitioners, it is vital that consistent protocols are employed to ensure that bat activity can be compared before and after the road is built. Evidence from such research should be used to minimize the risks

  6. Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

    2009-05-05

    A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

  7. Mediated Intercultural Communication Barrier in No Drama Zone! Group

    OpenAIRE

    Lizal, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    This research study aimed to describe the mediated intercultural communication barriers in the No Drama Zone! group. This study is a qualitative descriptive type of research, with case study method. By doing in depth interview and observation, researcher found two barriers that generates other barriers in the group's mediated intercultural communication. The two big barriers were: language and physical barriers. Language barriers in this group generated two barriers, emotional barrier and pe...

  8. Evaluation of diffusion barrier and electrical properties of tantalum oxynitride thin films for silver metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, E.; Wang, Y.; Theodore, N.D.; Alford, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal stability and the diffusion barrier properties of DC reactively sputtered tantalum oxynitride (Ta-O-N) thin films, between silver (Ag) and silicon (Si) p + n diodes were investigated. Both materials characterization (X-ray diffraction analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), Auger depth profiling) and electrical measurements (reverse-biased junction leakage current-density) were used to evaluate diffusion barrier properties of the thin films. The leakage current density of p + n diodes with the barrier (Ta-O-N) was approximately four orders of magnitude lower than those without barriers after a 30 min, 400 deg. C back contact anneal. The Ta-O-N barriers were stable up to 500 deg. C, 30 min anneals. However, this was not the case for the 600 deg. C anneal. RBS spectra and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of as-deposited and vacuum annealed samples of Ag/barrier (Ta-O-N)/Si indicate the absence of any interfacial interaction between the barrier and substrate (silicon). The failure of the Ta-O-N barriers has been attributed to thermally induced stresses, which cause the thin film to crack at elevated temperatures

  9. Self-reported financial barriers to care among patients with cardiovascular-related chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David J T; King-Shier, Kathryn; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Sanmartin, Claudia; Ronksley, Paul E; Weaver, Robert G; Tonelli, Marcello; Hennessy, Deirdre; Manns, Braden J

    2014-05-01

    People with chronic conditions who do not achieve therapeutic targets have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes. Failure to meet these targets may be due to a variety of barriers. This article examines self-reported financial barriers to health care among people with cardiovascular-related chronic conditions. A population-based survey was administered to western Canadians with cardiovascular-related chronic conditions (n = 1,849). Associations between self-reported financial barriers and statin use, the likelihood of stopping use of prescribed medications, and emergency department visits or hospitalizations were assessed. More than 10% respondents reported general financial barriers (12%) and lack of drug insurance (14%); 4% reported financial barriers to accessing medications. Emergency department visits or hospitalizations were 70% more likely among those reporting a general financial barrier. Those reporting a financial barrier to medications were 50% less likely to take statins and three times more likely to stop using prescribed medications. Individuals without drug insurance were nearly 30% less likely to take statins. In this population, self-reported financial barriers were associated with lower medication use and increased likelihood of emergency department visits or hospitalization.

  10. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  11. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Jarek

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  12. Footwear traction and lower extremity noncontact injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannop, John W; Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-11-01

    Football is the most popular high school sport; however, it has the highest rate of injury. Speculation has been prevalent that foot fixation due to high footwear traction contributes to injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the athlete's specific footwear traction (measured with their own shoes on the field of play) and lower extremity noncontact injury in high school football. For 3 yr, 555 high school football athletes had their footwear traction measured on the actual field of play at the start of the season, and any injury the athletes suffered during a game was recorded. Lower extremity noncontact injury rates, grouped based on the athlete's specific footwear traction (both translational and rotational), were compared. For translational traction, injury rate reached a peak of 23.3 injuries/1000 game exposures within the midrange of translational traction, before decreasing to 5.0 injuries/1000 game exposures in the high range of traction. For rotational traction, there was a steady increase in injury rate as footwear traction increased, starting at 4.2 injuries/1000 game exposures at low traction and reaching 19.2 injuries/1000 game exposures at high traction. A relationship exists between footwear traction and noncontact lower extremity injury, with increases in rotational traction leading to a greater injury rate and increases in translational traction leading to a decrease in injury. It is recommended that athletes consider selecting footwear with the lowest rotational traction values for which no detriment in performance results.

  13. Implementation of renewable energy technologies - Opportunities and barriers. Egypt country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The project used case studies of renewable energy implementation projects to analyse the reasons for success or failure of specific projects or technologies. In particular the study aimed to identify possibilities for 'removing' the main barriers and thus 'promoting' increased implementation of (RETs), and to 'generalise' the experiences from the case studies and produce results that can be disseminated and utilized further in a planned second phase. The specific objectives for Egypt Country Study were: 1) To determine, on the basis of analysis of the past experience, the barriers against implementation of RETs in Egypt, and to identify the favourable conditions and actions required for such implementation. 2) To apply the knowledge gained and results of the analysis of past projects for a detailed analysis of barriers to a chosen set of potential RETs implementation projects with view to success. 3) To identify specific RET projects for implementation including necessary actions to overcome identified barriers. The case study revealed that; for Domestic Solar Water Heating (DSWH) the main barriers are; the economic barriers followed by the awareness / information barriers, then the Technical and Institution barriers. For the PV rural electrification, the most important barriers are; the economic and financial barriers, the awareness and information barriers then the technical barriers. For the large-scale biogas systems, the main barriers are the institution and capacity, economic, policy and awareness / information respectively. According to the project results the main actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers and make use of the available opportunities are: Economic / Financial: 1) Creation of new financial schemes for the RETs applications components and systems. 2) Reducing the taxes and duties for the components and / or materials needed for Renewable Energy (RE) systems. 3) More government-supported market incentives

  14. Implementation of renewable energy technologies - Opportunities and barriers. Egypt country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The project used case studies of renewable energy implementation projects to analyse the reasons for success or failure of specific projects or technologies. In particular the study aimed to identify possibilities for 'removing' the main barriers and thus 'promoting' increased implementation of (RETs), and to 'generalise' the experiences from the case studies and produce results that can be disseminated and utilized further in a planned second phase. The specific objectives for Egypt Country Study were: 1) To determine, on the basis of analysis of the past experience, the barriers against implementation of RETs in Egypt, and to identify the favourable conditions and actions required for such implementation. 2) To apply the knowledge gained and results of the analysis of past projects for a detailed analysis of barriers to a chosen set of potential RETs implementation projects with view to success. 3) To identify specific RET projects for implementation including necessary actions to overcome identified barriers. The case study revealed that; for Domestic Solar Water Heating (DSWH) the main barriers are; the economic barriers followed by the awareness / information barriers, then the Technical and Institution barriers. For the PV rural electrification, the most important barriers are; the economic and financial barriers, the awareness and information barriers then the technical barriers. For the large-scale biogas systems, the main barriers are the institution and capacity, economic, policy and awareness / information respectively. According to the project results the main actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers and make use of the available opportunities are: Economic / Financial: 1) Creation of new financial schemes for the RETs applications components and systems. 2) Reducing the taxes and duties for the components and / or materials needed for Renewable Energy (RE) systems. 3) More government-supported market incentives to encourage further

