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Sample records for low-z material requires

  1. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials

  2. The scattering of muons in low-Z materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.; Bell, P.; Bull, S.; McMahon, T.; Wilson, J.; Fernow, R.; Gruber, P.; Jamdagni, A.; Long, K.; McKigney, E.; Savage, P.; Curtis-Rouse, M.; Edgecock, T.R.; Ellis, M.; Lidbury, J.; Murray, W.; Norton, P.; Peach, K.; Ishida, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagamine, K.; Nakamura, S.; Marshall, G.M.; Benveniste, S.; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; Lee, K.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Holmes, S.; Bogacz, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionisation cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the GEANT4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionisation cooling will work better than would be predicted by GEANT 4.7.0p01

  3. The scattering of muons in low Z materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

    2005-12-03

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionization cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionization cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

  4. Low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET: beryllium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Hugon, M.; Booth, S.J.; Dean, J.R.; Dietz, K.J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Watkins, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of graphite and beryllium, as a low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET, are compared. A consideration of data on thermomechanical properties, retention of hydrogen and gettering action, indicates that beryllium offers the best prospects as a material for the JET belt limiters and walls. (U.K.)

  5. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D., E-mail: dmueller@pppl.gov; Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Raman, P.; Ruzic, D. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, Center for Plasma Material Interaction, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15 μm thick. Using a 0.1 mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  6. Study of radiative ablation to low-Z material and energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Miao Wenyong; Sun Kexu; Yi Rongqing; Chen Zhenglin; Wang Hongbin; Li Sanwei; Wang Yaomei; Wen Shuhuai; Zheng Zhijian; Zhang Wenhai; Yu Yanning

    1998-12-01

    X-ray emissions from the gold foil target, irradiated by 0.35 μm laser on the Xingguang facility, have been studied. A clean and intense X-ray source has been obtained from the rear of gold foil target by selection of irradiating laser parameters. Then, characteristics of radiation ablation to low-Z materials C 8 H 8 and C 10 H 16 O 5 and energy transport have been investigated comprehensively. Experimental results show that mass ablative rate of C 10 H 16 O 5 are greater than those of C 8 H 8 due to its better match with the ablative source spectra

  7. Surface segregation of low-Z elements on plasma-facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiapu; Liu Xiang

    1994-10-01

    Surface segregation behavior of low-Z elements, e.g., lithium and beryllium on ternary alloy Al-Li-Mg and Binary alloy Cu-Be has been observed. The experiments were performed by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AEA). The experimental results of Al-Li-Mg alloy indicated that lithium concentration on the specimen surface reached approximately 100% in the temperature range of 150 to 300 degree C, which can be explained by Gibbsian segregation theory. The depth profile of Li showed that there was some broadening resulting from recoil implantation by high energy Ar ion bombardment. When the specimen temperature exceeded 360 degree C, beryllium, the impurity element in the alloy was found to segregate to the surface. For this reason, another experiment on surface segregation of Cu-Be alloy was carried out by SIMS and AES, the surface analysis utilizing in-situ AES analysis revealed that the surface was enriched by Be and O at elevated temperature, considering the chemical affinity of Be and O, the principal driving force of segregation was attributed to the oxygen partial pressure in the atmosphere. The depth profile of Be in the alloy was also investigated. (9 figs.)

  8. Development of low-Z materials for plasma facing, structural applications in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassen, R.; Foerster, J.; Yehia, A.; Hammelmann, K.; Buchkremer, H.P.; Bolt, H.; Stoever, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper results of a systematic development of materials with regard to an improvement of fusion reactor relevant properties (i.e. thermal shock resistance evaluated at heating rates comparable to those during disruptions) will be described. Materials were produced by sintering and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of mixtures of SiC, B 4 C, TiC, C, B, and Ti powders. The variety of samples were devided into several groups: SiC-, TiC-, and B 4 C-based materials, depending on the majority phase within the composite. Also ultrafine SiC powders ( 2 and pulse duration of 5 ms in the KFA electron beam test facility JUDITH. Weight loss measurements, as well as microstructural investigations reveal large differences between the various samples. The results show clear tendencies of microstructural features (e.g. porosity, chemical composition, grain size) which lead to an increase in thermal shock resistance. An analytical model was developed and the results compared to the experimental erosion data. The model as well as beam current measurements gave indication that transgression of the maximal compressive strength at the surface is the mechanism, which determines erosion during the first transient heat phase. In order to compare our materials with conventional available ceramics, several SiC and graphite qualities of different manufactures were tested under the same conditions. The results show that commercial fine grained graphites have superior thermal shock properties compared to our materials (as was expected). But compared to the best tested commercial SiC quality our optimised ceramics reveal better shock resistance especially in the high energy range. (orig.)

  9. Saturation and isotopic replacement of deuterium in low-Z material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Brice, D.K.; Picraux, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    The saturation and replacement of hydrogen isotopes implanted into TiC, TiB 2 , VB 2 , B 4 C, B, Si, and C has been examined experimentally and modeled theoretically. The deuterium saturation concentrations for these materials varied from .16 to .57. A new isotopic replacement model is presented which predicts isotopic trapping and exchange on the basis of the depth dependence of the implanted ions and the experimentally determined hydrogen saturation concentration. Our results indicate that, for these materials used as coatings on components in a D-T fueled tokamak, T recovery by ion induced replacement with H or D should be feasible and that T buildup will be at tolerable levels

  10. Thin low Z coatings for plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Bowers, D.A.

    1978-05-01

    Coating the walls of the vacuum chamber with beryllium or some other low Z material has been proposed as a possible means of solving the problems of high Z influx into plasmas. We attempt to demonstrate that very thin, low Z coatings are compatible with the operation of plasma devices and beneficial to plasma performance. We determine that the thickness of coating material required is only about 10 monolayers. In a radiation environment, radiation-induced solute segregation should help to maintain the integrity of such thin coatings against diffusion and other processes. We discuss the properties of these thin coatings and possible means of in situ application and maintenance. Since deposition of plasma impurities on the walls will occur anyway, we discuss injection of solid pellets into the plasma as a direct way of introducing impurities which would ultimately serve as coating material

  11. Single-particle characterization of 'Asian Dust' certified reference materials using low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hee Jin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2006-01-01

    In order to clearly elucidate whether Asian Dust particles experience chemical modification during long-range transport, it is necessary to characterize soil particles where Asian Dust particles originate. If chemical compositions of source soil particles are well characterized, then chemical compositions of Asian Dust particles collected outside source regions can be compared with those of source soil particles in order to find out the occurrence of chemical modification. Asian Dust particles are chemically and morphologically heterogeneous, and thus the average composition and the average aerodynamic diameter (obtainable by bulk analysis) are not much relevant if the chemical modifications of the particles must be followed. The major elemental composition and abundance of the particle types that are potential subjects of chemical modification can only be obtained using single-particle analysis. A single particle analytical technique, named low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA), was applied to characterize two certified reference materials (CRMs) for Asian Dust particles, which were collected from a loess plateau area and a desert of China. The CRMs were defined by bulk analyses to provide certified concentrations for 13 chemical elements. Using the low-Z particle EPMA technique, the concentrations of major chemical species such as aluminosilicates, SiO 2 , CaCO 3 , and carbonaceous species were obtained. Elemental concentrations obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA are close to the certified values, with considering that the single particle and bulk analyses employ very different approaches. There are still some discrepancies between those concentration values, resulting from analyses of particles with different sizes, different sample amounts analyzed, and uncertainties involved in the single particle analysis

  12. High Intensity Beam Test of Low Z Materials for the Upgrade of SPS-to-LHC Transfer Line Collimators and LHC Injection Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Maciariello, Fausto; Butcher, Mark; Calviani, Marco; Folch, Ramon; Kain, Verena; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Lamas Garcia, Inigo; Lechner, Anton; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier; Steele, Genevieve; Uythoven, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) and High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, the collimators in the SPS-to LHC transfer lines will undergo important modifications. The changes to these collimators will allow them to cope with beam brightness and intensity levels much increased with respect to their original design parameters: nominal and ultimate LHC. The necessity for replacement of the current materials will need to be confirmed by a test in the High Radiation to Materials (HRM) facility at CERN. This test will involve low Z materials (such as Graphite and 3-D Carbon/Carbon composite), and will recreate the worst case scenario those materials could see when directly impacted by High luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) or Batch Compression Merging and Splitting (BCMS) beams. Thermo-structural simulations used for the material studies and research, the experiment preparation phase, the experiment itself, pre irradiation analysis (including ultrasound and metrology tests on the target materials), the resul...

  13. A low-Z PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, C.A.; Kaufman, D.E.; Chesler, D.A.; Stearns, C.W.; Correia, J.A.; Brownell, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to examine the potential of low-Z detector materials for PET, a small field imaging system using plastic detectors has been designed. In this system the site of a photon interaction in the detector is located using light produced by the first Compton electron. This is in contrast to high-Z detectors where multiple interactions occur. The calculated performance of the detector and supporting measurements are presented

  14. Low-Z coating as a first wall of nuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Okada, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak nuclear fusion devices of the largest scale in the world, TFTR in USA and JET in Europe, started the operation from the end of 1982 to 1983. Also in Japan, the tokamak JT-60 is scheduled to begin the operation in 1985. One of the technological obstacles is the problem of first walls facing directly to plasma and subjected to high particle loading and thermal loading. Moreover, first walls achieve the active role of controlling impurities in plasma and recycling hydrogen isotopes. It is impossible to find a single material which satisfies all these requirements. The compounding of materials can create a material having new function, but also has the meaning of expanding the range of material selection. One of the material compounding methods is surface coating. In this paper, as the materials for first walls, the characteristics of low Z materials are discussed from the design examples of actual takamak nuclear fusion devices. The outline of first walls is explained. High priority is given to the impurity control in plasma, and in view of plasma energy emissivity and the rate of self sputtering, low Z material coating seems to be the solution. The merits and the problems of such low Z material coating are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  15. Present status of low-Z coating development in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.; Abe, T.; Obara, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-01-01

    In the JT-60 at JAERI, TiC-coated molybdenum and TiC-coated Inconel tiles are currently used as plasma interactive components. They have already been subjected to initial ohmic heating experiments and exhibited good adhesion characteristics under high heat flux conditions. The present article reviews a JAERI's coating development program for JT-60 experiments currently under way and for the next-step experiments. The program includes development and performance tests of the TiC-coated tiles, development of an in-situ coating technique for the repair of damaged surface of the tiles, and research on carbonization. Stress is laid on thermal shock and thermal fatigue tests of these coatings. In the thermal tests, adhesion between low-Z coatings and bulk materials have been investigated under high heat irradiation. TiC and TiN are used as coating material while Mo and Inconel 625 are employed as bulk material. Results are shown in this report concerning calculated temperature elavation of TiC/TiN/Mo due to hydrogen beam irradiation. As regards the irradiation time required for the melting of the substrate, experimental results mostly agree with calculations. Almost all coatings investigated are not exfoliated from the substrate until the melting of the substrate. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Low-Z impurities in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnov, E.; Suckewer, S.; Bol, K.; Hawryluk, R.; Hosea, J.; Meservey, E.

    1977-11-01

    Low-Z impurities concentrations (oxygen and carbon) have been measured in different discharges in PLT. The contribution to Z/sub eff/, influx rates and radiation losses by oxygen and carbon were obtained. An inverse correlation was found between the low-Z impurity density (and also the edge ion temperature) and the high-Z impurity (tungsten) density. A one-dimensional computer transport model has been used to calculate the spatial profiles of different oxygen and carbon ionization states. This model predicts that fully stripped oxygen and carbon ions should exist near the plasma periphery

  17. Low-z Type Ia Supernova Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuy, Mario

    The discovery of acceleration and dark energy in 1998 arguably constitutes one of the most revolutionary discoveries in astrophysics in recent years. This paradigm shift was possible thanks to one of the most traditional cosmological tests: the redshift-distance relation between galaxies. This discovery was based on a differential measurement of the expansion rate of the universe: the current one provided by nearby (low-z) type Ia supernovae and the one in the past measured from distant (high-z) supernovae. This paper focuses on the first part of this journey: the calibration of the type Ia supernova luminosities and the local expansion rate of the universe, which was made possible thanks to the introduction of digital CCD (charge-coupled device) digital photometry. The new technology permitted us in the early 1990s to convert supernovae as precise tools to measure extragalactic distances through two key surveys: (1) the "Tololo Supernova Program" which made possible the critical discovery of the "peak luminosity-decline rate" relation for type Ia supernovae, the key underlying idea today behind precise cosmology from supernovae, and (2) the Calán/Tololo project which provided the low - z type Ia supernova sample for the discovery of acceleration.

  18. Thermal spray deposition and evaluation of low-Z coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Swindeman, C.J.; White, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally sprayed low-Z coatings of B 4 C on Al substrates were investigated as candidate materials for first-wall reactor protective surfaces. Comparisons were made to thermally sprayed coatings of B, MgAl 2 O 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and composites. Graded bond layers were applied to mitigate coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Microstructures, thermal diffusivity before and after thermal shock loading, steel ball impact resistance, CO 2 pellet cleaning and erosion tolerance, phase content, stoichiometry by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and relative tensile strengths were measured

  19. Effect of low-Z absorber's thickness on gamma-ray shielding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh, E-mail: ksmann6268@gmail.com [Department of Applied Sciences, Punjab Technical University, Kapurthala 144601 (India); Department of Physics, D.A.V. College, Bathinda 151001, Punjab (India); Heer, Manmohan Singh [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar 144001 (India); Rani, Asha [Department of Applied Sciences, Ferozpur College of Engineering and Technology, Ferozshah, Ferozpur 142052 (India)

    2015-10-11

    Gamma ray shielding behaviour of any material can be studied by various interaction parameters such as total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub m}); half value layer (HVL); tenth value layer (TVL); effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}), electron density (N{sub el}), effective atomic weight (A{sub eff}) and buildup factor. For gamma rays, the accurate measurements of μ{sub m} (cm{sup 2} g{sup −1}) theoretically require perfect narrow beam irradiation geometry. However, the practical geometries used for the experimental investigations deviate from perfect-narrowness thereby the multiple scattered photons cause systematic errors in the measured values of μ{sub m}. Present investigation is an attempt to find the optimum value of absorber thickness (low-Z) for which these errors are insignificant and acceptable. Both experimental and theoretical calculations have been performed to investigate the effect of absorber's thickness on μ{sub m} of six low-Z (10materials (cement-black; cement-white; clay; red-mud; lime-stone and plaster of paris) at gamma-ray energies 661.66 keV, 1173.24 keV and 1332.50 keV. A computer program (GRIC2-toolkit) was designed for theoretical evaluation of shielding parameters of any material. Good agreement of theoretical and measured values of μ{sub m} was observed for all absorbers with thickness ≤0.5 mean free paths, thus considered it as optimum thickness for low-Z materials in the selected energy range. White cement was found to possess maximum shielding effectiveness for the selected gamma rays. - Highlights: • Optimum thickness value is 0.5 mfp for low-Z absorbers in energy range 662–1332 keV. • For accurate measurement of μ{sub m} absorber's thickness should be ≤optimum thickness. • GRIC2-toolkit is useful for γ-ray shielding analysis of composite materials.

  20. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  1. Comparative study of a low-Z cone-beam computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D A; Hansen, V N; Poludniowski, G; Evans, P M; Thompson, M G; Niven, A; Seco, J

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography images have been acquired using an experimental (low atomic number (Z) insert) megavoltage cone-beam imaging system. These images have been compared with standard megavoltage and kilovoltage imaging systems. The experimental system requires a simple modification to the 4 MeV electron beam from an Elekta Precise linac. Low-energy photons are produced in the standard medium-Z electron window and a low-Z carbon electron absorber located after the window. The carbon electron absorber produces photons as well as ensuring that all remaining electrons from the source are removed. A detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies is also employed. Quantitative assessment of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) contrast shows that the low-Z imaging system is an order of magnitude or more superior to a standard 6 MV imaging system. CBCT data with the same contrast-to-noise ratio as a kilovoltage imaging system (0.15 cGy) can be obtained in doses of 11 and 244 cGy for the experimental and standard 6 MV systems, respectively. Whilst these doses are high for everyday imaging, qualitative images indicate that kilovoltage like images suitable for patient positioning can be acquired in radiation doses of 1-8 cGy with the experimental low-Z system.

  2. Ultra-dense hot low Z line transition opacity simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvan, P.; Minguez, E.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.; Calisti, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this work two atomic physics models (the IDEFIX code using the dicenter model and the code based on parametric potentials ANALOP) have been used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot ultra-dense, low Z plasmas. These simulations are in connection with experiments carried out at LULI during the last two years, focused on bound-bound radiation. In this paper H-like opacities for aluminum and fluorine plasmas have been simulated, using both theoretical models, in a wide range of densities and temperatures higher than 200 eV

  3. Material requirements planning: a better way to plan material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, S

    1990-08-01

    MRP systems can benefit hospitals in their management of material. Systems provide the means to schedule surgical procedures, calculate material requirements, release orders, plan future capacity requirements, and release and track work orders. MRP can be a powerful tool if properly implemented. All it takes is individuals dedicated to maintaining the discipline and data integrity required to make MRP successful.

  4. Thermal shock testing of low-Z coatings with pulsed hydrogen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    1982-03-01

    Thermal shock testing of candidate low-Z surface coatings for JT-60 application has been made by using a pulsed hydrogen beam apparatus which is operated at a power density of 2KW/cm 2 . The materials tested are PVD (Physical Vapor Deposited) TiC and PVD and CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposited) TiN on molybdenum and Inconel 625. The result shows that CVD TiC on Mo and CVD TiN on Inconel are the most interesting choices for the coating-substrate combinations. (author)

  5. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks. [Neoclassical transport theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed.

  6. Use of muonic x rays for nondestructive analysis of bulk samples for low Z constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidy, J.J.; Hutson, R.L.; Daniel, H.; Springer, K.

    1978-01-01

    Muonic x rays have been used in quantitative analysis on bulk samples of ''tissue equivalent'' material whose primary constituents are low Z elements (Z less than or equal to 20). The muonic x-ray spectrum resulting from negative muons stopping in ''tissue equivalent'' materials has been obtained. Relative muonic x-ray intensities were determined and correlated with atomic abundances in these materials. A comparison of the results for the various samples is presented. This work establishes the usefulness of this technique for analyses of gross specimens (greater than or equal to few grams) for elements with 6 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 20 and atomic abundances greater than 0.15 percent

  7. Heavy oils processing materials requirements crude processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloley, Andrew W. [CH2M Hill, Englewood, CO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, recommended best practices for crude unit materials selection have evolved to accommodate new operating requirements, feed qualities, and product qualities. The shift to heavier oil processing is one of the major changes in crude feed quality occurring over the last 20 years. The three major types of crude unit corrosion include sulfidation attack, naphthenic acid attack, and corrosion resulting from hydrolyzable chlorides. Heavy oils processing makes all three areas worse. Heavy oils have higher sulfur content; higher naphthenic acid content; and are more difficult to desalt, leading to higher chloride corrosion rates. Materials selection involves two major criteria, meeting required safety standards, and optimizing economics of the overall plant. Proper materials selection is only one component of a plant integrity approach. Materials selection cannot eliminate all corrosion. Proper materials selection requires appropriate support from other elements of an integrity protection program. The elements of integrity preservation include: materials selection (type and corrosion allowance); management limits on operating conditions allowed; feed quality control; chemical additives for corrosion reduction; and preventive maintenance and inspection (PMI). The following discussion must be taken in the context of the application of required supporting work in all the other areas. Within that context, specific materials recommendations are made to minimize corrosion due to the most common causes in the crude unit. (author)

  8. Requirements for materials of dispersion fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlov, A.G.; Kashtanov, A.I.; Volkov, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements for materials of dispersion fuel elements are considered. The necessity of structural and fissile materials compatibility at maximum permissible operation temperatures and temperatures arising in a fuel element during manufacture is pointed out. The fuel element structural material must be ductile, possess high mechanical strength minimum neutron absorption cross section, sufficient heat conductivity, good corrosion resistance in a coolant and radiation resistance. The fissile material must have high fissile isotope concentration, radiation resistance, high thermal conductivity, certain porosity high melting temperature must not change the composition under irradiation

  9. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited

  10. CIT alpha particle extraction and measurement: Low-Z ablation cloud profile simulation for alpha-particle diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdin, G.; Vahala, L.; El Cashlan, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the expected properties of the ablation cloud of low-Z pellets interacting with a thermonuclear plasma, which in turn is proposed as a charge-neutralization medium for confined alpha particles, a numerical program has been developed. The physical model for this program is based on Parks' low-Z pellet-plasma interaction model for the interior of the cloud adjacent to the pellet's surface out to the sonic surface (roughly, a millimeter in separation) and then propagating outward from this region using the conservation laws of enthalpy, momentum, and mass, along with the assumption of charge-state equilibrium. The effects of local heating by the plasma electrons slowing down in the cloud, and ionization of the ablatant material are treated self-consistently in the model. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Parks of General Atomics Corporation, a joint ODU-GAC research plan for modeling low-Z pellet-plasma interactions has been devised, and considerable progress has been made in its implementation. Recently, using a constraint in the ablatant flow, results from the program were obtained which could be compared with the results from the GAC experiments on TEXT. The predictions of the program are in pretty good agreement with the TEXT data as to the dimensions of the C +3 region of the cloud along the magnetic field. Also a small improvement has been made in the low-Z pellet plasma-penetration program, which brings the predictions of the model in closer agreement with the carbon pellet injection experiments on TFTR. 22 refs., 3 figs

  11. Characterizing Low-Z erosion and deposition in the DIII-D divertor using aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Chrobak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements and modeling of aluminum erosion and redeposition experiments in separate helium and deuterium low power, low density L-mode plasmas at the outer divertor strike point of DIII-D to provide a low-Z material benchmark dataset for tokamak erosion-deposition modeling codes. Coatings of Al ∼100nm thick were applied to ideal (smooth and realistic (rough surfaces and exposed to repeat plasma discharges using the DiMES probe. Redeposition in all cases was primarily in the downstream toroidal field direction, evident from both in-situ spectroscopic and post-mortem non-spectroscopic measurements. The gross Al erosion yield was estimated from film thickness change measurements of small area samples, and was found to be ∼40–70% of the expected erosion yield based on theoretical physical sputtering yields after including sputtering by a 1–3% carbon impurity. The multi-step redeposition and re-erosion process, and hence the measured net erosion yield and material migration patterns, were found to be influenced by the surface roughness and/or porosity. A time-dependent model of material migration accounting for deposit accumulation in hidden areas was developed to reproduce the measurements in these experiments and determine a redeposition probability distribution function for sputtered atoms.

  12. Testing of low Z coated limiters in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitely, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.; Langley, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive testing on a laboratory scale has been used to select those coatings most suitable for this environment. From this testing which included pulsed electron beam heating, low energy ion bombardment and arcing, chemical vapor deposited coating of TiB 2 and TiC on Poco graphite substrates have been selected and tested as limiters in ISX. Both limiter materials gave clean, stable, reproducible tokamak discharges the first day of operation. After one weeks exposure, the TiC limiter showed only superficial damage with no coating failure. The TiB 2 limiter had some small areas of coating failure. TiC coated graphite limiters have also been briefly tested in the tokamaks Alcator and PDX with favorable results

  13. Low-Z impurity transport studies using CXRS at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Cecilia; McDermott, Rachael; Dux, Ralph; Angioni, Clemente; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Kappatou, Athina; Lebschy, Alexander; Puetterich, Thomas; Viezzer, Eleonora [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Impurities in fusion plasmas arise from many sources including the erosion of material from plasma facing components and the intentional injection of impurities for control of the radiation losses. With the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) the density profiles of low-Z impurity species can be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution and can, thus, be used to investigate the transport of these impurities. Previous work on this topic at AUG has focused primarily on steady state profiles, which deliver the ratio of the diffusive and convective transport coefficients. However, from the time response of the density profiles after applying an external perturbation (e.g. a fast impurity puff) the convective and diffusive components of the transport can be separately determined. The work presented here aims to achieve this by a less conventional approach that is better suited to the limited time resolution of the CXRS diagnostics; namely, a sinusoidal modulation of the boron densities invoked by modulating the power from the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas. The work presented here aims to achieve this by an approach that is better suited to the limited time resolution of the CXRS diagnostics; namely, a sinusoidal modulation of the boron densities invoked by modulating the power from the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas. We present the first measurements of the boron density modulation as well as the machine and plasma parameter dependencies of the boron response to the ICRF power.

  14. Low Z target switching to increase tumor endothelial cell dose enhancement during gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@partners.org; Detappe, Alexandre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Tsiamas, Panogiotis [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Parsons, David; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Robar, James [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have introduced gold nanoparticles as vascular-disrupting agents during radiation therapy. Crucial to this concept is the low energy photon content of the therapy radiation beam. The authors introduce a new mode of delivery including a linear accelerator target that can toggle between low Z and high Z targets during beam delivery. In this study, the authors examine the potential increase in tumor blood vessel endothelial cell radiation dose enhancement with the low Z target. Methods: The authors use Monte Carlo methods to simulate delivery of three different clinical photon beams: (1) a 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam, (2) a 6 MV flattening filter free (Cu/W), and (3) a 6 MV (carbon) beam. The photon energy spectra for each scenario are generated for depths in tissue-equivalent material: 2, 10, and 20 cm. The endothelial dose enhancement for each target and depth is calculated using a previously published analytic method. Results: It is found that the carbon target increases the proportion of low energy (<150 keV) photons at 10 cm depth to 28% from 8% for the 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam. This nearly quadrupling of the low energy photon content incident on a gold nanoparticle results in 7.7 times the endothelial dose enhancement as a 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam at this depth. Increased surface dose from the low Z target can be mitigated by well-spaced beam arrangements. Conclusions: By using the fast-switching target, one can modulate the photon beam during delivery, producing a customized photon energy spectrum for each specific situation.

  15. CIT alpha particle extraction and measurement: Low-Z ablation cloud profile simulation for alpha-particle diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdin, G.; Vahala, L.; El Cashlan, A.G.

    1990-05-01

    In order to determine the expected properties of the ablation cloud of low-Z pellets interacting with a thermonuclear plasma, which in turn is proposed as a charge-neutralization medium for confined alpha particles, a numerical program has been developed. The physical model for this program is based on Park's low-Z pellet-plasma interaction model for the interior of the cloud adjacent to the pellet's surface out to the sonic surface (roughly, a millimeter in separation), and then propagating outward from this region using the conservation laws of enthalpy, momentum, and mass, along with the assumption of charge-state equilibrium. The effects of local heating by the plasma electrons slowing down in the cloud, and ionization of the ablatant material are treated self-consistently in the model. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Parks of General Atomics Corporation, a joint ODU-GAC research plan for modeling low-Z pellet-plasma interactions has been devised, and considerable progress has been made in its implementation. Recently, using a constraint in the ablatant flow, so that it approximates its observed flow along the magnetic field, results from the program were obtained which could be compared with the results from the GAC experiments on TEXT. The predictions of the program are in poor agreement with the TEXT data as to the dimensions of the C +3 region of the cloud along the magnetic field. The failure of the model appears to be the breakdown of the assumption that charge-state equilibrium exists in the cloud. This problem is particularly severe for the TEXT parameters so modifications in the model to include non-equilibrium effects are being implemented

  16. TH-C-12A-10: Surface Dose Enhancement Using Novel Hybrid Electron and Photon Low-Z Therapy Beams: Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C; Parsons, D [Dept of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Robar, J; Kelly, R [Dept of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Dept of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The introduction of the TrueBeam linac platform provides access to an in-air target assembly making it possible to apply novel treatments using multiple target designs. One such novel treatment uses multiple low-Z targets to enhance surface dose replacing the use of synthetic tissue equivalent material (bolus). This treatment technique will decrease the common dosimetric and set up errors prevalent in using physical treatment accessories like bolus. The groundwork for a novel treatment beam used to enhance surface dose to within 80-100% of the dose at dmax by utilizing low-Z (Carbon) targets of various percent CSDA range thickness operated at 2.5–4 MeV used in conjunction with a clinical 6 MV beam is presented herein. Methods: A standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was developed to manufacturers specifications. Simulations were performed using Be, C, AL, and C, as potential low-Z targets, placed in the secondary target position. The results determined C to be the target material of choice. Simulations of 15, 30 and 60% CSDA range C beams were propagated through slab phantoms. The resulting PDDs were weighted and combined with a standard 6 MV treatment beam. Versions of the experimental targets were installed into a 2100C Clinac and the models were validated. Results: Carbon was shown to be the low-Z material of choice for this project. Using combinations of 15, 30, 60% CSDA beams operated at 2.5 and 4 MeV in combination with a standard 6 MV treatment beam the surface dose was shown to be enhanced to within 80–100% the dose at dmax. Conclusion: The modeled low-Z beams were successfully validated using machined versions of the targets. Water phantom measurements and slab phantom simulations show excellent correlation. Patient simulations are now underway to compare the use of bolus with the proposed novel beams. NSERC.

  17. TH-C-12A-10: Surface Dose Enhancement Using Novel Hybrid Electron and Photon Low-Z Therapy Beams: Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, C; Parsons, D; Robar, J; Kelly, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The introduction of the TrueBeam linac platform provides access to an in-air target assembly making it possible to apply novel treatments using multiple target designs. One such novel treatment uses multiple low-Z targets to enhance surface dose replacing the use of synthetic tissue equivalent material (bolus). This treatment technique will decrease the common dosimetric and set up errors prevalent in using physical treatment accessories like bolus. The groundwork for a novel treatment beam used to enhance surface dose to within 80-100% of the dose at dmax by utilizing low-Z (Carbon) targets of various percent CSDA range thickness operated at 2.5–4 MeV used in conjunction with a clinical 6 MV beam is presented herein. Methods: A standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was developed to manufacturers specifications. Simulations were performed using Be, C, AL, and C, as potential low-Z targets, placed in the secondary target position. The results determined C to be the target material of choice. Simulations of 15, 30 and 60% CSDA range C beams were propagated through slab phantoms. The resulting PDDs were weighted and combined with a standard 6 MV treatment beam. Versions of the experimental targets were installed into a 2100C Clinac and the models were validated. Results: Carbon was shown to be the low-Z material of choice for this project. Using combinations of 15, 30, 60% CSDA beams operated at 2.5 and 4 MeV in combination with a standard 6 MV treatment beam the surface dose was shown to be enhanced to within 80–100% the dose at dmax. Conclusion: The modeled low-Z beams were successfully validated using machined versions of the targets. Water phantom measurements and slab phantom simulations show excellent correlation. Patient simulations are now underway to compare the use of bolus with the proposed novel beams. NSERC

  18. Analysis of low Z elements in various environmental samples with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefler, H.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Ovari, M.; Zaray, Gy.

    2006-01-01

    Recently there is a growing interest in low Z elements such as carbon, oxygen up to sulphur and phosphorus in biological specimen. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a suitable technique demanding only very small amounts of sample. On the other side, the detection of low Z elements is a critical point of this analytical technique. Besides other effects, self absorption may occur in the samples, because of the low energy of the fluorescence radiation. The calibration curves might be not linear any longer. To investigate this issue water samples and samples from human cerebrospinal fluid were used to examine absorption effects. The linearity of calibration curves in dependence of sample mass was investigated to verify the validity of the thin film approximation. The special requirements to the experimental setup for low Z energy dispersive fluorescence analysis were met by using the Atominstitute's TXRF vacuum chamber. This spectrometer is equipped with a Cr-anode X-ray tube, a multilayer monochromator and a SiLi detector with 30 mm 2 active area and with an ultrathin entrance window. Other object on this study are biofilms, living on all subaqueous surfaces, consisting of bacteria, algae and fungi embedded in their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Many trace elements from the water are bound in the biofilm. Thus, the biofilm is a useful indicator for polluting elements. For biomonitoring purposes not only the polluting elements but also the formation and growth rate of the biofilm are important. Biofilms were directly grown on TXRF reflectors. Their major elements and C-masses correlated to the cultivation time were investigated. These measured masses were related to the area seen by the detector, which was experimentally determined. Homogeneity of the biofilms was checked by measuring various sample positions on the reflectors

  19. Analysis of low Z elements in various environmental samples with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefler, H. [Atominstitut of the Austrian Universities, TU-Wien, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Streli, C. [Atominstitut of the Austrian Universities, TU-Wien, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: streli@ati.ac.at; Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut of the Austrian Universities, TU-Wien, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Ovari, M. [Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry, H-1117, Budapest, Pazmany P. stny 1/a. (Hungary); Zaray, Gy. [Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry, H-1117, Budapest, Pazmany P. stny 1/a. (Hungary)

    2006-11-15

    Recently there is a growing interest in low Z elements such as carbon, oxygen up to sulphur and phosphorus in biological specimen. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a suitable technique demanding only very small amounts of sample. On the other side, the detection of low Z elements is a critical point of this analytical technique. Besides other effects, self absorption may occur in the samples, because of the low energy of the fluorescence radiation. The calibration curves might be not linear any longer. To investigate this issue water samples and samples from human cerebrospinal fluid were used to examine absorption effects. The linearity of calibration curves in dependence of sample mass was investigated to verify the validity of the thin film approximation. The special requirements to the experimental setup for low Z energy dispersive fluorescence analysis were met by using the Atominstitute's TXRF vacuum chamber. This spectrometer is equipped with a Cr-anode X-ray tube, a multilayer monochromator and a SiLi detector with 30 mm{sup 2} active area and with an ultrathin entrance window. Other object on this study are biofilms, living on all subaqueous surfaces, consisting of bacteria, algae and fungi embedded in their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Many trace elements from the water are bound in the biofilm. Thus, the biofilm is a useful indicator for polluting elements. For biomonitoring purposes not only the polluting elements but also the formation and growth rate of the biofilm are important. Biofilms were directly grown on TXRF reflectors. Their major elements and C-masses correlated to the cultivation time were investigated. These measured masses were related to the area seen by the detector, which was experimentally determined. Homogeneity of the biofilms was checked by measuring various sample positions on the reflectors.

  20. New properties of z-scaling: flavor independence and saturation at low z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zborovsky, I.; Tokarev, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental ISR, RHIC, and Tevatron data on inclusive cross sections of particles produced in high energy proton-(anti)proton collisions are analyzed in the framework of z-scaling. New features of the scaling function ψ(z) are established. These are flavor independence of ψ(z) including particles with heavy flavor content and saturation at low z. Flavor independence means that the shape of the scaling function ψ(z) is the same for different hadron species. Saturation corresponds to flattering of ψ(z) for low z < 0.1. Relations of model parameters used in data z-presentation with some thermodynamical quantities (entropy, specific heat, temperature) are discussed. It is shown that behavior of particle spectra at low z is controlled by a parameter c interpreted as specific heat of the created medium associated with production of the inclusive particle. The saturation regime of ψ(z) observed at low z is assumed to be preferable in searching for phase transitions of hadron matter and for study of nonperturbative QCD in high energy proton-(anti)proton collisions at U70, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC

  1. A comparison of two atomic models for the radiative properties of dense hot low Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.; Sauvan, P.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Florido, R.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, two different atomic models (ANALOP based on parametric potentials and IDEFIX based on the dicenter model) are used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot dense, low Z plasmas, and the results are compared to each other. In addition, the ANALOP code has been used to compute free-bound cross sections for hydrogen-like ions

  2. Phase change materials in energy sector - applications and material requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuta, Marta; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.

    2015-05-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have been applying in many areas. One of them is energy field. PCMs are interesting for the energy sector because their use enables thermal stabilization and storage of large amount of heat. It is major issue for safety of electronic devices, thermal control of buildings and vehicles, solar power and many others energy domains. This paper contains preliminary results of research on solid-solid phase change materials designed for thermal stabilisation of electronic devices.

  3. Materials and fabrication requirements for APWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothby, R.M.; Hippsley, C.A.; Gorton, O.K.; Garwood, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Materials specifications for advanced pressurized water-cooled reactor (APWR) systems are generally based on existing designs, with improved materials and fabrication procedures being developed to counter known degradation effects. In this paper, materials ageing and degradation mechanisms in PWR primary circuit pressure boundary components (i.e. the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs), coolant piping, coolant pump casing, pressurizer, and steam generators) are reviewed. Important degradation mechanisms include irradiation embrittlement of the RPV, thermal ageing embrittlement of ferritic (e.g. the pressurizer) and cast austenitic (e.g. coolant pump casing and pipe elbows) steel components and environmentally assisted cracking of steam generator tubing and CRDM penetrations. Improved materials specifications and component design and fabrication issues affecting the integrity of the pressure boundary are discussed in the light of these materials problems. Improved fabrication procedures adopted for Sizewell B, such as the utilization of ring forgings to eliminate axial welds in the RPV and steam generator shells and the use of one-piece castings for coolant pump casings, provide a benchmark against which other APWR designs may be judged. (author)

  4. MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS FOR THERMIONIC ENERGY CONVERSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R. C.; Skeen, C. H.

    1963-03-15

    The fundamentals of the thermionic energy conversion and its potential applications are reviewed. Materials problems associated with thermionic emitters are considered in relation to the following: work function; emissivity; vaporization; thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties; chemical stability; permeation; and stability under nuclear radiation. Cesium purity and materials suitable for collectors, electrical leads, support structures, insulators, and seals are also discussed. Experimental work on problems involved is reviewed. It is concluded that significant developments have occurred recently in all areas of thermionic energy conversion. (40 references) (A.G.W.)

  5. Material requirements planning using uncertain data

    OpenAIRE

    Ramonas, Martynas

    2007-01-01

    Last decennials in many companies information like strategical reservoir bursted into preponderant positions. Strategical information systems which withstand competition hold information place like this and help to survive for companies. First integrated IS which upstarted to computerize the planning of companies activities, are material recourse planning systems (MRP). It helps for company to solve the serious problems. Strategical information systems change the aims, processes of business, ...

  6. Attenuation and Emittance Growth of 450 GeV and 7 TeV Proton Beams in Low-Z Absorber Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Goddard, B; Schmidt, R

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of the LHC beams will be several orders of magnitude above the damage thresholds for equipment. Passive protection of accelerator equipment against failures during beam transfer, injection and dumping of the beam with diluters and collimators is foreseen. These protection devices must be robust in case of beam impact, and low-Z materials such as carbon are favored. In these diluters, the reduction of the energy density is determined both by the attenuation due to inelastic nuclear collisions and by the emittance growth of the surviving protons due to elastic scattering processes. The physics principles leading to attenuation and emittance growth for a hadron beam traversing matter are summarised, and FLUKA simulation results for 450 GeV and 7 TeV proton beams on low-Z absorbers are compared with these predictions. Design criteria for the LHC absorbers are derived from these results.

  7. Search for two-photon emission from 2S states of low-Z muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, A.L.; Hincks, E.P.; Cox, C.R.; Dodson, G.W.; Eckhause, M.; Kane, J.R.; Rushton, A.M.; Siegel, R.T.; Welsh, R.E.; Hargrove, C.K.; Mes, H.; Dixit, M.S.; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario)

    1983-01-01

    A search for two-photon emission from 2S states of low-Z muonic atoms has been made. Intrinsic Ge detectors were positioned around target of Li, Be, B, or their hydrides, or a vessel containing B 2 H 6 , H 2 , or O 2 . Upper limits on the fraction of stopping muons which formed metastable 2S states range from approx.= 10 - 3 to 10 - 5 . (orig.)

