WorldWideScience

Sample records for low-speed high-turbulence flows

  1. Particle deposition in low-speed, high-turbulence flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Mads; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Ullum, U.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental and numerical study considers the concentration of airborne particulate contaminants, such as spores of spoilage fungi, and their deposition on a surface, in a petri dish, and on a warm box-shaped product placed in a food-processing environment. Field measurements by standard...... field measurements. Particle deposition is shown to be associated with near-wall coherent structures. Flow reversal, simulated by impulsive start, is shown to give higher deposition rates than steady mean flows. Key word index: Spoilage fungi; spores; food processing plant; deposition flux; large eddy...

  2. Aeroacoustic modelling of low-speed flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, Jens

    1998-08-01

    A new numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is developed. The approach involves two steps comprising an incompressible flow part and inviscid acoustic part. The acoustic part can be started at any time of the incompressible computation. The formulation can be applied both for isentropic flows and non-isentropic flows. The model is validated for the cases of an isentropic pulsating sphere and non-isentropic flows past a circular cylinder and a NACA 0015 airfoil. The computations show that the generated acoustic frequencies have the form 1/m of the basic frequency of incompressible flow. (au) 15 refs.

  3. Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient methods for low speed flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Ng, Wing-Fai; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1993-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the viability of using a generalized Conjugate Gradient-like method as an iterative solver to obtain steady-state solutions of very low-speed fluid flow problems. Low-speed flow at Mach 0.1 over a backward-facing step is chosen as a representative test problem. The unsteady form of the two dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time using discrete time-steps. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in an implicit, upwind finite-volume, flux split formulation. The new iterative solver is used to solve a linear system of equations at each step of the time-integration. Preconditioning techniques are used with the new solver to enhance the stability and the convergence rate of the solver and are found to be critical to the overall success of the solver. A study of various preconditioners reveals that a preconditioner based on the lower-upper (L-U)-successive symmetric over-relaxation iterative scheme is more efficient than a preconditioner based on incomplete L-U factorizations of the iteration matrix. The performance of the new preconditioned solver is compared with a conventional line Gauss-Seidel relaxation (LGSR) solver. Overall speed-up factors of 28 (in terms of global time-steps required to converge to a steady-state solution) and 20 (in terms of total CPU time on one processor of a CRAY-YMP) are found in favor of the new preconditioned solver, when compared with the LGSR solver.

  4. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  5. Loss reduction in axial-flow compressors through low-speed model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic procedure for reducing losses in axial-flow compressors is presented. In this procedure, a large, low-speed, aerodynamic model of a high-speed core compressor is designed and fabricated based on aerodynamic similarity principles. This model is then tested at low speed where high-loss regions associated with three-dimensional endwall boundary layers flow separation, leakage, and secondary flows can be located, detailed measurements made, and loss mechanisms determined with much greater accuracy and much lower cost and risk than is possible in small, high-speed compressors. Design modifications are made by using custom-tailored airfoils and vector diagrams, airfoil endbends, and modified wall geometries in the high-loss regions. The design improvements resulting in reduced loss or increased stall margin are then scaled to high speed. This paper describes the procedure and presents experimental results to show that in some cases endwall loss has been reduced by as much as 10 percent, flow separation has been reduced or eliminated, and stall margin has been substantially improved by using these techniques.

  6. Preconditioned conjugate-gradient methods for low-speed flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Ng, Wing-Fai; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1993-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the viability of using a generalized Conjugate Gradient-like method as an iterative solver to obtain steady-state solutions of very low-speed fluid flow problems. Low-speed flow at Mach 0.1 over a backward-facing step is chosen as a representative test problem. The unsteady form of the two dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations is integrated in time using discrete time-steps. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in an implicit, upwind finite-volume, flux split formulation. The new iterative solver is used to solve a linear system of equations at each step of the time-integration. Preconditioning techniques are used with the new solver to enhance the stability and convergence rate of the solver and are found to be critical to the overall success of the solver. A study of various preconditioners reveals that a preconditioner based on the Lower-Upper Successive Symmetric Over-Relaxation iterative scheme is more efficient than a preconditioner based on Incomplete L-U factorizations of the iteration matrix. The performance of the new preconditioned solver is compared with a conventional Line Gauss-Seidel Relaxation (LGSR) solver. Overall speed-up factors of 28 (in terms of global time-steps required to converge to a steady-state solution) and 20 (in terms of total CPU time on one processor of a CRAY-YMP) are found in favor of the new preconditioned solver, when compared with the LGSR solver.

  7. Calibration of a γ- Re θ transition model and its application in low-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YunTao; Zhang, YuLun; Meng, DeHong; Wang, GunXue; Li, Song

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer is very important for obtaining accurate aerodynamic characteristics with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) tools, because laminar-turbulent transition is directly related to complex flow phenomena in boundary layer and separated flow in space. Unfortunately, the transition effect isn't included in today's major CFD tools because of non-local calculations in transition modeling. In this paper, Menter's γ- Re θ transition model is calibrated and incorporated into a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code — Trisonic Platform (TRIP) developed in China Aerodynamic Research and Development Center (CARDC). Based on the experimental data of flat plate from the literature, the empirical correlations involved in the transition model are modified and calibrated numerically. Numerical simulation for low-speed flow of Trapezoidal Wing (Trap Wing) is performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data. It is indicated that the γ- Re θ transition model can accurately predict the location of separation-induced transition and natural transition in the flow region with moderate pressure gradient. The transition model effectively imporves the simulation accuracy of the boundary layer and aerodynamic characteristics.

  8. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  9. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  10. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  11. New method for eliminating the statistical bias in highly turbulent flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, S.I.; Terao, Y.; Hirata, K.I.; Kitakyushu Industrial Research Institute, Fukuoka, Japan)

    1987-01-01

    A simple method was developed for eliminating statistical bias which can be applied to highly turbulent flows with the sparse and nonuniform seeding conditions. Unlike the method proposed so far, a weighting function was determined based on the idea that the statistical bias could be eliminated if the asymmetric form of the probability density function of the velocity data were corrected. Moreover, the data more than three standard deviations away from the mean were discarded to remove the apparent turbulent intensity resulting from noise. The present method was applied to data obtained in the wake of a block, which provided local turbulent intensities up to about 120 percent, it was found to eliminate the statistical bias with high accuracy. 9 references

  12. Concurrent Flame Growth, Spread and Extinction over Composite Fabric Samples in Low Speed Purely Forced Flow in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyang; T'ien, James S.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the NASA BASS and BASS-II experimental projects aboard the International Space Station, flame growth, spread and extinction over a composite cotton-fiberglass fabric blend (referred to as the SIBAL fabric) were studied in low-speed concurrent forced flows. The tests were conducted in a small flow duct within the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The fuel samples measured 1.2 and 2.2 cm wide and 10 cm long. Ambient oxygen was varied from 21% down to 16% and flow speed from 40 cm/s down to 1 cm/s. A small flame resulted at low flow, enabling us to observe the entire history of flame development including ignition, flame growth, steady spread (in some cases) and decay at the end of the sample. In addition, by decreasing flow velocity during some of the tests, low-speed flame quenching extinction limits were found as a function of oxygen percentage. The quenching speeds were found to be between 1 and 5 cm/s with higher speed in lower oxygen atmosphere. The shape of the quenching boundary supports the prediction by earlier theoretical models. These long duration microgravity experiments provide a rare opportunity for solid fuel combustion since microgravity time in ground-based facilities is generally not sufficient. This is the first time that a low-speed quenching boundary in concurrent spread is determined in a clean and unambiguous manner.

  13. Evolution of a polydispersed spray in heated and in highly turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Florian; Bazile, Rudy

    2009-11-01

    This work aims to study experimentally the dispersion and the evaporation of a polydispersed and bi-component spray in highly turbulent and heated flow. A chamber is designed to generate a heated turbulent flow in which two-component droplets are injected. The two components are octane (85%) and 3-pentanone (15%) and are chosen such that the 3-pentanone vapour concentration can be characterized by laser techniques. The experimental setup consists of a vertical channel with optical access. Before the heated air is injected in the channel, it passes through a turbulence generator. The carrier flow is characterized using Laser Doppler Anemometry. The turbulence is shown to have isotropic properties after a distance equal to four times the width of the channel and to have high levels up to 30%. The liquid phase is characterized with Phase Doppler Anemometry which allows to measure the diameter, the longitudinal and the radial velocity of the droplets. The spatial evolution of the diameter probability density function (PDF) and of the rms and mean velocities are obtained. Droplets mass fluxes are also calculated. In the mixture, 3-pentanone is the only component that fluoresces. So the vapour concentration of 3-pentanone in the carrier flow is determined using Laser Induced Fluorescence.

  14. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    A prediction of the three-dimensional turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation of high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modeling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  15. NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor for 3-D viscous code assessment and fundamental flow physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Wood, J. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A low speed centrifugal compressor facility recently built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this facility is to obtain detailed flow field measurements for computational fluid dynamic code assessment and flow physics modeling in support of Army and NASA efforts to advance small gas turbine engine technology. The facility is heavily instrumented with pressure and temperature probes, both in the stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and is rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage being tested is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance centrifugal compressor stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Preliminary experimental investigations of inlet and exit flow uniformly and measurement repeatability are presented. These results demonstrate the high quality of the data which may be expected from this facility. The significance of synergism between computational fluid dynamic analysis and experimentation throughout the development of the low speed centrifugal compressor facility is demonstrated.

  16. Numerical study of the influence of flow blockage on the aerodynamic coefficients of models in low-speed wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V. T.; Kalugin, V. T.; Lapygin, V. I.; Khlupnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    With the use of ANSYS Fluent software and ANSYS ICEM CFD calculation grid generator, the flows past a wing airfoil, an infinite cylinder, and 3D blunted bodies located in the open and closed test sections of low-speed wind tunnels were calculated. The mathematical model of the flows included the Reynolds equations and the SST model of turbulence. It was found that the ratios between the aerodynamic coefficients in the test section and in the free (unbounded) stream could be fairly well approximated with a piecewise-linear function of the blockage factor, whose value weakly depended on the angle of attack. The calculated data and data gained in the analysis of previously reported experimental studies proved to be in a good agreement. The impact of the extension of the closed test section on the airfoil lift force is analyzed.

  17. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Three-Dimensional Rotor Flow Field in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    A laser anemometer system was used to provide detailed surveys of the three-dimensional velocity field within the NASA low-speed centrifugal impeller operating with a vaneless diffuser. Both laser anemometer and aerodynamic performance data were acquired at the design flow rate and at a lower flow rate. Floor path coordinates, detailed blade geometry, and pneumatic probe survey results are presented in tabular form. The laser anemometer data are presented in the form of pitchwise distributions of axial, radial, and relative tangential velocity on blade-to-blade stream surfaces at 5-percent-of-span increments, starting at 95-percent-of-span from the hub. The laser anemometer data are also presented as contour and wire-frame plots of throughflow velocity and vector plots of secondary velocities at all measurement stations through the impeller.

  18. Development of the Seeding System Used for Laser Velocimeter Surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.; Hathaway, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Consideration is given to an atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of polystyrene latex (PSL) seed material developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Compressor flow field. Complete evaporation of the liquid carrier before the flow entering the compressor was of primary concern for the seeder system design. It is argued that the seed nozzle should incorporate a needle valve that can mechanically dislodge accumulated PSL seed material when the nozzle is turned off. Water is less expensive as the liquid carrier and should be used whenever adequate residence times are available to ensure complete evaporation. PSL agglomerates over time and needs to be mixed or blended before use. Arrangement of the spray nozzles needs to be adjustable to provide maximum seeding at the laser probe volume.

  19. Numerical modeling of the flow conditions in a closed-circuit low-speed wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Roels, S.; Carmeliet, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    A methodology for numerically simulating the flow conditions in closed-circuit wind tunnels is developed as a contribution to the general philosophy of incorporating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in wind tunnel design and testing and to CFD validation studies. The methodology is applied to the

  20. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission in low speed cross-flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, J. W.; Yang, H. S.; Yoon, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Droplet dynamics and emission of a supercritical droplet in crossing gas stream are numerically investigated. Effects of ambient pressure and velocity of nitrogen gas on the dynamics of the supercritical oxygen droplet are parametrically examined. Unsteady conservative axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates are preconditioned and solved by dual-time stepping method. A unified property evaluation scheme based on a fundamental equation of state and extended corresponding-state principle is established to deal with thermodynamic non-idealities and transport anomalies. At lower pressures and velocities of nitrogen cross flows, both the diffusion and the convection are important in determining the droplet dynamics. Relative flow motion causes a secondary breakup and cascading vortices, and the droplet lifetime is reduced with increasing in ambient pressure. At higher ambient pressures and velocities, however, the droplet dynamics become convection-controlled while the secondary breakup is hindered by reduced diffusivity of the oxygen. Gas-phase mixing depends on the convection and diffusion velocities in conjunction with corresponding droplet deformation and flow interaction. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission is not similar with respect to the pressure and velocity of the ambient gas and thus provides no scale

  1. Experimental Studies of Flow Separation of the NACA 2412 Airfoil at Low Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, H. C.; Rodgers, E. J.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been conducted on an NACA 2412 airfoil section at Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10(exp 6) and Mach number of 0.13. Detailed measurements of flow fields associated with turbulent boundary layers have been obtained at angles of attack of 12.4 degrees, 14.4 degrees, and 16.4 degrees. Pre- and post-separated velocity and pressure survey results over the airfoil and in the associated wake are presented. Extensive force, pressure, tuft survey, hot-film survey, local skin friction, and boundary layer data are also included. Pressure distributions and separation point locations show good agreement with theory for the two layer angles of attack. Boundary layer displacement thickness, momentum thickness, and shape factor agree well with theory up to the point of separation. There is considerable disparity between extent of flow reversal in the wake as measured by pressure and hot-film probes. The difference is attributed to the intermittent nature of the flow reversal.

  2. Coupling Analysis of Low-Speed Multiphase Flow and High-Frequency Electromagnetic Field in a Complex Pipeline Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokai Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of water content in an oil-water mixture is a key technology in oil exploration and production. Based on the principles of the microwave transmission line (MTL, the logging probe is an important water content measuring apparatus. However, the effects of mixed fluid flow on the measurement of electromagnetic field parameters are rarely considered. This study presents the coupling model for low-speed multiphase flow and high-frequency electromagnetic field in a complex pipeline structure. We derived the S-parameter equations for the stratified oil/water flow model. The corresponding relationship between the S-parameters and water holdup is established. Evident coupling effects of the fluid flow and the electromagnetic field are confirmed by comparing the calculated S-parameters for both stratified and homogeneous flow patterns. In addition, a multiple-solution problem is analyzed for the inversion of dielectric constant from the S-parameters. The most sensitive phase angle range is determined to improve the detection of variation in the dielectric constant. Suggestions are proposed based on the influence of the oil/water layer on measurement sensitivity to optimize the geometric parameters of a device structure. The method proposed elucidates how accuracy and sensitivity can be improved in water holdup measurements under high water content conditions.

  3. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  4. Investigation of the Shear Flow Effect and Tip Clearance on a Low Speed Axial Flow Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Varpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of inlet shear flow on the tip leakage flow in an axial flow compressor cascade. A flow with a high shear rate is generated in the test section of an open circuit cascade wind tunnel by using a combination of screens with a prescribed solidity. It is observed that a stable shear flow of shear rate 1.33 is possible and has a gradual decay rate until 15 times the height of the shear flow generator downstream. The computational results obtained agree well with the available experimental data on the baseline configuration. The detailed numerical analysis shows that the tip clearance improves the blade loading near the tip through the promotion of favorable incidence by the tip leakage flow. The tip clearance shifts the centre of pressure on the blade surface towards the tip. It, however, has no effect on the distribution of end wall loss and deviation angle along the span up to 60% from the hub. In the presence of a shear inflow, the end wall effects are considerable. On the other hand, with a shear inflow, the effects of tip leakage flow are observed to be partly suppressed. The shear flow reduces the tip leakage losses substantially in terms of kinetic energy associated with it.

  5. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  6. Hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamic global bifurcations in a highly turbulent von Karman flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2005-09-01

    We report experimental studies of the turbulent von Karman flow, inertially stirred between counter-rotating impellers. We first study the flow and its transition from laminar to turbulent regime. We highlight the role of slowly varying large scales, due to the presence of an azimuthal mixing layer. The large scales of this flow can be unstable in turbulent regime. We study the statistics of the transitions between the different mean states. The second part is dedicated to an experiment in liquid sodium, called VKS2. We optimize the time-averaged flow in order to allow kinematic dynamo action. We report the very first results of the experiment, and discuss the role of the large scales temporal non-stationariness. (author)

  7. NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel: Background Noise and Flow Survey Results Prior to FY05 Construction of Facilities Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel is a premier facility for model-scale testing of jet noise reduction concepts at realistic flow conditions. However, flow inside the open jet test section is less than optimum. A Construction of Facilities project, scheduled for FY 05, will replace the flow collector with a new design intended to reduce recirculation in the open jet test section. The reduction of recirculation will reduce background noise levels measured by a microphone array impinged by the recirculation flow and will improve flow characteristics in the open jet tunnel flow. In order to assess the degree to which this modification is successful, background noise levels and tunnel flow are documented, in order to establish a baseline, in this report.

  8. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  9. Low speed/low rarefaction flow simulation in micro/nano cavity using DSMC method with small number of particles per cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri-Jaghargh, Ali; Roohi, Ehsan; Niazmand, Hamid; Stefanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the validity of the simplified Bernoulli-trials (SBT)/dual grid algorithm, newly proposed by Stefanov, as a suitable alternative of the standard collision scheme in the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, for solving low speed/low Knudsen number rarefied micro/nano flows. The main advantage of the SBT algorithm is to provide accurate calculations using much smaller number of particles per cell, i.e., ≈ 1. Compared to the original development of SBT [1], we extend the application of the SBT scheme to the near continuum rarefied flows, i.e., Kn = 0.005, where NTC scheme requires a relatively large sample size. Comparing the results of the SBT/dual grid scheme with NTC, it is shown that the SBT/dual grid scheme could successfully predict the thermal pattern and hydrodynamics field as well as surface parameters such as velocity slip and temperature jump. Nonlinear flux-corrected transport algorithm (FCT) is also employed as a filter to extract the smooth solution from the noisy DSMC calculation for low-speed/low-Knudsen number DSMC calculations. The results indicate that combination of SBT/dual grid and FTC filtering can decrease the total sample size needed to reach smooth solution without losing significant accuracy.

  10. Cross-B convection of artificially created, negative-ion clouds and plasma depressions: Low-speed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A negative-ion, positive-ion plasma produced by the release of an electron attachment chemical into the F region becomes electrically polarized by the collisions with neutrals moving across magnetic field lines. The resulting electric field causes E x B drift of the two ion species and the residual electrons. The cross-field flow of the modified ionosphere is computed using a two-dimensional numerical simulation which includes electron attachment and mutual neutralization chemistry, self-consistent electric fields, and three-species plasma transport. The velocity of the plasma is initially in the direction of the neutral wind because the negative-ion cloud is a Pedersen conductivity enhancement. As the positive and negative ions react, the Pedersen conductivity becomes depressed below the ambient value and the velocity of the plasma reverses direction. A plasma hole remains after the positive and negative ions have mutually neutralized. The E x B gradient drift instability produces irregularities on the upwind edge of the hole. These processes may be observed experimentally with optical and backscatter-radar diagnostics

  11. Investigation of Unsteady Tip Clearance Flow in a Low-Speed One and Half Stage Axial Compressor with LES And PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph; Tan, David

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate how a rotor's unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor when the rotor tip gap size is increased from 0.5 mm (0.49% of rotor tip blade chord, 2% of blade span) to 2.4 mm (2.34% chord, 4% span) at the design condition are investigated. The changes in unsteady tip clearance flow with the 0.62 % tip gap as the flow rate is reduced to near stall condition are also investigated. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at these three flow conditions. Detailed Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) measurements of the current flow fields were also performed at the Johns Hopkins University in a refractive index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. Unsteady tip clearance flow fields from LES are compared with the PIV measurements and both LES and PIV results are used to study changes in tip clearance flow structures. The current study shows that the tip clearance vortex is not a single structure as traditionally perceived. The tip clearance vortex is formed by multiple interlaced vorticities. Therefore, the tip clearance vortex is inherently unsteady. The multiple interlaced vortices never roll up to form a single structure. When phased-averaged, the tip clearance vortex appears as a single structure. When flow rate is reduced with the same tip gap, the tip clearance vortex rolls further upstream and the tip clearance vortex moves further radially inward and away from the suction side of the blade. When the tip gap size is increased at the design flow condition, the overall tip clearance vortex becomes stronger and it stays closer to the blade suction side and the vortex core extends all the way to the exit of the blade passage. Measured and calculated unsteady flow

  12. A novel five-wire micro anemometer with 3D directionality for low speed air flow detection and acoustic particle velocity detecting capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chang, Wenhan; Gao, Chengchen; Hao, Yilong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a novel five-wire micro-fabricated anemometer with 3D directionality based on calorimetric principle is proposed, which is capable of measuring low speed airflow. This structure is realized by vertically bonding two different dies, which can be fabricated on the same wafer resulting in a simple fabrication process. Experiments on speed lower than 200 mm s-1 are conducted, showing good repeatability and directionality. The speed of airflow is controlled by the volumetric flow rate. The measured velocity sensitivity is 9.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 37.1 dB. The deviation between the expected and the measured directivity is analyzed by both theories and simulations. A correction procedure is proposed and turns out to be useful to eliminate this deviation. To further explore the potential of our device, we expose it to acoustic plane waves in a standing wave tube, showing consistent planar directivity of figure of eight. The measured velocity sensitivity at 1 kHz and 120 dBC is 4.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 27.0 dB. By using the correction method proposed above, the maximum angle error is about  ±2°, showing its good directionality accuracy.

  13. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  14. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  15. Quantitative Infrared Image Analysis Of Simultaneous Upstream and Downstream Microgravity Flame Spread over Thermally-Thin Cellulose in Low Speed Forced Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S. L.; Lee, J. R.; Fujita, O.; Kikuchi, M.; Kashiwagi, T.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of low velocity forced flow on microgravity flame spread is examined using quantitative analysis of infrared video imaging. The objective of the quantitative analysis is to provide insight into the mechanisms of flame spread in microgravity where the flame is able to spread from a central location on the fuel surface, rather than from an edge. Surface view calibrated infrared images of ignition and flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were obtained along with a color video of the surface view and color images of the edge view using 35 mm color film at 2 Hz. The cellulose fuel samples were mounted in the center of a 12 cm wide by 16 cm tall flow duct and were ignited in microgravity using a straight hot wire across the center of the 7.5 cm wide by 14 cm long samples. Four cases, at 1 atm. 35%O2 in N2, at forced flows from 2 cm/s to 20 cm/s are presented here. This flow range captures flame spread from strictly upstream spread at low flows, to predominantly downstream spread at high flow. Surface temperature profiles are evaluated as a function of time, and temperature gradients for upstream and downstream flame spread are measured. Flame spread rates from IR image data are compared to visible image spread rate data. IR blackbody temperatures are compared to surface thermocouple readings to evaluate the effective emissivity of the pyrolyzing surface. Preheat lengths and pyrolysis lengths are evaluated both upstream and downstream of the central ignition point. A surface energy balance estimates the net heat flux from the flame to the fuel surface along the length of the fuel. Surface radiative loss and gas-phase radiation from soot are measured relative to the net heat feedback from the flame. At high surface heat loss relative to heat feedback, the downstream flame spread does not occur.

  16. Development of N_2O-MTV for low-speed flow and in-situ deployment to an integral effect test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Matthieu A.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cadell, Seth R.; Woods, Brian G.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2018-01-01

    A molecular tagging velocity (MTV) technique is developed to non-intrusively measure velocity in an integral effect test (IET) facility simulating a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor in accident scenarios. In these scenarios, the velocities are expected to be low, on the order of 1 m/s or less, which forces special requirements on the MTV tracer selection. Nitrous oxide (N_2O) is identified as a suitable seed gas to generate NO tracers capable of probing the flow over a large range of pressure, temperature, and flow velocity. The performance of N_2O-MTV is assessed in the laboratory at temperature and pressure ranging from 295 to 781 K and 1 to 3 atm. MTV signal improves with a temperature increase, but decreases with a pressure increase. Velocity precision down to 0.004 m/s is achieved with a probe time of 40 ms at ambient pressure and temperature. Measurement precision is limited by tracer diffusion, and absorption of the tag laser beam by the seed gas. Processing by cross-correlation of single-shot images with high signal-to-noise ratio reference images improves the precision by about 10% compared to traditional single-shot image correlations. The instrument is then deployed to the IET facility. Challenges associated with heat, vibrations, safety, beam delivery, and imaging are addressed in order to successfully operate this sensitive instrument in-situ. Data are presented for an isothermal depressurized conduction cooldown. Velocity profiles from MTV reveal a complex flow transient driven by buoyancy, diffusion, and instability taking place over short (30 min) time scales at sub-meter per second speed. The precision of the in-situ results is estimated at 0.027, 0.0095, and 0.006 m/s for a probe time of 5, 15, and 35 ms, respectively.

  17. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  18. Low Speed Wind Tunnel Facility (LSWTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This facility consists of a large-scale, low-speed open-loop induction wind tunnel which has been modified to house a linear turbine cascade. A 125-hp...

  19. Hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamic global bifurcations in a highly turbulent von Karman flow; Bifurcations globales hydrodynamiques et magnetohydrodynamiques dans un ecoulement de von Karman turbulent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravelet, F

    2005-09-15

    We report experimental studies of the turbulent von Karman flow, inertially stirred between counter-rotating impellers. We first study the flow and its transition from laminar to turbulent regime. We highlight the role of slowly varying large scales, due to the presence of an azimuthal mixing layer. The large scales of this flow can be unstable in turbulent regime. We study the statistics of the transitions between the different mean states. The second part is dedicated to an experiment in liquid sodium, called VKS2. We optimize the time-averaged flow in order to allow kinematic dynamo action. We report the very first results of the experiment, and discuss the role of the large scales temporal non-stationariness. (author)

  20. Low Speed Automation, a French Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sébastien, Glaser; Maurice, Cour; Lydie, Nouveliere; Alain, Lambert; Fawzi, Nashashibi; Jean-Christophe, Popieul; Benjamin, Mourllion

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Nowadays, vehicle safety is constantly increasing thanks to the improvement of vehicle passive and active safety. However, on a daily usage of the car, traffic jams remains a problem. With limited space for road infrastructure, automation of the driving task on specific situation seems to be a possible solution. The French project ABV, which stands for low speed automation, tries to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to prove the benefits. In this article, ...

  1. Low speed turbines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugol'nikov, V.V.; Kosyak, Yu.F.; Virchenko, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Work of the Kharkov turbine plant on planning and manufacture for nuclear power plants of low-speed (1500 rpm) turbines with a power of 500-1000 MW is described. The selection of a construction diagram for the turbine assembly, determined basically by the presence or absence of parts of average pressure, is considered. Special construction features of the condenser and turbine are described. Turbine K-500, with a rate of 1500 rpm, was calculated for operation in a two-loop nuclear power plant with saturated steam with intermediate separation and two-stage steam regeneration. On the base of this turbine, three models of 1000-MW turbines were developed. The first model has a cylinder of average pressure (TsSD) and a lateral condenser. The second has no TsSD but a low location of the condensers. The third has no TsSD and the condensers are located laterally. Calculations of the heat efficiency of the three types of turbines showed that several advantages are offered by the model with a TsSD. Better aerodynamic properties of the exhaust nozzles and condensers with lateral location allows decreasing the specific heat consumption to 0.5-1% or, at the same power, a 10-20% decrease in cooling water consumption

  2. Wind-tunnel investigation of the flow correction for a model-mounted angle of attack sensor at angles of attack from -10 deg to 110 deg. [Langley 12-foot low speed wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary wind tunnel investigation was undertaken to determine the flow correction for a vane angle of attack sensor over an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 110 deg. The sensor was mounted ahead of the wing on a 1/5 scale model of a general aviation airplane. It was shown that the flow correction was substantial, reaching about 15 deg at an angle of attack of 90 deg. The flow correction was found to increase as the sensor was moved closer to the wing or closer to the fuselage. The experimentally determined slope of the flow correction versus the measured angle of attack below the stall angle of attack agreed closely with the slope of flight data from a similar full scale airplane.

  3. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Business Jets Wing Using STAR-CCM+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong

    2016-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted: to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircrafts swept wing modified with (1) a laminar-flow wing glove, or (2) a seamless flap. The stall aerodynamics of these two different wing configurations were analyzed and compared with the unmodified baseline wing for low-speed flight. The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First AIAA CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop.

  4. General atomics low speed Maglev technology development program (Supplemental #3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    This report details accomplishments of the Low Speed Maglev Technology Development Program, Supplemental #3. The 4 major tasks included: guideway foundation construction, fabrication and installation of 7 guideway modules, system integration and test...

  5. HPOTP low-speed flexible rotor balancing, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed that shows promise in overcoming many balancing limitations. This method establishes one or more windows for low speed, out-of-housing balancing of flexible rotors. These windows are regions of speed and support flexibility where two conditions are simultaneously fulfilled. First, the rotor system behaves flexibly; therefore, there is separation among balance planes. Second, the response due to balance weights is large enough to reliably measure. The analytic formulation of the low-speed flexible rotor balancing method is described. The results of proof-of-principle tests conducted under the program are presented. Based on this effort, it is concluded that low speed flexible rotor balancing is a viable technology. In particular, the method can be used to balance a rotor bearing system at low speed which results in smooth operation above more than one bending critical speed. Furthermore, this balancing methodology is applicable to SSME turbopump rotors.

  6. Development of Delta Wing Aerodynamics Research in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Shabudin Mat; I. S. Ishak; Tholudin Mat Lazim; Shuhaimi Mansor; Mazuriah Said; Abdul Basid Abdul Rahman; Ahmad Shukeri Mohd. Kamaludim; Romain Brossay

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents wind tunnel experiment on two delta wing configurations which are differentiated by their leading edge profiles: sharp and round-edged wings. The experiments were performed as a part of the delta wing aerodynamics research development in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, low speed tunnel (UTM-LST). Steady load balance and flow visualization tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 × 106, respectively. The flow measurement at low Reynolds number was also per...

  7. Proactive condition monitoring of low-speed machines

    CERN Document Server

    Stamboliska, Zhaklina; Moczko, Przemyslaw

    2015-01-01

    This book broadens readers’ understanding of proactive condition monitoring of low-speed machines in heavy industries. It focuses on why low-speed machines are different than others and how maintenance of these machines should be implemented with particular attention. The authors explain the best available monitoring techniques for various equipment and the principle of how to get proactive information from each technique. They further put forward possible strategies for application of FEM for detection of faults and technical assessment of machinery. Implementation phases are described and industrial case-studies of proactive condition monitoring are included. Proactive Condition Monitoring of Low-Speed Machines is an essential resource for engineers and technical managers across a range of industries as well as design engineers working in industrial product development. This book also: ·         Explains the practice of proactive condition monitoring and illustrates implementation phases ·   ...

  8. Sleep-related vehicle crashes on low speed roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filtness, A J; Armstrong, K A; Watson, A; Smith, S S

    2017-02-01

    Very little is known about the characteristics of sleep related (SR) crashes occurring on low speed roads compared with current understanding of the role of sleep in crashes occurring on high speed roads e.g. motorways. To address this gap, analyses were undertaken to identify the differences and similarities between (1) SR crashes occurring on roads with low (≤60km/h) and high (≥100km/h) speed limits, and (2) SR crashes and not-SR crashes occurring on roads with low speed limits. Police reports of all crashes occurring on low and high speed roads over a ten year period between 2000 and 2009 were examined for Queensland, Australia. Attending police officers identified all crash attributes, including 'fatigue/fell asleep', which indicates that the police believe the crash to have a causal factor relating to falling asleep, sleepiness due to sleep loss, time of day, or fatigue. Driver or rider involvement in crashes was classified as SR or not-SR. All crash-associated variables were compared using Chi-square tests (Cramer's V=effect size). A series of logistic regression was performed, with driver and crash characteristics as predictors of crash category. A conservative alpha level of 0.001 determined statistical significance. There were 440,855 drivers or riders involved in a crash during this time; 6923 (1.6%) were attributed as SR. SR crashes on low speed roads have similar characteristics to those on high speed roads with young (16-24y) males consistently over represented. SR crashes on low speed roads are noticeably different to not-SR crashes in the same speed zone in that male and young novice drivers are over represented and outcomes are more severe. Of all the SR crashes identified, 41% occurred on low speed roads. SR crashes are not confined to high speed roads. Low speed SR crashes warrant specific investigation because they occur in densely populated areas, exposing a greater number of people to risk and have more severe outcomes than not-SR crashes

  9. Numerical Research on Effects of Turbine Outlet Flow Angle on Aerodynamic Performance of Wind-Ejector of Low-Speed Wind Turbine%涡轮出口气流角对低速风力引射器流场影响的数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩万龙; 颜培刚; 韩万金; 何玉荣

    2015-01-01

    为了开发先进的具有广泛适用性的低速风力涡轮,采用涡扇发动机喷管引射技术设计了双涵道风力涡轮,以新型低速引射式风力涡轮的引射混合器为研究对象,采用CFX商用软件基于RANS方程和k-Epsilon湍流模型,数值研究了涡轮出口气流角对风力引射器混合性能的影响。研究结果显示,涡轮出口气流与轴向夹角由0°增至30°,引起了波瓣后侧流向涡量迁移,最大正交涡量降低了1/3,波瓣内侧中部分离对涡与槽道吸力侧分离区汇合,风力引射器内流道总压损失从2.4%增大至5%,此夹角大于10°时外流场对称结构消失并失稳。%The turbofan engine nozzle ejector technology was adopted to design a high-efficiency low speed wind turbine with the double bypass for a broader areas in the world. The aerodynamic characteristics of the wind-ejector of the new wind turbine were numerically researched on turbine outlet flow angle changing based on Reyn⁃olds-averaged NS equations and k-Epsilon turbulence model, using commercial software CFX. Results show that,as the angle between turbine outlet flow and the rotation axis increased from 0°to 30°,the positive vorticity of the stream-wise vortice pairs migrated to the negative vorticity,the maximum normal vorticity was gradually reduced by 1/3,the separation vortex pairs adhesion of the lobes were gradually forced to mix with the separation vortices near the suction surface of the channels, the total pressure loss in the lobes of the wind-ejector in⁃creased from 2.4%to 5%, and if the angle was greater than 10° , the flow stability of the wind turbine outflow field rapidly disappeared.

  10. Artist rendering of dust grains colliding at low speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Clues to the formation of planets and planetary rings -- like Saturn's dazzling ring system -- may be found by studying how dust grains interact as they collide at low speeds. To study the question of low-speed dust collisions, NASA sponsored the COLLisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) at the University of Colorado. It was designed to spring-launch marble-size projectiles into trays of powder similar to space or lunar dust. COLLIDE-1 (1998) discovered that collisions below a certain energy threshold eject no material. COLLIDE-2 was designed to identify where the threshold is. In COLLIDE-2, scientists nudged small projectiles into dust beds and recorded how the dust splashed outward (video frame at top; artist's rendering at bottom). The slowest impactor ejected no material and stuck in the target. The faster impactors produced ejecta; some rebounded while others stuck in the target.

  11. Effects of curvature and rotation on turbulence in the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1992-01-01

    The flow in the NASA Low-Speed Impeller is affected by both curvature and rotation. The flow curves due to the following: (1) geometric curvature, e.g. the curvature of the hub and shroud profiles in the meridional plane and the curvature of the backswept impeller blades; and (2) secondary flow vortices, e.g. the tip leakage vortex. Changes in the turbulence and effective turbulent viscosity in the impeller are investigated. The effects of these changes on three-dimensional flow development are discussed. Two predictions of the flow in the impeller, one with, and one without modification to the turbulent viscosity due to rotation and curvature, are compared. Some experimental and theoretical background for the modified mixing length model of turbulent viscosity will also be presented.

  12. PIV Measurements in the 14 x 22 Low Speed Tunnel: Recommendations for Future Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; McGinley, Catherine B.; Paschal, Keith B.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2003-01-01

    During the period from February 4 to March 21, 2003 stereo digital particle imaging velocimetry measurements were made on a generic high lift model, the Trap Wing, as part of the High Lift Flow Physics Experiment. These measurements were the first PIV measurements made in the NASA, Langley Research Center 14 x 22 Foot Low Speed Tunnel, and several problems were encountered and solved in the acquisition of the data. It is the purpose of this paper to document the solutions to these problems and to make recommendations for further improvements to the tunnel/setup in order to facilitate future measurements of this type.

  13. Universal intermittent properties of particle trajectories in highly turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnèodo, A.; Benzi, R.; Berg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    all data sets are found to collapse onto each other on a wide range of time lags, pointing towards the existence of a universal behavior, within present statistical convergence, and calling for a unified theoretical description. Parisi-Frisch multifractal theory, suitably extended to the dissipative...