  15. Health Sector Coordination in Disasters: Barriers & Facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coordination is a critical factor in successful organization and appropriate response to disasters. In this regard, a centralized coordination mechanism is the first step towards an effective, efficient, and sustainable response in order to be ensured of the short- and long-term recovery. Thus, this study aimed to identify and prioritize the barriers and facilitators of coordination in disasters. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted in 2016. The participants comprised 22 experts in field of disaster. Data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire according to the analytical hierarchy process approach. For data analysis, we used Expert Choice software. Results: Based on the results, “dominance of organizational approach instead of national points of view when addressing the health management during disasters,” took the first priority rank, earning the score of 0.344 among the barriers. Furthermore, among the facilitators, “having a processive and organizational view in health management during disasters,” took the first priority rank, earning the score of 0.374. Conclusion: To increase the effective coordination in health area, we should develop infrastructure and structural measures, which include bolstering authorities’ belief about the health system’s role in the response to disasters, reinforcing the national approach rather than organizational approach in the field of health at disasters, implementing the coordination requirements, attending sufficiently and specifically to public participation, reducing the organizational friction in the health field for sharing resources and information, raising the level of readiness with a focus on people and training programs, and finally creating an evolutionary process in the health field at disasters.

  16. Liquid-drop effects in sub-barrier fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, C E; Barbosa, V C; Canto, L F; Donangelo, R

    1988-01-28

    We introduce an operational measure for the enhancement of the fusion cross section at sub-barrier energies in terms of an asymptotic energy shift ..delta..E. It is shown that ..delta..E has a continuously growing trend with the size of the system. This trend is explained in terms of neck formation using the liquid-drop model. Deviations from this trend are attributed to strong coupling to specific channels.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a Ceramide-Infused Skin Barrier Versus a Standard Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ariel; Inglese, Gary; Skountrianos, George; Karlsmark, Tonny; Oguz, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    the product of maximum willingness to pay for 1 QALD times additional QALDs with CIB less the incremental cost of CIB) of A$228 (US $174). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was also completed; it revealed that 97% of model runs resulted in fewer expected PSCs with CIB; 92% of these runs resulted in lower expected costs with CIB. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that the CIB is a cost-effective skin barrier for persons living with an ostomy. PMID:29438140

  18. Na+/K+-ATPase α1 identified as an abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier that plays an essential role in the barrier integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial-blood/tissue barrier is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The ear harbors a unique endothelial-blood/tissue barrier which we term "blood-labyrinth-barrier". This barrier is critical for maintaining inner ear homeostasis. Disruption of the blood-labyrinth-barrier is closely associated with a number of hearing disorders. Many proteins of the blood-brain-barrier and blood-retinal-barrier have been identified, leading to significant advances in understanding their tissue specific functions. In contrast, capillaries in the ear are small in volume and anatomically complex. This presents a challenge for protein analysis studies, which has resulted in limited knowledge of the molecular and functional components of the blood-labyrinth-barrier. In this study, we developed a novel method for isolation of the stria vascularis capillary from CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea and provided the first database of protein components in the blood-labyrinth barrier as well as evidence that the interaction of Na(+/K(+-ATPase α1 (ATP1A1 with protein kinase C eta (PKCη and occludin is one of the mechanisms of loud sound-induced vascular permeability increase.Using a mass-spectrometry, shotgun-proteomics approach combined with a novel "sandwich-dissociation" method, more than 600 proteins from isolated stria vascularis capillaries were identified from adult CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea. The ion transporter ATP1A1 was the most abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier. Pharmacological inhibition of ATP1A1 activity resulted in hyperphosphorylation of tight junction proteins such as occludin which increased the blood-labyrinth-barrier permeability. PKCη directly interacted with ATP1A1 and was an essential mediator of ATP1A1-initiated occludin phosphorylation. Moreover, this identified signaling pathway was involved in the breakdown of the blood-labyrinth-barrier resulting from loud sound trauma.The results presented here provide a novel method for

  19. Subsurface barrier verification technologies, informal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    One of the more promising remediation options available to the DOE waste management community is subsurface barriers. Some of the uses of subsurface barriers include surrounding and/or containing buried waste, as secondary confinement of underground storage tanks, to direct or contain subsurface contaminant plumes and to restrict remediation methods, such as vacuum extraction, to a limited area. To be most effective the barriers should be continuous and depending on use, have few or no breaches. A breach may be formed through numerous pathways including: discontinuous grout application, from joints between panels and from cracking due to grout curing or wet-dry cycling. The ability to verify barrier integrity is valuable to the DOE, EPA, and commercial sector and will be required to gain full public acceptance of subsurface barriers as either primary or secondary confinement at waste sites. It is recognized that no suitable method exists for the verification of an emplaced barrier's integrity. The large size and deep placement of subsurface barriers makes detection of leaks challenging. This becomes magnified if the permissible leakage from the site is low. Detection of small cracks (fractions of an inch) at depths of 100 feet or more has not been possible using existing surface geophysical techniques. Compounding the problem of locating flaws in a barrier is the fact that no placement technology can guarantee the completeness or integrity of the emplaced barrier. This report summarizes several commonly used or promising technologies that have been or may be applied to in-situ barrier continuity verification

  20. Energy policy of Lower Saxony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirche, W.

    1988-01-01

    The government of the Land Lower Saxony in February 1988 submitted a new energy programme intended to define the energy-political boundary data for energy industry and energy consumers, and to bring about the broadest possible consensus for the implementation of this energy policy between politicians, the energy industry and the population. The Minister of Economy of Lower Saxony in his statement refers particularly to the topics nuclear energy and coal, renewable energies, structure of areas to be supplied with energy, and considerations relating to a revision of the antitrust laws. (orig.) [de

  1. Overcoming Barriers in Unhealthy Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Lemke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the phenomenon of sustained health-supportive behaviors among long-haul commercial truck drivers, who belong to an occupational segment with extreme health disparities. With a focus on setting-level factors, this study sought to discover ways in which individuals exhibit resiliency while immersed in endemically obesogenic environments, as well as understand setting-level barriers to engaging in health-supportive behaviors. Using a transcendental phenomenological research design, 12 long-haul truck drivers who met screening criteria were selected using purposeful maximum sampling. Seven broad themes were identified: access to health resources, barriers to health behaviors, recommended alternative settings, constituents of health behavior, motivation for health behaviors, attitude toward health behaviors, and trucking culture. We suggest applying ecological theories of health behavior and settings approaches to improve driver health. We also propose the Integrative and Dynamic Healthy Commercial Driving (IDHCD paradigm, grounded in complexity science, as a new theoretical framework for improving driver health outcomes.

  2. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  3. Next generation of non-mammalian blood-brain barrier models to study parasitic infections of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Flynn, Robin; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Transmigration of neuropathogens across the blood-brain barrier is a key step in the development of central nervous system infections, making it a prime target for drug development. The ability of neuropathogens to traverse the blood-brain barrier continues to inspire researchers to understand the specific strategies and molecular mechanisms that allow them to enter the brain. The availability of models of the blood-brain barrier that closely mimic the situation in vivo offers unprecedented o...