  8. Search for two-photon emission from 2S states of low-Z muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, A.L.; Hincks, E.P. (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics); Cox, C.R.; Dodson, G.W.; Eckhause, M.; Kane, J.R.; Rushton, A.M.; Siegel, R.T.; Welsh, R.E. (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Hargrove, C.K.

    1983-05-12

    A search for two-photon emission from 2S states of low-Z muonic atoms has been made. Intrinsic Ge detectors were positioned around target of Li, Be, B, or their hydrides, or a vessel containing B/sub 2/H/sub 6/, H/sub 2/, or O/sub 2/. Upper limits on the fraction of stopping muons which formed metastable 2S states range from approximately = 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -5/.

  9. Spreadsheet Decision Support Model for Training Exercise Material Requirements Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tringali, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    ... associated with military training exercises. The model combines the business practice of Material Requirements Planning and the commercial spreadsheet software capabilities of Lotus 1-2-3 to calculate the requirements for food, consumable...

  10. Source and special nuclear material sealing and labeling requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.N.

    1978-04-01

    Purpose of this document is to define requirements for the use of tamper-indicating seals and identifying labels on SS Material containers at Rockwell Hanford Operations. The requirements defined in this document are applicable to all Rockwell Hanford Operation employees involved in handling, processing, packaging, transferring, shipping, receiving or storing SS Material

  11. The contribution of material control to meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) is in the process of implementing a set of performance requirements for material control and accountability (MC ampersand A). These graded requirements set a uniform level of performance for similar materials at various facilities with respect to the threat of an insider adversary stealing special nuclear material (SNM). These requirements are phrased in terms of detecting the theft of a goal quantity of SNM within a specified time period and with a probability greater than or equal to a specified value and include defense in-depth requirements

  12. Materials technology for fusion - Current status and future requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.E.; Bloom, E.E.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Smith, D.L.; Stevenson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The general status of the materials research and development activities currently under way in support of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors in the United States is reviewed. In the area of magnetic confinement configurations, attention is given to development programs for first wall materials, which are at various stages for possible austenitic stainless steels, high-strength Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, reactive and refractory metal alloys, specially designed long-range ordered and rapidly solidified alloys, and ferritic/martensitic steels, and for tritium breeding materials, electrical insulators, ceramics, and coolants. The development of materials for inertial confinement reactors is also surveyed in relation to the protection scheme employed for the first wall and the effects of pulsed neutron irradiation. Finally, the materials requirements and selection procedures for the ETF/INTOR and Starfire tokamak reactor designs are examined. Needs for the expansion of research on nonfirst-wall materials and inertial confinement fusion reactor material requirements are pointed out

  13. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of low-Z element radiation in the PDX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, K.; Suckewer, S.; Wong, S.K.

    1983-06-01

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of hydrogen isotopes and low-Z impurity radiation in the PDX tokamak may be caused by poloidally asymmetric sources of these elements at gas inlet valves, limiters or vacuum vessel walls, asymmetric magnetic field geometry in the region beyond the plasma boundary, or by ion curvature drifts. Low ionization states of carbon (C II- C IV) are more easily influenced by edge conditions than is CV. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of CV are correlated with the direction of the toroidal field. The magnitude of the asymmetry agrees with the predictions of a quasifluid neoclassical model. Experimental data and numerical simulations are presented to investigate different models of impurity poloidal asymmetries.

  14. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of low-Z element radiation in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, K.; Suckewer, S.; Wong, S.K.

    1983-06-01

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of hydrogen isotopes and low-Z impurity radiation in the PDX tokamak may be caused by poloidally asymmetric sources of these elements at gas inlet valves, limiters or vacuum vessel walls, asymmetric magnetic field geometry in the region beyond the plasma boundary, or by ion curvature drifts. Low ionization states of carbon (C II- C IV) are more easily influenced by edge conditions than is CV. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of CV are correlated with the direction of the toroidal field. The magnitude of the asymmetry agrees with the predictions of a quasifluid neoclassical model. Experimental data and numerical simulations are presented to investigate different models of impurity poloidal asymmetries

  15. Low-Z internal target from a cryogenically cooled liquid microjet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, M.; Petridis, N. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Winters, D.F.A. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Popp, U. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grisenti, R.E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); GSI, Planckstr. 1, 64291 (Germany)], E-mail: grisenti@atom.uni-frankfurt.de

    2009-04-21

    We carried out an extensive investigation on the production of cryogenically cooled liquid hydrogen and helium droplet beams at the experimental storage ring at GSI with the goal to achieve high area densities for these low-Z internal targets. Our results show that an area density of up to 10{sup 14}cm{sup -2} is achieved for both light gases by expanding the liquid through sub-10 {mu}m diameter nozzles. The achieved area density is comparable with the previous results for the hydrogen internal target and represents an improvement by about four orders of magnitude for the helium target.

  16. Low-Z internal target from a cryogenically cooled liquid microjet source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, M.; Petridis, N.; Winters, D.F.A.; Popp, U.; Doerner, R.; Stoehlker, Th.; Grisenti, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an extensive investigation on the production of cryogenically cooled liquid hydrogen and helium droplet beams at the experimental storage ring at GSI with the goal to achieve high area densities for these low-Z internal targets. Our results show that an area density of up to 10 14 cm -2 is achieved for both light gases by expanding the liquid through sub-10 μm diameter nozzles. The achieved area density is comparable with the previous results for the hydrogen internal target and represents an improvement by about four orders of magnitude for the helium target.

  17. Temperature- and density-dependent x-ray scattering in a low-Z plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.T.

    1976-06-01

    A computer program is described which calculates temperature- and density-dependent differential and total coherent and incoherent x-ray scattering cross sections for a low-Z scattering medium. Temperature and density are arbitrary within the limitations of the validity of local thermodynamic equilbrium, since ionic populations are calculated under this assumption. Scattering cross sections are calculated in the form factor approximation. The scattering medium may consist of any mixure of elements with Z less than or equal to 8, with this limitation imposed by the availability of atomic data

  18. Progress in the design of mechanically attached, conductively cooled low-Z armour tiles for the NET integrated first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.; Vieider, G.

    1991-01-01

    For the NET device complete or extensive coverage of the first wall with a low-Z armour is envisaged. This armour may comprise a general protection, ∝90% total first-wall surface, of low-temperature conductively cooled tiles, complemented by a local protection of radiatively cooled tiles in regions where near peak fluxes are incident. A low-temperature (∝1000deg C) carbon-based armour, cooled via conduction to the reference NET integrated first wall, has been developed using currently available materials. The armour comprises a small square tile fabricated in high-conductivity 3-D or random-fibre carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite attached to the steel first wall via a stainless-steel/refractory metal stud assembly. Attachment forces are maintained within acceptable limits, particularly during baking, through material selection and component geometry. To ensure effective heat transfer throughout the duty cycle an intermediate conductive layer of a highly compliant material is foreseen. The scope of the paper covers the design of the armour assembly for proof of principle testing with the NET first-wall test section, TS1, and reports the results of supporting thermomechanical analyses. (orig.)

  19. Spreadsheet Decision Support Model for Training Exercise Material Requirements Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tringali, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    This thesis focuses on developing a spreadsheet decision support model that can be used by combat engineer platoon and company commanders in determining the material requirements and estimated costs...

  20. Implications of fusion power plant studies for materials requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Ian; Ward, David; Dudarev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the key requirements for fusion materials, as these have emerged from studies of commercial fusion power plants. The objective of the international fusion programme is the creation of power stations that will have very attractive safety and environmental features and viable economics. Fusion power plant studies have shown that these objectives may be achieved without requiring extreme advances in materials. But it is required that existing candidate materials perform at least as well as envisaged in the environment of fusion neutrons, heat fluxes and particle fluxes. The development of advanced materials would bring further benefits. The work required entails the investigation of many intellectually exciting physics issues of great scientific interest, and of wider application than fusion. In addition to giving an overview, selected aspects of the science, of particular physics interest, are illustrated

  1. Energy, material and land requirement of a fusion plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleisner, Liselotte; Hamacher, T.; Cabal, H.

    2001-01-01

    The energy and material necessary to construct a power plant and the land covered by the plant are indicators for the ‘consumption’ of environment by a certain technology. Based on current knowledge, estimations show that the material necessary to construct a fusion plant will exceed the material...... requirement of a fission plant by a factor of two. The material requirement for a fusion plant is roughly 2000 t/MW and little less than 1000 t/MW for a fission plant. The land requirement for a fusion plant is roughly 300 m2/MW and the land requirement for a fission plant is a little less than 200 m2/MW...... less ‘environment’ for the construction than renewable technologies, especially wind and solar....

  2. Network-Based Material Requirements Planning (NBMRP) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Network-Based Material Requirements Planning (NBMRP) in Product Development Project. ... International Journal of Development and Management Review ... To address the problems, this study evaluated the existing material planning practice, and formulated a NBMRP model out of the variables of the existing MRP and ...

  3. 14 CFR 221.195 - Requirement for filing printed material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement for filing printed material... filing printed material. (a) Any tariff, or revision thereto, filed in paper format which accompanies... supporting paper tariff, except as authorized by the Department. (b) Any printed justifications, or other...

  4. Life Science Research Facility materials management requirements and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Programs Office at NASA Ames Research Center has defined hypothetical experiments for a 90-day mission on Space Station to allow analysis of the materials necessary to conduct the experiments and to assess the impact on waste processing of recyclable materials and storage requirements of samples to be returned to earth for analysis as well as of nonrecyclable materials. The materials include the specimens themselves, the food, water, and gases necessary to maintain them, the expendables necessary to conduct the experiments, and the metabolic products of the specimens. This study defines the volumes, flow rates, and states of these materials. Process concepts for materials handling will include a cage cleaner, trash compactor, biological stabilizer, and various recycling devices.

  5. Materials requirements for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.W.; Horton, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    Materials requirements for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) are quite varied with requisite applications ranging from ex-reactor components such as piping, pumps, steam generators and heat exchangers to in-reactor components such as heavy section reactor vessels, core structurals, fuel pin cladding and subassembly flow ducts. Requirements for ex-reactor component materials include: good high temperature tensile, creep and fatigue properties; compatibility with high temperature flowing sodium; resistance to wear, stress corrosion cracking, and crack propagation; and good weldability. Requirements for in-reactor components include most of those cited above for ex-reactor components as supplemented by the following: resistance to radiation embrittlement, swelling and radiation enhanced creep; good neutronics; compatibility with fuel and fission product materials; and resistance to mass transfer via flowing sodium. Extensive programs are currently in place in a number of national laboratories and industrial contractors to address the materials requirements for LMFBRs. These programs are focused on meeting the near term requirements of early LMFBRs such as the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor as well as the longer term requirements of larger near-commercial and fully-commercial reactors

  6. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described

  7. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  8. Material requirements for the High Speed Civil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Hecht, Ralph J.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA-sponsored High Speed Research (HSR) programs, the materials and processing requirements have been identified for overcoming the environmental and economic barriers of the next generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) propulsion system. The long (2 to 5 hours) supersonic cruise portion of the HSCT cycle will place additional durability requirements on all hot section engine components. Low emissions combustor designs will require high temperature ceramic matrix composite liners to meet an emission goal of less than 5g NO(x) per Kg fuel burned. Large axisymmetric and two-dimensional exhaust nozzle designs are now under development to meet or exceed FAR 36 Stage III noise requirements, and will require lightweight, high temperature metallic, intermetallic, and ceramic matrix composites to reduce nozzle weight and meet structural and acoustic component performance goals. This paper describes and discusses the turbomachinery, combustor, and exhaust nozzle requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system.

  9. Packaging configurations and handling requirements for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The basic safety concepts for radioactive material are that the package is the primary protection for the public, that the protection afforded by the package should be proportional to the hazard and that the package must be proved by performance. These principles are contained in Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations which classify hazards of various radioactive materials and link packaging requirements to the physical form and quantities being shipped. Packaging requirements are reflected in performance standards to guarantee that shipments of low hazard quantities will survive the rigors of normal transportation and that shipments of high hazard quantities will survive extreme severity transportation accidents. Administrative controls provide for segregation of radioactive material from people and other sensitive or hazardous material. They also provide the necessary information function to control the total amounts in a conveyance and to assure that appropriate emergency response activities be started in case of accidents or other emergencies. Radioactive materials shipped in conjunction with the nuclear reactor programs include, ores, concentrates, gaseous diffusion feedstocks, enriched and depleted uranium, fresh fuel, spent fuel, high level wastes, low level wastes and transuranic wastes. Each material is packaged and shipped in accordance with regulations and all hazard classes, quantity limits and packaging types are called into use. From the minimal requirements needed to ship the low hazard uranium ores or concentrates to the very stringent requirements in packaging and moving high level wastes or spent fuel, the regulatory system provides a means for carrying out transportation of radioactive material which assures low and controlled risk to the public

  10. Requirements applied in Cuba to the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouevedo Garcia, J.R.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to comment the supplementary requirements imposed by the Competent Authority to the operations of the main importing/delivering enterprise of unsealed sources for approvals and administration since the establishment, in 1987, of the legal framework on transport of radioactive materials. The paper summarizes the achieved results in this field in over 11 years operation. (author)

  11. Research Perspectives for Material Requirements Planning Systems. Paper No. 434.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W. L.; Whybark, D. Clay

    Material requirements planning (MRP) systems are described as management tools for planning and controlling production operations. A wide variety of industries and production organizations are credited as reporting significant operating improvements in such areas as inventory control, production scheduling, delivery performance, and production…

  12. Safety assessment requirements for onsite transfers of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Jackson, E.J.; Eggers, A.G.

    1992-05-01

    This document contains the requirements for developing a safety assessment document for an onsite package containing radioactive material. It also provides format and content guidance to establish uniformity in the safety assessment documentation and to ensure completeness of the information provided

  13. Radioactive material package test standards and performance requirements - public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses issues related to the public perception of the regulatory test standards and performance requirements for packaging and transporting radioactive material. Specifically, it addresses the adequacy of the package performance standards and testing for Type B packages, which are those packages designed for transporting the most hazardous quantities and forms of radioactive material. Type B packages are designed to withstand accident conditions in transport. To improve public perception, the public needs to better understand: (a) the regulatory standards and requirements themselves, (b) the extensive history underlying their development, and (c) the soundness of the technical foundation. The public needs to be fully informed on studies, tests, and analyses that have been carried out worldwide and form the basis of the regulatory standards and requirements. This paper provides specific information aimed at improving the public perception of packages test standards

  14. Development of the material selection practice - a study exploring articulation of material requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Hasling, Karen Marie

    2014-01-01

    indicates that students focus on technical requirements when using the matrix and justifying their selection of materials. This is surprising since the students attend an arts and crafts oriented design school and are encouraged and guided to consider non-technical requirements, as part of the course where...... the matrix is introduced. A possible reason for the undesired behavior could be that students are allowed very freely to define their own matrices, having only little guidance to which requirements to use. A more formal procedure for making the material matrices is therefore proposed. The procedure requires...

  15. Determination of material irradiation parameters. Required accuracies and available methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.M.; Mas, P.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports some main methods to determine the nuclear parameters of material irradiation in testing reactor (nuclear power, burn-up, fluxes, fluences, ...). The different methods (theoretical or experimental) are reviewed: neutronics measurements and calculations, gamma scanning, thermal balance, ... The required accuracies are reviewed: they are of 3-5% on flux, fluences, nuclear power, burn-up, conversion factor, ... These required accuracies are compared with the real accuracies available which are at the present time of order of 5-20% on these parameters

  16. Material control and accounting requirements for uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has defined material control and accounting (MC and A) requirement for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants licensed under 10 CFR parts 40 and 70. Following detailed assessment of potential safeguards issues relevant to these facilities, a new MC and A rule was developed. The primary safeguards considerations are detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of clandestine production of special nuclear material of low strategic significance for unauthorized use or distribution, and detection of unauthorized production of uranium enriched to ≥10 wt % U-235. The primary safeguards concerns identified were the large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, the inability to shutdown some uranium enrichment technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and the flexibility of some of these technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could circumvent the detection of the production and removal of 5 kilograms of U-235 as high-enriched uranium through conventional material control and accounting programs. Safeguards techniques, including the use of production and process control information, measurements, and technical surveillance, were identified to compensate for these concerns

  17. ANALYSIS OF MPC ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR ADDITION OF FILLER MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. Wallin

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request (Ref. 5.1) from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: Specific MPC access requirements for the addition of filler materials at the MGDS (i.e., location and size of access required). The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a documented record of the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein. The response is based upon requirements from an MGDS perspective

  18. Physical and Chemical Study of Minerals and Rocks Containing Low-Z Compounds of Interest to Astrobiology and Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the origins of Life requires a good understanding of the physics and chemistry of biogenic low-z elements H, C, N, O, P, S in terrestrial environments, on Mars, on extraterrestrial bodies such as meteorite parent bodies and comets, and in interstellar space. In this Proposal five Tasks form a coherent program aimed at elucidating various aspects of low-z element geo- and cosmochemistry with special reference to the origin of Life on Earth and to the search for life on Mars, extant or extinct. (i) Formation of organic molecules, in particular oxygenated H-C-0 molecules or precursors thereof of the composition H(x)C(y)O(z)(n-), inside the hard matrix of structurally dense magmatic minerals; (ii) Formation of organic molecules inside the soft matrix of amorphous and crystalline water ice; (iii) Preservation of organic molecules in cherts and other siliceous rocks formed in hot spring or submarine hydrothermal vent environments; (iv) The nature of the elusive Martian soil oxidant; and (v) Prototype development of an XRD instrument, using a new patented XRD camera concept that utilizes a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) as a camera and as a energy-dispersive analyzer.

  19. Regulatory requirements for the transport of radioactive materials in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Canada is a major producer and shipper of radioactive material. Each year more than a million packages are transported in Canada. The safety record with the transport of RAM in Canada has historically been excellent. There have never been any serious injuries, overexposure or fatality or environmental consequences attributable to the radioactive nature of such material being transported or being involved in a transport accident. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the prime agency of the federal government entrusted with regulating all activities related to the use of nuclear energy and nuclear substances including the packaging and transport of nuclear substances. The mission of the CNSC is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security of the person and the environment and to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The division of responsibility for the regulation of transport of radioactive material has been split between Transport Canada and the CNSC. The governing Transport Canada's regulations are Transport of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Regulations and the CNSC regulations are Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations (PTNSR). Canada has actively participated in the development of the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material since 1960. As an IAEA member state, Canada generally follows the requirements of IAEA regulations with few deviations. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) strongly supports Canada's international obligations to ensure safe packaging, transport, storage and disposal of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information. Prescribed equipment and prescribed information are defined in the CNSC General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations. This paper presents the current CNSC regulatory requirements and initiatives taken by the CNSC to improve its effectiveness and

  20. Regulatory requirements for the transport of radioactive materials in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Canada is a major producer and shipper of radioactive material. Each year more than a million packages are transported in Canada. The safety record with the transport of RAM in Canada has historically been excellent. There have never been any serious injuries, overexposure or fatality or environmental consequences attributable to the radioactive nature of such material being transported or being involved in a transport accident. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the prime agency of the federal government entrusted with regulating all activities related to the use of nuclear energy and nuclear substances including the packaging and transport of nuclear substances. The mission of the CNSC is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security of the person and the environment and to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The division of responsibility for the regulation of transport of radioactive material has been split between Transport Canada and the CNSC. The governing Transport Canada's regulations are Transport of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Regulations and the CNSC regulations are Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations (PTNSR). Canada has actively participated in the development of the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material since 1960. As an IAEA member state, Canada generally follows the requirements of IAEA regulations with few deviations. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) strongly supports Canada's international obligations to ensure safe packaging, transport, storage and disposal of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information. Prescribed equipment and prescribed information are defined in the CNSC General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations. This paper presents the current CNSC regulatory requirements and initiatives taken by the CNSC to improve its effectiveness and efficiency

  1. Analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with leukemias by SRTXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: edgar@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ/COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Engineering Program. Nuclear Instrumentation Lab.; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Leukemia is a disease that occurs all over the world. Leukemia is a type of cancer. All cancers begin in cells, which make up blood and other tissues. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. Leukemia is a kind of cancer that begins in blood cells. There are four common types of leukemia: Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). In this work, low Z elements were determined in serum of patients with four groups of leukemia (CML, AML, CLL and ALL) and control group (CG) or healthy subjects using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence induced by Synchrotron Radiation (SRTXRF). We studied thirty patients - male gender and feminine gender - with ages ranging from 18 to 60 years, suffering from CML, AML, CLL, ALL and thirty healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples were collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. All of them were submitted to medical history. This study was performed with the approval of the ethics committee. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. By using t-test it could be seen significant differences (alpha = 0.05) between groups of healthy subjects and four groups of leukemia. The t- test showed real differences among the elemental concentrations. Thus, our findings indicate that the elements can be directly related to the biochemical processes in leukemias. The significant differences found between the groups may be indicators of these diseases. This could help biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. (author)

  2. REVERBERATION AND PHOTOIONIZATION ESTIMATES OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION RADIUS IN LOW-z QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrete, C. Alenka [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (Mexico); Dultzin, Deborah [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Marziani, Paola [INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Sulentic, Jack W., E-mail: cnegrete@inaoep.mx, E-mail: deborah@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: paola.marziani@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: sulentic@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, E-18008 Granada (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    Black hole mass estimation in quasars, especially at high redshift, involves the use of single-epoch spectra with signal-to-noise ratio and resolution that permit accurate measurement of the width of a broad line assumed to be a reliable virial estimator. Coupled with an estimate of the radius of the broad-line region (BLR) this yields the black hole mass M{sub BH}. The radius of the BLR may be inferred from an extrapolation of the correlation between source luminosity and reverberation-derived r{sub BLR} measures (the so-called Kaspi relation involving about 60 low-z sources). We are exploring a different method for estimating r{sub BLR} directly from inferred physical conditions in the BLR of each source. We report here on a comparison of r{sub BLR} estimates that come from our method and from reverberation mapping. Our ''photoionization'' method employs diagnostic line intensity ratios in the rest-frame range 1400-2000 A (Al III {lambda}1860/Si III] {lambda}1892, C IV {lambda}1549/Al III {lambda}1860) that enable derivation of the product of density and ionization parameter with the BLR distance derived from the definition of the ionization parameter. We find good agreement between our estimates of the density, ionization parameter, and r{sub BLR} and those from reverberation mapping. We suggest empirical corrections to improve the agreement between individual photoionization-derived r{sub BLR} values and those obtained from reverberation mapping. The results in this paper can be exploited to estimate M{sub BH} for large samples of high-z quasars using an appropriate virial broadening estimator. We show that the width of the UV intermediate emission lines are consistent with the width of H{beta}, thereby providing a reliable virial broadening estimator that can be measured in large samples of high-z quasars.

  3. Analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with leukemias by SRTXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is a disease that occurs all over the world. Leukemia is a type of cancer. All cancers begin in cells, which make up blood and other tissues. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. Leukemia is a kind of cancer that begins in blood cells. There are four common types of leukemia: Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). In this work, low Z elements were determined in serum of patients with four groups of leukemia (CML, AML, CLL and ALL) and control group (CG) or healthy subjects using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence induced by Synchrotron Radiation (SRTXRF). We studied thirty patients - male gender and feminine gender - with ages ranging from 18 to 60 years, suffering from CML, AML, CLL, ALL and thirty healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples were collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. All of them were submitted to medical history. This study was performed with the approval of the ethics committee. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. By using t-test it could be seen significant differences (α = 0.05) between groups of healthy subjects and four groups of leukemia. The t- test showed real differences among the elemental concentrations. Thus, our findings indicate that the elements can be directly related to the biochemical processes in leukemias. The significant differences found between the groups may be indicators of these diseases. This could help biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. (author)

  4. Regulatory Requirements to Combat Illicit Trafficking of Hazardous Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Zakaria, Kh.M.

    2011-01-01

    Since more than a decade illicit Trafficking of hazardous ( CBRNE), materials ( chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive ) has been identified as a key threat in national, regional, inter regional and international strategies. An Effective response to hazardous materials (CBRNE) risk and threat were realized to require a very high level of cooperation and coordination between various governments and their responsible organizations and authorities of regional and international partner. While improper policy of actions may easily be exploited by non- state members to (CBRNE) trafficking which may lead to develop weapon of mass destruction (WMD). Such strategy are of paramount important between all levels of the states and among regional agreements through comprehensive tailored assistance packages (e.g. export control, illicit trafficking of hazardous materials, redirection of scientist, emergency planning, crisis response safety and security culture. Capacity building, action plans and instruments for stability are necessary actions for efficient combating against illicit trafficking of hazardous materials. Regarding the needs of assessment phase, assistance must be based on data collection, analysis and prioritization of implanting the regulatory controls. Several activities have to be conducted to reduce CBRNE threat. The one- by- one approach, covering either nuclear and radioactive or chemical or biological materials has to be implanted on the country basis performance to mitigate CBRNE hazardous risk. On several consequent phases of intervention dealing with CBRNE risk mitigation the country has to establish a network of local, regional and international capabilities. Such network is setting up the mechanism for the country needs identifications, the guidelines for data collection, for data platform maintenance and update, the data assessment and the competent and operative organizations. This network will be to strengthen the long - term

  5. Safety requirements and feedback of commonly used material handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cranes, hoists, chain pulley blocks are the most commonly used material handling equipment in industry along with attachments like chains, wire rope slings, d-shackles, etc. These equipment are used at work for transferring loads from one place to another and attachments are used for anchoring, fixing or supporting the load. Selection of the correct equipment, identification of the equipment planning of material handling operation, examination/testing of the equipment, education and training of the persons engaged in operation of the material handling equipment can reduce the risks to safety of people in workplace. Different safety systems like boom angle indicator, overload tripping device, limit switches, etc. should be available in the cranes for their safe use. Safety requirement for safe operation of material handling equipment with emphasis on different cranes and attachments particularly wire rope slings and chain slings have been brought out in this paper. An attempt has also been made to bring out common nature of deficiencies observed during regulatory inspection carried out by AERB. (author)

  6. Impact of proposed financial assurance requirements on nuclear materials licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Scott, M.J.; Mullen, M.F.; Nicholls, A.K.; Smith, S.A.

    1987-09-01

    The NRC is considering a possible rulemaking that would require certain nuclear materials licensees to demonstrate financial ability to clean up accidental releases of radioactive materials. The rulemaking would potentially affect approximately 16,350 NRC and Agreement State licensees. This report was prepared for NRC by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide background information and analysis for the potential rulemaking. Specific topics examined in the report include: (1) characteristics of potentially affected licensees, (2) the availability and cost of various financial assurance mechanisms, (3) the financial impacts for licensees (including licensees classified as small businesses) of providing $2M of assurance per licensee and a sliding amount of assurance tied to risk, (4) the cost of administering a financial assurance rule, and (5) overall benefits and costs. Tabular information on past material licensee accidents and cleanup efforts is also included. The financial occurrence mechanism that appears to be most suitable for providing the desired financial assurance is one or more newly formed captive insurance companies. Potential benefits of the rulemaking include reduced need for taxpayer-funded cleanup of accidental releases, reduces administrative time to secure such funds, and the possibility of more cleanup with correspondingly reduced occupational and public exposure to radioactive materials

  7. Borehole sealing literature review of performance requirements and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinin, D.; Hooton, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    To ensure the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, all potential pathways for radionuclide release to the biosphere must be effectively sealed. This report presents a summary of the literature up to August 1982 and outlines the placement, mechanical property and durability-stability requirements for borehole sealing. An outline of the materials that have been considered for possible use in borehole sealing is also included. Cement grouts are recommended for further study since it is indicated in the literature that cement grouts offer the best opportunity of effectively sealing boreholes employing present technology. However, new and less well known materials should also be researched to ensure that the best possible borehole plugging system is developed. 78 refs

  8. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n 2 ) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978

  9. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n/sub 2/) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978.

  10. Quality assurance requirements for packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, R.F.; MacDonald, C.E.; Doda, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the new quality assurance regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. These regulations became effective on October 18, 1977. Background information concerning these regulations and packaging and transportation history is included. The quality assurance program is described with indications of how it is composed of general (administrative) provisions which must meet the 18 quality assurance criteria and be approved by the NRC; specific provisions which appear in the DOT and NRC regulations and in the individual package design approval; and other specific procedures which are not required by regulations but which are necessary for the proper control of quality. The quality assurance program is to be developed using a graded approach for the application of pertinent criteria and optimizing the required degree of safety and control efforts involved in achieving this level of safety. The licensee-user is responsible for all phases of quality assurance for packaging activities including: design, manufacture, test, use, maintenance and repair. The package design phase is considered to be particularly important in producing adequate safety in operational activities concerning packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

  11. Dose requirements for microbial decontamination of botanical materials by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razem, D.; Katusin-Razem, Branka

    2002-01-01

    Microbial contamination levels and corresponding resistivities to irradiation (expressed as dose required for the first 90% reduction, D first 9 0% r ed ) were analyzed in a number of various botanical materials. The following generalizations could be made: total aerobic plate count is the most informative measure of contamination; the probability of contamination depends on available surface of the material and processing history: flowers and leaves usually contain more contamination than fruits and seeds, while crude herbs contain more than extracts; liquid extracts are more contaminated than dry ones. At the same time, resistivity to irradiation increases approximately in the reverse order of contamination level on going from flowers and leaves, to fruits and seeds, to liquid and dry extracts. The two quantities, probability of contamination and D first 9 0% r ed being inversely related, the treatment dose needed to reduce initial contamination to tolerable level amounts to between 4 and 30 kGy under a typical scenario, and between 8 and 40 kGy under the worst-case scenario for the whole range of raw materials and botanical products

  12. Functional requirements document for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Alvarez, J.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.C.; McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    This document states the general functional requirements for systems and procedures for measuring emissions of airborne radioactive materials from facilities administered by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The following issues are addressed in this document: lg-bullet definition of the program objectives lg-bullet selection of the overall approach to collecting the samples lg-bullet sampling equipment design lg-bullet sampling equipment maintenance and quality assurance issues. The following issues are not addressed in this document: lg-bullet air sampling in work areas or containments lg-bullet selection of specific on-line sample monitoring instrumentation lg-bullet analyzing collected samples lg-bullet reporting and interpreting results. The document provides equipment design guidance that is performance based rather than prescriptive. Locations from which samples are obtained should exhibit mixing of the contaminants with the airstream and acceptable air flow characteristics. Sample collection equipment and effluent and sample flow elements should meet defined performance standards. Quality control and assurance requirements specific to sample collection, equipment inspection, and calibration are presented. Key sample collection performance requirements are summarized in Section 5.4. The intent of this document is to assist WHC in demonstrating a high quality of air emission measurements with verified system performance based on documented system design, testing, inspection, and maintenance

  13. Cost of quality assurance in radiotherapy: human and material requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, V.; Garcia, R.; Chauvet, B.; Bourhis, J.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, three new important laws were passed concerning radiotherapy services. The first two concerns the internal and external quality control of linear accelerators and the last concerns the role of the medical physicist, whose presence was made mandatory during the whole length of the treatments. These laws, which aim to improve the quality and the security of treatments, represent an increase in price that we have calculated, and which prevents them being implemented, as a joint study realised by the SFRO and the SFPM has shown. The cost of quality in radiotherapy requires investment in material and manpower and improvement in availability of the accelerators which entails a complete reorganization of the services. Cost analysis is included. The difficulties in implementing these laws have also been evaluated and this evaluation already enables us to propose certain elements enabling us to go forward to globally improve the quality and security in radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Active materials for automotive adaptive forward lighting Part 1: system requirements vs. material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Andrew C.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.

    2011-04-01

    Adaptive Frontlighting Systems (AFS in GM usage) improve visibility by automatically optimizing the beam pattern to accommodate road, driving and environmental conditions. By moving, modifying, and/or adding light during nighttime, inclement weather, or in sharp turns, the driver is presented with dynamic illumination not possible with static lighting systems The objective of this GM-HRL collaborative research project was to assess the potential of active materials to decrease the cost, mass, and packaging volume of current electric stepper-motor AFS designs. Solid-state active material actuators, if proved suitable for this application, could be less expensive than electric motors and have lower part count, reduced size and weight, and lower acoustic and EMF noise1. This paper documents Part 1 of the collaborative study, assessing technically mature, commercially available active materials for use as actuators. Candidate materials should reduce cost and improve AFS capabilities, such as increased angular velocity on swivel. Additional benefits to AFS resulting from active materials actuators were to be identified as well such as lower part count. In addition, several notional approaches to AFS were documented to illustrate the potential function, which is developed more fully in Part 2. Part 1 was successful in verifying the feasibility of using two active materials for AFS: shape memory alloys, and piezoelectrics. In particular, this demonstration showed that all application requirements including those on actuation speed, force, and cyclic stability to effect manipulation of the filament assembly and/or the reflector could be met by piezoelectrics (as ultrasonic motors) and SMA wire actuators.

  15. SU-E-T-244: Designing Low-Z Targets To Enhance Surface Dose: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R [Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada); Robar, J [Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, NS (Canada); Parsons, D [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Recent developments in The Varian Truebeam linac platform allows for the introduction of low-Z targets into the beam line for the imaging purposes. We have proposed using a low-Z target for radiation therapy purposes to enhance the surface dose during radiation treatment. The target arm of the Varian Truebeam accelerator consists of multiple targets with are linearly translated into the beam line. We have designed two Low-Z targets made of carbon: 1) a step target consisting of three steps of 15%, 30% and 60% CSDA range for 2.5 MeV electrons Figure 1a; 2) and a ramp target, an incline plane 2cm long with thicknesses ranging from 0% to 60% CSDA range, Figure 1b. The purpose of this work will determine the spectral characteristics of these target designs and determine if they have practical clinical applications for enhancing surface dose. Methods: To calculate the spectral characteristics of these targets, a standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was used. Simulations were performed with a carbon step target, and a carbon ramp target, located at the same position as the electron foil in the rotating carousel. Simulations were carried out using a 2.5 MeV electron beam. Results: The step target design produced spectral characteristics which were similar to spectral model using a single disk target of the same thickness. The ramp target provides a means to have positional variation of the spectral components of the beam, however, the electron component as 60% CSDA us much broader than the step target. Conclusion: The carbon step-target provides a spectral distribution which is similar to a carbon disk of comparable thickness. The spectral distribution from the ramp-target can be modified as a function of position to provide a wide range of low energy electrons for surface dose enhancement.

  16. A Cost Control Policy for Material Requirements Planning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is sometimes difficult to predict that a particular material will be out of stock at a particular time. This uncertainty can be avoided by deriving a probability distribution of stock-out. Let us assume that the stock-out of material occur only at the end of a certain period, say t. This paper derives a probability distribution theory of ...

  17. Dynamic control of low-Z material deposition and tungsten erosion by strike point sweeping on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guterl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon deposition on tungsten between ELMs was investigated in DIII-D in semi-attached/detached H-mode plasma conditions using fixed outer strike point (OSP positions. Carbon deposition during plasma exposure of tungsten was monitored in-situ by measuring the reflectivity of the tungsten sample surface. No significant carbon deposition, i.e., without strong variations of the reflectivity, was observed during these experiments including discharges at high densities. In contrast, ERO modeling predicts a significant carbon deposition on the tungsten surface for those high density plasma conditions. The surface reflectivity decreases with methane injection, consistent with increased carbon coverage, as expected. The sweeping of OSP leads to a pronounced increase of the surface reflectivity, suggesting that the strike point sweeping may provide an effective means to remove carbon coating from tungsten surface. The ERO modeling however predicts again a regime of carbon deposition for these experiments. The discrepancies between carbon deposition regime predicted by the ERO model and the experimental observations suggest that carbon erosion during ELMs may significantly affect carbon deposition on tungsten.

  18. 49 CFR 178.358-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials of construction and other requirements... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire resistant and... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  19. 49 CFR 178.356-2 - Materials of construction and other requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials of construction and other requirements... Materials of construction and other requirements. (a) Phenolic foam insulation must be fire-resistant and... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  20. Inner-shell photo-ionized X-ray laser schemes for low-Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, S.J.; Strobel, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    Gain calculations for inner-shell photo-ionized lasing in C at 45 angstrom are performed. An incident x-ray source represented by a 150 eV blackbody with a rise time of 50 fsec gives a gain of order 10 cm -1 . The x-ray source and thus the driving optical laser requirements are significantly reduced as compared to what is needed for Ne at 15 angstrom. The authors expect that existing ultra-short pulse lasers can produce the required x-ray source and thus produce a table-top x-ray laser at 45 angstrom

  1. Transport of radioactive materials and equipment. Requirements. (Provisional)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This standard is aimed at establishing the procedures that must be followed when transporting radioactive materials and equipment in Venezuelan Territory. The ''Consejo Nacional para el Desarrollo de la Industria Nuclear'' is responsible for their fulfillment and control

  2. Packaging requirements and procedures for the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Canadian regulations on the transportation of radioactive materials are based on those formulated by the IAEA. A synopsis of these regulations is presented, and the background to certain key provisions is explained. (LL)

  3. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700 STN CNC, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, Institutul National pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30, Magurele (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C.; D' Uffizi, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Fiorini, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R.S. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T., E-mail: tomoichi.ishiwatari@assoc.oeaw.ac.at [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-23

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C{sub 22}H{sub 10}N{sub 2}O{sub 5}) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z=6,7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n=5–8) were determined. The relative yields of the successive transitions in the same atoms and the yield ratios of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) for the same transitions were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton.

  4. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  5. REQUIREMENTS FOR DRILLING CUTTINGS AND EARTH-BASED BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chertes Konstantin L'vovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the problem of utilization of drilling cuttings by means of scavenging, is researched. The product received could be used for the restoration of lands disturbed during construction and economic activities. When assessing technogenic formations, the binary approach was used, as a system of two components. The purpose of the study is to assess the state and possibility of utilizing drilling cuttings as raw materials in order to produce technogenic building materials; to study the effect of the degree of homogeneity of initial mixtures based on drilling cuttings, on kinetics of their hardening which leads to obtaining final products for various applications . As a result of research, relations of hardening and subsequent strengthening of slurry-cement mixtures were obtained; the plan of the process area for treatment of drilling cuttings is presented on the spot of demolished drilling pit.

  6. 40 CFR 261.6 - Requirements for recyclable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., following its original use, for any purpose (including the purpose for which the oil was originally used...)) for purpose of recovery is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR part 262, subpart H, if it is subject... recycling process itself is exempt from regulation except as provided in § 261.6(d).) (2) Owners or...

  7. Experimental study of population inversion and spectral line broadening in a plasma containing a mixture of high Z and low Z ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.

    1988-10-01

    In our work this past year at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics we have studied laser-produced plasmas using spherical targets continuing layers of high Z and low Z materials. Our emphasis was on quantitative spectroscopy of ions in a very dense, recombining plasma. The targets used consisted of carbon-copper, carbon-gold, and aluminum-gold mixtures, instead of the originally proposed Fe or Mo mixtures with carbon. The thickness of the Cu and the Au layers were varied in order to study the effect of higher Z ions cooling the plasma. Indeed a pronounced cooling effect was observed by increasing the thickness of the Au layer in targets with Al-Au layers. Electron temperatures were studied by measuring the 1s-2p/1s 2 -1s2p line ratio of Al XIII to Al XII. Our experimental measurements, together with a collisional-radiative model and a 1-D hydrodynamic code, indicate that the electron temperature falls from 1500 eV with no gold to 950 eV with a 500 angstrom layer of gold. A detailed discussion of our results with Al-Au targets can be found in the enclosed preprint entitled Radiation Cooling in Laser-Produced Plasmas Due to High-Z Layers

  8. Improvements in quantification of low z element analysis for Sr- and conventional TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, K.; Brennan, S.; Pianetta, P.; Kerner, J.; Zhu, Q.; Burrow, B.