  14. Development of Delta Wing Aerodynamics Research in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabudin Mat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents wind tunnel experiment on two delta wing configurations which are differentiated by their leading edge profiles: sharp and round-edged wings. The experiments were performed as a part of the delta wing aerodynamics research development in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, low speed tunnel (UTM-LST. Steady load balance and flow visualization tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 × 106, respectively. The flow measurement at low Reynolds number was also performed at as low as speed of 5 m/s. During the experiments, laser with smoke flow visualizations test was performed on both wings. The study has identified interesting features of the interrelationship between the conventional leading edge primary vortex and the occurrence and development of the vortex breakdown above the delta wings. The results conclude the vortex characteristics are largely dependent on the Reynolds number, angle of attack, and leading-edge radii of the wing.

  15. A Numerical Investigation into Low-Speed Impact Cratering Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen; Richardson, D. C.; Michel, P.

    2012-10-01

    Impact craters are the geological features most commonly observed on the surface of solid Solar System bodies. Crater shapes and features are crucial sources of information regarding past and present surface environments, and can provide indirect information about the internal structures of these bodies. In this study, we consider the effects of low-speed impacts into granular material. Studies of low-speed impact events are suitable for understanding the cratering process leading, for instance, to secondary craters. In addition, upcoming asteroid sample return missions will employ surface sampling strategies that use impacts into the surface by a projectile. An understanding of the process can lead to better sampling strategies. We use our implementation of the Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) (Schwartz et al. 2012, Granular Matter 14, 363-380) into the parallel N-body code PKDGRAV (cf. Richardson et al. 2011, Icarus 212, 427-437) to model the impact cratering process into granular material. We consider the effects of boundary conditions on the ejecta velocity profile and discuss how results relate to the Maxwell Z-Model during the crater growth phase. Cratering simulations are compared to those of Wada et al. 2006 (Icarus 180, 528-545) and to impact experiments performed in conjunction with Hayabusa 2. This work is supported in part by grants from the National Science Foundation under grant number AST1009579 and from the Office of Space Science of NASA under grant number NNX08AM39G. Part of this study resulted from discussions with the International Team (#202) sponsored by ISSI in Bern (Switzerland). Some simulations were performed on the YORP cluster administered by the Center for Theory and Computation of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Maryland in College Park and on the SIGGAM computer cluster hosted by the Côte d'Azur Observatory in Nice (France).

  16. Low-speed shredder and waste shreddability tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnell, G.R.; Aldrich, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    Most waste drums and large crates in the nuclear industry are or will be opened by hand, in gloveboxes, or with manipulators. The Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF), which was being designed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), was no exception. The TWTF's manipulator concept required 4 to 6 hours to open and route a crate or drum for further processing; a costly operation. An alternative method was sought. Four of the relatively new low-speed shredders were tested on simulated transuranic waste packaged in 55-gal drums and 4- x 4- x 4-ft boxes. Three of the shredders were capable of shredding these containers and their contents in 1 to 15 minutes. Two were able to shred typical TWTF waste to acceptable particle size. The test waste included concrete, 1/4-in. steel plate (carbon and stainless), 1-in. rebar, rock, glass, plastic, paper, cloth, wood, steel cable, chain, etc. The two shredders were able to shred drums even with unshreddable items inside; the unshreddable items lay on top for later recovery by a manipulator while the other waste was being shredded

  17. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Further low speed testing and final design studies for the transonic facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Work was continued with the low speed self streamlining wind tunnel (SSWT) using the NACA 0012-64 airfoil in an effort to explain the discrepancies between the NASA Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel (LTPT) and SSWT results obtained with the airfoil stalled. Conventional wind tunnel corrections were applied to straight wall SSWT airfoil data, to illustrate the inadequacy of standard correction techniques in circumstances of high blockage. Also one SSWT test was re-run at different air speeds to investigate the effects of such changes (perhaps through changes in Reynold's number and freestream turbulence levels) on airfoil data and wall contours. Mechanical design analyses for the transonic self-streamlining wind tunnel (TSWT) were completed by the application of theoretical airfoil flow field data to the elastic beam and streamline analysis. The control system for the transonic facility, which will eventually allow on-line computer operation of the wind tunnel, was outlined.

  18. Experimental Research on an Active Sting Damper in a Low Speed Acoustic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnels usually use long cantilever stings to support aerodynamic models in order to reduce support system flow interference on experimental data. However, such support systems are a potential source of vibration problems which limit the test envelope and affect data quality due to the inherently low structural damping of the systems. When exposed to tunnel flow, turbulence and model flow separation excite resonant Eigenmodes of a sting structure causing large vibrations due to low damping. This paper details the development and experimental evaluation of an active damping system using piezoelectric devices with balance signal feedback both in a lab and a low speed acoustic wind tunnel and presents the control algorithm verification tests with a simple cantilever beam. It is shown that the active damper, controlled separately by both PID and BP neural network, has effectively attenuated the vibration. For sting mode only, 95% reduction of displacement response under exciter stimulation and 98% energy elimination of sting mode frequency have been achieved.

  19. STEADY STATE PERFORMANCES ANALYSIS OF MODERN MARINE TWO-STROKE LOW SPEED DIESEL ENGINE USING MLP NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozren Bukovac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the other marine engines for ship propulsion, turbocharged two-stroke low speed diesel engines have advantages due to their high efficiency and reliability. Modern low speed ”intelligent” marine diesel engines have a flexibility in its operation due to the variable fuel injection strategy and management of the exhaust valve drive. This paper carried out verified zerodimensional numerical simulations which have been used for MLP (Multilayer Perceptron neural network predictions of marine two-stroke low speed diesel engine steady state performances. The developed MLP neural network was used for marine engine optimized operation control. The paper presents an example of achieving lowest specific fuel consumption and for minimization of the cylinder process highest temperature for reducing NOx emission. Also, the developed neural network was used to achieve optimal exhaust gases heat flow for utilization. The obtained data maps give insight into the optimal working areas of simulated marine diesel engine, depending on the selected start of the fuel injection (SOI and the time of the exhaust valve opening (EVO.

  20. Experimental study of wind-turbine airfoil aerodynamics in high turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devinant, Ph.; Laverne, T.; Hureau, J. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Energetique Ecole Superieure de l' Energie et des Materiaux Universite d' Orleans, rue Leonard de Vinci F-45072 , Cedex 2 Orleans (France)

    2002-06-01

    Wind turbines very often have to operate in high turbulence related, for example, with lower layers atmospheric turbulence or wakes of other wind turbines. Most available data on airfoil aerodynamics concerns mainly aeronautical applications, which are characterized by a low level of turbulence (generally less than 1%) and low angles of attack. This paper presents wind tunnel test data for the aerodynamic properties-lift, drag, pitching moment, pressure distributions-of an airfoil used on a wind turbine when subjected to incident flow turbulence levels of 0.5-16% and placed at angles of attack up to 90. The results show that the aerodynamic behavior of the airfoil can be strongly affected by the turbulence level both qualitatively and quantitatively. This effect is especially evidenced in the angle of attack range corresponding to airfoil stall, as the boundary layer separation point advances along the leeward surface of the airfoil.

  1. Sub-harmonic broadband humps and tip noise in low-speed ring fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Stéphane; Sanjose, Marlène

    2016-01-01

    A joint experimental and numerical study has been achieved on a low-speed axial ring fan in clean inflow. Experimental evidence shows large periodic broadband humps at lower frequencies than the blade passing frequencies and harmonics even at design conditions. These sub-harmonic humps are also found to be sensitive to the fan process and consequently to its tip geometry. Softer fans yield more intense humps more shifted to lower frequencies with respect to the fan harmonics. Unsteady turbulent flow simulations of this ring fan mounted on a test plenum have been achieved by four different methods that have been validated by comparing with overall performances and detailed hot-wire velocity measurements in the wake. Noise predictions are either obtained directly or are obtained through Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings' analogy, and compared with narrowband and third-octave power spectra. All unsteady simulations correctly capture the low flow rates, the coherent vortex dynamics in the tip clearance and consequently the noise radiation dominated by the tip noise in the low- to mid-frequency range. Yet, only the scale-adaptive simulation and the lattice Boltzmann method simulations which can describe most of the turbulent structures accurately provide the proper spectral shape and levels, and consequently the overall sound power level.

  2. Inverse airfoil design method for low-speed straight-bladed Darrieus-type VAWT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, F. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Paraschivoiu, I.; Trifu, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Hess, M.; Gabrys, C. [Mariah Power Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Inverse airfoil design of a low-speed straight-bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) can help improve aerodynamic performance and power output by eliminating undesirable flow field characteristics at very low Reynolds number. This study used an interactive inverse airfoil design method (PROFOIL) that allows specification of velocity and boundary-layer characteristics over different segments of the airfoil subject to constraints on the geometry (closure) and the flow field (far field boundary). Additional constraints were also considered to address pitching moment coefficient, thickness and the power output for a given tip-speed ratio. Performance analyses of the airfoil and the VAWT were carried out using state-of-the-art analyses codes XFOIL and CARDAAV, respectively. XFOIL is a panel method with a coupled boundary-layer scheme and is used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of resulting airfoil shapes. The final airfoil geometry is obtained through a multi-dimensional Newton iteration. The study showed that the strength of the method lies in the inverse design methodology whereas its weaknesses is in reliably predicting aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at low Reynolds numbers and high angles of attack. A 10-15 per cent increase in the relative performance of the VAWT was achieved with this method. Although the results of the study showed that the method has great application potential for VAWTs in general, there is much room for improvement in flow analysis capabilities for low Re flows in reliably predicting post-stall aerodynamic characteristics. In the absence of such analysis capabilities, the authors suggested that the results should be viewed qualitatively and not quantitatively. 36 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  3. Performance Improvement of Servo Machine Low Speed Operation Using RBFN Disturbance Observer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme to estimate the moment of inertia in the servo motor drive system in very low speed is proposed in this paper. The typical speed estimation scheme in most servo system for low speed operation is sensitive to the variation of machine parameters, especially the moment of inertia....... To estimate the motor inertia value, the observer using the Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN) is applied. The effectiveness of the proposed inertia estimation method is verified by experiments. It is concluded that the speed control performance in the low speed region is improved with the proposed...

  4. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  5. An online condition monitoring system implemented an internet connectivity and FTP for low speed slew bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesarendra, W.; Kosasih, B.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Ariyanto, M.; Daryl, LWQ; Pamungkas, D.

    2018-04-01

    Rapid and reliable information in slew bearing maintenance is not trivial issue. This paper presents the online monitoring system to assist maintenance engineer in order to monitor the bearing condition of low speed slew bearing in sheet metal company. The system is able to pass the vibration information from the place where the bearing and accelerometer sensors are attached to the data center; and from the data center it can be access by opening the online monitoring website from any place and by any person. The online monitoring system is built using some programming languages such as C language, MATLAB, PHP, HTML and CSS. Generally, the flow process is start with the automatic vibration data acquisition; then features are calculated from the acquired vibration data. These features are then sent to the data center; and form the data center, the vibration features can be seen through the online monitoring website. This online monitoring system has been successfully applied in School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong.

  6. Evaluation of sounds for hybrid and electric vehicles operating at low speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    Electric vehicles (EV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), operated at low speeds may reduce auditory cues used by pedestrians to assess the state of nearby traffic creating a safety issue. This field study compares the auditory detectability of num...

  7. FTA Low-speed urban maglev research program lessons learned : March 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    In 1999, the Federal Transit Administration initiated the Low-Speed Urban Magnetic Levitation (UML) Program to develop magnetic levitation technology that offers a cost effective, reliable, and environmentally sound transit option for urban mass tran...

  8. Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Investigation of a Full-Scale UH-60 Rotor System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norman, Thomas R; Shinoda, Patrick M; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Jacklin, Stephen A; Sheikman, Alex

    2002-01-01

    .... evaluation of an Individual Blade Control system to reduce vibration and noise, 3. acquisition of low-speed performance and load data for comparison with flight test results and analyses, and 4...

  9. FTA low-speed urban Maglev research program : updated lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    In 1999, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) initiated the Low-Speed Urban Magnetic Levitation (Urban Maglev) Program to develop magnetic levitation technology that offers a cost-effective, reliable, and environmentally-sound transit option for ...

  10. The effect of low-speed drilling without irrigation on heat generation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Hyeon; Fang, Yiqin; Jeong, Seung-Mi; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2016-02-01

    In this study we evaluated heat generation during the low-speed drilling procedure without irrigation. Ten artificial bone blocks that were similar to human D1 bone were used in this study. The baseline temperature was 37.0℃. We drilled into 5 artificial bone blocks 60 times at the speed of 50 rpm without irrigation. As a control group, we drilled into an additional 5 artificial bone blocks 60 times at the speed of 1,500 rpm with irrigation. The temperature changes during diameter 2 mm drilling were measured using thermocouples. The mean maximum temperatures during drilling were 40.9℃ in the test group and 39.7℃ in the control group. Even though a statistically significant difference existed between the two groups, the low-speed drilling did not produce overheating. These findings suggest that low-speed drilling without irrigation may not lead to overheating during drilling.

  11. A Very Low-Speed Sensorless Induction Motor Drive with Online Stator Resistance identification scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaky

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, speed sensorless control of induction motor drives received great attention to avoid the different problems associated with direct speed sensors. However, low speed operation with robustness against parameter variations remains an area of research for sensorless systems. Stator resistance is of greatest importance for good operation of speed sensorless systems in low speed region. In this paper, a sliding mode current observer for an induction motor is presented. An estimation algorithm based on this observer in conjunction with Popov's hyper-stability theory is proposed to calculate the speed and stator resistance independently. The proposed speed observer with parallel stator resistance identification is firstly verified by simulation. Experimental results are included as well to demonstrate the good performance of the proposed observer and estimation algorithms at low speed.

  12. Robust and Stable Disturbance Observer of Servo System for Low-Speed Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2007-01-01

    A new scheme to estimate the moment of inertia in the servo motor drive system in very low speed is proposed in this paper. The speed estimation scheme in most servo drive systems for low-speed operation is sensitive to the variation of machine parameter, especially the moment of inertia....... To estimate the motor inertia value, the observer using the Radial Basis Function Network (RBFN) is applied. A control law for stabilizing the system and adaptive laws for updating both of the weights in the RBFN and a bounding constant are established so that the whole closed-loop system is stable...

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Heavy Fuel Oil Spray and Combustion under Low-Speed Marine Engine-Like Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available On account of their high power, thermal efficiency, good reliability, safety, and durability, low-speed two-stroke marine diesel engines are used as the main drive devices for large fuel and cargo ships. Most marine engines use heavy fuel oil (HFO as the primary fuel, however, the physical and chemical characteristics of HFO are not clear because of its complex thermophysical properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of fuel properties on the spray and combustion characteristics under two-stroke marine engine-like conditions via a sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis of fuel properties for non-reacting and reacting simulations are conducted by comparing two fuels having different physical properties, such as fuel density, dynamic viscosity, critical temperature, and surface tension. The performances of the fuels are comprehensively studied under different ambient pressures, ambient temperatures, fuel temperatures, and swirl flow conditions. From the results of non-reacting simulations of HFO and diesel fuel properties in a constant volume combustion chamber, it can be found that the increase of the ambient pressure promotes fuel evaporation, resulting in a reduction in the steady liquid penetration of both diesel and HFO; however, the difference in the vapor penetrations of HFO and diesel reduces. Increasing the swirl flow significantly influences the atomization of both HFO and diesel, especially the liquid distribution of diesel. It is also found that the ambient temperature and fuel temperature have the negative effects on Sauter mean diameter (SMD distribution. For low-speed marine engines, the combustion performance of HFO is not sensitive to activation energy in a certain range of activation energy. At higher engine speed, the difference in the effects of different activation energies on the in-cylinder pressure increases. The swirl flow in the cylinder can significantly promote fuel evaporation and

  14. Preliminary Design of the Low Speed Propulsion Air Intake of the LAPCAT-MR2 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerts, C.; Steelant, J.; Hendrick, P.

    2011-08-01

    A supersonic air intake has been designed for the low speed propulsion system of the LAPCAT-MR2 aircraft. Development has been based on the XB-70 aircraft air intake which achieves extremely high performances over a wide operation range through the combined use of variable geometry and porous wall suction for boundary layer control. Design of the LAPCAT-MR2 intake has been operated through CFD simulations using DLR TAU-Code (perfect gas model - Menter SST turbulence model). First, a new boundary condition has been validated into the DLR TAU-Code (perfect gas model) for porous wall suction modelling. Standard test cases have shown surprisingly good agreement with both theoretical predictions and experimental results. Based upon this validation, XB-70 air intake performances have been assessed through CFD simulations over the subsonic, transonic and supersonic operation regions and compared to available flight data. A new simulation strategy was deployed avoiding numerical instabilities when initiating the flow in both transonic and supersonic operation modes. First, the flow must be initiated with a far field Mach number higher than the target flight Mach number. Additionally, the inlet backpressure may only be increased to its target value once the oblique shock pattern downstream the intake compression ramps is converged. Simulations using that strategy have shown excellent agreement with in-flight measurements for both total pressure recovery ratio and variable geometry schedule prediction. The demarcation between stable and unstable operation could be well reproduced. Finally, a modified version of the XB-70 air intake has been integrated in the elliptical intake on the LAPCAT vehicle. Operation of this intake in the LAPCAT-MR2 environment is under evaluation using the same simulation strategy as the one developed for the XB-70. Performances are assessed at several key operation points to assess viability of this design. This information will allow in a next

  15. Unmanned Water Craft Identification and Adaptive Control in Low-Speed and Reversing Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This paper treats L1 adaptive hovering control of an unmanned surface vehicle in a station-keeping mode where a region of zero control authority and under-actuation are main challenges. Low-speed and reversing dynamics are identied from full scale sea trials, and parameter uncertainty is estimate...

  16. Low speed hybrid generalized predictive control of a gasoline-propelled car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M; de Madrid, A P; Mañoso, C; Milanés, V

    2015-07-01

    Low-speed driving in traffic jams causes significant pollution and wasted time for commuters. Additionally, from the passengers׳ standpoint, this is an uncomfortable, stressful and tedious scene that is suitable to be automated. The highly nonlinear dynamics of car engines at low-speed turn its automation in a complex problem that still remains as unsolved. Considering the hybrid nature of the vehicle longitudinal control at low-speed, constantly switching between throttle and brake pedal actions, hybrid control is a good candidate to solve this problem. This work presents the analytical formulation of a hybrid predictive controller for automated low-speed driving. It takes advantage of valuable characteristics supplied by predictive control strategies both for compensating un-modeled dynamics and for keeping passengers security and comfort analytically by means of the treatment of constraints. The proposed controller was implemented in a gas-propelled vehicle to experimentally validate the adopted solution. To this end, different scenarios were analyzed varying road layouts and vehicle speeds within a private test track. The production vehicle is a commercial Citroën C3 Pluriel which has been modified to automatically act over its throttle and brake pedals. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low speed sound emission test procedures. 205.54-1 Section 205.54-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205...

  18. A pro-forma design for car-carriers: Low-speed performance-based standards

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Benade R, Berman R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available the constraints of the pro-forma design met the Level 1 requirements of the low-speed PBS. Future work will ensure compliance with the full set of twelve performance standards. It is estimated that the pro-forma approach as compared to doing full assessments would...

  19. Fluid Flow Characterization of High Turbulent Intensity Compressible Flow Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    completed in order to begin further experimentation. A 10 kHz Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) system and a 3 kHz Planer Laser ...9 2.3.2 Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF...35 Figure 4.4: Solenoid valve (a), proportional control valve (b) and flowmeter (c) ...................................... 36 Figure 4.5

  20. Upwind scheme for acoustic disturbances generated by low-speed flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekaterinaris, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    , compressible how equations, A numerical method for the solution of the equations governing the acoustic field is presented. The primitive variable form of the governing equations is used for the numerical solution. Time integration is performed with a fourth-order, Runge-Kutta method, Discretization...... of the primitive variables space derivatives is obtained with a high-order, upwind-biased numerical scheme. Upwinding of these convective fluxes is performed according to the eigenvalue sign of the coefficient matrices. Nonreflecting boundary conditions are applied to properly convect outgoing waves away from...... the computational domain. Solutions are obtained for the acoustic field generated by a pair of corotating point vortices. Computed results are compared with the existing analytic solution for the sound field....

  1. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  2. An Application of CFD to Guide Forced Boundary-Layer Transition for Low-Speed Tests of a Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Deere, Karen A.; Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid transition trip-dot sizing and placement test technique was developed in support of recent experimental research on a hybrid wing-body configuration under study for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. The approach combines traditional methods with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The application had three-dimensional boundary layers that were simulated with either fully turbulent or transitional flow models using established Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Trip strip effectiveness was verified experimentally using infrared thermography during a low-speed wind tunnel test. Although the work was performed on one specific configuration, the process was based on fundamental flow physics and could be applicable to other configurations.

  3. Sand Transport under Highly Turbulent Airflow on a Beach Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, A. C. W.; Jackson, D. W. T.; Cooper, J. A. G.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, J. H. M.

    2012-04-01

    The past decade has seen a growing body of research on the relation between turbulence in the wind and the resultant transport of sediment over active sand surfaces. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated recent field studies over dunes and beach surfaces, to move beyond monitoring of mean wind speed and bulk transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a field study conducted in the recirculation flow and re-attachment zone on a beach behind a foredune at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. The offshore winds over the foredune at this site are associated with flow separation and reversal located over the beach surface in the lee of the dune row, often strong enough to induce sand transport toward the toe of the foredune ('against' the overall offshore flow). The re-attachment and recirculation zone are associated with strongly turbulent fluid flow and complex streamlines that do not follow the underlying topography. High frequency (25 Hz) wind and sand transport data were collected at a grid of point locations distributed over the beach surface between 35 m to 55 m distance from the 10 m high dune crest, using ultrasonic anemometers at 0.5 m height and co-located load cell traps and Safires at the bed surface. The wind data are used to investigate the role of Reynolds shear stresses and quadrant analysis techniques for identifying burst-sweep events in relation to sand transport events. This includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to complex flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u', v', w'). Results illustrate how transport may exist under threshold mean velocities because of the role played by coherent flow structures, and the findings corroborate previous findings that shear velocity

  4. Sensorless Characteristics of Hybrid PM Machines at Zero and Low Speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Torben N.; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2009-01-01

    Sensorless methods for zero and low speed operation in drives with hybrid PM machines make use of the machine saliency to determine the rotor position in an indirect fashion. When integrating the position measurement in the electrical power supply to the machine, i.e. make the machine self......-sensing, the sensorless obtained position can be affected by the actual operation conditions of the machine e.g. the stator currents. This may deteriorate the machine self-sensing suitability using injection methods. In this paper an analysis method based on accurate knowledge of the machine flux linkages is proposed...... for analysing the suitability for sensorless control at zero and low speed. The method can be used to evaluate a particular machine design so the self-sensing characteristics for sensorless control of machine can be found. The characteristics can be obtained from finite element simulation data or experimental...

  5. A learning-based autonomous driver: emulate human driver's intelligence in low-speed car following

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junqing; Dolan, John M.; Litkouhi, Bakhtiar

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, an offline learning mechanism based on the genetic algorithm is proposed for autonomous vehicles to emulate human driver behaviors. The autonomous driving ability is implemented based on a Prediction- and Cost function-Based algorithm (PCB). PCB is designed to emulate a human driver's decision process, which is modeled as traffic scenario prediction and evaluation. This paper focuses on using a learning algorithm to optimize PCB with very limited training data, so that PCB can have the ability to predict and evaluate traffic scenarios similarly to human drivers. 80 seconds of human driving data was collected in low-speed (car-following scenarios. In the low-speed car-following tests, PCB was able to perform more human-like carfollowing after learning. A more general 120 kilometer-long simulation showed that PCB performs robustly even in scenarios that are not part of the training set.

  6. Comparison of sensorless FOC and SVM-DTFC of PMSM for low-speed applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basar, M. Sertug; Bech, Michael Møller; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the performance analysis of Field Oriented Control (FOC) and Space Vector Modulation (SVM) Direct Torque and Flux Control (DTFC) of a Non-Salient Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) under sensorless control within low speed region. The high-frequency alternating...... with a commercially available PMSM machine. Both controllers show satisfactory sensorless performance. FOC provides smoother and more accurate response while SVM-DTFC has the advantage of faster control....

  7. Comparison of sensorless FOC and SVM-DTFC of PMSM for low-speed applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basar, Mehmet Sertug

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the performance analysis of Field Oriented Control (FOC) and Space Vector Modulation (SVM) Direct Torque and Flux Control (DTFC) of a Non-Salient Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) under sensorless control within low speed region. The high-frequency alternating...... with a commercially available PMSM machine. Both controllers show satisfactory sensorless performance. FOC provides smoother and more accurate response while SVM-DTFC has the advantage of faster control....

  8. Reconstruction of Low Speed Rear-End collisions - Technical Means of Assessing Cervical Spine Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hitzemann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, an increasing number of cervical spine injuries sustained by vehicle occupants in collisions at comparatively low speeds have been reported to insurance companies and in civil litigation. The reported injuries occur in both rear-end and side impact collisions. The paper describes how a detailed assessment of such cases requires interdisciplinary teamwork involving technical, biomechanical and medical experts.

  9. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  10. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  11. Modeling and predicting low-speed vehicle emissions as a function of driving kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lijun; Chen, Wei; Li, Lei; Tan, Jianwei; Wang, Xin; Yin, Hang; Ding, Yan; Ge, Yunshan

    2017-05-01

    An instantaneous emission model was developed to model and predict the real driving emissions of the low-speed vehicles. The emission database used in the model was measured by using portable emission measurement system (PEMS) under actual traffic conditions in the rural area, and the characteristics of the emission data were determined in relation to the driving kinematics (speed and acceleration) of the low-speed vehicle. The input of the emission model is driving cycle, and the model requires instantaneous vehicle speed and acceleration levels as input variables and uses them to interpolate the pollutant emission rate maps to calculate the transient pollutant emission rates, which will be accumulated to calculate the total emissions released during the whole driving cycle. And the vehicle fuel consumption was determined through the carbon balance method. The model predicted the emissions and fuel consumption of an in-use low-speed vehicle type model, which agreed well with the measured data. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Very-low speed control of PMSM based on EKF estimation with closed loop optimized parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Shaoguang; Liu, Jingmeng

    2013-11-01

    When calculating the speed from the position of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), the accuracy and real-time are limited by the precision of the sensor. This problem causes crawling and jitter at very-low speed. Using the angle from the position sensor, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) designed in dq-coordinate is presented to solve this problem. The usage of position sensor simplifies the model and improves the accuracy of speed estimation. Specially, a closed loop optimal (CLO) method is devised to overcome the difficulty to adjust the parameters of the EKF. The EKF is the feedback link of speed control, CLO method is derived from the perspective of the speed step response to optimize the measurement covariance matrix and the system covariance matrix of EKF. Simulation and experimental results, comparing the low-speed performance of the EKF and sensor feedback methods, prove the effectiveness of the method to adjust the parameters of EKF and the advantages in eliminating the low speed jitter. © 2013 ISA. Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  13. Disturbance observer that uses radial basis function networks for the low speed control of a servo motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Bae, C.H.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A scheme to estimate the moment of inertia in a servo motor drive system at very low speed is proposed. The typical speed estimation scheme used in most servo systems operated at low speed is highly sensitive to variations in the moment of inertia. An observer that uses a radial basis function...

  14. Background noise levels measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    The acoustic capability of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel has been significantly improved by reducing the background noise levels measured by in-flow microphones. This was accomplished by incorporating streamlined microphone holders having a profile developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center. These new holders were fabricated for fixed mounting on the tunnel wall and for an axially traversing microphone probe which was mounted to the tunnel floor. Measured in-flow noise levels in the tunnel test section were reduced by about 10 dB with the new microphone holders compared with those measured with the older, less refined microphone holders. Wake interference patterns between fixed wall microphones were measured and resulted in preferred placement patterns for these microphones to minimize these effects. Acoustic data from a model turbofan operating in the tunnel test section showed that results for the fixed and translating microphones were equivalent for common azimuthal angles, suggesting that the translating microphone probe, with its significantly greater angular resolution, is preferred for sideline noise measurements. Fixed microphones can provide a local check on the traversing microphone data quality, and record acoustic performance at other azimuthal angles.

  15. Optimal design of a for middle-low-speed maglev trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Song; Zhang, Kunlun; Liu, Guoqing; Jing, Yongzhi; Sykulski, Jan K.

    2018-04-01

    A middle-low-speed maglev train is supported by an electromagnetic force between the suspension electromagnet (EM) and the steel rail and is driven by a linear induction motor. The capability of the suspension system has a direct bearing on safety and the technical and economic performance of the train. This paper focuses on the dependence of the electromagnetic force on the structural configuration of the EM with the purpose of improving performance of a conventional EM. Finally, a novel configuration is proposed of a hybrid suspension magnet, which combines permanent magnets and coils, in order to increase the suspension force while reducing the suspension power loss.

  16. Optimal design of a for middle-low-speed maglev trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Song

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A middle-low-speed maglev train is supported by an electromagnetic force between the suspension electromagnet (EM and the steel rail and is driven by a linear induction motor. The capability of the suspension system has a direct bearing on safety and the technical and economic performance of the train. This paper focuses on the dependence of the electromagnetic force on the structural configuration of the EM with the purpose of improving performance of a conventional EM. Finally, a novel configuration is proposed of a hybrid suspension magnet, which combines permanent magnets and coils, in order to increase the suspension force while reducing the suspension power loss.

  17. Low-Speed Cooperative Car-Following Fuzzy Controller for Cybernetic Transport Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Milanés , Vicente; Marouf , Mohamed; Pérez Rastelli , Joshué; Gonzalez Bautista , David; Nashashibi , Fawzi

    2014-01-01

    International audience; — This paper describes the development of a Coop-erative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) for the future urban transportation system at low-speed. The control algorithm was evaluated using two Cybecars as prototype vehicles. A longitu-dinal response model for the vehicles was developed to design the CACC system. The control algorithm was implemented on a fuzzy logic-based controller that has been tuned to minimize a cost function in order to get a trade-off between a pro...

  18. Minimum-Voltage Vector Injection Method for Sensorless Control of PMSM for Low-Speed Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Ge; Lu, Kaiyuan; Kumar, Dwivedi Sanjeet

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a simple signal injection method is proposed for sensorless control of PMSM at low speed, which ideally requires one voltage vector only for position estimation. The proposed method is easy to implement resulting in low computation burden. No filters are needed for extracting...... may also be further developed to inject two opposite voltage vectors to reduce the effects of inverter voltage error on the position estimation accuracy. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by comparing with other sensorless control method. Theoretical analysis and experimental...

  19. Experimental Study of Low Speed Sensorless Control of PMSM Drive Using High Frequency Signal Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional techniques for sensorless control of permanent magnet synchronous motor drive (PMSM, which requires information on rotor position, are reviewed, and recent developments in this area are introduced in this paper along with their inherent advantages and drawbacks. The paper presents an improved method for sensorless speed control of PMSM drive with emphasis placed on signal injection method. This signal injection method examines the control performance of sensorless PMSM drive by injecting signal externally and thereby sensing the rotor position. The main objective of this drive system is to have speed control at standstill and low speed regions. Several tests are carried out to demonstrate the ability of proposed models at different operating conditions with the help of simulation results in Matlab/Simulink environment. Simulation results confirm that the proposed sensorless control approach of PMSM can achieve high performance at standstill and low speeds but not at very high speeds. An experimental setup is implemented using a 1HP surface mounted (SM PMSM and DsPICDEM^TM MCHV-2 development board, to check the validity of simulation results.

  20. The effect of a low-speed automatic brake system estimated from real life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson-Hellman, Irene; Lindman, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    A substantial part of all traffic accidents involving passenger cars are rear-end collisions and most of them occur at low speed. Auto Brake is a feature that has been launched in several passenger car models during the last few years. City Safety is a technology designed to help the driver mitigate, and in certain situations avoid, rear-end collisions at low speed by automatically braking the vehicle.Studies have been presented that predict promising benefits from these kinds of systems, but few attempts have been made to show the actual effect of Auto Brake. In this study, the effect of City Safety, a standard feature on the Volvo XC60 model, is calculated based on insurance claims data from cars in real traffic crashes in Sweden. The estimated claim frequency of rear-end frontal collisions measured in claims per 1,000 insured vehicle years was 23% lower for the City Safety equipped XC60 model than for other Volvo models without the system.

  1. Math modeling for helicopter simulation of low speed, low altitude and steeply descending flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P. F.; Robinson, C.; Shaw, J.; White, F.

    1982-01-01

    A math model was formulated to represent some of the aerodynamic effects of low speed, low altitude, and steeply descending flight. The formulation is intended to be consistent with the single rotor real time simulation model at NASA Ames Research Center. The effect of low speed, low altitude flight on main rotor downwash was obtained by assuming a uniform plus first harmonic inflow model and then by using wind tunnel data in the form of hub loads to solve for the inflow coefficients. The result was a set of tables for steady and first harmonic inflow coefficients as functions of ground proximity, angle of attack, and airspeed. The aerodynamics associated with steep descending flight in the vortex ring state were modeled by replacing the steady induced downwash derived from momentum theory with an experimentally derived value and by including a thrust fluctuations effect due to vortex shedding. Tables of the induced downwash and the magnitude of the thrust fluctuations were created as functions of angle of attack and airspeed.

  2. Utilisation of acoustic emission technique to monitor lubrication condition in a low speed bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin Jamaludin; Mohd Jailani Mohd Nor

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring of lubrication condition in rolling element bearings through the use of vibration analysis is an established technique. However, this success has not mirrored at low rotational speeds. At low speeds the energy generated from the poor lubricated bearing lubrication might not show as an obvious change in signature and thus become undetectable using conventional vibration measuring equipment. This paper presents an investigation into the applicability of acoustic emission technique and analysis for detecting poorly lubricated bearing rotating at a speed of 1.12 rpm. Investigations were centered on a test-rig designed to simulate the real bearing used in the field. The variation of lubricant amount in the low-speed bearing was successfully monitored using a new developed method known as pulse injection technique (PIT). The PIT technique was based on acoustic emission method. The technique involved transmitting a Dirac pulse to the test bearing via a transmitting acoustic emission sensor while the bearing was in operation. Analysing the captured acoustic emission signatures using established statistical method could differentiate between properly and poorly lubricated bearing. (Author)

  3. Investigation of the low-speed impact behavior of dual particle size metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerit, Afşın Alper

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AA2124 matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles were manufactured. • Low-speed impact behaviors of composites were investigated. • Composites were manufactured with single (SPS) and dual particle sizes (DPS). • Impact behaviors of DPS composites are more favorable than the SPS composites. • Approximately 50–60% of input energy was absorbed by the composite samples. - Abstract: SiC-reinforced aluminum matrix composites were manufactured by powder metallurgy using either single or dual particle sized SiC powders and samples sintered under argon atmosphere. Quasi-static loading, low-speed impact tests and hardness tests were used to investigate mechanical behavior and found that dual particle size composites had improved hardness and impact performance compared to single particle size composites. Sample microstructure, particle distributions, plastic deformations and post-testing damages were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified microstructure agglomerations in SPS composites. Impact traces were characterized by broken and missing SiC particles and plastically deformed composite areas

  4. Accelerated Bearing Life-time Test Rig Development for Low Speed Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Klausen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Condition monitoring plays an important role in rotating machinery to ensure reliability of the equipment, and to detect fault conditions at an early stage. Although health monitoring methodologies have been thoroughly developed for rotating machinery, low-speed conditions often pose a challenge due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. To this aim, sophisticated algorithms that reduce noise and highlight the bearing faults are necessary to accurately diagnose machines undergoing this condition. In the development phase, sensor data from a healthy and damaged bearing rotating at low-speed is required to verify the performance of such algorithms. A test rig for performing accelerated life-time testing of small rolling element bearings is designed to collect necessary sensor data. Heavy loads at high-speed conditions are applied to the test bearing to wear it out fast. Sensor data is collected in intervals during the test to capture the degeneration features. The main objective of this paper is to provide a detailed overview for the development and analysis of this test rig. A case study with experimental vibration data is also presented to illustrate the efficacy of the developed test rig.

  5. Grey Wolf based control for speed ripple reduction at low speed operation of PMSM drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerioui, Ali; Houari, Azeddine; Ait-Ahmed, Mourad; Benkhoris, Mohamed-Fouad; Chouder, Aissa; Machmoum, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    Speed ripple at low speed-high torque operation of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) drives is considered as one of the major issues to be treated. The presented work proposes an efficient PMSM speed controller based on Grey Wolf (GW) algorithm to ensure a high-performance control for speed ripple reduction at low speed operation. The main idea of the proposed control algorithm is to propose a specific objective function in order to incorporate the advantage of fast optimization process of the GW optimizer. The role of GW optimizer is to find the optimal input controls that satisfy the speed tracking requirements. The synthesis methodology of the proposed control algorithm is detailed and the feasibility and performances of the proposed speed controller is confirmed by simulation and experimental results. The GW algorithm is a model-free controller and the parameters of its objective function are easy to be tuned. The GW controller is compared to PI one on real test bench. Then, the superiority of the first algorithm is highlighted. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaporation-Driven Deposition of ITO Thin Films from Aqueous Solutions with Low-Speed Dip-Coating Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Uchiyama, Hiroaki; Kozuka, Hiromitsu

    2017-05-30

    We suggest a novel wet coating process for preparing indium tin oxide (ITO) films from simple solutions containing only metal salts and water via evaporation-driven film deposition during low-speed dip coating. Homogeneous ITO precursor films were deposited on silica glass substrates from the aqueous solutions containing In(NO 3 ) 3 ·3H 2 O and SnCl 4 ·5H 2 O by dip coating at substrate withdrawal speeds of 0.20-0.50 cm min -1 and then crystallized by the heat treatment at 500-800 °C for 10-60 min under N 2 gas flow of 0.5 L min -1 . The ITO films heated at 600 °C for 30 min had a high optical transparency in the visible range and a good electrical conductivity. Multiple-coating ITO films obtained with five-times dip coating exhibited the lowest sheet (ρ S ) and volume (ρ V ) resistivities of 188 Ω sq -1 and 4.23 × 10 -3 Ω cm, respectively.