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  5. Determination of the thickness of Al2O3 barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.D.R.; Hase, T.P.A.; Tanner, B.K.; Hughes, N.D.; Hicken, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The barrier thickness in magnetic spin-dependent tunnel junctions with Al 2 O 3 barriers has been measured using grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity and by fitting the tunneling current to the Simmons model. We have studied the effect of glow discharge oxidation time on the barrier structure, revealing a substantial increase in Al 2 O 3 thickness with oxidation. The greater thickness of barrier measured using grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity compared with that obtained by fitting current density-voltage to the Simmons electron tunneling model suggests that electron tunneling is localized to specific regions across the barrier, where the thickness is reduced by fluctuations due to nonconformal roughness

  6. It isn't all about language: communication barriers for Latinas using contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Shelly; Kohler, Connie; Askelson, Natoshia M; Ortiz, Cristina; Losch, Mary

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about barriers that Latinas in the United States face in preventing unintended pregnancies beyond those of language and cost. This study examined factors inhibiting contraceptive use among 18- to 30-year-old Latinas in the Midwest. Individual interviews (N = 31) were conducted in Spanish with Latinas residing across the state. The interview protocol included questions about contraceptives and unintended pregnancies. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, translated, and coded for themes related to barriers. The majority of the barriers were related to communication but not English proficiency. Respondents talked about specific situations and experiences in which communication presented obstacles to using contraceptives. While language and cost are important barriers, attention needs to be paid to the other communication issues that women face related to culture, religion, partners, family, and spontaneity. Health care providers need to address the range of communication barriers that affect Latinas' contraceptive use. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Barriers to recovery in communities exposed to disasters: Sri Lankan voices speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Gaithri A; Wilkins, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Disasters experienced by a community place all members at risk for physical and psychological harm. While natural resilience may help many to recover, there may be barriers that hinder the recovery process. This qualitative study was conducted to examine barriers to recovery in a community impacted by both war and the tsunami. A group of 43 ethnically diverse Sri Lankans (F = 63%) participated in six focus groups and provided their perspectives on barriers they perceived to impede their recovery from traumatic events. Grounded-theory-based data analysis revealed culture-general and culture-specific socio-economic, environmental, sociocultural, and individual barriers that participants identified as impeding their recovery. Interventions and health policies targeting these groups could focus on helping communities to overcome these barriers as a means of facilitating recovery in these beleaguered communities.

  8. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-01-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  9. Strategies for Better Hypertension Control in India and Other Lower Middle Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Khedar, Raghuvir Singh; Panwar, Raja Babu

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is the most important cause of global burden of disease. It is highly prevalent in India and other low and lower-middle income countries. Prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension varies from 70-90% and is significantly greater in rural vs urban locations. Guidelines based treatment strategy has improved blood pressure (BP) control in high income countries but no context-specific guidelines exist in low and lower-middle income countries such as India. There are numerous barriers to proper BP control in these countries and include political apathy, bureaucratic inertia, weak health systems, overburdened healthcare providers and unempowered patients. Hypertension control can be improved in these countries by better political focus on social determinants of health such as education, development of health systems, proper healthcare financing, free or low-cost BP medicines, healthcare provider education for hypertension management, free primary care, task sharing with trained community health workers, patient empowerment and use of technological innovations. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  10. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-01-01

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  11. Rhinosinusitis and the lower airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Peter W.; Hens, Greet

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between upper and lower airway disease has been recognized for centuries, with recent studies showing a direct link between upper and airway inflammation in allergic patients. The mechanisms underlying the interaction between nasal and bronchial inflammation have primarily been

  12. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  13. Adolescent Neuroblastoma of Lower Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari K

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumour of neural crest origin, commonly seen in children with upper abdomen involvement. Rarely neuroblastomas present in adolescents and adults involving lower limb. Histopathologically neuroblastoma of lower limb can be confused with other small round cell tumour especially with Ewing's sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. A 16 year old male presented with 15x11cm swelling, pain and multiple discharging sinuses of right leg since 4 months. Routine haematological and biochemical analysis were within normal limits. Radiology of right leg showed large soft tissue swelling encompassing the pathological fracture of tibia and bowing of fibula. Fine needle aspiration of the swelling revealed malignant small round cell tumour. Histopathology revealed poorly differentiated neuroblastoma of lower limb. The immunohistochemistry of Synaptophysin and Chromogranin were positive and CD 99 was negative. Neuroblastoma diagnosed at unusual site with uncommon age has poor prognosis. Hence, one must keep in mind the differential diagnosis of neuroblastoma as one of the differential diagnosis in evaluating the soft tissue tumours of lower limb.

  14. Quantum lower bound for sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yaoyun

    2000-01-01

    We prove that \\Omega(n log(n)) comparisons are necessary for any quantum algorithm that sorts n numbers with high success probability and uses only comparisons. If no error is allowed, at least 0.110nlog_2(n) - 0.067n + O(1) comparisons must be made. The previous known lower bound is \\Omega(n).

  15. Expected utility with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendon, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1994-01-01

    An uncertain and not just risky situation may be modeled using so-called belief functions assigning lower probabilities to subsets of outcomes. In this article we extend the von Neumann-Morgenstern expected utility theory from probability measures to belief functions. We use this theory...

  16. Nash equilibrium with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the concept of Nash equilibrium in mixed strategies for strategic form games to allow for ambiguity in the players' expectations. In contrast to other contributions, we model ambiguity by means of so-called lower probability measures or belief functions, which makes it possible...

  17. Unconditional lower bounds against advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhrman, H.; Fortnow, L.; Santhanam, R.

    2009-01-01

    We show several unconditional lower bounds for exponential time classes against polynomial time classes with advice, including: (1) For any constant c, NEXP not in P^{NP[n^c]} (2) For any constant c, MAEXP not in MA/n^c (3) BPEXP not in BPP/n^{o(1)}. It was previously unknown even whether NEXP in

  18. How Barriers to Collaboration Prevent Progress in Demand for Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    2015-01-01

    (RTOs) as potential mediators of collaboration between SMEs and universities. On the basis of a unique sample consisting of 151 SMEs, RTOs and universities from seven countries, the differences across dyads of potential collaborations are identified. In particular, the article finds that both firms...... and universities with collaboration experience with the other partner in general perceive higher barriers than inexperienced firms or universities. In terms of the mediating role of RTOs, the article illustrates that universities perceive lower barriers when collaborating with RTOs than with SMEs. A similar...... tendency to a mediating role of RTOs can be found among the SMEs' perception of university collaboration. Finally, the analysis shows that the knowledge institutions perceive the SMEs as very important collaboration partners, but the same sense of importance is not shared by the SMEs regarding...

  19. Perceived barriers to consumption of fish among Norwegian women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondsen, Torbjørn; Scholderer, Joachim; Lund, Eiliv

    2003-01-01

    with consumption levels among those who would like to eat more fish. Higher education and income were associated with increased dissatisfaction about fish consumption, but also with reduced perception of most barriers. It is concluded that improvements in the supply of high-quality fresh and processed fish......This study aimed to characterize constraints on consumption of fish perceived by consumers in Norway. A random sample of Norwegian women aged 45-69 years answered a self-administered mail questionnaire in 1996 about eating habits, perceived barriers to fish consumption, socioeconomic status...... weight are dissatisfied with the range of products offered in the marketplace. Satisfaction with quality and availability of wild lean codfish, especially in inland regions, is lower than for aqua-cultured fat salmon. Neither income nor education or health factors were significantly associated...