    2000-01-01

    As the dimensions of integrated circuits continue to shrink also the amount of tolerable contamination on Si wafer surfaces decreases. Contaminants of primary concern are transition metals and light elements like Al. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation from the Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory (SSRL) is one of the most powerful techniques for trace impurity analysis on Si wafer surfaces. In addition, it is among the more sensitive techniques and the only one, which is non-destructive. Upon having established a better detection sensitivity for transition elements than required by semiconductor industry, the current effort focuses on the improvement of the sensitivity for the detection and data analysis of light elements. Due to the presence of the neighboring Si signal from the substrate this can only be achieved by tuning the excitation energy below the Si-K absorption edge. For conventional TXRF systems this can be done by using a W-M fluorescence line (1.78 keV) for excitation or by employing the tunability of synchrotron radiation. However, this results in a substantial increase in background due to resonant X-ray Raman scattering. This scattering dominates the background behavior of the Al K fluorescence line, and consequently limits the achievable sensitivity for the detection of Al surface contaminants. In particular, we find that for a precise determination of the achievable sensitivity, the specific shape of the continuous Raman background must be used in the deconvolution. This data analysis opens a new perspective for conventional TXRF systems to overcome background problems in quantification and first results will be presented. (author)

  9. Requirements for the transport of surplus fissile materials in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirements and issues associated with the transportation of surplus fissile materials in the United States. The paper describes the materials that will be transported, the permissible modes of transport for these materials, and the safety and security requirements for each mode of transport. The paper also identifies transportation issues associated with these requirements, including the differences in requirements corresponding to who owns the material and whether the transport is on-site or off-site. Finally, the paper provides a discussion that suggests that by adopting the spent fuel standard and stored weapon standard proposed by the National Academy of Sciences, the requirements for transportation become straightforward

  10. Semiconductive Nanostructures - Materials for Spinelectronics: New Data Bank Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paata J Kervalishvili

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience, the interdisciplinary science that draws on physics, chemistry, biology, and computational mathematics, is still in its infancy. Control and manipulation on a nanometric scale allow the fabrication of nanostructures, the properties of which are mainly determined by quantum mechanics and differ considerably from that of the common crystalline state. Nanostructures constructed from inorganic solids such as semiconductors have new electronic and optical properties because of their size and quantization effects [1, 2]. The quantization effects reflect the fundamental characteristics of structures as soon as their size falls below a certain limit. An example of the simplest nanostructure is the quantum dot formed from the energy well of certain semiconductor materials with 5-10nm thickness sandwiched between other semiconductors with normal properties. Quantum dots, for example, have led to important novel technology for lasers, optical sensors, and other electronic devices. The application of nanolayers to data storage, switching, lighting, and other devices can lead to substantially new hardware, for example, energy cells, and eventually to the quantum-based internet. Nanoscience and nanotechnology encompass the development of nano-spinelectronics, spinelectronics materials production, and nano-spinelectronic measuring devices and technologies. Nano-spinelectronics, based on usage of magnetic semiconductors, represents a new and emerging area of science and engineering of the 21st century. It is a primary example of the creation and enhancement of new materials and devices for information technologies, operating with charge and spin degrees of freedom of carriers, free from present-day limitations. This new multi-disciplinary direction of science and technology is very much in need of support from new data banks, which will function as a source of new ideas and approaches.

  11. 46 CFR 160.023-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements. 160.023-3 Section 160.023-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Combination... requirements. (a) The materials, construction, workmanship, general and detail requirements shall conform to...

  12. Special requirements for bolting material for nuclear and other special applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A specification that provides special requirements for bolting material for use in nuclear and other special applications is presented. The requirements of the specification are supplemental to the requirements of the basic material specifications and they include tempering, welding, elimination of surface defects, certification and identification, quality assurance and various examination methods

  13. Basic fracture toughness requirements for ferritic materials of nuclear class pressure retaining equipment in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Dong; Yao Weida

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, theory basis on cold brittleness and anti-brittle fracture design of ferritic materials are introduced summarily and fracture toughness requirements for ferritic materials in ASME code for nuclear safety class pressure retaining equipment in NPP are summarized and evaluated. The results show that notch impact toughness requirements for materials relate to nuclear safety class of materials so as to ensure that brittle fracture of retaining pressure boundary in NPP can not occur. (authors)

  14. MRP II (material requirements planning): one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, W L; Norman, R L

    1994-08-01

    This article addresses the continued need for the behavior change process that must be managed long after materiel requirements planning (MRP II) implementation. Mason & Hanger, Pantex Plant is the final assembly and dismantlement facility for all United States nuclear weapons. On October 1, 1990, Mason & Hanger implemented a full production cutover to MRP II. One year later, following class A certification, the MRP II implementation team is still actively managing the change process through education and training programs and overall continuous improvement initiatives. Actual behavior change problems are identified together with the proven solutions implemented in a government-owned, contractor-operated facility environment. Performance measurements ranging from senior management planning to shop floor accomplishments and cost variance reports are shown as normal management tools used to identify target improvement areas.

  15. The deduction of low-Z ion temperature and densities in the JET tokamak using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boileau, A.; Hellermann, M. von; Horton, L.D.; Spence, J.; Summers, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic has been established on JET to study fully stripped low-Z species. Ion temperature in the plasma centre is measured from visible lines of helium, carbon and oxygen excited by charge exchange with heating neutral beam particles. Coincident cold components produced at the plasma edge are apparent on helium and carbon spectra and most spectra are subject to accidental blending from other species' edge plasma emission. The charge exchange feature can be isolated from the various composite lines and all three impurities agree on the same temperature within experimental error. Observed column emissivities are converted into absolute impurity densities using a neutral beam attenuation code and charge exchange effective rate coefficients. Comprehensive new calculations have been performed to obtain the effective rate coefficients. The models take detailed account of cascading and the influence of the plasma environment in causing l-mixing, and allow the n-dependence of the rate coefficients to be addressed experimentally. The effective ion charge reconstructed from simultaneous measurements of the densities of dominant impurities shows good agreement with the value inferred from visible Bremsstrahlung. Some illustrative results are shown for helium (helium discharge or minority r.f.. heating), carbon and oxygen concentrations monitored during characteristic operating regimes. (author)

  16. Order acceptance in food processing systems with random raw material requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilic, Onur A.; van Donk, Dirk Pieter; Wijngaard, Jacob; Tarim, S. Armagan

    This study considers a food production system that processes a single perishable raw material into several products having stochastic demands. In order to process an order, the amount of raw material delivery from storage needs to meet the raw material requirement of the order. However, the amount

  17. 75 FR 10973 - Hazardous Materials: Risk-Based Adjustment of Transportation Security Plan Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... (explosive) material; (3) More than 1 L (1.06 qt.) per package of a material poisonous by inhalation in... controlled; and 6.1 materials poisonous by inhalation. We also proposed to require security plans for any... happens very rapidly, and in the process, the propane combines readily with air to form fuel air mixtures...

  18. 46 CFR 160.037-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-3 Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements. (a...

  19. 48 CFR 52.225-10 - Notice of Buy American Act Requirement-Construction Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirement-Construction Materials. 52.225-10 Section 52.225-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.225-10 Notice of Buy American Act Requirement—Construction Materials. As prescribed... Materials (FEB 2009) (a) Definitions. “Commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) item,” “construction...

  20. Critical and precious materials consumption and requirement in wind energy system in the EU 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Junbeum; Guillaume, Bertrand; Chung, Jinwook; Hwang, Yongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Critical and precious materials requirement in the wind energy system in the EU 27 by 2020. - Highlights: • The critical and precious materials consumption were calculated in wind energy system in the EU 27. • The future requirement of critical and precious materials was estimated in the EU 27 by 2020. • Fluorspar, silver, magnesium, indium, gold and tantalum are the mainly used and required materials. • This research approach could be applied to other industrial sectors as well as other renewable technology. - Abstract: Critical materials as well as rare earth elements and precious metals such as platinum, gold and silver are used significantly for computer hard disk drives, mobile phones, hybrid electric vehicles, batteries, renewable energy system and many other applications. It is therefore important to quantify and estimate both current stocks and flows of such materials, as well as future requirement for industries and economies. In this study, which is focused on wind energy system in the European Union (EU) 27, the current consumption and future requirement of critical and precious materials were calculated and estimated using the wind power production dataset from ecoinvent and data from National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP). It is shown that fluorspar has been the most consumed material to date, and will probably be the most required material in the future. Among other critical and valuable materials, the main materials used for current wind energy system are silver, magnesium, indium, gold and tantalum. These materials will also be required significantly by 2020 for the wind energy system in the EU 27. It is argued that these results should be connected to the future energy and material policy and management

  1. 49 CFR 176.99 - Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials. 176.99 Section 176.99 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements for Barges § 176.99 Permit requirements for certain hazardous...

  2. Requirements for timber and cadmium used in shielding for fissile material transport packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This Code of Practice has been prepared as a guide for designers who require packaging for fissile materials. It should be noted that this document covers design requirements only and it is not a manufacturing specification which can be quoted on a manufacturing contract without qualification. Compliance with the regulations regarding the safe transport of fissile materials may be achieved by the provision of an effective shield embodying:- (a) a moderating material -usually one rich in hydrogen, such as wood - in order to thermalise incoming neutrons, and (b) a material - such as cadmium - with a large absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, located between the moderator and the fissile material, in order to capture the incoming neutrons. This Code describes the requirements in two sections, one for each of these materials. (author)

  3. IMPLEMENTASI MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS PLANNING (MRP PADA PERENCANAAN PERSEDIAAN MATERIAL PANEL LISTRIK DI PT.TIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Sari Dewi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Semakin berkembangnya dunia industri perusahaan manufaktur membuat semakin ketatnya  persaingan pasar untuk mencukupi kebutuhan konsumen. Selain itu perusahaan juga dituntut untuk dapat memuaskan konsumen dengan cara  menyelesaikan pesanan konsumen tepat pada waktunya. Sehingga perlu ditunjang oleh sistem produksi yag efisien. Untuk dapat menciptakan sistem produksi yang efisien maka diperlukan suatu perencanaan yang baik. Peramalan dan perencanaan material untuk box panel menjadi alasan yang kuat untuk meminimalkan stok gudang, khususnya PT. TIS.  Adapun untuk perencanaan persediaan material box panel tersebut memerlukan peramalan yang optimal dengan memafaatkan metode Simple Moving Average (SMA dan Single Exponential Smoothing (SES. Dengan membandingkan kedua metode tersebut dihasilkan data bahwa dengan metode Simple Moving Average menghasilkan nilai eror (MAD dan MSE paling kecil, yaitu sebesar MAD 7,3 dan MSE 72. Sedangkan untuk perencanaan material menggunakan metode MRP Lot for Lot (LFL dan Fixed Order Quantity (FOQ. Hasil perbandingan kedua metode tersebut menghasilan sistem Lot for Lot lebih efisien dan sesuai diterapkan pada PT. TIS karena total biaya persediaan minimum, yaitu sebesar Rp 199.692.470.

  4. Radioactive materials and nuclear fuel transport requirements in Poland in the light of international regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musialowicz, T.

    1977-01-01

    National regulations for the transport of radioactive materials and nuclear fuel in Poland are discussed. Basic transport requirements and regulations, transport experience including transport accidents and emergency service are described. The comparison with international regulations is given

  5. System requirement specifications for the Z-plant materials information tracking system (ZMITS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NEGIN, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    This is a system requirement specification for a database which will be developed to track classified information related to nuclear materials stored at PFP. The system will supplement existing databases to support both processing and disposition information needs

  6. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2009 ed. Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication establishes the regulations that are applied to the transport of radioactive material by all modes of transport on land, water or in the air, including transport that is incidental to the use of the radioactive material. The objective and scope of the regulations are described in detail as well as the range of their application. The publication provides requirements useful to governments, regulators, operators of nuclear and radiation facilities, carriers, users of radiation sources and cargo handling personnel. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Definitions; 3. General provisions; 4. Activity limits and classification; 5. Requirements and controls for transport; 6. Requirements for radioactive materials and for packagings and packages; 7. Test procedures; 8. Approval and administrative requirements; Annex I: Summary of approval and prior notification requirements; Annex II: Conversion factors and prefixes.

  7. The analysis of normative requirements to materials of PWR components, basing on LBB concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikovsky, V.V.; Karzov, G.P.; Timofeev, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the advisability of the correction of Norms to solve in terms of material science the Problem: how the normative requirements to materials must be changed in terms of the concept open-quotes leak before breakclose quotes (LBB)

  8. Approved requirements for the packaging, labelling and carriage of radioactive material by rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document specifies the detailed provisions in the United Kingdom with respect to rail transport for packages and packaging, test procedures for radioactive materials, information concerning the preparation of radioactive materials and the operation of tanks and container wagons. The Approved Requirements came into force on 1 September 1996 and are legally binding. (UK)

  9. The analysis of normative requirements to materials of PWR components, basing on LBB concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikovsky, V.V.; Karzov, G.P.; Timofeev, B.T. [CRISM Prometey, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-04-01

    The paper discusses the advisability of the correction of Norms to solve in terms of material science the Problem: how the normative requirements to materials must be changed in terms of the concept {open_quotes}leak before break{close_quotes} (LBB).

  10. Materials requirements for the ITER vacuum vessel and in-vessel components - approaching the construction phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Ioki, K.; Pick, M.; Girard, J.P.; Merola, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The ITER activities are fully devoted toward its construction. In accordance with the ITER integrated project schedule, the procurement specifications for the manufacturing of the Vacuum Vessel should be prepared by March 2008 and the procurement specifications for the in-vessel components (first wall/blanket, divertor) by 2009. To update the design, considering design and technology evolution, the ITER Design Review has been launched. Among the various topics being discussed are the important issues related to selection of materials, material procurement, and assessment of performance during operation. The main requirements related to materials for the vacuum vessel and the in-vessel components are summarized in the paper. The specific licensing requirements are to be followed for structural materials of pressure and nuclear pressure equipment components for construction of ITER. In addition, the procurements in ITER will be done mostly 'in-kind' and it is assumed that materials for these components will be produced by different Parties. However, in accordance with the regulatory requirements and quality requirements for operation, common specifications and the general rules to fulfill these requirements are to be adopted. For some ITER components (e.g. first wall, divertor high heat flux components), the ultimate qualification of the joining technologies (Be/Cu, SS/Cu, CFC/Cu, W/Cu) is under final evaluation. Successful accomplishment of the qualification program will allow to proceed with procurements of the components for ITER. The criteria for acceptance of these components and materials after manufacturing are described and the main results will be reported. Additional materials issues, which come from the on-going manufacturing R and D program, will be also described. Finally, further materials activity during the construction phase, needs for final qualification and acceptance of materials are discussed. (authors)

  11. Single-particle characterization of urban aerosol particles collected in three Korean cites using low-Z electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Chul-Un; Kim, HyeKyeong; Oh, Keun-Young; Yea, Sun Kyung; Lee, Chong Bum; Jang, Meongdo; Van Grieken, René

    2002-11-15

    A recently developed single-particle analytical technique, called low-Z electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z EPMA), was applied to characterize urban aerosol particles collected in three cities of Korea (Seoul, CheongJu, and ChunCheon) on single days in the winter of 1999. In this study, it is clearly demonstrated that the low-Z EPMA technique can provide detailed and quantitative information on the chemical composition of particles in the urban atmosphere. The collected aerosol particles were analyzed and classified on the basis of their chemical species. Various types of particles were identified, such as soil-derived, carbonaceous, marine-originated, and anthropogenic particles. In the sample collected in Seoul, carbonaceous, aluminosilicates, silicon dioxide, and calcium carbonate aerosol particles were abundantly encountered. In the CheongJu and ChunCheon samples, carbonaceous, aluminosilicates, reacted sea salts, and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles were often seen. However, in the CheongJu sample, ammonium sulfate particles were the most abundant in the fine fraction. Also, calcium sulfate and nitrate particles were significantly observed. In the ChunCheon sample, organic particles were the most abundant in the fine fraction. Also, sodium nitrate particles were seen at high levels. The ChunCheon sample seemed to be strongly influenced by sea-salt aerosols originating from the Yellow Sea, which is located about 115 km away from the city.

  12. Basic requirements of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Dong; Yao Weida

    2011-01-01

    The four basic aspects of strengths, ductility, toughness and fatigue strengths can be summarized for overall mechanical properties requirements of materials for nuclear pressure-retaining vessels in ASME-BPV code. These mechanical property indexes involve in the factors of melting, manufacture, delivery conditions, check or recheck for mechanical properties and chemical compositions, etc. and relate to degradation and damage accumulation during the use of materials. This paper specifically accounts for the basic requirements and theoretic basis of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code and states the internal mutual relationships among the four aspects of mechanical properties. This paper focuses on putting forward at several problems on mechanical properties of materials that shall be concerned about during design and manufacture for nuclear pressure vessels according to ASME-BPV code. (author)

  13. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  14. Guidance and methods for satisfying low specific activity material and surface contaminated object regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Boyle, R.W.; Easton, E.P.; Coodk, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have prepared a comprehensive set of draft guidance for shippers and inspectors to use when applying the newly imposed regulatory requirements for low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCOs). These requirements represent significant departures in some areas from the manner in which these materials and objects were regulated by the earlier versions of the regulations. The proper interpretation and application of the regulatory criteria can require a fairly complex set of decisions be made. To assist those trying these regulatory requirements, a detailed set of logic-flow diagrams representing decisions related to multiple factors were prepared and included in the draft report for comment on Categorizing and Transporting Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects, (DOT/NRC, 1997). These logic-flow diagrams, as developed, are specific to the U.S. regulations, but were readily adaptable to the IAEA regulations. The diagrams have been modified accordingly and tied directly to specific paragraphs in IAEA Safety Series No. 6. This paper provides the logic-flow diagrams adapted in the IAEA regulations, and demonstrated how these diagrams can be used to assist consignors and inspectors in assessing compliance of shipments with the LSA material and SCO regulatory requirements. (authors)

  15. General Approaches and Requirements on Safety and Security of Radioactive Materials Transport in Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, V.N.; Buchel'nikov, A.E.; Komarov, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Development and implementation of safety and security requirements for transport of radioactive materials in the Russian Federation are addressed. At the outset it is worth noting that the transport safety requirements implemented are in full accordance with the IAEA's ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2009 Edition)''. However, with respect to security requirements for radioactive material transport in some cases the Russian Federation requirements for nuclear material are more stringent compared to IAEA recommendations. The fundamental principles of safety and security of RM managements, recommended by IAEA documents (publications No. SF-1 and GOV/41/2001) are compared. Its correlation and differences concerning transport matters, the current level and the possibility of harmonization are analysed. In addition a reflection of the general approaches and concrete transport requirements is being evaluated. Problems of compliance assessment, including administrative and state control problems for safety and security provided at internal and international shipments are considered and compared. (author)

  16. 76 FR 76728 - Benefits and Burdens of Requiring Commenters To File Cited Materials in Rulemaking Proceedings as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... Requiring Commenters To File Cited Materials in Rulemaking Proceedings as Further Reform To Enhance Record... materials they cite in pleadings submitted in rulemaking proceedings, so that those materials are more... should require commenters to file materials they cite in pleadings submitted in rulemaking proceedings...

  17. Regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material, 2005 edition. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication includes amendments to the 1996 Edition (As Amended 2003) arising from the second cycle of the biennial review and revision process, as agreed by the Transport Safety Standards Committee (TRANSSC) at its ninth meeting in March 2004, as endorsed by the Commission on Safety Standards at its meeting in June 2004 and as approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in November 2004. Although this publication is identified as a new edition, there are no changes that affect the administrative and approval requirements in Section VIII. The fields covered are General Provisions (radiation protection; emergency response; quality assurance; compliance assurance; non-compliance; special arrangement and training); Activity Limits and Materials Restrictions, Requirement and Controls for Transport , Requirements for Radioactive Materials and for Packagings and Packages, Test Procedures, Approval and Administrative Requirements

  18. 75 FR 63 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Requirements for the Transportation of Batteries and Battery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... contained in equipment, fuel cell systems must not charge batteries during transport; (3) For transportation... 2137-AE54 Hazardous Materials: Revision to Requirements for the Transportation of Batteries and Battery... batteries and battery-powered devices. This final rule corrects several errors in the January 14, 2009 final...

  19. 21 CFR 111.460 - What requirements apply to holding in-process material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to holding in-process material? 111.460 Section 111.460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  20. Sales and marketing's partnership role in class A MRP II (material requirements planning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, J R; Lerner, W

    1994-08-01

    As the material and requirements planning (MRP) II process has evolved, many companies have discovered that the process is greatly enhanced when the entire business participates. The sales and operations planning process is the forum for the businesswide decisions concerning sales, production, and inventory. Sales and marketing must be integral parts of these decision-making activities.

  1. The qualification requirements for personnel carry out the testing for the pressure equipment materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojas, M.; Walczak, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article contains information about qualification requirements for personnel carry out the destructive and non-destructive testing for the pressure equipment materials based on the Directive 97/23/CE(PED). Competence laboratory carry out the testing. The responsibility lies with producer / employer. The producer / employer could elaborate the written practice procedure for qualification and certification testing personnel. (authors)

  2. An examination of source material requirements contained in 10 CFR Part 40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, D.; Smith, D.A.; Wiblin, C.

    1992-10-01

    This report identifies issues for consideration for rule-making to update the requirements for source material in 10 CFR Part 40 and examines options for resolving these issues. The contemplated rulemaking is intended to update 10 CFR Part 40 to reflect current radiation protection principles and regulatory practices. It is expected that such an update would make requirements for the control of source material more comparable to those pertaining to byproduct material contained in 10 CFR Part 30. The newer biological data and dose calculation methodology reflected in revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be used in analyses of potential regulatory amendments. This report presents historical background information and discussion on the various issues identified and makes preliminary recommendations concerning needed regulatory changes and approaches to rulemaking

  3. New safety and security requirements for the transport of nuclear and other radioactive materials in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.; Horvath, K.; Safar, J.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the promulgation of mode-specific regulations of international transport of dangerous goods, some Hungarian governmental and ministerial decrees impose further conditions upon the transport of nuclear and other radioactive materials. One of these ministerial decrees on the transport, carriage and packaging of radioactive materials is under revision and it will require • approval of emergency response plan (including security and safety contingency plan); • report on transport incidents and accidents for classifying them in accordance with the INES scale; • the competent authority to request experts’ support for the approval of package designs, radioactive material designs and shipments. Regarding the security of the transport of nuclear and other radioactive materials a new Hungarian governmental decree and a related guidance are about to be published which will supply additional requirements in the field of the transport security especially concerning radioactive materials, implementing - among others - IAEA recommendations of the NSS No9 and No14. The main and relevant features of the Hungarian nuclear regulatory system and the details of both new decrees regarding the safety and security issues of transport of nuclear and other radioactive materials will be discussed. (author)

  4. Future semiconductor material requirements and innovations as projected in the ITRS 2005 roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The international technology roadmap for semiconductors (ITRS) is a joint global effort of the semiconductor industry, the manufacturing equipment and material industry and the research community and consortia to define the future requirements and development of the semiconductor technology for the next 15 years. The ITRS started in 1992 as a US-national roadmap and became an international effort in 1998 with all major five industrial global regions (US, Japan, Taiwan, Korea and Europe) participating in its definition. The outlook in semiconductor manufacturing expects the continuous application of silicon technology for the next 15 years where complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based devices will carry the development of the industry at least for one more decade. New device architectures and concepts based on silicon wafer material are being developed to support the development of the IC industry for another one or two decade. The major section of the ITRS contains technical information about frontend processing and interconnects, device structures and memory concepts, lithography and metrology as well as factory integration and environmental issues. This paper will review the material requirements and the expected material innovations for the industry as outlined in the ITRS Version 2005. Materials to be discussed are, for example, high permittivity gate dielectrics, insulating layers with low dielectric constants for interconnects, and capacitor dielectrics for dynamic memories. In addition, the paper will address, for example, new transistor gate materials, new solutions for interconnect systems beyond copper as well as new starting materials for wafer sizes beyond 300 mm. This publication was presented as an invited paper in the Symposium V of the 2006 spring meeting of the European Materials Research Society (E-MRS) in Nice, May 29th

  5. A Monte Carlo investigation of low-Z target image quality generated in a linear accelerator using Varian's VirtuaLinac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, David; Robar, James L.; Sawkey, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The focus of this work was the demonstration and validation of VirtuaLinac with clinical photon beams and to investigate the implementation of low-Z targets in a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Linac) using Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: VirtuaLinac, a cloud based web application utilizing Geant4 Monte Carlo code, was used to model the Linac treatment head components. Particles were propagated through the lower portion of the treatment head using BEAMnrc. Dose distributions and spectral distributions were calculated using DOSXYZnrc and BEAMdp, respectively. For validation, 6 MV flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams were generated and compared to measurement for square fields, 10 and 40 cm wide and at d max for diagonal profiles. Two low-Z targets were investigated: a 2.35 MeV carbon target and the proposed 2.50 MeV commercial imaging target for the TrueBeam platform. A 2.35 MeV carbon target was also simulated in a 2100EX Clinac using BEAMnrc. Contrast simulations were made by scoring the dose in the phosphor layer of an IDU20 aSi detector after propagating through a 4 or 20 cm thick phantom composed of water and ICRP bone. Results: Measured and modeled depth dose curves for 6 MV flattened and FFF beams agree within 1% for 98.3% of points at depths greater than 0.85 cm. Ninety three percent or greater of points analyzed for the diagonal profiles had a gamma value less than one for the criteria of 1.5 mm and 1.5%. The two low-Z target photon spectra produced in TrueBeam are harder than that from the carbon target in the Clinac. Percent dose at depth 10 cm is greater by 3.6% and 8.9%; the fraction of photons in the diagnostic energy range (25–150 keV) is lower by 10% and 28%; and contrasts are lower by factors of 1.1 and 1.4 (4 cm thick phantom) and 1.03 and 1.4 (20 cm thick phantom), for the TrueBeam 2.35 MV/carbon and commercial imaging beams, respectively. Conclusions: VirtuaLinac is a promising new tool for Monte Carlo modeling of novel

  6. Parametric linear programming for a materials requirement planning problem solution with uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Darío Arango Serna; Conrado Augusto Serna; Giovanni Pérez Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Using fuzzy set theory as a methodology for modelling and analysing decision systems is particularly interesting for researchers in industrial engineering because it allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of problems involving uncertainty and imprecision. Thus, in an effort to gain a better understanding of the use of fuzzy logic in industrial engineering, more specifically in the field of production planning, this article was aimed at providing a materials requirement planning (MRP) pr...

  7. NRC's rulemaking to require materials licensees to be financially responsible for cleanup of accidental releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    On June 7, 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register to address funding for cleanup of accidents and unexpected decontamination by certain materials licensees. The NRC asked for public comment to help them determine whether to amend its regulations to require certain materials and fuel cycle licensees to demonstrate that they possess adequate financial means to pay for cleanup of accidental releases of radioactive materials. If licensees lack adequate financial resources and funds are to available for prompt cleanup, the consequences could be potentially significant for the public, the licencee and the federal government. The purpose of this paper is to explain the purpose and scope of the Commission's proposed regulatory action, as well as describing several accidents that made the Commission consider this action. Additionally, the paper will address other regulatory precedents. Finally, the paper will conclude by generally characterizing the public comments and items of concern raised by commenters

  8. Structural materials requirements for in-vessel components of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der

    2000-01-01

    The economic production of fusion energy is determined by principal choices such as using magnetic plasma confinement or generating inertial fusion energy. The first generation power plants will use deuterium and tritium mixtures as fuel, producing large amounts of highly energetic neutrons resulting in radiation damage in materials. In the far future the advanced fuels, 3 He or 11 B, determine power plant designs with less radiation damage than in the first generation. The first generation power plants design must anticipate radiation damage. Solid sacrificing armour or liquid layers could limit component replacements costs to economic levels. There is more than radiation damage resistance to determine the successful application of structural materials. High endurance against cyclic loading is a prominent requirement, both for magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. For high efficiency and compactness of the plant, elevated temperature behaviour should be attractive. Safety and environmental requirements demand that materials have low activation potential and little toxic effects under both normal and accident conditions. The long-term contenders for fusion power plant components near the plasma are materials in the range from innovative steels, such as reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, to highly advanced ceramic composites based on silicon carbide, and chromium alloys. The steels follow an evolutionary path to basic plant efficiencies. The competition on the energy market in the middle of the next century might necessitate the riskier but more rewarding development of SiCSiC composites or chromium alloys

  9. Synchrotron radiation induced TXRF of low Z elements on Si wafer surfaces at SSRL-comparison of excitation geometries and condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Pepponi, G.; Pianetta, P.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of low Z elements, like Na and Al at ultra trace levels on Si wafer surfaces is demanded by semiconductor industry. SR-TXRF is a promising method to fulfill the task, if a special energy dispersive detector with an ultra thin window is used. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal suited excitation source for TXRF of low Z elements due to its intensive, natural collimated and linear polarized radiation with wide spectral range down to low energies even below 1 keV. TXRF offers some advantages for wafer surface analysis like nondestructive investigation and mapping capability. Experiments have been performed at SSRL beamline 3-4, a bending magnet beamline using white (<3 keV) and monochromatic radiation, as well as on beamline 3-3, using a crystal monochromator as well as a multilayer monochromator. A comparison of excitation detection geometries was performed, using a sidelooking detector with vertical positioned wafer as well as a downlooking detector with a horizontally arranged wafer. The advantages and disadvantages of the various geometries and excitation conditions are presented and the results compared. Detection limits are in the 100 fg range for Na, determined with droplet samples on Si wafer surfaces. (author)

  10. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements of S and P in proteins using a vacuum chamber specially designed for low Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauwolf, M.; Vanhoof, C.; Tirez, K.; Maes, E.; Ingerle, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-01-01

    As the ratio of phosphorus and sulfur in proteins allows the determination of the phosphorylation degree in proteins, the absolute determination of phosphorus and sulfur in organic samples is of growing interest. While it takes some effort to quantify phosphorus and sulfur with inductively coupled quadrupole plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS), total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) allows easy quantification. In the presented work, the low Z TXRF spectrometer at the Atominstitut was used to analyze phosphorus and sulfur in proteins. Although the preparation of the protein samples proved to be more difficult than originally expected, it could be shown that TXRF is well suited for the determination of P and S in proteins. The obtained lower limits of detection (LLD) for P and S in proteins were extrapolated for 1000s and were 34 pg and 19 pg, respectively. The importance of height scans for each sample to exclude heterogeneities was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Low Z TXRF spectrometry was used to analyze phosphorus and sulfur in proteins. • TXRF is well suited for the determination of P and S in proteins. • Good detection limits for P (34 pg) and S (19 pg) were achieved. • Due to the detection limits, we propose that TXRF is a suitable method to analyze protein fractions

  11. Quality assurance and reference material requirements and considerations for environmental sample analysis in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Perrin, R.E.; Goldberg, S.A.; Cappis, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High-sensitivity nuclear environmental sampling and analysis techniques have been proven in their ability to verify declared nuclear activities, as well as to assist in the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and facilities. Following the Gulf War, the capability and revealing power of environmental sampling and analysis techniques to support international safeguards was demonstrated and subsequently adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as routine safeguards measures in safeguards inspections and verifications. In addition to having been proved useful in international safeguards, environmental sampling and analysis techniques have demonstrated their utility in identifying the origins of 'orphaned' nuclear material, as well as the origin of intercepted smuggled nuclear material. Today, environmental sampling and analysis techniques are now being applied in six broad areas to support nonproliferation, disarmament treaty verification, national and international nuclear security, and environmental stewardship of weapons production activities. Consequently, more and more laboratories around the world are establishing capabilities or expanding capabilities to meet these growing applications, and as such requirements for quality assurance and control are increasing. The six areas are: 1) Nuclear safeguards; 2) Nuclear forensics/illicit trafficking; 3) Ongoing monitoring and verification (OMV); 4) Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT); 5) Weapons dismantlement/materials disposition; and 6) Research and development (R and D)/environmental stewardship/safety. Application of environmental sampling and analysis techniques and resources to illicit nuclear material trafficking, while embodying the same basic techniques and resources, does have unique requirements for sample management, handling, protocols, chain of custody, archiving, and data interpretation. These requirements are derived from needs of how data from nuclear forensics

  12. Analysis of NEPA/CEQ requirements with respect to nuclear materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, K.E.L.; Welles, B.W.; Pellettieri, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the responsibility of federal agencies concerned with nuclear materials transportation decisions that come within the scope of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the requirements established by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Two of the case histories presented in this paper focus on actions taken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A third case history, in which the limits of environmental impact are judicially redefined, presents an analysis of NEPA application in an NRC licensing action. The decision by the US Supreme Court (April 19, 1983) disallowed psychological stress as a factor to be required in environmental analysis of federal actions. The review by the Supreme Court of environmental impact considerations required under NEPA is clearly transferable to federal actions involving transportation of nuclear materials. Of interest in these examples is the application of NEPA requirements for worst-case analysis and the employment of the rule of reason by a federal agency to determine the limits of its NEPA obligations

  13. Main requirements and criteria for State nuclear material control and accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, B.G.; Goryunov, V.K.; Erastov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents comments and substantiation of the main requirements and criteria for the State nuclear materials (NM) control and accounting system in the draft of the federal Main regulations of NM control and accounting. The State NM control and accounting system structure and design principles, the list of nuclear and special non-nuclear materials which are subject to the control and accounting, NM control and accounting principles are considered. Measurement system for the values for NM control and accounting and measurement assurance program, NM transfer procedures, physical inventory taking, closing a material balance and evaluation of inventory difference and balance closure of bulk form NM are shown. Accounting units in the inventory, the system accounting report documentation and preliminary notifications, the NM control and accounting arrangement, the federal and departmental control in the State NM control and accounting system, the State NM control and accounting system supervision and requirement to the personnel carrying out the NM control and accounting are discussed [ru

  14. One Generation of New Material, One Generation of New Type Engine:Development Trend of Aero-engine and Its Requirements for Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Da-xiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the brief review of accelerated developing status of aircraft power technology in the world, the present status and developing trend of key materials technology for aero-engine were analyzed. In accordance with the idea of "one generation of new material, one generation of new type engine", development requirements for the materials technology of the system and main parts of aero-engine were proposed. Suggestions for improving development and application level of the materials technology in China were presented from aspects of quality stability and technical maturity, investigation and verification for engineering, materials system and data, composite materials, airworthiness certificate,etc.

  15. The urgent requirement for new radioanalytical certified reference materials for nuclear safeguards, forensics, and consequence management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inn, K.G.W.; Martin Johnson, Jr.C.; Warren Oldham; Lav Tandon; Simon Jerome; Thomas Schaaff; Robert Jones; Daniel Mackney; Pam MacKill; Brett Palmer

    2013-01-01

    A multi-agency workshop was held from 25 to 27 August 2009, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to identify and prioritize the development of radioanalytical Certified Reference Materials (CRMs, generally provided by National Metrology Institutes; Standard Reference Materials, a CRM issued by NIST) for field and laboratory nuclear measurement methods to be used to assess the consequences of a domestic or international nuclear event. Without these CRMs, policy makers concerned with detecting proliferation and trafficking of nuclear materials, attribution and retribution following a nuclear event, and public health consequences of a nuclear event would have difficulty making decisions based on analytical data that would stand up to scientific, public, and judicial scrutiny. The workshop concentrated on three areas: post-incident Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) nuclear forensics, safeguard materials characterization, and consequence management for an IND or a Radiological Dispersion Device detonation scenario. The workshop identified specific CRM requirements to fulfill the needs for these three measurement communities. Of highest priority are: (1) isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards, specifically 233 U, 236 gNp, 244 Pu, and 243 Am, used for quantitative analysis of the respective elements that are in critically short supply and in urgent need of replenishment and certification; (2) CRMs that are urgently needed for post-detonation debris analysis of actinides and fission fragments, and (3) CRMs used for destructive and nondestructive analyses for safeguards measurements, and radioisotopes of interest in environmental matrices. (author)

  16. Regulatory requirements on management of radioactive material safe transport in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980s, the IAEA Regulation for safe transport of radioactive material was introduced into China; the regulatory system of China began with international standards, and walked towards the institutionalized. In 2003 the National People’s Congress (NPC) promulgated “the Act on the Prevention of Radioactive Pollution of the People's Republic of China”. In 2009 “Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material” (Referred to “Regulation”) was promulgated by the State Council. Subsequently, the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) began to formulate executive detailed department rules, regulations guidelines and standards. The present system of acts, regulations and standards on management of safe transport of radioactive material in China and future planning were introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the paper described the specific administration requirements of the Regulation on classification management of radioactive materials, license management of transport packaging including design, manufacture and use, licensing management of transport activities and the provisions of illegal behaviors arising in safe transport of radioactive material. (author)

  17. Megavoltage planar and cone-beam imaging with low-Z targets: dependence of image quality improvement on beam energy and patient separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robar, James L; Connell, Tanner; Huang, Weihong; Kelly, Robin G

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the improvement of megavoltage planar and cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality with the use of low atomic number (Z) external targets in the linear accelerator. In this investigation, two experimental megavoltage imaging beams were generated by using either 3.5 or 7.0 MeV electrons incident on aluminum targets installed above the level of the carousel in a linear accelerator (2100EX, Varian Medical, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Images were acquired using an amorphous silicon detector panel. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in planar and CBCT images was measured as a function of dose and a comparison was made between the imaging beams and the standard 6 MV therapy beam. Phantoms of variable diameter were used to examine the loss of contrast due to beam hardening. Porcine imaging was conducted to examine qualitatively the advantages of the low-Z target approach in CBCT. In CBCT imaging CNR increases by factors as high as 2.4 and 4.3 for the 7.0 and 3.5 MeV/Al beams, respectively, compared to images acquired with 6 MV. Similar factors of improvement are observed in planar imaging. For the imaging beams, beam hardening causes a significant loss of the contrast advantage with increasing phantom diameter; however, for the 3.5 MeV/Al beam and a phantom diameter of 25 cm, a contrast advantage remains, with increases of contrast by factors of 1.5 and 3.4 over 6 MV for bone and lung inhale regions, respectively. The spatial resolution is improved slightly in CBCT images for the imaging beams. CBCT images of a porcine cranium demonstrate qualitatively the advantages of the low-Z target approach, showing greater contrast between tissues and improved visibility of fine detail. The use of low-Z external targets in the linear accelerator improves megavoltage planar and CBCT image quality significantly. CNR may be increased by a factor of 4 or greater. Improvement of the spatial resolution is also apparent.

  18. Application of the Materials Requirement Planning (MRP in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory Oriente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Saumell–Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the logistics management of any business organization the allocation of material resources is very important, both for its dynamic approach to the internal processes of the company, as the pursuit of customer satisfaction, enabling the fulfillment of their goals efficiently and effectively. In this context, are used with effective results the models of Material’s Requirements Planning (MRP which allow to plan and control the demands for materials and production capacities in companies, conjugating with orders’s delivery dates, so is a tool proven effective, especially in the conditions of the Cuban economy. The present work has as objective to apply a MRP model in drugs manufacturing in the Company Laboratory Oriente in Santiago de Cuba, based on a theoretical and practical analysis for application of MRP tool using the WinQSB software. 

  19. Requirements for near-real-time accounting of strategic nuclear materials in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.