  7. Experimental investigation about the effect of non-axisymmetric wake impact on a low speed axial compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyong; Lu, Yajun; Li, Zhiping

    2010-05-01

    Non-axisymmetric wake impact experiments were carried out after the best exciting frequency for a low speed axial compressor had been found by axisymmetric wake impact experiments. When the number and circumferential distribution of inlet guide vanes (IGV) are logical the wakes of non-axisymmetric IGVs can exert beneficial unsteady exciting effect on their downstream rotor flow fields and improve the compressor’s performance. In the present paper, four non-axisymmetric wake impact plans were found working better than the axisymmetric wake impact plan. Compared with the base plan, the best non-axisymmetric plan increased the compressor’s peak efficiency, and the total pressure rise by 1.1 and 2%, and enhanced the stall margin by 4.4%. The main reason why non-axisymmetric plans worked better than the axisymmetric plan was explained as the change of the unsteady exciting signal arising from IGV wakes. Besides the high-frequency components, the non-axisymmetric plan generated a beneficial low-frequency square-wave exciting signal and other secondary frequency components. Compared with the axisymmetric plan, multi-frequency exciting wakes arising from the non-axisymmetric plans are easier to get coupling relation with complex vortices such as clearance vortices, passage vortices and shedding vortices.

  8. Identification of the Viscous Superlayer on the Low-Speed Side of a Single-Stream Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, John; Peabody, Jason

    2010-11-01

    Image pairs (elevation/plan views) have been acquired of a smoke streakline originating in the irrotational region on the low-speed side of a high Re single-stream shear layer of Morris and Foss (2003). The viscous superlayer (VSL) is identified as the terminus of the streak; 1800 such images provide VSL position statistics. Hot-wire data acquired concurrently at the shear layer edge and interior are used to investigate the relationship between these velocity magnitudes and the large-scale motions. Distinctive features (plumes) along the streakline are tracked between images to provide discrete irrotational region velocity magnitudes and material trajectories. A non-diffusive marker, introduced in the separating (high speed) boundary layer and imaged at x/θo=352, has revealed an unexpected bias in the streak-defined VSL locations. The interpretation of this bias clarifies the induced flow patterns in the entrainment region. The observations are consistent with a conception of the large-scale shear layer motions as "billows" of vortical fluid separated by re-entrant "wedges" of irrotational fluid, per Phillips (1972). Morris, S.C. and Foss, J.F. (2003). "Turbulent Boundary Layer to Single Stream Shear Layer: The Transition Region." Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Vol. 494, pp. 187-221. Phillips, O. M. (1972). "The Entrainment Interface." Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Vol. 51, pp. 97-118.

  9. UH-60 Black Hawk Disturbance Rejection Study for Hover/Low Speed Handling Qualities Criteria and Turbulence Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Labows, Steven

    2000-01-01

    .... This paper discusses the airborne flight test of the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in turbulent conditions to determine disturbance rejection criteria and to develop a low speed turbulence...

  10. WTSETUP: Software for Creating and Editing Configuration Files in the Low Speed Wind Tunnel Data Acquisition System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Craig

    1999-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System in the Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory is responsible for the measurement, recording, processing and displaying of wind tunnel test data...

  11. Evaluation of the crash mitigation effect of low-speed automated emergency braking systems based on insurance claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson-Hellman, Irene; Lindman, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the crash mitigation performance of low-speed automated emergency braking collision avoidance technologies by examining crash rates, car damage, and personal injuries. Insurance claims data were used to identify rear-end frontal collisions, the specific situations where the low-speed automated emergency braking system intervenes. We compared cars of the same model (Volvo V70) with and without the low-speed automated emergency braking system (AEB and no AEB, respectively). Distributions of spare parts required for car repair were analyzed to identify car damage, and crash severity was estimated by comparing the results with laboratory crash tests. Repair costs and occupant injuries were investigated for both the striking and the struck vehicle. Rear-end frontal collisions were reduced by 27% for cars with low-speed AEB compared to cars without the system. Those of low severity were reduced by 37%, though more severe crashes were not reduced. Accordingly, the number of injured occupants in vehicles struck by low-speed AEB cars was reduced in low-severity crashes. In offset crash configurations, the system was found to be less effective. This study adds important information about the safety performance of collision avoidance technologies, beyond the number of crashes avoided. By combining insurance claims data and information from spare parts used, the study demonstrates a mitigating effect of low-speed AEB in real-world traffic.

  12. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  13. Multigrid solution of the Navier-Stokes equations at low speeds with large temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    Multigrid methods for the Navier-Stokes equations at low speeds and large temperature variations are investigated. The compressible equations with time-derivative preconditioning and preconditioned flux-difference splitting of the inviscid terms are used. Three implicit smoothers have been incorporated into a common multigrid procedure. Both full coarsening and semi-coarsening with directional fine-grid defect correction have been studied. The resulting methods have been tested on four 2D laminar problems over a range of Reynolds numbers on both uniform and highly stretched grids. Two of the three methods show efficient and robust performance over the entire range of conditions. In addition, none of the methods has any difficulty with the large temperature variations

  14. Influence of Low Speed Rolling Movement on High Electrical Breakdown for Water Dielectric with Microsecond Charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zicheng; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua

    2006-01-01

    By means of a coaxial apparatus, high electrical breakdown experiments are carried out in the rest state and the low speed rolling state with microsecond charging and the experimental results are analyzed. The conclusions are: (1) the breakdown stress of water dielectric in the rolling state is in good agreement with that in Martin formula, and so is that in the rest state; (2) the breakdown stress of water dielectric in the rolling state is about 5% higher than that in the rest state; (3) the results simulated with ANSYS demonstrate that the breakdown stress of water dielectric decreases when the bubbles appear near the surface of electrodes; (4) the primary mechanism to increase the breakdown stress of water dielectric in the rolling state is that the bubbles are driven away and the number of bubbles near the surface of electrodes is decreased by rolling movement

  15. Coupled vibration analysis of Maglev vehicle-guideway while standing still or moving at low speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Jung; Han, Jong-Boo; Han, Hyung-Suk; Yang, Seok-Jo

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic instability, that is, resonance, may occur on an electromagnetic suspension-type Maglev that runs over the elevated guideway, particularly at very low speeds, due to the flexibility of the guideway. An analysis of the dynamic interaction between the vehicle and guideway is required at the design stage to investigate such instability, setting slender guideway in design direction for reducing construction costs. In addition, it is essential to design an effective control algorithm to solve the problem of instability. In this article, a more detailed model for the dynamic interaction of vehicle/guideway is proposed. The proposed model incorporates a 3D full vehicle model based on virtual prototyping, flexible guideway by a modal superposition method and levitation electromagnets including feedback controller into an integrated model. By applying the proposed model to an urban Maglev vehicle newly developed for commercial application, an analysis of the instability phenomenon and an investigation of air gap control performance are carried out through a simulation.

  16. Wind turbine blades for harnessing energy from Malaysian low speed wind - manufacturing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abas Abd Wahab; Azmin Shakrine

    2000-01-01

    Blades for wind turbine to harness energy in the Malaysia low speed winds have been designed. During wind tunnel testing, wind turbine model using this type of blades has cut in speed of 1.5 m/s and turned at 450 rpm at 4 m/s wind. The blades, due to their critical dimensions of 1.2 m length, 5 cm thickness, tapered and 15 degree twist, were difficult to produce especially in large number. Several production methods have been studied but for economical mass production, fibreglass blades using CNC cutting mould were chosen. The blade and mould designs and the manufacturing processes are briefly outlined in this paper. (Author)

  17. Pigeons produce aerodynamic torques through changes in wing trajectory during low speed aerial turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Ivo G; Badger, Marc A; Pierson, Alyssa N; Bassman, Lori C; Biewener, Andrew A

    2015-02-01

    The complexity of low speed maneuvering flight is apparent from the combination of two critical aspects of this behavior: high power and precise control. To understand how such control is achieved, we examined the underlying kinematics and resulting aerodynamic mechanisms of low speed turning flight in the pigeon (Columba livia). Three birds were trained to perform 90 deg level turns in a stereotypical fashion and detailed three-dimensional (3D) kinematics were recorded at high speeds. Applying the angular momentum principle, we used mechanical modeling based on time-varying 3D inertia properties of individual sections of the pigeon's body to separate angular accelerations of the torso based on aerodynamics from those based on inertial effects. Directly measured angular accelerations of the torso were predicted by aerodynamic torques, justifying inferences of aerodynamic torque generation based on inside wing versus outside wing kinematics. Surprisingly, contralateral asymmetries in wing speed did not appear to underlie the 90 deg aerial turns, nor did contralateral differences in wing area, angle of attack, wingbeat amplitude or timing. Instead, torso angular accelerations into the turn were associated with the outside wing sweeping more anteriorly compared with a more laterally directed inside wing. In addition to moving through a relatively more retracted path, the inside wing was also more strongly pronated about its long axis compared with the outside wing, offsetting any difference in aerodynamic angle of attack that might arise from the observed asymmetry in wing trajectories. Therefore, to generate roll and pitch torques into the turn, pigeons simply reorient their wing trajectories toward the desired flight direction. As a result, by acting above the center of mass, the net aerodynamic force produced by the wings is directed inward, generating the necessary torques for turning. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Effects of Sweep Angle on the Boundary-Layer Stability Characteristics of an Untapered Wing at Low Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Frederick W.; Kenyon, George C.; Allen, Clyde Q.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to determine the effects of sweep on the boundary-layer stability characteristics of an untapered variable-sweep wing having an NACA 64(2)A015 section normal to the leading edge. Pressure distribution and transition were measured on the wing at low speeds at sweep angles of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 deg. and at angles of attack from -3 to 3 deg. The investigation also included flow-visualization studies on the surface at sweep angles from 0 to 50 deg. and total pressure surveys in the boundary layer at a sweep angle of 30 deg. for angles of attack from -12 to 0 deg. It was found that sweep caused premature transition on the wing under certain conditions. This effect resulted from the formation of vortices in the boundary layer when a critical combination of sweep angle, pressure gradient, and stream Reynolds number was attained. A useful parameter in indicating the combined effect of these flow variables on vortex formation and on beginning transition is the crossflow Reynolds number. The critical values of crossflow Reynolds number for vortex formation found in this investigation range from about 135 to 190 and are in good agreement with those reported in previous investigations. The values of crossflow Reynolds number for beginning transitions were found to be between 190 and 260. For each condition (i.e., development of vortices and initiation of transition at a given location) the lower values in the specified ranges were obtained with a light coating of flow-visualization material on the surface. A method is presented for the rapid computation of crossflow Reynolds number on any swept surface for which the pressure distribution is known. From calculations based on this method, it was found that the maximum values of crossflow Reynolds number are attained under conditions of a strong pressure gradient and at a sweep angle of about 50 deg. Due to the primary dependence on pressure

  19. Robust and Stable Disturbance Observer of Servo System for Low Speed Operation Using the Radial Basis Function Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new scheme to estimate the moment of inertia in the servo motor drive system in very low speed is proposed in this paper. The speed estimation scheme in most servo drive systems for low speed operation is sensitive to the variation of machine parameter, especially the moment of inertia....... To estimate the motor inertia value, the observer using the Radial Basis Function Network (RBFN) is applied. A control law for stabilizing the system and adaptive laws for updating both of the weights in the RBFN and a bounding constant are established so that the whole closed-loop system is stable...... in the sense of Lyapunov. The effectiveness of the proposed inertia estimation is verified by simulations and experiments. It is concluded that the speed control performance in low speed region is improved with the proposed disturbance observer using RBFN....

  20. Optimizing Low Speed VoIP Network for Rural Next Generation Network (R-NGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoanes Bandung

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we propose an optimization method based-on E-Model for designing an efficient low speed VoIP network for Rural Next Generation Network (R-NGN. We are choosing 128 kbps and 256 kbps bandwidth as the typical community link to be used in the designing of R-NGN infrastructure. The method is based on selection of some VoIP network parameters such as voice coder, communication protocol, packet loss level, network utilization and resource allocation. We draw analytic approach for achieving rating value (R of E-model that represent level of quality of service. In this approach, we focus on delay and packet loss calculation to find the rating value. We state the rating value = 70 as minimum level of quality of service for each call, equivalent to 3.6 of Mean Opinion Score (MOS. In our experiments, either G.723.1 5.3 kbps or G.729 is chosen for maximizing the number of VoIP calls, it depends on link utilization and level of packet loss.

  1. Low Speed Longitudinal Control Algorithms for Automated Vehicles in Simulation and Real Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marcano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS acting over throttle and brake are already available in level 2 automated vehicles. In order to increase the level of automation new systems need to be tested in an extensive set of complex scenarios, ensuring safety under all circumstances. Validation of these systems using real vehicles presents important drawbacks: the time needed to drive millions of kilometers, the risk associated with some situations, and the high cost involved. Simulation platforms emerge as a feasible solution. Therefore, robust and reliable virtual environments to test automated driving maneuvers and control techniques are needed. In that sense, this paper presents a use case where three longitudinal low speed control techniques are designed, tuned, and validated using an in-house simulation framework and later applied in a real vehicle. Control algorithms include a classical PID, an adaptive network fuzzy inference system (ANFIS, and a Model Predictive Control (MPC. The simulated dynamics are calculated using a multibody vehicle model. In addition, longitudinal actuators of a Renault Twizy are characterized through empirical tests. A comparative analysis of results between simulated and real platform shows the effectiveness of the proposed framework for designing and validating longitudinal controllers for real automated vehicles.

  2. Risk Factors Associated with Injury and Mortality from Paediatric Low Speed Vehicle Incidents: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Paul Anthikkat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study reviews modifiable risk factors associated with fatal and nonfatal injury from low-speed vehicle runover (LSVRO incidents involving children aged 0–15 years. Data Sources. Electronic searches for child pedestrian and driveway injuries from the peer-reviewed literature and transport-related websites from 1955 to 2012. Study Selection. 41 studies met the study inclusion criteria. Data Extraction. A systematic narrative summary was conducted that included study design, methodology, risk factors, and other study variables. Results. The most commonly reported risk factors for LSVRO incidents included age under 5 years, male gender, and reversing vehicles. The majority of reported incidents involved residential driveways, but several studies identified other traffic and nontraffic locations. Low socioeconomic status and rental accommodation were also associated with LSVRO injury. Vehicles were most commonly driven by a family member, predominantly a parent. Conclusion. There are a number of modifiable vehicular, environmental, and behavioural factors associated with LSVRO injuries in young children that have been identified in the literature to date. Strategies relating to vehicle design (devices for increased rearward visibility and crash avoidance systems, housing design (physical separation of driveway and play areas, and behaviour (driver behaviour, supervision of young children are discussed.

  3. Computational study on the effect of a conical spring on handling of buses at low speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Aravind

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Handling and ride characteristic are dependent to a large extent on the characteristic of a vehicle’s suspension system. This work explores the effect of the use of conical spring in place of conventional cylindrical profiled helical spring design in the handling of a bus at low speeds through full vehicle multi-body simulations. The bus was modelled using standard template available in ADAMSTM software package. The vehicle inertial properties were verified against properties in literature. The conventional spring characteristic (L from ADAMSTM database was taken as reference and compared it with a non-linear characteristic (NL based on literature data. The planned maneuover was to execute a right turn based on standard road dimension inputs from IRC 86:1983 at a constant speed of 30 km/hour with acceleration controlled by software module. Chassis displacements, displacements of spring were tracked to understand handling and ride quality. The variation of chassis displacements showed a significant improvement in ride characteristic of vehicle with most vibrations being damped in NL at time lower than the L characteristic suspension. All through the study, lateral acceleration was well within the rollover threshold and tire interaction forces did not exhibit any significant changes.

  4. Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System User`s Guide, June 1, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitus, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Jatko, W.B.; Manges, W.W.; Treece, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (LS-FICS) uses a Sun workstation controlling a Lenzar ElectroOptics Opacity 1000 imaging system to digitize fingerprint card images to support the Federal Bureau of Investigation`s (FBI`s) Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) program. The system also supports the operations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- (ORNL-) developed Image Transmission Network (ITN) prototype card scanning system. The input to the system is a single FBI fingerprint card of the agreed-upon standard format and a user-specified identification number. The output is a file formatted to be compatible with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) draft standard for fingerprint data exchange dated June 10, 1992. These NIST compatible files contain the required print and text images. The LS-FICS is designed to provide the FBI with the capability of scanning fingerprint cards into a digital format. The FBI will replicate the system to generate a data base of test images. The Host Workstation contains the image data paths and the compression algorithm. A local area network interface, disk storage, and tape drive are used for the image storage and retrieval, and the Lenzar Opacity 1000 scanner is used to acquire the image. The scanner is capable of resolving 500 pixels/in. in both x and y directions. The print images are maintained in full 8-bit gray scale and compressed with an FBI-approved wavelet-based compression algorithm. The text fields are downsampled to 250 pixels/in. and 2-bit gray scale. The text images are then compressed using a lossless Huffman coding scheme. The text fields retrieved from the output files are easily interpreted when displayed on the screen. Detailed procedures are provided for system calibration and operation. Software tools are provided to verify proper system operation.

  5. An Investigation of Large Tilt-Rotor Hover and Low Speed Handling Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpica, Carlos A.; Decker, William A.; Theodore, Colin R.; Lindsey, James E.; Lawrence, Ben; Blanken, Chris L.

    2011-01-01

    A piloted simulation experiment conducted on the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator evaluated the hover and low speed handling qualities of a large tilt-rotor concept, with particular emphasis on longitudinal and lateral position control. Ten experimental test pilots evaluated different combinations of Attitude Command-Attitude Hold (ACAH) and Translational Rate Command (TRC) response types, nacelle conversion actuator authority limits and inceptor choices. Pilots performed evaluations in revised versions of the ADS-33 Hover, Lateral Reposition and Depart/Abort MTEs and moderate turbulence conditions. Level 2 handling qualities ratings were primarily recorded using ACAH response type in all three of the evaluation maneuvers. The baseline TRC conferred Level 1 handling qualities in the Hover MTE, but there was a tendency to enter into a PIO associated with nacelle actuator rate limiting when employing large, aggressive control inputs. Interestingly, increasing rate limits also led to a reduction in the handling qualities ratings. This led to the identification of a nacelle rate to rotor longitudinal flapping coupling effect that induced undesired, pitching motions proportional to the allowable amount of nacelle rate. A modification that counteracted this effect significantly improved the handling qualities. Evaluation of the different response type variants showed that inclusion of TRC response could provide Level 1 handling qualities in the Lateral Reposition maneuver by reducing coupled pitch and heave off axis responses that otherwise manifest with ACAH. Finally, evaluations in the Depart/Abort maneuver showed that uncertainty about commanded nacelle position and ensuing aircraft response, when manually controlling the nacelle, demanded high levels of attention from the pilot. Additional requirements to maintain pitch attitude within 5 deg compounded the necessary workload.

  6. Coupled vibration study of the blade of the flexible wind wheel with the low-speed shafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L Y; Zhao, R Z; Liu, H; Meng, Z R

    2013-01-01

    Movement and deformation of flexible wind wheel has a profound effect on dynamics of the low-speed shafting in Megawatt wind turbine. The paper is based on the power production1.2 MW wind turbine, vibration characteristics of elastic wind wheel with the low-speed shafting were studied. In order to obtain the finite element model, the author created a physical model of this coupled system and used the minimum energy principle to simplify the model. While its single blade simplified as cantilever. Using modal superposition method for solving the coupled system model. Structural mechanics equations were used to solve the simple blade finite element model. Analyzing the natural frequency of the coupled system and the stress diagram, the results indicate that in the coupling system, low frequency vibration occurs in the low-speed shaft bearing, while the high-frequency vibration happens on wind turbine blades. In the low-frequency vibration process, blades vibration and low-speed shaft vibration there is a strong correlation. Contrast inherent frequency of the wind wheel with natural frequency of a single blade, the results show that the frequency of the wind wheel slightly less than it in the single blade

  7. Improvement of low speed induction generator performances and reducing the power of excitation and voltage control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budisan, N. [Politechnica Univ. of Timisoara (Romania); Hentea, T.; Mahil, S. [Purdue Univ. Calumet, Hammond, IN (United States); Madescu, G. [Romanian Academy, Timisoara (Romania)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present the results of our investigations concerning the utilization of induction generators at very low speed. It is shown that, by proper design, it is possible to obtain high efficiency and high power factor values. The optimized induction generators require lower reactive power resulting in lower size and price of the excitation control system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Laboratory Scale Prototype of a Low-Speed Electrodynamic Levitation System Based on a Halbach Magnet Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniguez, J.; Raposo, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of a small-scale model of a magnetic levitation system based on the Inductrack concept. Drag and lift forces acting on our prototype, moving above a continuous copper track, are studied analytically following a simple low-speed approach. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical…

  9. Flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques are reviewed, with particular attention given to those applicable to liquid helium flows. Three techniques capable of obtaining qualitative and quantitative measurements of complex 3D flow fields are discussed including focusing schlieren, particle image volocimetry, and holocinematography (HCV). It is concluded that the HCV appears to be uniquely capable of obtaining full time-varying, 3D velocity field data, but is limited to the low speeds typical of liquid helium facilities. 8 refs

  10. Occupant kinematics in low-speed frontal sled tests: Human volunteers, Hybrid III ATD, and PMHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Franck, Christopher T; Loftus, Stephen C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 34 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed, 17 low (2.5g, Δv=4.8kph) and 17 medium (5.0g, Δv=9.7kph), with five male human volunteers of approximately 50th percentile height and weight, a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD, and three male PMHS. Each volunteer was exposed to two impulses at each severity, one relaxed and one braced prior to the impulse. A total of four tests were performed at each severity with the ATD and one trial was performed at each severity with each PMHS. A Vicon motion analysis system, 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D kinematics (±1mm) (1kHz). Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. The forward excursions of the select anatomical regions generally increased with increasing severity. The forward excursions of relaxed human volunteers were significantly larger than those of the ATD for nearly every region at both severities. The forward excursions of the upper body regions of the braced volunteers were generally significantly smaller than those of the ATD at both severities. Forward excursions of the relaxed human volunteers and PMHSs were fairly similar except the head CG response at both severities and the right knee and C7 at the medium severity. The forward excursions of the upper body of the PMHS were generally significantly larger than those of the braced volunteers at both severities. Forward excursions of the PMHSs exceeded those of the ATD for all regions at both severities with significant differences within the upper body regions. Overall human volunteers, ATD, and PMHSs do not have identical biomechanical responses in low-speed frontal sled tests but all contribute valuable data that can be used to refine and validate computational models and ATDs used to assess injury risk in automotive collisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A correlation for single phase turbulent mixing in square rod arrays under highly turbulent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kwon, Young Min; Chang, Won Pyo; Lee, Yong Bum

    2006-01-01

    The existing experimental data related to the turbulent mixing factor in rod arrays is examined and a new definition of the turbulent mixing factor is introduced to take into account the turbulent mixing of fluids with various Prandtl numbers. The new definition of the mixing factor is based on the eddy diffusivity of energy. With this definition of the mixing factor, it was found that the geometrical parameter, δ ij /D h , correlates the turbulent mixing data better than S/d, which has been used frequently in existing correlations. Based on the experimental data for a highly turbulent condition in square rod arrays, a correlation describing turbulent mixing dependent on the parameter δ ij /D h has been developed. The correlation is insensitive to the Re number and it takes into account the effect of the turbulent Prandtl number. The proposed correlation predicts a reasonable mixing even at a lower S/d ratio

  12. Performance of a Low Speed Axial Compressor Rotor Blade Row under Different Inlet Distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taghavi Zenouz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Responses of an axial compressor isolated rotor blade row to various inlet distortions have been investigated utilizing computational fluid dynamic technique. Distortions have been imposed by five screens of different geometries, but with the same blockage ratio. These screens were embedded upstream of the rotor blade row. Flow fields are simulated in detail for compressor design point and near stall conditions. Performance curves for distorted cases are extracted and compared to the undisturbed case. Flow simulations and consequent performance characteristics show that the worst cases belong to non-symmetric blockages, i.e., those of partial circumferential configurations. These cases produce the largest wakes which can disturb the flow, considerably. Superior performances correspond to the inner and outer continuous circumferential distortion screens. Since, they produce no significant disturbances to the main flow in comparison to the non-symmetric screens.

  13. Low-Speed Control of Heavy-Load Transfer Robot with Long Telescopic Boom Based on Stribeck Friction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo You

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The severe low-speed creep phenomenon occurs in the telescopic boom system of a heavy-load transfer robot with a long telescopic boom as a result of nonlinear friction. In order to improve control precision and operation performance at low speeds, we built a three-loop control nonlinear model of an AC servo motor with Stribeck friction disturbance. Traditional proportional-integral-derivative controller (PID and fuzzy PID controls were, respectively, adopted in the position loop, and the control performance was simulated. The results showed that a system with fuzzy PID control eliminates “flat top” position tracking and “dead zone” speed tracking, which are generated by traditional PID, and thereby decreases the effect of friction on the performance of the servo system. This elimination also improved the tracking accuracy and robustness of the system.

  14. Laboratory scale prototype of a low-speed electrodynamic levitation system based on a Halbach magnet array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniguez, J; Raposo, V

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of a small-scale model of a magnetic levitation system based on the Inductrack concept. Drag and lift forces acting on our prototype, moving above a continuous copper track, are studied analytically following a simple low-speed approach. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. 3D-numerical simulations are also used to highlight the significance of the edge effects and to extrapolate the results to higher speeds

  15. Laboratory scale prototype of a low-speed electrodynamic levitation system based on a Halbach magnet array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iniguez, J; Raposo, V [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37071 (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of a small-scale model of a magnetic levitation system based on the Inductrack concept. Drag and lift forces acting on our prototype, moving above a continuous copper track, are studied analytically following a simple low-speed approach. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. 3D-numerical simulations are also used to highlight the significance of the edge effects and to extrapolate the results to higher speeds.

  16. M2-F1 in flight during low-speed car tow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 shown in flight during a low-speed car tow runs across the lakebed. Such tests allowed about two minutes to test the vehicle's handling in flight. NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) personnel conducted as many as 8 to 14 ground-tow flights in a single day either to test the vehicle in preparation for air tows or to train pilots to fly the vehicle before they undertook air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30

  17. Acoustic Performance of the GEAE UPS Research Fan in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel in 1994. The Universal Propulsion Simulator fan was designed and manufactured by General Electric Aircraft Engines, and included an active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The fan was tested with several rotors featuring unswept, forward-swept and aft-swept designs of both metal and composite construction. Sideline acoustic data were taken with both hard and acoustically treated walls in the flow passages. The fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20, which is representative of aircraft takeoff/approach conditions. All rotors showed similar aerodynamic performance. However, the composite rotors typically showed higher noise levels than did corresponding metal rotors. Aft and forward rotor sweep showed at most modest reductions of transonic multiple pure tone levels. However, rotor sweep often introduced increased rotor-stator interaction tone levels. Broadband noise was typically higher for the composite rotors and also for the aft-swept metal rotor. Transonic MPT generation was reduced with increasing fan axis angle of attack (AOA); however, higher downstream noise levels did increase with AOA resulting in higher overall Effective Perceived Noise Level.

  18. Comparison of peri-implant bone loss between conventional drilling with irrigation versus low-speed drilling without irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Chover, H; Peñarrocha-Oltra, D; Aloy-Prosper, A; Sanchis-Gonzalez, J-C; Peñarrocha-Diago, M-A; Peñarrocha-Diago, M

    2017-11-01

    To compare the technique of high speed drilling with irrigation and low speed drilling without irrigation in order to evaluate the success rate and peri-implant bone loss at 12 months of follow-up. A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial was carried out in patients requiring dental implants to rehabilitate their unitary edentulism. Patients were recruited from the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia (Spain) between September 2014 and August 2015. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomized to two groups: group A (high-speed drilling with irrigation) and group B (low-speed drilling without irrigation). The success rate and peri-implant bone loss were recorded at 12 months of follow-up. Twenty-five patients (9 men and 16 women) with 30 implants were enrolled in the study: 15 implants in group A and 15 implants in group B. The mean bone loss of the implants in group A and group B was 0.83 ± 0.73 mm and 0.62 ± 0.70 mm, respectively (p> 0.05). In the maxilla, the bone loss was 1.04 ± 0.63 mm in group A and 0.71 ± 0.36 mm in group B (p> 0.05), while bone loss in the mandible was 0.59 ± 0.80 mm in group A and 0.69 ± 0.77 mm in group B (p> 0.05). The implant success rate at 12 months was 93.3% in group A and 100% in group B. Within the limitations of the study, the low-speed drilling technique presented peri-implant bone loss outcomes similar to those of the conventional drilling technique at 12 months of follow-up.

  19. Visualization of the heat release zone of highly turbulent premixed jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Liang; Tan, Jianguo; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-10-01

    Visualization of the heat release zone (HRZ) of highly turbulent flames is significantly important to understand the interaction between turbulence and chemical reactions, which is the foundation to design and optimize engines. Simultaneous measurements of OH and CH2O using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were performed to characterize the HRZ. A well-designed piloted premixed jet burner was employed to generate four turbulent premixed CH4/air jet flames, with different jet Reynolds numbers (Rejet) ranging from 4900 to 39200. The HRZ was visualized by both the gradient of OH and the pixel-by-pixel product of OH and CH2O. It is shown that turbulence has an increasing effect on the spatial structure of the flame front with an increasing height above the jet exit for the premixed jet flames, which results in the broadening of the HRZ and the increase of the wrinkling. The HRZ remains thin as the Rejet increases, whereas the preheat zone is significantly broadened and thickened. This indicates that the smallest turbulent eddies can only be able to enter the flame front rather than the HRZ in the present flame conditions. The flame quenching is observed with Rejet = 39200, which may be due to the strong entrainment of the cold air from outside of the burned gas region.

  20. Low-Speed Stability-and-Control and Ground-Effects Measurements on the Industry Reference High Speed Civil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Yaros, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a national effort to develop an economically feasible High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), a single configuration has been accepted as the testing baseline by the organizations working in the High Speed Research (HSR) program. The configuration is based on a design developed by the Boeing Company and is referred to as the Reference H (Ref H). The data contained in this report are low-speed stability-and-control and ground-effect measurements obtained on a 0.06 scale model of the Ref H in a subsonic tunnel.

  1. Turbofan Noise Studied in Unique Model Research Program in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive aeroacoustic research program called the Source Diagnostic Test was recently concluded in NASA Glenn Research Center's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The testing involved representatives from Glenn, NASA Langley Research Center, GE Aircraft Engines, and the Boeing Company. The technical objectives of this research were to identify the different source mechanisms of noise in a modern, high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine through scale-model testing and to make detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements to more fully understand the physics of how turbofan noise is generated.

  2. Remote operation over low speed, high latency links; Operacao remota confiavel usando circuitos de baixa velocidade e alta latencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Marcelo D.; Nunes, Ildemar P. [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia Brasil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Remote Control and monitoring of a compressor station with more than 3000 tags can be a hard task to accomplish over a low speed satellite link. This paper presents Datasync, an application specially developed to provide acceptable performance levels over a VSAT link. One of its main features is to enable the establishment of communication dead bands. The dead bands can be altered while the application is running (no restart is needed), so that the operator is able to increase a specific tag's dead band immediately after detecting that it is reporting too many exceptions, which would cause an increase on the traffic and response times. (author)

  3. Performance Comparison of Two Topologies Double-Fed Brushless Machine with 36 Slots for Low-Speed Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The performances of two topologies of low-speed double-fed brushless machine (DFBM with fractional slot windings are quantitatively compared and analyzed using two-dimensional (2-D finite element method (FEM. To fairly compare the torque capability and power efficiency of different DFBMs, the investigated DFBMs have the same outer diameter, the same axial stack length and the same iron core materials, and some comparison rules are presented. In order to maximize the torque density, several important structure parameters are optimized. The results of this paper reveal the torque density levels and power density levels of two kinds of DFBMs.

  4. POD analysis of the instability mode of a low-speed streak in a laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Si-Chao; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jin-Jun; Rinoshika, Akira

    2017-12-01

    The instability of one single low-speed streak in a zero-pressure-gradient laminar boundary layer is investigated experimentally via both hydrogen bubble visualization and planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. A single low-speed streak is generated and destabilized by the wake of an interference wire positioned normal to the wall and in the upstream. The downstream development of the streak includes secondary instability and self-reproduction process, which leads to the generation of two additional streaks appearing on either side of the primary one. A proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis of PIV measured velocity field is used to identify the components of the streak instability in the POD mode space: for a sinuous/varicose type of POD mode, its basis functions present anti-symmetric/symmetric distributions about the streak centerline in the streamwise component, and the symmetry condition reverses in the spanwise component. It is further shown that sinuous mode dominates the turbulent kinematic energy (TKE) through the whole streak evolution process, the TKE content first increases along the streamwise direction to a saturation value and then decays slowly. In contrast, varicose mode exhibits a sustained growth of the TKE content, suggesting an increasing competition of varicose instability against sinuous instability.

  5. A comparison of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) strategies at high load, low speed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuri, Chaitanya; Paz, Jordan; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Targeting high load-low speed, optimizations of RCCI and GCI strategies were performed. • The two strategies were compared in terms of performance, controllability and stability. • The optimum cases had high gross indicated efficiency (∼47%) and low NOx emissions. • RCCI strategy showed better combustion control but had higher soot emissions. • GCI strategy was relatively more sensitive to fluctuations in charge conditions. - Abstract: Past research has shown that Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) combustion are promising approaches to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. However, the benefits have generally been confined to mid-load operating conditions. To enable practical application, these approaches must be able to operate over the entire engine map. A particularly challenging area is high load, low speed operation. Accordingly, the present work uses detailed CFD modeling and engine experiments to compare RCCI and GCI combustion strategies at a high load, low speed condition. Computational optimizations of RCCI and GCI combustion were performed at 20 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and 1300 rev/min. The optimum points from the two combustion strategies were verified using engine experiments and were used to make the comparisons between RCCI and GCI combustion. The comparison showed that both the strategies had very similar combustion characteristics with a near top dead center injection initiating combustion. A parametric study was performed to identify the key input parameters that control combustion for the RCCI and GCI strategies. For both strategies, the combustion phasing could be controlled by the start of injection (SOI) timing of the near TDC injection. The short ignition delay of diesel fuel gave the RCCI strategy better control over combustion than the GCI strategy, but also had a simultaneous tradeoff with soot emissions. With the GCI

  6. Modelling and design optimization of low speed fuel cell - battery hybrid electric vehicles. Paper no. IGEC-1-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, M.; Dong, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A push for electric vehicles has occurred in the past several decades due to various concerns about air pollution and the contribution of emissions to global climate change. Although electric cars and buses have been the focus of much of electric vehicle development, smaller vehicles are used extensively for transportation and utility purposes in many countries. In order to explore the viability of fuel cell - battery hybrid electric vehicles, empirical fuel cell system data has been incorporated into the NREL's vehicle design and simulation tool, ADVISOR (ADvanced Vehicle SimulatOR), to predict the performance of a low-speed, fuel cell - battery electric vehicle through MATLAB Simulink. The modelling and simulation provide valuable feedback to the design optimization of the fuel cell power system. A sampling based optimization algorithm was used to explore the viability and options of a low cost design for urban use. (author)

  7. Benefits of sequential turbocharging in improving high torque/low speed operation of medium speed diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyluk, P.; Gutoski, G. [Coltec Industries Inc., Fairbanks Morse Engine Division (United States); Chen, S.K. [PEI Consultants (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the benefits of sequential turbocharging in improving the operating envelope of a medium speed diesel engine. In particular, the high torque, low speed performance envelope can be greatly extended over that of a standard medium speed engine and, in addition, can offer improved operating range over what has been achieved with compressor air bypass/waste gate systems. This paper compares the three approaches on the basis of possible operating envelopes for a specific application, the new U.S. Navy LPD-17 amphibious assault ship, which has a very demanding requirement for high torque at low engine speed and low ambient temperatures. Comparison is made to the earlier approach to extend the operating envelope on the U.S. Navy LSD-41 class engines. The LSD-41 fleet has been in service since 1985 running with a compressor air bypass system developed jointly by Lockheed Shipyard and Coltec Industries for the U.S. Navy. (au)

  8. Fractional-Order Generalized Predictive Control: Application for Low-Speed Control of Gasoline-Propelled Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in using fractional calculus applied to control theory generalizing classical control strategies as the PID controller and developing new ones with the intention of taking advantage of characteristics supplied by this mathematical tool for the controller definition. In this work, the fractional generalization of the successful and spread control strategy known as model predictive control is applied to drive autonomously a gasoline-propelled vehicle at low speeds. The vehicle is a Citroën C3 Pluriel that was modified to act over the throttle and brake pedals. Its highly nonlinear dynamics are an excellent test bed for applying beneficial characteristics of fractional predictive formulation to compensate unmodeled dynamics and external disturbances.