  20. Prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson William

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This retrospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication using duplex ultrasound in the patient population of a large urban medical center. Materials and Methods: The reports of all lower extremity venous ultrasound examinations performed at our institution between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 were reviewed. Ultrasound examinations that were performed for purposes other than the detection of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis were excluded. The prevalence of duplication and its specific location were recorded. In addition, the prevalence of thrombus and its specific location were also recorded. Results: A total of 3118 exams were performed in 2664 patients. Of the 2664 patients, 2311 had only one examination performed during the study period; 353 patients had more than one examination performed. We found that 10.1% of patients (270/2664 had at least one venous segment duplicated and 5.4% of patients (143/2664 had a thrombus in at least one venous segment. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of both duplication and thrombus with a change in venous segment. Only 0.4% of patients (11/2664 had thrombus within a duplicated segment. Of those who had more than one examination performed, 15.3% (54/353 had the same venous segment(s seen on one examination but not another. Conclusion: Lower extremity venous duplication is a frequent anatomic variant that is seen in 10.1% of patients, but it may not be as common as is generally believed. It can result in a false negative result for deep vein thrombosis.

  1. Herbicides: A new threat to the Great Barrier Reef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Stephen E.; Brodie, Jon E.; Bainbridge, Zoe T.; Rohde, Ken W.; Davis, Aaron M.; Masters, Bronwyn L.; Maughan, Mirjam; Devlin, Michelle J.; Mueller, Jochen F.; Schaffelke, Britta

    2009-01-01

    The runoff of pesticides (insecticides, herbicides and fungicides) from agricultural lands is a key concern for the health of the iconic Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Relatively low levels of herbicide residues can reduce the productivity of marine plants and corals. However, the risk of these residues to Great Barrier Reef ecosystems has been poorly quantified due to a lack of large-scale datasets. Here we present results of a study tracing pesticide residues from rivers and creeks in three catchment regions to the adjacent marine environment. Several pesticides (mainly herbicides) were detected in both freshwater and coastal marine waters and were attributed to specific land uses in the catchment. Elevated herbicide concentrations were particularly associated with sugar cane cultivation in the adjacent catchment. We demonstrate that herbicides reach the Great Barrier Reef lagoon and may disturb sensitive marine ecosystems already affected by other pressures such as climate change. - Herbicide residues have been detected in Great Barrier Reef catchment waterways and river water plumes which may affect marine ecosystems.

  2. Return-to-work barriers for workers with contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, D Linn

    2003-12-01

    There is little information available regarding barriers to return-to-work (RTW) in workers with contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to survey occupational health and safety personnel to determine their perceptions regarding RTW barriers for workers with contact dermatitis. The study was conducted during an occupational health and safety research conference attended by stakeholders from labour, management, injured workers, government, safety associations, occupational health and safety practitioners and researchers. The attendees were presented with 3 pictures of varying degrees of work-related hand contact dermatitis and were asked to list the 3 key barriers or challenges in RTW for individuals with contact dermatitis. 21 individuals completed the survey. Issues identified in descending order of frequency were concern of ongoing dermatitis, ability to do the job safely, appearance, ability to accommodate, personal protective equipment, fear that the rash was contagious, workplace attitudes and pain. While some of these issues are potentially common to RTW situations in general, others are more specific to health problems which have a visible manifestation. Increased awareness of and attention to these possible barriers to RTW may lead to better RTW outcomes.

  3. Barriers of inter-organisational integration in vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihlman, Ulla; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Axelsson, Runo; Holmström, Inger

    2008-06-19

    A project of vocational rehabilitation was studied in Sweden between 1999 and 2002. The project included four public organisations: the social insurance office, the local health services, the municipal social service and the office of the state employment service. The aim of this paper was to analyse perceived barriers in the development of inter-organisational integration. Theories of inter-professional and inter-organisational integration, and theories on organisational change. In total, 51 semi-structured interviews and 14 focus group discussions were performed with actors within the project between 1999 and 2002. A thematic approach was used for the analysis of the data. THREE DIFFERENT MAIN THEMES OF BARRIERS EMERGED FROM THE DATA: A Uncertainty, B Prioritising own organisation and C Lack of communication. The themes are interconnected in an intricate web and hence not mutually exclusive. The barriers found are all related partly to organisational change in general and partly to the specific development of organisational integration. Prioritising of own organisation led to flaws in communication, which in turn led to a high degree of uncertainty within the project. This can be seen as a circular relationship, since uncertainty might increase focus on own organisation and lack of communication. A way to overcome these barriers would be to take the needs of the clients as a point of departure in the development of joint services and to also involve them in the development of inter-organisational integration.

  4. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D. M.; Jarek, R.; Mariner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  5. Measuring solvent barrier properties of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollström, Roger; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Toivakka, Martti; Räty, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    New methods for measuring barrier properties against solvents, acids and bases on dispersion coated paper were developed and investigated. Usability, reliability and repeatability were compared both between the new methods and with the standardized method for measuring barrier properties against water vapor. Barrier properties could be measured with all methods and the results obtained by the different methods were in correlation with each other. A qualitative method based on a trace color provided an indicative result, whereas further developed methods also took into account the durability. The effective barrier lifetime could be measured by measuring the conductivity through the substrate as a function of time, or by utilizing a glass prism where the change in refractive index caused by penetrated liquid was monitored, also as a function of time. Barrier properties against water and humidity were also measured and were found not to be predictors for barrier properties against either solvents, or acids or bases, which supports the need to develop new methods

  6. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  7. Comparison of skin barrier function and sensory nerve electric current perception threshold between IgE-high extrinsic and IgE-normal intrinsic types of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, T; Ishida, K; Mukumoto, S; Yamada, Y; Imokawa, G; Kabashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Bito, T; Nakamura, M; Ogasawara, K; Tokura, Y

    2010-01-01

    Background Two types of atopic dermatitis (AD) have been proposed, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this seemingly heterogeneous disorder. The extrinsic type shows high IgE levels presumably as a consequence of skin barrier damage and feasible allergen permeation, whereas the intrinsic type exhibits normal IgE levels and is not mediated by allergen-specific IgE. Objectives To investigate the relationship between pruritus perception threshold and skin barrier function of patients with AD in a comparison between the extrinsic and intrinsic types. Methods Enrolled in this study were 32 patients with extrinsic AD, 17 with intrinsic AD and 24 healthy individuals. The barrier function of the stratum corneum was assessed by skin surface hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and pruritus perception was evaluated by the electric current perception threshold (CPT) of sensory nerves upon neuroselective transcutaneous electric stimulation. Results Skin surface hydration was significantly lower and TEWL was significantly higher in extrinsic AD than intrinsic AD or normal controls. Although there was no statistically significant difference in CPT among extrinsic AD, intrinsic AD and normal controls, CPT was significantly correlated with skin surface hydration and inversely with TEWL in intrinsic AD and normal controls, but not extrinsic AD. Finally, CPT was correlated with the visual analogue scale of itch in the nonlesional skin of patients with extrinsic but not intrinsic AD. Conclusions Patients with extrinsic AD have an impaired barrier, which increases the pre-existing pruritus but rather decreases sensitivity to external stimuli. In contrast, patients with intrinsic AD retain a normal barrier function and sensory reactivity to external pruritic stimuli.