    1978-01-01

    A Purex-based nuclear fuel reprocessing plant has been studied for possible incorporation of near-real-time accounting to supplement conventional accounting procedures. Near-real-time accounting of special nuclear materials relies on in-line or at-line flow measurements and plutonium assay of product and waste streams, complemented by conventional analytical chemistry for daily instrument calibrations. In-line alpha monitors could be used for waste stream measurements of plutonium, even in the presence of high beta-gamma fluxes from fission products. X-ray absorption edge densitometry using either K- or L-absorption edges could be used for plutonium concentration measurements in main product streams. Some problem areas identified in waste stream measurements include measurements of leached hulls and of centrifuge sludge. Conventional analytical chemical methods for measuring plutonium in weapons grade material can be modified for reprocessed plutonium. Analytical techniques requiring special precautions will be reviewed

  20. Material characterization for morphing purposes in order to match flight requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Sebastian; Kintscher, Markus; Heintze, Olaf; Wierach, Peter; Monner, Hans-Peter; Wiedemann, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Natural laminar flow is one of the challenging aims of the current aerospace research. Main reasons for the aerodynamic transition from laminar into turbulent flow focusing on the airfoil-structure is the aerodynamic shape and the surface roughness. The Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems at the German Aerospace Center in Braunschweig works on the optimization of the aerodynamic-loaded structure of future aircrafts in order to increase their efficiency. Providing wing structures suited for natural laminar flow is a step towards this goal. Regarding natural laminar flow, the structural design of the leading edge of a wing is of special interest. An approach for a gap-less leading edge was developed to provide a gap- and step-less high quality surface suited for natural laminar flow and to reduce slat noise. In a national project the first generation of the 3D full scale demonstrator was successfully tested in 2010. The prototype consists of several new technologies, opening up the issue of matching the long and challenging list of airworthiness requirements simultaneously. Therefore the developed composite structure was intensively tested for further modifications according to meet requirements for abrasion, impact and deicing basically. The former presented structure consists completely of glass-fiber-prepreg (GFRP-prepreg). New functions required the addition of a new material-mix, which has to fit into the manufacturing-chain of the composite structure. In addition the hybrid composites have to withstand high loadings, high bending-induced strains (1%) and environmentally influenced aging. Moreover hot-wet cycling tests are carried out for the basic GFRP-structure in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material under extrem conditions. The presented paper shows results of four-points-bending-tests of the most critical section of the morphing leading edge device. Different composite-hybrids are built up and processed. An experimental

  1. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions in time-dependent simulations of low-Z materials illuminated by a high-intensity X-ray laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Varga, A.G.; Velarde, P.; de Gaufridy de Dortan, Francois; Portillo, D.; Cotelo, M.; Barbas, A.; González, A.; Zeitoun, Ph.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2013), s. 542-547 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-Maxwellian electron distribution * time - dependent atomic kinetics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.519, year: 2013

  2. TXRF analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Bellido, Alfredo Victor B.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. ITP results from development of an antibody directed against a structural platelet antigen (an autoantibody). Platelets are also called thrombocytes, meaning cells that form clots. The cause of ITP is not known and their diagnosis requires that other disorders be excluded through selective tests. In this work, forty patients suffering from ITP and sixty healthy volunteers (Control Group) were analyzed. All the serum samples had been collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a monochromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation and an Ultra-LEGe detector with resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV. Standard solutions with Vanadium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The Student's t-test was used to analyze significant differences (α = 0.05) between group of patients with ITP and control group. The elements that presented significant differences for the mean of their concentrations between each one of the ITP group and control group in μg.g-1 were: phosphorous (136±12 and 92±12), Sulphur (1077±97 and 847±80), Chlorine (2905±385 and 2266±378), Potassium (137±118 and 82±15) and Calcium (64±7 and 44±6) respectively. These results will help the biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that these elements can be related to the important biochemical processes in ITP. (author)

  3. TXRF analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bellido, Alfredo Victor B., E-mail: alfredo@ien.gov.b [Federal Fluminense University (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Chemistry Inst.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b [State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Physics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. ITP results from development of an antibody directed against a structural platelet antigen (an autoantibody). Platelets are also called thrombocytes, meaning cells that form clots. The cause of ITP is not known and their diagnosis requires that other disorders be excluded through selective tests. In this work, forty patients suffering from ITP and sixty healthy volunteers (Control Group) were analyzed. All the serum samples had been collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a monochromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation and an Ultra-LEGe detector with resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV. Standard solutions with Vanadium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The Student's t-test was used to analyze significant differences ({alpha} = 0.05) between group of patients with ITP and control group. The elements that presented significant differences for the mean of their concentrations between each one of the ITP group and control group in {mu}g.g-1 were: phosphorous (136{+-}12 and 92{+-}12), Sulphur (1077{+-}97 and 847{+-}80), Chlorine (2905{+-}385 and 2266{+-}378), Potassium (137{+-}118 and 82{+-}15) and Calcium (64{+-}7 and 44{+-}6) respectively. These results will help the biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that these elements can be related to the important biochemical processes in ITP. (author)

  4. 48 CFR 52.225-12 - Notice of Buy American Act Requirement-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirement-Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements. 52.225-12 Section 52.225-12 Federal Acquisition...—Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements. As prescribed in 25.1102(d)(1), insert the following provision: Notice of Buy American Act Requirement—Construction Materials Under Trade Agreements (FEB 2009) (a...

  5. Report Summarizing the Effort Required to Initiate Welding of Irradiated Materials within the Welding Cubicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Allen W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The advanced welding facility within a hot cell at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which has been jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, is in the final phase of development. Research and development activities in this facility will involve direct testing of advanced welding technologies on irradiated materials in order to address the primary technical challenge of helium induced cracking that can arise when conventional fusion welding techniques are utilized on neutron irradiated stainless steels and nickel-base alloys. This report details the effort that has been required since the beginning of fiscal year 2017 to initiate welding research and development activities on irradiated materials within the hot cell cubicle, which houses welding sub-systems that include laser beam welding (LBW) and friction stir welding (FSW) and provides material containment within the hot cell.

  6. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Andrew, P.L.; Wu, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behaviour of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armours exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper we elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next-step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known data bases for design purposes. Owing to their strong anticipated implications on tritium uptake and release, attention is focused mainly on the interaction of tritium with neutron damage induced defects, on tritium codeposition with eroded carbon and on the effects of oxide and surface contaminants. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modelling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e. amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified. (orig.)

  7. Inkjet Printing of Functional and Structural Materials: Fluid Property Requirements, Feature Stability, and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Brian

    2010-08-01

    Inkjet printing is viewed as a versatile manufacturing tool for applications in materials fabrication in addition to its traditional role in graphics output and marking. The unifying feature in all these applications is the dispensing and precise positioning of very small volumes of fluid (1-100 picoliters) on a substrate before transformation to a solid. The application of inkjet printing to the fabrication of structures for structural or functional materials applications requires an understanding as to how the physical processes that operate during inkjet printing interact with the properties of the fluid precursors used. Here we review the current state of understanding of the mechanisms of drop formation and how this defines the fluid properties that are required for a given liquid to be printable. The interactions between individual drops and the substrate as well as between adjacent drops are important in defining the resolution and accuracy of printed objects. Pattern resolution is limited by the extent to which a liquid drop spreads on a substrate and how spreading changes with the overlap of adjacent drops to form continuous features. There are clearly defined upper and lower bounds to the width of a printed continuous line, which can be defined in terms of materials and process variables. Finer-resolution features can be achieved through appropriate patterning and structuring of the substrate prior to printing, which is essential if polymeric semiconducting devices are to be fabricated. Low advancing and receding contact angles promote printed line stability but are also more prone to solute segregation or “coffee staining” on drying.

  8. The analysis of normative requirements to materials of VVER components, basing on LBB concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikovsky, V.V.; Karzov, G.P.; Timofeev, B.T. [CRISM Prometey, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-04-01

    The paper demonstrates an insufficiency of some requirements native Norms (when comparing them with the foreign requirements for the consideration of calculating situations): (1) leak before break (LBB); (2) short cracks; (3) preliminary loading (warm prestressing). In particular, the paper presents (1) Comparison of native and foreign normative requirements (PNAE G-7-002-86, Code ASME, BS 1515, KTA) on permissible stress levels and specifically on the estimation of crack initiation and propagation; (2) comparison of RF and USA Norms of pressure vessel material acceptance and also data of pressure vessel hydrotests; (3) comparison of Norms on the presence of defects (RF and USA) in NPP vessels, developments of defect schematization rules; foundation of a calculated defect (semi-axis correlation a/b) for pressure vessel and piping components: (4) sequence of defect estimation (growth of initial defects and critical crack sizes) proceeding from the concept LBB; (5) analysis of crack initiation and propagation conditions according to the acting Norms (including crack jumps); (6) necessity to correct estimation methods of ultimate states of brittle an ductile fracture and elastic-plastic region as applied to calculating situation: (a) LBB and (b) short cracks; (7) necessity to correct estimation methods of ultimate states with the consideration of static and cyclic loading (warm prestressing effect) of pressure vessel; estimation of the effect stability; (8) proposals on PNAE G-7-002-86 Norm corrections.

  9. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  10. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a... Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.113 What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? (a) Quality control personnel must...

  11. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  12. A case study on determining air monitoring requirements in a radioactive materials handling area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Bechtold, W.E.; Hoover, M.D.; Ghanbari, F.; Herring, P.S.; Jow, Hong-Nian

    1993-01-01

    A technical, defensible basis for the number and placement of air sampling instruments in a radioactive materials handling facility was developed. Historical air sampling data, process and physicochemical knowledge, qualitative smoke dispersion studies with video documentation, and quantitative trace gas dispersion studies were used to develop a strategy for number and placement of air samplers. These approaches can be used in other facilities to provide a basis for operational decisions. The requirements for retrospective sampling, personal sampling, and real-time monitoring are included. Other relevant operational decisions include selecting the numbers, placement, and appropriate sampling rates for instruments, identifying areas of stagnation or recirculation, and determining the adequacy and efficiency of any sampling transport lines. Justification is presented for using a graded approach to characterizing the workplace and determining air sampling and monitoring needs

  13. Schedules of requirements for the transport of specified types of radioactive material consignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    These Schedules have been prepared as a companion document to the 1985 Edition of the Transport Regulations (Safety Series No. 6). As presented here, the Schedules also reflect the corrections and changes implemented by the 1986 Supplement to the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. Direct cross-referencing to the paragraphs, tables and figures in the Regulations is made, and the use of both the International System of Units (SI) and the formerly accepted, traditional units is continued. In many cases, due to rounding off the numbers, the two values for a given parameter for the two units may differ somewhat. To move toward international use of SI units and to avoid inconsistencies, the values for the SI units are controlling in all cases. These Schedules are provided only as an aid to users of the Regulations and the provisions of the Regulations take precedence over the Schedules. These Schedules also serve as a generic model of the Schedules which are part of modal international regulatory documents, such as the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the European Agreement Concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) and the International Convention Concerning the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail (CIM/RID). For regulatory purposes, reference shall be made to the detailed provisions of the Regulations specified in Safety Series No. 6. The Schedules do not reproduce the provisions of the Regulations in detail nor do they contain any additional requirements. They merely provide a summary of the main provisions for each specified type of radioactive material, references being provided to the relevant detailed provisions of the Regulations to enable these to be consulted where necessary. A table summarizing package, shipment approval, and notification requirements of the Regulations is provided

  14. Shape memory alloy wires turn composites into smart structures: I. Material requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrooten, Jan; Michaud, Veronique J.; Zheng, Yanjun; Balta-Neumann, J. Antonio; Manson, Jan-Anders E.

    2002-07-01

    Composites containing thin Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires show great potential as materials able to adapt their shape, thermal behavior or vibrational properties to external stimuli. The functional properties of SMA-composites are directly related to the constraining effect of the matrix on the reversible martensitic transformation of the embedded pre-strained SMA wires. The present work reports results of a concerted European effort towards a fundamental understanding of the manufacturing and design of SMA composites. This first part investigates the transformational behavior of constrained SMA wires and its translation into functional properties of SMA composites. Thermodynamic and thermomechanical experiments were performed on SMA wires. A model was developed to simulate the thermomechanical behavior of the wires. From the screening of potential wires it was concluded that NiTiCu, as well as R-phase NiTi appeared as best candidates. Requirements for the host composite materials were surveyed. A Kevlar-epoxy system was chosen. Finally, the quality of the SMA wire-resin interface was assessed by two different techniques. These indicated that a thin oxide layer seems to provide the best interfacial strength. A temperature window in which SMA composites can be safely used was also defined. The manufacturing and properties of the SMA composites will be discussed in Part II.

  15. Transportation of hydrogen in pipelines: interaction of NDE and material requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.B.; Thompson, A.W.; Thompson, D.O.

    1976-01-01

    The role of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials used in H pipelines and storage facilities is examined. NDE techniques are available which detect critical flaws in today's natural gas lines, and which should have some success in hydrogen lines made of resistant materials. However, the critical flaws in a hydrogen line which is built of a steel whose toughness is significantly reduced in hydrogen, or which contains low-toughness defects such as weld hard spots, would be extremely difficult to detect with today's instrumentation. That instrumentation is designed to test efficiently long lengths of line with minimum disruption of service. Technology is available that would be capable of the more detailed inspection required for the smaller defects. However, the equipment might be expensive and time-consuming to operate, and these costs must be included in the overall assessment of a system using existing lines without embrittlement protection. In addition, it is evident that strong motivation exists to construct new facilities from steels with improved resistance to hydrogen

  16. European DEMO divertor target: Operational requirements and material-design interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. You

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an integrated program of conceptual design activities for the European DEMO reactor was launched in the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium, where reliable power handling capability was identified as one of the most critical scientific as well as technological challenges for a DEMO reactor. The divertor is the key in-vessel plasma-facing component being in charge of power exhaust and removal of impurity particles. The DEMO divertor target will have to withstand extreme thermal loads where the local peak heat flux is expected to reach up to 20 MW/m2 during slow transient events in DEMO. To assure sufficient heat removal capability of the divertor target against normal and transient operational scenarios under expected cumulative neutron dose of up to 13 dpa is one of the fundamental engineering challenges imposed on target design. To develop the design of the DEMO divertor and related technologies, an R&D work package ‘Divertor’ has been set up in this consortium. The subproject ‘Target Development’ is devoted to the development of the conceptual design and the core technologies of the plasma-facing target. Devising and implementing novel structural heat sink materials (e.g. W/Cu composites to advanced target design concepts is one of the major objectives of this subproject. In this paper, the underlying design requirements imposed by the envisaged power exhaust goal and the prominent material-design interface issues are discussed. In addition, the candidate design concepts being currently considered are presented together with the related material issues. Finally, the first results achieved so far are presented.

  17. Pilot program to assess proposed basic quality assurance requirements in the medical use of byproduct materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, E.; Nelson, K.; Meinhold, C.B. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed amendments to 10 CFR Part 35 that would require medical licensees using byproduct material to establish and implement a basic quality assurance program. A 60-day real-world trial of the proposed rules was initiated to obtain information beyond that generally found through standard public comment procedures. Volunteers from randomly selected institutions had opportunities to review the details of the proposed regulations and to implement these rules on a daily basis during the trial. The participating institutions were then asked to evaluate the proposed regulations based on their personal experiences. The pilot project sought to determine whether medical institutions could develop written quality assurance programs that would meet the eight performance-based objectives of proposed Section 35.35. In addition, the NRC wanted to learn from these volunteers if they had any recommendations on how the rule could be revised to minimized its cost and to clarify its objectives without decreasing its effectiveness. It was found that licensees could develop acceptable QA programs under a performance-based approach, that most licensee programs did meet the proposed objectives, and that most written QA plans would require consultations with NRC or Agreement State personnel before they would fully meet all objectives of proposed Section 35.35. This report describes the overall pilot program. The methodology used to select and assemble the group of participating licensees is presented. The various workshops and evaluation questionnaires are discussed, and detailed findings are presented. 7 refs.

  18. Pilot program to assess proposed basic quality assurance requirements in the medical use of byproduct materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, E.; Nelson, K.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed amendments to 10 CFR Part 35 that would require medical licensees using byproduct material to establish and implement a basic quality assurance program. A 60-day real-world trial of the proposed rules was initiated to obtain information beyond that generally found through standard public comment procedures. Volunteers from randomly selected institutions had opportunities to review the details of the proposed regulations and to implement these rules on a daily basis during the trial. The participating institutions were then asked to evaluate the proposed regulations based on their personal experiences. The pilot project sought to determine whether medical institutions could develop written quality assurance programs that would meet the eight performance-based objectives of proposed Section 35.35. In addition, the NRC wanted to learn from these volunteers if they had any recommendations on how the rule could be revised to minimized its cost and to clarify its objectives without decreasing its effectiveness. It was found that licensees could develop acceptable QA programs under a performance-based approach, that most licensee programs did meet the proposed objectives, and that most written QA plans would require consultations with NRC or Agreement State personnel before they would fully meet all objectives of proposed Section 35.35. This report describes the overall pilot program. The methodology used to select and assemble the group of participating licensees is presented. The various workshops and evaluation questionnaires are discussed, and detailed findings are presented. 7 refs

  19. Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Sanborn, J.

    1994-12-01

    Preliminary estimates of the inspection effort to verify a Nuclear Material Cutoff Convention are presented. The estimates are based on (1) a database of about 650 facilities a total of eight states, i.e., the five nuclear-weapons states and three ''threshold'' states; (2) typical figures for inspection requirements for specific facility types derived from IAEA experience, where applicable; and (3) alternative estimates of inspection effort in cutoff options where full IAEA safeguards are not stipulated. Considerable uncertainty must be attached to the effort estimates. About 50--60% of the effort for each option is attributable to 16 large-scale reprocessing plants assumed to be in operation in the eight states; it is likely that some of these will be shut down by the time the convention enters into force. Another important question involving about one third of the overall effort is whether Euratom inspections in France and the U.K. could obviate the need for full-scale IAEA inspections at these facilities. Finally, the database does not yet contain many small-scale and military-related facilities. The results are therefore not presented as predictions but as the consequences of alternative assumptions. Despite the preliminary nature of the estimates, it is clear that a broad application of NPT-like safeguards to the eight states would require dramatic increases in the IAEA's safeguards budget. It is also clear that the major component of the increased inspection effort would occur at large reprocessing plants (and associated plutonium facilities). Therefore, significantly bounding the increased effort requires a limitation on the inspection effort in these facility types

  20. SB certification handout material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels for mixture-based specification for flexible base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    A handout with tables representing the material requirements, test methods, responsibilities, and minimum classification levels mixture-based specification for flexible base and details on aggregate and test methods employed, along with agency and co...

  1. 46 CFR 164.009-3 - Noncombustible materials not requiring specific approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Noncombustible Materials for... noncombustible materials may be used in merchant vessel construction though not specifically approved under this subpart: (a) Sheet glass, block glass, clay, ceramics, and uncoated fibers. (b) All metals, except...

  2. Conceptual design of a system for nuclear material control in a research centre according to the IAEA safeguards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueker, H.; Kotte, U.; Stein, G.

    1976-01-01

    In comparison with other facilities handling nuclear material, a nuclear research centre is characterized by a wider spectrum of operations. This requires a number of installations within the centre such as research reactors, critical assemblies, research institutes and central departments, operating, in general, independently of each other. Nuclear material is stored and processed in small quantities and in different chemical and physical configurations within prescribed license areas. The conceptual design of a new system for nuclear material control in a research centre has to consider the operator's and IAEA's safeguards requirements. Using the example of the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre in the Federal Republic of Germany, these requirements are being examined in conjunction with the specified peculiarities of a nuclear research centre. Following this, a division of the research centre into material balance areas and key measurement points is being proposed, based on the existing facilities and licence areas. The essential characteristic of the concept is a far-reaching displayability of the inventory and flow of nuclear material. The availability of information is based on differentiated material accountancy in conjunction with adequate measurement of nuclear material data. For data processing and generation of data, a computerized record and report system is to be provided as well as a central measurement system. The design of an integrated accountancy system with a central computer and remote terminals is described; various measuring appliances, now being developed or tested, for the non-destructive assay of nuclear material are specified. The functions of a central department for nuclear material management for operating these systems are discussed and the planned verification of nuclear material in the different material balance areas illustrated. On applying the measures described in this paper, the conceptual design of a system for nuclear material

  3. Development of an improved radiological basis and revised requirements for the transport of LSA/SCO materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Lange, F.; Hoermann, E.; Carr, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material specify a range of package requirements that are dependent upon the activity and properties of the radioactive material being transported. For example, Type A packages can be used for the transport of material with an activity of up to one A1 of special form material and one A2 of other material. The A1 and A2 values are determined for over 350 radionuclides using the Q system in the advisory material. This system models the following pathways in the event of a severe accident: External photon dose; External beta dose; Inhalation dose; Skin and ingestion dose due to contamination transfer; Submersion dose. Industrial packages can be used for the transport of low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCO) and the particular requirements for these types of materials are derived from a simplistic radiological model that is often referred to as the 10 mg inhalation model. This is because it is based on the assumption that, in a dusty environment, an individual would inhale no more than 10 mg in such a situation, although there is limited reliable information to justify this assumption. Furthermore, there are deficiencies in the specification of some of the material requirements for LSA/SCO material in the IAEA Transport Regulations. Consequently, this can cause some difficulties for operators in complying with the regulations and to competent authorities in their compliance assurance role. Particular areas of difficulty include: It can be difficult to distinguish between LSA-type material and SCO-type; It is difficult to distinguish surface contamination from activity within the object, and between fixed and nonfixed contamination; In order to demonstrate compliance with SCO requirements, measurements of both accessible and nonaccessible contamination are required, although it is not clear how compliance with the inaccessible contamination limit can be measured if it cannot

  4. Comparison of TXRF detection limits for low Z elements in different beam geometries at the PTB monochromator beamline for undulator radiation at Bessy II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckhoff, B.; Ulm, G.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Fabry, L.; Pahlke, S.

    2000-01-01

    A set of initial TXRF experiments were conducted at the PTB plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation at the electron storage ring BESSY II allowing for exciting energies between 0.1 keV and 1.9 keV. Here, the lower limits of detection of TXRF analysis investigated for some low Z elements such as C, N, 0, Al, Mg and Na in two different detection geometries for various excitation modes. Compared to ordinary XRF geometries involving large incident angles, the TXRF variant offers also at low excitation energies drastically reduced background contributions due to the small penetration depth caused by the total reflection of the incident beam at the polished surface of a flat specimen carrier such as a silicon wafer. For the sake of an application-oriented TXRF approach, droplet samples on Si wafer surfaces were prepared by Wacker Siltronic and investigated in the TXRF irradiation chamber of the Atominstitut offering a semiconductor detector with a thin entrance window that was only 300 nm thick. (author)

  5. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100-300 Å spectral banda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li+ or Li2 +, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li+ and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li2 + lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  6. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, K., E-mail: widmann1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  7. Use of alpha-particle excited x-rays to measure the thickness of thin films containing low-Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanser, F.A.; Sellers, B.; Ziegler, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The thickness of thin surface films containing low Z elements can be determined by measuring the K X-ray yields from alpha particle excitation. The samples are irradiated in a helium atmosphere by a 5 mCi polonium-210 source, and the low energy X-rays detected by a flow counter with a thin-stretched polypropylene window. The flow counter output is pulse height sorted by a single channel analyzer (SCA) and counted to give the X-ray yield. Best results have been obtained with Z = 6 to 9 (C, N, O, and F), but usable yields are obtained even for Z = 13 or 14 (Al and Si). The low energy of the X-rays (0.28 to 1.74 keV) limits the method to films of several hundred nm thickness or less and to situations where the substrate does not produce interfering X-rays. It is possible to determine the film thickness with 50 percent accuracy by direct calculation using the measured alpha-particle spectrum and known or calculated K X-ray excitation cross sections. By calibration with known standards the accuracy can be increased substantially. The system has thus far been applied to SiO 2 on Si, Al 2 O 3 on Al, and CH 2 on Al

  8. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I follow for cranes and... Performance Standards § 250.108 What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment? (a) All cranes installed on fixed platforms must be operated in accordance with American...

  9. 49 CFR 173.427 - Transport requirements for low specific activity (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) materials and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transport requirements for low specific activity... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.427 Transport requirements for low specific... must be transported in accordance with the following conditions: (1) The external dose rate may not...

  10. 10 CFR 32.26 - Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Requirements for license to manufacture, process, produce, or initially transfer. 32.26 Section 32.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS... byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture, process, produce, or initially transfer. An...

  11. Reduction of minimum required weight of cementitious materials in WisDOT concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This project was designed to explore the feasibility of lowering the cementitious materials content : (CMC) used in Wisconsin concrete pavement construction. The cementitious materials studied included : portland cement, fly ash, and ground granulate...

  12. Reduction of minimum required weight of cementitious materials in WisDOT concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    "This project was designed to explore the feasibility of lowering the cementitious materials content : (CMC) used in Wisconsin concrete pavement construction. The cementitious materials studied included : portland cement, fly ash, and ground granulat...

  13. 46 CFR 160.057-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Floating Orange Smoke Distress Signals (15 Minutes) § 160.057-3 Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...

  14. 46 CFR 160.062-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Releases. Lifesaving Equipment, Hydraulic and Manual § 160.062-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance...

  15. 46 CFR 160.031-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Line-Throwing Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-3 Materials, construction, workmanship, and...

  16. 46 CFR 160.036-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand-Held Rocket-Propelled Parachute Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.036-3 Materials, workmanship, construction and...

  17. 46 CFR 160.040-3 - Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, construction, workmanship, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Line-Throwing Appliance, Impulse-Projected Rocket Type (and Equipment) § 160.040-3 Materials, construction, workmanship...

  18. 46 CFR 160.024-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Pistol-Projected Parachute Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.024-3 Materials, workmanship, construction, and performance...

  19. 46 CFR 160.058-3 - Materials, workmanship, construction and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials, workmanship, construction and performance...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Desalter Kits, Sea Water, for Merchant Vessels § 160.058-3 Materials, workmanship, construction and performance...

  20. Peculiarities in covering the requirements for seed material of sorghum crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. І. Мельник

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the demand for sorghum seed material and sufficiency of domestic seeds. Results. The analysis of the State register for the period of 2002–2012 showed that there was the tendency not only towards increasing quantity of sorghum crops in general but their substitution by hybrids of foreign breeding. During the period from 2002 to 2017, 72 sorghum varieties were entered on the State register in total, among them only 12 varieties were of domestic breeding, the rest 60 was presented by foreign breeding institutions. Investigation results allowed to determine that the production of base and prebase seeds of sorghum in 2010 amounted to 1,3 t, in 2016 was 43 t. During the same period the production of sugar sorghum increased from 0,2 to 12,0 t, grass sorghum – from 4,0 to 83 t. In 2017, requirements of acreage of such crops as grass sorghum and broomcorn were completely satisfied by the amount of grown seeds. At the same time, the need for seeds of sorghum and sugar sorghum can not be covered completely at the expense of domestic varieties reproduction. In 2017, general demand for sorghum seeds was 400,5 t, among which only 42,0 t was of domestic production. The rest demand for seeds will be met at the expense of import of foreign breeding seeds into the country to be grown and prepared for sowing abroad. Conclusions. In the Register of plant varieties suitable for dissemination in Ukraine, there are 72 sorghum varieties among them only 12 varieties were of domestic breeding, that is 17%, as compared to 83% of recommended great sorghum varieties of foreign breeding. In Ukraine, the area occupied by sorghum cultivation was 22,8 thou ha in 2005, up to 2017 it increased to 89,0 thou ha, and accordingly the demand for seeds run up from 102,6 to 400,5 t. The area occupied by the sugar sorghum in 2005 amounted to only 2,6 thou ha, in 2017 – 20,0 thou ha, that accordingly determined increase of demand for seed material from 13,0 to 99

  1. Design of the breeder units in the new HCPB modular blanket concept and material requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Fischer, U.; Hermsmeyer, S.; Reimann, J.; Xu, Z.; Koehly, C.

    2004-01-01

    ; according to the experience from the old design no major problems are expected concerning stress levels and gap formation in the pebble beds; in fact, the situation should be more favourable due to the reduced dimensions (max. 20 cm) of the beds that should minimise ratcheting and particle flow phenomena. In respect to tritium extraction, the most favourable features of the HCPB concept (e.g. an overall low partial pressure of tritium in the beds that minimise permeation into the main coolant system) can be kept in the new design; a complication could be the necessity to provide each cell with a system of tubes to inlet the purge helium in the front part of the beds or to divide the purge flow for Be and CB. The modular design of the new HCPB blanket, that makes the breeder units almost independent on the structural design of the box, opens interesting possibilities in the development of these units. The present design can be optimised on the basis of the results of the present R and D programme on Be and CB. In addition, new requirements could appear to improve the design performances or manufacturing: i.e. in respect to filling procedures of the beds (use of pre-packed breeder units) or the necessity of insulating layer to thermally decouple the breeder units from the box or the selection of new materials with a better compatibility with Be and CB at high temperatures as protection of the steel structure. (author)

  2. Single-particle investigation of summertime and wintertime Antarctic sea spray aerosols using low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry, and ATR-FTIR imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Cho, Hye-Rin; Hwang, Hee Jin; Do Hur, Soon; Gim, Yeontae; Ro, Chul-Un

    2016-11-01

    Two aerosol samples collected at King Sejong Korean scientific research station, Antarctica, on 9 December 2011 in the austral summer (sample S1) and 23 July 2012 in the austral winter (sample S2), when the oceanic chlorophyll a levels on the collection days of the samples were quite different, by ˜ 19 times (2.46 vs. 0.13 µg L-1, respectively), were investigated on a single-particle basis using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry (RMS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging techniques to obtain their characteristics based on the elemental chemical compositions, molecular species, and mixing state. X-ray analysis showed that the supermicron summertime and wintertime Antarctic aerosol samples have different elemental chemical compositions, even though all the individual particles analyzed were sea spray aerosols (SSAs); i.e., the contents of C, O, Ca, S, and Si were more elevated, whereas Cl was more depleted, for sample S1 than for sample S2. Based on qualitative analysis of the chemical species present in individual SSAs by the combined application of RMS and ATR-FTIR imaging, different organic species were observed in samples S1 and S2; i.e., Mg hydrate salts of alanine were predominant in samples S1 and S2, whereas Mg salts of fatty acids internally mixed with Mg hydrate salts of alanine were significant in sample S2. Although CaSO4 was observed significantly in both samples S1 and S2, other inorganic species, such as Na2SO4, NaNO3, Mg(NO3)2, SiO2, and CH3SO3Mg, were observed more significantly in sample S1, suggesting that those compounds may be related to the higher phytoplankton activity in summer.

  3. Development of guidance on applications of regulatory requirements for low specific activity materials and surface contaminated objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Easton, E.P.; Shankman, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    In 1985, the International Atomic Energy Agency issued revised regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material. Significant among the changes were major revisions to requirements for Low Specific Activity (LSA) material and Surface Contaminated Objects (SCOs). In preparation for the adoption of these requirements into regulations in the United States, it became apparent that guidance on how to apply these requirements, clarifying technical uncertainties and ensuring proper implementation, would be needed both by the regulators and those regulated. Thus, the US Department of Transportation and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are preparing regulatory guidance for LSA material and SCO transport. The guidance will present examples of acceptable methods for demonstrating compliance with the revised rules. Ideas being investigated for inclusion in the pending guidance are discussed in this paper. Under current plans, the guidance will be issued for public comment prior to final issuance of the guidance in 1997

  4. Development of guidance on applications of regulatory requirements for low specific activity materials and surface contaminated objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Easton, E.P.; Shankman, S.F.; Boyle, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    In 1985, the International Atomic Energy Agency issued revised regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material. Significant among the changes were major revisions to requirements for Low Specific Activity (LSA) material and Surface Contaminated Objects (SCOs). In preparation for the adoption of these requirements into regulations in the United States, it became apparent that guidance on how to apply these requirements, clarifying technical uncertainties and ensuring proper implementation, would be needed both by the regulators and those regulated. Thus, the US Department of Transportation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are preparing regulatory guidance for LSA material and SCO transport. The guidance will present examples of acceptable methods for demonstrating compliance with the revised rules. Ideas being investigated for inclusion in the pending guidance are discussed in this paper. Under current plans, the guidance will be issued for public comment prior to final issue of the guidance in 1997. (Author)

  5. Review of high Z materials for PSI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsuo; Noda, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroo.

    1992-06-01

    Application of carbon based low Z materials to PFM has significantly improved plasma parameters in large tokamaks. There are, however, serious concerns of erosion, neutron damage etc. for application of low Z materials in future D - T burning machine. To apply high Z metals to PFM, there are several issues to be solved; high Z impurity production by sputtering, their accumulation in plasma center, and high radiation loss. Because of these concerns high Z metals are not widely employed nor planned to be used in the present large tokamaks. Since our efforts have been concentrated to optimize the low Z materials, little systematic investigations for high Z materials in tokamak have been done, lacking data base especially those concerning the impacts on plasma core. In order to employ high Z material as PFM near future, material properties related to impurity production and hydrogen recycling are reviewed and discussed what is important and what shall be done. (author) 109 refs

  6. The effect of using low-polluting building materials on ventilation requirements and energy use in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wargocki, P.; Frontczak, M. (International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (DK)); Knudsen, Henrik N. (Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg Univ., Hoersholm (DK))

    2007-07-01

    The main objective of the ongoing research project described in this paper was to study the potential for reducing energy used for ventilating buildings by using low-polluting building materials, without compromising the indoor air quality. To quantify this potential, the exposure-response relationships, i.e. the relationships between ventilation rate and perceived indoor air quality, were established for rooms furnished with different categories of polluting materials and the simulations of energy used for ventilation were carried out. The exposure-response relationships were based on a summary of data reported in the literature on exposure-response relationships for materials tested in laboratory settings in small-scale glass chambers, and in full-scale in climate chambers, test rooms or normal offices. New experiments were also considered in which the effect of using low-polluting materials on perceived air quality was examined in test rooms ventilated with different outdoor air supply rates, low-polluting materials being selected in small glass chambers. The results suggest that the exposure-response relationships vary between different building materials and that the perceived air quality can be improved considerably when polluting building materials are substituted with materials that pollute less. The preliminary energy simulations indicate that selecting low-polluting materials will result in considerable energy savings as a result of reducing the ventilation rates required to achieve acceptable indoor air quality. (au)

  7. Single-particle investigation of summertime and wintertime Antarctic sea spray aerosols using low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry, and ATR-FTIR imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Eom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two aerosol samples collected at King Sejong Korean scientific research station, Antarctica, on 9 December 2011 in the austral summer (sample S1 and 23 July 2012 in the austral winter (sample S2, when the oceanic chlorophyll a levels on the collection days of the samples were quite different, by  ∼  19 times (2.46 vs. 0.13 µg L−1, respectively, were investigated on a single-particle basis using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, called low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry (RMS, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR imaging techniques to obtain their characteristics based on the elemental chemical compositions, molecular species, and mixing state. X-ray analysis showed that the supermicron summertime and wintertime Antarctic aerosol samples have different elemental chemical compositions, even though all the individual particles analyzed were sea spray aerosols (SSAs; i.e., the contents of C, O, Ca, S, and Si were more elevated, whereas Cl was more depleted, for sample S1 than for sample S2. Based on qualitative analysis of the chemical species present in individual SSAs by the combined application of RMS and ATR-FTIR imaging, different organic species were observed in samples S1 and S2; i.e., Mg hydrate salts of alanine were predominant in samples S1 and S2, whereas Mg salts of fatty acids internally mixed with Mg hydrate salts of alanine were significant in sample S2. Although CaSO4 was observed significantly in both samples S1 and S2, other inorganic species, such as Na2SO4, NaNO3, Mg(NO32, SiO2, and CH3SO3Mg, were observed more significantly in sample S1, suggesting that those compounds may be related to the higher phytoplankton activity in summer.

  8. TU-E-BRA-11: Volume of Interest Cone Beam CT with a Low-Z Linear Accelerator Target: Proof-of-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robar, J; Parsons, D; Berman, A; MacDonald, A

    2012-06-01

    This study demonstrates feasibility and advantages of volume of interest (VOI) cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging performed with an x-ray beam generated from 2.35 MeV electrons incident on a carbon linear accelerator target. The electron beam energy was reduced to 2.35 MeV in a Varian 21EX linear accelerator containing a 7.6 mm thick carbon x-ray target. Arbitrary imaging volumes were defined in the planning system to produce dynamic MLC sequences capable of tracking off-axis VOIs in phantoms. To reduce truncation artefacts, missing data in projection images were completed using a priori DRR information from the planning CT set. The feasibility of the approach was shown through imaging of an anthropomorphic phantom and the head-and-neck section of a lamb. TLD800 and EBT2 radiochromic film measurements were used to compare the VOI dose distributions with those for full-field techniques. CNR was measured for VOIs ranging from 4 to 15 cm diameter. The 2.35 MV/Carbon beam provides favorable CNR characteristics, although marked boundary and cupping artefacts arise due to truncation of projection data. These artefacts are largely eliminated using the DRR filling technique. Imaging dose was reduced by 5-10% and 75% inside and outside of the VOI, respectively, compared to full-field imaging for a cranial VOI. For the 2.35 MV/Carbon beam, CNR was shown to be approximately invariant with VOI dimension for bone and lung objects. This indicates that the advantage of the VOI approach with the low-Z target beam is substantial imaging dose reduction, not improvement of image quality. VOI CBCT using a 2.35 MV/Carbon beam is a feasible technique whereby a chosen imaging volume can be defined in the planning system and tracked during acquisition. The novel x-ray beam affords good CNR characteristics while imaging dose is localized to the chosen VOI. Funding for this project has been received from Varian Medical, Incorporated. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Meeting Radiation Protection Requirements and Reducing Spacecraft Mass - A Multifunctional Materials Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina; Franklin, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Both crew and radio-sensitive systems, especially electronics must be protected from the effects of the space radiation environment. One method of mitigating this radiation exposure is to use passive-shielding materials. In previous vehicle designs such as the International Space Station (ISS), materials such as aluminum and polyethylene have been used as parasitic shielding to protect crew and electronics from exposure, but these designs add mass and decrease the amount of usable volume inside the vehicle. Thus, it is of interest to understand whether structural materials can also be designed to provide the radiation shielding capability needed for crew and electronics, while still providing weight savings and increased useable volume when compared against previous vehicle shielding designs. In this paper, we present calculations and analysis using the HZETRN (deterministic) and FLUKA (Monte Carlo) codes to investigate the radiation mitigation properties of these structural shielding materials, which includes graded-Z and composite materials. This work is also a follow-on to an earlier paper, that compared computational results for three radiation transport codes, HZETRN, HETC, and FLUKA, using the Feb. 1956 solar particle event (SPE) spectrum. In the following analysis, we consider the October 1989 Ground Level Enhanced (GLE) SPE as the input source term based on the Band function fitting method. Using HZETRN and FLUKA, parametric absorbed doses at the center of a hemispherical structure on the lunar surface are calculated for various thicknesses of graded-Z layups and an all-aluminum structure. HZETRN and FLUKA calculations are compared and are in reasonable (18% to 27%) agreement. Both codes are in agreement with respect to the predicted shielding material performance trends. The results from both HZETRN and FLUKA are analyzed and the radiation protection properties and potential weight savings of various materials and materials lay-ups are compared.

  10. Future materials requirements for the high-energy-intensity production of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, B. J.; Hyland, M. M.; James, B. J.