  9. Sensorless Control of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor in Low-Speed Region Using Novel Adaptive Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisi Tian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel position and speed estimation method for low-speed sensorless control of interior permanent-magnet synchronous machines (IPMSMs. The parameter design of the position and speed estimator is based on the sampled current rather than the motor electrical parameters. The proposed method not only simplifies the parameter design, it enables the estimator to work normally even in the condition that the electrical parameters are uncertain or varied. The adaptive filters are adopted to extract the desired high frequency current. The structure and corresponding transfer function are analyzed. To address the shortage of insufficient stop-band attenuation, the structure of the adaptive filter is modified to provide suitable bandwidth and stop-band attenuation simultaneously. The effectiveness of the proposed sensorless control strategy has been verified by simulations and experiments.

  10. Development, Implementation and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention to Prevent Low Speed Vehicle Run-Over Events: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bronwyn; Watt, Kerrianne; Kimble, Roy; Shields, Linda

    2018-04-05

    There is a growing body of literature regarding low speed vehicle runover (LSVRO) events among children. To date, no literature exists on evaluation of interventions to address this serious childhood injury. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour regarding LSVROs were assessed via survey at a shopping centre (pre-intervention), then five months later (post-intervention), to investigate the effect of a population level educational intervention in Queensland, Australia. Participants' knowledge regarding frequency of LSVRO events was poor. No participant demonstrated 'adequate behaviour' in relation to four safe driveway behaviours pre-intervention; this increased at post-intervention ( p experience reflects the 'real-world' challenges associated with implementing prevention strategies. We suggest a multi-faceted approach involving media (including social media), legislative changes, subsidies (for reversing cameras), and education to prevent LSVROs.

  11. A methodology for low-speed broadband rotational energy harvesting using piezoelectric transduction and frequency up-conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Hailing; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    Energy harvesting from vibration for low-power electronics has been investigated intensively in recent years, but rotational energy harvesting is less investigated and still has some challenges. In this paper, a methodology for low-speed rotational energy harvesting using piezoelectric transduction and frequency up-conversion is analysed. The system consists of a piezoelectric cantilever beam with a tip magnet and a rotating magnet on a revolving host. The angular kinetic energy of the host is transferred to the vibration energy of the piezoelectric beam via magnetic coupling between the magnets. Frequency up-conversion is achieved by magnetic plucking, converting low frequency rotation into high frequency vibration of the piezoelectric beam. A distributed-parameter theoretical model is presented to analyse the electromechanical behaviour of the rotational energy harvester. Different configurations and design parameters were investigated to improve the output power of the device. Experimental studies were conducted to validate the theoretical estimation. The results illustrate that the proposed method is a feasible solution to collecting low-speed rotational energy from ambient hosts, such as vehicle tires, micro-turbines and wristwatches. - Highlights: • A topology to harvest low-frequency broad-band rotational energy is studied. • Different configurations were considered; arrangement (a)-repulsive was the best. • Theoretical analysis shows the harvester has a wide bandwidth at low frequency. • The ripples of output power are related to the beam's natural frequency. • Experimental results show a good performance (over 20 μW) from 15 Hz to 35 Hz.

  12. Analytical and Numerical Deflection Study on the Structure of 10 kW Low Speed Permanent Magnet Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Syaeful Alam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical and numerical studies of the deflection in the structure of 10 kW low speed permanent magnet generator (PMG have been discussed in this paper. This study is intended to prevent failure of the structure when the prototype is made. Numerical analysis was performed with the finite-element method (FEM. Flux density, weight and temperature of the components are the required input parameters. Deflection observed were the movements of the two main rotor components, namely the rim and shaft, where the maximum deflection allowed at the air gap between rotor and stator should be between 10% to 20% of the air gap clearance or 0.1000 mm to 0.2000 mm. Base on the analysis, total deflection of the analytic calculation was 0.0553 mm, and numerical simulation was 0.0314 mm. Both values were in the acceptable level because it was still below the maximum allowed deflection. These results indicate that the structure of a permanent magnet generator (rim and shaft can be used safely.

  13. a Study on the Mechanism of OCCUPANT'S Cervical Injury by Low Speed Rear-End Collision of Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wonhak; Kim, Yongchul; Choi, Hyeonki

    Neck injury in rear-end car collisions is an increasing concern in the field of traffic safety. This injury commonly occurs at rear-end impact, however the injury mechanisms for whiplash remain a mystery. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively analyze the head and neck kinematics during the low-speed rear-end impact of automobiles. It is important to produce data that is related as closely as possible to the in vivo situation. So, we performed a sled test which simulated rear-end impacts with a velocity of 0.6 m/s with five normal healthy male subjects. 3-D motion analysis system was used to document motion data of two situations. When we compare the values of angular velocity and acceleration of head and neck, the peak magnitudes of inclined seated posture were smaller than those of upright seated posture. The result of this study is expected to provide insight that will aid in determining the mechanism of whiplash which is crucial to the identification of possible injury mechanisms.

  14. Analysis of a Split-Plot Experimental Design Applied to a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A procedure to analyze a split-plot experimental design featuring two input factors, two levels of randomization, and two error structures in a low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a small-scale model of a fighter airplane configuration is described in this report. Standard commercially-available statistical software was used to analyze the test results obtained in a randomization-restricted environment often encountered in wind tunnel testing. The input factors were differential horizontal stabilizer incidence and the angle of attack. The response variables were the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment. Using split-plot terminology, the whole plot, or difficult-to-change, factor was the differential horizontal stabilizer incidence, and the subplot, or easy-to-change, factor was the angle of attack. The whole plot and subplot factors were both tested at three levels. Degrees of freedom for the whole plot error were provided by replication in the form of three blocks, or replicates, which were intended to simulate three consecutive days of wind tunnel facility operation. The analysis was conducted in three stages, which yielded the estimated mean squares, multiple regression function coefficients, and corresponding tests of significance for all individual terms at the whole plot and subplot levels for the three aerodynamic response variables. The estimated regression functions included main effects and two-factor interaction for the lift coefficient, main effects, two-factor interaction, and quadratic effects for the drag coefficient, and only main effects for the pitching moment coefficient.

  15. A wind-tunnel investigation of parameters affecting helicopter directional control at low speeds in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Young, W. H., Jr.; Mantay, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to measure the performance of several helicopter tail-rotor/fin configurations with regard to directional control problems encountered at low speeds in ground effect. Tests were conducted at wind azimuths of 0 deg to 360 deg in increments of 30 deg and 60 deg and at wind speeds from 0 to 35 knots. The results indicate that at certain combinations of wind speed and wind azimuth, large increases in adverse fin force require correspondingly large increases in the tail-rotor thrust, collective pitch, and power required to maintain yaw trim. Changing the tail-rotor direction of rotation to top blade aft for either a pusher tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing away from fin) or a tractor tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing against fin) will alleviate this problem. For a pusher tail rotor at 180 deg wind azimuth, increases in the fin/tail-rotor gap were not found to have any significant influence on the overall vehicle directional control capability. Changing the tail rotor to a higher position was found to improve tail-rotor performance for a fin-off configuration at a wind azimuth of 180 deg. A V-tail configuration with a pusher tail rotor with top blade aft direction of rotation was found to be the best configuration with regard to overall directional control capability.

  16. Numerical simulation of a simple low-speed model for an electrodynamic levitation system based on a Halbach magnet array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniguez, J.; Raposo, V.

    2010-01-01

    The design and analysis of a small prototype of a magnetic levitation system at low-speed using a Halbach-type magnet array is presented here. For that purpose, we have arranged a copper rim over a carbon fiber wheel, which is driven by an electric motor in presence of the magnet array, in such a manner that allows performing the experiment readily. The analysis of the system is undertaken under a two-dimensional (2D)-approach which permits computing and extending the study of our model to higher speeds. Our work is completed with a series of experimental measurements of lift and drag forces for different circumstances. Initially, the drag force is significant but after the compensation speed (when both forces balance) it slowly decreases. Conversely, the lift force becomes progressively bigger in such a manner that it attains quickly noteworthy values. We observe that the theoretical compensation speed is always minor than the experimental one and that the measured values for both forces are slightly smaller than the expected, although the main features of the experiment are well matched by our numerical simulation.

  17. Numerical simulation of a simple low-speed model for an electrodynamic levitation system based on a Halbach magnet array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iniguez, J., E-mail: nacho@usal.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37071 (Spain); Raposo, V. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37071 (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The design and analysis of a small prototype of a magnetic levitation system at low-speed using a Halbach-type magnet array is presented here. For that purpose, we have arranged a copper rim over a carbon fiber wheel, which is driven by an electric motor in presence of the magnet array, in such a manner that allows performing the experiment readily. The analysis of the system is undertaken under a two-dimensional (2D)-approach which permits computing and extending the study of our model to higher speeds. Our work is completed with a series of experimental measurements of lift and drag forces for different circumstances. Initially, the drag force is significant but after the compensation speed (when both forces balance) it slowly decreases. Conversely, the lift force becomes progressively bigger in such a manner that it attains quickly noteworthy values. We observe that the theoretical compensation speed is always minor than the experimental one and that the measured values for both forces are slightly smaller than the expected, although the main features of the experiment are well matched by our numerical simulation.

  18. Simulation and experimental research on trans-media vehicle water-entry motion characteristics at low speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Li, Yongli; Feng, Jinfu; Hu, Junhua; Liu, An

    2017-01-01

    The motion characteristics of trans-media vehicles during the water-entry process were explored in this study in an effort to obtain the optimal water-entry condition of the vehicle for developing a novel, single control strategy integrating underwater non-control and in-air control. A water-entry dynamics model is established by combining the water-entry motion characteristics of the vehicle in uncontrolled conditions at low speed with time-varying parameters (e.g. buoyancy, added mass). A water-entry experiment is designed to confirm the effectiveness of the established model. After that, by comparing the experimental results with the simulated results, the model is further modified to more accurately reflect water-entry motion. The change laws of the vehicle's attitude and position during the water-entry process are also obtained by analyzing the simulation of the modified model under different velocity, angle, and angle of attack conditions. The results presented here have guiding significance for the future realization of reaching the stable underwater navigation state of the vehicle after water-entry process.

  19. Simulation and experimental research on trans-media vehicle water-entry motion characteristics at low speed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    Full Text Available The motion characteristics of trans-media vehicles during the water-entry process were explored in this study in an effort to obtain the optimal water-entry condition of the vehicle for developing a novel, single control strategy integrating underwater non-control and in-air control. A water-entry dynamics model is established by combining the water-entry motion characteristics of the vehicle in uncontrolled conditions at low speed with time-varying parameters (e.g. buoyancy, added mass. A water-entry experiment is designed to confirm the effectiveness of the established model. After that, by comparing the experimental results with the simulated results, the model is further modified to more accurately reflect water-entry motion. The change laws of the vehicle's attitude and position during the water-entry process are also obtained by analyzing the simulation of the modified model under different velocity, angle, and angle of attack conditions. The results presented here have guiding significance for the future realization of reaching the stable underwater navigation state of the vehicle after water-entry process.

  20. Development, Implementation and Evaluation of an Educational Intervention to Prevent Low Speed Vehicle Run-Over Events: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Griffin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of literature regarding low speed vehicle runover (LSVRO events among children. To date, no literature exists on evaluation of interventions to address this serious childhood injury. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour regarding LSVROs were assessed via survey at a shopping centre (pre-intervention, then five months later (post-intervention, to investigate the effect of a population level educational intervention in Queensland, Australia. Participants’ knowledge regarding frequency of LSVRO events was poor. No participant demonstrated ‘adequate behaviour’ in relation to four safe driveway behaviours pre-intervention; this increased at post-intervention (p < 0.05. Most of the sample perceived other’s driveway behaviour as inadequate, and this reduced significantly (<0.05. Perceived effectiveness of LSVRO prevention strategies increased from pre- to post-intervention, but not significantly. TV was the greatest source of knowledge regarding LSVROs pre- and post-intervention. This study provides some evidence that the educational campaign and opportunistic media engagement were successful in increasing awareness and improving behaviour regarding LSVROs. While there are several limitations to this study, our experience reflects the ‘real-world’ challenges associated with implementing prevention strategies. We suggest a multi-faceted approach involving media (including social media, legislative changes, subsidies (for reversing cameras, and education to prevent LSVROs.

  1. Analysis and Test Correlation of Proof of Concept Box for Blended Wing Body-Low Speed Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Regina L.

    2003-01-01

    The Low Speed Vehicle (LSV) is a 14.2% scale remotely piloted vehicle of the revolutionary Blended Wing Body concept. The design of the LSV includes an all composite airframe. Due to internal manufacturing capability restrictions, room temperature layups were necessary. An extensive materials testing and manufacturing process development effort was underwent to establish a process that would achieve the high modulus/low weight properties required to meet the design requirements. The analysis process involved a loads development effort that incorporated aero loads to determine internal forces that could be applied to a traditional FEM of the vehicle and to conduct detailed component analyses. A new tool, Hypersizer, was added to the design process to address various composite failure modes and to optimize the skin panel thickness of the upper and lower skins for the vehicle. The analysis required an iterative approach as material properties were continually changing. As a part of the material characterization effort, test articles, including a proof of concept wing box and a full-scale wing, were fabricated. The proof of concept box was fabricated based on very preliminary material studies and tested in bending, torsion, and shear. The box was then tested to failure under shear. The proof of concept box was also analyzed using Nastran and Hypersizer. The results of both analyses were scaled to determine the predicted failure load. The test results were compared to both the Nastran and Hypersizer analytical predictions. The actual failure occurred at 899 lbs. The failure was predicted at 1167 lbs based on the Nastran analysis. The Hypersizer analysis predicted a lower failure load of 960 lbs. The Nastran analysis alone was not sufficient to predict the failure load because it does not identify local composite failure modes. This analysis has traditionally been done using closed form solutions. Although Hypersizer is typically used as an optimizer for the design

  2. A Comprehensive Review of Low-Speed Rear Impact Volunteer Studies and a Comparison to Real-World Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Joseph; Gwin, Lisa; Reinhart, Lars; Wood, Rawson; Bain, Charles

    2018-02-27

    This study combined all prior research involving human volunteers in low-speed rear-end impacts and performed a comparative analysis of real-world crashes using the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of neck pain between volunteer and real-world collisions as well as the likelihood of an injury beyond symptoms as a function of impact severity and occupant characteristics in real-world collisions. A total of 51 human volunteer studies were identified that produced a dataset of 1984 volunteer impacts along with a separate dataset of 515,601 weighted occupants in real-world rear impacts. Operating-characteristic curves were created to assess the utility of the volunteer dataset in making predictions regarding the overall population. Change in speed or delta-V was used to model the likelihood of reporting symptoms in both real-world and volunteer exposures and more severe injuries using real-world data. Logistic regression models were created for the volunteer data and survey techniques were used to analyze the weighted sampling scheme with the National Automotive Sampling System database. Symptom reporting rates were not different between males and females and were nearly identical between laboratory and real-world exposures. The minimal risk of injury predicted by real-world exposure is consistent with the statistical power of the large number of volunteer studies without any injury beyond the reporting of neck pain. This study shows that volunteer studies do not under-report symptoms and are sufficient in number to conclude that the risk of injury beyond neck strain under similar conditions is essentially zero. The real-world injury analyses demonstrate that rear impacts do not produce meaningful risks of cervical injury at impacts of similar and greater severity to those of the volunteer research. Future work concerning the mechanism of whiplash-related trauma should focus on impacts of

  3. CFD Investigation of Flow Past Idealized Engine Nacelle Clutter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casper, Matthew S

    2007-01-01

    ...), to resolve the flow-field dynamics inside the clutter element and determine mechanisms accounting for the failure of suppressant spray droplets from traversing the array under low-speed, free-stream conditions (ReD = 1, 575...

  4. Investigation at Low Speeds of the Effect of Aspect Ratio and Sweep on Rolling Stability Derivatives of Untapered Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alex; Fisher, Lewis R

    1950-01-01

    A low-scale wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in rolling flow to determine the effects of aspect ratio and sweep (when varied independently) on the rolling stability derivatives for a series of untapered wings. The rolling-flow equipment of the Langley stability tunnel was used for the tests. The data of the investigation have been used to develop a method of accounting for the effects of the drag on the yawing moment due to rolling throughout the lift range.

  5. Incidence of paediatric fatal and non-fatal low speed vehicle run over events in Queensland, Australia: eleven year analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence of fatal and non-fatal Low Speed Vehicle Run Over (LSVRO) events among children aged 0–15 years in Queensland, Australia, at a population level. Methods Fatal and non-fatal LSVRO events that occurred in children resident in Queensland over eleven calendar years (1999-2009) were identified using ICD codes, text description, word searches and medical notes clarification, obtained from five health related data bases across the continuum of care (pre-hospital to fatality). Data were manually linked. Population data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics were used to calculate crude incidence rates for fatal and non-fatal LSVRO events. Results There were 1611 LSVROs between 1999–2009 (IR = 16.87/100,000/annum). Incidence of non-fatal events (IR = 16.60/100,000/annum) was 61.5 times higher than fatal events (IR = 0.27/100,000/annum). LSVRO events were more common in boys (IR = 20.97/100,000/annum) than girls (IR = 12.55/100,000/annum), and among younger children aged 0–4 years (IR = 21.45/100000/annum; 39% or all events) than older children (5–9 years: IR = 16.47/100,000/annum; 10–15 years IR = 13.59/100,000/annum). A total of 896 (56.8%) children were admitted to hospital for 24 hours of more following an LSVRO event (IR = 9.38/100,000/annum). Total LSVROs increased from 1999 (IR = 14.79/100,000) to 2009 (IR = 18.56/100,000), but not significantly. Over the 11 year period, there was a slight (non –significant) increase in fatalities (IR = 0.37-0.42/100,000/annum); a significant decrease in admissions (IR = 12.39–5.36/100,000/annum), and significant increase in non-admissions (IR = 2.02-12.77/100,000/annum). Trends over time differed by age, gender and severity. Conclusion This is the most comprehensive, population-based epidemiological study on fatal and non-fatal LSVRO events to date. Results from this study indicate

  6. Influence of Climatic Factors on the Efficiency of Disposal Metal- Hydride Unit for the Double-Fuel Low-Speed Internal Combustion Engine of Gas Tankers

    OpenAIRE

    Cherednichenko, Oleksandr Costyntunovich; Tkach, Mykhaylo Romanovich

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary tendencies in the development of ship power engineering have been analyzed. Consideration was given to the specific features of the transportation of liquefied natural gas by gas tankers. The prospects of utilization of the secondary energy resources of marine double-fuel low-speed diesel engines were defined. The metal hydride units of a continuous action were offered for this purpose. The need for the estimation of the influence of climatic factors on the efficiency of disposal...

  7. Grid-Free LES 3D Vortex Method for the Simulation of Tubulent Flows Over Advanced Lifting Surfaces, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Turbulent flows associated with advanced aerodynamic designs represent a considerable challenge for accurate prediction. For example, the flow past low-speed wings...

  8. Maximum Power Point Tracking Control of Hydrokinetic Turbine and Low-speed High-Thrust Permanent Magnet Generator Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    MPPT control method is similar to hill-climbing used as MPPT control in photovoltaic ...climbing method used as MPPT control in photovoltaic systems. In addition, the proposed MPPT control strategy is generic to all the hydrokinetic...convert AC power from the generator into DC power and a boost converter is used to implement energy flow control . On the load side, an electronic

  9. Stereo PIV Application to 6.5m x 5.5m Low-speed Wind Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 重哉; WATANABE, Shigeya; 加藤, 裕之; KATO, Hiroyuki

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale wind tunnels at NAL have been utilized to acquire data on aerodynamic characteristics for the development of various types of airplane and aerospace vehicle. Although in most cases measurements concentrate on the information needed directly for vehicle design, such as aerodynamic force and moment, surface pressure, and aerodynamic heating, the need for detailed spatial information on flows around vehicles is gradually increasing as the result of advancements in vehicle design tech...

  10. Evaluation of the hybrid III and Q-series pediatric ATD upper neck loads as compared to pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacrist, Thomas; Mathews, Emily A; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2013-11-01

    Debate exists in the automotive community regarding the validity of the pediatric ATD neck response and corresponding neck loads. Previous research has shown that the pediatric ATDs exhibit hyper-flexion and chin-to-chest contact resulting in overestimations of neck loads and neck injury criteria. Our previous work comparing the kinematics of the Hybrid III and Q-series 6 and 10-year-old ATDs to pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal sled tests revealed decreased ATD cervical and thoracic spine excursions. These kinematic differences may contribute to the overestimation of upper neck loads by the ATD. The current study compared upper neck loads of the Hybrid III and Q-series 6 and 10-year-old ATDs against size-matched male pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal sled tests. A 3-D near-infrared target tracking system quantified the position of markers on the ATD and pediatric volunteers (head top, nasion, bilateral external auditory meatus). Shear force (F x ), axial force (F z ), bending moment (M y ), and head angular acceleration ([Formula: see text]) were calculated about the upper neck using standard equations of motion. In general, the ATDs underestimated axial force and overestimated bending moment compared to the human volunteers. The Hybrid III 6, Q6, and Q10 exhibited reduced head angular acceleration and modest increases in upper neck shear compared to the pediatric volunteers. The reduction in axial force and bending moment has important implications for neck injury predictions as both are used when calculating N ij . These analyses provide insight into the biofidelity of the pediatric ATD upper neck loads in low-speed crash environments.

  11. Very low speed performance of active flux based sensorless control: interior permanent magnet synchronous motor vector control versus direct torque and flux control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paicu, M. C.; Boldea, I.; Andreescu, G. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study is focused on very low speed performance comparison between two sensorless control systems based on the novel ‘active flux' concept, that is, the current/voltage vector control versus direct torque and flux control (DTFC) for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives...... with space vector modulation (SVM), without signal injection. The active flux, defined as the flux that multiplies iq current in the dq-model torque expression of all ac machines, is easily obtained from the stator-flux vector and has the rotor position orientation. Therefore notable simplification...

  12. Forest Ecosystem respiration estimated from eddy covariance and chamber measurements under high turbulence and substantial tree mortality from bark beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckman, Heather N.; Frank, John M.; Bradford, John B.; Miles, Brianna L.; Massman, William J.; Parton, William J.; Ryan, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy covariance nighttime fluxes are uncertain due to potential measurement biases. Many studies report eddy covariance nighttime flux lower than flux from extrapolated chamber measurements, despite corrections for low turbulence. We compared eddy covariance and chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration at the GLEES Ameriflux site over seven growing seasons under high turbulence (summer night mean friction velocity (u*) = 0.7 m s−1), during which bark beetles killed or infested 85% of the aboveground respiring biomass. Chamber-based estimates of ecosystem respiration during the growth season, developed from foliage, wood and soil CO2 efflux measurements, declined 35% after 85% of the forest basal area had been killed or impaired by bark beetles (from 7.1 ±0.22 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2005 to 4.6 ±0.16 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2011). Soil efflux remained at ~3.3 μmol m−2 s−1 throughout the mortality, while the loss of live wood and foliage and their respiration drove the decline of the chamber estimate. Eddy covariance estimates of fluxes at night remained constant over the same period, ~3.0 μmol m−2 s−1 for both 2005 (intact forest) and 2011 (85% basal area killed or impaired). Eddy covariance fluxes were lower than chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration (60% lower in 2005, and 32% in 2011), but the mean night estimates from the two techniques were correlated within a year (r2 from 0.18-0.60). The difference between the two techniques was not the result of inadequate turbulence, because the results were robust to a u* filter of > 0.7 m s−1. The decline in the average seasonal difference between the two techniques was strongly correlated with overstory leaf area (r2=0.92). The discrepancy between methods of respiration estimation should be resolved to have confidence in ecosystem carbon flux estimates.

  13. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  14. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Several Different Wings Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Calculated numerical values for some aerodynamic terms and stability Derivatives for several different wings in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow were made using a discrete vortex method involving a limited number of horseshoe vortices. Both longitudinal and lateral-directional derivatives were calculated for steady conditions as well as for sinusoidal oscillatory motions. Variables included the number of vortices used and the rotation axis/moment center chordwise location. Frequencies considered were limited to the range of interest to vehicle dynamic stability (kb <.24 ). Comparisons of some calculated numerical results with experimental wind-tunnel measurements were in reasonable agreement in the low angle-of-attack range considering the differences existing between the mathematical representation and experimental wind-tunnel models tested. Of particular interest was the presence of induced drag for the oscillatory condition.

  15. Improvement of the low-speed friction characteristics of a hydraulic piston pump by PVD-coating of TiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yeh Sun; Lee, Sang Yul; Kim, Sung Hun; Lim, Hyun Sik

    2006-01-01

    The hydraulic pump of an Electro-hydrostatic Actuator should be able to quickly feed large volume of oil into hydraulic cylinder in order to reduce the response time. On the other hand, it should be also able to precisely dispense small amount of oil through low-speed operation so that the steady state position control error of the actuator can be accurately compensated. Within the scope of axial piston type hydraulic pumps, this paper is focused on the investigation how the surface treatment of their cylinder barrel with TiN plasma coating can contribute to the reduction of the friction and wear rate of valve plate in the low-speed range with mixed lubrication. The results showed that the friction torque of the valve plate mated with a TiN-coated cylinder barrel could be reduced to 22% of that with an uncoated original one when load pressure was 300 bar and rotational speed 100 rpm. It means that the torque efficiency of the test pump was expected to increase more than 1.3% under the same working condition. At the same time, the wear rate of the valve plate could be reduced to 40∼50%

  16. An Airbreathing Launch Vehicle Design with Turbine-Based Low-Speed Propulsion and Dual Mode Scramjet High-Speed Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, P. L.; Bouchard, K. A.; Vause, R. F.; Pinckney, S. Z.; Ferlemann, S. M.; Leonard, C. P.; Taylor, L. W., III; Robinson, J. S.; Martin, J. G.; Petley, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing launch vehicles continue to be a subject of great interest in the space access community. In particular, horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing vehicles are attractive with their airplane-like benefits and flexibility for future space launch requirements. The most promising of these concepts involve airframe integrated propulsion systems, in which the external undersurface of the vehicle forms part of the propulsion flowpath. Combining of airframe and engine functions in this manner involves all of the design disciplines interacting at once. Design and optimization of these configurations is a most difficult activity, requiring a multi-discipline process to analytically resolve the numerous interactions among the design variables. This paper describes the design and optimization of one configuration in this vehicle class, a lifting body with turbine-based low-speed propulsion. The integration of propulsion and airframe, both from an aero-propulsive and mechanical perspective are addressed. This paper primarily focuses on the design details of the preferred configuration and the analyses performed to assess its performance. The integration of both low-speed and high-speed propulsion is covered. Structural and mechanical designs are described along with materials and technologies used. Propellant and systems packaging are shown and the mission-sized vehicle weights are disclosed.

  17. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Blowing Boundary-Layer Control on Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps of a Large-Scale, Low-Aspect-Ratio, 45 Swept-wing Airplane Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Ralph L.

    1959-01-01

    Blowing boundary-layer control was applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg sweptback-wing complete model in a full-scale low-speed wind-tunnel study. The principal purpose of the study was to determine the effects of leading-edge flap deflection and boundary-layer control on maximum lift and longitudinal stability. Leading-edge flap deflection alone was sufficient to maintain static longitudinal stability without trailing-edge flaps. However, leading-edge flap blowing was required to maintain longitudinal stability by delaying leading-edge flow separation when trailing-edge flaps were deflected either with or without blowing. Partial-span leading-edge flaps deflected 60 deg with moderate blowing gave the major increase in maximum lift, although higher deflection and additional blowing gave some further increase. Inboard of 0.4 semispan leading-edge flap deflection could be reduced to 40 deg and/or blowing could be omitted with only small loss in maximum lift. Trailing-edge flap lift increments were increased by boundary-layer control for deflections greater than 45 deg. Maximum lift was not increased with deflected trailing-edge flaps with blowing.

  18. Forest ecosystem respiration estimated from eddy covariance and chamber measurements under high turbulence and substantial tree mortality from bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckman, Heather N; Frank, John M; Bradford, John B; Miles, Brianna L; Massman, William J; Parton, William J; Ryan, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    Eddy covariance nighttime fluxes are uncertain due to potential measurement biases. Many studies report eddy covariance nighttime flux lower than flux from extrapolated chamber measurements, despite corrections for low turbulence. We compared eddy covariance and chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration at the GLEES Ameriflux site over seven growing seasons under high turbulence [summer night mean friction velocity (u*) = 0.7 m s(-1)], during which bark beetles killed or infested 85% of the aboveground respiring biomass. Chamber-based estimates of ecosystem respiration during the growth season, developed from foliage, wood, and soil CO2 efflux measurements, declined 35% after 85% of the forest basal area had been killed or impaired by bark beetles (from 7.1 ± 0.22 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in 2005 to 4.6 ± 0.16 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in 2011). Soil efflux remained at ~3.3 μmol m(-2) s(-1) throughout the mortality, while the loss of live wood and foliage and their respiration drove the decline of the chamber estimate. Eddy covariance estimates of fluxes at night remained constant over the same period, ~3.0 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for both 2005 (intact forest) and 2011 (85% basal area killed or impaired). Eddy covariance fluxes were lower than chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration (60% lower in 2005, and 32% in 2011), but the mean night estimates from the two techniques were correlated within a year (r(2) from 0.18 to 0.60). The difference between the two techniques was not the result of inadequate turbulence, because the results were robust to a u* filter of >0.7 m s(-1). The decline in the average seasonal difference between the two techniques was strongly correlated with overstory leaf area (r(2) = 0.92). The discrepancy between methods of respiration estimation should be resolved to have confidence in ecosystem carbon flux estimates. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of pediatric ATD biofidelity as compared to child volunteers in low-speed far-side oblique and lateral impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacrist, Thomas; Locey, Caitlin M; Mathews, Emily A; Jones, Dakota L; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2014-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury and mortality for children. Mitigation of these injuries requires biofidelic anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) to design and evaluate automotive safety systems. Effective countermeasures exist for frontal and near-side impacts but are limited for far-side impacts. Consequently, far-side impacts represent increased injury and mortality rates compared to frontal impacts. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the biofidelity of the Hybrid III and Q-series pediatric ATDs in low-speed far-side impacts, with and without shoulder belt pretightening. Low-speed (2 g) far-side oblique (60°) and lateral (90°) sled tests were conducted using the Hybrid III and Q-series 6- and 10-year-old ATDs. ATDs were restrained by a lap and shoulder belt equipped with a precrash belt pretightener. Photoreflective targets were attached to the head, spine, shoulders, and sternum. ATDs were exposed to 8 low-speed sled tests: 2 oblique nontightened, 2 oblique pretightened, 2 lateral nontightened, 2 lateral pretightened. ATDs were compared with previously collected 9- to 11-year-old (n=10) volunteer data and newly collected 6- to 8-year-old volunteer data (n=7) tested with similar methods. Kinematic data were collected from a 3D target tracking system. Metrics of comparison included excursion, seat belt and seat pan reaction loads, belt-to-torso angle, and shoulder belt slip-out. The ATDs exhibited increased lateral excursion of the head top, C4, and T1 as well as increased downward excursion of the head top compared to the volunteers. Volunteers exhibited greater forward excursion than the ATDs in oblique nontightened impacts. These kinematics correspond to increased shoulder belt slip-out for the ATDs in oblique tests (ATDs=90%; volunteers=36%). Contrarily, similar shoulder belt slip-out was observed between ATDs and volunteers in lateral impacts (ATDs=80%; volunteers=78%). In pretightened impacts, the ATDs exhibited reduced

  20. Human occupants in low-speed frontal sled tests: effects of pre-impact bracing on chest compression, reaction forces, and subject acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; Beeman, Stephanie M; Madigan, Michael L; Duma, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-impact bracing on the chest compression, reaction forces, and accelerations experienced by human occupants during low-speed frontal sled tests. A total of twenty low-speed frontal sled tests, ten low severity (∼2.5g, Δv=5 kph) and ten medium severity (∼5g, Δv=10 kph), were performed on five 50th-percentile male human volunteers. Each volunteer was exposed to two impulses at each severity, one relaxed and the other braced prior to the impulse. A 59-channel chestband, aligned at the nipple line, was used to quantify the chest contour and anterior-posterior sternum deflection. Three-axis accelerometer cubes were attached to the sternum, 7th cervical vertebra, and sacrum of each subject. In addition, three linear accelerometers and a three-axis angular rate sensor were mounted to a metal mouthpiece worn by each subject. Seatbelt tension load cells were attached to the retractor, shoulder, and lap portions of the standard three-point driver-side seatbelt. In addition, multi-axis load cells were mounted to each interface between the subject and the test buck to quantify reaction forces. For relaxed tests, the higher test severity resulted in significantly larger peak values for all resultant accelerations, all belt forces, and three resultant reaction forces (right foot, seatpan, and seatback). For braced tests, the higher test severity resulted in significantly larger peak values for all resultant accelerations, and two resultant reaction forces (right foot and seatpan). Bracing did not have a significant effect on the occupant accelerations during the low severity tests, but did result in a significant decrease in peak resultant sacrum linear acceleration during the medium severity tests. Bracing was also found to significantly reduce peak shoulder and retractor belt forces for both test severities, and peak lap belt force for the medium test severity. In contrast, bracing resulted in a significant

  1. Application of permanent magnet BaFe12O19 and NdFeB on small scale low speed permanent magnet generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudji Irasari; Novrita Idayanti

    2009-01-01

    Designing and manufacturing of low speed permanent magnet generator (PMG) for small scale electric power plant have been conducted. In this paper, the characteristics of generator using permanent magnet of barium ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) and neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) were compared. Surface mounted type is selected as the rotor structure as all flux faces to stator winding and take a role in energy conversion. The experiment result demonstrates that at nominal speed, generator with BaFe 12 O 19 magnet can only generate power of 8.87 W while generator with NdFeB magnet can generate power of 1,988.93 W. (author)

  2. An Auto-Tuning PI Control System for an Open-Circuit Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Designed for Greenhouse Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Karlos; Valera, Diego L; Torres, José A; López, Alejandro; Molina-Aiz, Francisco D

    2015-08-12

    Wind tunnels are a key experimental tool for the analysis of airflow parameters in many fields of application. Despite their great potential impact on agricultural research, few contributions have dealt with the development of automatic control systems for wind tunnels in the field of greenhouse technology. The objective of this paper is to present an automatic control system that provides precision and speed of measurement, as well as efficient data processing in low-speed wind tunnel experiments for greenhouse engineering applications. The system is based on an algorithm that identifies the system model and calculates the optimum PI controller. The validation of the system was performed on a cellulose evaporative cooling pad and on insect-proof screens to assess its response to perturbations. The control system provided an accuracy of integrated software unit that manages the tests in terms of airflow speed and pressure drop set points.