  8. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-02-26

    factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

  9. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-01-01

    groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe 0 was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes

  10. Perceived barriers to effective job performance among nursing assistants in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmelee, Patricia A; Laszlo, Mary C; Taylor, Jo A

    2009-10-01

    This research explored perceived barriers to job performance among a national sample of nursing assistants (NAs). Specific objectives were (1) to clarify which of the problems identified by previous research are most troublesome for NAs, (2) to develop a reliable quantitative measure of perceived barriers to job performance, and (3) to test construct validity of the measure vis-à-vis work-related psychological empowerment and job satisfaction. Nursing assistants attending the 2006 national conference of the National Association of Health Care Assistants completed a paper-and-pencil survey including 33 barriers to job performance and standardized measures of empowerment and job satisfaction. The barriers were also rated by a small sample of NAs at a single Georgia nursing home. Factor analysis of barriers items yielded a 30-item Nursing Assistants Barriers Scale (NABS) comprising 6 subscales: Teamwork, Exclusion, Respect, Workload, Work Stress, and New NAs. Lack of teamwork and exclusion from communication processes were rated as most problematic by both samples. The 6 NABS subscales were significantly and independently associated with empowerment and satisfaction; different barriers predicted the 2 constructs. This study is a first step toward quantitative assessment of NAs' perceptions of barriers to doing their jobs. Primary limitations are the select sample and use of a job satisfaction measure that may have artificially inflated correlations with the NABS. Nonetheless, results confirm the validity of the new scale as an operationalization of the barriers construct. The concept of barriers to job performance is a unique construct from work empowerment and satisfaction with one's job. Nursing assistants clearly differentiate various barriers, converging on workload and lack of teamwork as most problematic. Further work is needed to substantiate validity and reliability of the NABS, particularly with respect to NAs' actual job performance, intent to stay on the

  11. Breaking the Barriers to the Circular Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchherr, J.W.; Hekkert, M.P.; Bour, Ruben; Huijbrechtse-Truijens, Anne; Kostense-Smit, Erica; Muller, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, the Netherlands and Deloitte have jointly carried out research on barriers to the Circular Economy (CE) in the European Union. For this research, a survey with 153 businesses, 55 government officials and expert interviews with forty-seven thought leaders on the circular economy from businesses, governments, academia and NGOs have been carried out. Two types of barriers emerged as main barriers Firstly, there are the cult...

  12. Triggering of internal transport barrier in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffrin, E. [Association Euratom-CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Challis, C.D. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2002-08-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) can be produced in JET by the application of strong additional heating during the current rise phase of the plasma discharge. Using up to 3 MW of lower hybrid power to tailor the q-profile prior to the main heating phase, a large variety of q-profiles ranging from low positive to strong negative central shear have been obtained during the current rise (0.4 MA s{sup -1}). With negative central magnetic shear s=(r/q)(r/q), the analysis of ITB triggering reveals a correlation between the formation of the ITB and q{sub andmin;} reaching an integer value (q=2 or q=3). This observation is confirmed by the analysis of the Alfven cascades. The minimum power required to access regimes with ITBs is probably related to the transport and magnetohydrodynamic properties of integer magnetic surfaces. Laser ablation and shallow pellet injection have also been attempted in recent JET ITB triggering experiments. (author)

  13. Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables - Common test methods - Part 5-1: Methods specific to filling compounds - Drop-point - Separation of oil - Lower temperature brittleness - Total acid number - Absence of corrosive components - Permittivity at 23 °C - DC resistivity at 23 °C and 100 °C

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Specifies the test methods for filling compounds of electric cables used with telecommunication equipment. Gives the methods for drop-point, separation of oil, lower temperature brittleness, total acid number, absence of corrosive components, permittivity at 23 °C, d.c. resistivity at 23°C and 100°C.

  14. Barriers to electricity load shift in companies: A survey-based exploration of the end-user perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsthoorn, Mark; Schleich, Joachim; Klobasa, Marian

    2015-01-01

    As countries move toward larger shares of renewable electricity, the slow diffusion of active electricity load management should concern energy policy makers and users alike. Active load management can increase capacity factors and thereby reduce the need for new capacity, improve reliability, and lower electricity prices. This paper conceptually and empirically explores barriers to load shift in industry from an end-user perspective. An online survey, based on a taxonomy of barriers developed in the realm of energy efficiency, was carried out among manufacturing sites in mostly Southern Germany. Findings suggest that the most important barriers are risk of disruption of operations, impact on product quality, and uncertainty about cost savings. Of little concern are access to capital, lack of employee skills, and data security. Statistical tests suggest that companies for which electricity has higher strategic value rate financial and regulatory risk higher than smaller ones. Companies with a continuous production process report lower barrier scores than companies using batch or just-in-time production. A principal component analysis clusters the barriers and multivariate analysis with the factor scores confirms the prominence of technical risk as a barrier to load shift. The results provide guidance for policy making and future empirical studies. - Highlights: • We quantitatively assess barriers to load shift adoption among manufacturing firms. • Conceptually, we build on the literature on barriers to energy efficiency. • The most important barriers are interference with production and with product quality. • Companies with a continuous production process report lower barrier scores. • The barriers to load shift may be organized in distinct clusters via principal component analysis

  15. Barriers for realisation of energy savings in buildings; Barrierer for realisering af energibesparelser i bygninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, O.M.

    2004-07-01

    Many years' efforts within the energy labelling area have shown large saving potentials in heating and use of electricity in buildings. At the same time it has been proved that these saving potentials, even when economically advantageous, only are cashed to a limited extent. The reason to this is ascribed to barriers that meet the individual building owner who wants to start saving energy. Most barriers are known and a lot of these have been sought overcome for some time. The questions are how many barriers still exist, have new barriers arisen and the character of these barriers. On this background the objective of this survey has been to concretize and study the barriers, which are blocking reasonable energy savings. Focus has especially been on barriers for realisation of heating savings, but through a general evaluation of energy savings of barriers other forms of energy saving methods have been taken into consideration. Special interest has been directed towards houses, typically one family houses, which are affected by the Energy Labelling Scheme. The concept barriers include all kinds of barriers, also barriers that not are acknowledged as barriers by the individual house owner, or that on closer inspection turn out to be something else than actual barriers. This note suggests an alternative inertia model, in order to create an idea of the inertness characteristic of the many house owners who understand the message but fail to act on it. (BA)

  16. [Ultrasound examination for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kosaku

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is known to be a major risk factor of vein thrombosis. Progression from lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to pulmonary embolism can lead to catastrophic outcome, although the incidence ratio is low. The ability to rule in or rule out DVT is becoming essential for anesthesiologists. Non-invasive technique of ultrasonography is a sensitive and specific tool for the assessment of lower extremity DVT. This article introduces the basics and practical methods of ultrasound examination for lower extremity DVT.