    2001-02-01

    Like all metallurgical industries, aluminum smelting has been under pressure from two fronts—to give maximum return on investment to the shareholders and to comply with environmental regulations by reducing greenhouse emissions. The smelting process has advanced by improving efficiency and productivity while continuing to seek new ways to extend the cell life. Materials selection (particularly the use of more graphitized cathodic electrodes) has enabled lower energy consumption, while optimization of the process and controlling in a narrow band has enabled increases in productivity and operations at higher current densities. These changes have, in turn, severely stressed the materials used for cell construction, and new problems are emerging that are resulting in a reduction of cell life. The target for aluminum electro-winning has been to develop an oxygen-evolving electrode, rather than one that evolves substantial amounts of carbon dioxide. Such an electrode, when combined with suitable wettable cathode material developments, would reduce operating costs by eliminating the need for frequent electrode change and would enable more productive cell designs and reduce plant size. The materials specifications for developing these are, however, an extreme challenge. Those specifications include minimized corrosion rate of any electrode into the electrolyte, maintaining an electronically conducting oxidized surface that is of low electrical resistance, meeting the metal purity targets, and enabling variable operating current densities. Although the materials specifications can readily be written, the processing and production of the materials is the challenge.

  11. 14 CFR Appendix O to Part 121 - Hazardous Materials Training Requirements For Certificate Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... K of this chapter. The training requirements for various categories of persons are defined by job... to persons actually performing the job function. Training requirements for certificate holders.... The method of delivering the training will be determined by the certificate holder. The certificate...

  12. Uranium refining in South Africa. The production of uranium trioxide, considering raw material properties and nuclear purity requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colborn, R.P.; Bayne, D.L.G.; Slabber, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    Conventional practice results in raw materials being delivered to the uranium refineries in a form more suitable for transportation than for processing, and therefore the refineries are required to treat these raw materials to produce an acceptable intermediate feed stock. During this treatment, it is advantageous to include a purification step to ensure that the feed stock is of the required purity for nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride production, and this usually results in ammonium diuranate slurries of the required quality being produced as the intermediate feed stock. All subsequent processing steps can therefore be standardized and are effectively independent of the origin of the raw materials. It is established practice in South Africa to transport uranium as an ammonium diuranate slurry from the various mines to the Nufcor central processing plant for UOC production, and therefore the process for the production of uranium hexafluoride in South Africa was designed to take cognizance of existing transport techniques and to accept ammonium diuranate slurries as the raw material. The South African refinery will be able to process these slurries directly to uranium trioxide. This paper discusses the conditions under which the various ammonium diuranate raw materials, exhibiting a wide range of properties, can be effectively processed to produce a uranium trioxide of acceptably consistent properties. Mention is also made of the uranium hexafluoride distillation process adopted

  13. 48 CFR 52.216-30 - Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition without...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition without Adequate Price Competition. 52.216... Price Competition. As prescribed in 16.601(e)(2), insert the following provision: Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition Without Adequate Price Competition (FEB...

  14. Supplement to the approved requirements for the packaging, labelling and carriage of radioactive material by rail. Packaging, Labelling and Carriage of Radioactive Material by Rail Regulations 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The ADR and RID Framework Directives require EC member states' arrangements for the carriage of dangerous goods on domestic road and rail journeys to align with the existing ADR and RID agreements which cover international journeys by road and rail. Because ADR and RID are updated every two years in line with technical and scientific developments, the ADR/RID Framework Directives are also revised on a two-year cycle, to require member states to amend their implementing legislation accordingly. In Great Britain, these two Directives were initially implemented on 1 September 1996 via regulations (usually referred to as the 'carriage regulations'), containing the general legal duties, supported by approved documents, and an Approved Code of Practice containing the detailed technical requirements. The following approved documents have been updated: (a) Approved Vehicle Requirements (AVR) - L89; (b) Approved Requirements and test methods for the classification and packaging of dangerous goods for carriage (ARTM) - L88; (c) Approved Requirements for the packaging, labelling and carriage of radioactive material by rail (ARCRR) - L94; (d) Approved Requirements for the construction of vehicles intended for the carriage of explosives by road (AEVR) - L92; and (e) Approved Carriage List (ACL) - L90

  15. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: General considerations and data needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Purdy, C M [U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (United States)

    1977-07-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. (author)

  16. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: general considerations and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Purdy, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel

  17. Material property requirements for application leak-before-break technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chengliang; Deng Xiaoyun; Yin Zhiying; Liu Meng

    2012-01-01

    The application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping systems can improve their safety and economy, while propose some new requirements on testing material properties. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's LBB related standard review plan and implementation specifications were analyzed, and test items, object, temperature, quantity and thermal aging effect of five general requirements were summarized. In addition, four key testing technical requirements, such as specimen size, side grooves, strain range and the orientation of specimens were also discussed to ensure the test data usefulness, representativeness and integrity. This study can provide some guidance for the aforementioned test program on domestic materials. (authors)

  18. Graded approach for establishment of QA requirements for Type B packaging of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, R.R.; Woodruff, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    A study that was conducted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the U.S. Congress to assess the effectiveness of quality assurance (QA) activities has demonstrated a need to modify and improve the application of QA requirements for the nuclear industry. As a result, the packaging community, along with the nuclear industry as a whole, has taken action to increase the efficacy of the QA function. The results of the study indicate that a graded approach for establishing QA requirements is the preferred method. The essence of the graded approach is the establishment of applicable QA requirements to an extent consistent with the importance to safety of an item, component, system, or activity. This paper describes the process that is used to develop the graded approach for QA requirements pertaining to Type B packaging

  19. Hybrid supply chain model for material requirement planning under financial constraints: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Vita; Dassisti, Michele; Josefa, Mula Bru; Manuel, Díaz Madroñero

    2014-10-01

    Supply chain model (SCM) are potentially capable to integrate different aspects in supporting decision making for enterprise management tasks. The aim of the paper is to propose an hybrid mathematical programming model for optimization of production requirements resources planning. The preliminary model was conceived bottom-up from a real industrial case analysed oriented to maximize cash flow. Despite the intense computational effort required to converge to a solution, optimisation done brought good result in solving the objective function.

  20. Generic Planning and Control of Automated Material Handling Systems: Practical Requirements Versus Existing Theroy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneyah, S.W.A.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.; Schuur, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of generic planning and control of Automated Material Handling Systems (AMHSs). The paper illustrates the relevance of this research direction, and then addresses three different market sectors where AMHSs are used. These market sectors are: baggage handling,

  1. Analysis of requirements for teaching materials based on the course bioinformatics for plant metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Widodo, Lukiati, Betty; Amin, Mohamad

    2017-05-01

    A way to improve the quality of learning in the course of Plant Metabolism in the Department of Biology, State University of Malang, is to develop teaching materials. This research evaluates the needs of bioinformatics-based teaching material in the course Plant Metabolism by the Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate (ADDIE) development model. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to the students in the Plant Metabolism course of the Department of Biology, University of Malang, and analysis of the plan of lectures semester (RPS). Learning gains of this course show that it is not yet integrated into the field of bioinformatics. All respondents stated that plant metabolism books do not include bioinformatics and fail to explain the metabolism of a chemical compound of a local plant in Indonesia. Respondents thought that bioinformatics can explain examples and metabolism of a secondary metabolite analysis techniques and discuss potential medicinal compounds from local plants. As many as 65% of the respondents said that the existing metabolism book could not be used to understand secondary metabolism in lectures of plant metabolism. Therefore, the development of teaching materials including plant metabolism-based bioinformatics is important to improve the understanding of the lecture material in plant metabolism.

  2. Guide relative to the regulatory requirements applicable to the radioactive materials transport in airport area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    This guide makes an inventory of all the points necessary for the correct functioning of the transport of radioactive materials in airport zone. Stowage of the parcels, program of radiological protection (P.R.P.), operation of transport, quality assurance, radiation dose evaluation, radiation monitoring, dose optimization, storage management, are the principal points of this guide. (N.C.)

  3. Generic planning and control of automated material handling systems : practical requirements versus existing theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneyah, S.W.A.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.; Schuur, Peter; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem to design a generic planning and control architecture for utomated material handling systems (AMHSs). We illustrate the relevance of this research direction, and then address three different market sectors where AMHSs are used, i.e., baggage handling, distribution,

  4. 77 FR 17394 - Hazardous Materials: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... seat-belt pretensioner devices to a capacity not greater than fifty (50) percent of the drum's total... transported; transportation operations conducted under a special permit; the potential for broad application... utilized by 31 grantees with no known safety problems. A review of the Hazardous Materials Incident Data...

  5. Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Fainberg, A.; Sanborn, J.; Allentuck, J.; Sun, C.

    1996-11-01

    On 27 September 1993, President Clinton proposed open-quotes... a multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards.close quotes The UN General Assembly subsequently adopted a resolution recommending negotiation of a non-discriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty (hereinafter referred to as open-quotes the Cutoff Conventionclose quotes) banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The matter is now on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament, although not yet under negotiation. This accord would, in effect, place all fissile material (defined as highly enriched uranium and plutonium) produced after entry into force (EIF) of the accord under international safeguards. open-quotes Productionclose quotes would mean separation of the material in question from radioactive fission products, as in spent fuel reprocessing, or enrichment of uranium above the 20% level, which defines highly enriched uranium (HEU). Facilities where such production could occur would be safeguarded to verify that either such production is not occurring or that all material produced at these facilities is maintained under safeguards

  6. 10 CFR 32.18 - Manufacture, distribution and transfer of exempt quantities of byproduct material: Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacture, distribution and transfer of exempt... COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exempt Concentrations and Items § 32.18 Manufacture, distribution and transfer of exempt quantities of...

  7. Materials for the plasma-facing components of steady state stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Boscary, J.; Greuner, H.; Grigull, P.; Maier, H.; Streibl, B.

    2005-01-01

    The specific advantage of current-free stellarators is their inherent capability for full steady-state operation. This will lead to long discharges and the corresponding stationary plasma exposure of the plasma-facing materials. Further to this, the absence of disruptions relaxes the requirements to the plasma-facing materials in terms of thermal shock stability, although ELM activity occurs also in stellarators and leads to fast transient surface loads on the ms-time scale. Another aspect regarding the plasma-material interactions in stellarators is the sensitivity to impurity accumulation in the core plasma. Thus, it is preferred to apply low-Z materials until operation scenarios are established which do not lead to this accumulation process. In the case of high-Z materials impurity accumulation will lead to a radiative plasma collapse. For the stellarator W7-X low-Z plasma-facing materials have been selected to protect the divertor and the wall surfaces. Due to the stationary operation, the plasma-facing materials have to be bonded or clamped to actively water-cooled substrates to remove the incident heat fluxes. The following materials have been selected to fulfil the operational requirements: 1. A three directionally carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) with very high thermal conductivity bonded to a water cooled CuCrZr heat sink for the divertor which will be exposed to heat fluxes up to 10MW/m 2 . 2. Isotropic fine grain graphite tiles mechanically clamped to a CuCrZr heat sink which is brazed to a stainless steel cooling tube for the areas of moderate heat fluxes up to 0.5 MW/m 2 (baffles, inner wall). 3. Thick boron carbide coating on water cooled steel panels for the outer wall surfaces with low heat fluxes up to 0.2 MW/m 2 . This coating would be applied on most surfaces only after the initial operation. In the presentation the properties of these materials will be discussed with a view to the plasma-wall interaction in W7-X. In fusion reactors

  8. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  9. Capital requirements for the transportation of energy materials: 1979 ARC estimates. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-28

    TERA's estimates of capital requirements to transport natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, and coal in the US by 1990 are presented. It is a continuation of a 1978 study (EAPA 5:3946) to perform a similar analysis on 1979 scenarios. Scenarios B, C, and D from the EIA's Mid-range Energy Forecasting Systems, as used in the 1979 Annual Report to Congress (ARC), were provided as a basis for the analysis and represent three alternative futures. Summaries of transportation investment requirements through 1990 are given for Scenarios B, C, and D. Total investment requirements for the three models (pipelines, railroads, waterways) and the three energy commodities (coal, petroleum, petroleum products, natural gas) are estimated to range between $35.3 and $42.7 billion by 1990 depending on the scenario.

  10. Reprocessing and disposal of used lubricating and process materials. requirements, problems, and solution methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzke, U D

    1978-02-01

    A discussion covers West German laws concerning used oil disposal and re-refining (316,000 tons were reprocessed in 1976); disposal of sulfuric acid resins or tar and fuller's earth containing mineral oils by solidification (with added lime, alkali ash, clay, etc.) or pyrolysis; disposal of rolling mill scale and sludge containing oil and grease by rolling with a solid carbonaceous material and processing to high-grade sponge iron; and the breaking of oil-water emulsions.

  11. War games: using MRP (material requirements planning) audits to pinpoint problems and keep the competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, S H; Yocus, T E

    1994-05-01

    In today's world, it is a challenge just to stay in business, let alone remain competitive in a specific industry. We will show you how to pinpoint MRP II problems and attack them through self-assessment audits. You will discover the secrets of breaking down barriers between Master Schedulers, Material Planners, Production Control Planners, and the Manufacturing Line. Self-assessment audits are one way to take care of your planning functions before outside auditors take care of them for you.

  12. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... arrangement for data sharing between plants. d. There must be a contingency plan to assure that the... Requirements I. Introduction II. Definitions III. Surveillance Program Criteria IV. Report of Test Results I..., Rockville, MD 20852-2738. II. Definitions All terms used in this appendix have the same meaning as in...

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Special requirements for... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION... special storage and handling. It is the responsibility of the holding agency to properly store hazardous...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Special requirements for... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION... is the responsibility of the Federal holding agency or State agency to properly store hazardous...

  15. Material surface modification for first wall protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    The elements and strategy of a program to develop low Z surfaces for tokamak reactors is described. The development of low Z coated limiters is selected as an interim goal. Candidate materials were selected from the elements: Be, B, Al, Ti, V, C, O, N and their compounds. The effect of low energy erosion on surface morphology is shown for Be, TiC and VBe 12 . The tradeoffs in coating design are described. Stress analysis results for TiB 2 coated POCO graphite limiters for ORNL's ISX-B tokamak are given

  16. Assessment of state and local notification requirements for transportation of radioactive and other hazardous materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dively, D.; Morris, F.; Schilling, A.H.; Shen, E.; Allen, J.

    1985-01-01

    State and local laws requiring notification for shipments of radioactive and other hazardous materials have become increasingly common and controversial during the last decade. Such laws are seen by their proponents as essential for planning and emergency response, while their opponents view them as unnecessary and intrusive. The debate over the value of notification requirements has often been hampered by the lack of information about the extent and nature of these laws. The report is intended to present factual information about notification laws in order to facilitate more informed discussion

  17. Detection capabilities and accuracy requirements of concentrations of radioactive material in air for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in the formulation of detection capability and accuracy criteria for bioassay measurements will be interpreted and adapted to provide similar criteria for the measurement of air concentrations of radioactive material for radiation protection purposes. Considerations of accuracy will be related to the known variability of measurement processes, as well as the uncertainties in the calculated limits of intake that serve as the basis of regulatory and voluntary standards of practice. Formulations and criteria will be presented for minimum detection amounts (MDA) and precision and bias of measurements for radiation protection purposes. 17 references

  18. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    OpenAIRE

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Investigations in mechanobiology rely on correlation of cellular processes with mechanical signals, such as matrix stiffness and cell tractions. Almost all cell traction and force quantification methodologies require knowledge of the underlying mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix to convert displacement data into corresponding traction data, which restricts the use of these techniques to systems in which the material properties are known. To overcome this hurdle, we present a ne...

  19. 18th ICPR paper: Master Production Scheduling and A Comparision of Material Requirements Planning and Cover-Time Planning

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract For a company?s long-term profitability, most important processes are the way it starts parts of the manufacturing process before the customer order arrives and the way it determines and promises delivery quantities and times for the customer orders. In practical computer applications Material Requirement Planning and/or Reorder point systems are the base techniques mostly used. This article pre?sents Cover-Time Planning, a variant of a reorder point system. Cover-Time Pla...

  20. Information or resolution: Which is required from an SEM to study bulk inorganic materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Q

    2016-11-01

    Significant technological advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been achieved over the past years. Different SEMs can have significant differences in functionality and performance. This work presents the perspectives on selecting an SEM for research on bulk inorganic materials. Understanding materials demands quantitative composition and orientation information, and informative and interpretable images that reveal subtle differences in chemistry, orientation/structure, topography, and electronic structure. The capability to yield informative and interpretable images with high signal-to-noise ratios and spatial resolutions is an overall result of the SEM system as a whole, from the electron optical column to the detection system. The electron optical column determines probe performance. The roles of the detection system are to capture, filter or discriminate, and convert signal electrons to imaging information. The capability to control practical operating parameters including electron probe size and current, acceleration voltage or landing voltage, working distance, detector selection, and signal filtration is inherently determined by the SEM itself. As a platform for various accessories, e.g. an energy-dispersive spectrometer and an electron backscatter diffraction detector, the properties of the electron optical column, specimen chamber, and stage greatly affect the performance of accessories. Ease-of-use and ease-of-maintenance are of practical importance. It is practically important to select appropriate test specimens, design suitable imaging conditions, and analyze the specimen chamber geometry and dimensions to assess the overall functionality and performance of an SEM. For an SEM that is controlled/operated with a computer, the stable software and user-friendly interface significantly improve the usability of the SEM. SCANNING 38:864-879, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  2. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Chinese Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  3. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  4. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  5. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to ''establish or adopt standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  6. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  7. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  8. Impact of dynamic certification requirements on the Nuclear Materials Technology Division's transuranic waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, J.J.; Montoya, A.J.; Wieneke, Ronald E.

    2002-01-01

    The issuance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit in August of 2000, specifically the attachment I3 Waste Analysis Plan (WAP),had a profound impact upon transuranic (TRU) waste certification at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Plutonium Facility. Program certification was lost until Laboratory internal program documents could be amended to meet the new WAP requirements, waste management personnel could be retrained to incorporate the changes into waste operations and the entire program successfully pass subsequent Carlsbad Field Ofice (CBFO) audit. This action resulted in the suspension of transuranic waste shipments from LANL to WIPP. In addition the changes unnecessarily increased the complexity of TRU waste program activities in waste handling.

  9. Usulan Aplikasi Metode Material Requirement Planning (MRP dalam Perencanaan Kebutuhan Firebrick PT Semen Padang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Aristiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to describe the results of research models firebrick requirements planning in PT Semen Padang with MRP method. Firebrick is one of the spare parts and essential in the production of operational PT Semen Padang as protective and insulating of shell kiln. This article describes the firebrick requirements planning at all kiln Indarung II / III, IV and V to meet the needs of 2017 up to 2018. One type of firebrick most widely used in PT Semen Padang is spinal firebrick. Spinal firebrick highly susceptible to hydration and moisture as the main component is MgO compound that is hygroscopic so susceptible to damage in the form of cracks firebrick. Based on the research that has been done, get MRP application design that can be used in planning the needs of firebrick PT Semen Padang to come. Plans need firebrick for compliance in 2017 to 2018 : (a item 422 purchased through two phases in the 4th month of 12.711 pcs and in the 9th month of 24.909 pcs (b item 622 purchased through two phases in the 4th month of 21.185 pcs and in the 9th  month of 41.515 pcs (c item P22 purchased through two phases in the 4th month of 446 pcs and in the 9th month of 874 pcs (d item P + 22 purchased through two phases in the 4th month of 446 pcs and in the 9th month of 874 pcs (e item 425 purchased in the 8th month of 14.626 pcs (f item 825 purchased in the 8th month of 20.600 pcs (g P25 item purchased in the 8th  month of 412 pcs (h P + 25 items purchased in the 8th month of 412 pcs.

  10. Assessment of Quality Assurance Measures for Radioactive Material Transport Packages not Requiring Competent Authority Design Approval - 13282

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komann, Steffen; Groeke, Carsten; Droste, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The majority of transports of radioactive materials are carried out in packages which don't need a package design approval by a competent authority. Low-active radioactive materials are transported in such packages e.g. in the medical and pharmaceutical industry and in the nuclear industry as well. Decommissioning of NPP's leads to a strong demand for packages to transport low and middle active radioactive waste. According to IAEA regulations the 'non-competent authority approved package types' are the Excepted Packages and the Industrial Packages of Type IP-1, IP-2 and IP-3 and packages of Type A. For these types of packages an assessment by the competent authority is required for the quality assurance measures for the design, manufacture, testing, documentation, use, maintenance and inspection (IAEA SSR 6, Chap. 306). In general a compliance audit of the manufacturer of the packaging is required during this assessment procedure. Their regulatory level in the IAEA regulations is not comparable with the 'regulatory density' for packages requiring competent authority package design approval. Practices in different countries lead to different approaches within the assessment of the quality assurance measures in the management system as well as in the quality assurance program of a special package design. To use the package or packaging in a safe manner and in compliance with the regulations a management system for each phase of the life of the package or packaging is necessary. The relevant IAEA-SSR6 chap. 801 requires documentary verification by the consignor concerning package compliance with the requirements. (authors)

  11. Assessment of Quality Assurance Measures for Radioactive Material Transport Packages not Requiring Competent Authority Design Approval - 13282

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komann, Steffen; Groeke, Carsten; Droste, Bernhard [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44-46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The majority of transports of radioactive materials are carried out in packages which don't need a package design approval by a competent authority. Low-active radioactive materials are transported in such packages e.g. in the medical and pharmaceutical industry and in the nuclear industry as well. Decommissioning of NPP's leads to a strong demand for packages to transport low and middle active radioactive waste. According to IAEA regulations the 'non-competent authority approved package types' are the Excepted Packages and the Industrial Packages of Type IP-1, IP-2 and IP-3 and packages of Type A. For these types of packages an assessment by the competent authority is required for the quality assurance measures for the design, manufacture, testing, documentation, use, maintenance and inspection (IAEA SSR 6, Chap. 306). In general a compliance audit of the manufacturer of the packaging is required during this assessment procedure. Their regulatory level in the IAEA regulations is not comparable with the 'regulatory density' for packages requiring competent authority package design approval. Practices in different countries lead to different approaches within the assessment of the quality assurance measures in the management system as well as in the quality assurance program of a special package design. To use the package or packaging in a safe manner and in compliance with the regulations a management system for each phase of the life of the package or packaging is necessary. The relevant IAEA-SSR6 chap. 801 requires documentary verification by the consignor concerning package compliance with the requirements. (authors)

  12. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cuban experience in verification of the execution of the safety requirements during the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo Garcia, J.R.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The Cuban Regulatory Authority has paid special attention to the verification of the execution of the safety requirements during the transport of radioactive material in the country. With this purpose, the Authority has followed a consequent policy based on supplementary demands to those collections in the juridical mark settled down in 1987 in the sphere of transport of radioactive substances. In the work the technical approaches are exposed kept in mind when establishing the one referred politics, the current situation is characterized, the results are evaluated obtained in correspondence with the pursued objectives and the essential aspects are exposed to keep in mind for the adopted politics ulterior development. (author)

  14. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation: Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements

  15. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  16. Production and requirements for pre-basic seed potato material in the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Srpska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Drago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-basic seed potato material is used for basic seed (elite and certified seed potato production. At this moment all basic seed material is imported into Republic of Serbia and Republic of Srpska, despite the fact that the method of in vitro tissue culture production of virus-free seed potato has been developed in both countries and there is a continuous demand for pre-basic and basic seed potato. Current total production is significantly lower than actual requirements. In the 80s and 90s of the previous century two modern facilities for production of virus-free seed potato and certified seed were built in Sokolac (Republic of Srpska and Guča (Republic of Serbia. Although facilities were well-equipped, seed potato production was permanently ceased in 2000. The presence of high infection pressure dominated by potato virus Y is shown in the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Srpska. This paper gives an overview of pre-basic seed potato material production in both countries over the last two decades.

  17. An evaluation of the procedures required to ensure consistent material supply in the Eastern Cape automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GS Horn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a common perception that logistics practice and supply chain management have not yet reached the required international standards among all the supply chain members in the South African automotive industry. This article is based on a research study that investigated possible reasons for the inconsistent supply of materials in the Eastern Cape automotive industry specifically. Problems identified include the fact that suppliers are not evaluated on a regular basis and do not receive sufficient logistics training, while a commitment and will to development local suppliers is lacking. Recommendations made to the South African automotive industry include the improvement of development programmes to assist local suppliers in becoming world-class suppliers, better logistics training, more regular supplier assessments, as well as improved mutual communication among suppliers and motor vehicle assemblers.

  18. Transportation of radioactive materials: a summary of state and local legislative requirements for the period ending December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, N.P.; Goins, L.F.; Fowler, J.W.; Owen, P.T.

    1986-04-01

    This report lists 670 adopted US state and local laws that impact the transportation of radioactive materials. The report was generated from information contained in the Legislative Database (LDB), a comprehensive, interactive database developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy and the Joint Integration Office. Laws are sorted alphabetically by state, with state and local bills listed separately and sorted by date of adoption. Each citation contains the following information: locale (geographical areas and political jurisdictions affected by the action), bill number, bill title, bill sponsor, history of bill status, comments, and abstract. Seven indexes are provided to assist the reader in locating legislation of interest: locale, bill number, title word (permuted), sponsor, transport restriction (type of transportation restriction specified, e.g., escort, notify, permit, ban), transport mode (mode of transportation specified, e.g., truck, rail, barge), and keyword. This report adds new legislation to the information contained in last year's report, ''Transportation of Radioactive and Hazardous Materials: A Summary of State and Local Legislative Requirements for the Period Ending December 31, 1981,'' ORNL/TM-9563, published in September 1985

  19. Transportation of radioactive materials: a summary of state and local legislative requirements for the period ending December 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Goins, L.F.; Fowler, J.W.; Owen, P.T.

    1986-04-01

    This report lists 670 adopted US state and local laws that impact the transportation of radioactive materials. The report was generated from information contained in the Legislative Database (LDB), a comprehensive, interactive database developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy and the Joint Integration Office. Laws are sorted alphabetically by state, with state and local bills listed separately and sorted by date of adoption. Each citation contains the following information: locale (geographical areas and political jurisdictions affected by the action), bill number, bill title, bill sponsor, history of bill status, comments, and abstract. Seven indexes are provided to assist the reader in locating legislation of interest: locale, bill number, title word (permuted), sponsor, transport restriction (type of transportation restriction specified, e.g., escort, notify, permit, ban), transport mode (mode of transportation specified, e.g., truck, rail, barge), and keyword. This report adds new legislation to the information contained in last year's report, ''Transportation of Radioactive and Hazardous Materials: A Summary of State and Local Legislative Requirements for the Period Ending December 31, 1981,'' ORNL/TM-9563, published in September 1985.

  20. Mean deformation metrics for quantifying 3D cell–matrix interactions without requiring information about matrix material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, David A.; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Toyjanova, Jennet; Kesari, Haneesh; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiology relates cellular processes to mechanical signals, such as determining the effect of variations in matrix stiffness with cell tractions. Cell traction recorded via traction force microscopy (TFM) commonly takes place on materials such as polyacrylamide- and polyethylene glycol-based gels. Such experiments remain limited in physiological relevance because cells natively migrate within complex tissue microenvironments that are spatially heterogeneous and hierarchical. Yet, TFM requires determination of the matrix constitutive law (stress–strain relationship), which is not always readily available. In addition, the currently achievable displacement resolution limits the accuracy of TFM for relatively small cells. To overcome these limitations, and increase the physiological relevance of in vitro experimental design, we present a new approach and a set of associated biomechanical signatures that are based purely on measurements of the matrix's displacements without requiring any knowledge of its constitutive laws. We show that our mean deformation metrics (MDM) approach can provide significant biophysical information without the need to explicitly determine cell tractions. In the process of demonstrating the use of our MDM approach, we succeeded in expanding the capability of our displacement measurement technique such that it can now measure the 3D deformations around relatively small cells (∼10 micrometers), such as neutrophils. Furthermore, we also report previously unseen deformation patterns generated by motile neutrophils in 3D collagen gels. PMID:26929377

  1. 48 CFR 252.216-7002 - Alternate A, Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition... Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition. As prescribed in 216.601(e...-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price...

  2. Wind energy in the United States and materials required for the land-based wind turbine industry from 2010 through 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of electricity in the United States from wind-powered turbines is increasing. An understanding of the sources and abundance of raw materials required by the wind turbine industry and the many uses for these materials is necessary to assess the effect of this industry's growth on future demand for selected raw materials relative to the historical demand for these materials. The U.S. Geological Survey developed estimates of future requirements for raw (and some recycled) materials based on the assumption that wind energy will supply 20 percent of the electricity consumed in the United States by 2030. Economic, environmental, political, and technological considerations and trends reported for 2009 were used as a baseline. Estimates for the quantity of materials in typical "current generation" and "next generation" wind turbines were developed. In addition, estimates for the annual and total material requirements were developed based on the growth necessary for wind energy when converted in a wind powerplant to generate 20 percent of the U.S. supply of electricity by 2030. The results of the study suggest that achieving the market goal of 20 percent by 2030 would require an average annual consumption of about 6.8 million metric tons of concrete, 1.5 million metric tons of steel, 310,000 metric tons of cast iron, 40,000 metric tons of copper, and 380 metric tons of the rare-earth element neodymium. With the exception of neodymium, these material requirements represent less than 3 percent of the U.S. apparent consumption for 2008. Recycled material could supply about 3 percent of the total steel required for wind turbine production from 2010 through 2030, 4 percent of the aluminum required, and 3 percent of the copper required. The data suggest that, with the possible exception of rare-earth elements, there should not be a shortage of the principal materials required for electricity generation from wind energy. There may, however, be selective

  3. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  4. Review and evaluation of the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Volume 1. Comparison of DOE nuclear materials information system requirements with NMMSS capabilities and recommendations for NMMSS improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report documents the result of a review of the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS), a Department of Energy nuclear materials control and accountability data base and information processing system. This review was performed to determine what data are required from the NMMSS, how it is collected, and how it is used. Based upon the review, NMMSS deficiencies and excess capabilities were identified and a draft set of requirements for the nuclear materials information system that the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) should be supporting as well as recommendations for attaining that capability

  5. Help guide for the application of regulatory requirements on the transport of radioactive material; Guia de ayuda para la aplicacion de requisitos reglementarios sobr el transporte de material radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rodriguez, S.; Acena Moreno, V.; Zamora Martin, F.; Rubio de Juan, E.

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of transport of radioactive material by road in Spain refers to compliance with the requirements of the European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) in force. The structure presented by this legislation, which is international, and the inclusion in it of requirements that apply to other dangerous goods makes it difficult to consult the requirements that specifically apply to the transport of radioactive material. Therefore, the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) has found it necessary to publish a guide that facilitates users to comply with its provisions and, consequently, this transport security.

  6. Randomised controlled trial of whether erotic material is required for semen collection: impact of informed consent on outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, D J; Sivananathan, T; Andres, L; Bathur, F; Jayadev, V; Conway, A J

    2013-11-01

    Semen is collected to evaluate male fertility or cryostore sperm preferentially in laboratories but such collection facilities have no standard fit-out. It is widely believed but untested whether providing erotic material (EM) is required to collect semen by masturbation in the unfamiliar environment. To test this assumption, 1520 men (1046 undergoing fertility evaluation, 474 sperm cryostorage, providing 1932 semen collection episodes) consecutively attending the semen laboratory of a major metropolitan teaching hospital for semen analysis were eligible for randomization to be provided or not with printed erotic material EM (X-rated, soft-core magazines) during semen collection. Randomization was performed by providing magazines in the collection rooms (as a variation on non-standard fit-out) on alternate weeks using a schedule concealed from participants. In the pilot study, men were randomized without seeking consent. In the second part of the study, which continued on from the first without interruption, an approved informed consent procedure was added. The primary outcome, the time to collect semen defined as the time from receiving to returning the sample receptacle, was significantly longer (by ~6%, 14.9 ± 0.3 [mean ± standard error of mean] vs. 14.0 ± 0.2 minutes, p = 0.02) among men provided with EM than those randomized to not being provided. There was no significant increase in the failure to collect semen samples (2.6% overall) nor any difference in age, semen volume or sperm concentration, output or motility according to whether EM was provided or not. The significantly longer time to collect was evident in the pilot study and the study overall, but not in the main study where the informed consent procedure was used. This study provides evidence that refutes the assumption that EM needs to be provided for semen collection in a laboratory. It also provides an example of a usually unobservable participation bias influencing study outcome of a

  7. Engineering report. Part 2: NASA wheel and brake material tradeoff study for space shuttle type environmental requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    The study included material selection and trade-off for the structural components of the wheel and brake optimizing weight vs cost and feasibility for the space shuttle type application. Analytical methods were used to determine section thickness for various materials, and a table was constructed showing weight vs. cost trade-off. The wheel and brake were further optimized by considering design philosophies that deviate from standard aircraft specifications, and designs that best utilize the materials being considered.

  8. Materials Science Research Hardware for Application on the International Space Station: an Overview of Typical Hardware Requirements and Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S.; Fiske, M. R.; Srinivas, R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the lead center for Materials Science Microgravity Research. The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a key development effort underway at MSFC. The MSRF will be the primary facility for microgravity materials science research on board the International Space Station (ISS) and will implement the NASA Materials Science Microgravity Research Program. It will operate in the U.S. Laboratory Module and support U. S. Microgravity Materials Science Investigations. This facility is being designed to maintain the momentum of the U.S. role in microgravity materials science and support NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise goals and objectives for Materials Science. The MSRF as currently envisioned will consist of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR), which will be deployed to the International Space Station (ISS) in phases, Each rack is being designed to accommodate various Experiment Modules, which comprise processing facilities for peer selected Materials Science experiments. Phased deployment will enable early opportunities for the U.S. and International Partners, and support the timely incorporation of technology updates to the Experiment Modules and sensor devices.

  9. 10 CFR 73.73 - Requirement for advance notice and protection of export shipments of special nuclear material of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... shipments of special nuclear material of low strategic significance. 73.73 Section 73.73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Records and Reports § 73.73... Incident Response, using any appropriate method listed in § 73.4; (2) Assure that the notification will be...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ggggg of... - Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for Tanks Managing Remediation Material With a Maximum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for Tanks Managing Remediation Material With a Maximum HAP Vapor Pressure Less Than 76.6 kPa 2..., Subpt. GGGGG, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart GGGGG of Part 63—Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for...

  11. Report of consultants to the IAEA on requirements for the safe transport of low hazard radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, W.; Grenier, M.; Hopkins, D.

    1982-01-01

    In the present paper changes are recommmended to certain definitions given in the 2nd draft revision of the IAEA 'regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials (safety series no. 6)'. (orig./RW)

  12. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintenance. Each laboratory must have and follow written procedures to ensure that equipment is routinely... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where...) Laboratory Controls § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process...

  13. 48 CFR 52.216-29 - Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition. 52.216-29... Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition (FEB 2007) (a) The... Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price...

  14. Effect of near-infrared-radiation reflective screen materials on ventilation requirement, crop transpiration and water use efficiency of a greenhouse rose crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Jianfeng, D.; Kempkes, F.L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of Near Infrared (NIR)-reflective screen material on ventilation requirement, crop transpiration and water use efficiency of a greenhouse rose crop was investigated in an experiment whereby identical climate was ensured in greenhouse compartments installed with either NIR-reflective or

  15. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  16. Concerning major items in government ordinance requiring modification of part of enforcement regulation for law relating to control of nuclear material, nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The report describes major items planned to be incorporated into the enforcement regulations for laws relating to control of nuclear material, nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor. The modifications have become necessary for the nation to conclude a nuclear material protection treaty with other countries. The modification include the definitions of 'special nuclear fuel substances' and 'special nuclear fuel substances' and 'special nuclear fuel substances subject to protection'. The modifications require that protective measures be taken when handling and transporting special nuclear fuel substances subject to protection. Transport of special nuclear fuel substances requires approval from the Prime Minister or Transport Minister. Transport of special nuclear fuel substances subject to protection should be conducted after notifying the prefectural Public Safety Commission. Transport of special nuclear fuel substances subject to protection requires the conclusion of arrangements among responsible persons and approval of them from the Prime Minister. (N.K.)

  17. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  18. 10 CFR 35.390 - Training for use of unsealed byproduct material for which a written directive is required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., radionuclide handling, quality assurance, and clinical use of unsealed byproduct material for which a written... the related radiation surveys; (B) Performing quality control procedures on instruments used to... 200 hours of classroom and laboratory training, in basic radionuclide handling techniques applicable...

  19. A Chemist's View of Labeling Hazardous Materials as Required by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurpik, Anton J.; Beim, Howard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of materials and labels used by the Department of Transportation, including label design and color: red (flammable and spontaneously combustible), white/yellow (radioactives), orange (explosives), white (poisons), yellow (oxidizers), green (non-flammable gas), black/white (corrosive), blue (dangerous when wet). Includes…

  20. Vacuum-brazed joints made from carbon-based materials and metals for the nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppitz, T.; Lison, R.; Bolt, H.; Hohenauer, W.

    1998-01-01

    The stationary operation of fusion plants may involve power fluxes of up to 5 MW/m2 in the region of the surfaces of plasma-facing components. In the case of disruptions, these power fluxes can reach 30 MW/m2 at exposed locations within a few milliseconds. Special materials with fusion capability are required to cope with loads arising at these locations due to thermal fatigue, physical and chemical erosion as well as thermal evaporation or sublimation. Such materials, so-called low-Z materials, include carbon-based materials such as graphites, carbon fibre reinforced carbon, boron carbides and others. The exposure of these materials to the above power fluxes for experimental purposes requires particular water-cooled components of different geometry with a materials-connected interface between the carbon-based material and the water-cooled component of TZM or copper. The application of high-temperature brazing for a largely defect-free fabrication of such components with different geometry will be presented in the following. (orig.)

  1. PERENCANAAN DAN PENGENDALIAN BAHAN BAKU UNTUK MENINGKATKAN EFISIENSI PRODUKSI DENGAN METODE MATERIAL REQUIREMENT PLANNING DAN ANALYTICAL HIERARCHY PROCESS DI PT. XYZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Adi Sungkono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suatu perusahaan sering kali mengalami kesulitan dalam pengendalian bahan baku, diantaranya adalah persediaan yang terlalu banyak atau terlalu sedikit. Untuk menghindari masalah tersebut perlu dibuat suatu pemecahan masalah. Perencanaan kebutuhan material dimaksudkan agar dalam pelaksanaan pekerjaan, penggunaan material menjadi efisien dan efektif sehingga tidak terjadi masalah akibat tidak tersedianya material pada saat dibutuhkan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk merencanakan dan mengendalikan bahan baku dan pemilihan supplier dengan metode Material Requirement Planning (MRP. Perencanaan kebutuhan bahan (Material Requirement Planning adalah suatu metode untuk menentukan bahan-bahan atau komponen-komponen apa yang harus di buat atau di beli, berapa jumlah yang dibutuhkan dan kapan dibutuhkan. Hasil yang didapatkan dengan melakukan perhitungan dengan metode MRP, di dapatkan metode yang paling baik di pergunakan adalah metode Period Order Quantity (POQ karena dari perhitungan metode Period Order Quantity didapatkan total biaya yang paling kecil yaitu sebesar Rp. 23.372.166,- . bila dibandingkan dengan perhitungan Lot For Lot yaitu sebesar Rp. 28.567.200,- , dan perhitugan Economic Order Quantity yaitu sebesar Rp. 37.209.031,- . karena dengan metode POQ dapat meminimalkan biaya pesan dan biaya simpan sehingga total biaya yang dikeluarkan kecil dibandingkan dengan metode EOQ dan L-F-L. sedangkan biaya terbesar adalah metode EOQ, karena pada perhitungan metode EOQ biaya pesan dan biaya simpan sangat besar.