  3. High-speed resistance training is more effective than low-speed resistance training to increase functional capacity and muscle performance in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Castillo, Angélica; de la Fuente, Carlos I; Campos-Jara, Christian; Andrade, David C; Álvarez, Cristian; Martínez, Cristian; Castro-Sepúlveda, Mauricio; Pereira, Ana; Marques, Mário C; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-10-01

    To examine the effects of 12 weeks of high-speed resistance training (RT) versus low-speed RT on muscle strength [one repetition of maximum leg-press (1RMLP) and bench-press (1RMBP), plus dominant (HGd) and non-dominant maximum isometric handgrip], power [counter-movement jump (CMJ), ball throwing (BT) and 10-m walking sprint (S10)], functional performance [8-foot up-and-go test (UG) and sit-to-stand test (STS)], and perceived quality of life in older women. 45 older women were divided into a high-speed RT group [EG, n=15, age=66.3±3.7y], a low-speed RT group [SG, n=15, age=68.7±6.4y] and a control group [CG, n=15, age=66.7±4.9y]. The SG and EG were submitted to a similar 12-week RT program [3 sets of 8 reps at 40-75% of the one-repetition maximum (1work per exercise without CMJ and BT). Over the 12-week training period, both RT groups showed small to large clinically significant improvements in the dependent variables; however, a significant difference was found between the EG and SG for the performance changes in BT, S10 and UG (20% vs. 11%, pperformance and quality of life in older women, although a high-speed RT program induces greater improvements in muscle power and functional capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  5. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Flames in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the flow direction and (b) typical flame length scales seen in the OH-PLIF image with Mach 4.5 freestream (high turbulence) at P0 = 0.65 bar, T0...flame structures (3 mm) are observed at the upstream location of area 1 where the combustion localization first appears. The typical flame length scale

  6. Design of large permanent magnetized synchronous electric machines: Low speed, high torque machines - generator for direct driven wind turbine - motor for rim driven thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroevel, Oeystein

    2011-02-15

    This work presents the design of two prototype permanent magnetized electric machines for two different applications where large permanent magnet machines might be used. Existing technology have been used as the fundament for new design and adapted to new applications, contributing, hopefully, to the development of better and more environmental friendly energy conversion. The first application presented is represented with a prototype made in cooperation with the industry in which a PM-motor is integrated into a propeller unit. Both because of the industrial connection, and the integration between the PM-motor and the propeller, the choices made for the PM-motor are conservative trying to reduce the risk. The direct rim driven thruster prototype includes a surface mounted radial flux permanent magnet machine (SM RFPM) with fractional slot winding with a q around 1. Other engineering features were introduced to make the integration of propeller and motor feasible, but without the PM-machine the thruster would not have reached the performance demand. An important part of the project was to show that the SM RFPM enables this solution, providing high performance with a large air gap. The prototype has been tested in sea, under harsh conditions, and even though the magnets have been exposed directly to sea water and been visible corroded, the electric motor still performs well within the specifications. The second application is represented with a prototype PM-generator for wind turbines. This is an example of a new, very low speed high torque machine. The generator is built to test phenomena regarding concentrated coils, and as opposed to the first application, being a pure academic university project, its success is not connected to its performance, but with the prototype's ability to expose the phenomena in question. The prototype, or laboratory model, of the generator for direct driven wind turbines features SM RFPM with concentrated coils (CC). An opportunity

  7. Reduction of relative centrifugation force within injectable platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF) concentrates advances patients' own inflammatory cells, platelets and growth factors: the first introduction to the low speed centrifugation concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukroun, J; Ghanaati, S

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze systematically the influence of the relative centrifugation force (RCF) on leukocytes, platelets and growth factor release within fluid platelet-rich fibrin matrices (PRF). Systematically using peripheral blood from six healthy volunteers, the RCF was reduced four times for each of the three experimental protocols (I-III) within the spectrum (710-44 g), while maintaining a constant centrifugation time. Flow cytometry was applied to determine the platelets and leukocyte number. The growth factor concentration was quantified 1 and 24 h after clotting using ELISA. Reducing RCF in accordance with protocol-II (177 g) led to a significantly higher platelets and leukocytes numbers compared to protocol-I (710 g). Protocol-III (44 g) showed a highly significant increase of leukocytes and platelets number in comparison to -I and -II. The growth factors' concentration of VEGF and TGF-β1 was significantly higher in protocol-II compared to -I, whereas protocol-III exhibited significantly higher growth factor concentration compared to protocols-I and -II. These findings were observed among 1 and 24 h after clotting, as well as the accumulated growth factor concentration over 24 h. Based on the results, it has been demonstrated that it is possible to enrich PRF-based fluid matrices with leukocytes, platelets and growth factors by means of a single alteration of the centrifugation settings within the clinical routine. We postulate that the so-called low speed centrifugation concept (LSCC) selectively enriches leukocytes, platelets and growth factors within fluid PRF-based matrices. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of cell and growth factor enrichment on wound healing and tissue regeneration while comparing blood concentrates gained by high and low RCF.

  8. The RID2 biofidelic rear impact dummy: a pilot study using human subjects in low speed rear impact full scale crash tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Arthur C; Philippens, Mathieu M G M

    2007-03-01

    Human subjects and the recently developed RID2 rear impact crash test dummy were exposed to a series of full scale, vehicle-to-vehicle crash tests. To evaluate the biofidelity of the RID2 anthropometric test dummy on the basis of calculated neck injury criterion (NIC) values by comparing these values to those obtained from human subjects exposed in the very same crashes. The widely used and familiar hybrid III dummy has been said to lack biofidelity in the special application of low speed rear impact crashes. Several attempts have been made to modify this dummy with only marginal success. Two completely new dummies have been developed; the BioRID and the RID2. Neither have been tested under real world crash boundary conditions in side-by-side comparisons with live human subjects. Volunteer subjects, including a 50th percentile male, a 95th percentile male, and a 50th percentile female, were placed in the driver's seat of a vehicle and subjected to a series of three low speed rear impact crashes each. The RID2 dummy, which is modeled after a 50th percentile male, was placed in the passenger seat in each case. Both subjects and dummy were fully instrumented and acceleration-time histories were recorded. From this data, velocities of the heads and torsos were determined and both were used to calculate the NIC values for both crash test subjects and the RID2. The RID2 demonstrated generally higher head accelerations and NIC values than those of the human subjects. Most of the observed variations might be explained on the basis of differing head restraint geometry, posture, and body size. The RID2 NIC values compared most favorably with those of the 50th percentile male subject. For the whole group, the correlations between RID2 and human subjects did not reach statistical significance. The small number of test subjects and crash tests limited the statistical power of this pilot study, and the correlation between the RID2 and human subject NIC values were not

  9. Experimental study of high-speed counter-rotation propeller on low speed wind range; Dojiku hantengata kosoku propeller no teisokuiki ni okeru fudo jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Collaborative research was conducted by National Aerospace Laboratory and Japan Aircraft Development Company in the period of fiscal 1988-1992 into methods for testing aircraft with advanced propeller in low-speed wind tunnel. The propulsion efficiency of the currently available high-bypass turbofan engine is approximately 60% in the vicinity of Mach number 0.85. Propeller-driven aircraft, whose propulsion efficiency is as high as 80% in the low Mach number domain, are scarcely in practical use in the domain of Mach number 0.75 or higher. There are studies reported abroad as well as in Japan for the propeller-driven aircraft to enjoy higher propeller propulsion efficiency even in the vicinity of Mach number 0.8 by modifying the propeller diameter, number of blades, and blade sections, etc. This paper describes the experimental research into the high-speed counter-rotation propeller. A counter-rotation propeller 0.3m in diameter and provided with coaxially arranged 8times2 SR-2 blades is evaluated for pitch angles during the takeoff and landing modes, for thrust characteristics at the pitch angle for the cruising mode, and for propeller backwash and noise. 15 refs., 72 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. An Auto-Tuning PI Control System for an Open-Circuit Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Designed for Greenhouse Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlos Espinoza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnels are a key experimental tool for the analysis of airflow parameters in many fields of application. Despite their great potential impact on agricultural research, few contributions have dealt with the development of automatic control systems for wind tunnels in the field of greenhouse technology. The objective of this paper is to present an automatic control system that provides precision and speed of measurement, as well as efficient data processing in low-speed wind tunnel experiments for greenhouse engineering applications. The system is based on an algorithm that identifies the system model and calculates the optimum PI controller. The validation of the system was performed on a cellulose evaporative cooling pad and on insect-proof screens to assess its response to perturbations. The control system provided an accuracy of <0.06 m·s‾1 for airflow speed and <0.50 Pa for pressure drop, thus permitting the reproducibility and standardization of the tests. The proposed control system also incorporates a fully-integrated software unit that manages the tests in terms of airflow speed and pressure drop set points.

  11. Production of syngas and oil at biomass refinery and their application in low speed two stroke engines for combined cycle electric energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatti, Daltro Garcia [Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: pinatti@demar.eel.usp.br; Oliveira, Isaias de; Ferreira, Joao Carlos; Romao, Erica Leonor [RM Materiais Refratarios Ltd., Lorena, SP (Brazil)], Emails: isaias@rm-gpc.com.br, joaocarlos@rm-gpc.com.br, ericaromao@rm-gpc.com.br; Conte, Rosa Ana [University of Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), SP (Brazil). Lorena School of Engineering. Dept. of Materials Engineering], E-mail: rosaconte@demar.eel.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Low speed two stroke engines burn fuels of medium quality with high efficiency (47%) and allows a flexible use of oil (> 8% of total power) and syngas (< 92%, low heating value-LHV>11.2MJ/m{sup 3}). Biomass refinery (BR) generates oil from sludge and oleaginous biomass by low temperature conversion and syngas from lignocellulosic biomass treated by diluted acidic prehydrolysis. BR has low investment cost (US$1,500.00/kW) compared with hydroelectric plants (US$2,500.00/kW) and both generate electric energy with sales price below US$75.00/MWh. It allows distributed generation from 30 MW up to 170 MW or centralized power of 1 GW with six motor generator sets. BR matrix, mass and energy balance, fuels compositions, modulations and scope of supply will be presented. Besides electric energy BR can be tailored to supply other products such as ethanol, H{sub 2} for fuel cells, biodiesel, fertilizer recycling, char and simultaneously maximizes the production of animal protein. (author)

  12. Pre-treatment of waste fuel with low-speed shredding and screening for fluidized bed incineration; Foerbehandling av avfallsbraensle foer fluidbaeddpannor med laangsamtgaaende valskross och saekerhetssiktning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, Sven; Victoren, Anders; Niklasson, Fredrik; Jones, Frida

    2013-09-01

    In FB combustion of waste, an important cost factor is the pre-treatment of the waste fuel. The most common method of final levigation of the waste fuel is using hammer mills, which crushes the fuel with high force and high rotational speed. The advantage of the powerful hammer mill is, however, also a disadvantage. The fraction of fines becomes large, and the method is experienced to cause high maintenance costs and problems with accidental fires. A plausible alternative to the hammer mill is the shredder. The rotational speed of the shreeder is lower, while it cutting and slicing the waste fuel instead of grinding it. The shredder is, therefore, expected to yield less wear and tear, lower electricity consumption and less accidental fires. On the other hand, the shreeder may yield a higher fraction of oversized fuel particles, which could cause problems in the combustion, especially in smaller FB-plants with one single fuel supply conveyor. In this project, the framing of question has been if low-speed shredding in combination with screening of over sizes fuel particles, may function for smaller FB plants with one single fuel supplying conveyor. The aim of the project has been to support FB plant owners and manufacturers for independent comparision of the different fuel pre-treatment methods, via pre-treatment and combustions trials and economical comparisons. The concept of lowspeed shreddning and screening has been compared economically with a traditional hammer mill system and a shredding system designed for a larger FB plant. Moreover, combustion trials have been carried out with shredded and screened fuel, and hammer milled fuel, in two smaller parallel FB furnaces with one single fuel supplying conveyor per furnace. The fuels were analysed for particle size distribution and composition, and the operation during the combustion trial was evaluated. The economical evaluation of the new pre-treatment concept, with lowspeed shredding and screening, yielded an

  13. Swirling flow in a two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Casper Schytte; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are performed for the turbulent swirling flow in a scale model of a low-speed two-stroke diesel engine with a moving piston. The purpose of the work is to investigate the accuracy of different turbulence models including two-equation Reynolds- Averaged Navier...

  14. Flight Investigation of the Low-Speed Characteristics of a 45 deg Swept-Wing Fighter-Type Airplane with Blowing Boundary-Layer Control Applied to the Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Hervey C.; Anderson, Seth B.; Innis, Robert C.

    1960-01-01

    A flight investigation has been conducted to study how pilots use the high lift available with blowing-type boundary-layer control applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg. swept-wing airplane. The study includes documentation of the low-speed handling qualities as well as the pilots' evaluations of the landing-approach characteristics. All the pilots who flew the airplane considered it more comfortable to fly at low speeds than any other F-100 configuration they had flown. The major improvements noted were the reduced stall speed, the improved longitudinal stability at high lift, and the reduction in low-speed buffet. The study has shown the minimum comfortable landing-approach speeds are between 120.5 and 126.5 knots compared to 134 for the airplane with a slatted leading edge and the same trailing-edge flap. The limiting factors in the pilots' choices of landing-approach speeds were the limits of ability to control flight-path angle, lack of visibility, trim change with thrust, low static directional stability, and sluggish longitudinal control. Several of these factors were found to be associated with the high angles of attack, between 13 deg. and 15 deg., required for the low approach speeds. The angle of attack for maximum lift coefficient was 28 deg.

  15. Influence of piston position on the scavenging and swirling flow in two-stoke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeidat, Anas; Haider, Sajjad; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2011-01-01

    We study the eect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a low speed large two-stroke marine diesel engine model. We are using Large Eddy Simulations in OpenFOAM, with three different models for the turbulent flow: a one equation model (OEM), a dynamic one equation model (DOEM...

  16. Optimisation of non-axisymmetric end wall contours for the rotor of a low speed, 1 1/2 stage research turbine with unshrouded blades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 2-dimensional, linear cascades, and therefore do not include a number of features which are present in the flow field of a real turbine. Recent work by Snedden et al involved the introduction of “generic”, non-axisymmetric end wall contours...

  17. Formation of hybrid gold nanoparticle network aggregates by specific host-guest interactions in a turbulent flow reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinhart-Mejia, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    A multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) was used to investigate the formation of hybrid gold nanoparticle network aggregates under highly turbulent flow conditions. To form aggregates, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (CD) and mixed with adamantyl (Ad)-terminated

  18. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  19. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Pitching Stability Derivatives of a 1/9-Scale Powered Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 373

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queijo, M. J.; Wolhart, Walter D.; Fletcher, H. S.

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel at low speed to determine the pitching stability derivatives of a 1/9-scale powered model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. Effects of thrust coefficient, control deflections, and propeller blade angle were investigated. The tests were made through an angle-of-attack range from about -4deg to 29deg, and the thrust coefficient range was from 0 to 0.7. In order to expedite distribution of these data, no analysis of the data has been prepared for this paper.

  20. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Rolling Stability Derivatives of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-9 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolhart, Walter D.; Thomas, David F., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the low-speed yawing, pitching, and static stability characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Grumman F9F-9 airplane. Tests were made to determine the effects of duct-entrance-fairing plugs on the static lateral and longitudinal stability characteristics of the complete model in the clean condition. The remaining tests were concerned with determining tail contributions as well as the effect of duct-entrance-fairing plugs, slats, flaps, and landing gear on the yawing and pitching stability derivatives. These data are presented without analysis in order to expedite distribution.

  1. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Yawing, Pitching, and Static Stability Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-9 Airplane, TED No. NACA AD 3109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolhart, Walter D.; Thomas, David F., Jr.

    1955-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the low-speed yawing, pitching, and static stability characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Grumman F9F-9 airplane. Tests were made to determine the effects of duct-entrance-fairing plugs on the static lateral and longitudinal stability characteristics of the complete model in the clean condition. The remaining tests were concerned with determining tail contributions as well as the effect of duct-entrance-fairing plugs, slats, flaps, and landing gear on the yawing and pitching stability derivatives. These data are presented without analysis in order to expedite distribution.

  2. Laser doppler anemometry in single- and two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, F.

    1976-01-01

    The present report gives an introduction into laser-Doppler anemometry and tries to explain the basic physical principles of this measuring technique. Moire fringe patterns are used in order to visually model LDA-signals and to explain the basic difference in optical systems. It is pointed out that LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows and in two-phase flows should be attempted with direction sensitive instruments only. Some of the optical systems developed by the author and his collaborators are introduced and their functioning in measurements is demonstrated. These measurements embrace investigations in a number of single-phase flows including flames. (orig.) [de

  3. Unsteady effects in flows past stationary airfoils with Gurney flaps due to unsteady flow separations at low Reynolds numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Dan MATEESCU

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the unsteady flows past stationary airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers, aiming to study the unsteady behavior of the aerodynamic coefficients due to the flow separations occurring at these Reynolds numbers. The Gurney flaps are simple but very efficient lift-increasing devices, which due to their mechanical simplicity are of particular interest for the small size micro-air-vehicles (MAV) flying at low speed and very low Reynolds numb...

  4. New devices for flow measurements: Hot film and burial wire sensors, infrared imagery, liquid crystal, and piezo-electric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcree, Griffith J., Jr.; Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program aimed at identifying areas in low speed aerodynamic research where infrared imaging systems can make significant contributions is discussed. Implementing a new technique, a long electrically heated wire was placed across a laminar flow. By measuring the temperature distribution along the wire with the IR imaging camera, the flow behavior was identified.

  5. Design, manufacture and construction of a compressor test rig and the start of experimental operation of a low speed axial compressor at Dresden. Final report; Konstruktion, Fertigung und Aufbau eines Verdichterpruefstandes und Aufnahme des Versuchsbetriebes an einem Niedergeschwindigkeits-Axialverdichter in Dresden. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Bernhard, H.; Biesinger, T.; Boos, P.; Moeckel, H.; Sauer, H.

    1996-12-01

    In this report, the design, manufacture and construction of the low speed compressor, the build-up of the compressor test rig and the measurement technique used are described. The first measured results obtained after setting to work and the start of experimental operation on the rotational symmetry at the compressor inlet and outlet and of a flow field behind the rotor and stator of the third stage are described. The operating period of 540 hours to the end of the subject shows faultfree operation of the experimental plant. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Im vorliegenden Bericht werden Konstruktion, Fertigung und Aufbau des Niedergeschwindigkeitsverdichters, der Aufbau des Verdichterpruefstandes und die verwendete Messtechnik beschrieben. Die nach der Inbetriebnahme und Aufnahme des Versuchsbetriebes erhaltenen ersten Messergebnisse zur Rotationssymmetrie am Ein- und Austritt des Verdichters und von einem Stroemungsfeld hinter dem Rotor und Stator der dritten Stufe werden geschildert. Die zum Abschluss des Themas erreichte Betriebszeit von 540 Stunden weist auf einen stoerungsfreien Betrieb der Versuchsanlage hin. (orig./AKF)

  6. Road and Street Centerlines, Average Freeway/Arterial/Low Speed Arterial Travel Speeds - Spring and Fall 2010 Data collected during PM Peak period (4:30 - 6:30pm) and AM Peak Period (7 - 9am) on selected roadways - GPS travel speeds at 1,000 ft interval, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Baltimore Metropolitan Council.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Road and Street Centerlines dataset current as of 2010. Average Freeway/Arterial/Low Speed Arterial Travel Speeds - Spring and Fall 2010 Data collected during PM...

  7. Influence of piston displacement on the scavenging and swirling flow in two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeidat, Anas; Haider, Sajjad; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark

    We study the effect of piston motion on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a low speed, large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The work involves experimental, and numerical simulation using OpenFOAM platform, Large Eddy Simulation was used with three different models, One equation Eddy, Dynamic One...

  8. High Reynolds number flows using liquid and gaseous helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to liquid and gaseous helium as test fluids, high Reynolds number test requirements in low speed aerodynamics, the measurement of subsonic flow around an appended body of revolution at cryogenic conditions in the NTF, water tunnels, flow visualization, the six component magnetic suspension system for wind tunnel testing, and recent aerodynamic measurements with magnetic suspension systems. Attention is also given to application of a flow visualization technique to a superflow experiment, experimental investigations of He II flows at high Reynolds numbers, a study of homogeneous turbulence in superfluid helium, and thermal convection in liquid helium

  9. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Yawing Stability Derivatives of a 1/9-Scale Powered Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 373

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queijo, M. J.; Wolhart, w. D.; Fletcher, H. S.

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel at low speed to deter+nine the yawing stability derivatives of a 1/9-scale powered model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. Effects of thrust coefficient were investigated for the complete model and for certain components of the model. Effects of control deflections and of propeller blade angle were investigated for the complete model. Most of the tests were made through an angle-of-attack range from about -4deg to 29deg, and the thrust coefficient range was from 0 to 0.7. In order to expedite distribution of these data, no analysis of the data has been prepared for this.

  10. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Rolling Stability Derivatives of a 1/9-Scale Powered Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 373

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queijo, M. J.; Wolhart, Walter D.; Fletcher, H. S.

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel at low speed to determine the rolling stability derivatives of a 1/9-scale powered model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. Effects of thrust coefficient were investigated for the complete model and for certain components of the model. Effects of control deflections and of propeller blade angle were investigated for the complete model. Most of the tests were made through an angle-of-attack range from about -4deg to 29deg, and the thrust coefficient range was from 0 to 0.7. In order to expedite distribution of these data, no analysis of the data has been prepared for this paper.

  11. Aerodynamic evaluation of wing shape and wing orientation in four butterfly species using numerical simulations and a low-speed wind tunnel, and its implications for the design of flying micro-robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Ancel, Alejandro; Eastwood, Rodney; Vogt, Daniel; Ithier, Carter; Smith, Michael; Wood, Rob; Kovač, Mirko

    2017-02-06

    Many insects are well adapted to long-distance migration despite the larger energetic costs of flight for small body sizes. To optimize wing design for next-generation flying micro-robots, we analyse butterfly wing shapes and wing orientations at full scale using numerical simulations and in a low-speed wind tunnel at 2, 3.5 and 5 m s -1 . The results indicate that wing orientations which maximize wing span lead to the highest glide performance, with lift to drag ratios up to 6.28, while spreading the fore-wings forward can increase the maximum lift produced and thus improve versatility. We discuss the implications for flying micro-robots and how the results assist in understanding the behaviour of the butterfly species tested.

  12. Aerodynamic evaluation of wing shape and wing orientation in four butterfly species using numerical simulations and a low-speed wind tunnel, and its implications for the design of flying micro-robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Rodney; Vogt, Daniel; Ithier, Carter; Smith, Michael; Wood, Rob; Kovač, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    Many insects are well adapted to long-distance migration despite the larger energetic costs of flight for small body sizes. To optimize wing design for next-generation flying micro-robots, we analyse butterfly wing shapes and wing orientations at full scale using numerical simulations and in a low-speed wind tunnel at 2, 3.5 and 5 m s−1. The results indicate that wing orientations which maximize wing span lead to the highest glide performance, with lift to drag ratios up to 6.28, while spreading the fore-wings forward can increase the maximum lift produced and thus improve versatility. We discuss the implications for flying micro-robots and how the results assist in understanding the behaviour of the butterfly species tested. PMID:28163879

  13. Microprocessor Control of Low Speed VSTOL Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-08

    7 WRITE (ZCOIJT, 12) 1FC’rMAT(" TMANTTOIi:R"S M) READ( ZC’l-IT- 14)TMAX C TI: 6. T=ft.TZ T=T* IELT +T(-) GO1 TO’ 4 W R ITE ( OUT, 10U) 1C) F’:’RrMrAI...N IF( IN EC7!. 0) PRRINT, "ENTER A BY ROWS, I ROW/LINE" PRINT DC :: I =I, N E: REAE( IN, 50-) (A( I, .J), .J=I, N) IF( I OUT . NE. 0) WRITE ( IOUT, 510... WRITE ( IOCl, 510C) Di :30 I=1, N IF( IOUT . NE. 0) WRITE ( IOUT, 520) (A( I, J), J=1, N) 3:)’ WRITE (IO, 520) (A(I, J), .1=1, N) CALL FADD(A, E:, AX

  14. Trailing vortices from low speed flyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Rye; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The structure and strength of the vortex wake behind a airplane or animal flying with a fixed or flapping wing contains valuable information about the aerodynamic load history. However, the amount of vorticity measured in the trailing vortex is not always in agreement with the known lift generated, and the behavior of these vortices at relatively low Reynolds numbers is also not well-understood. We present the results from a series of wind tunnel PIV experiments conducted behind a low-aspect ratio rectangular wing at a chord-Reynolds numbers of 30,000. In addition to wake PIV measurements measured in the cross-stream (Trefftz) plane, we measure the lift and drag directly using a six-axis force-torque transducer. We discuss how vortex size, shape, strength and position vary in time and downstream location, as well as the challenges associated with the use of PIV wake measurements to accurate determine aerodynamic forces.

  15. パルスYAGレーザPIVの高速流計測への応用

    OpenAIRE

    Gomi, Mitsuo; Kurosawa, Yoji; Guezet, Jacky; Suzuki, Kazuo; 五味 光男; 黒澤 要治; Guezet, Jacky; 鈴木 和雄

    1999-01-01

    The extremely attractive Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in flow measurement, which can instantly measure the velocity vector map of the flow field from high speed to low speed, has been a subject of rapid research and development. In particular, it has evolved into the application to the high speed flow measurement, which has been considered difficult with conventional methods. In National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL), it has been applied to the high speed and high turbulence region measureme...

  16. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  17. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of the static stability and control characteristics of an advanced turboprop configuration with the propellers placed over the tail. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Graham Scott

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory wind tunnel investigation was performed in the 30 x 60 foot wind tunnel to determine the low speed static stability and control characteristics into the deep stall regime of an advanced turboprop aircraft with the propellers located over the horizontal tail. By this arrangement, the horizontal tail could potentially provide acoustic shielding to reduce the high community noise caused by the propeller blades. The current configuration was a generic turboprop model equipped with 1 foot diameter single rotating eight bladed propellers that were designed for efficient cruise operation at a Mach number of 0.8. The data presented is static force data. The effects of power on the configuration characteristics were generally favorable. An arrangement with the propellers rotating with the outboard blades moving down was found to have significantly higher installed thrust than an arrangement with the propellers rotating with the inboard blades moving down. The primary unfavorable effect was a large pitch trim change which occurred with power, but the trim change could be minimized with a proper configuration design.

  18. Effects of low speed wind on the recognition/identification and pass-through communication tasks of auditory situation awareness afforded by military hearing protection/enhancement devices and tactical communication and protective systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kichol; Casali, John G

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of controlled low-speed wind-noise on the auditory situation awareness performance afforded by military hearing protection/enhancement devices (HPED) and tactical communication and protective systems (TCAPS). Recognition/identification and pass-through communications tasks were separately conducted under three wind conditions (0, 5, and 10 mph). Subjects wore two in-ear-type TCAPS, one earmuff-type TCAPS, a Combat Arms Earplug in its 'open' or pass-through setting, and an EB-15LE electronic earplug. Devices with electronic gain systems were tested under two gain settings: 'unity' and 'max'. Testing without any device (open ear) was conducted as a control. Ten subjects were recruited from the student population at Virginia Tech. Audiometric requirements were 25 dBHL or better at 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz in both ears. Performance on the interaction of communication task-by-device was significantly different only in 0 mph wind speed. The between-device performance differences varied with azimuthal speaker locations. It is evident from this study that stable (non-gusting) wind speeds up to 10 mph did not significantly degrade recognition/identification task performance and pass-through communication performance of the group of HPEDs and TCAPS tested. However, the various devices performed differently as the test sound signal speaker location was varied and it appears that physical as well as electronic features may have contributed to this directional result.

  19. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  20. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  1. Investigation of the Low-Speed Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel TED No. NACA DE 349

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph L.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane has been made in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The model was flown with leading-edge slats retracted and extended over a lift-coefficient range from 0.5 to the stall. Only relatively low-altitude conditions were simulated and no attempt was made to determine the effect on the stability characteristics of freeing the controls. The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the model were satisfactory for all conditions investigated except near the stall with slats extended, where the model had a slight nosing-up tendency. The lateral stability and control characteristics of the model were considered satisfactory for all conditions investigated except near the stall with slats retracted, where a change in sign of the static- directional-stability parameter Cn(sub beta) caused the model to be directionally divergent. The addition of an extension to the top of the vertical tail did not increase Cn(sub beta) enough to eliminate the directional divergence of the model, but a large increase in Cn(sub beta) that was obtainable by artificial means appeared to eliminate the divergence and flights near the stall could be made. Artificially increasing the stability derivative-Cn(sub r) (yawing moment due to yawing) and Cn(sub p) (yawing moment due to rolling) had little effect on the divergence for the range of these parameters investigated. Calculations indicate that the damping of the lateral oscillation of the airplane with slats retracted or extended will be satisfactory at sea level but will be only marginally satisfactory at 40,000 feet.

  2. Parameter analysis and optimal design for low-speed permanent magnet wind turbine generators%低速永磁风力发电机的参数分析及优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何庆领; 王群京

    2011-01-01

    文章讨论了低速永磁同步风力发电机的设计特点,为了有效地减少阻力矩,采用分数槽绕组,为减少漏磁通,采用瓦片型和放射状的永磁体安装结构,并重点对结构参数与运行性能之间的内在关系进行了参数分析,为风力发电机本体的优化设计打下基础.在一定安装尺寸的限制下,以电机效率作为优化目标,采用基于混沌理论的最优化算法获取风力发电机的最大输出效率.%This paper discusses the design characteristics of low-speed permanent magnet synchronous wind turbine generator, including the use of fractional slot windings to effectively reduce the resistance moment, the use of tiles and reflective-like structure to reduce leakage flux,and the installation of permanent magnet The intrinsic relationship between structural parameters and operational performance is also analyzed for the optimal design of wind turbine foundation. Aiming at optimizing the motor efficiency, the optimization algorithm based on chaos theory can be used to obtain the maximum output efficiency of wind turbine generator under a certain restriction of installation size.

  3. PIV Study of the Effect of Piston Motion on the Confined Swirling Flow in the Scavenging Process in 2-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Meyer, Knud Erik; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The effect of piston motion on the incylinder swirling flow for a low speed, large two-stroke marine diesel engine is studies using the stereoscopic PIV technique. The measuremenrs are conducted at 5 cross sectional planes along the cylinder length and at piston positions covering the air intake...

  4. PIV study of the effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Schnipper, Teis; Obeidat, Anas

    2013-01-01

    A simplified model of a low speed large twostroke marine diesel engine cylinder is developed. The effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process is studied using the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique. The measurements are conducted...

  5. Incidence and characteristics of low-speed vehicle run over events in rural and remote children aged 0-14 years in Queensland: an 11 year (1999-2009) retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bronwyn R; Kimble, Roy M; Watt, Kerrianne; Shields, Linda

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to describe incidence rates of low-speed vehicle run-over (LSVRO) events among children aged 0-14 years residing in Queensland from 1999 to 2009. A second objective was to describe the associated patterns of injury, with respect to gender, age group, severity, characteristics (host, vehicle and environment), and trends over time in relation to geographical remoteness. Final results are hoped to inform prevention policies. In this statewide, retrospective, population-based study, data were collected on LSVRO events that occurred among children aged 0-14 years in Queensland from 1999 to 2009 from all relevant data sources across the continuum of care, and manually linked to obtain the most comprehensive estimate possible of the magnitude and nature of LSVRO events to date. Crude incidence rates were calculated separately for males and females, for fatal events, non-fatal events (hospital admissions and non-admissions, respectively), and for all LSVRO events, for each area of geographical remoteness (major cities, inner regional, outer regional, remote/very remote). Relative risks and 95% confidence interval were calculated, and trends over time were examined. Data on host, injury and event characteristics were also obtained to investigate whether these characteristics varied between areas of remoteness. Incidence rates were lowest among children (0-14 years) living in major cities (13.8/100 000/annum, with the highest recorded incidence in outer regional areas (incidence rate =42.5/100 000/annum). Incidence rates were higher for children residing outside major cities for both males and females, for every age group, for each of the 11 years of the study, and consequences of LSVRO events were worse. Young children aged 0-4 years were identified as those most at risk for these events, regardless of geographical location. Differences were observed as a function of remoteness category in relation to injury characteristics (eg injury

  6. Efficiency improvements of electromagnetic flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, E.; Reizes, J.A.; Leonardi, E.

    2005-01-01

    In turbulent flow, frictional resistance and heat transfer are controlled to a large degree by the intensity of the turbulence fluctuations in the near vicinity of a surface. In the case of a weak electrically conducting fluid, such as seawater, turbulence intensity can be controlled by subjecting the fluid to electromagnetic fields. This technique, known as Electro-magneto-hydro-dynamic (EMHD) flow control, has been shown to have promise as a means of reducing the turbulence intensity, and hence heat transfer or frictional drag of turbulent boundary layers. Unfortunately EMHD flow control currently suffers from poor efficiency due to the high energy requirements of the electromagnetic field. A numerical study has been conducted in which a new electromagnetic actuator design has been developed to provide a more efficient spatial distribution of the electromagnetic forces. The new actuator design has then been coupled to an ideal flow sensor. A flow control subroutine, embedded in the numerical model, uses the velocity information from the ideal sensor to determine the appropriate actuating force to apply to the flow at each time step. The new actuator design has been shown to be capable of successfully attenuating a sequence of artificial low speed streaks in a simplified model of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. Thus, a potential solution to the poor efficiency of EMHD flow control has been offered by providing the means whereby the expensive electromagnetic forces can be strategically and sparingly applied to the flow

  7. Airfoil Shape Optimization in Transonic Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Z.

    2004-01-01

    A computationally efficient and adaptable design tool is constructed by coupling a flow analysis code based on Euler equations, with the well established numerical optimization algorithms. Optimization technique involving two analysis methods of Simplex and Rosenbrock have been used. The optimization study involves the minimization of wave drag for two different airfoils with geometric constraints on the airfoil maximum thickness or the cross sectional area along with aerodynamic constraint on lift coefficient. The method is applied to these airfoils transonic flow design points, and the results are compared with the original values. This study shows that the conventional low speed airfoils can be optimized to become supercritical for transonic flight speeds, while existing supercritical airfoils can still be improved further at particular design condition. (author)

  8. Performance assessment of turbulence models for the prediction of moderator thermal flow inside CANDU calandria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong

    2012-01-01

    The moderator thermal flow in the CANDU calandria is generally complex and highly turbulent because of the interaction of the buoyancy force with the inlet jet inertia. In this study, the prediction performance of turbulence models for the accurate analysis of the moderator thermal flow are assessed by comparing the results calculated with various types of turbulence models in the commercial flow solver FLUENT with experimental data for the test vessel at Sheridan Park Engineering Laboratory (SPEL). Through this comparative study of turbulence models, it is concluded that turbulence models that include the source term to consider the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent flow should be used for the reliable prediction of the moderator thermal flow inside the CANDU calandria

  9. A Galloping Energy Harvester with Attached Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Khovanov, Igor; Tucker-Harvey, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Aeroelastic energy harvesters are a promising technology for the operation of wireless sensors and microelectromechanical systems, as well as providing the possibility of harvesting wind energy in applications were conventional wind turbines are ineffective, such as in highly turbulent flows, or unreliable, such as in harsh environmental conditions. The development of aeroelastic energy harvesters to date has focused on the flutter of airfoils, the galloping of prismatic structures, and the vortex induced vibrations. We present a novel type of galloping energy harvester with the flow becoming attached when the oscillation amplitude is high enough. With the flow attached, the harvester blade acts closer to an aerofoil than a bluff body, which results in a higher efficiency. The dynamics of a prototype device has been characterised experimentally with the use of a motion tracking system. The flow structure in the vicinity of the device has been studied using smoke visualisation and PIV measurements. A lumped parameter mathematical model has been developed and related to the experimental results.

  10. The effect of inlet distorted flow on steady and unsteady performance of a centrifugal compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyoung; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2005-01-01

    Effects of inlet distorted flow on performance, stall and surge are experimentally investigated for a high-speed centrifugal compressor. Tested results for the distorted inlet flow cases are compared with the result of the undistorted one. The performance of compressor is slightly deteriorated due to the inlet distortion. The inlet distortion does not affect the number of stall cell and the propagation velocity. It also does not change stall inception flow rate. However, as the distortion increases, stall starts at the higher flow rate for low speed at the lower flow rate for high speed. For 50,000 rpm stall occurs as the flow rate decreases, however disappears for the smaller flow rate. This is due to the interaction of surge and stall. After the stall and surge interact, the number of stall cell decreases

  11. Rarefield gas dynamics fundamentals, simulations and micro flows

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Ching

    2006-01-01

    This book elucidates the methods of molecular gas dynamics or rarefied gas dynamics which treat the problems of gas flows when the discrete molecular effects of the gas prevail under the circumstances of low density, the emphasis being on the basis of the methods, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method applied to the simulation of non-equilibrium effects and the frontier subjects related to low speed microscale rarefied gas flows. It provides a solid basis for the study of molecular gas dynamics for senior students and graduates in the aerospace and mechanical engineering departments of universities and colleges. It gives a general acquaintance of modern developments of rarefied gas dynamics in various regimes and leads to the frontier topics of non-equilibrium rarefied gas dynamics and low speed microscale gas dynamics. It will be also of benefit to the scientific and technical researchers engaged in aerospace high altitude aerodynamic force and heating design and in the research on gas flow in MEMS.

  12. The effect of valve strategy on in-cylinder flow and combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederberg, F

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of different valve strategies and their effect on in-cylinder flow and combustion. A conventional four valve per cylinder otto engine was modified to enable optical access. The flow measurements were made with a two-component laser Doppler velocimetry system. The combustion was monitored by running pressure data from a pressure transducer through a one-zone heat release model. The results show that when the valves operate normally a barrel flow is present and when one valve is closed a swirling flow occurs. No increase in turbulence was found with later phasing, except in the case of very late inlet valve opening and port deactivation. This resulted in a jet with high turbulence, making the combustion fast and stable, even with a very lean mixture ({lambda}=1.8). 6 refs, 44 figs, 4 tabs

  13. Indirect Combustion Noise: Noise Generation by Accelerated Vorticity in a Nozzle Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Kings

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The noise generation by accelerated vorticity waves in a nozzle flow was investigated in a model experiment. This noise generation mechanism belongs, besides entropy noise, to the indirect combustion noise phenomena. Vorticity as well as entropy fluctuations, originating from the highly turbulent combustion zone, are convected with the flow and produce noise during their acceleration in the outlet nozzle of the combustion chamber. In the model experiment, noise generation of accelerated vorticity fluctuations was achieved. The vorticity fluctuations in the tube flow were produced by injecting temporally additional air into the mean flow. As the next step, a parametric study was conducted to determine the major dependencies of the so called vortex noise. A quadratic dependency of the vortex noise on the injected air amount was found. In order to visualise and classify the artificially generated vorticity structures, planar velocity measurements have been conducted applying Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV.