  17. Biological and Sociocultural Differences in Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity among 5th–7th Grade Urban Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Amber L.; Ling, Jiying; Voskuil, Vicki R.; Bakhoya, Marion; Wesolek, Stacey M.; Bourne, Kelly A.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Robbins, Lorraine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate physical activity (PA) contributes to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescent girls. Barriers preventing adolescent girls from meeting PA guidelines have not been thoroughly examined. Objectives The threefold purpose of this study was to: (a) determine pubertal stage, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in ratings of interference of barriers to PA; (b) examine relationships between perceived barriers and age, body mass index (BMI), recreational screen time, sedentary activity, and PA; and (c) identify girls’ top-rated perceived barriers to PA. Methods Girls (N = 509) from eight Midwestern U.S. schools participated. Demographic, pubertal stage, perceived barriers, and recreational screen time data were collected via surveys. Height and weight were measured. Accelerometers measured sedentary activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and light plus MVPA. Results Girls of low SES reported greater interference of perceived barriers to PA than those who were not of low SES (1.16 vs. 0.97, p = .01). Girls in early/middle puberty had lower perceived barriers than those in late puberty (1.03 vs. 1.24, p barriers were negatively related to MVPA (r = −.10, p = .03) and light plus MVPA (r = −.11, p = .02). Girls’ top five perceived barriers included lack of skills, hating to sweat, difficulty finding programs, being tired, and having pain. Discussion Innovative interventions, particularly focusing on skill development, are needed to assist girls in overcoming their perceived barriers to PA. PMID:26325276

  18. Biological and Sociocultural Differences in Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity Among Fifth- to Seventh-Grade Urban Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Amber L; Ling, Jiying; Voskuil, Vicki R; Bakhoya, Marion; Wesolek, Stacey M; Bourne, Kelly A; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Robbins, Lorraine B

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity (PA) contributes to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescent girls. Barriers preventing adolescent girls from meeting PA guidelines have not been thoroughly examined. The threefold purpose of this study was to (a) determine pubertal stage, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in ratings of interference of barriers to PA; (b) examine relationships between perceived barriers and age, body mass index, recreational screen time, sedentary activity, and PA; and (c) identify girls' top-rated perceived barriers to PA. Girls (N = 509) from eight Midwestern U.S. schools participated. Demographic, pubertal stage, perceived barriers, and recreational screen time data were collected via surveys. Height and weight were measured. Accelerometers measured sedentary activity, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and light plus MVPA. Girls of low SES reported greater interference of perceived barriers to PA than those who were not of low SES (1.16 vs. 0.97, p = .01). Girls in early/middle puberty had lower perceived barriers than those in late puberty (1.03 vs. 1.24, p barriers were negatively related to MVPA (r = -.10, p = .03) and light plus MVPA (r = -.11, p = .02). Girls' top five perceived barriers included lack of skills, hating to sweat, difficulty finding programs, being tired, and having pain. Innovative interventions, particularly focusing on skill development, are needed to assist girls in overcoming their perceived barriers to PA.

  19. Patient-Reported Barriers to the Prekidney Transplant Evaluation in an At-Risk Population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Mark B; Saunders, Milda R; Nass, Rachel; McGivern, Claire L; Cunningham, Patrick N; Chon, W James; Josephson, Michelle A; Becker, Yolanda T; Lee, Christopher S

    2017-06-01

    Despite our knowledge of barriers to the early stages of the transplant process, we have limited insight into patient-reported barriers to the prekidney transplant medical evaluation in populations largely at-risk for evaluation failure. One-hundred consecutive adults were enrolled at an urban, Midwestern transplant center. Demographic, clinical, and quality of life data were collected prior to patients visit with a transplant surgeon/nephrologist (evaluation begins). Patient-reported barriers to evaluation completion were collected using the Subjective Barriers Questionnaire 90-days after the initial medical evaluation appointment (evaluation ends), our center targeted goal for transplant work-up completion. At 90 days, 40% of participants had not completed the transplant evaluation. Five barrier categories were created from the 85 responses to the Subjective Barriers Questionnaire. Patient-reported barriers included poor communication, physical health, socioeconomics, psychosocial influences, and access to care. In addition, determinants for successful evaluation completion included being of white race, higher income, free of dialysis, a lower comorbid burden, and reporting higher scores on the Kidney Disease Quality of Life subscale role-emotional. Poor communication between patients and providers, and among providers, was the most prominent patient-reported barrier identified. Barriers were more prominent in marginalized groups such as ethnic minorities and people with low income. Understanding the prevalence of patient-reported barriers may aid in the development of patient-centered interventions to improve completion rates.

  20. High Performance Multi Barrier Thermionic Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2003-01-01

    Thermoelectric transport perpendicular to layers in multiple barrier superlattice structures is investigated theoretically in two limiting cases of no lateral momentum scattering and strong scattering...

  1. Water and contaminant movement: migration barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, L.J.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1984-11-01

    Migration barriers are used in shallow land burial facilities to slow or stop the movement of water and contaminants and are discussed here as a single component embedded in a complex environmental system. Analytical solutions to solute transport equations are used to approximate the behavior of migration barriers and to derive design criteria for control of subsurface water and contaminant migration. Various types of migration barriers are compared and design recommendations are made for shallow land burial trench caps and liners. Needed improvements and suggested field experiments for future designs of migration barriers are then discussed relative to the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  2. Barriers to healthcare for transgender individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safer, Joshua D; Coleman, Eli; Feldman, Jamie; Garofalo, Robert; Hembree, Wylie; Radix, Asa; Sevelius, Jae

    2016-04-01

    Transgender persons suffer significant health disparities and may require medical intervention as part of their care. The purpose of this manuscript is to briefly review the literature characterizing barriers to healthcare for transgender individuals and to propose research priorities to understand mechanisms of those barriers and interventions to overcome them. Current research emphasizes sexual minorities' self-report of barriers, rather than using direct methods. The biggest barrier to healthcare reported by transgender individuals is lack of access because of lack of providers who are sufficiently knowledgeable on the topic. Other barriers include: financial barriers, discrimination, lack of cultural competence by providers, health systems barriers, and socioeconomic barriers. National research priorities should include rigorous determination of the capacity of the US healthcare system to provide adequate care for transgender individuals. Studies should determine knowledge and biases of the medical workforce across the spectrum of medical training with regard to transgender medical care; adequacy of sufficient providers for the care required, larger social structural barriers, and status of a framework to pay for appropriate care. As well, studies should propose and validate potential solutions to address identified gaps.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides, Infections and the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja Lisa; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis and trans......The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis...

  4. Radon barrier: Method of testing airtightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2017-01-01

    The test method NBI 167/02 Radon membrane: Test of airtightness can be used for determining the airtightness of a radon barrier as a system solution. The test determines the air infiltration through the radon barrier for a number of levels of air pressure differences. The airflow through versus...... of the barrier with the low air pressure, through a well-defined opening, as a modification of the test method in general. Results, obtained using the improved test method, are shown for a number of radon barriers tested....