  2. Construction and equipment requirements for installations and laboratories handling unsealed radioactive materials in low and medium activity - Proposal of an Israeli standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Schlesinger, T; Barshad, M [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1993-10-01

    Working with unsealed radioactive materials involves risks of internal or external exposure to ionizing radiation. Exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation involves adverse health effects and must be prevented or at least reduced to reasonable levels. Radiation sources in this work are unsealed radioactive materials, that may be solids, liquid or in gaseous states, and in varying toxic levels. Various works and actions that are performed on the unsealed radioactive materials have varying potentials of dispersion, contamination and exposure, so that the combination of the type of work activity, isotope characteristics and physical state dictate the internal and external exposure risks. In order to limit the exposure of the personnel of installations and laboratories which deals with unsealed radioactive materials, national and international authorities and organizations standards and procedures for the requirements of construction and equipment of such installations and laboratories. This document means to be a proposal for an Israeli standard requirements for equipment and construction of installations working with low and medium activity unsealed radioactive materials. The targets for defining the, construction and equipment, requirements are: a. Safety and proper protection of personnel and public from external and internal exposure while the work is done properly. Proper protection against the risk of contaminating the environment. c. Standardization of requirements. d. Proper design of installations and laboratories. e. Supply means for evaluation and reduction of construction costs.The equipment detailed here refers to fixed (none movable) equipment which is a part of the construction of the laboratory or installation, unless specified otherwise. The document starts with a review of the recommendations of some international organizations (WHO, IAEA, NRPB) for construction and equipment requirements for these laboratories and installations. Then the

  3. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-03-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  4. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  5. Evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings sites for liner requirements: Characterization and interaction of tailings, soil, and liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Martin, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of laboratory experiments using soils from Clive, Utah and tailings samples from three inactive uranium processing sites. The results are to be used to predict contaminant behavior for comparison with the regulatory criteria to decide whether a liner is needed. The interactions of leachates with soils and liner material were studied using both batch and column methods. It is determined that batch leaching tests are suitable for screening a large number of tailings samples for relative contaminant concentrations between samples but not for determining contaminant concentrations and release rates in tailings leachate. The results of column leaching tests on samples of tailings from inactive sites indicate that contaminant concentrations are highest in initial leachate from the columns and that concentrations decrease by an order of magnitude or more after one pore volume

  6. Megavoltage cargo radiography with dual energy material decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2018-02-01

    Megavoltage (MV) radiography has important applications in imaging large cargos for detecting illicit materials. A useful feature of MV radiography is the possibility of decomposing and quantifying materials with different atomic numbers. This can be achieved by imaging cargo at two different X-ray energies, or dual energy (DE) radiography. The performance of both single energy and DE radiography depends on beam energy, beam filtration, radiation dose, object size, and object content. The purpose of this work was to perform comprehensive qualitative and quantitative investigations of the image quality in MV radiography depending on the above parameters. A digital phantom was designed including Fe background with thicknesses of 2cm, 6cm, and 18cm, and materials samples of Polyethylene, Fe, Pb, and U. The single energy images were generated at x-ray beam energies 3.5MV, 6MV, and 9MV. The DE material decomposed images were generated using interlaced low and high energy beams 3.5/6MV and 6/9MV. The X-ray beams were filtered by low-Z (Polyethylene) and high-Z (Pb) filters with variable thicknesses. The radiation output of the accelerator was kept constant for all beam energies. The image quality metrics was signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the particular sample over a particular background. It was found that the SNR depends on the above parameters in a complex way, but can be optimized by selecting a particular set of parameters. For some imaging setups increased filter thicknesses, while strongly absorbing the beams, increased the SNR of material decomposed images. Beam hardening due to polyenergetic x-ray spectra resulted in material decomposition errors, but this could be addressed using region of interest decomposition. It was shown that it is not feasible to separate the materials with close atomic numbers using the DE method. Particularly, Pb and U were difficult to decompose, at least at the dose levels allowed by radiation source and safety requirements.

  7. Revk - a Tool for the Fulfilment of Requirements from National Rules for Tracking and Documentation of Radioactive Residual Material and Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, B.; Haeger, M.; Gruendler, D.

    2006-01-01

    According to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance treatment, storage, whereabouts of radioactive material etc. have to be documented. Due to legal requirements an electronic documentation system for radioactive waste has to be installed. Within the framework of the currently largest decommissioning project of nuclear facilities by Energiewerke Nord GmbH, a material flow-waste tracking and control system (ReVK) has been developed, tailored to the special needs of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. With this system it is possible to record radioactive materials which can be released after treatment or decay storage for restricted and unrestricted utilization. Radioactive waste meant for final storage can be registered and documented as well. Based on ORACLE, ReVK is a client/server data base system with the following modules: 1. data registration, 2. transport management, 3. waste tracking, 4. storage management, 5. container management, 6. reporting, 7. activity calculation, 8. examination of technical acceptance criteria for storages and final repositories. Furthermore ReVK provides a multitude of add-ons to meet special user needs, which enlarge the spectrum of application enormously. ReVK is validated and qualified, accepted by experts and authorities and fulfils the requirements for a radioactive waste documentation system. (authors)

  8. Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L.; Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M.

    1991-11-01

    A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC ampersand A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC ampersand A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion

  9. Vacuum-brazed joints made from carbon-based materials and metals for the nuclear fusion research; Loetverbindungen zwischen Kohlenstoffwerkstoffen und metallischen Werkstoffen fuer die Fusionsforschung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppitz, T. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Lison, R.; Bolt, H.; Hohenauer, W.

    1998-12-01

    The stationary operation of fusion plants may involve power fluxes of up to 5 MW/m2 in the region of the surfaces of plasma-facing components. In the case of disruptions, these power fluxes can reach 30 MW/m2 at exposed locations within a few milliseconds. Special materials with fusion capability are required to cope with loads arising at these locations due to thermal fatigue, physical and chemical erosion as well as thermal evaporation or sublimation. Such materials, so-called low-Z materials, include carbon-based materials such as graphites, carbon fibre reinforced carbon, boron carbides and others. The exposure of these materials to the above power fluxes for experimental purposes requires particular water-cooled components of different geometry with a materials-connected interface between the carbon-based material and the water-cooled component of TZM or copper. The application of high-temperature brazing for a largely defect-free fabrication of such components with different geometry will be presented in the following. (orig.)

  10. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear security. Overview of safeguards requirements for States with limited nuclear material and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodding, J.; Ribeiro, B.

    2006-06-01

    This booklet provides an overview of safeguards obligations that apply to States which are parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) that have no nuclear facilities and only limited quantities of nuclear material. Most State parties to the NPT have no nuclear facilities and only limited quantities of nuclear material. For such States, safeguards implementation is expected to be simple and straightforward. This booklet provides an overview of the safeguards obligations that apply to such States. It is hoped that a better understanding of these requirements will facilitate the conclusion and implementation of safeguards agreements and additional protocols, and thereby contribute to the strengthening of the IAEA?s safeguards system and of collective security

  11. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear security. Overview of Safeguards requirements for States with limited nuclear material and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodding, J.; Ribeiro, B.

    2006-06-01

    This booklet provides an overview of safeguards obligations that apply to States which are parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) that have no nuclear facilities and only limited quantities of nuclear material. Most State parties to the NPT have no nuclear facilities and only limited quantities of nuclear material. For such States, safeguards implementation is expected to be simple and straightforward. This booklet provides an overview of the safeguards obligations that apply to such States. It is hoped that a better understanding of these requirements will facilitate the conclusion and implementation of safeguards agreements and additional protocols, and thereby contribute to the strengthening of the IAEA?s safeguards system and of collective security

  12. The influence of the static wind load concept on the material requirements for reinforced-concrete natural-draught cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnach, R.

    1977-01-01

    The natural wind is the decisive risk factor in natural-draught cooling towers; therefore, the establishment of an assumed velocity is indispensable for the safety and reliability of the construction. In the framework of a statistical wind concept, static substitution loads for the assumed dynamic wind pressure have been determined, also including dynamic wind effects and the resonance response of the structure. On this basis, it has been studied how wind loads with different periodicity affect the material requirements of reinforced-concrete natural-draught cooling towers. It is found that the additional steel requirements, related to the total building cost, remain within acceptable limits even for extreme wind loads. (orig.) [de

  13. New Materials Developed To Meet Regulatory And Technical Requirements Associated With In-Situ Decommissioning Of Nuclear Reactors And Associated Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-01

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m 3 (250,000 yd 3 ) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker exposure to

  14. Heat release, time required, and cleaning ability of MTwo R and ProTaper universal retreatment systems in the removal of filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Fidelis, Natasha Siqueira; Assumpção, Tatiana Santos; Bernardineli, Norberti; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Bramante, Alexandre Silva; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2010-11-01

    This ex vivo study evaluated the heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy of MTwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper Universal Retreatment systems (Dentsply/Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and hand instrumentation in the removal of filling material. Sixty single-rooted human teeth with a single straight canal were obturated with gutta-percha and zinc oxide and eugenol-based cement and randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 20). After 30-day storage at 37 °C and 100% humidity, the root fillings were removed using ProTaper UR, MTwo R, or hand files. Heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy data were analyzed statistically (analysis of variance and the Tukey test, α = 0.05). None of the techniques removed the root fillings completely. Filling material removal with ProTaper UR was faster but caused more heat release. Mtwo R produced less heat release than the other techniques but was the least efficient in removing gutta-percha/sealer. ProTaper UR and MTwo R caused the greatest and lowest temperature increase on root surface, respectively; regardless of the type of instrument, more heat was released in the cervical third. Pro Taper UR needed less time to remove fillings than MTwo R. All techniques left filling debris in the root canals. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials: a summary of state and local legislative requirements for the period ending December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, N.P.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1985-09-01

    This report summarizes 513 adopted US state and local laws that impact the transportation of radioactive materials. The report was generated from legislative information contained in the Legislative Data Base (LDB), a comprehensive interactive database developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The annotated citations alphabetically by state, with state and local bills listed separately and sorted by date of adoption. Each citation contains the following information: locale (geographical areas and political jurisdictions affected by the action), bill number, bill title, bill sponsor, history of bill status, comments, and abstract. Six indexes are provided to assist the reader in locating legislation of interest: locale index, bill number index, title word index (permuted), sponsor index, transport restriction index (type of transportation restriction specified, e.g., escort, notify, permit, ban), transport mode index (mode of transportation specified, e.g., truck, rail, barge), and keyword index. This report updates the information contained in Transportation of Radioactive and Hazardous Materials: A Summary of State and Local Legislative Requirements for the Period ending September 30, 1983, ORNL/TM-8860 (TTC-0485), published in June 1984

  16. Acceptable standard format and content for the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan required for low-enriched uranium facilities. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.R.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a standard format suggested by the NRC for use in preparing fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plans as required by the Low Enriched Uranium Reform Amendments (10CFR 74.31). This report also describes the necessary contents of a comprehensive plan and provides example acceptance criteria which are intended to communicate acceptable means of achieving the performance capabilities of the Reform Amendments. By using the suggested format, the licensee or applicant will minimize administrative problems associated with the submittal, review and approval of the FNMC plan. Preparation of the plan in accordance with this format Will assist the NRC in evaluating the plan and in standardizing the review and licensing process. However, conformance with this guidance is not required by the NRC. A license applicant who employs a format that provides a equal level of completeness and detail may use their own format. This document is also intended for providing guidance to licensees when making revisions to their FNMC plan

  17. Evaluation of Shielding Performance for Newly Developed Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Beren Richard

    This work details an investigation into the contributing factors behind the success of newly developed composite neutron shield materials. Monte Carlo simulation methods were utilized to assess the neutron shielding capabilities and secondary radiation production characteristics of aluminum boron carbide, tungsten boron carbide, bismuth borosilicate glass, and Metathene within various neutron energy spectra. Shielding performance and secondary radiation data suggested that tungsten boron carbide was the most effective composite material. An analysis of the macroscopic cross-section contributions from constituent materials and interaction mechanisms was then performed in an attempt to determine the reasons for tungsten boron carbide's success over the other investigated materials. This analysis determined that there was a positive correlation between a non-elastic interaction contribution towards a material's total cross-section and shielding performance within the thermal and epi-thermal energy regimes. This finding was assumed to be a result of the boron-10 absorption reaction. The analysis also determined that within the faster energy regions, materials featuring higher non-elastic interaction contributions were comparable to those exhibiting primarily elastic scattering via low Z elements. This allowed for the conclusion that composite shield success within higher energy neutron spectra does not necessitate the use elastic scattering via low Z elements. These findings suggest that the inclusion of materials featuring high thermal absorption properties is more critical to composite neutron shield performance than the presence of constituent materials more inclined to maximize elastic scattering energy loss.

  18. Educational and laboratory base for the expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials: the requirements and experience of practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarev, P.V.; Pogozhin, N.S.; Ryzhukhin, D.V.; Tolstoy, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials (NMPP) an educational and laboratory base has special importance. In these laboratories the students receive practical skills concerning physical protection systems (PPS). The basic requirements for creating such base are formulated in a certain educational program implemented at an educational institution. Thus it is necessary to take into account the following features of a modern nuclear object PPS: restriction of an object visiting with the purpose of acquaintance with features of a certain object PPS; dynamical change of PPS component nomenclature; increase of use of computer facilities for managing all PPS subsystems; increase of integration degree of separate subsystems in a uniform PPS complex; high cost of PPS components. Taking that into consideration a university, which assumes to begin the expert training on NMPP, is compelled to solve the following tasks: creation of its own laboratory base. The implementation of practical occupations with visiting a nuclear object cannot be executed practically; definition of quantity and structure of educational laboratories. Thus the features of the implemented educational plan should be taken into account in addition; optimization of expenses on laboratory creation. The regular updating of laboratory equipment structure is impossible in a practical manner. Therefore unique correct decision is to supply laboratories with the equipment, which uses the typical technological decisions on performing the basic PPS functions (detection, delay, estimation of a situation, neutralization); development of laboratory work conducting procedures (laboratory practical works); technical support of the created laboratories. The certain experience of solving the listed tasks is accumulated at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (MEPhl) while implementing 'Physical Protection, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials' master

  19. Thermal stress analysis and the effect of temperature dependence of material properties on Doublet III limiter design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvey, T.E.; Koniges, A.E.; Marcus, F.; Sabado, M.; Smith, R.

    1979-10-01

    Temperature and thermal stress parametric design curves are presented for two materials selected for Doublet III primary limiter applications. INC X-750 is a candidate for the medium Z limiter design and ATJ graphite for the low Z design. The dependence of significant material properties on temperature is shown and the impact of this behavior on the decision to actively or passively cool the limiter is discussed

  20. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate 'real' waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  1. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  2. Cumulative input/output balance of a mechanical-biological waste treatment plant. Comparison of construction material requirements, operating energy expenditure, and the requirement of auxiliary materials in comparison with waste combustion; Kumulative Bilanzierung der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung - Baumaterialien und betrieblicher Energie- und Hilfsstoffaufwand im Vergleich zur Muellverbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, R.; Fricke, K. [Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen (Germany); Vogtmann, H. [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Regionalentwicklung und Landwirtschaft, Kassel (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The study strikes a cumulative input/output balance of an existing waste conditioning plant considering not only operating energy demand but also the required construction materials for erecting the plant. In operation since 1996, the waste conditioning plant is entirely state of the art; hence the data obtained are up to date. The results are compared with relevant results for a waste processing plant and evaluated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Untersuchung erfolgt eine kumulative Bilanzierung einer bestehenden MBA-Anlage, wobei neben den betrieblichen Energieaufwendungen auch die Baumaterialien zur Herstellung der Anlage beruecksichtigt werden. Die seit 1996 in Betrieb befindliche Abfallbehandlungsanlage entspricht weitestgehend dem Stand der Technik der MBA, wodurch die Aktualitaet der Daten gegeben ist. Die Ergebnisse der Bilanzierung werden im Vergleich zu einer MVA dargestellt und bewertet. (orig.)

  3. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  4. Southeast Regional Implementation Manual for Requirements and Procedures for Evaluation of the Ocean Disposal of Dredged Material in Southeastern U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coast Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Regional Implementation Manual was prepared by EPA Region 4 to provide guidance for applicants proposing open-water disposal of dredged material in southeastern U.S. coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Historical background of the development of various requirements in the international regulations for the safe packaging and transport of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, R.B.

    2004-07-01

    Questions are frequently asked regarding the source of some of the package test requirements in the Transport Regulations, the philosophy behind them and the basis for selecting them. This paper summarizes the results of a review of early historical documents and elaborates on the early philosophy behind the regulatory requirements. To the extent possible, the paper compares the early philosophy with the current structure of the Transport Regulations in key topic areas with a focus on the test requirements for packages that are designed to withstand accident conditions of transport.

  6. Historical background of the development of various requirements in the international regulations for the safe packaging and transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Questions are frequently asked regarding the source of some of the package test requirements in the Transport Regulations, the philosophy behind them and the basis for selecting them. This paper summarizes the results of a review of early historical documents and elaborates on the early philosophy behind the regulatory requirements. To the extent possible, the paper compares the early philosophy with the current structure of the Transport Regulations in key topic areas with a focus on the test requirements for packages that are designed to withstand accident conditions of transport

  7. Materials testing and requirement for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1975--May 30, 1976. [BIOMER and AVCOTHANE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J. D.; Hufferd, W. L.; Lyman, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The two materials currently being used for the artificial heart fabrication are BIOMER and AVCOTHANE. BIOMER is a polyether urethane polymer. AVCOTHANE is a proprietary polyurethane/polydimethylsiloxane polymer blend. Research progress on the chemical degradation, mechanical strength, and blood compatibility is reported. (TFD)

  8. Materials testing and requirement for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1975--May 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, J.D.; Hufferd, W.L.; Lyman, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    The two materials currently being used for the artificial heart fabrication are BIOMER and AVCOTHANE. BIOMER is a polyether urethane polymer. AVCOTHANE is a proprietary polyurethane/polydimethylsiloxane polymer blend. Research progress on the chemical degradation, mechanical strength, and blood compatibility is reported

  9. Materials testing and requirements for the ERDA nuclear-powered artificial heart. Technical progress report, July 15, 1974--May 1, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, J.D.; Coleman, D.L.; Leigh, A.; Hufferd, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Progress on the materials research and development effort for the ERDA-sponsored nuclear-powered artificial heart program is presented. Progress made during the first three years on hydrogel grafting and biological studies is summarized. Progress during the fourth year on studies of implanted artificial hearts, development of albumin surfaces, and in vitro mechanical studies is presented. (U.S.)

  10. Towards Materials Sustainability through Materials Stewardship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Materials sustainability requires a concerted change in philosophy across the entire materials lifecycle, orienting around the theme of materials stewardship. In this paper, we address the opportunities for improved materials conservation through dematerialization, durability, design for second life, and diversion of waste streams through industrial symbiosis.

  11. System for Capturing/Storage/Retrieval/Sharing of Toxicological Information Required for Rapid Assessment of Risks Posed By Release of CBRN Materials in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M. L.; Ritondo, M.; Earp Singer, L.; Rogers, J. V.; Price, J. A.; Fleming, E. J.; Chappie, D.; McGonigle, D.; Nichols, T. L.; Sonich-Mullin, C.

    2007-01-01

    The Threat and Consequence Assessment Division (TCAD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) is developing methodology for performing rapid risk assessments needed for incident management, cleanup, and mitigation of hazards in the aftermath of a terrorist event. TCAD, working with the Department of Defense's Chemical and Biological Defense Information Analysis Center (CBIAC, operated by Battelle) has developed SERRA - Support for Environmental Rapid Risk Assessment. This paper describes the methodology utilized to formulate SERRA, presents current contents of the SERRA database (information derived from assessments of over 3,000 publications selected from 10,000 citations), and describes SERRA implementation. The paper also discusses how an Internet-accessible version of the SERRA database could be utilized by a country or countries to prepare for and respond to the intentional release of chemical, biological or radiological materials.(author)

  12. An assessment of electric vehicles: technology, infrastructure requirements, greenhouse-gas emissions, petroleum use, material use, lifetime cost, consumer acceptance and policy initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucchi, M A; Yang, C; Burke, A F; Ogden, J M; Kurani, K; Kessler, J; Sperling, D

    2014-01-13

    Concerns about climate change, urban air pollution and dependence on unstable and expensive supplies of foreign oil have led policy-makers and researchers to investigate alternatives to conventional petroleum-fuelled internal-combustion-engine vehicles in transportation. Because vehicles that get some or all of their power from an electric drivetrain can have low or even zero emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and urban air pollutants, and can consume little or no petroleum, there is considerable interest in developing and evaluating advanced electric vehicles (EVs), including pure battery-electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicles. To help researchers and policy-makers assess the potential of EVs to mitigate climate change and reduce petroleum use, this paper discusses the technology of EVs, the infrastructure needed for their development, impacts on emissions of GHGs, petroleum use, materials use, lifetime costs, consumer acceptance and policy considerations.

  13. Dose limits and licensing requirements for the limitation of the emission of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations in the FRG and the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwibach, J; Huber, O

    1975-08-01

    In licensing the operation of nuclear power plants in the FRG and USA, particular limitations of the release of radioactive materials in the air and water are layed down to correspond to the protective laws of radiation and environmental protection. The first limiting recommendations for the removal of radioactive waste waters were worked out in 1965 in the FRG and in 1968/69 for the removal of radioactive exhaust air of nuclear power plants. Based on this, in 1975 these relevant regulations were included in the draft of the new radiation protection specification. In 1971, these type of guidelines were put to discussion in the USA and were dismissed in 1975 in a licensing regulation of the NRC. These regulations or guidelines differ in their various dose limits. For example, the German dose limits of 30 mrem/a whole body dose for radioactive materials in the exhaust air of nuclear power plants and of 90 mrem/a for the thyroid dose through radioiodine via the exposure exhaust air-pasture-cow-milk-infant are often compared to the American dose limits of 5 mrem/a whole body dose and 15 mrem/a skin dose as well as 15 mrem/a thyroid dose. Such a numerical comparison is, howewer, wrong. The dose limits used in the FRG are, e.g., not to be exceeded. Furthermore, in the FRG, all contributions to be calculated on one site are to be considered. In the USA, the corresponding values are only valid for actual exposure paths due to the emission of a power reactor. They can be multiply exceeded. Thus the German licensing practise is clearly more restrictive.

  14. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements. (Russian Edition); Pravila bezopasnoj perevozki radioaktivnykh materialov. Izdanie 2012 goda. Konkretnye trebovaniya bezopasnosti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  15. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition); Reglement de transport des matieres radioactives. Edition de 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to ''establish or adopt standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  16. Performance of brazed graphite, carbon-fiber composite, and TZM materials for actively cooled structures: qualification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Watson, R. D.; Linke, J.; Cardella, A.; Bolt, H.; Reheis, N.; Kny, E.

    1995-01-01

    The divertor of a near-term fusion device has to withstand high heat fluxes, heat shocks, and erosion caused by the plasma. Furthermore, it has to be maintainable through remote techniques. Above all, a good heat removal capability across the interface (low-Z armor/heat sink) plus overall integrity after many operational cycles are needed. To meet all these requirements, an active metal brazing technique is applied to bond graphite and carbon-fiber composite materials to a heat sink consisting of a Mo-41Re coolant tube through a TZM body. Plain brazed graphite and TZM tiles are tested for their fusion-relevant properties. The interfaces appear undamaged after thermal cycling when the melting point of the braze joint is not exceeded and when the graphite armor is > 4 mm thick. High heat flux tests are performed on three actively cooled divertor targets. The braze joints show no sign of failure after exposure to thermal loads ∼ 25 % higher than the design value surface heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . (author)

  17. A grey incidence algorithm to detect high-Z material using cosmic ray muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Xiao, S.; Shuai, M.; Chen, Y.; Lan, M.; Wei, M.; An, Q.; Lai, X.

    2017-10-01

    Muon scattering tomography (MST) is a method for using cosmic muons to scan cargo containers and vehicles for special nuclear materials. However, the flux of cosmic ray muons is low, in the real life application, the detection has to be done a short timescale with small numbers of muons. In this paper, we present a novel approach to detection of special nuclear material by using cosmic ray muons. We use the degree of grey incidence to distinguish typical waste fuel material, uranium, from low-Z material, medium-Z material and other high-Z materials of tungsten and lead. The result shows that using this algorithm, it is possible to detect high-Z materials with an acceptable timescale.

  18. [Applications of self-renewing coatings to improved vacuum materials, hydrogen permeation barriers and sputter-resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of Gibbsian segregation, radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation modify the surface composition and properties of alloys and compounds. In some cases, the change in properties is both substantial and useful, the most notable example being that of stainless steel. When surface-modifying phenomena are investigated as a class, a number of additional materials emerge as candidates for study, having potential applications in a number of technologically important areas. These materials are predicted to produce self-sustaining coatings which provide hydrogen permeation barriers, low-sticking and stimulated desorption coefficients for vacuum applications, and low-Z, sputtering-resistant surfaces for fusion applications. Several examples of each type of material are presented, along with a discussion of the experimental verification of their properties and the status of the corresponding applications development program

  19. Transport of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This address overviews the following aspects: concepts on transport of radioactive materials, quantities used to limit the transport, packages, types of packages, labeling, index transport calculation, tags, labeling, vehicle's requirements and documents required to authorize transportation. These requirements are considered in the regulation of transport of radioactive material that is in drafting step

  20. Byproduct metals and rare-earth elements used in the production of light-emitting diodes—Overview of principal sources of supply and material requirements for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is expanding because of environmental issues and the efficiency and cost savings achieved compared with use of traditional incandescent lighting. The longer life and reduced power consumption of some LEDs have led to annual energy savings, reduced maintenance costs, and lower emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides from powerplants because of the resulting decrease in energy consumption required for lighting applications when LEDs are used to replace less-energy-efficient sources. Metals such as arsenic, gallium, indium, and the rare-earth elements (REEs) cerium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, terbium, and yttrium are important mineral materials used in LED semiconductor technology. Most of the world's supply of these materials is produced as byproducts from the production of aluminum, copper, lead, and zinc. Most of the rare earths required for LED production in 2011 came from China, and most LED production facilities were located in Asia. The LED manufacturing process is complex and is undergoing much change with the growth of the industry and the changes in demand patterns of associated commodities. In many respects, the continued growth of the LED industry, particularly in the general lighting sector, is tied to its ability to increase LED efficiency and color uniformity while decreasing the costs of producing, purchasing, and operating LEDs. Research is supported by governments of China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. Because of the volume of ongoing research in this sector, it is likely that the material requirements of future LEDs may be quite different than LEDs currently (2011) in use as industry attempts to cut costs by reducing material requirements of expensive heavy rare-earth phosphors and increasing the sizes of wafers for economies of scale. Improved LED performance will allow customers to reduce the number of LEDs in automotive, electronic

  1. Brazing and machining of carbon based materials for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, M.; Guerreschi, U.; Rossi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon based materials in the recent years have often been considered and used as armour material in plasma facing components for several fusion devices, because of their low Z and good high temperature characteristics that are compatible with the operation of nuclear reactors. These materials are often connected (mechanically or by brazing) to metals, that allow the support and the cooling functions (heat sink materials). In the following the experience of Ansaldo Ricerche about the study and the manufacturing of plasma facing components and mockups is described with reference to the influence of the carbon materials in performing brazing junction with metals. It is interesting to observe how the different characteristics of the carbon materials influence the brazing process. ((orig.))

  2. SOFG: Standards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, T.; Grigorov, S.; Kozhukharov, V.; Brashkova, N.

    2005-01-01

    It is well-known that Solid Oxide Fuel Cells will have industrial application in the nearest future. In this context, the problem of SOFC materials and SOFC systems standardization is of high level of priority. In the present study the attention is focused on the methods for physical and chemical characterization of the materials for SOFC components fabrication and about requirements on single SOFC cells tests. The status of the CEN, ISO, ASTM (ANSI, ASSN) and JIS class of standards has been verified. Standards regarding the test methods for physical-chemical characterization of vitreous materials (as sealing SOFC component), ceramic materials (as electrodes and electrolyte components, including alternative materials used) and metallic materials (interconnect components) are subject of overview. It is established that electrical, mechanical, surface and interfacial phenomena, chemical durability and thermal corrosion behaviour are the key areas for standardization of the materials for SOFC components

  3. Composite materials for Tokamak wall armor, limiters, and beam dump applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.; Dickinson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes materials which are composites of carbon fibers and low Z number carbides. The composite materials are fabricated by applying chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coats of either low Z number elements (i.e., boron, titanium, silicon, or nickel) or carbides (B 4 C, TiC, or SiC) onto graphite fibers, in the form of yarn, cloth, or three-dimensional structures, and then hot pressing the coated material to full density. The benefits of this approach are: (1) Each graphite filament (approx. 9 μm diameter) is surrounded by a refractory carbide which offers better resistance to erosion loss than graphite. If some material is spalled from the surface, the underlying graphite fibers are still coated, and thus still protected from hydrogen bombardment; (2) The composites should have longer thermal fatigue lives than carbides because of the graphite fiber reinforcement running through the composite; (3) Enhanced mechanical properties are obtained because of completely interconnected networks of carbide and graphite

  4. Development and evaluation of first wall materials for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Anderson, A.T.; Honea, E.C.; Skulina, K.M.; Milam, D.; Evans, M.; Rainer, F.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1996-01-01

    Several low-Z refractory materials are evaluated for use as the NIF first wall in terms of their cost and ability to survive laser light, target emissions and debris, as well as be cleanable and not outgas excessively. Best performers contain B, C, or both, with B 4 C being the best overall. It appears possible at this time that plasma-sprayed B 4 C can be fabricated with low enough porosity and cost to be preferred to hot-pressed B 4 C, the conservative choice

  5. Plasma-material interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-interactive components must be resistant to erosion processes, efficient in heat removal, and effective in minimizing tritium inventory and permeation. As long as plasma edge temperatures are 50 eV, no one material can satisfy the diverse requirements imposed by these plasma materials interactions. The only solution is the design of duplex, or even more complicated, structures. The material that faces the plasma should be low atomic number, with acceptable erosion and evaporation characteristics. The substrate material must have high thermal conductivity for heat removal. Finally, materials must be selected judiciously for tritium compatibility. In conclusion, materials play a critical role in the achievement of safe and economical magnetic fusion energy. Improvements in materials have already led to many advances in present day device operation, but additional innovative materials solutions are required for the critical plasma materials interaction issues in future power reactors

  6. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  7. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  9. Equation of state and shock compression of carbon-hydrogen and other ablator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Militzer, B.; Whitley, H.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic compression experiments in planetary interior studies and fusion sciences often implement carbon-hydrogen or other low-Z elements or compounds as ablators. Accurate quantum simulations of these materials enables theoretical investigation of the equation of state (EOS) over temperatures and pressures that are difficult to access experimentally, and can help guide the design of targets for future experiments. In this work, we use path integral Monte Carlo and density functional molecular dynamics to calculate the equation of state of a series of hydrocarbons and other low-Z materials (B, B4C, and BN). For the hydrocarbon with C:H=1:1, we predict the pressure-compression profile to agree remarkably with experiments at low pressures. At high pressures, we find the Hugoniot curve displays a single compression maximum of 4.7 that corresponds to K-shell ionization. This is slightly higher than that of glow-discharge polymers but both occur at the same pressure (0.47 Gbar). We study the linear mixing approximation for the EOS of hydrocarbons and demonstrate its validity at stellar core conditions. We examine the sensitivity of the fusion yield to the EOS of these candidate ablator materials in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of a direct-drive implosion. We also make detailed comparisons of the EOS and atomic and electronic structure of C and BN, which is useful for systematic improvement of existing EOS models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Users' requirements for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Jitsukawa, S.; Ehrlich, K.; Moeslang, A.

    1998-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a high energy neutron irradiation facility which generates an intense neutron flux with D-Li stripping reactions for fusion materials testing. The role of IFMIF is (1) development of various fusion reactor materials, (2) determination of design-relevant engineering databases for the DEMO fusion reactor, (3) calibration and validation of data generated from fission reactor irradiations and the other simulation experiments, etc. The conceptual design activity (CDA) of IFMIF was initiated in February 1995 as an IEA collaborative activity to complete a reference conceptual design of IFMIF in December 1996. Users' requirements for the conceptual design of IFMIF were developed for materials to be tested, types of experiments, small specimen test technology and irradiation conditions. Furthermore, the neutron irradiation field characteristics (spectrum, flux/volume, etc.) of IFMIF were evaluated for the conceptual design parameters and were shown to meet the essential requirements of the users. (orig.)

  11. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  12. Material Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-15

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  13. Material Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-01

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  14. Materials and material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergens, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review based on 105 literature quotations is given on the latest state of development in the steel sector and in the field of non-ferrous metals and plastics. The works quoted also include, preparation, working, welding including simulation methods, improvement of weldability, material mechanics (explanation of defects mechanisms by means of fracture mechanics), defect causes (corrosion, erosion, hydrogen influence), mechanical-technological and non-destructive material testing. Examples from the field of reactor building are also given within there topics. (IHOE) [de

  15. Modern electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, John B

    2013-01-01

    Modern Electronic Materials focuses on the development of electronic components. The book first discusses the history of electronic components, including early developments up to 1900, developments up to World War II, post-war developments, and a comparison of present microelectric techniques. The text takes a look at resistive materials. Topics include resistor requirements, basic properties, evaporated film resistors, thick film resistors, and special resistors. The text examines dielectric materials. Considerations include basic properties, evaporated dielectric materials, ceramic dielectri

  16. Materials Genome Initiative Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA is committed to developing new materials and manufacturing methods that can enable new missions with ever increasing mission demands. Typically, the development and certification of new materials and manufacturing methods in the aerospace industry has required more than 20 years of development time with a costly testing and certification program. To reduce the cost and time to mature these emerging technologies, NASA is developing computational materials tools to improve understanding of the material and guide the certification process.

  17. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  18. Reference materials and measurement traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear materials safeguards within the U.S.A. are accomplished by the integration of activities involving physical protection, material control and material accountability. Material accountability requires both sound measurement technology and well-defined accounting procedures to provide final evidence that physical protection and materials control have achieved their purpose. 5 refs

  19. Computational materials design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Trial and error experimentation is an extremely expensive route to the development of new materials. The coming age of reduced defense funding will dramatically alter the way in which advanced materials have developed. In the absence of large funding we must concentrate on reducing the time and expense that the R and D of a new material consumes. This may be accomplished through the development of computational materials science. Materials are selected today by comparing the technical requirements to the materials databases. When existing materials cannot meet the requirements we explore new systems to develop a new material using experimental databases like the PDF. After proof of concept, the scaling of the new material to manufacture requires evaluating millions of parameter combinations to optimize the performance of the new device. Historically this process takes 10 to 20 years and requires hundreds of millions of dollars. The development of a focused set of computational tools to predict the final properties of new materials will permit the exploration of new materials systems with only a limited amount of materials characterization. However, to bound computational extrapolations, the experimental formulations and characterization will need to be tightly coupled to the computational tasks. The required experimental data must be obtained by dynamic, in-situ, very rapid characterization. Finally, to evaluate the optimization matrix required to manufacture the new material, very rapid in situ analysis techniques will be essential to intelligently monitor and optimize the formation of a desired microstructure. Techniques and examples for the rapid real-time application of XRPD and optical microscopy will be shown. Recent developments in the cross linking of the world's structural and diffraction databases will be presented as the basis for the future Total Pattern Analysis by XRPD. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  20. Material efficiency: providing material services with less material production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Julian M; Ashby, Michael F; Gutowski, Timothy G; Worrell, Ernst

    2013-03-13

    Material efficiency, as discussed in this Meeting Issue, entails the pursuit of the technical strategies, business models, consumer preferences and policy instruments that would lead to a substantial reduction in the production of high-volume energy-intensive materials required to deliver human well-being. This paper, which introduces a Discussion Meeting Issue on the topic of material efficiency, aims to give an overview of current thinking on the topic, spanning environmental, engineering, economics, sociology and policy issues. The motivations for material efficiency include reducing energy demand, reducing the emissions and other environmental impacts of industry, and increasing national resource security. There are many technical strategies that might bring it about, and these could mainly be implemented today if preferred by customers or producers. However, current economic structures favour the substitution of material for labour, and consumer preferences for material consumption appear to continue even beyond the point at which increased consumption provides any increase in well-being. Therefore, policy will be required to stimulate material efficiency. A theoretically ideal policy measure, such as a carbon price, would internalize the externality of emissions associated with material production, and thus motivate change directly. However, implementation of such a measure has proved elusive, and instead the adjustment of existing government purchasing policies or existing regulations-- for instance to do with building design, planning or vehicle standards--is likely to have a more immediate effect.

  1. Materials for Slack Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Traute

    1940-01-01

    This report deals with systematic experiments carried out on five diaphragm materials with different pretreatment, for the purpose of ascertaining the suitability of such materials for slack diaphragms. The relationship of deflection and load, temperature and moisture, was recorded. Of the explored materials, synthetic leather, balloon cloth, goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna, synthetic leather treated with castor oil is the most suitable material for the small pressure range required. Balloon cloth is nearly as good, while goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna were found to be below the required standards.

  2. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  3. HMPT: Basic Radioactive Material Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Hazardous Materials and Packaging and Transportation (HMPT): Basic Radioactive Material Transportation Live (#30462, suggested one time) and Test (#30463, required initially and every 36 months) address the Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) function-specific [required for hazardous material (HAZMAT) handlers, packagers, and shippers] training requirements of the HMPT Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Labwide training. This course meets the requirements of 49 CFR 172, Subpart H, Section 172.704(a)(ii), Function-Specific Training.

  4. Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  5. FOREWORD: Materials metrology Materials metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Seton; Valdés, Joaquin

    2010-04-01

    It seems that so much of modern life is defined by the materials we use. From aircraft to architecture, from cars to communications, from microelectronics to medicine, the development of new materials and the innovative application of existing ones have underpinned the technological advances that have transformed the way we live, work and play. Recognizing the need for a sound technical basis for drafting codes of practice and specifications for advanced materials, the governments of countries of the Economic Summit (G7) and the European Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 1982 to establish the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS). This project supports international trade by enabling scientific collaboration as a precursor to the drafting of standards. The VAMAS participants recognized the importance of agreeing a reliable, universally accepted basis for the traceability of the measurements on which standards depend for their preparation and implementation. Seeing the need to involve the wider metrology community, VAMAS approached the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM). Following discussions with NMI Directors and a workshop at the BIPM in February 2005, the CIPM decided to establish an ad hoc Working Group on the metrology applicable to the measurement of material properties. The Working Group presented its conclusions to the CIPM in October 2007 and published its final report in 2008, leading to the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding between VAMAS and the BIPM. This MoU recognizes the work that is already going on in VAMAS as well as in the Consultative Committees of the CIPM and establishes a framework for an ongoing dialogue on issues of materials metrology. The question of what is meant by traceability in the metrology of the properties of materials is particularly vexed when the measurement results depend on a specified procedure. In these cases, confidence in results requires not only traceable

  6. Building Materials in Arctic Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    Building in the artic requires special attention on the appropriateness of building materials. The harsh climate makes execution difficult and sets unusual requirements for the pure material properties. In addition, there is a lack of choice of good, natural building materials in the arctic...