  14. Application of Shark Skin Flow Control Techniques to Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jackson Alexander

    Due to millions of years of evolution, sharks have evolved to become quick and efficient ocean apex predators. Shark skin is made up of millions of microscopic scales, or denticles, that are approximately 0.2 mm in size. Scales located on the shark's body where separation control is paramount (such as behind the gills or the trailing edge of the pectoral fin) are capable of bristling. These scales are hypothesized to act as a flow control mechanism capable of being passively actuated by reversed flow. It is believed that shark scales are strategically sized to interact with the lower 5% of a boundary layer, where reversed flow occurs at the onset of boundary layer separation. Previous research has shown shark skin to be capable of controlling separation in water. This thesis aims to investigate the same passive flow control techniques in air. To investigate this phenomenon, several sets of microflaps were designed and manufactured with a 3D printer. The microflaps were designed in both 2D (rectangular) and 3D (mirroring shark scale geometry) variants. These microflaps were placed in a low-speed wind tunnel in the lower 5% of the boundary layer. Solid fences and a flat plate diffuser with suction were placed in the tunnel to create different separated flow regions. A hot film probe was used to measure velocity magnitude in the streamwise plane of the separated regions. The results showed that low-speed airflow is capable of bristling objects in the boundary layer. When placed in a region of reverse flow, the microflaps were passively actuated. Microflaps fluctuated between bristled and flat states in reverse flow regions located close to the reattachment zone.

  15. Intracycle angular velocity control of cross-flow turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven L.; Polagye, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, are attractive for power generation from wind and water currents. Some cross-flow turbine designs optimize unsteady fluid forces and maximize power output by controlling blade kinematics within one rotation. One established method is to dynamically pitch the blades. Here we introduce a mechanically simpler alternative: optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of angular blade position. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 59% increase in power output over standard control methods. Analysis of fluid forcing and blade kinematics suggest that power increase is achieved through modification of the local flow conditions and alignment of fluid force and rotation rate extrema. The result is a low-speed, structurally robust turbine that achieves high efficiency and could enable a new generation of environmentally benign turbines for renewable power generation.

  16. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  17. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  18. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  19. Optimization and design of an aircraft's morphing wing-tip demonstrator for drag reduction at low speeds, Part II - Experimental validation using Infra-Red transition measurement from Wind Tunnel tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Koreanschi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, an ‘in-house’ genetic algorithm was numerically and experimentally validated. The genetic algorithm was applied to an optimization problem for improving the aerodynamic performances of an aircraft wing tip through upper surface morphing. The optimization was performed for 16 flight cases expressed in terms of various combinations of speeds, angles of attack and aileron deflections. The displacements resulted from the optimization were used during the wind tunnel tests of the wing tip demonstrator for the actuators control to change the upper surface shape of the wing. The results of the optimization of the flow behavior for the airfoil morphing upper-surface problem were validated with wind tunnel experimental transition results obtained with infra-red Thermography on the wing-tip demonstrator. The validation proved that the 2D numerical optimization using the ‘in-house’ genetic algorithm was an appropriate tool in improving various aspects of a wing’s aerodynamic performances.

  20. A Study on the Uncertainty of Flow-Induced Vibration in a Cross Flow over Staggered Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Su; Park, Jong-Woon [Dongguk univ, Gyeong Ju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyeon-Kyeong [HanNam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Cross-flow in many support columns of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) lower plenum would have FIV issues under high speed flow jetting from the core. For a group of multiple circular cylinders subjected to a cross-flow, three types of potential vibration mechanisms may exist: (1) Vortex-induced vibration (VIV), (2) Fluid-elastic vibration (FEV) and (3) Turbulence-induced vibration (TIV). Kevalahan studied the free vibration of circular cylinders in a tightly packed periodic square inline array of cylinders. Pandey et al. studied the flue gas flow distribution in the Low Temperature Super Heater (LTSH) tube bundles situated in second pass of a utility boiler and the phenomenon of flow induced vibration. Nakamura et al. studied flow instability of cylinder arrays resembling U-bend tubes in steam generators. The FIV evaluation is usually performed with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to obtain unknown frequency of oscillation of the multiple objects under turbulent flow and thus the uncertainty residing in the turbulence model used should be quantified. In this paper, potential FIV uncertainty arising from the turbulence phenomena are evaluated for a typical cross flow through staggered tube bundles resembling the VHTR lower plenum support columns. Flow induced vibration (FIV) is one of the important mechanical and fatigue issues in nuclear systems. Especially, cross-flow in many support structures of VHTR lower plenum would have FIV issues under highly turbulent jet flows from the core. The results show that the effect of turbulence parameters on FIV is not negligible and the uncertainty is 5 to 10%. Present method can be applied to future FIV evaluations of nuclear systems. More extensive studies on flow induced vibration in a plant scale by using more rigorous computational methods are under way.

  1. Conversion Method of the Balance Test Results in Open Jet Tunnel on the Free Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem of sizing a model and converting the balance test results in the low speed open-jet wind tunnel to free-flow conditions. The ANSYS Fluent commercial code performs flow model calculations in the test section and in the free flow, and the ANSYS ICEM CFD module is used to provide grid generation. A structured grid is generated in the free flow and an unstructured one is provided in the test section. The changes of aerodynamic coefficients are determined at the different values of the blockage factor for the segmental-conical and hemisphere cylinder-cone shapes of the model. The blockage factor values are found at which the interference of the test section – model is neglected. The paper presents a technique to convert the wind tunnel test results to the free flow conditions.

  2. Three dimensional simulation of compressible and incompressible flows through the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gustavo Koury

    2004-11-01

    Although incompressible fluid flows can be regarded as a particular case of a general problem, numerical methods and the mathematical formulation aimed to solve compressible and incompressible flows have their own peculiarities, in such a way, that it is generally not possible to attain both regimes with a single approach. In this work, we start from a typically compressible formulation, slightly modified to make use of pressure variables and, through augmenting the stabilising parameters, we end up with a simplified model which is able to deal with a wide range of flow regimes, from supersonic to low speed gas flows. The resulting methodology is flexible enough to allow for the simulation of liquid flows as well. Examples using conservative and pressure variables are shown and the results are compared to those published in the literature, in order to validate the method. (author)

  3. Ion flow ripples in the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Pitkänen, Timo; Norqvist, Patrik; Mann, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, magnetotail flows were considered rather smooth and laminar, and primarily dominated by a simple convection flow pattern. However, in the early 90's, high speed bursty bulk flows (BBFs) were discovered and found to commonly perturb the underlying convection flows. In addition, there are other disturbances complicating the magnetotail flow pattern. Instabilities such as the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and the kink instability can cause different types of magnetic field oscillations, such as field line resonances. It is expected that ions will follow these oscillations if the typical time and length scales are larger than the gyroperiod and gyroradius of the ions. Though low-velocity sloshing and ripple disturbances of the average magnetotail convection flows have been observed, their connection with magnetic field oscillations is not fully understood. Furthermore, when studying BFFs, these "Ion Flow Ripples" (IFRs) are often neglected, dismissed as noise or can even erroneously be identified as BBFs. It is therefore of utter importance to find out and understand the role of IFRs in magnetotail dynamics. In a statistical investigation, we use several years of Cluster plasma sheet data to study the low-speed flows in the magnetotail. We investigate different types of IFRs, study their occurrence, and discuss their possible causes.

  4. Comparison of Simultaneous PIV and Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry in Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) technique that relies on the photo- dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser-induced fluorescence. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is about 50 micro-s. The feasibility of using HTV for probing low- speed flows (a few m/s) is investigated by using an inert, heated gas as a means to increase the OH species lifetime. Unlike particle-based techniques, MTV does not suffer from tracer settling, which is particularly problematic at low speeds. Furthermore, the flow needs to be seeded with only a small mole fraction of water vapor, making it safer for both the user and facilities than other MTV techniques based on corrosive or toxic chemical tracers. HTV is demonstrated on a steam-seeded nitrogen jet at approximately 75 C in the laminar (Umean=3.31 m/s, Re=1,540), transitional (Umean=4.48 m/s, Re=2,039), and turbulent (Umean=6.91 m/s, Re=3,016) regimes at atmospheric pressure. The measured velocity profiles are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed simultaneously with a second imager. Seeding for the PIV is achieved by introducing micron-sized water droplets into the flow with the steam; the same laser sheet is used for PIV and HTV to guarantee spatial and temporal overlap of the data. Optimizing each of these methods, however, requires conflicting operating conditions: higher temperatures benefit the HTV signals but reduce the available seed density for the PIV through evaporation. Nevertheless, data are found to agree within 10% for the instantaneous velocity profiles and within 5% for the mean profiles and demonstrate the feasibility of HTV for low-speed flows at moderate to high temperatures.

  5. Experiments in polydisperse two-phase turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachalo, W.D.; Houser, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of turbulent two-phase flow measurements obtained with a laser Doppler velocimeter that was modified to also obtain particle size were investigated. Simultaneous measurements of the particle size and velocity allowed the determination of the lag characteristics of particles over a range of sizes. Relatively large particles were found to respond well to the turbulent fluctuations in low speed flows. Measurements of sprays were obtained at various points throughout the spray plume. Velocity measurements for each drop size class were obtained and revealed the relative velocity relaxation with downstream distance. The evolution of the rms velocities for each size class was also examined. Difficulties associated with seeding polydispersions to obtain gas phase turbulence data were discussed. Several approaches for mitigating the errors due to seed particle concentration bias were reviewed

  6. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics titles offer the essential background but generally include very sparse coverage of rotating flows-which is where this book comes in. Beginning with an accessible introduction to rotating flow, recognized expert Peter Childs takes you through fundamental equations, vorticity and vortices, rotating disc flow, flow around rotating cylinders and flow in rotating cavities, with an introduction to atmospheric and oceanic circul...

  7. Hybrid continuum–molecular modelling of multiscale internal gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patronis, Alexander; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Borg, Matthew K.; Reese, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    We develop and apply an efficient multiscale method for simulating a large class of low-speed internal rarefied gas flows. The method is an extension of the hybrid atomistic–continuum approach proposed by Borg et al. (2013) [28] for the simulation of micro/nano flows of high-aspect ratio. The major new extensions are: (1) incorporation of fluid compressibility; (2) implementation using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for dilute rarefied gas flows, and (3) application to a broader range of geometries, including periodic, non-periodic, pressure-driven, gravity-driven and shear-driven internal flows. The multiscale method is applied to micro-scale gas flows through a periodic converging–diverging channel (driven by an external acceleration) and a non-periodic channel with a bend (driven by a pressure difference), as well as the flow between two eccentric cylinders (with the inner rotating relative to the outer). In all these cases there exists a wide variation of Knudsen number within the geometries, as well as substantial compressibility despite the Mach number being very low. For validation purposes, our multiscale simulation results are compared to those obtained from full-scale DSMC simulations: very close agreement is obtained in all cases for all flow variables considered. Our multiscale simulation is an order of magnitude more computationally efficient than the full-scale DSMC for the first and second test cases, and two orders of magnitude more efficient for the third case

  8. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  9. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kh'yuitt, G.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction into the problem of two-phase flows is presented. Flow regimes arizing in two-phase flows are described, and classification of these regimes is given. Structures of vertical and horizontal two-phase flows and a method of their identification using regime maps are considered. The limits of this method application are discussed. The flooding phenomena and phenomena of direction change (flow reversal) of the flow and interrelation of these phenomena as well as transitions from slug regime to churn one and from churn one to annular one in vertical flows are described. Problems of phase transitions and equilibrium are discussed. Flow regimes in tubes where evaporating liquid is running, are described [ru

  10. A frequency conversion mode for dispenser in the service station based on flow rate signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y J; Tang, D; Huang, J B; Liu, J; Jia, P F

    2012-01-01

    Dispenser is an integrated fuel transport and measurement system at the service station. In this paper, we developed a frequency conversion mode for the dispenser, based on the flow rate signal which is obtained from the converter measuring flow capacity. After introducing the frequency conversion mode to dispenser, we obtained that pump rotates at a high speed when fuelled with high flow rate, and it rotates at a low speed when fuelled with low flow rate. This makes the fuel dispenser more energy-efficient and controllable. We also did some valve optimizations on the dispenser and developed a new control mode for preset refuelling based on the frequency conversion mode, Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the new dispenser not only can meet the national standards, but also performs better than the ordinary one especially in preset refuelling.

  11. Hybrid RANS/LES method for wind flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2010-01-01

    for flows at high Reynolds numbers. To reduce the computational cost of traditional LES, a hybrid method is proposed in which the near-wall eddies are modelled in a Reynolds-averaged sense. Close to walls, the flow is treated with the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations (unsteady RANS...... rough walls. Previous attempts of combining RANS and LES has resulted in unphysical transition regions between the two layers, but the present work improves this region by using a stochastic backscatter model. To demonstrate the ability of the proposed hybrid method, simulations are presented for wind...... the turbulent kinetic energy, whereas the new method captures the high turbulence levels well but underestimates the mean velocity. The presented results are for a relative mild configuration of complex terrain, but the proposed method can also be used for highly complex terrain where the benefits of the new...

  12. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-07-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that profiles of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs.

  13. A Low Speed BIST Framework for High Speed Circuit Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speek, H.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Shashaani, M.; Sachdev, M.

    2000-01-01

    Testing of high performance integrated circuits is becoming increasingly a challenging task owing to high clock frequencies. Often testers are not able to test such devices due to their limited high frequency capabilities. In this article we outline a design-for-test methodology such that high

  14. Handling Qualities of Large Rotorcraft in Hover and Low Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    shaft axes can themselves be a function of the nacelle angle. Following the rules of calculus of variations, the variation for the -force from Eq. (7...their preference. Main inceptor forces, in terms of gradients , breakouts, damping, and friction are provided by a hydraulic McFadden variable force...during training and formal evaluation. 29 Table 8. Inceptor force-displacement characteristics. Cockpit Control Rotorcraft Configuration Gradient

  15. Low speed phaselock speed control system. [for brushless dc motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, R. W.; Sudey, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A motor speed control system for an electronically commutated brushless dc motor is provided which includes a phaselock loop with bidirectional torque control for locking the frequency output of a high density encoder, responsive to actual speed conditions, to a reference frequency signal, corresponding to the desired speed. The system includes a phase comparator, which produces an output in accordance with the difference in phase between the reference and encoder frequency signals, and an integrator-digital-to-analog converter unit, which converts the comparator output into an analog error signal voltage. Compensation circuitry, including a biasing means, is provided to convert the analog error signal voltage to a bidirectional error signal voltage which is utilized by an absolute value amplifier, rotational decoder, power amplifier-commutators, and an arrangement of commutation circuitry.

  16. Balancing High-Speed Rotors at Low Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1986-01-01

    Flexible balancing reduces vibrations at operating speeds. Highspeed rotors in turbomachines dynamically balanced at fraction of operating rotor speed. New method takes into account rotor flexible rather than rigid.

  17. The General Atomics low speed urban Maglev technology development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop magnetic levitation technology that is a cost effective, reliable, : and environmentally friendly option for urban mass transportation in the United States. Maglev is a revolutionary : approach in w...

  18. Commutating Permanent-Magnet Motors At Low Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolland, C.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit provides forced commutation during starting. Forced commutation circuit diverts current from inverter SCR's and turns SCR's off during commutation intervals. Silicon controlled rectifier in circuit unnecessary when switch S10 replaced by high-current, high-voltage transistor. At present, high-current, low-voltage device must suffice.

  19. Noisiness of the Surfaces on Low-Speed Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw Gardziejczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traffic noise is a particular threat to the environment in the vicinity of roads. The level of the noise is influenced by traffic density and traffic composition, as well as vehicle speed and the type of surface. The article presents the results of studies on tire/road noise from passing vehicles at a speed of 40–80 kph, carried out by using the statistical pass-by method (SPB, on seven surfaces with different characteristics. It has been shown that increasing the speed from 40 kph to 50 kph contributes to the increase in the maximum A-weighted sound pressure level by about 3 dB, regardless of the type of surface. For larger differences in speed (30 kph–40 kph increase in noise levels reaches values about 10 dB. In the case of higher speeds, this increase is slightly lower. In this article, special attention is paid to the noisiness from surfaces made of porous asphalt concrete (PAC, BBTM (thin asphalt layer, and stone mastic asphalt (SMA with a maximum aggregate size of 8 mm and 5 mm. It has also been proved that surfaces of porous asphalt concrete, within two years after the commissioning, significantly contribute to a reduction of the maximum level of noise in the streets and roads with lower speed of passing cars. Reduction of the maximum A-weighted sound pressure level of a statistical car traveling at 60 kph reaches values of up to about 6 dB, as compared with the SMA11. Along with the exploitation of the road, air voids in the low-noise surface becomes clogged and acoustic properties of the road decrease to a level similar to standard asphalt.

  20. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that pro files of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs

  1. Three Flow Features behind the Flow Control Authority of DBD Plasma Actuator: Result of High-Fidelity Simulations and the Related Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozo Fujii

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Both computational and experimental studies are conducted for understanding of the flow separation control mechanism of a DBD (dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator. Low speed flows over an airfoil are considered. A DBD plasma actuator is attached near the leading edge of an airfoil and the mechanism of flow control of this small device is discussed. The DBD plasma actuator, especially in burst mode, is shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at Reynolds number of 6.3 × 104, when applied to the flows at an angle of attack higher than the stall. The analysis reveals that the flow structure includes three remarkable features that provide good authority for flow separation control with the appropriate actuator parameters. With proper setting of the actuator parameters to enhance the effective flow features for the application, good flow control can be achieved. Based on the analysis, guidelines for the effective use of DBD plasma actuators are proposed. A DBD plasma actuator is also applied to the flows under cruise conditions. With the DBD plasma actuator attached, a simple airfoil turns out to show higher lift-to-drag ratio than a well-designed airfoil.

  2. Measurement of phase interaction in dispersed gas-particle two-phase flow by phase-doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mergheni Ali Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For simultaneous measurement of size and velocity distributions of continuous and dispersed phases in a two-phase flow a technique phase-Doppler anemometry was used. Spherical glass particles with a particle diameter range from 102 up to 212 µm were used. In this two-phase flow an experimental results are presented which indicate a significant influence of the solid particles on the flow characteristics. The height of influence of these effects depends on the local position in the jet. Near the nozzle exit high gas velocity gradients exist and therefore high turbulence production in the shear layer of the jet is observed. Here the turbulence intensity in the two-phase jet is decreased compared to the single-phase jet. In the developed zone the velocity gradient in the shear layer is lower and the turbulence intensity reduction is higher. .

  3. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with spanwise alternatively distributed strips control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weidan; Lu, Lipeng; Fang, Jian; Moulinec, Charles; Yao, Yufeng

    2018-05-01

    The effect of spanwise alternatively distributed strips (SADS) control on turbulent flow in a plane channel has been studied by direct numerical simulations to investigate the characteristics of large-scale streamwise vortices (LSSVs) induced by small-scale active wall actuation, and their potential in suppressing flow separation. SADS control is realized by alternatively arranging out-of-phase control (OPC) and in-phase control (IPC) wall actuations on the lower channel wall surface, in the spanwise direction. It is found that the coherent structures are suppressed or enhanced alternatively by OPC or IPC, respectively, leading to the formation of a vertical shear layer, which is responsible for the LSSVs’ presence. Large-scale low-speed region can also be observed above the OPC strips, which resemble large-scale low-speed streaks. LSSVs are found to be in a statistically-converged steady state and their cores are located between two neighboring OPC and IPC strips. Their motions contribute significantly to the momentum transport in the wall-normal and spanwise directions, demonstrating their potential ability to suppress flow separation.

  4. Conical quarl swirl stabilized non-premixed flames: flame and flow field interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The flame-flow field interaction is studied in non-premixed methane swirl flames stabilized in quartz quarl via simultaneous measurements of the flow field using a stereo PIV and OH-PLIF at 5 KHz repetition rate. Under the same swirl intensity, two flames with different fuel jet velocity were investigated. The time-averaged flow field shows a unique flow pattern at the quarl exit, where two recirculation vortices are formed; a strong recirculation zone formed far from the quarl exit and a larger recirculation zone extending inside the quarl. However, the instantaneous images show that, the flow pattern near the quarl exit plays a vital role in the spatial location and structure of the reaction zone. In the low fuel jet velocity flame, a pair of vortical structures, located precisely at the corners of the quarl exit, cause the flame to roll up into the central region of low speed flow, where the flame sheet then tracks the axial velocity fluctuations. The vorticity field reveals a vortical structure surrounding the reaction zones, which reside on a layer of low compressive strain adjacent to that vortical structure. In the high fuel jet velocity flame, initially a laminar flame sheet resides at the inner shear layer of the main jet, along the interface between incoming fresh gas and high temperature recirculating gas. Further downstream, vortex breakdown alters the flame sheet path toward the central flame region. The lower reaction zones show good correlation to the regions of maximum vorticity and track the regions of low compressive strain associated with the inner shear layer of the jet flow. In both flames the reactions zones conform the passage of the large structure while remaining inside the low speed regions or at the inner shear layer.

  5. Conical quarl swirl stabilized non-premixed flames: flame and flow field interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2017-09-19

    The flame-flow field interaction is studied in non-premixed methane swirl flames stabilized in quartz quarl via simultaneous measurements of the flow field using a stereo PIV and OH-PLIF at 5 KHz repetition rate. Under the same swirl intensity, two flames with different fuel jet velocity were investigated. The time-averaged flow field shows a unique flow pattern at the quarl exit, where two recirculation vortices are formed; a strong recirculation zone formed far from the quarl exit and a larger recirculation zone extending inside the quarl. However, the instantaneous images show that, the flow pattern near the quarl exit plays a vital role in the spatial location and structure of the reaction zone. In the low fuel jet velocity flame, a pair of vortical structures, located precisely at the corners of the quarl exit, cause the flame to roll up into the central region of low speed flow, where the flame sheet then tracks the axial velocity fluctuations. The vorticity field reveals a vortical structure surrounding the reaction zones, which reside on a layer of low compressive strain adjacent to that vortical structure. In the high fuel jet velocity flame, initially a laminar flame sheet resides at the inner shear layer of the main jet, along the interface between incoming fresh gas and high temperature recirculating gas. Further downstream, vortex breakdown alters the flame sheet path toward the central flame region. The lower reaction zones show good correlation to the regions of maximum vorticity and track the regions of low compressive strain associated with the inner shear layer of the jet flow. In both flames the reactions zones conform the passage of the large structure while remaining inside the low speed regions or at the inner shear layer.

  6. Entropic multirelaxation lattice Boltzmann models for turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya V.

    2015-10-01

    We present three-dimensional realizations of a class of lattice Boltzmann models introduced recently by the authors [I. V. Karlin, F. Bösch, and S. S. Chikatamarla, Phys. Rev. E 90, 031302(R) (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.031302] and review the role of the entropic stabilizer. Both coarse- and fine-grid simulations are addressed for the Kida vortex flow benchmark. We show that the outstanding numerical stability and performance is independent of a particular choice of the moment representation for high-Reynolds-number flows. We report accurate results for low-order moments for homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence and second-order grid convergence for most assessed statistical quantities. It is demonstrated that all the three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann realizations considered herein converge to the familiar lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model when the resolution is increased. Moreover, thanks to the dynamic nature of the entropic stabilizer, the present model features less compressibility effects and maintains correct energy and enstrophy dissipation. The explicit and efficient nature of the present lattice Boltzmann method renders it a promising candidate for both engineering and scientific purposes for highly turbulent flows.

  7. The calibration of a cylindrical pressure probe for recirculating flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, C.J.

    1975-06-01

    The use of the pressure distribution around a cylinder in cross-flow to indicate the magnitude and direction of the velocity vector is discussed in the context of making measurements in highly turbulent recirculating flows. The intended application is the measurement of the flow between the ribs on the large-scale model of the AGR fuel-pin surface. Results from a number of calibration experiments in boundary layers are used to provide a correlation for the positions at which local static pressure is measured on the cylinder surface. After appropriate corrections, the dynamic pressure is deduced from the pressure at the stagnation point. Corrections are also necessary in deducing the direction of flow from the bisector of the static pressure positions, when the cylinder is in a shear flow or near a wall, and these too are evaluated from the results of the calibration experiments. Measurements in two recirculating flows are then presented as an illustration both of the validity and limitations of the technique. In the first case, comparison is made with the measurements of a pulsed-wire anemometer behind a surface-mounted cube and, in the second, the continuity is used to provide an overall check on measurements behind a transverse plate. It is concluded that useful results can be obtained in many turbulent flow situations. (author)

  8. A Dual-Plane PIV Study of Turbulent Heat Transfer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Locke, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film cooling is a widely used technique in turbomachinery and rocket propulsion applications, where cool injection air protects a surface from hot combustion gases. The injected air typically has a different velocity and temperature from the free stream combustion flow, yielding a flow field with high turbulence and large temperature differences. These thin film cooling flows provide a good test case for evaluating computational model prediction capabilities. The goal of this work is to provide a database of flow field measurements for validating computational flow prediction models applied to turbulent heat transfer flows. In this work we describe the application of a Dual-Plane Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in a thin film cooling wind tunnel facility where the injection air stream velocity and temperatures are varied in order to provide benchmark turbulent heat transfer flow field measurements. The Dual-Plane PIV data collected include all three components of velocity and all three components of vorticity, spanning the width of the tunnel at multiple axial measurement planes.

  9. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Internal boundaries in multiphase flow greatly complicate fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer descriptions. Different flow regimes or topological configurations can have radically dissimilar interfacial and wall mass, momentum, and energy exchanges. To model the flow dynamics properly requires estimates of these rates. In this paper the common flow regimes for gas-liquid systems are defined and the techniques used to estimate the extent of a particular regime are described. Also, the current computer-code procedures are delineated and introduce a potentially better method is introduced

  10. Characterization of Passive Flow-Actuated Microflaps Inspired by Shark Skin for Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jackson; Devey, Sean; Lang, Amy; Hubner, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to millions of years of natural selection, sharks have evolved into quick apex predators. Previous research has proven shark skin to reduce flow separation, which would result in lower pressure drag. Mako shark skin is made up of microscopic scales on the order of 0.2 mm in size. These scales are hypothesized to be a flow control mechanism, capable of being passively actuated by reversed flow. We believe shark scales are strategically sized to interact with the lower 5 percent of the boundary layer, where reversed flow occurs near the wall. Previous wind tunnel research has shown that it is possible to passively actuate 2D flaps in the lower regions of the boundary layer. This research aims to identify reverse flow conditions that will cause small 3D flaps to actuate. Several sets of microflaps (about 4 mm in length) geometrically similar to shark scales were 3D printed. These microflaps were tested in a low-speed wind tunnel in various reverse flow conditions. Microflaps were observed to be actuated by the reversing flow and flow conditions were characterized using a hot-wire probe. These microflaps have the potential to mimic the mako shark type of flow control in air, passively actuated by reverse flow conditions. This research was supported by Boeing, the US Army, and the National Science Foundation REU program.

  11. A matrix-free implicit treatment for all speed flows on unstructured grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloczko, Th.

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this research work is the development of an efficient implicit scheme for computing compressible and low-speed flows on unstructured meshes. The first part is devoted to the review and analysis of some standard block-implicit treatments for the two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with a view to identify the best candidate for a fair comparison with the matrix-free treatment. The second part forms the main original contribution of this research work. It describes and analyses a matrix-free treatment that can be applied to any type of flow (inviscid/viscous, low Mach/highly compressible, steady/unsteady). The third part deals with the implementation of this treatment within the CAST3M code, and the demonstration of its advantages over existing techniques for computing applications of interest for the CEA: low-Mach number steady and unsteady flows in a Tee junction for example

  12. Experimental Study of Boundary Layer Flow Control Using an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Zaman, Khairul B.M.Q.; Bencic, Tomothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a database on the flowfield past an array of vortex generators (VGs) in a turbulent boundary layer. All testing was carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a flow velocity of 29 ft/sec, giving a Reynolds number of 17,500 based on the width of the VG. The flowfield generated by an array of five ramp-shaped vortex generators was examined with hot wire anemometry and smoke flow visualization. The magnitude and extent of the velocity increase near the wall, the penetration of the velocity deficit into the core flow, and the peak streamwise vorticity are examined. Influence of various parameters on the effectiveness of the array is considered on the basis of the ability to pull high momentum fluid into the near wall region.

  13. Fluidic actuators for active flow control on airframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, M.; Weigel, P.; Lipowski, M.; Meyer, M.; Schlösser, P.; Bauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    One objective of the European Projects AFLoNext and Clean Sky 2 is to apply Active Flow Control (AFC) on the airframe in critical aerodynamic areas such as the engine/wing junction or the outer wing region for being able to locally improve the aerodynamics in certain flight conditions. At the engine/wing junction, AFC is applied to alleviate or even eliminate flow separation at low speeds and high angle of attacks likely to be associated with the integration of underwing- mounted Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) engines and the necessary slat-cut-outs. At the outer wing region, AFC can be used to allow more aggressive future wing designs with improved performance. A relevant part of the work on AFC concepts for airframe application is the development of suitable actuators. Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a Flow Control Technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes out of the aircraft skin. FAFC actuators can be classified by their Net Mass Flux and accordingly divided into ZNMF (Zero Net Mass Flux) and NZNMF (Non Zero Net-Mass-Flux) actuators. In the frame of both projects, both types of the FAFC actuator concepts are addressed. In this paper, the objectives of AFC on the airframe is presented and the actuators that are used within the project are discussed.

  14. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  15. Unsteady effects in flows past stationary airfoils with Gurney flaps due to unsteady flow separations at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MATEESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the unsteady flows past stationary airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers, aiming to study the unsteady behavior of the aerodynamic coefficients due to the flow separations occurring at these Reynolds numbers. The Gurney flaps are simple but very efficient lift-increasing devices, which due to their mechanical simplicity are of particular interest for the small size micro-air-vehicles (MAV flying at low speed and very low Reynolds number. The unsteady aerodynamic analysis is performed with an efficient time-accurate numerical method developed for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations at low Reynolds numbers, which is second-order-accurate in time and space. The paper presents solutions for the unsteady aerodynamic coefficients of lift and drag and for the lift-to-drag ratio of several symmetric and cambered airfoils with Gurney flaps. It was found that although the airfoil is considered stationary, starting from a relatively small incidence (about 8 degrees the flow becomes unsteady due to the unsteadiness of the flow separations occurring at low Reynolds numbers, and the aerodynamic coefficients display periodic oscillations in time. A detailed study is presented in the paper on the influence of various geometric and flow parameters, such as the Gurney flap height, Reynolds number, airfoil relative thickness and relative camber, on the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag and lift-to-drag ratio. The flow separation is also studied with the aid of flow visualizations illustrating the changes in the flow pattern at various moments in time.

  16. Sensor Development for Active Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Seun K.; Gorton, Susan A.; Mau, Johnney C.; Soto, Hector L.; Hernandez, Corey D.

    2001-01-01

    Presented are the developmental efforts for MEMS sensors for a closed-loop active flow control in a low-speed wind tunnel evaluation. The MEMS sensors are designed in-house and fabricated out of house, and the shear sensors are a thermal type that are collocated with temperature and pressure sensors on a flexible polyimide sheet, which conforms to surfaces of a simple curvature. A total of 6 sensors are located within a 1.5 by 3 mm area as a cluster with each sensor being 300 pm square. The thickness of this sensor cluster is 75 pm. Outputs from the shear sensors have been compared with respect to those of the Preston tube for evaluation of the sensors on a flat plate. Pressure sensors are the absolute type and have recorded pressure measurements within 0.05 percent of the tunnel ESP pressure sensor readings. The sensors and signal conditioning electronics have been tested on both a flat plate and a ramp in Langley s 15-Inch Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The system configuration and control PC is configured with LabView, where calibration constants are stored for desired compensation and correction. The preliminary test results are presented within.

  17. Velocity measurements and flow patterns within the hinge region of a Medtronic Parallel bileaflet mechanical valve with clear housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J T; Healy, T M; Fontaine, A A; Saxena, R; Yoganathan, A P

    1996-11-01

    During recent clinical trials the Medtronic Parallel bileaflet mechanical heart valve was found to have an unacceptable number of valves with thrombus formation when implanted in the mitral position. Thrombi were observed in the hinge region and also in the upstream portion of the valve housing in the vicinity of the hinge. It was hypothesized that the flow conditions inside the hinge may have contributed to the thrombus formation. In order to investigate the flow structures within the hinge, laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were conducted in both steady and pulsatile flow at approximately 70 predetermined sites within the hinge region of a 27 mm Medtronic Parallel mitral valve with transparent housing. The pulsatile flow velocity measurements were animated in time using a graphical software package to visualize the hinge flow field throughout the cardiac cycle. The LDA measurements revealed that mean forward flow velocities through the hinge region were on the order of 0.10-0.20 m/s. In the inflow channel, a large vortical structure was present during diastole. Upon valve closure, peak reverse velocity reached 3 m/s close to the housing wall in the inflow channel. This area also experienced high turbulent shear stresses (> 6000 dynes/cm2) during the leakage flow phase. A disturbed, vortical flow was again present in the inflow channel after valve closure, while slightly above the leaflet peg and relief the flow was essentially stagnant. The high turbulent stresses near the top of the inflow channel, combined with a persistent vortex, implicate the inflow channel of the hinge as a likely region of thrombus formation. This experimental investigation revealed zones of flow stagnation in the inflow region of the hinge throughout the cardiac cycle and elevated turbulent shear stress levels in the inflow region during the leakage flow phase. These fluid mechanic phenomena are most likely a direct result of the complex geometry of the hinge of this valve

  18. Flow chemistry vs. flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The flow mode of conducting chemical syntheses facilitates chemical processes through the use of on-line analytical monitoring of occurring reactions, the application of solid-supported reagents to minimize downstream processing and computerized control systems to perform multi-step sequences. They are exactly the same attributes as those of flow analysis, which has solid place in modern analytical chemistry in several last decades. The following review paper, based on 131 references to original papers as well as pre-selected reviews, presents basic aspects, selected instrumental achievements and developmental directions of a rapidly growing field of continuous flow chemical synthesis. Interestingly, many of them might be potentially employed in the development of new methods in flow analysis too. In this paper, examples of application of flow analytical measurements for on-line monitoring of flow syntheses have been indicated and perspectives for a wider application of real-time analytical measurements have been discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Three dimensional simulation of compressible and incompressible flows through the finite element method; Simulacao tridimensional de escoamentos compressiveis e incompressiveis atraves do metodo dos elementos finitos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gustavo Koury

    2004-11-15

    Although incompressible fluid flows can be regarded as a particular case of a general problem, numerical methods and the mathematical formulation aimed to solve compressible and incompressible flows have their own peculiarities, in such a way, that it is generally not possible to attain both regimes with a single approach. In this work, we start from a typically compressible formulation, slightly modified to make use of pressure variables and, through augmenting the stabilising parameters, we end up with a simplified model which is able to deal with a wide range of flow regimes, from supersonic to low speed gas flows. The resulting methodology is flexible enough to allow for the simulation of liquid flows as well. Examples using conservative and pressure variables are shown and the results are compared to those published in the literature, in order to validate the method. (author)

  20. Vortical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Ma, Hui-Yang; Zhou, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and intensive book for graduate students in fluid dynamics as well as scientists, engineers and applied mathematicians. Offering a systematic introduction to the physical theory of vortical flows at graduate level, it considers the theory of vortical flows as a branch of fluid dynamics focusing on shearing process in fluid motion, measured by vorticity. It studies vortical flows according to their natural evolution stages,from being generated to dissipated. As preparation, the first three chapters of the book provide background knowledge for entering vortical flows. The rest of the book deals with vortices and vortical flows, following their natural evolution stages. Of various vortices the primary form is layer-like vortices or shear layers, and secondary but stronger form is axial vortices mainly formed by the rolling up of shear layers. Problems are given at the end of each chapter and Appendix, some for helping understanding the basic theories, and some involving specific applications; but the emphasis of both is always on physical thinking.

  1. Vortical flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Engineering; Ma, Hui-Yang [Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Dept. of Physics; Zhou, Ming-De [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    2015-11-01

    This book is a comprehensive and intensive book for graduate students in fluid dynamics as well as scientists, engineers and applied mathematicians. Offering a systematic introduction to the physical theory of vortical flows at graduate level, it considers the theory of vortical flows as a branch of fluid dynamics focusing on shearing process in fluid motion, measured by vorticity. It studies vortical flows according to their natural evolution stages,from being generated to dissipated. As preparation, the first three chapters of the book provide background knowledge for entering vortical flows. The rest of the book deals with vortices and vortical flows, following their natural evolution stages. Of various vortices the primary form is layer-like vortices or shear layers, and secondary but stronger form is axial vortices mainly formed by the rolling up of shear layers. Problems are given at the end of each chapter and Appendix, some for helping understanding the basic theories, and some involving specific applications; but the emphasis of both is always on physical thinking.