  5. Barrier for cold-fusion production of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Moeller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the fusion-barrier height B fu (two-body) for approaching ions in cold-fusion reactions in a model where the projectile deformation and quadrupole zero-point vibrational energy are taken into account. This barrier height is defined as the barrier energy at the target and projectile separation distance where an original oblate deformation of projectile and/or target caused by a repulsive Coulomb force turns into a large prolate deformation caused by the attractive nuclear force as the target and projectile come closer. The instability develops before touching because the attractive short-range nuclear force overcomes the repulsive Coulomb force and the shape-stabilizing effect of shell structure. The shell structure of the doubly magic 208 Pb target is sufficiently strong that its shape remains very close to spherical in all cases studied here. The fusion potential for approaching ions in the two-body channel is calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic model with the quadrupole vibrational zero-point energy obtained in the WKB approximation. We compare our results with data from 10 experimental cold-fusion reactions and with the Bass barriers. Differences and similarities between the Yukawa-plus-exponential model and the Bass model are discussed. We also calculate five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces for the single compound system and show that well-established fission and fusion valleys are both present. For heavy systems, B fu (two-body) becomes lower than the fission barrier just beyond the ground state of the compound system. In the vicinity of this transition, the optimum collision energy for formation of evaporation residues can be expected to depend in a delicate fashion on the interplay among B fu (two-body) , the fusion valley, the fission barrier of the compound system, and the one- and two-neutron separation energies S 1n and S 2n . We discuss these issues in detail and calculate fission-barrier heights. Except for reactions in which

  6. Barriers to Use of Family Planning Methods Among Heterosexual Mexican Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María Luisa Flores; Champion, Jane Dimmitt; Soto, Norma Elva Sáenz; Tovar, Marlene; Dávila, Sandra Paloma Esparza

    2017-05-01

    Family planning has become increasingly important as a fundamental component of sexual health and as such is offered via public health systems worldwide. Identification of barriers to use of family planning methods among heterosexual couples living in Mexico is indicated to facilitate access to family planning methods. Barriers to family planning methods were assessed among Mexican heterosexual, sexually active males and females of reproductive age, using a modified Spanish version of the Barriers to the Use of Family Planning Methods scale (Cronbach's alpha = .89, subscales ranging from .53 to .87). Participants were recruited via convenience sampling in ambulatory care clinics within a metropolitan area in Central Mexico. Participants included 52 heterosexual couples aged 18-35 years (N = 104). Sociodemographic comparisons by gender identified older age and higher education, income, and numbers of sexual partners among men than women. More men (50%) than women (25%) were currently using family planning methods; however, 80% overall indicated intentions for its use. Overall, male condoms were used and intended for use most often by men than women. Significant gender-specific differences were found, with men (71.15%) reporting no family planning barriers, whereas women (55.66%) reported barriers including low socioeconomic status, medical concerns, and stigma. The modified Spanish translation demonstrated usefulness for measuring barriers to family planning methods use in Mexico among heterosexual males and females of reproductive age. Barriers identified by Mexican women in this study may be addressed to reduce potential barriers to family planning among Mexican populations.

  7. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC, leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix] of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction.

  8. Barriers to obstetric fistula treatment in low-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Zoë; Bellows, Ben; Bach, Rachel; Warren, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    To identify the barriers faced by women living with obstetric fistula in low-income countries that prevent them from seeking care, reaching medical centres and receiving appropriate care. Bibliographic databases, grey literature, journals, and network and organisation websites were searched in English and French from June to July 2014 and again from August to November 2016 using key search terms and specific inclusion and exclusion criteria for discussion of barriers to fistula treatment. Experts provided recommendations for additional sources. Of 5829 articles screened, 139 were included in the review. Nine groups of barriers to treatment were identified: psychosocial, cultural, awareness, social, financial, transportation, facility shortages, quality of care and political leadership. Interventions to address barriers primarily focused on awareness, facility shortages, transportation, financial and social barriers. At present, outcome data, though promising, are sparse and the success of interventions in providing long-term alleviation of barriers is unclear. Results from the review indicate that there are many barriers to fistula treatment, which operate at the individual, community and national levels. The successful treatment of obstetric fistula may thus require targeting several barriers, including depression, stigma and shame, lack of community-based referral mechanisms, financial cost of the procedure, transportation difficulties, gender power imbalances, the availability of facilities that offer fistula repair, community reintegration and the competing priorities of political leadership. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Religious culture as a barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2016-01-01

    Political interventions, media coverage and research often refer to the underrepresentation of ethnic minorities, particularly girls and women, participating in physical activity and organised sports. In both public and academic debates, reference is made to the religious culture as a particular...... barrier to participation in sports among Muslim girls and women. This article aims to provide a counter-narrative by focusing on young Muslim girls who simultaneously practice their religion and sports. The main research question was: How do young Danish Muslim girls align participation in sports...... religion as hegemonic, embodied and dynamic cultural phenomena, the analysis points to the diversity through which Muslim girls and women participate and engage in sports. Finally, the article discusses the extent to which counter-narratives may contribute to changing perspectives on so-called hard...

  10. Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Krauss, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The project examined the effectiveness of studying the creep behavior of thermal barrier coating system through the use of a general purpose, large strain finite element program, NIKE2D. Constitutive models implemented in this code were applied to simulate thermal-elastic and creep behavior. Four separate ceramic-bond coat interface geometries were examined in combination with a variety of constitutive models and material properties. The reason for focusing attention on the ceramic-bond coat interface is that prior studies have shown that cracking occurs in the ceramic near interface features which act as stress concentration points. The model conditions examined include: (1) two bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion curves; (2) the creep coefficient and creep exponent of the bond coat for steady state creep; (3) the interface geometry; and (4) the material model employed to represent the bond coat, ceramic, and superalloy base.

  11. Pediatric lower extremity mower injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sean M; Elwood, Eric T

    2011-09-01

    Lawn mower injuries in children represent an unfortunate common problem to the plastic reconstructive surgeon. There are approximately 68,000 per year reported in the United States. Compounding this problem is the fact that a standard treatment algorithm does not exist. This study follows a series of 7 pediatric patients treated for lower extremity mower injuries by a single plastic surgeon. The extent of soft tissue injury varied. All patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy as a bridge to definitive closure. Of the 7 patients, 4 required skin grafts, 1 required primary closure, 1 underwent a lower extremity amputation secondary to wounds, and 1 was repaired using a cross-leg flap. Function limitations were minimal for all of our patients after reconstruction. Our basic treatment algorithm is presented with initial debridement followed by the simplest method possible for wound closure using negative pressure wound therapy, if necessary.