  7. Simulation study into the identification of nuclear materials in cargo containers using cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, T. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Muon tomography represents a new type of imaging technique that can be used in detecting high-Z materials. Monte Carlo simulations for muon scattering in different types of target materials are presented. The dependence of the detector capability to identify high-Z targets on spatial resolution has been studied. Muon tracks are reconstructed using a basic point of closest approach (PoCA) algorithm. In this article we report the development of a secondary analysis algorithm that is applied to the reconstructed PoCA points. This algorithm efficiently ascertains clusters of voxels with high average scattering angles to identify `areas of interest' within the inspected volume. Using this approach the effect of other parameters, such as the distance between detectors and the number of detectors per set, on material identification is also presented. Finally, false positive and false negative rates for detecting shielded HEU in realistic scenarios with low-Z clutter are presented.

  8. Materials Genome Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) project element is a cross-Center effort that is focused on the integration of computational tools to simulate manufacturing processes and materials behavior. These computational simulations will be utilized to gain understanding of processes and materials behavior to accelerate process development and certification to more efficiently integrate new materials in existing NASA projects and to lead to the design of new materials for improved performance. This NASA effort looks to collaborate with efforts at other government agencies and universities working under the national MGI. MGI plans to develop integrated computational/experimental/ processing methodologies for accelerating discovery and insertion of materials to satisfy NASA's unique mission demands. The challenges include validated design tools that incorporate materials properties, processes, and design requirements; and materials process control to rapidly mature emerging manufacturing methods and develop certified manufacturing processes

  9. Alternate Materials In Design Of Radioactive Material Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  10. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  11. Optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ortiz, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on: Diamond films, Synthesis of optical materials, Structure related optical properties, Radiation effects in optical materials, Characterization of optical materials, Deposition of optical thin films, and Optical fibers and waveguides

  12. Strategic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buhler, Carl; Burke, Adrian; Davis, Kirk; Gerhard, Michelle; Heil, Valerie; Hulse, Richard; Kwong, Ralph; Mahoney, Michael; Moran, Scott; Peek, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Some materials possess greater value than others. Materials that provide essential support for the nation's economic viability or enable critical military capabilities warrant special attention in security studies...

  13. Plasma-material interactions in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Bell, M.G.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.P.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Cecchi, J.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Combs, S.K.; Davis, S.L.; Doyle, B.L.; Efthimion, P.C.; England, A.C.; Eubank, H.P.; Fonck, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Grisham, L.R.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Groebner, R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heifetz, D.; Hendel, H.; Hill, K.W.; Hiroe, S.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; Kilpatrick, S.; Lamarche, P.H.; Little, R.; Manos, D.M.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Milora, S.L.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Nieschmidt, E.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Pontau, A.; Prichard, B.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Sesnic, S.; Shimada, M.; Simpkins, J.E.; Sinnis, J.; Stauffer, F.; Stratton, B.; Tait, G.D.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Von Goeler, S.; Wampler, W.R.; Wilson, K.; Williams, M.; Wong, K.L.; Young, K.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of plasma-material interactions which influence the operation of TFTR with high current (≤ 2.2 MA) ohmically heated, and high-power (≅ 10 MW) neutral-beam heated plasmas. The conditioning procedures which are applied routinely to the first-wall hardware are reviewed. Fueling characteristics during gas, pellet, and neutral-beam fueling are described. Recycling coefficients near unity are observed for most gas fueled discharges. Gas fueled discharges after helium discharge conditioning of the toroidal bumper limiter, and discharges fueled by neutral beams and pellets, show R e = 5-6x10 19 m -3 ) values of Z eff are ≤ 1.5. Increases in Z eff of ≤ 1 have been observed with neutral beam heating of 10 MW. The primary low Z impurity is carbon with concentrations decreasing from ≅ 10% to e . Oxygen densities tend to increase with n e , and at the ohmic plasma density limit oxygen and carbon concentrations are comparable. Chromium getter experiments and He 2+ /D + plasma comparisons indicate that the limiter is the primary source of carbon and that the vessel wall is a significant source of the oxygen impurity. Metallic impurities, consisting of the vacuum vessel metals (Ni, Fe, Cr) have significant (≅ 10 -4 n e ) concentrations only at low plasma densities (n e 19 m -3 ). The primary source of metallic impurities is most likely ion sputtering from metals deposited on the carbon limiter surface. (orig.)

  14. Superconductors and electrotechnical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanculescu, V

    1975-07-01

    A description is given of the properties of superconducting materials and of other materials which will be used in low temperature electrical engineering. The electrical and magnetic properties of type 1 or soft and type 2 or hard superconducting materials are analyzed. Electroinsulating and magnetic materials at low temperatures are also surveyed. Emphasis is placed on gaseous and fluid dielectric substances which retain their condition of physical aggregation at low temperatures and provide a cryogenic medium. These include helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen. As for solid dielectrics, satisfactory electroinsulating materials in terms of mechanical and electrical properties include the category of thermoplastic organic materials such as mylar, teflon, kapton, and nylon. It is also emphasized that cryoelectrical engineering requires magnetic materials with high magnetic induction at low temperatures, coercive field and low magnetic loss.

  15. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The norm which establishes the requirements of radiation protection and safety related to the transport of radioactive materials, aiming to keep a suitable control level of eventual exposure of personnels, materials and environment of ionizing radiation, including: specifications on radioactive materials for transport, selection of package type; specification of requirements of the design and assays of acceptance of packages; disposal related to the transport; and liability and administrative requirements, are presented. This norm is applied to: truckage, water carriage and air service; design, fabrication, assays and mantenaince of packages; preparation, despatching, handling, loading storage in transition and reception in the ultimate storage of packages; and transport of void packages which have been contained radioactive materials. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  17. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  18. Preliminary evaluation of beta-spodumene as a fusion reactor structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, P.V. Jr.; Schmunk, R.E.; Henslee, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Beta-spodumene was investigated as a candidate material for use in fusion reactor environments. Properties which support the use of beta-spodumene include good thermal shock resistance, a very low coefficient of thermal expansion, a low-Z composition which would result in minimum impact on the plasma, and flexibility in fabrication processes. Specimens were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a fluence of 5.3 x 10 22 n/m 2 , E > MeV, and 4.9 x 10 23 n/m 2 thermal fluence in order to obtain a preliminary evaluation of the impact of irradiation on the material. Preliminary data indicate that the mechanical properties of beta-spodumene are little affected by irradiation. Gas production and release have also been investigated. (orig.)

  19. Materials selection for cutting tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhis, Adel M.

    2008-01-01

    The selection of proper tool steel for a given application is a difficult task. So; the most important selection factors in choosing cutting tool materials are based on their tool material requirements, cutting tool design and service conditions which is mainly considered as functional requirements. The processability requirements concerns in heat treat ability of the material tool. The classification of these tool materials were discussed with their properties requirement and percent of alloying element which is added to give best properties with a little increase in cost that highly appear in comparison of the selection. The cutting tool materials were evaluated based on two cases; The first was in case of rough surface; the high speed steels is the best material and the other was the ceramic material is the highest performance in cutting of soft or high rate of metal removal. (author)

  20. Development of Si–W transient tolerant plasma facing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C., E-mail: wongc@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Chen, B. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Hollmann, E.M.; Rudakov, D.L. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Wall, D.; Tao, R. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Wright, M. [Ultramet, 12173 Montague Street, Pacoima, CA 91331 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Solid W is projected as the preferred plasma facing material. Unfortunately, W surfaces could suffer radiation damage under DT operation and will melt under Type-I edge localized modes and disruption events. A possible approach is the use of a low-Z sacrificial material, like Si deposited on the W-surface to withstand a few type-I ELMs and/or disruptions via the vapor shielding effect. Accordingly, sets of Si–W test buttons were fabricated and exposed in the DIII-D lower divertor. We found that when the Si–W buttons were exposed to a few DIII-D vertical displacement event disruptions, tungsten–silicide was formed which melts at 1414 °C. This clearly indicates that the Si–W combination cannot be used as a transient tolerance surface material, since the W surface can be damaged. Even when Si is used as a wall conditioning material the Si–W surface temperature should be operated at much lower than 1400 °C.

  1. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational

  2. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is mixed with water before administration liquid paste tablet When iodine-based and barium-sulfate contrast materials ... for patients with kidney failure or allergies to MRI and/or computed tomography (CT) contrast material. Microbubble ...

  3. Dirac materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wehling, T. O.; Black-Schaffer, A. M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of materials, like d-wave superconductors, graphene, and topological insulators, share a fundamental similarity: their low-energy fermionic excitations behave as massless Dirac particles rather than fermions obeying the usual Schrodinger Hamiltonian. This emergent behavior of Dirac fermions in condensed matter systems defines the unifying framework for a class of materials we call "Dirac materials''. In order to establish this class of materials, we illustrate how Dirac fermions ...

  4. Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic materials are the foundation of multi-billion dollar industries and the focus of intensive research across many disciplines. This book covers the fundamentals, basic theories and applications of magnetism and conventional magnetic materials. Based on a lecture course given by Nicola Spaldin in the Materials Department at University of California, Santa Barbara, the book is ideal for a one- semester course in magnetic materials. It contains numerous homework problems and solutions.

  5. Guide relative to the regulatory requirements applicable to the radioactive materials transport in airport area; Guide relatif aux exigences reglementaires applicables au transport des matieres radioactives en zone aeroportuaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This guide makes an inventory of all the points necessary for the correct functioning of the transport of radioactive materials in airport zone. Stowage of the parcels, program of radiological protection (P.R.P.), operation of transport, quality assurance, radiation dose evaluation, radiation monitoring, dose optimization, storage management, are the principal points of this guide. (N.C.)

  6. Composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambrook, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A superconductor composite is described comprising at least one longitudinally extending superconductor filament or bundle of sub-filaments, each filament or bundle of sub-filaments being surrounded by and in good electrical contact with a matrix material, the matrix material comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending cells of a metal of high electrical conductivity surrounded by a material of lower electrical conductivity. The high electrical conductivity material surrounding the superconducting filament or bundle of sub-filaments is interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of the lower electrical conductivity, the arrangement being such that at least two superconductor filaments or sub-filaments are circumferentially circumscribed by a single annulus of the material of high electrical conductivity. The annulus is electrically interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of low electrical conductivity

  7. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  8. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Materials Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials characterization of sample by incoming beam and measuring outgoing particles, with data being stored and analyzed Staff Scientist Dr. Zakutayev specializes in design of novel semiconductor materials for energy

  9. Materials issues in cask development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.L.; Sorensen, K.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper identifies potential new materials as a function of their use in the cask. To the extent that identified materials are not yet qualified for their intended application, this paper identifies probable technical issues and development efforts that may be required to qualify the materials for use in transportation casks. 1 tab

  10. Designing Material Materialising Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Designing Material Materialising Design documents five projects developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture. These projects explore the idea that new designed materials might require new design methods....... Focusing on fibre reinforced composites, this book sustains an exploration into the design and making of elastically tailored architectural structures that rely on the use of computational design to predict sensitive interdependencies between geometry and behaviour. Developing novel concepts...

  11. Nano Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu

    2006-02-01

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  12. Material focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we build on the notion of computational composites, which hold a material perspective on computational technology. We argue that a focus on the material aspects of the technology could be a fruitful approach to achieve new expressions and to gain a new view on the technology's role...... in design. We study two of the computer's material properties: computed causality and connectability and through developing two computational composites that utilize these properties we begin to explore their potential expressions....

  13. Materializing Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Geismar, H.; Horst, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    The articles in this volume were originally presented in a panel entitled ‘Material Methodologies’ at the American Anthropological Association meeting in New Orleans (November 2002). The panel was devised to tie together theoretical advances in the study of the material with the creative possibilities of fieldwork practices. Through detailed ethnographic discussion, we highlighted the ways in which a focus on a specifically material world enabled us to discover new perspecti...

  14. Materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad

    2005-01-01

    Various nuclear techniques have been developed and employed by technologies and scientists worldwide to physically and chemically characterise the material particularly those that have applications in industry. These include small angle neutron scattering (SANS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the internal structural study of material, whereas, the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for the chemical analysis, while the Moessbauer spectroscopy for the study on the magnetic properties and structural identity of material. Basic principle and instrumentations of the techniques are discussed in this chapter. Example of their applications in various disciplines particularly in characterisation of industrial materials also described

  15. Material control evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddoups, I.G.; Anspach, D.A.; Abbott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the Department of Energy's (DOE) scope of work have stimulated several laboratories and commercial companies to develop and apply technology to enhance nuclear material control. Accountability, inventory, radiation exposure, and insider protection concerns increase as many DOE facilities require increased storage. This paper summarizes a study of the existing material control technologies. The goal of the study is to identify, characterize, and quantify the trade-offs associated with using these technologies to provide real-time information on stored nuclear material that in turn supports decreasing the frequency of inventories conducted by site personnel

  16. Recycling fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooms, L.

    2005-01-01

    The inherent safety and environmental advantages of fusion power in comparison with other energy sources play an important role in the public acceptance. No waste burden for future generations is therefore one of the main arguments to decide for fusion power. The waste issue has thus been studied in several documents and the final conclusion of which it is stated that there is no permanent disposal waste needed if recycling is applied. But recycling of fusion reactor materials is far to be obvious regarding mostly the very high specific activity of the materials to be handled, the types of materials and the presence of tritium. The main objective of research performed by SCK-CEN is to study the possible ways of recycling fusion materials and analyse the challenges of the materials management from fusion reactors, based on current practices used in fission reactors and the requirements for the manufacture of fusion equipment

  17. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  18. Materials information data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, K.E.

    1978-03-01

    A major concern in the design of weapons systems is compatibility of materials with each other and with the enclosed environment. Usually these systems require long-term storage and must have high reliability at the end of this storage period. Materials selection is thus based on past experience and on laboratory-accelerated testing to assure this long-term reliability. To assist in materials selection, a computerized materials data bank has been established. In addition to references on personnel and documents, this data bank provides annotated information on materials so that the designer and materials engineer can draw on it for guidance in selecting materials. The primary purpose of the data bank is to provide materials compatibility data. However, the structure of the system permits the data bank to be used for storage and retrieval of general materials information. The data bank storage and information retrieval philosophy is discussed and procedures for information gathering are outlined. Examples of data entries and a list of search routines are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and versatility of the system

  19. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  20. A Stochastic Imaging Technique for Spatio-Spectral Characterization of Special Nuclear Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Michael C.

    Radiation imaging is advantageous for detecting, locating and characterizing special nuclear material (SNM) in complex environments. A dual-particle imager (DPI) has been designed that is capable of detecting gamma-ray and neutron signatures from shielded SNM. The system combines liquid organic and NaI(Tl) scintillators to form a combined Compton and neutron scatter camera. Effective image reconstruction of detected particles is a crucial component for maximizing the performance of the system; however, a key deficiency exists in the widely used list-mode maximum-likelihood estimation-maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction technique. The steady-state solution produced by this iterative method will have poor quality compared to solutions produced with fewer iterations. A stopping condition is required to achieve a better solution but these conditions fail to achieve maximum image quality. Stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) imaging is a good candidate to address this problem as it uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to reach a stochastic steady-state solution that has image quality comparable to the best MLEM solution. The application of SOE to the DPI is presented in this work. SOE was originally applied in medical imaging applications with no mechanism to isolate spectral information based on location. This capability is critical for non-proliferation applications as complex radiation environments with multiple sources are often encountered. This dissertation extends the SOE algorithm to produce spatially dependent spectra and presents experimental result showing that the technique was effective for isolating a 4.1-kg mass of weapons grade plutonium (WGPu) when other neutron and gamma-ray sources were present. This work also demonstrates the DPI as an effective tool for localizing and characterizing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A series of experiments were performed with the DPI using a deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator, as well as

  1. Final draft consultants report. Consultants' meeting on requirements for reference materials and intercomparison runs - IAEA programme on Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS), 17-21 April 1994, Kona, HI, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to define the aims of the Agency's Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) programme in view of its uniqueness as an international programme and to establish objectives for the organization of intercomparison runs and production of reference materials and the Agency's services to Member States in future years. This draft report contains the meeting agenda and recommendations made by the consultants. The recommendations are grouped as follows: Mission Statement; Laboratory Qualification; Training and Development; Resources and Technical Concepts; Standing Group of Experts

  2. New materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.K.; Rao, C.N.R.; Tsuruta, T.

    1992-01-01

    The book contains the state-of-the art lectures delivered at the discussion meeting on new materials, a field in which rapid advances are taking place. The main objective of the meeting was to bring active scientists in this area from Japan and India together. The topics covered diverse aspects of modern materials including high temperature superconducting compounds. (M.G.B.)

  3. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    the document is a collection of papers on different aspects of materials science. It discusses many items such as semiconductors, surface properties and interfaces, construction and civil engineering, metallic materials, polymers and composites, biology and biomaterials, metallurgy etc.. - 1 - Document1 Document1

  4. Essentials of inorganic materials synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, C N R

    2015-01-01

    This compact handbook describes all the important methods of synthesis employed today for synthesizing inorganic materials. Some features: Focuses on modern inorganic materials with applications in nanotechnology, energy materials, and sustainability Synthesis is a crucial component of materials science and technology; this book provides a simple introduction as well as an updated description of methods Written in a very simple style, providing references to the literature to get details of the methods of preparation when required

  5. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    . Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program......, and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  6. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  7. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Materials Science Division is engaged in research on physical properties of materials and the effects of radiation upon them. This involves solid state materials undergoing phase transitions, energy storing materials, and biomaterials. The Division also offers research facilities for M.S. and Ph.D. thesis work in the fields of physics, chemistry, materials, and radiation sciences in cooperation with the various colleges and departments of the UPR Mayaguez Campus. It is anticipated that it will serve as a catalyst in starting energy-related research programs in cooperation with UPR faculty, especially programs involving solar energy. To encourage and promote cooperative efforts, contact is maintained with former graduate students and with visiting scientists from Latin American research institutions

  8. Touching Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2012-01-01

    Dripping ink pens, colourful paint on skin, vegetables pots on a school roof. In interviews with three generations of former school pupils, memories of material objects bore a relation to everyday school life in the past. Interwoven, these objects entered the memorising processes, taking...... the interviewer and interviewee beyond an exclusively linguistic understanding of memory. This article analyses how the shifting objects of materiality in personal and generational school memories connects to material as well as sensuous experiences of everyday school life and its complex processes of learning....... Drawing on anthropological writings, the article argues that the objects of materiality are part of important but non-verbalised memories of schooling. The Dutch philosopher Eelco Runia’s notions of presence and metonymy are incorporated as tools for approaching objects of materiality in memory studies....

  9. Analysis of proposed eco-design requirements for boilers and water heaters. Paper within the framwork of the ''Material Efficiency and Resource Conservation'' (MaRess) Project - Task 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Klaus; Franke, Moritz [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    In 2005, the European Union released the EuP Directive focusing on ecodesign requirements for energy-using products (2005/32/EC: EU Parliament and Council of the EU 2005). This directive, also called Ecodesign Directive, is a framework directive establishing a structure in which so-called implementing measures define specific requirements for placing products on the market and/or putting them into service within the internal European market. These requirements can be environmental performance standards (e.g. minimum energy efficiency or emission standards) and labelling or information requirements. Some existing European directives are already declared as being implementing measures of the Ecodesign Directive. Additionally, new implementing measures have been and will further be developed. Product-specific preparatory studies on behalf of the European Commission provide the basis for this. The preparatory studies for boilers (Lot 1) and water heaters (Lot 2) have been conducted from February 2006 to October 2007 by Van Holsteijn en Kemna (VHK). Based on the preparatory studies, the EU Commission has released several working documents (WD) on possible ecodesign requirements for boilers and water heaters at the beginning of 2008. Following these documents, boilers and water heaters comprise gas-fired, oil-fired and electric central heating (CH) (combi-) boilers / dedicated water heaters in combination with capturing solar thermal energy or ambient heat1. The requirements contain basically energy labelling measures, minimum efficiency performance standards and limits on NOx emissions. An ''Ecoboiler Model'' resp. an ''Eco Hot Water Model'' has been elaborated within the preparatory studies. These models are a crucial part of the requirements and allow for calculation of the efficiencies of boilers and water heaters. Since the models have a high degree of complexity, the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) has asked Wuppertal

  10. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  11. Impacted material placement plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility

  12. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  13. Inflammable materials stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandagopan, V.

    2017-01-01

    A new Inflammable Materials Stores has been constructed by A and SED, BARC near Gamma Field for storage of inflammable materials falling into Petroleum Class ‘A’ ‘B’ and “C” mainly comprising of oils and lubricants, Chemicals like Acetone, Petroleum Ether etc. which are regularly procured by Central Stores Unit (CSU) for issue to the various divisions of BARC. The design of the shed done by A and SED, BARC was duly got approved from Petroleum and Explosive Safety Organization (PESO) which is a mandatory requirement before commencement of the construction. The design had taken into account various safety factors which is ideally required for an inflammable materials stores

  14. Modeling of materials supply, demand and prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The societal, economic, and policy tradeoffs associated with materials processing and utilization, are discussed. The materials system provides the materials engineer with the system analysis required for formulate sound materials processing, utilization, and resource development policies and strategies. Materials system simulation and modeling research program including assessments of materials substitution dynamics, public policy implications, and materials process economics was expanded. This effort includes several collaborative programs with materials engineers, economists, and policy analysts. The technical and socioeconomic issues of materials recycling, input-output analysis, and technological change and productivity are examined. The major thrust areas in materials systems research are outlined.

  15. Nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1998, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) performed 38 inspections, 25 of them were performed in co-operation with IAEA inspectors. There is no fresh nuclear fuel at Bohunice A-1 NPP at present. Fresh fuel of Bohunice V-1 and V-2 NPPs is inspected in the fresh fuel storage.There are 327 fresh fuel assemblies in Mochovce NPP fresh fuel storage. In addition to that, are also 71 small users of nuclear materials in Slovakia. In most cases they use: covers made of depleted uranium for non-destructive works, detection of level in production plants, covers for therapeutical sources at medical facilities. In. 1995, NRA SR issued 4 new licences for nuclear material withdrawal. In the next part manipulation with nuclear materials, spent fuel stores and illegal trafficking in nuclear materials are reported

  16. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...

  17. Hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... substances that could harm human health or the environment. Hazardous means dangerous, so these materials must be ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Utopian Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard-Jensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    In various ways, this paper makes the counter-intuitive claim that the utopian and the material are thoroughlyinterdependent, rather than worlds apart. First, through a reading of Thomas More's Utopia, it is argued thatUtopia is the product of particular kinds of relations, rather than merely...... a detachment from the known world.Second, the utopianism of a new economy firm is examined. It is argued that the physical set-up of the firm -in particular the distribution of tables and chairs - evoke a number of alternatives to ordinary work practice.In this way the materialities of the firm are crucial...... to its persuasive image of being the office of the future.The notion that utopia is achieved through material arrangements is finally related to the analysis of facts andfictions in ANT. It is argued, that even though Utopias are neither fact nor fiction, they are both material andeffective...

  19. Propulsion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Edward J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sullivan, Rogelio A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Gibbs, Jerry L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  20. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  1. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  2. The first word in material control is material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R.; Wilkey, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Material control has tended to rely on containment and access control, augmented by physical inventories, to meet the material control and accounting (MC ampersand A) goals of detecting theft/diversion and providing assurance that all nuclear material (NM) is present. Such systems have significant deficiencies. Material containment strategies are generally based on protection provided at boundaries around the NM and rely on alarms at the boundary for detection of theft/diversion. Assurance that all NM is present requires a negative inference based on the absence of alarms. Additionally, design of effective boundary protection systems requires that the designer be able to anticipate and provide protection for all scenarios that the insider adversary might utilize in removing material from the facility. Access control is an administrative system that cannot protect against malevolent actions by insiders authorized to access the material. Inventories may not provide timely detection of theft/diversion, and the sensitivity of detection depends on the magnitude of the variance of the inventory difference. More effective material control is provided for both material in storage and in process by a material-oriented system designed to detect abnormal events involving NM. Abnormal events are defined as any unauthorized activity involving NM, whether accidental or deliberate, and are assessed to determine the cause of the discrepancy. The designs of material-oriented control systems vary greatly, depending on the operations involved; however, a model system would include the use of process monitoring data for material control and automated surveillance of material in storage

  3. Optimized manufacturable porous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    Topology optimization has been used to design two-dimensional material structures with specific elastic properties, but optimized designs of three-dimensional material structures are more scarsely seen. Partly because it requires more computational power, and partly because it is a major challenge...... to include manufacturing constraints in the optimization. This work focuses on incorporating the manufacturability into the optimization procedure, allowing the resulting material structure to be manufactured directly using rapid manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting/sintering (SLM....../S). The available manufacturing methods are best suited for porous materials (one constituent and void), but the optimization procedure can easily include more constituents. The elasticity tensor is found from one unit cell using the homogenization method together with a standard finite element (FE) discretization...

  4. Fission reactors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions

  5. Application of Chemistry in Materials Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavandi, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Overview of NASA GRC Materials Development. New materials enabled by new chemistries offering unique properties and chemical processing techniques. Durability of materials in harsh environments requires understanding and modeling of chemical interaction of materials with the environment.

  6. Evaluation of issues around road materials for sustainable transport

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJVDM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to a number of other factors (social, economic, etc) sustainable transport requires the sustainable supply and use of construction materials. This includes the use of marginal materials, waste materials, novel / innovative materials...

  7. Cybermaterials: materials by design and accelerated insertion of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Olson, Gregory B.

    2016-02-01

    Cybermaterials innovation entails an integration of Materials by Design and accelerated insertion of materials (AIM), which transfers studio ideation into industrial manufacturing. By assembling a hierarchical architecture of integrated computational materials design (ICMD) based on materials genomic fundamental databases, the ICMD mechanistic design models accelerate innovation. We here review progress in the development of linkage models of the process-structure-property-performance paradigm, as well as related design accelerating tools. Extending the materials development capability based on phase-level structural control requires more fundamental investment at the level of the Materials Genome, with focus on improving applicable parametric design models and constructing high-quality databases. Future opportunities in materials genomic research serving both Materials by Design and AIM are addressed.

  8. Doublet III limiter performance and implications for mechanical design and material selection for future limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabado, M.M.; Marcus, F.B.; Trester, P.W.; Wesley, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    The plasma limiter system for Doublet III is described. Initially, high-Z materials, Ta-10W for the primary limiter and Mo for the backup limiters, were selected as the most attractive metallic candidates from the standpoint of thermal and structural properties. For the purpose of evaluating the effect of material Z on plasma performance, the nonmagnetic, Ni-base alloy Inconel X-750 was selected for a medium-Z limiter material. Graphite, a low-Z material, will likely be the next limiter material for evaluation. Design and material selection criteria for the different Z ranges are presented. The performance of the high-Z limiters in Doublet III is reviewed for an operation period that included approximately 5000 plasma shots. Changes in surface appearance and metallurgical changes are characterized. Discussion is presented on how and to what extent the high-Z elements affected the performance of the plasma based on theory and measurements in Doublet III. The fabrication processes for the Inconel X-750 limiters are summarized, and, last, observations on early performance of the Inconel limiters are described

  9. Doublet III limiter performance and implications for mechanical design and material selection for future limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabado, M.M.; Marcus, F.B.; Trester, P.W.; Wesley, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    The plasma limiter system for Doublet III is described. Initially, high-Z materials, Ta-10W for the primary limiter and Mo for the backup limiters, were selected as the most attractive metallic candidates from the standpoint of thermal and structural properties. For the purpose of evaluating the effect of material Z on plasma performance, the nonmagnetic, Ni-base alloy Inconel X-750 was selected for a medium-Z limiter material. Graphite, a low-Z material, will likely be the next limiter material for evaluation. Design and material selection criteria for the different Z ranges are presented. The performance of the high-Z limiters in Doublet III is reviewed for an operation period that included approximately 5000 plasma shots. Changes in surface appearance and metallurgical changes are characterized. Discussion is presented on how and to what extent the high-Z elements affected the performance of the plasma based on theory and measurements in Doublet III. The fabrication processes for the Inconel X-750 limiters are summarized, and, last, observations on early performance of the Inconel limiters are described. (MOW)

  10. Display Parameters and Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    MEASUREMENTS * Broadband Radiometry or Filtered Photodetector Radiometric Method * Spectroradiometric Method * PHOTOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS * COLOUR MEASUREMENTS * LUMINANCE, CONTRAST RATIO, THRESHOLD CHARACTERISTIC AND POLAR PLOT * SWITCHING SPEED * ELECTRICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Operating Voltage, Current Drainage and Power Consumption * Operating Frequency * Life Expectancy * LCD FAILURE MODES * Liquid Crystal Materials * Substrate Glass * Electrode Patterns * Alignment and Aligning Material * Peripheral and End Plug Seal * Spacers * Crossover Material * Polarizers and Reflectors * Connectors * Heater * Colour Filters * Backlighting System * Explanation For Some of the Observed Defects * BLOOMING PIXELS * POLARIZER RELATED DEFECTS * DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL EXPANSION RELATED DEFECTS * ELECTROCHEMICAL AND ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC RELATED DEFECTS * REVERSE TWIST AND REVERSE TILT * MEMORY OR REMINISCENT CONTRAST * LCD RELIABILRY AND ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES * APPENDIX

  11. Radiation resistant lining material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Koki; Okagawa, Seigo; Tamaki, Hidehiro.

    1990-01-01

    Rigidity, viscoelasticity, flexibility, radiation resistance, leaching resistance, rust-proofness, endurance, etc. are required for the lining materials to wall surfaces and floor surfaces of facilities used under the effect of radiation rays and for the inner surface protection of vessels for radioactive wastes. The present invention provides radiation resistant lining material capable of satisfying such various requirements in a well-balanced manner. That is, the material contains (A) 100 parts by weight of rapidly curing cement, (B) 50 to 300 % by weight of aggregate, and (C) 80 to 120 parts by weight of polymer emulsion. As the specific example, the ingredient (A) is commercially available under the trade name of Jet Cement. The aggregate of the ingredient (B) has preferably from about 0.6 to 0.2 mm of size and is made of material, preferably, silicon or iron grains. As the ingredient (C), acrylic resin emulsion is preferred. As a result of example, these ingredient constitutions can satisfy each of the required performance described above. (I.S.)

  12. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  13. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  14. Basic concepts of materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of accounting for nuclear materials to the efficient, safe, and economical operation of nuclear facilities is introduced, and the following topics are covered: material balance equation; item control areas; material balance uncertainty; decision procedures for materials accounting; conventional and near-real-time accounting; regulatory requirements of the US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and a summary related to the development of a materials accounting system to implement the basic concepts described. The summary includes a section on each of the following: problem definition, system objectives, and system design

  15. Basic optics of effect materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Effect materials derive their color and effect primarily from thin-film interference. Effect materials have evolved over the decades from simple guanine crystals to the complex multilayer optical structures of today. The development of new complex effect materials requires an understanding of the optics of effect materials. Such an understanding would also benefit the cosmetic formulator as these new effect materials are introduced. The root of this understanding begins with basic optics. This paper covers the nature of light, interference of waves, thin-film interference, color from interference, and color travel.

  16. Advanced Materials for Automotive Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisza, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper some recent material developments will be overviewed mainly from the point of view of automotive industry. In car industry, metal forming is one of the most important manufacturing processes imposing severe restrictions on materials; these are often contradictory requirements, e.g. high strength simultaneously with good formability, etc. Due to these challenges and the ever increasing demand new material classes have been developed; however, the more and more wide application of high strength materials meeting the requirements stated by the mass reduction lead to increasing difficulties concerning the formability which requires significant technological developments as well. In this paper, the recent materials developments will be overviewed from the point of view of the automotive industry

  17. Research materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Development of techniques required for the preparation and characterization of ultrahigh-purity and controlled-impurity research specimens of interest to ORNL and other ERDA installations is described

  18. Hierarchical materials: Background and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical design draws inspiration from analysis of biological materials and has opened new possibilities for enhancing performance and enabling new functionalities and extraordinary properties. With the development of nanotechnology, the necessary technological requirements for the manufactur...

  19. Material selection for TFTR limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.

    1980-10-01

    The requirements for the material to be used as the first surface of limiters in TFTR are that it: (1) withstand a heat flux of 1 kw/cm 2 for a pulse length of 1.5s and a duty cycle of 1/200 for 10 5 cycles, (2) withstand the thermal and electro-magnetic loads from 10 4 plasma current disruptions lasting about 200 μs, (3) generate impurities at a rate low enough to meet impurity control requirements (which depend on the atomic number of the material) for TFTR, and (4) have tritium retention characteristics consistent with tritium inventory requirements for TFTR. An extensive set of material tests using electron beams, neutral beams, and plasma bombardment have been carried out to identify materials which can meet the thermal requirements of the above

  20. Polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Many polymeric materials have already been used in the field of artificial organs. However, the materials used in artificial organs are not necessarily created with the best material selectivity and materials design; therefore, the development of synthesized polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs based on well-defined designs is required. The approaches to the development of biocompatible polymeric materials fall into three categories: (1) control of physicochemical characteristics on material surfaces, (2) modification of material surfaces using biomolecules, and (3) construction of biomimetic membrane surfaces. This review will describe current issues regarding polymeric membrane materials for use in artificial organs.

  1. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  2. Supplementary Material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mraga

    1. Supplementary Material. A soluble-lead Redox Flow Battery with corrugated graphite sheet and reticulated vitreous carbon as positive and negative current collectors by A Banerjee et al (pp 163-. 170). Figure S1. SEM images for bare substrates: (a) graphite sheet, (b) 20 ppi RVC, (c) 30 ppi. RVC and (d) 45 ppi RVC.

  3. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily be und...

  4. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...

  5. Absorbant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quetier, Monique.

    1978-11-01

    Absorbants play a very important part in the nuclear industry. They serve for the control, shut-down and neutron shielding of reactors and increase the capacity of spent fuel storage pools and of special transport containers. This paper surveys the usual absorbant materials, means of obtainment, their essential characteristics relating to their use and their behaviour under neutron irradiation [fr

  6. Global nuclear material control model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material

  7. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  8. 49 CFR 7.4 - Publication required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication required. 7.4 Section 7.4 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Required To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.4 Publication required. (a) General. The material described in § 7.3...

  9. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  10. Evaluative Review in Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Fredricka L.; Horn, Bradley; Grabe, William; Robinson, Marin S.

    2006-01-01

    English for Academic Purposes (EAP) professionals know that initial efforts to produce or adapt materials generally require evaluative review and revision. A review process that solicits feedback from teacher and student users is critical because materials writers often find it difficult to envision the problems others may have with their…

  11. Safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Delivering radioactive material to where it is needed is a vital service to industry and medicine. Millions of packages are shipped all over the world by all modes of transport. The shipments pass through public places and must meet stringent safety requirements. This video explains how radioactive material is safely transported and describes the rules that carriers and handlers must follow

  12. A Paradigm for EST Materials Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Edwina S.; Balarbar, Corazon V.

    In many countries, suitable English for special purposes (ESP) textbooks and materials are difficult to find. ESP teachers and program coordinators often must develop their own materials, but preparing such materials requires training. One model that has served as a guide to numerous ESP materials projects is the Hutchinson and Waters' model. This…

  13. Shape memory materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Compared with piezoelectric ceramics and magnetostrictive materials, the shape memory materials possess larger recoverable strain and recovery stress but slower response to external field. It is expected that the magneto-shape memory materials may develop considerable strain as well as rapid and precise shape control. Pseudoelasticity and shape memory effect (SME) resulted from martensitic transformation and its reverse transformation in shape memory materials were generally described. The requirements of appearing the shape memory effect in materials and the criteria for thermoelastic martensitic transformation were given. Some aspects concerning characteristics of martensitic transformation, and factors affecting SME in Ni-Ti, Cu-Zn-Al and Fe-Mn-Si based alloys as well as ZrO2 containing ceramics were briefly reviewed. Thermodynamic calculation of Ms temperature as function of grain size and parent ordering in Cu-Zn-Al was presented. The works on prediction of Ms in Fe-Mn-Si based alloys and in ZrO2-CeO2 were mentioned. Magnetic shape memory materials were briefly introduced.

  14. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  15. Investigation of the transportation requirements for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, R.E.; Davis, D.K.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents a general investigation of the transport requirements associated with the construction and operation of conceptual fusion reactors. Projections of amounts of construction and operating materials requiring transportation are presented for several proposed designs. The material to be shipped is described along with the shipping containers that might be used, the transport modes and the expected impact of transporting these materials. Transportation of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials will be required. Most of these materials are routinely shipped by the transportation industry. Transportation requirements of a representative fusion reactor are also compared with Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) requirements

  16. Effects of low-Z and high-Z impurities on divertor detachment and plasma confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Q. Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The impurity-seeded detached divertor is essential for heat exhaust in ITER and other reactor-relevant devices. Dedicated experiments with injection of N2, Ne and Ar have been performed in DIII-D to assess the impact of the different impurities on divertor detachment and confinement. Seeding with N2, Ne and Ar all promote divertor detachment, greatly reducing heat flux near the strike point. The upstream plasma density at the onset of detachment decreases with increasing impurity-puffing flow rates. For all injected impurity species, the confinement and pedestal pressure are correlated with the impurity content and the ratio of separatrix loss power to the l-H transition threshold power. As the divertor plasma approaches detachment, the high-Z impurity seeding tends to degrade the core confinement owing to the increased core radiation. In particular, Ar injection with up to 50% of the injected power radiating in the core cools the pedestal and core plasmas, thus significantly degrading the confinement. As for Ne seeding, medium confinement with H98∼0.8 can be maintained during the detachment phase with the pedestal temperature being reduced by about 50%. In contrast, in the N2 seeded plasmas, radiation is predominately confined in the boundary plasma, which leads to less effect on the confinement and pedestal. In the case of strong N2 gas puffing, the confinement recovers during the detachment, from ∼20% reduction at the onset of the detachment to greater than unity comparable to that before the seeding. The core and pedestal temperatures feature a reduction of 30% from the initial attached phase and remain nearly constant during the detachment phase. The improvement in confinement appears to arise from the increase in pedestal and core density despite the temperature reduction.

  17. Low-Z impurity transport in DIII-D - observations and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Houlberg, W.A.; Baylor, L.R.; West, W.P.; Baker, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Impurity transport studies on DIII-D have revealed transport phenomena that are qualitatively consistent with that expected from turbulence transport theory in some cases and neoclassical transport theory in other cases. The transport model proposed here, which assumes that the total impurity transport is a linear sum of turbulence-driven transport and neoclassical transport, is shown to reproduce many of these observed features. This transport model is then applied to burn condition calculations, revealing that profile effects associated with neoclassical transport have a large effect on the maximum allowable impurity fraction in machines based on achieving neoclassical transport levels

  18. Two-dimensional structure and kinematics of a representative sample of low-z ULIRGs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Marin, M; Colina, L; Arribas, S

    2008-01-01

    We present the optical INTEGRAL integral field spectroscopy data and Hubble Space Telescope archive images obtained for a representative sample of 22 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs L IR >10 12 L o-dot ). The sample has been designed for fulfilling a program aimed at studying the internal structure and kinematics of this type of galaxies. Taking advantage of the two-dimensional nature of the data, we study the structure of the stellar and ionized gas, the internal ionization state and the gas kinematics. In this contribution we present the sample and the most important results obtained so far.