  2. Collision partner selection schemes in DSMC: From micro/nano flows to hypersonic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roohi, Ehsan, E-mail: e.roohi@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir; Stefanov, Stefan

    2016-10-25

    The motivation of this review paper is to present a detailed summary of different collision models developed in the framework of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The emphasis is put on a newly developed collision model, i.e., the Simplified Bernoulli trial (SBT), which permits efficient low-memory simulation of rarefied gas flows. The paper starts with a brief review of the governing equations of the rarefied gas dynamics including Boltzmann and Kac master equations and reiterates that the linear Kac equation reduces to a non-linear Boltzmann equation under the assumption of molecular chaos. An introduction to the DSMC method is provided, and principles of collision algorithms in the DSMC are discussed. A distinction is made between those collision models that are based on classical kinetic theory (time counter, no time counter (NTC), and nearest neighbor (NN)) and the other class that could be derived mathematically from the Kac master equation (pseudo-Poisson process, ballot box, majorant frequency, null collision, Bernoulli trials scheme and its variants). To provide a deeper insight, the derivation of both collision models, either from the principles of the kinetic theory or the Kac master equation, is provided with sufficient details. Some discussions on the importance of subcells in the DSMC collision procedure are also provided and different types of subcells are presented. The paper then focuses on the simplified version of the Bernoulli trials algorithm (SBT) and presents a detailed summary of validation of the SBT family collision schemes (SBT on transient adaptive subcells: SBT-TAS, and intelligent SBT: ISBT) in a broad spectrum of rarefied gas-flow test cases, ranging from low speed, internal micro and nano flows to external hypersonic flow, emphasizing first the accuracy of these new collision models and second, demonstrating that the SBT family scheme, if compared to other conventional and recent collision models, requires smaller

  3. Collision partner selection schemes in DSMC: From micro/nano flows to hypersonic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The motivation of this review paper is to present a detailed summary of different collision models developed in the framework of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The emphasis is put on a newly developed collision model, i.e., the Simplified Bernoulli trial (SBT), which permits efficient low-memory simulation of rarefied gas flows. The paper starts with a brief review of the governing equations of the rarefied gas dynamics including Boltzmann and Kac master equations and reiterates that the linear Kac equation reduces to a non-linear Boltzmann equation under the assumption of molecular chaos. An introduction to the DSMC method is provided, and principles of collision algorithms in the DSMC are discussed. A distinction is made between those collision models that are based on classical kinetic theory (time counter, no time counter (NTC), and nearest neighbor (NN)) and the other class that could be derived mathematically from the Kac master equation (pseudo-Poisson process, ballot box, majorant frequency, null collision, Bernoulli trials scheme and its variants). To provide a deeper insight, the derivation of both collision models, either from the principles of the kinetic theory or the Kac master equation, is provided with sufficient details. Some discussions on the importance of subcells in the DSMC collision procedure are also provided and different types of subcells are presented. The paper then focuses on the simplified version of the Bernoulli trials algorithm (SBT) and presents a detailed summary of validation of the SBT family collision schemes (SBT on transient adaptive subcells: SBT-TAS, and intelligent SBT: ISBT) in a broad spectrum of rarefied gas-flow test cases, ranging from low speed, internal micro and nano flows to external hypersonic flow, emphasizing first the accuracy of these new collision models and second, demonstrating that the SBT family scheme, if compared to other conventional and recent collision models, requires smaller

  4. Numerical investigation of the variable nozzle effect on the mixed flow turbine performance characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, B.; Hamel, M.; Hireche, O.; Hamidou, K.

    2016-09-01

    There are various matching ways between turbocharger and engine, the variable nozzle turbine is the most significant method. The turbine design must be economic with high efficiency and large capacity over a wide range of operational conditions. These design intents are used in order to decrease thermal load and improve thermal efficiency of the engine. This paper presents an original design method of a variable nozzle vane for mixed flow turbines developed from previous experimental and numerical studies. The new device is evaluated with a numerical simulation over a wide range of rotational speeds, pressure ratios, and different vane angles. The compressible turbulent steady flow is solved using the ANSYS CFX software. The numerical results agree well with experimental data in the nozzleless configuration. In the variable nozzle case, the results show that the turbine performance characteristics are well accepted in different open positions and improved significantly in low speed regime and at low pressure ratio.

  5. Measurement of flow field in the pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sa Ya; Lee, Jae Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flow field measurement of the Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) for the High Temperature Gascooled Reactor(HTGR) was performed. Large number of pebbles in the core of PBR provides complicated flow channel. Due to the complicated geometries, numerical analysis has been intensively made rather than experimental observation. However, the justification of computational simulation by the experimental study is crucial to develop solid analysis of design method. In the present study, a wind tunnel installed with pebbles stacked was constructed and equipped with the Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). We designed the system scaled up to realize the room temperature condition according to the similarity. The PIV observation gave us stagnation points, low speed region so that the suspected high temperature region can be identified. With the further supplementary experimental works, the present system may produce valuable data to justify the Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation method

  6. Granular flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu

    2012-01-01

    Granular material is a collection of macroscopic particles that are visible with naked eyes. The non-equilibrium nature of the granular materials makes their rheology quite different from that of molecular systems. In this minireview, we present the unique features of granular materials focusing...... on the shear flow of dry granular materials and granule-liquid mixture....

  7. Coupled oscillations of flow along a perforated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, E.; Rockwell, D.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent shear flow past a perforated plate bounded by a closed cavity can give rise to highly coherent oscillations, which have a wavelength of the order of the plate length. The present investigation focuses on the coupling between unsteady events on either side of the plate when the oscillations are self-sustaining. A cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry, which provides a space-time representation of the unsteadiness at a large number of locations over entire planes, is employed to characterize the distinctively different patterns of flow structure on the back (low-speed) side of the plate relative to those on the front (high-speed) side. Global cross-spectral analysis leads to patterns of spectral peaks and phase variations, along and across the plate. This approach, along with complementary types of image evaluation, delineates the physics of the oscillations, which include downstream propagating disturbances along either side of the plate and a coherent region of unsteadiness at its trailing-edge. On the backside of the plate, a sequence of upstream-oriented, pulsatile jets are formed, and the time-averaged flow pattern is a counterflow wall jet

  8. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  9. Opposed-flow Flame Spread Over Solid Fuels in Microgravity: the Effect of Confined Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Hu, Jun; Xiao, Yuan; Ren, Tan; Zhu, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Effects of confined spaces on flame spread over thin solid fuels in a low-speed opposing flow is investigated by combined use of microgravity experiments and computations. The flame behaviors are observed to depend strongly on the height of the flow tunnel. In particular, a non-monotonic trend of flame spread rate versus tunnel height is found, with the fastest flame occurring in the 3 cm high tunnel. The flame length and the total heat release rate from the flame also change with tunnel height, and a faster flame has a larger length and a higher heat release rate. The computation analyses indicate that a confined space modifies the flow around the spreading flame. The confinement restricts the thermal expansion and accelerates the flow in the streamwise direction. Above the flame, the flow deflects back from the tunnel wall. This inward flow pushes the flame towards the fuel surface, and increases oxygen transport into the flame. Such a flow modification explains the variations of flame spread rate and flame length with tunnel height. The present results suggest that the confinement effects on flame behavior in microgravity should be accounted to assess accurately the spacecraft fire hazard.

  10. Investigating motion and stability of particles in flows using numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Nidhi

    The phenomenon of transport of particles in a fluid is ubiquitous in nature and a detailed understanding of its mechanism continues to remain a fundamental question for physicists. In this thesis, we use numerical methods to study the dynamics and stability of particles advected in flows. First, we investigate the dynamics of a single, motile particle advected in a two-dimensional chaotic flow. The particle can be either spherical or ellipsoidal. Particle activity is modeled as a constant intrinsic swimming velocity and stochastic fluctuations in both the translational and rotational motions are also taken into account. Our results indicate that interaction of swimming with flow structures causes a reduction in long-term transport at low speeds. Swimmers can get trapped at the transport barriers of the flow. We show that elongated swimmers respond more strongly to the dynamical structures of the flow field. At low speeds, their macroscopic transport is reduced even further than in the case of spherical swimmers. However, at high speeds these elongated swimmers tend to get attracted to the stable manifolds of hyperbolic fixed points, leading to increased transport. We then investigate the collective dynamics of a system of particles. The particles may interact both with each other and with the background flow. We focus on two different cases. In the fist case, we examine the stability of aggregation models in a turbulent-like flow. We use a simple aggregation model in which a point-like particle moves with a constant intrinsic speed while its velocity vector is reoriented according to the average direction of motion of its neighbors. We generate a strongly fluctuating, spatially correlated background flow using Kinematic Simulation, and show that flocks are highly sensitive to this background flow and break into smaller clusters. Our results indicate that such environmental perturbations must be taken into account for models which aim to capture the collective

  11. Flow Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper Lind

    2003-01-01

    Flow Game er et dialogspil, der kan bruges som ledelsesværktøj, ledertræning, samtaletræning, coachingtræning og ideudvikling m.m. Gennem dilemmakort provokeres en dialog og teori-U inspireret afklaring- og udviklingsproces, hvor der enten arbejdes på en gruppes eller et individs vision/innovatio......Flow Game er et dialogspil, der kan bruges som ledelsesværktøj, ledertræning, samtaletræning, coachingtræning og ideudvikling m.m. Gennem dilemmakort provokeres en dialog og teori-U inspireret afklaring- og udviklingsproces, hvor der enten arbejdes på en gruppes eller et individs vision...

  12. Media Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    News and other kinds of journalistic stories, 16-17 hours a day, all year round, on all platforms, also the moderated social media. The key research thesis behind this article is that the continuous and speedy stream of news stories and media content now is becoming the centre of the production...... processes and the value creation in converged multimedia newsrooms. The article identify new methods and discuss editorial challenges in handling media flow....

  13. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF OSCILLATORY FLOW BIODIESEL REACTOR FOR CONTINUOUS BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM JATROPHA TRIGLYCERIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZHARI T. I. MOHD. GHAZI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a continuous process in producing biodiesel from jatropha oil by using an Oscillatory Flow Biodiesel Reactor (OFBR is discussed in this paper. It has been recognized that the batch stirred reactor is a primary mode used in the synthesis of biodiesel. However, pulsatile flow has been extensively researcehed and the fundamental principles have been successfully developed upon which its hydrodynamics are based. Oscillatory flow biodiesel reactor offers precise control of mixing by means of the baffle geometry and pulsation which facilitates to continuous operation, giving plug flow residence time distribution with high turbulence and enhanced mass and heat transfer. In conjunction with the concept of reactor design, parameters such as reactor dimensions, the hydrodynamic studies and physical properties of reactants must be considered prior to the design work initiated recently. The OFBR reactor design involves the use of simulation software, ASPEN PLUS and the reactor design fundamentals. Following this, the design parameters shall be applied in fabricating the OFBR for laboratory scale biodiesel production.

  14. Comparison of PDF and Moment Closure Methods in the Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1994-01-01

    In modeling turbulent reactive flows, Probability Density Function (PDF) methods have an advantage over the more traditional moment closure schemes in that the PDF formulation treats the chemical reaction source terms exactly, while moment closure methods are required to model the mean reaction rate. The common model used is the laminar chemistry approximation, where the effects of turbulence on the reaction are assumed negligible. For flows with low turbulence levels and fast chemistry, the difference between the two methods can be expected to be small. However for flows with finite rate chemistry and high turbulence levels, significant errors can be expected in the moment closure method. In this paper, the ability of the PDF method and the moment closure scheme to accurately model a turbulent reacting flow is tested. To accomplish this, both schemes were used to model a CO/H2/N2- air piloted diffusion flame near extinction. Identical thermochemistry, turbulence models, initial conditions and boundary conditions are employed to ensure a consistent comparison can be made. The results of the two methods are compared to experimental data as well as to each other. The comparison reveals that the PDF method provides good agreement with the experimental data, while the moment closure scheme incorrectly shows a broad, laminar-like flame structure.

  15. Phase-locked stereoscopic PIV measurements of the turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for the optimization of in-cylinder processes in large two-stroke low-speed uniflowscavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used...... profiles in general will not be representative for the dynamic conditions. The temporal development of the swirl strength is investigated by computing the angular momentum. The swirl strength shows an exponential decay from scavenge port closing to scavenge port opening corresponding to a reduction of 34%....

  16. The Evaporation of Liquid Droplets in Highly Turbulent Gas Streams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gould, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Single acetone and heptane droplets were suspended from a hypodermic needle in turbulent airflow, and the Nusselt number was obtained from direct measurements of the droplet diameter and evaporation rate...

  17. Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    can be written as â fj (t) =WO tanh( WIx (t)+bI)+bO, (38) where WI , WO are the input and output matrices, respectively, and bI and bO are the input...applications, present on envisioned airborne optical platforms . One of the problems is that all adaptive optical systems rely on mechanically moving some...of successfully controlling the optical aberration due to the flow over the aperture of airborne optical platforms . As outlined above, systems

  18. On the properties and mechanisms of microjet arrays in crossflow for the control of flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Erik J.

    By utilizing passive and active methods of flow control, the aerodynamic performance of external and internal components can be greatly improved. Recently however, the benefits of applying active flow control methods to turbomachinery components for improved fuel efficiency, reduced engine size, and greater operational envelope has sparked a renewed interest in some of these flow control techniques. The more attractive of these, is active control in the form of jets in cross flow. With their ability to be turned on and off, as well as their negligible effect on drag when not being actuated, they are well suited for applications such as compressor and turbine blades, engine inlet diffusers, internal engine passages, and general external aerodynamics. This study consists of two parts. The first is the application of active control on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) cascade to determine the effectiveness of microjet actuators on flow separation at relatively low speeds. The second study, motivated by the first, involves a parametric study on a more canonical model to examine the effects of various microjet parameters on the efficacy of separation control and to provide a better understanding of the relevant flow physics governing this control approach. With data obtained from velocity measurements across the wide parametric range, correlations for the growth of the counter-rotating vortex pairs generated by these actuators are deduced. From the information and models obtained throughout the study, basic suggestions for microjet actuator design are presented.

  19. Wavelet analysis of hemispheroid flow separation toward understanding human vocal fold pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Daniel H.; Carr, Ian A.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Physiological flows observed in human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps and nodules, can be modeled by flow over a wall-mounted protuberance. The experimental investigation of flow separation over a surface-mounted hemispheroid was performed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measurements of surface pressure in a low-speed wind tunnel. This study builds on the hypothesis that the signatures of vortical structures associated with flow separation are imprinted on the surface pressure distributions. Wavelet decomposition methods in one- and two-dimensions were utilized to elucidate the flow behavior. First, a complex Gaussian wavelet was used for the reconstruction of surface pressure time series from static pressure measurements acquired from ports upstream, downstream, and on the surface of the hemispheroid. This was followed by the application of a novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D-Ricker wavelet for coherent structure detection on instantaneous PIV-data. The goal of this study is to correlate phase shifts in surface pressure with Strouhal numbers associated with the vortex shedding. Ultimately, the wavelet-based analytical framework will be aimed at addressing pulsatile flows. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  20. Heat transfer enhancement through control of added perturbation velocity in flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiansheng; Wu, Cui; Li, Kangning

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three strategies which restrain the flow drag in heat transfer are proposed. ► Added perturbation induces quasi-streamwise vortices around controlled zone. ► The flow and heat transfer features depend on induced quasi-streamwise vortices. ► Vertical strategy has the best synthesis performance of three control strategies. ► Synthesis performance with control strategy is superior to that without strategy. - Abstract: The characteristics of heat transfer and flow, through an added perturbation velocity, in a rectangle channel, are investigated by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The downstream, vertical, and upstream control strategy, which can suppress the lift of low speed streaks in the process of improving the performance of heat transfer, are adopted in numerical investigation. Taking both heat transfer and flow properties into consideration, the synthesis performance of heat transfer and flow of three control strategies are evaluated. The numerical results show that the flow structure in boundary layer has been varied obviously for the effect of perturbation velocity and induced quasi-streamwise vortices emerging around the controlled zone. The results indicate that the vertical control strategy has the best synthesis performance of the three control strategies, which also has the least skin frication coefficient. The upstream and downstream strategies can improve the heat transfer performance, but the skin frication coefficient is higher than that with vertical control strategy

  1. Investigation of turbulent separation in a forward-facing step flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D S; Goulart, P J; Ganapathisubramani, B

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the upstream and downstream regions of separation of the flow over a forward-facing step is investigated using experimental data. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data is used to show a correlation between the wall shear stress of the oncoming boundary layer and the streamwise location of reverse flow upstream of the step. The time delay associated with the correlation is consistent with average convection velocities in the lower boundary layer. This suggests that appropriate addition of momentum into the boundary layer could be used to control the spatial extent of the separation upstream of the step. In addition, low-speed PIV data is used to show statistical relations between the flow characteristics of the recirculation regions in the vicinity of the step face. It is shown that a slower than average flow velocity above the step face is associated with an increase in the wall-normal extent of upstream reverse flow, an increase in the inclination of the flow above the step and an increase in downstream vorticity.

  2. Effect of Thickness-to-Chord Ratio on Flow Structure of Low Swept Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsacan, Burak; Sencan, Gizem; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2017-11-01

    The effect of thickness-to-chord (t/C) ratio on flow structure of a delta wing with sweep angle of 35 degree is characterized in a low speed wind tunnel using laser illuminated smoke visualization, particle image velocimetry, and surface pressure measurements. Four different t/C ratio varying from 4.75% to 19% are tested at angles of attack 4, 6, 8, and 10 degrees for Reynolds numbers Re =10,000 and 35,000. The results indicate that the effect of thickness-to-chord ratio on flow structure is quite substantial, such that, as the wing thickness increases, the flow structure transforms from leading edge vortex to three-dimensional separated flow regime. The wing with low t/C ratio of 4.75% experiences pronounced surface separation at significantly higher angle of attack compared to the wing with high t/C ratio. The results might explain some of the discrepancies reported in previously conducted studies related to delta wings. In addition, it is observed that the thickness of the shear layer separated from windward side of the wing is directly correlated with the thickness of the wing. To conclude, the flow structure on low swept delta wing is highly affected by t/C ratio, which in turn might indicate the potential usage of wing thickness as an effective flow control parameter.

  3. A Study on the Nonmetallic Inclusion Motions in a Swirling Flow Submerged Entry Nozzle in a New Cylindrical Tundish Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peiyuan; Ersson, Mikael; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2018-04-01

    Different sizes and shapes of nonmetallic inclusions in a swirling flow submerged entry nozzle (SEN) placed in a new tundish design were investigated by using a Lagrangian particle tracking scheme. The results show that inclusions in the current cylindrical tundish have difficulties remaining in the top tundish region, since a strong rotational steel flow exists in this region. This high rotational flow of 0.7 m/s provides the required momentum for the formation of a strong swirling flow inside the SEN. The results show that inclusions larger than 40 µm were found to deposit to a smaller extent on the SEN wall compared to smaller inclusions. The reason is that these large inclusions have Separation number values larger than 1. Thus, the swirling flow causes these large size inclusions to move toward the SEN center. For the nonspherical inclusions, large size inclusions were found to be deposited on the SEN wall to a larger extent, compared to spherical inclusions. More specifically, the difference of the deposited inclusion number is around 27 pct. Overall, it was found that the swirling flow contains three regions, namely, the isotropic core region, the anisotropic turbulence region and the near-wall region. Therefore, anisotropic turbulent fluctuations should be taken into account when the inclusion motion was tracked in this complex flow. In addition, many inclusions were found to deposit at the SEN inlet region. The plotted velocity distribution shows that the inlet flow is very chaotic. A high turbulent kinetic energy value of around 0.08 m2/s2 exists in this region, and a recirculating flow was also found here. These flow characteristics are harmful since they increase the inclusion transport toward the wall. Therefore, a new design of the SEN inlet should be developed in the future, with the aim to modify the inlet flow so that the inclusion deposition is reduced.

  4. Astrophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, James E.; King, Andrew

    2003-07-01

    Almost all conventional matter in the Universe is fluid, and fluid dynamics plays a crucial role in astrophysics. This new graduate textbook provides a basic understanding of the fluid dynamical processes relevant to astrophysics. The mathematics used to describe these processes is simplified to bring out the underlying physics. The authors cover many topics, including wave propagation, shocks, spherical flows, stellar oscillations, the instabilities caused by effects such as magnetic fields, thermal driving, gravity, shear flows, and the basic concepts of compressible fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics. The authors are Directors of the UK Astrophysical Fluids Facility (UKAFF) at the University of Leicester, and editors of the Cambridge Astrophysics Series. This book has been developed from a course in astrophysical fluid dynamics taught at the University of Cambridge. It is suitable for graduate students in astrophysics, physics and applied mathematics, and requires only a basic familiarity with fluid dynamics.• Provides coverage of the fundamental fluid dynamical processes an astrophysical theorist needs to know • Introduces new mathematical theory and techniques in a straightforward manner • Includes end-of-chapter problems to illustrate the course and introduce additional ideas

  5. Conductive solar wind models in rapidly diverging flow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, T.E.; Leer, E.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed parameter study of conductive models of the solar wind has been carried out, extending the previous similar studies of Durney (1972) and Durney and Hundhausen (1974) by considering collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction, rapidly diverging flow geometries, and the structure of solutions for the entire n 0 -T 0 plane (n 0 and T 0 are the coronal base density and temperature). Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the complex effects of the physical processes operative in conductive solar wind models. There are five points of particular interest that have arisen from the study: (1) neither collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction nor rapidly diverging flow geometries can significantly increase the solar wind speed at 1 AU; (2) there exists a firm upper limit on the coronal base temperature consistent with observed values of the coronal base pressure and solar wind mass flux density; (3) the principal effect of rapidly diverging flow geometries is a decrease in the solar wind mass flux density at 1 AU and an increase in the mass flux density at the coronal base; (4) collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction can lead to a solar wind flow speed that either increases or decreases with increasing coronal base density (n 0 ) and temperature (T 0 , depending on the region of the n 0 -T 0 plane considered; (5) there is a region of the n 0 -T/sub o/ plane at high coronal base densities where low-speed, high-mass-flux, transonic solar wind flows exist: a region not previously considered

  6. Vortex flow and cavitation in diesel injector nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, A.; Gavaises, M.; Arcoumanis, C.

    Flow visualization as well as three-dimensional cavitating flow simulations have been employed for characterizing the formation of cavitation inside transparent replicas of fuel injector valves used in low-speed two-stroke diesel engines. The designs tested have incorporated five-hole nozzles with cylindrical as well as tapered holes operating at different fixed needle lift positions. High-speed images have revealed the formation of an unsteady vapour structure upstream of the injection holes inside the nozzle volume, which is referred to as . Computation of the flow distribution and combination with three-dimensional reconstruction of the location of the strings inside the nozzle volume has revealed that strings are found at the core of recirculation zones; they originate either from pre-existing cavitation sites forming at sharp corners inside the nozzle where the pressure falls below the vapour pressure of the flowing liquid, or even from suction of outside air downstream of the hole exit. Processing of the acquired images has allowed estimation of the mean location and probability of appearance of the cavitating strings in the three-dimensional space as a function of needle lift, cavitation and Reynolds number. The frequency of appearance of the strings has been correlated with the Strouhal number of the vortices developing inside the sac volume; the latter has been found to be a function of needle lift and hole shape. The presence of strings has significantly affected the flow conditions at the nozzle exit, influencing the injected spray. The cavitation structures formed inside the injection holes are significantly altered by the presence of cavitation strings and are jointly responsible for up to 10% variation in the instantaneous fuel injection quantity. Extrapolation using model predictions for real-size injectors operating at realistic injection pressures indicates that cavitation strings are expected to appear within the time scales of typical injection

  7. Development of Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging technique that relies on the photo-dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser induced fluorescence. Velocities are then obtained from time-of-flight calculations. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is relatively short (<50 µs), making it suited for high speed flows. Lifetime and radicals formation increases with temperature, which allows HTV to also probe low-velocity, high-temperature flows or reacting flows such as flames. The present work aims at extending the domain of applicability of HTV, particularly towards low-speed (<10 m/s) and moderate (<500 K) temperature flows. Results are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements recorded in identical conditions. Single shot and averaged velocity profiles are obtained in an air jet at room temperature. By modestly raising the temperature (100-200 degC) the OH production increases, resulting in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Use of nitrogen - a non-reactive gas with minimal collisional quenching - extends the OH species lifetime (to over 500 µs), which allows probing of slower flows or, alternately, increases the measurement precision at the expense of spatial resolution. Instantaneous velocity profiles are resolved in a 100degC nitrogen jet (maximum jet-center velocity of 6.5 m/s) with an uncertainty down to 0.10 m/s (1.5%) at 68% confidence level. MTV measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry and show agreement within 2%.

  8. An experimental study of turbulent two-phase flow in hydraulic jumps and application of a triple decomposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Felder, Stefan; Chanson, Hubert

    2014-07-01

    Intense turbulence develops in the two-phase flow region of hydraulic jump, with a broad range of turbulent length and time scales. Detailed air-water flow measurements using intrusive phase-detection probes enabled turbulence characterisation of the bubbly flow, although the phenomenon is not a truly random process because of the existence of low-frequency, pseudo-periodic fluctuating motion in the jump roller. This paper presents new measurements of turbulent properties in hydraulic jumps, including turbulence intensity, longitudinal and transverse integral length and time scales. The results characterised very high turbulent levels and reflected a combination of both fast and slow turbulent components. The respective contributions of the fast and slow motions were quantified using a triple decomposition technique. The decomposition of air-water detection signal revealed "true" turbulent characteristics linked with the fast, microscopic velocity turbulence of hydraulic jumps. The high-frequency turbulence intensities were between 0.5 and 1.5 close to the jump toe, and maximum integral turbulent length scales were found next to the bottom. Both decreased in the flow direction with longitudinal turbulence dissipation. The results highlighted the considerable influence of hydrodynamic instabilities of the flow on the turbulence characterisation. The successful application of triple decomposition technique provided the means for the true turbulence properties of hydraulic jumps.

  9. Three-dimensional flow structure measurements behind a queue of studied model vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.F.; Chan, T.L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow structures of a queue of studied model vehicles (i.e., one-, two- and three-vehicle cases) were investigated comprehensively in a closed-circuit wind tunnel using particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the typical urban vehicle speeds (i.e., 10, 30 and 50 km/h). In this three-dimensional vehicle wake, a pair of longitudinal vortices is characterized by counter-rotating and moving downstream at relatively low velocity than their surrounding flow. The flow structures of multiple studied model vehicles are dominated by the wake generated from the last studied model vehicle but the preceding studied model vehicle(s) also has/have some minor effects. Cross-sectional turbulence distribution is non-uniform in the far-wake region for all studied cases. The lowest turbulence occurs at the center part of the vehicle wake while high turbulence occurs at its two sides. As such, it may lead to considerable underestimation in turbulence magnitude if the measurement is only taken along the centerline of the vehicle wake.

  10. Comparison of spatio-temporal resolution of different flow measurement techniques for marine renewable energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Vincent; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy conversion devices are subject to a wide range of turbulent scales, either due to upstream bathymetry, obstacles and waves, or from wakes of upstream devices in array configurations. The commonly used, robust Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) are well suited for long term flow measurements in the marine environment, but are limited to low sampling rates due to their operational principle. The resulting temporal and spatial resolution is insufficient to measure all turbulence scales of interest to the device, e.g., ``blade-scale turbulence.'' The present study systematically characterizes the spatial and temporal resolution of ADCP, Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Measurements were conducted in a large cross section tow tank (3.7m × 2.4m) for several benchmark cases, including low and high turbulence intensity uniform flow as well as in the wake of a cylinder, to quantitatively investigate the flow scales which each of the instruments can resolve. The purpose of the study is to supply data for mathematical modeling to improve predictions from ADCP measurements, which can help lead to higher-fidelity energy resource assessment and more accurate device evaluation, including wake measurements. Supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  11. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H F; Huo, Y W; Pan, Z B; Zhou, W C; He, M H

    2012-01-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  12. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. F.; Huo, Y. W.; Pan, Z. B.; Zhou, W. C.; He, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  13. Analysis of zonal flow bifurcations in 3D drift wave turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The main issue of experimental magnetic fusion devices lies with their inherently high turbulent transport, preventing long-term plasma confinement. A deeper understanding of the underlying transport processes is therefore desirable, especially in the high-gradient tokamak edge which marks the location of the drift wave regime as well as the outer boundary of the still badly understood high confinement mode. One of the most promising plasma features possibly connected to a complete bifurcation theory for the transition to this H-mode is found in large-scale phenomena capable of regulating radial transport through vortex shearing - i.e. zonal flows, linearly stable large-scale poloidal vector E x vector B-modes based on radial flux surface averages of the potential gradient generated through turbulent self-organization. Despite their relevance, few detailed turbulence studies of drift wave-based zonal flows have been undertaken, and none of them have explicitly targeted bifurcations - or, within a resistive sheared-slab environment, observed zonal flows at all. In this work, both analytical means and the two-fluid code NLET are used to analyze a reduced set of Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, describing a sheared collisional drift wave system without curvature. The characteristics of the drift waves themselves, as well as those of the drift wave-based zonal flows and their retroaction on the drift wave turbulence are examined. The single dimensionless parameter ρ s proposed in previous analytical models is examined numerically and shown to divide the drift wave scale into two transport regimes, the behavioral characteristics of which agree perfectly with theoretical expectations. This transport transition correlates with a transition from pure drift wave turbulence at low ρ s into the high-ρ s zonal flow regime. The associated threshold has been more clearly identified by tracing it back to a tipping of the ratio between a newly proposed frequency gradient length at

  14. Inception mechanism and suppression of rotating stall in an axial-flow fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, T

    2013-01-01

    Inception patterns of rotating stall at two stagger-angle settings for the highly loaded rotor blades were experimentally investigated in a low-speed axial-flow fan. Rotor-tip flow fields were also numerically investigated to clarify the mechanism behind the rotating stall inception. The stall inception patterns depended on the rotor stagger-angle settings. The stall inception from a rotating instability was confirmed at the design stagger-angle settings. The stall inception from a short length-scale stall cell (spike) was also confirmed at the small stagger-angle setting. The spillage of tip-leakage flow and the tip-leakage vortex breakdown influence the rotating stall inception. An air-separator has been developed based on the clarified inception mechanism of rotating stall. The rotating stall was suppressed by the developed air-separator, and the operating range of fan was extended towards low flow rate. The effect of developed air-separator was also confirmed by application to a primary air fan used in a coal fired power plant. It is concluded from these results that the developed air-separator can provide a wide operating range for an axial-flow fan

  15. Active unsteady aerodynamic suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, thereby addressing the important need for centrifugal compressor rotating stall and surge control. In this model, the precursor to to instability is a weak rotating potential velocity perturbation in the inlet flow field that eventually develops into a finite disturbance. To suppress the growth of this potential disturbance, a rotating control vortical velocity disturbance is introduced into the impeller inlet flow. The effectiveness of this control is analyzed by matching the perturbation pressure in the compressor inlet and exit flow fields with a model for the unsteady behavior of the compressor. To demonstrate instability control, this model is then used to predict the control effectiveness for centrifugal compressor geometries based on a low speed research centrifugal compressor. These results indicate that reductions of 10 to 15 percent in the mean inlet flow coefficient at instability are possible with control waveforms of half the magnitude of the total disturbance at the inlet.

  16. A blended pressure/density based method for the computation of incompressible and compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossow, C.-C.

    2003-01-01

    An alternative method to low speed preconditioning for the computation of nearly incompressible flows with compressible methods is developed. For this approach the leading terms of the flux difference splitting (FDS) approximate Riemann solver are analyzed in the incompressible limit. In combination with the requirement of the velocity field to be divergence-free, an elliptic equation to solve for a pressure correction to enforce the divergence-free velocity field on the discrete level is derived. The pressure correction equation established is shown to be equivalent to classical methods for incompressible flows. In order to allow the computation of flows at all speeds, a blending technique for the transition from the incompressible, pressure based formulation to the compressible, density based formulation is established. It is found necessary to use preconditioning with this blending technique to account for a remaining 'compressible' contribution in the incompressible limit, and a suitable matrix directly applicable to conservative residuals is derived. Thus, a coherent framework is established to cover the discretization of both incompressible and compressible flows. Compared with standard preconditioning techniques, the blended pressure/density based approach showed improved robustness for high lift flows close to separation

  17. Experimental Visualization of the Flow Structure for Jet in Crossflow with a Curved Hole Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of a hole curvature on the flow structure and characteristics downstream of JICF (jet in cross-Flow by means of smoke visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV. The experiment was performed in a low speed wind tunnel with Reynolds numbers of about 480 and 1000, based on the hole diameter and main flow speed. Two geometries were tested: a circular hole with 90° curvature and a circular straight hole for comparison, under blowing ratios 0.5 and 1.0. The measurements were done in the symmetric plane and four cross-sections. The results show that the curved hole could decrease the mixing behavior of jet flow with the main flow as the hole leading edge also increases the chance of transportingthecoolant to the wall surface and the transverse coverage. The curved hole shows a high potential to increase the cooling effectiveness once it is applied to the turbine blades.

  18. A flow visualization study of spore release using a wind tunnel-mounted laser light sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Eisner, A.D.; Wiener, R.W.; Main, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    A phase Doppler anemometry system in combination with a laser light sheet was used in a low-speed recirculating wind tunnel to examine the flow field around an individual leaf. Turbulence similar to that encountered near the surface of the earth in a neutral stability boundary layer was generated using a grid at the upwind end of the wind tunnel test section. Individual healthy and diseased plant leaves were introduced into the tunnel with the leaf tip pointing downwind. The Mie-scattered radiation from the spores departing the diseased leaf was captured on videotape. Image processing software was used to enhance the visual quality of the individual frames from the videotape and to make spore velocity calculations. Three main vortex regions around the leaf were identified. The importance of these regions to the separation of the spores from the leaf surface and their subsequent downwind movement was analyzed

  19. Kinetic description of flow past a micro-plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Hitchon, W. Nicholas G.; Boyd, Iain D.; Sun Quanhua

    2004-01-01

    In this work we discuss a novel numerical scheme and present numerical results for the problem of 'high' (of order unity) Knudsen number, Kn=λ/L, low velocity gas flow past a micro-plate. The scheme used here is similar to one employed in the past to examine heat flow, but in order to deal with momentum transport in the vicinity of a plate, new techniques had to be developed. These include a new scheme for finding 'transition probabilities', which eliminates some forms of numerical diffusion, and a method for handling reflections off surfaces which preserves the essential properties of the flow. The purpose of the paper is to present these methods and examine their performance. The method is found to function well, but the results indicate that the collision operator which is employed here must be improved in order to obtain accurate results for the drag. Low speed neutral particle transport, in long mean free path (LMFP) environments, presents challenges for well-established techniques, such as the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In particular, at low flow velocities, statistical methods suffer from noise that may render them impractical in LMFP environments. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is the alternative to these statistical methods. As computing power increases, Boltzmann-based approaches become more accessible. We discuss here a novel non-statistical (no random numbers are used) kinetic model for particle transport and explore its accuracy and sensitivity to resolution and other details of its implementation. The model is an enhanced version of the transition probability matrix (TPM) method. The results generated by the TPM are compared with the information preservation (IP) method, the Navier-Stokes (NS) slip model and when applicable to DSMC. We provide a qualitative comparison of the models and then we compare the results of the different models for various Kn for flow past a plate. For Kn in the slip flow regime, the TPM, IP and NS

  20. Flow and heat transfer experiments in the turbine airfoil/endwall region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Taek

    An experimental investigation of the three-dimensional flow and heat transfer near the junction between the endwall and suction wall of a gas turbine was performed. A large-scale, two-half-blade facility which simulates a turbine cascade was introduced. The simulator consists of two large half-blade sections, one wall simulating the pressure surface and the other wall simulating the suction surface. The advantage of this configuration is that the features of the secondary flow are large, because of the relatively large test section, and the flow is easily accessible with probes. Qualification of this simulator was by comparison to a multi-blade cascade flow. Various flow visualization techniques--oil and lampblack, ink and oil of wintergeeen, a single tuft probe, and a tuft grid--were employed to confirm that the important features of the cascade flow were replicated in this simulator. The triangular region on the suction surface, which was affected by the passage vortex, and the endwall secondary crossflow were observed by shear stress visualization and the liquid crystal measurement techniques. In order to investigate the effects of the turbulence level on the secondary flow in a turbine passage, a turbulence generator, designed to reproduce the characteristics of a combustor exit flow, was built. The generator was designed not only to generate a high turbulence level but to produce three main features of a combustor exit flow. The generator produced a turbulence intensity level of about 10 percent and an integral length scale of 5 centimeters. It was observed that the endwall secondary flow, including the passage vortex, is not significantly influenced by freestream turbulence levels up to 10 percent. A flow management technique using a boundary layer fence designed to reduce some harmful effects of secondary flow in the endwall region of a turbine passage was introduced. The boundary layer fence is effective in changing the passage of the vortex and reducing

  1. Ultrasonic flow meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötters, Joost Conrad; Snijders, G.J.; Volker, A.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to an ultrasonic flow meter comprising a flow tube for the fluid whose flow rate is to be determined. The flow meter comprises a transmitting element for emitting ultrasonic waves, which is provided on the outer jacket of the flow tube. A receiving element, which is provided on

  2. Flow tilt angles near forest edges – Part 1: Sonic anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dellwik

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of flow tilt angles from a fetch-limited beech forest site with clearings is presented in the context of vertical advection of carbon dioxide. Flow angles and vertical velocities from two sonic anemometers by different manufacturers were analyzed. Instead of using rotations, where zero-flow angles were assumed for neutral flow, the data was interpreted in relation to upstream and downstream forest edges.

    Uncertainties caused by flow distortion, vertical misalignment and limited sampling time (statistical uncertainty were evaluated and found to be highly significant. Since the attack angle distribution of the wind on the sonic anemometer is a function of atmospheric stratification, an instrumental error caused by imperfect flow distortion correction is also a function of the atmospheric stratification. In addition, it is discussed that the sonic anemometers have temperature dependent off-sets. These features of the investigated sonic anemometers make them unsuitable for measuring vertical velocities over highly turbulent forested terrain. By comparing the sonic anemometer results to that of a conically scanning Doppler lidar (Dellwik et al., 2010b, sonic anemometer accuracy for measuring mean flow tilt angles was estimated to between 2° and 3°. Use of planar fit algorithms, where the mean vertical velocity is calculated as the difference between the neutral and non-neutral flow, does not solve this problem of low accuracy and is not recommended.