  12. Lymphoscintigraphy of the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, N.Z.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty one lower extremities of 26 normal healthy volunteers and 26 extremities of 13 patients with oedema have been studied. Dynamic quantitative lymphoscintigraphy using 99Tc-m antimony sulphide colloid during passive exercise as well as before and after active exercise was performed. parameters of lymphatic function including percentage of radioactivity cleared from the injection site, the percentage uptake by the inguinal lymph nodes, the time of arrival of activity at the regional lymph nodes and the lymphatic reserve index have been evaluated. The percentage clearance of activity from the injection site was found technically difficult to standardize and proved to be an unreliable parameter of lymphatic function. However, the quantitation of nodal uptake, the lymphatic transit time and the lymphatic reserve capacity accurately depicted the lymphatic functional status of an individual. The physiologic parameters of lymphatic function of the contralateral lower extremities were compared and a physiologic difference in the lymphatic capacity of the two limbs was scintigraphically documented. (author)

  13. An examination of how women and underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities experience barriers in biomedical research and medical programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Devasmita

    Women in medicine and biomedical research often face challenges to their retention, promotion, and advancement to leadership positions (McPhillips et al., 2007); they take longer to advance their careers, tend to serve at less research-intensive institutions and have shorter tenures compared to their male colleagues (White, McDade, Yamagata, & Morahan, 2012). Additionally, Blacks and Hispanics are the two largest minority groups that are vastly underrepresented in medicine and biomedical research in the United States (AAMC, 2012; NSF, 2011). The purpose of this study is to examine specific barriers reported by students and post-degree professionals in the field through the following questions: 1. How do women who are either currently enrolled or graduated from biomedical research or medical programs define and make meaning of gender-roles as academic barriers? 2. How do underrepresented groups in medical schools and biomedical research institutions define and make meaning of the academic barriers they face and the challenges these barriers pose to their success as individuals in the program? These questions were qualitatively analyzed using 146 interviews from Project TrEMUR applying grounded theory. Reported gender-role barriers were explained using the "Condition-Process-Outcome" theoretical framework. About one-third of the females (across all three programs; majority White or Black between 25-35 years of age) reported gender-role barriers, mostly due to poor mentoring, time constraints, set expectations and institutional barriers. Certain barriers act as conditions, causing gender-role issues, and gender-role issues influence certain barriers that act as outcomes. Strategies to overcome barriers included interventions mostly at the institutional level (mentor support, proper specialty selection, selecting academia over medicine). Barrier analysis for the two largest URM groups indicated that, while Blacks most frequently reported racism, gender barriers

  14. Batteries: Lower cost than gasoline?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werber, Mathew; Fischer, Michael; Schwartz, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    We compare the lifecycle costs of an electric car to a similar gasoline-powered vehicle under different scenarios of required driving range and cost of gasoline. An electric car is cost competitive for a significant portion of the scenarios: for cars of lower range and for higher gasoline prices. Electric cars with ∼150 km range are a technologically viable, cost competitive, high performance, high efficiency alternative that can presently suit the vast majority of consumers' needs.

  15. An Optimal Lower Eigenvalue System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfan Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal lower eigenvalue system is studied, and main theorems including a series of necessary and suffcient conditions concerning existence and a Lipschitz continuity result concerning stability are obtained. As applications, solvability results to some von-Neumann-type input-output inequalities, growth, and optimal growth factors, as well as Leontief-type balanced and optimal balanced growth paths, are also gotten.

  16. Lower-Limb Wearable Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Pons, J.L.; Moreno, J.C.; Brunetti, F.J.; Rocon, E.

    2007-01-01

    The differences found in the patients' kinematic gait patterns during the application of functional compensation on the lower limb showed significant differences regarding the subjects' usual gait. In both patients rapid adaptations were observed and new motor commands were learnt necessary for managing the exoskeleton with the constraints imposed on the limb. The benefits of the correct release of the knee in both instances is clear evidence of approximating their gait patterns to the normal...

  17. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  18. Addressing barriers to low carbon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Fiona; Dunstan, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Two energy solutions gaining attention are cogeneration and trigeneration, mostly fuelled by natural gas, although other renewable sources can be used, such as sewage, agricultural waste and municipal waste. Trigeneration has become increasingly popular in Australia's urban centres as a relatively cost-effective means to cut the carbon-intensity of energy supply by more than half compared to traditional coal- fired electricity. Some examples of trigeneration projects include the City of Sydney's planned 360 megawatt trigeneration networks by 2030, the University of Technology Sydney's campus master plan and the six star Green Star Commonwealth Bank Place building in Sydney. Trigeneration and cogeneration can present opportunities such as addressing the issue of rising peak demand, which is a major driver for the current $9 billion per annum of network infrastructure spending. They can also face barriers. For example, depending on the current state of the network, additional network costs can be required to accommodate trigeneration. Furthermore, under the current National Electricity Market regulations and conventions, challenges do exist to timely and financially viable connection to the grid. Here we present two examples of barriers to trigeneration and cogeneration and solutions being considered and implemented. The University of Technology Sydney campus master plan is underway, with approximately 100,000sq.m of floor area being built by 2019 and includes plans for trigeneration. During the master planning phase of development, the university considered small trigeneration units in individual buildings in order to reduce the carbon intensity of electricity supply and deliver high ratings under Green Star ratings. When considering connecting trigeneration with the grid at multiple buildings on an individual basis, a number of barriers were encountered by UTS. The largest barrier was appropriate charging for connecting to and using the grid. However

  19. Desmoglein 2 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungewiß, Hanna; Vielmuth, Franziska; Suzuki, Shintaro T; Maiser, Andreas; Harz, Hartmann; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Kugelmann, Daniela; Schlegel, Nicolas; Waschke, Jens

    2017-07-24

    Intestinal epithelial barrier properties are maintained by a junctional complex consisting of tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ) and desmosomes. Desmoglein 2 (Dsg2), an adhesion molecule of desmosomes and the only Dsg isoform expressed in enterocytes, is required for epithelial barrier properties and may contribute to barrier defects in Crohn's disease. Here, we identified extradesmosomal Dsg2 on the surface of polarized enterocytes by Triton extraction, confocal microscopy, SIM and STED. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed Dsg2-specific binding events along the cell border on the surface of enterocytes with a mean unbinding force of around 30pN. Binding events were blocked by an inhibitory antibody targeting Dsg2 which under same conditions activated p38MAPK but did not reduce cell cohesion. In enterocytes deficient for Dsg2, p38MAPK activity was reduced and both barrier integrity and reformation were impaired. Dsc2 rescue did not restore p38MAPK activity indicating that Dsg2 is required. Accordingly, direct activation of p38MAPK in Dsg2-deficient cells enhanced barrier reformation demonstrating that Dsg2-mediated activation of p38MAPK is crucial for barrier function. Collectively, our data show that Dsg2, beside its adhesion function, regulates intestinal barrier function via p38MAPK signalling. This is in contrast to keratinocytes and points towards tissue-specific signalling functions of desmosomal cadherins.

  20. Barriers to knowledge sharing in Chinese healthcare referral services: an emergent theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper reports on a research study that aims to identify and explain barriers to knowledge sharing (KS) in the provision of healthcare referral services in Chinese healthcare organisations. Design An inductive case study approach was employed, in which 24 healthcare professionals and workers from four healthcare organisations in the province of Hubei, Central China, were interviewed using semi-structured scripts. Results Through data analysis, 14 KS barriers emerged in four main themes: interpersonal trust barriers, communication barriers, management and leadership barriers, and inter-institutional barriers. A cause–consequence analysis of the identified barriers revealed that three of them are at the core of the majority of problems, namely, the absence of national and local policies for inter-hospital KS, lack of a specific hospital KS requirement, and lack of mutual acquaintance. Conclusions To resolve KS problems, it is of great importance that healthcare governance agencies, both at the national and regional levels, take leadership in the process of KS implementation by establishing specific and strong policies for inter-institutional KS in the referral process. This paper raises important issues that exceed academic interests and are important to healthcare professionals, hospital managers, and Information communication technology (ICT) managers in hospitals, as well as healthcare politicians and policy makers. PMID:26895146