  19. NEW PROPERTIES OF z-SCALING: FLAVOR INDEPENDENCE AND SATURATION AT LOW z

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zborovský, Imrich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2009), s. 1417-1442 ISSN 0217-751X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Proton-(anti)proton interactions * high energy * spectra Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.941, year: 2009

  20. Electron response of some low-Z scintillators in wide energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiderski, L; Marcinkowski, R; Moszynski, M; Czarnacki, W; Szawlowski, M; Szczesniak, T; Pausch, G; Plettner, C; Roemer, K

    2012-01-01

    Light yield nonproportionality and the intrinsic resolution of some low atomic number scintillators were studied by means of the Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique. The plastic and liquid scintillator response to Compton electrons was measured in the energy range of 10 keV up to 4 MeV, whereas a CaF 2 :Eu sample was scanned from 3 keV up to 1 MeV. The nonproportionality of the CaF 2 :Eu light yield has characteristics typical for inorganic scintillators of the multivalent halides group, whereas tested organic scintillators show steeply increasing nonproportionality without saturation point. This is in contrast to the behavior of all known inorganic scintillators having their nonproportionality curves at saturation above energies between tens and several hundred keV.

  1. Electron response of some low-Z scintillators in wide energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, L.; Marcinkowski, R.; Moszynski, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Pausch, G.; Plettner, C.; Roemer, K.

    2012-06-01

    Light yield nonproportionality and the intrinsic resolution of some low atomic number scintillators were studied by means of the Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique. The plastic and liquid scintillator response to Compton electrons was measured in the energy range of 10 keV up to 4 MeV, whereas a CaF2:Eu sample was scanned from 3 keV up to 1 MeV. The nonproportionality of the CaF2:Eu light yield has characteristics typical for inorganic scintillators of the multivalent halides group, whereas tested organic scintillators show steeply increasing nonproportionality without saturation point. This is in contrast to the behavior of all known inorganic scintillators having their nonproportionality curves at saturation above energies between tens and several hundred keV.

  2. X-ray atomic scattering factors of low-Z ions with a core hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.

    2007-01-01

    Short and intense x-ray pulses may be used for atomic-resolution diffraction imaging of single biological molecules. One of the dominant damage mechanisms is atomic ionization, resulting in a large fraction of atoms with core holes. We calculated the atomic scattering factor of atoms with atomic charge numbers between 3 and 10 in different ionization states with and without a core hole. Our results show that orbital occupation and the change of the orbitals upon core ionization (core relaxation) have a significant impact on the diffraction pattern

  3. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C 4 H 4 S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact

  4. Control of discharge conditions to reduce hydrogen content in low Z films produced with DC glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsir, M.; Sagara, A.; Tsuzuki, K.; Tsuchiya, B.; Hasegawa, Y.; Motojima, O.

    1995-09-01

    Boronization at near room temperature has been performed in plasma processing teststand (PPT) by using a 5 % diborane gases B 2 H 6 in He on electrically floating or unfloating Al samples under various conditions on DC glow discharge power or total gas pressure. The hydrogen concentration was analyzed by using elastic recoil detection method (ERD) and a new modified normalizing technique with Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Results showed that a high growth rate of film formation and floating surface were effective in reducing hydrogen concentration in B films. This result was in good agreement with earlier measurements of H with flash filament (FF) desorption method. In particular the H/B ratio was reduced by decreasing ions but increasing radicals for B film formation. (author)

  5. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  6. From the Cluster Temperature Function to the Mass Function at Low Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Markevitch, Maxim

    2004-01-01

    This XMM project consisted of three observations of the nearby, hot galaxy cluster Triangulum Australis, one of the cluster center and two offsets. The goal was to measure the radial gas temperature profile out to large radii and derive the total gravitating mass within the radius of average mass overdensity 500. The central pointing also provides data for a detailed two-dimensional gas temperature map of this interesting cluster. We have analyzed all three observations. The derivation of the temperature map using the central pointing is complete, and the paper is soon to be submitted. During the course of this study and of the analysis of archival XMM cluster observations, it became apparent that the commonly used XMM background flare screening techniques are often not accurate enough for studies of the cluster outer regions. The information on the cluster's total masses is contained at large off-center distances, and it is precisely the temperatures for those low-brightness regions that are most affected by the detector background anomalies. In particular, our two offset observations of the Triangulum have been contaminated by the background flares ("bad cosmic weather") to a degree where they could not be used for accurate spectral analysis. This forced us to expand the scope of our project. We needed to devise a more accurate method of screening and modeling the background flares, and to evaluate the uncertainty of the XMM background modeling. To do this, we have analyzed a large number of archival EPIC blank-field and closed-cover observations. As a result, we have derived stricter background screening criteria. It also turned out that mild flares affecting EPIC-pn can be modeled with an adequate accuracy. Such modeling has been used to derive our Triangulum temperature map. The results of our XMM background analysis, including the modeling recipes, are presented in a paper which is in final preparation and will be submitted soon. It will be useful not only for our future analysis but for other XMM cluster observations as well.

  7. EPPUR SI MUOVE: POSITIONAL AND KINEMATIC CORRELATIONS OF SATELLITE PAIRS IN THE LOW Z UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Famaey, Benoit; Martin, Nicolas; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Neil G.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that pairs of satellite galaxies located diametrically opposite to each other around their host possess predominantly anti-correlated velocities. This is consistent with a scenario in which ≳50% of satellite galaxies belong to kinematically coherent rotating planar structures. Here we extend this analysis, examining satellites of giant galaxies drawn from an SDSS photometric redshift catalog. We find that there is a ∼17% overabundance (>3σ significance) of candidate satellites at positions diametrically opposite to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite. We show that ΛCDM cosmological simulations do not possess this property when contamination is included. After subtracting contamination, we find ∼2 times more satellites diametrically opposed to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite than at 90° from it, at projected distances ranging from 100 to 150 kpc from the host. This independent analysis thus strongly supports our previous results on anti-correlated velocities. We also find that those satellite pairs with anti-correlated velocities have a strong preference (∼3:1) to align with the major axis of the host whereas those with correlated velocities display the opposite behavior. We finally show that repeating a similar analysis to Ibata et al. with same-side satellites is generally hard to interpret, but is not inconsistent with our previous results when strong quality cuts are applied on the sample. This addresses all of the concerns recently raised by Cautun et al., who did not uncover any flaw in our previous analysis, but may simply have hinted at the physical extent of planar satellite structures by pointing out that the anti-correlation signal weakens at radii >150 kpc. All these unexpected positional and kinematic correlations strongly suggest that a substantial fraction of satellite galaxies are causally linked in their formation and evolution

  8. EPPUR SI MUOVE: POSITIONAL AND KINEMATIC CORRELATIONS OF SATELLITE PAIRS IN THE LOW Z UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Famaey, Benoit; Martin, Nicolas [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ibata, Neil G., E-mail: rodrigo.ibata@astro.unistra.fr [Trinity College, Trinity Street, Cambridge, CB2 1TQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-20

    We have recently shown that pairs of satellite galaxies located diametrically opposite to each other around their host possess predominantly anti-correlated velocities. This is consistent with a scenario in which ≳50% of satellite galaxies belong to kinematically coherent rotating planar structures. Here we extend this analysis, examining satellites of giant galaxies drawn from an SDSS photometric redshift catalog. We find that there is a ∼17% overabundance (>3σ significance) of candidate satellites at positions diametrically opposite to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite. We show that ΛCDM cosmological simulations do not possess this property when contamination is included. After subtracting contamination, we find ∼2 times more satellites diametrically opposed to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite than at 90° from it, at projected distances ranging from 100 to 150 kpc from the host. This independent analysis thus strongly supports our previous results on anti-correlated velocities. We also find that those satellite pairs with anti-correlated velocities have a strong preference (∼3:1) to align with the major axis of the host whereas those with correlated velocities display the opposite behavior. We finally show that repeating a similar analysis to Ibata et al. with same-side satellites is generally hard to interpret, but is not inconsistent with our previous results when strong quality cuts are applied on the sample. This addresses all of the concerns recently raised by Cautun et al., who did not uncover any flaw in our previous analysis, but may simply have hinted at the physical extent of planar satellite structures by pointing out that the anti-correlation signal weakens at radii >150 kpc. All these unexpected positional and kinematic correlations strongly suggest that a substantial fraction of satellite galaxies are causally linked in their formation and evolution.

  9. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  10. Magnetocaloric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppesen, Stinus

    2008-10-15

    New and improved magnetocaloric materials are one of the cornerstones in the development of room temperature magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigeration has been used since the 1930ies in cryogenic applications, but has since the discovery of room temperature refrigerants received enormous attention. This Ph.D. work has been mainly concerned with developing a new technique to characterize the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and using this technique in the investigations on new and improved magnetocaloric materials. For this purpose a novel differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with applied magnetic fields was developed for measuring heat capacity as function of magnetic field. Measurements using the developed DSC demonstrate a very high sensitivity, fast measurements and good agreement with results obtained by other techniques. Furthermore, two material systems have been described in this work. Both systems take basis in the mixed-valence manganite system La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} well known from research on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR). The mixed-valence manganite crystallizes in the perovskite structure of general formula ABO{sub 3}. The first material system is designed to investigate the influence of low level Cu doping on the B-site. Six different samples were prepared with over-stoichiometric compositions La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 1.05}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3}, x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5%. All compositions crystallized well in the same perovskite structure, but the morphology of the samples changed drastically with doping. Investigation on the magnetocaloric properties revealed that small levels of Cu up to around 3% could improve the magnetocaloric performance of the materials. Furthermore, Cu could be used to tune the temperature interval without deteriorating the MCE, which is a much desired characteristic for potential use in magnetic refrigerators. A less comprehensive part of the work has been concerned with the investigation of doping on the A

  11. PFMC14. 14th international conference on plasma-facing materials and components for fusion applications. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices and of a future fusion power plant critically depends on the plasma facing materials and components. Resistance to local heat and particle loads, thermo-mechanical properties, as well as the response to neutron damage of the selected materials are critical parameters which need to be understood and tailored from atomistic to component levels. The 14th International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications addresses these issues. Among the topics of the joint conference recent developments and research results in the following fields are addressed: - Tungsten and tungsten alloys - Low-Z materials - Mixed materials - Erosion, redeposition and fuel retention - Materials under extreme thermal loads - Technology and testing of plasma-facing components - Neutron effects in plasma-facing materials - Advanced characterization of materials and components. Selected international speakers present overview lectures and treat detailed aspects of the given topics. Contributed papers to the subjects of the meeting are solicited for oral and poster presentations.

  12. Materializing Superghosts

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Victor; Krotov, Dmitry; Losev, Andrei; Lysov, Vyacheslav

    2007-01-01

    We construct the off-shell BV realization of N=1, d=10 SYM with 7 auxillary fields. This becomes possible due to materialized ghost phenomenon. Namely, supersymmetry ghosts are coordinates on a manifold B of 10-dimensional spinors with pure spinors cut out. Auxillary fields are sections of a bundle over B, and supersymmetry transformations are nonlinear in ghosts. By integrating out axillary fields we obtain on-shell supersymmetric BV action with terms quadratic in antifields. Exactly this on...

  13. Material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotter, W.; Zirker, L.; Hancock, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) facilities are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The overall goal for the Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Unit is to identify and establish the correct amount of waste generated so that it can be reduced. Quarterly, the INEL Pollution Prevention (P2) Unit compares the projected amount of waste generated per process with the actual amount generated. Examples of waste streams that would be addresses for our facility would include be are not limited to: Maintenance, Upgrades, Office and Scrap Metal. There are three potential sources of this variance: inaccurate identification of those who generate the waste; inaccurate identification of the process that generates the waste; and inaccurate measurement of the actual amount generated. The Materials Monitoring Program was proposed to identify the sources of variance and reduce the variance to an acceptable level. Prior to the implementation of the Material Monitoring Program, all information that was gathered and recorded was done so through an informal estimation of waste generated by various personnel concerned with each processes. Due to the inaccuracy of the prior information gathering system, the Material Monitoring Program was established. The heart of this program consists of two main parts. In the first part potential waste generators provide information on projected waste generation process. In the second part, Maintenance, Office, Scrap Metal and Facility Upgrade wastes from given processes is disposed within the appropriate bin dedicated to that process. The Material Monitoring Program allows for the more accurate gathering of information on the various waste types that are being generated quarterly

  14. Reference material systems: a sourcebook for material assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, N. (ed.)

    1976-12-01

    A reference set of data related to material systems and a framework for carrying out the material technologies assessment are presented. While the bulk of renewables have been considered in this report, the nonrenewable materials dealt with here include structural materials only, such as steel, aluminum, cement and concrete, and bricks. The complete data set is supposed to include material flows, energy requirements, capital and labor inputs, and environmental effects for each process that a resource must go through to become a useful material for an end use. Although effort has been made to obtain as much information as possible, considerable gaps in data, apparent throughout this report, could not be avoided. A new material technology can be evaluated by substituting that technology for appropriate elements of the reference materials system and calculating the net change in material resource, energy, capital and labor requirements, and environmental impacts. This combination of information thus serves as a means of evaluating the potential benefits to be gained by research in various material technologies.

  15. Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Berkun, Isil; Schmidt, Robert D.; Luzenski, Matthew F.; Lu, Xu; Bordon Sarac, Patricia; Case, Eldon D.; Hogan, Timothy P.

    2014-06-01

    Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds are promising candidate low-cost, lightweight, nontoxic thermoelectric materials made from abundant elements and are suited for power generation applications in the intermediate temperature range of 600 K to 800 K. Knowledge on the transport and mechanical properties of Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds is essential to the design of Mg2(Si,Sn)-based thermoelectric devices. In this work, such materials were synthesized using the molten-salt sealing method and were powder processed, followed by pulsed electric sintering densification. A set of Mg2.08Si0.4- x Sn0.6Sb x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.072) compounds were investigated, and a peak ZT of 1.50 was obtained at 716 K in Mg2.08Si0.364Sn0.6Sb0.036. The high ZT is attributed to a high electrical conductivity in these samples, possibly caused by a magnesium deficiency in the final product. The mechanical response of the material to stresses is a function of the elastic moduli. The temperature-dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, acoustic wave speeds, and acoustic Debye temperature of the undoped Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy from 295 K to 603 K. In addition, the hardness and fracture toughness were measured at room temperature.

  16. Radioactive material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.

    1979-10-01

    All movements of radioactive materials in Canada are governed by a comprehensive body of regqlations, both national and international. These regulations are designed to maximize shielding to the public and transport workers, allow for heat dissipation, and to prevent criticality accidents, by prescribing specific packaging arrangements, administrative controls, labelling and storage measures. This report describes in some detail specific requirements and summarizes some incidents that occurred between 1974 and 1978

  17. Gas from waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, H

    1943-01-01

    Various efforts to produce fuel gas from waste materials by fermentation are reviewed. Although the thermal yield appears to be attractive (60%) in the formation of CH/sub 4/ + CO/sub 2/ from cellulose the process requires very large equipment owing to the slowness of the reaction. From 1 ton of waste, a daily production of 1 m/sup 2/ of gas (7700 cal) is obtained for 50 days.

  18. Macrocyclic fragrance materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvito, Daniel; Lapczynski, Aurelia; Sachse-Vasquez, Christen

    2011-01-01

    A screening-level aquatic environmental risk assessment for macrocyclic fragrance materials using a “group approach” is presented using data for 30 macrocyclic fragrance ingredients. In this group approach, conservative estimates of environmental exposure and ecotoxicological effects thresholds....../L and for macrocyclic lactones/lactides is 2.7 μg/L. The results of this screening-level aquatic ecological risk assessment indicate that at their current tonnage, often referred to as volumes of use, macrocyclic fragrance materials in Europe and North America, pose a negligible risk to aquatic biota; with no PEC...... for compounds within two subgroups (15 macrocyclic ketones and 15 macrocyclic lactones/lactides) were used to estimate the aquatic ecological risk potential for these subgroups. It is reasonable to separate these fragrance materials into the two subgroups based on the likely metabolic pathway required...

  19. Edible packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Krochta, John M

    2010-01-01

    Research groups and the food and pharmaceutical industries recognize edible packaging as a useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving product stability, quality, safety, variety, and convenience for consumers. Recent studies have explored the ability of biopolymer-based food packaging materials to carry and control-release active compounds. As diverse edible packaging materials derived from various by-products or waste from food industry are being developed, the dry thermoplastic process is advancing rapidly as a feasible commercial edible packaging manufacturing process. The employment of nanocomposite concepts to edible packaging materials promises to improve barrier and mechanical properties and facilitate effective incorporation of bioactive ingredients and other designed functions. In addition to the need for a more fundamental understanding to enable design to desired specifications, edible packaging has to overcome challenges such as regulatory requirements, consumer acceptance, and scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications.

  20. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  1. Magnetic materials. Properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar'yakhtar, V.

    1998-01-01

    Main theoretical and experimental results of physics of magnetic materials have been stated. Special attention was paid to the problem of creation of magnetic materials for information recording and presentation. The results of fundamental researches have been considered for their effect on creation of magnetic materials with the properties required for production as well as the reverse effect of production financing on the development of fundamental investigations. The relations between the development of high technologies and the society requirements, financing volumes and the level of NIKOR. (author)

  2. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  3. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  4. Advanced materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giamei, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced materials will require improved processing methods due to high melting points, low toughness or ductility values, high reactivity with air or ceramics and typically complex crystal structures with significant anisotropy in flow and/or fracture stress. Materials for structural applications at elevated temperature in critical systems will require processing with a high degree of control. This requires an improved understanding of the relationship between process variables and microstructure to enable control systems to achieve consistently high quality. One avenue to the required level of understanding is computer simulation. Past attempts to do process modeling have been hampered by incomplete data regarding thermophysical or mechanical material behavior. Some of the required data can be calculated. Due to the advances in software and hardware, accuracy and costs are in the realm of acquiring experimental data. Such calculations can, for example, be done at an atomic level to compute lattice energy, fault energies, density of states and charge densities. These can lead to fundamental information about the competition between slip and fracture, anisotropy of bond strength (and therefore cleavage strength), cohesive strength, adhesive strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion and possibly other quantities which are difficult (and therefore expensive to measure). Some of these quantities can be fed into a process model. It is probable that temperature dependencies can be derived numerically as well. Examples are given of the beginnings of such an approach for Ni 3 Al and MoSi 2 . Solidification problems are examples of the state-of-the-art process modeling and adequately demonstrate the need for extensive input data. Such processes can be monitored in terms of interfacial position vs. time, cooling rate and thermal gradient

  5. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  6. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  7. Energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; Walton, Richard I

    2011-01-01

    In an age of global industrialisation and population growth, the area of energy is one that is very much in the public consciousness. Fundamental scientific research is recognised as being crucial to delivering solutions to these issues, particularly to yield novel means of providing efficient, ideally recyclable, ways of converting, transporting and delivering energy. This volume considers a selection of the state-of-the-art materials that are being designed to meet some of the energy challenges we face today. Topics are carefully chosen that show how the skill of the synthetic chemist can

  8. Construction material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S [Orland Park, IL; Antink, Allison L [Bolingbrook, IL

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  9. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  10. Strategic raw materials. Risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertau, Martin; Matschullat, Joerg; Kausch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This volume is divided into four chapters: (1) Raw material management, (2) Primary raw materials, (3) Secondary raw materials and recycling, (4). Processing and products. The topics for the chapter ''Raw material management'' are: Substitution of raw materials - framework conditions and implementation; Thales: Strategic raw materials; Time for cooperation between the EU and China in raw materials policy; Availability of elements for the semiconductor industry; Market price risks of raw material-intensive companies - identification and management. The topics on the second item ''Primary raw materials'' are: The supply of economic-critical raw materials - A search and analysis for causes; Lithium extraction from primary raw materials - state and perspectives; The global market of rare earths - A balancing act; Rare earth deposits in Namibia; New technologies in exploration and discovery - Focus on activities in Europe. The third chapter, ''Secondary Raw Materials and Recycling'', covered the topics: Technology metals - Systemic Requirements along the recycling chain; Integrated re-use of high-tech and greentech wastes; From the sewage sludge ash to the phosphorus fertilizer RecoPhos P38 in the stress field of waste, fertilizer and soil protection. In chapter 4. ''Processing and products'' are the topics: Treatment and processing of rare earth metals; Processing of mineral resources - opportunities and challenges; Consequences of modern germanium chemistry; Strategic resources - Risk management. A review and outlook with a pinch of fantasy.. [de

  11. Europa Lander Material Selection Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tappan, Alexander S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heller, Mellisa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Energetic materials (EMs, explosives, pyrotechnics, propellants) provide high-power output of high temperature reaction products. These products can be solid, liquid, or gaseous during reaction or after the products have equilibrated with the surroundings. For example, high explosives typically consist of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen bonded within a single molecule, and produce almost exclusively gaseous products. Conversely, intermetallics consist of physical mixtures of metals and metalloids, and produce almost exclusively condensed products. Other materials such as pyrotechnics and propellants have intermediate behavior. All energetic materials react in a self-propagating manner that after ignition, does not necessarily require energy input from the surroundings. The range of reaction velocities can range from mm/s for intermetallics, to km/s for high explosives. Energetic material selection depends on numerous requirements specific to the needs of a system. High explosives are used for applications where high pressure gases are necessary for pushing or fracturing materials (e.g., rock, metal) or creating shock waves or air blast. Propellants are used to produce moderate-pressure, high-temperature products without a shock wave. Pyrotechnics are used to produce numerous effects including: high-temperature products, gases, light, smoke, sound, and others. Thermites are used to produce heat, high-temperature products, materials, and other effects that require condensed products. Intermetallics are used to produce high-temperature condensed products and materials, with very little gas production. Numerous categories of energetic materials exist with overlapping definitions, effects, and properties.

  12. Asbestos-Containing Materials (ACM) and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are specific federal regulatory requirements that require the identification of asbestos-containing materials (ACM) in many of the residential buildings that are being demolished or renovated by a municipality.

  13. Photographic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Radiographic films based on silver halides are normally handled under red or orange safelights to prevent fogging due to their sensitivity to white light. The present invention relates to ultraviolet radiation sensitive material which can be handled under virtually white light without significant fogging. The film material is comprised of a base having at least one layer of a photographic silver halide emulsion and a yellow filter dye screening the emulsion from visible radiation. The silver halide emulsion contains 50-100 mole % of silver chloride, the higher the silver chloride content, the lower the visible light sensitivity. The nature and properties of the yellow filter dye are described. When recording an X-ray image, the film is loaded into the camera under white safelight conditions from which light of wavelength shorter than 400 nm is excluded. The film is in contact with one or more phosphor screens capable when struck by X-rays of emitting ultraviolet radiation, the screens having a peak ultraviolet emission within the wavelength range of 250-380 nm. After X-ray exposure, the film is removed and developed. Two examples illustrating the invention are given. (U.K.)

  14. Coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Takao; Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Maeda, Yutaka; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    A non-solvent type coating material composition having properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkid resins is provided by employing active energy irradiation, particularly electron beams, using a radically polymerizable low molecular compound (A) (hereafter called an oligomer) containing at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. This oligomer is produced by reacting an epoxy-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The composition (I) contains 10% - 100% of this oligomer. In embodiments, an oligomer having a fiberous trivinyl construction is produced by reacting 180 parts by weight of glycidyl methacrylate ester with 130 parts of itaconic acid in the presence of a polymerization-inhibitor and an addition reaction catalyst at 90 0 C for 6 hours. In practice, the coating material compositions (1), consist of the whole oligomer [I-1]; (2), consist of 10-90% of (A) component and 90%-10% of vinyl monomers containing at least 30% (meth) acrylic monomer [I-2]; (3), 10%-90% of component (A) and 90%-10% of other monomers containing at least two vinyl radicals [I-3]; (4), a mixture of (I-2) and (I-3), [I-4]; and (5), consist of 50% or less unsaturated polyester of 500-5,000 molecular weight range or drying oil, or alkyd resin of 500-5,000 molecular weight range modified by drying oil, [I-5]. As a catalyst a tertiary amino vinyl compound is preferred. Five examples are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  15. Functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Hong, G. W.; Lee, H. J.

    2002-05-01

    Development of fabrication process of functional ceramic materials, evaluation of characteristics and experiments for understanding of irradiation behavior of ceramics were carried out for application of ceramics to the nuclear industry. The developed processes were the SiC surface coating technology with large area for improvement of wear resistance and corrosion resistance, the fabrication technology of SiC composites for excellent irradiation resistance, performance improvement technology of SiC fiber and nano-sized powder processing by combustion ignition and spray. Typical results were CVD SiC coating with diameter of 25cm and thickness of 100μm, highly dense SiC composite by F-CVI, heat-treating technology of SiC fiber using B4C power, and nano-sized powders of ODS-Cu, Li-based breeding materials, Ni-based metal powders with primary particle diameter of 20∼50nm. Furthermore, test equipment, data productions and damage evaluations were performed to understand corrosion resistance and wear resistance of alumina, silicon carbide and silicon nitride under PWR or PHWR operation conditions. Experimental procedures and basic technologies for evaluation of irradiation behavior were also established. Additionally, highly reactive precursor powders were developed by various technologies and the powders were applied to the fabrication of 100 m long Ag/Bi-2223 multi-filamentary wires. High Tc magnets and fly wheel for energy storage were developed, as well

  16. Materials Science Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the Department of Energy in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research. The Director of this office is appointed by the President with Senate consent. The Director advises the Secretary on the physical research program; monitors the Department's R ampersand D programs; advises the Secretary on management of the laboratories under the jurisdiction of the Department, excluding those that constitute part of the nuclear weapon complex; and advises the Secretary on basic and applied research activities of the Department. The research covers a spectrum of scientific and engineering areas of interest to the Department of Energy and is conducted generally by personnel trained in the disciplines of Solid State Physics, Metallurgy, Ceramics, Chemistry, Polymers and Materials Science. The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. The aim is to provide the necessary base of materials knowledge required to advance the nation's energy programs. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1989 together with a convenient index to the Division's programs

  17. Overview of nuclear materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grella, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of transportation as it relates to one specific type of material, low specific activity (LSA) material. It is the predominant type of material that fits into the low-level waste category. An attempt is made to discuss how LSA is regulated, setting forth the requirements. First the general scheme of regulations are reviewed. In addition future changes in the regulations which will affect transportation of LSA materials and, which quite likely, will have an impact on R and D needs in this area are presented

  18. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  19. Analysis Of The Materials and Natural Resourc Requirements ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a ••-• t; 'i -r* '" bc: 1". "6 ,--, .poud &- •H '"3 '^ C) ~\\ \\i -f; /. „ * jj J "CJ :"' '* JL; C ii O it ao Si o .•3 a cr-- •ri r-! H -ri oo J -a -> •I- i". -•- O ^i .- -pcoa O'J .Z ...

  20. 76 FR 20513 - Revision of the Requirements for Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... to Yellow Fever Vaccine; Poliovirus Vaccine Live Oral; viral vaccines labeled for use with the jet... investigations of unapproved biologics (21 U.S.C. 355(i) and 42 U.S.C. 262(a)(2)(A)). In accordance with part 312... patient outcomes and adverse events observed during this investigation. FDA reviews the submitted data and...

  1. 75 FR 15639 - Revision of the Requirements for Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... preservative, except that a preservative need not be added to Yellow Fever Vaccine; Poliovirus Vaccine Live... and Research (CBER) or the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), as... and Research (HFM-17), Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville Pike, suite 200N, Rockville, MD...

  2. 77 FR 43665 - Requirements for Distribution of Byproduct Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... physicians, clinical laboratories, hospitals, and practitioners of veterinary medicine who preregister with... (distributor) or waste broker, and ultimately disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Under the new... commonly used in the home will tend to limit the contribution by these products to disposal doses; e.g...

  3. Material requirements for bio-inspired sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggins, Peter; Lloyd, Peter; Salmond, David; Kusterbeck, Anne

    2008-10-01

    The aim of developing bio-inspired sensing systems is to try and emulate the amazing sensitivity and specificity observed in the natural world. These capabilities have evolved, often for specific tasks, which provide the organism with an advantage in its fight to survive and prosper. Capabilities cover a wide range of sensing functions including vision, temperature, hearing, touch, taste and smell. For some functions, the capabilities of natural systems are still greater than that achieved by traditional engineering solutions; a good example being a dog's sense of smell. Furthermore, attempting to emulate aspects of biological optics, processing and guidance may lead to more simple and effective devices. A bio-inspired sensing system is much more than the sensory mechanism. A system will need to collect samples, especially if pathogens or chemicals are of interest. Other functions could include the provision of power, surfaces and receptors, structure, locomotion and control. In fact it is possible to conceive of a complete bio-inspired system concept which is likely to be radically different from more conventional approaches. This concept will be described and individual component technologies considered.

  4. A Proposed Material Requirements Planning System for NARF Alameda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    to be taken when irregular events ("bugs") occur. f. Training Involvement of the users in the early design stages will pay off when time for training...27. Ostle, B. and Mensing , R.W., Statistics in Research. The Iowa State University Press, Ames, 1975. 28. McMasters, A.W., A Repair Parts Inventory

  5. The Necessity of Qualitative Materiality in Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    Erdoğan, Nurten

    2006-01-01

    Auditors have to make materiality judgments on every audit. Assessing materiality requires careful consideration of all relevant circumstances, both quantitative and qualitative considerations, as well as interaction of these considerations. This process is difficult because both quantitative and qualitative factors must evaluate.Audit standards on materiality do not provide sufficient formal guidance to quantify materiality. As a result, the auditors have been left to assess materiality base...

  6. Visualizing Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Stibbon, E.; Harris, R.

    2016-12-01

    Earth materials are fundamental to art. They are pigments, they are clay, they provide form and color. Earth scientists, however, rarely attempt to make the physical properties of Earth materials visible through art, and similarly many artists use Earth materials without fully understanding their physical and chemical properties. Here we explore the intersection between art and science through study of the physical properties of Earth materials as characterized in the laboratory, and as transferred to paper using different techniques and suspending media. One focus of this collaboration is volcanic ash. Ash is interesting scientifically because its form provides information on the fundamental processes that drive volcanic eruptions, and determines its transport properties, and thus its potential to affect populations far downwind of the volcano. Ash properties also affect its behavior as an art material. From an aesthetic point of view, ash lends a granular surface to the image; it is also uncontrollable, and thus requires engagement between artist and medium. More fundamentally, using ash in art creates an exchange between the medium and the subject matter, and imparts something of the physical, visceral experience of volcanic landscapes to the viewer. Another component of this work uses powdered rock as a printing medium for geologic maps. Because different types of rock create powders with different properties (grain size distributions and shapes), the geology is communicated not only as color, but also by the physical characteristics of the material as it interacts with the paper. More importantly, the use of actual rocks samples as printing material for geologic maps not only makes a direct connection between the map and the material it represents, but also provides an emotional connection between the map, the viewer and the landscape, its colors, textures and geological juxtapositions. Both case studies provide examples not only of ways in which artists can

  7. Virtual materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    as their recounts of them and 3. the consumption of other media products like movies, reality shows, YouTube videos etc. How do we theorize ‘matter’ in such dimensions? Is it possible to theorize virtual matter as ‘materiality’ in line with any real life materiality? What conceptualization will help us understand......? These questions become crucial when we follow matter in and across real life, virtual experience, recounted imagery, night dreams, YouTube videos and even further. Some may already have recognized Phillip’s skeleton army as a transport/transformation from Lord of the Rings, DVD 3, the army which Aragon calls out....... Butler, J. (1993) Bodies that Matter. On the Discursive Limits of “Sex”. London: Routledge. Durkin, K. et al. (1998) Children, Media and Agression. Current Research in Australia and New Zealand. In: Carlson, U. & von Feilitzen, C. (red): Children and Media Violence. Yearbook from the UNESCO International...

  8. Photographic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Radiographic films based on silver halides are normally handled under red or orange safelights to prevent fogging due to their sensitivity to white light. The present invention relates to ultraviolet radiation sensitive material which can be handled under virtually white light without significant fogging. A photographic, chemically sensitised silver halide emulsion is described, containing 50-100 mole % of silver chloride, the higher the silver chloride content, the lower the visible light sensitivity. The remaining silver halide, if any, is silver bromide and/or silver iodide. The silver halide grains are grown in the presence of ammonia, an excess of chloride ions and tetraazaindene growth controller. Examples illustrating the invention are given. (U.K.)

  9. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with the section 26 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) the safety requirements to be taken into account in planning laboratories and other premises, which affect safety in the use of radioactive materials, are confirmed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. The guide specifies the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive materials are used or stored as unsealed sources. There are also some general instructions concerning work procedures in a radionuclide laboratory

  10. Materials processing using supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting areas of supercritical fluids applications is the processing of novel materials. These new materials are designed to meet specific requirements and to make possible new applications in Pharmaceuticals design, heterogeneous catalysis, micro- and nano-particles with unique structures, special insulating materials, super capacitors and other special technical materials. Two distinct possibilities to apply supercritical fluids in processing of materials: synthesis of materials in supercritical fluid environment and/or further processing of already obtained materials with the help of supercritical fluids. By adjusting synthesis parameters the properties of supercritical fluids can be significantly altered which further results in the materials with different structures. Unique materials can be also obtained by conducting synthesis in quite specific environments like reversed micelles. This paper is mainly devoted to processing of previously synthesized materials which are further processed using supercritical fluids. Several new methods have been developed to produce micro- and nano-particles with the use of supercritical fluids. The following methods: rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS supercritical anti-solvent (SAS, materials synthesis under supercritical conditions and encapsulation and coating using supercritical fluids were recently developed.

  11. Report of the Material Control and Material Accounting Task Force: appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Five appendixes are presented. The first comprises a chronological development of material control and material accounting requirements. The second gives a description of current NRC control and material accounting requirements, practices, and capabilities. In the third a description is given of NRC's research and technical assistance program concerning the measurement and measurement quality control elements of licensee material control and material accounting systems. The fourth covers some special considerations related to inventory differences and their analysis. In the fifth a detailed description is presented of the evaluation methodologies used in development of improved material control and material accounting systems

  12. EDITORIAL: Electroactive polymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Kim, Kwang J.; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Madden, John D. W.

    2007-04-01

    Imitating nature's mechanisms offers enormous potential for the improvement of our lives and the tools we use. This field of the study and imitation of, and inspiration from, nature's methods, designs and processes is known as biomimetics. Artificial muscles, i.e. electroactive polymers (EAPs), are one of the emerging technologies enabling biomimetics. Polymers that can be stimulated to change shape or size have been known for many years. The activation mechanisms of such polymers include electrical, chemical, pneumatic, optical and magnetic. Electrical excitation is one of the most attractive stimulators able to produce elastic deformation in polymers. The convenience and practicality of electrical stimulation and the continual improvement in capabilities make EAP materials some of the most attractive among activatable polymers (Bar-Cohen Y (ed) 2004 Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuators as Artificial Muscles—Reality, Potential and Challenges 2nd edn, vol PM136 (Bellingham, WA: SPIE Press) pp 1-765). As polymers, EAP materials offer many appealing characteristics that include low weight, fracture tolerance and pliability. Furthermore, they can be configured into almost any conceivable shape and their properties can be tailored to suit a broad range of requirements. These capabilities and the significant change of shape or size under electrical stimulation while being able to endure many cycles of actuation are inspiring many potential possibilities for EAP materials among engineers and scientists in many different disciplines. Practitioners in biomimetics are particularly excited about these materials since they can be used to mimic the movements of animals and insects. Potentially, mechanisms actuated by EAPs will enable engineers to create devices previously imaginable only in science fiction. For many years EAP materials received relatively little attention due to their poor actuation capability and the small number of available materials. In the last fifteen

  13. Safety requirements for the Pu carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, H.

    1993-01-01

    Ministry of Transport of Japan has now set about studying requirements for Pu carriers to ensure safety. It was first studied what the basic concept of safe carriage of Pu should be, and the basic ideas have been worked out. Next the requirements for the Pu carriers were studied based on the above. There are at present no international requirements of construction and equipment for the nuclear-material carriers, but MOT of Japan has so far required special construction and equipment for the nuclear-material carriers which carry a large amount of radioactive material, such as spent fuel or low level radioactive waste, corresponding to the level of the respective potential hazard. The requirements of construction and equipment of the Pu carriers have been established considering the difference in heat generation between Pu and spent fuel, physical protection, and so forth, in addition to the above basic concept. (J.P.N.)

  14. 20 CFR 416.968 - Skill requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (iii) The same or similar raw materials, products, processes, or services are involved. (3) Degrees of... jobs may require alertness and close attention to watching machine processes; or inspecting, testing or... suitability and needed quantities of materials, making precise measurements, reading blueprints or other...

  15. 49 CFR 178.801 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS... transportation and are considered minimum requirements. Each packaging must be manufactured and assembled so as... design type refers to an IBC that does not differ in structural design, size, material of construction...

  16. Materials compatibility information data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    A major concern in the design of weapons systems is the compatibility of the materials used with each other and with the enclosed environment. Usually these systems require long term storage with a high reliability for proper function at the end of this storage period. Materials selection is then based on both past experience and laboratory accelerated aging experiments to assure this long term reliability. To assist in the task of materials selection a computerized materials compatibility data bank is being established. This data bank will provide a source of annotated information and references to personnel and documents for both the designer and materials engineer to draw on for guidance in materials selection. The data bank storage and information retrieval philosophy will be discussed and procedures for information gathering outlined. Examples of data entries and search routines will be presented to demonstrate the usefulness and versatility of the proposed system

  17. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  18. Correlation monitor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    This task has been established with the explicit purpose of ensuring the continued availability of the pedigreed and extremely well-characterized material now required for inclusion in all additional and future surveillance capsules in commercial light-water reactors. During this reporting period, concrete was poured and pallets storage racks were installed to provide adequate room for the storage of the correlation monitor material being transferred from its location at the Y-12 Plant to its archival storage location at ORNL. The racks came from surplus material storage at ORNL and hence were obtained at no cost to the HSSI Program. Inquiries into cost-effective means of sheltering the blocks of correlation monitor materials from further weather-related deteriorization were initiated. The most likely approach would be to procure a turn-key sheet metal building installed over the storage racks by an outside contractor to minimize costs. Most of the material has now been transferred from Y-12 to the ORNL storage area. It has been repositioned on new storage pallets and placed into the storage racks, An update of the detailed material inventory was initiated to ascertain the revised location of all blocks. Pieces of HSST plate O3 were distributed to participants in the ASTM cross-comparison exercise on subsize specimen testing technology. The use of the HSST O3 will provide for data from the many varieties of tests to be performed to be compared with the standardized data previously developed. The testing techniques will focus on ways to measure transition temperature and fracture toughness

  19. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  20. Biointegrating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amédée, J.; Bordenave, L.; Durrieu, M.-C.; Fricain, J.-C.; Pothuaud, L.

    The extraordinary increase in human longevity explains the growing need for replacement organs. The remarkable successes of conventional transplants (associated with the development of effective antirejection drugs and improved control of their administration) are also accompanied by certain drawbacks. First on the list is an inadequate supply of replacement organs: the number of candidates for transplants grows larger, opposition to the removal of organs increases, and the number of transplants has reached a ceiling. Furthermore, it has come to light over the past few years that organ transplants carry a significant risk of transmitting pathogens. Finally, the main drawback lies in the need to pursue an immunosuppression treatment. Scientists and doctors have long been in search of alternatives to human organ transplants. According to the definition drawn up in Chester in 1986 at the Consensus Conference organised under the aegis of the European Society for Biomaterials, biomaterials are non-viable materials used in a medical device and destined to interact with biological systems, whether they contribute to the constitution of a diagnostic device, a tissue or organ substitute, or a device designed to provide functional assistance or replacement.