    Because of the large uncertainties caused by flow distortion and vertical alignment, it was only possible to a limited extent to relate sonic anemometer flow tilt angles to upwind forest edges, but the results by the lidar indicated that an internal boundary layer affect flow tilt angles at 21m above the forest. This is in accordance with earlier studies at the site.

    Since the mean flow tilt angles do not follow the terrain, an estimate of the vertical advection

  3. Flow of Aqueous Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Flow of Aqueous Humor Flow of Aqueous Humor Most, but not all, forms of glaucoma are ... remains normal when some of the fluid (aqueous humor) produced by the eye's ciliary body flows out ...

  4. Simulation of Flow Pattern around Inclined Bridge Group Pier using FLOW-3D Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihesadat Jafari

    2017-03-01

    around the piers group is entirely different than that for a single pier and consequently the outcomes of the flow pattern around single pier cannot be generalized to the pier group. At all levels of foundation setting, longitudinal component of flow velocity increases surrounding the first pier. The increase in the area and its extension towards downstream is caused by the constriction the flow due to the pier and area rotating of the wake vortex in downstream. When the pier foundation is set at the stream bed, the bed rotating flows extend to a distance between the two piers from near the bed up to the middle of flow depth while in upstream of the second pier and near water surface, the stream lines become parallel to the bed. The comparison of the results of the changes in bed shear stress in the situations of foundation setting in different levels showed that the maximum shear stress occurred when the foundation level is at the bed level and the maximum shear stress exerted on the bed decreases by factors of 17% and 53% in the cases of foundation level to be below and above bed levels, respectively. In addition, the results showed that, the amount of vortex flows increased in upstream piers group and near bed in the case of setting the foundation above the bed. This is because of the fact that the volume of piers group acted as obstacle against flow was more than other level settings. Furthermore, based on the obtained results, in the case of foundation level is set at the bed, the quantity and development zone of vortex flow are much higher than those observed when the setting foundation is below the bed level. This can be attributed to the higher effect of the second pier on the flow pattern being between the first and the second piers. Stream lines turn downward in the range between piers group, and after the collision to bed turn upward to water surface and cause to form rotating flow and hence high turbulence intensity in the area. In the near water surface and

  5. Numerical investigation of over expanded flow behavior in a single expansion ramp nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Mahmood; Pourabidi, Reza; Goshtasbi-Rad, Ebrahim

    2018-05-01

    The single expansion ramp nozzle is severely over-expanded when the vehicle is at low speed, which hinders its ability to provide optimal configurations for combined cycle engines. The over-expansion leads to flow separation as a result of shock wave/boundary-layer interaction. Flow separation, and the presence of shocks themselves, result in a performance loss in the single expansion ramp nozzle, leading to reduced thrust and increased pressure losses. In the present work, the unsteady two dimensional compressible flow in an over expanded single expansion ramp nozzle has been investigated using finite volume code. To achieve this purpose, the Reynolds stress turbulence model and full multigrid initialization, in addition to the Smirnov's method for examining the errors accumulation, have been employed and the results are compared with available experimental data. The results show that the numerical code is capable of predicting the experimental data with high accuracy. Afterward, the effect of discontinuity jump in wall temperature as well as the length of straight ramp on flow behavior have been studied. It is concluded that variations in wall temperature and length of straight ramp change the shock wave boundary layer interaction, shock structure, shock strength as well as the distance between Lambda shocks.

  6. Horn–Schunck optical flow applied to deformation measurement of a birdlike airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Xiaoliang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current deformation measurement techniques suffer from limited spatial resolution. In this work, a highly accurate and high-resolution Horn–Schunck optical flow method is developed and then applied to measuring the static deformation of a birdlike flexible airfoil at a series of angles of attack at Reynolds number 100,000 in a low speed, low noise wind tunnel. To allow relatively large displacements, a nonlinear Horn–Schunck model and a coarse-to-fine warping process are adopted. To preserve optical flow discontinuities, a nonquadratic penalization function, a multi-cue driven bilateral filtering and a principle component analysis of local image patterns are used. First, the accuracy and convergence of this Horn–Schunck technique are verified on a benchmark. Then, the maximum displacement that can be reliably calculated by this technique is studied on synthetic images. Both studies are compared with the performance of a Lucas–Kanade optical flow method. Finally, the Horn–Schunck technique is used to estimate the 3-D deformation of the birdlike airfoil through a stereoscopic camera setup. The results are compared with those computed by Lucas–Kanade optical flow, image correlation and numerical simulation.

  7. Experimental investigations on the fluid flow through a wall subchannel of a rod bundle (P/D = 1.036, W/D = 1.072)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehme, K.

    1982-07-01

    Measurements of the distributions of the mean velocity, the wall shear stresses and the turbulence were performed in a wall subchannel of a rod bundle of four parallel rods arranged symmetrically in a rectangular channel (P/D = 1.036, W/D = 1.072). The Reynolds number of this investigation was Re = 7.60 x 10 4 . The experimental results show that the momentum transport is highly anisotropic especially in the gaps of the rod bundle. Influences of secondary flow cannot be detected in the distribution of the time-mean velocity, however, such influences are found in the distributions of the turbulence intensities and the kinetic energy of turbulence. Very high turbulence intensities were observed in the gap between the rods. The comparison between experimental wall shear stress distributions and those calculated with the VELASCO-code shows discrepancies especially in the gap between the rods. (orig.) [de

  8. Implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme for steady state solutions in all flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhong, Chengwen; Xu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) for non-equilibrium steady state flow computation. The UGKS is a direct modeling method for flow simulation in all regimes with the updates of both macroscopic flow variables and microscopic gas distribution function. By solving the macroscopic equations implicitly, a predicted equilibrium state can be obtained first through iterations. With the newly predicted equilibrium state, the evolution equation of the gas distribution function and the corresponding collision term can be discretized in a fully implicit way for fast convergence through iterations as well. The lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) factorization method is implemented to solve both macroscopic and microscopic equations, which improves the efficiency of the scheme. Since the UGKS is a direct modeling method and its physical solution depends on the mesh resolution and the local time step, a physical time step needs to be fixed before using an implicit iterative technique with a pseudo-time marching step. Therefore, the physical time step in the current implicit scheme is determined by the same way as that in the explicit UGKS for capturing the physical solution in all flow regimes, but the convergence to a steady state speeds up through the adoption of a numerical time step with large CFL number. Many numerical test cases in different flow regimes from low speed to hypersonic ones, such as the Couette flow, cavity flow, and the flow passing over a cylinder, are computed to validate the current implicit method. The overall efficiency of the implicit UGKS can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude in comparison with the explicit one.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of the fluid flow in a side-ported rotary engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Baowei; Pan, Jianfeng; Tang, Aikun; Pan, Zhenhua; Zhu, Yuejin; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An optical side-ported rotary engine test bed has been set up and tested by PIV. • A three-dimensional dynamic simulation model is established. • Experiment and numerical simulation are combined to study the flow mechanisms. • A counterclockwise flow pattern was found in the combustion chamber in the experiment. • The effect of various parameters on the flow field is studied by numerical simulation. - Abstract: The side-ported rotary engine is a potential alternative to the reciprocating engine because of its favorable performance at low speed. The performance of side-ported rotary engines is strongly influenced by the flow field in the combustion chamber. In this study, an optical side-ported rotary engine test-bed was built and PIV was employed to measure the flow field in the rotor housing central plane. From experiment results, a counterclockwise swirl was detected in the rotor housing central plane. Meanwhile, a three-dimensional dynamic mesh and turbulent flow model was integrated and simulated using the Fluent CFD software. The three-dimensional dynamic simulation model was validated by comparison with experimental results. In addition, the effect of three major parameters on the flow field in the combustion chamber, namely rotating speed, intake pressure and intake angle were numerically investigated. The results show that a swirl forms in the middle and front of the combustion chamber during the intake stroke under low rotating speed. This is in line with the swirl detected in the rotor housing central plane though the PIV experiment at 600 rpm. Furthermore, the flow field, volume coefficient and average turbulence kinetic energy in the combustion chamber were studied in detail by varying rotating speed, intake pressure and intake angle

  10. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over the DrivAer fastback vehicle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruettgers, Mario; Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2017-11-01

    In 2012 the Technical University of Munich (TUM) made realistic generic car models called DrivAer available to the public. These detailed models allow a precise calculation of the flow around a lifelike car which was limited to simplified geometries in the past. In the present study, the turbulent flow around one of the models, the DrivAer Fastback model, is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). The goal of the study is to give a deeper physical understanding of highly turbulent regions around the car, like at the side mirror or at the rear end. For each region the contribution to the total drag is worked out. The results have shown that almost 35% of the drag is generated from the car wheels whereas the side mirror only contributes 4% of the total drag. Detailed frequency analysis on velocity signals in each wake region have also been conducted and found 3 dominant frequencies which correspond to the dominant frequency of the total drag. Furthermore, vortical structures are visualized and highly energetic points are identified. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government(Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning) (No. 2014R1A2A1A11049599, No. 2015R1A2A1A15056086, No. 2016R1E1A2A01939553).

  11. Theoretical analysis of the flow around a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouachria, Z.; Djoumati, D. [Batna Univ., Batna (Algeria). Laboratoire de Physique Energetique Appliquee; Djamel, H. [Batna Univ., Batna (Algeria). Dept. de Mecanique Energetique

    2009-07-01

    While Savonius rotors do not perform as well as Darrieus wind turbine rotors, Savonius rotors work in all wind directions, do not require a rudder, and are capable of operating at relatively low speeds. A discrete vortex method was used to analyze the complex flow around a Savonius rotor. Velocity and pressure fields obtained in the analysis were used to determine both mechanical and energetic rotor performance. Savonius rotor bi-blades were considered in relation to 4 free eddies, the leakage points of each blade, and the distribution of basic eddies along the blades. Each blade was divided into equal elementary arcs. Linear equations and Kelvin theorem were reduced to a single equation. Results showed good agreement with data obtained in previous experimental studies. The study demonstrated that vortice emissions were unbalanced. The resistant blade had 2 vortice emissions, while the driving blade had only a single vortex. The results of the study will be used to clarify the mechanical and aerodynamic functions as well as to determine the different values between the blades and the speed of the turbine's engine. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Water Tank Experiments on Stratified Flow over Double Mountain-Shaped Obstacles at High-Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stiperski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an overview of the HyIV-CNRS-SecORo (Hydralab IV-CNRS-Secondary Orography and Rotors Experiments laboratory experiments carried out in the CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques large stratified water flume. The experiments were designed to systematically study the influence of double obstacles on stably stratified flow. The experimental set-up consists of a two-layer flow in the water tank, with a lower neutral and an upper stable layer separated by a sharp density discontinuity. This type of layering over terrain is known to be conducive to a variety of possible responses in the atmosphere, from hydraulic jumps to lee waves and highly turbulent rotors. In each experiment, obstacles were towed through the tank at a constant speed. The towing speed and the size of the tank allowed high Reynolds-number flow similar to the atmosphere. Here, we present the experimental design, together with an overview of laboratory experiments conducted and their results. We develop a regime diagram for flow over single and double obstacles and examine the parameter space where the secondary obstacle has the largest influence on the flow. Trapped lee waves, rotors, hydraulic jumps, lee-wave interference and flushing of the valley atmosphere are successfully reproduced in the stratified water tank. Obstacle height and ridge separation distance are shown to control lee-wave interference. Results, however, differ partially from previous findings on the flow over double ridges reported in the literature due to the presence of nonlinearities and possible differences in the boundary layer structure. The secondary obstacle also influences the transition between different flow regimes and makes trapped lee waves possible for higher Froude numbers than expected for an isolated obstacle.

  13. Estudio histológico comparativo de la reparación ósea entre hueso alveolar y extra-alveolar en los cerdos sometidos a osteotomía con alta y baja velocidad, con refrigeración líquida Comparative study of bone repair between alveolar and extra-alveolar bone in pigs subjected to osteotomy at low speed and high speed with liquid refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique José Baldo de Toledo

    2012-03-01

    models, the present study has as its aim to evaluate the histological bone repair process of osteotomy performed on alveolar and extra-alveolar bones, using drilling tools with liquid refrigeration. Material and method Eighteen Large White pigs weighing between 20 and 25 Kg were divided into three groups of six animals in order to evaluate the osteotomy repairs with low and high speed in the alveolar bone and threes in the extra-alveolar area, study periods of 7, 14 and 28 days. Results: It was observed that in the alveolar bone at the postoperative times of 14 and 28 days, the best repair results were in the osteotomy performed with low speed, while in the 7 day postoperative period, the results with high speed were slightly better, in alveolar areas as well as extra-alveolar areas. There no statistically significant differences between the alveolar and extra-alveolar bone repair process. Conclusions: The repair process, by means of microscopic analysis in the alveolar and extra-alveolar areas, are similar with better results observed in osteotomies performed with low speed drills in the 14 and 28 day study periods, and at 7 days postoperative the results with high speed drills and refrigeration were slightly better. Research works using pigs as an animal model are perfectly viable.

  14. Numerical simulations of the laminar-turbulent transition process in plane Poiseuille flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiser, L.

    1982-04-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in plane Poiseuille flow is simulated by numerical integration of the time-dependent three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow. The mathematical model of a spatially periodic, timewise developing flow in a moving frame of reference is used to match vibrating-ribbon experiments of Nishioka et al. The numerical discretisation is based on a spectral method with Fourier and Chebyshev polynomial expansions in space and second order finite differences in time. The pressure is calculated using a new method which enforces incompressibility and boundary conditions exactly. This is achieved by deriving the correct boundary conditions for the pressure Poisson equation. The numerical results obtained for two-dimensional finite amplitude disturbances are consistent with nonlinear stability theory. The time-periodic secondary flow is attained by the time-dependent calculation with reasonable accuracy after a long quasi-steady state. No sign of two-dimensional instability, but strong three-dimensional instability as well of the periodic secondary flow as of the quasi-steady state is found. This secondary three-dimensional instability is shown to be responsible for transition. It is shown that the three-dimensional simulations presented here reproduce the experimentally observed transition process up to the spike stage. Detailed comparisons with measurements of mean velocity, rms-values of fluctuation and instantaneous velocity distribution reveal very satisfactory agreement. The formation of peak-valley structure, longitudinal vortices, local high-shear layers and distinct spike-type signals is shown. In addition, the three-dimensional flow field structure before breakdown is investigated. An array of horseshoe vortices similar to those inferred from boundary layer flow visualization experiments is found. Spike signals are produced by local accumulations of low-speed fluid in the downstream loops of these vortices. (orig.) [de

  15. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  16. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  17. An Investigation of the Composition of the Flow in and out of a Two-Stroke Diesel Engine and Air Consumption Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the mass, substance and energy flow through two-stroke low speed Diesel engines. For this reason, a zero-dimensional model of the combustion in the engine was developed with a calculated amount and composition of exhaust gases. Due to the large amount of oxygen in the exhaust gases, a ratio of real air consumption and stoichiometric amount of air required for combustion of injected fuel was set. The calculated ratio showed that the engine consumed four times more air than needed for combustion in AFRstoich. In this work, this was called the Air Consumption Factor or Ratio, and has not previously been mentioned in scientific literature. The air consumption ratio is defined as a factor of dry or humid air. To be more comprehensive, a modified diagram of the composition of the flow in and out of a two-stroke fuel injection engine and the cylinder was made.

  18. The flow over a thin airfoil subjected to elevated levels of freestream turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, Sridhar [University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Watkins, Simon; Watmuff, Jon; Massey, Kevin; Petersen, Phred; Marino, Matthew [RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ravi, Anuradha [Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-09-15

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) can be difficult to control in the outdoor environment as they fly at relatively low speeds and are of low mass, yet exposed to high levels of freestream turbulence present within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. In order to examine transient flow phenomena, two turbulence conditions of nominally the same longitudinal integral length scale (Lxx/c = 1) but with significantly different intensities (Ti = 7.2 % and 12.3 %) were generated within a wind tunnel; time-varying surface pressure measurements, smoke flow visualization, and wake velocity measurements were made on a thin flat plate airfoil. Rapid changes in oncoming flow pitch angle resulted in the shear layer to separate from the leading edge of the airfoil even at lower geometric angles of attack. At higher geometric angles of attack, massive flow separation occurred at the leading edge followed by enhanced roll up of the shear layer. This lead to the formation of large Leading Edge Vortices (LEVs) that advected at a rate much lower than the mean flow speed while imparting high pressure fluctuations over the airfoil. The rate of LEV formation was dependent on the angle of attack until 10 and it was independent of the turbulence properties tested. The fluctuations in surface pressures and consequently aerodynamic loads were considerably limited on the airfoil bottom surface due to the favorable pressure gradient. (orig.)

  19. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND LACK OF FRAGMENTATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING ACCRETION FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Shlosman, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    Rapid inflows associated with early galaxy formation lead to the accumulation of self-gravitating gas in the centers of proto-galaxies. Such gas accumulations are prone to nonaxisymmetric instabilities, as in the well known Maclaurin sequence of rotating ellipsoids, which are accompanied by a catastrophic loss of angular momentum (J). Self-gravitating gas is also intuitively associated with star formation. However, recent simulations of the infall process display highly turbulent continuous flows. We propose that J-transfer, which enables the inflow, also suppresses fragmentation. Inefficient J loss by the gas leads to decay of turbulence, triggering global instabilities and renewed turbulence driving. Flow regulated in this way is stable against fragmentation, while staying close to the instability threshold for bar formation-thick self-gravitating disks are prone to global instabilities before they become unstable locally. On smaller scales, the fraction of gravitationally unstable matter swept up by shocks in such a flow is a small and decreasing function of the Mach number. We conclude counterintuitively that gas able to cool down to a small fraction of its virial temperature will not fragment as it collapses. This provides a venue for supermassive black holes to form via direct infall, without the intermediary stage of forming a star cluster. Some black holes could have formed or grown in massive halos at low redshifts. Thus the fragmentation is intimately related to J redistribution within the system: it is less dependent on the molecular/metal cooling but is conditioned by the ability of the flow to develop virial, supersonic turbulence.

  20. [Design Method Analysis and Performance Comparison of Wall Filter for Ultrasound Color Flow Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lutao; Xiao, Jun; Chai, Hua

    2015-08-01

    The successful suppression of clutter arising from stationary or slowly moving tissue is one of the key issues in medical ultrasound color blood imaging. Remaining clutter may cause bias in the mean blood frequency estimation and results in a potentially misleading description of blood-flow. In this paper, based on the principle of general wall-filter, the design process of three classes of filters, infinitely impulse response with projection initialization (Prj-IIR), polynomials regression (Pol-Reg), and eigen-based filters are previewed and analyzed. The performance of the filters was assessed by calculating the bias and variance of a mean blood velocity using a standard autocorrelation estimator. Simulation results show that the performance of Pol-Reg filter is similar to Prj-IIR filters. Both of them can offer accurate estimation of mean blood flow speed under steady clutter conditions, and the clutter rejection ability can be enhanced by increasing the ensemble size of Doppler vector. Eigen-based filters can effectively remove the non-stationary clutter component, and further improve the estimation accuracy for low speed blood flow signals. There is also no significant increase in computation complexity for eigen-based filters when the ensemble size is less than 10.

  1. Design Optimization of An Axial Flow Fan Blade Considering Airfoil Shape and Stacking Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Sang; Kim, Kwang Yong; Samad, Abdus [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents a numerical optimization procedure for a low-speed axial flow fan blade with polynomial response surface approximation model. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Shear Stress Turbulence (SST) model are discretized by finite volume approximations and solved on hexahedral grids for flow analyses. The airfoil shape as well as stacking line is modified to enhance blade total efficiency, i.e., the objective function. The design variables of blade lean, maximum thickness and location of maximum thickness are selected, and a design of experiments technique produces design points where flow analyses are performed to obtain values of the objective function. A gradient-based search algorithm is used to find the optimal design in the design space from the constructed response surface model for the objective function. As a main result, the efficiency is increased effectively by the present optimization procedure. And, it is also shown that the modification of blade lean is more effective to improve the efficiency rather than modifying blade profile.

  2. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  3. Direct calibration framework of triple-hole pressure probes for incompressible flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz, K M Argüelles; Oro, J M Fernández; Marigorta, E Blanco

    2008-01-01

    This paper carries out a mathematical analysis of the limits and data reduction techniques of three-hole pressure (THP) probes operating in a 'non-nulling' mode for incompressible flow. As a result of this analysis, a direct procedure is advanced, based on the distinction of several zones within the angular range, where different relations can be applied to obtain the flow variables. This proposal provides a considerable increment of the operative angular range of THP probes: about ±70° instead of the typical ±35° for a cylindrical probe. This may extend the application of these probes in highly unsteady flows, or reduce the acquisition and data reduction effort minimizing the necessity of probe reorientation. The influence of the data reduction technique on the uncertainty transmission is also presented in the paper. From detailed considerations, it is demonstrated that the results uncertainty depends on the specific probe, but it is unaffected by the mathematical procedure employed to calculate the flow variables. Validation measurements with pneumatic probes have been made for Reynolds numbers from 4 × 10 3 to 3.5 × 10 4 . In addition, a highly unsteady measurement in a low-speed axial flow fan is succinctly analysed. Taking into account both attainable angular range and uncertainty, it is determined that the optimal construction angle for the holes of a low frequency response THP probe lies between 30° and 60°, while for fast response probes, in order to avoid the separated flow region, the optimal construction angle is around 30°

  4. Turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvorsen, K. M.; Meyer, K. E.; Walther, J. H.; Mayer, S.

    2014-06-01

    It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for optimization of the in-cylinder processes in low-speed two-stroke uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used turbulence models. In the present work, the flow in a dynamic scale model of a uniflow-scavenged cylinder is investigated experimentally. The model has a transparent cylinder and a moving piston driven by a linear motor. The flow is investigated using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) and time-resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Radial profiles of the phase-locked mean and rms velocities are computed from the velocity fields recorded with PIV, and the accuracy of the obtained profiles is demonstrated by comparison with reference LDA measurements. Measurements are carried out at five axial positions for 15 different times during the engine cycle and show the temporal and spatial development of the swirling in-cylinder flow. The tangential velocity profiles in the bottom of the cylinder near the end of the scavenge process are characterized by a concentrated swirl resulting in wake-like axial velocity profiles and the occurrence of a vortex breakdown. After scavenge port closing, the axial velocity profiles indicate that large transient swirl-induced structures exist in the cylinder. Comparison with profiles obtained under steady-flow conditions shows that the scavenge flow cannot be assumed to be quasi-steady. The temporal development of the swirl strength is investigated by computing the angular momentum. The swirl strength shows an exponential decay from scavenge port closing to scavenge port opening corresponding to a reduction of 34 %, which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  5. Energy recovery from air flow in underground railway systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, B.; Mariani, A. [Seconda Univ. degli studi di Napoli, Aversa (Italy). Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Costanzo, M.L. [Tecnosistem spa, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The 20-20-20 energy policy of the European Union commits members to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 20 per cent by 2020, and stipulates that 20 per cent of final-use energy is to be supplied by renewable energy sources. This paper proposed the concept of recovering energy from underground trains by using the air flow inside tunnels to drive energy conversion systems such as turbines to generate electricity. Underground trains use much of their power to overcome the aerodynamic resistance moving the air in front of the train, creating a piston effect when travelling inside tunnels at relatively low speed. Numerical simulations were used in this study to determine how much electricity could be produced. A one-dimensional numerical analysis of a specific subway train track was used to evaluate the air flow magnitude inside the tunnel. Once the air flow features were detected, the potential electricity production was evaluated by considering the characteristics of a Wells turbine. Two types of 3-dimensional models of the tunnel and train were presented. One considered a long straight tunnel with a train running in it, and a small portion of a bypass tunnel. The other considered a large part of an opposite tunnel connected to the main one through the by-pass tunnel. Both the 3D models revealed a maximum flow rate of 2.5 x 105 m{sup 3}/h, while the 1D model showed an air flow of 1.5 x 105 m{sup 3}/h. The difference was due primarily to the presence of fans in the 1D Model and different modelling assumptions. It was concluded that one single Wells type turbine placed in a by-pass tunnel can produce 32.6 kWh per day, or about 10 MWh per year, resulting in a CO{sub 2} savings of about 5.5 tons per year. 8 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  6. Practical flow cytometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Howard M

    2003-01-01

    ... ... Conflict: Resolution ... 1.3 Problem Number One: Finding The Cell(s) ... Flow Cytometry: Quick on the Trigger ... The Main Event ... The Pulse Quickens, the Plot Thickens ... 1.4 Flow Cytometry: ...

  7. Review of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Hahm, T.S.

    2004-10-01

    A comprehensive review of zonal flow phenomena in plasmas is presented. While the emphasis is on zonal flows in laboratory plasmas, zonal flows in nature are discussed as well. The review presents the status of theory, numerical simulation and experiments relevant to zonal flows. The emphasis is on developing an integrated understanding of the dynamics of drift wave - zonal flow turbulence by combining detailed studies of the generation of zonal flows by drift waves, the back-interaction of zonal flows on the drift waves, and the various feedback loops by which the system regulates and organizes itself. The implications of zonal flow phenomena for confinement in, and the phenomena of fusion devices are discussed. Special attention is given to the comparison of experiment with theory and to identifying direction for progress in future research. (author)

  8. Load flow optimization and optimal power flow

    CERN Document Server

    Das, J C

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses the major aspects of load flow, optimization, optimal load flow, and culminates in modern heuristic optimization techniques and evolutionary programming. In the deregulated environment, the economic provision of electrical power to consumers requires knowledge of maintaining a certain power quality and load flow. Many case studies and practical examples are included to emphasize real-world applications. The problems at the end of each chapter can be solved by hand calculations without having to use computer software. The appendices are devoted to calculations of line and cable constants, and solutions to the problems are included throughout the book.

  9. Fluid flow control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rion, Jacky.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid flow control system featuring a series of grids placed perpendicular to the fluid flow direction, characterized by the fact that it is formed of a stack of identical and continuous grids, each of which consists of identical meshes forming a flat lattice. The said meshes are offset from one grid to the next. This system applies in particular to flow control of the coolant flowing at the foot of an assembly of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor [fr

  10. Hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2017-10-25

    A hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer can acquire high-resolution hyperspectral images of particles, such as biological cells, flowing through a microfluidic system. The hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer can provide detailed spatial maps of multiple emitting species, cell morphology information, and state of health. An optimized system can image about 20 cells per second. The hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer enables many thousands of cells to be characterized in a single session.

  11. Flowing holographic anyonic superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Niko; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the flow of a strongly coupled anyonic superfluid based on the holographic D3-D7' probe brane model. By analyzing the spectrum of fluctuations, we find the critical superfluid velocity, as a function of the temperature, at which the flow stops being dissipationless when flowing past a barrier. We find that at a larger velocity the flow becomes unstable even in the absence of a barrier.

  12. Flame stabilization and mixing characteristics in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Mohan K.

    A novel combustor design, referred to as the Stagnation Point Reverse-Flow (SPRF) combustor, was recently developed that is able to operate stably at very lean fuel-air mixtures and with low NOx emissions even when the fuel and air are not premixed before entering the combustor. The primary objective of this work is to elucidate the underlying physics behind the excellent stability and emissions performance of the SPRF combustor. The approach is to experimentally characterize velocities, species mixing, heat release and flame structure in an atmospheric pressure SPRF combustor with the help of various optical diagnostic techniques: OH PLIF, chemiluminescence imaging, PIV and Spontaneous Raman Scattering. Results indicate that the combustor is primarily stabilized in a region downstream of the injector that is characterized by low average velocities and high turbulence levels; this is also the region where most of the heat release occurs. High turbulence levels in the shear layer lead to increased product entrainment levels, elevating the reaction rates and thereby enhancing the combustor stability. The effect of product entrainment on chemical timescales and the flame structure is illustrated with simple reactor models. Although reactants are found to burn in a highly preheated (1300 K) and turbulent environment due to mixing with hot product gases, the residence times are sufficiently long compared to the ignition timescales such that the reactants do not autoignite. Turbulent flame structure analysis indicates that the flame is primarily in the thin reaction zones regime throughout the combustor, and it tends to become more flamelet like with increasing distance from the injector. Fuel-air mixing measurements in case of non-premixed operation indicate that the fuel is shielded from hot products until it is fully mixed with air, providing nearly premixed performance without the safety issues associated with premixing. The reduction in NOx emissions in the SPRF

  13. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow

  14. OpenFlow cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Smiler S, Kingston

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for network protocol developers, SDN controller application developers, and academics who would like to understand and develop their own OpenFlow switch or OpenFlow controller in any programming language. With basic understanding of OpenFlow and its components, you will be able to follow the recipes in this book.

  15. STOCHASTIC FLOWS OF MAPPINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the stochastic flow of mappings generated by a Feller convolution semigroup on a compact metric space is studied. This kind of flow is the generalization of superprocesses of stochastic flows and stochastic diffeomorphism induced by the strong solutions of stochastic differential equations.

  16. Distributed Power Flow Controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Z.

    2010-01-01

    In modern power systems, there is a great demand to control the power flow actively. Power flow controlling devices (PFCDs) are required for such purpose, because the power flow over the lines is the nature result of the impedance of each line. Due to the control capabilities of different types of

  17. Flow lab.: flow visualization and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Cho, Won Jin; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2005-01-01

    The experimental setups for flow visualization and processes identification in laboratory scale (so called Flow Lab.) has developed to get ideas and answer fundamental questions of flow and migration in geologic media. The setup was made of a granite block of 50x50cm scale and a transparent acrylate plate. The tracers used in this experiments were tritiated water, anions, and sorbing cations as well as an organic dye, eosine, to visualize migration paths. The migration plumes were taken with a digital camera as a function of time and stored as digital images. A migration model was also developed to describe and identify the transport processes. Computer simulation was carried out not only for the hydraulic behavior such as distributions of pressure and flow vectors in the fracture but also for the migration plume and the elution curves

  18. Is there elliptic flow without transverse flow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huovinen, Pasi; Kolb, Peter F.; Heinz, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy of final particle distributions was originally introduced as a signature of transverse collective flow. We show that finite anisotropy in momentum space can result solely from the shape of the particle emitting source. However, by comparing the differential anisotropy to recent data from STAR collaboration we can exclude such a scenario, but instead show that the data favour strong flow as resulting from a hydrodynamical evolution

  19. Signal flow analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abrahams, J R; Hiller, N

    1965-01-01

    Signal Flow Analysis provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of signal flow analysis. This book discusses the basic theory of signal flow graphs and shows their relation to the usual algebraic equations.Organized into seven chapters, this book begins with an overview of properties of a flow graph. This text then demonstrates how flow graphs can be applied to a wide range of electrical circuits that do not involve amplification. Other chapters deal with the parameters as well as circuit applications of transistors. This book discusses as well the variety of circuits using ther

  20. Separation of flow

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary and Advanced Topics in Science and Engineering, Volume 3: Separation of Flow presents the problem of the separation of fluid flow. This book provides information covering the fields of basic physical processes, analyses, and experiments concerning flow separation.Organized into 12 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the flow separation on the body surface as discusses in various classical examples. This text then examines the analytical and experimental results of the laminar boundary layer of steady, two-dimensional flows in the subsonic speed range. Other chapt

  1. Physics of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Diamond, P.H.; Tynan, G.R.; Hahm, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Zonal flows, which means azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows, are ubiquitous phenomena in nature and the laboratory. It is now widely recognized that zonal flows are a key constituent in virtually all cases and regimes of drift wave turbulence, indeed, so much so that this classic problem is now frequently referred to as ''drift wave-zonal flow turbulence.'' In this review, new viewpoints and unifying concepts are presented, which facilitate understanding of zonal flow physics, via theory, computation and their confrontation with the results of laboratory experiment. Special emphasis is placed on identifying avenues for further progress. (author)

  2. Physics of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.; Fujisawa, A.; Tynan, G.R.; Yagi, M.; Nagashima, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Zonal flows, which means azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows, are ubiquitous phenomena in nature and the laboratory. It is now widely recognized that zonal flows are a key constituent in virtually all cases and regimes of drift wave turbulence, indeed, so much so that this classic problem is now frequently referred to as 'drift wave-zonal flow turbulence'. In this review, new viewpoints and unifying concepts are presented, which facilitate understanding of zonal flow physics, via theory, computation and their confrontation with the results of laboratory experiment. Special emphasis is placed on identifying avenues for further progress

  3. Flow Control by Slot Position and Noise Baffle in a Self-Recirculation Casing Treatment on an Axial Fan-Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the situations where the casing treatment needs to be used to stabilize axial compressors through strong recirculation, this paper initiated a CFD study to investigate how the flow could be suitably controlled in the casing treatment to minimize the efficiency penalty and increase the flow range. A counter-swirl self-recirculation casing treatment was first designed on a low speed axial fan rotor as a baseline case. Then three different slot positions and the influence of including the noise baffle were numerically studied. Based on the understanding of their coeffects, the shorter noise baffle was considered and it was found that the highest efficiency was achieved in the case of the upstream slot when the length of baffle was suitably adjusted to balance the incoming flow and recirculation. The largest flow range was achieved by locating the slot at the most downstream position and using a 50% length baffle since it suitably controlled the recirculating flow and relieved the separation at the low-span region. An optimization study showed that the optimum length of the baffle for efficiency was always larger than for the flow range. Both of the two optimum values reduce as the slot moves downstream.

  4. CANDU channel flow verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazalu, N.; Negut, Gh.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain accurate information on each channel flow that enables us to assess precisely the level of reactor thermal power and, for reasons of safety, to establish which channel is boiling. In order to assess the channel flow parameters, computer simulations were done with the NUCIRC code and the results were checked by measurements. The complete channel flow measurements were made in the zero power cold condition. In hot conditions there were made flow measurements using the Shut Down System 1 (SDS 1) flow devices from 0.1 % F.P. up to 100 % F.P. The NUCIRC prediction for CANDU channel flows and the measurements by Ultrasonic Flow Meter at zero power cold conditions and SDS 1 flow channel measurements at different reactor power levels showed an acceptable agreement. The 100 % F.P. average errors for channel flow of R, shows that suitable NUCIRC flow assessment can be made. So, it can be done a fair prediction of the reactor power distribution. NUCIRC can predict accurately the onset of boiling and helps to warn at the possible power instabilities at high powers or it can detect the flow blockages. The thermal hydraulic analyst has in NUCIRC a suitable tool to do accurate predictions for the thermal hydraulic parameters for different steady state power levels which subsequently leads to an optimal CANDU reactor operation. (authors)

  5. Computational and experimental studies of the flow field near the beam entrance window of a liquid metal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geža, Vadims; Milenković, Rade Ž.; Kapulla, Ralf; Dementjevs, Sergejs; Jakovičs, Andris; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Water model of liquid metal target for validation of CFD models was built. • PIV measurements showed flow features in the region near beam entrance window. • The zones with high turbulence kinetic energy were distinguished. • Reasonable agreement between modeling and PIV data was obtained. - Abstract: After the first world liquid metal target has been successfully operated at the SINQ facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) for 6 months. The idea of having a reliable target with a bypass flow for cooling the beam entrance window, but with the bypass flow not driven by a separate pump, was examined within the project called LIMETS (Liquid Metal Target for SINQ). In designing of liquid metal targets, turbulence modelling is of high importance due to lack in methods for measuring the spatial distribution of flow and turbulence characteristics. In this study, validation of different turbulence models were performed in water model with hemispherical geometry using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Two components of water flow velocity in plexiglas container with inner radius of 88 mm were measured in different cross sections, with the velocities varying from 1 to 10 m/s. Numerical calculations using large eddy simulation (LES) approach and Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) models were carried out to validate their applicability and study performance issues. Mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy data were used for comparison of PIV and calculation results. Reasonable agreement was obtained for mean velocity data, with some discrepancies due to the limited length of the inlet tube. However, several discrepancies in turbulence characteristics were found in numerical results, especially in RANS model calculations

  6. The mean Evershed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, W.-R.

    1984-09-01

    The paper gives a theoretical analysis of the overall characteristics of the Evershed flow (one of the main features of sunspots), with particular attention given to its outward flow from the umbra in the photosphere, reaching a maximum somewhere in the penumbra, and decreasing rapidly further out, and its inward flow of a comparable magnitude in chromosphere. Because the inertial force of the flow is small, the relevant dynamic process can be divided into a base state and a perturbation. The base-state solution yields the equilibrium relations between the pressure gradient, the Lorentz force, and gravity, and the flow law. The perturbation describes the force driving the Evershed flow. Since the pressure gradient in the base state is already in equilibrium with the Lorentz force and the gravity, the driving force of the mean Evershed flow is small.

  7. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  8. Flow Field Simulation and Noise Control of a Twin-Screw Engine-Driven Supercharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advantages of good low-speed torque capability and excellent instant response performance, twin-screw superchargers have great potential in the automobile market, but the noise of these superchargers is the main factor that discourages their use. Therefore, it is important to study their noise mechanism and methods of reducing it. This study included a transient numerical simulation of a twin-screw supercharger flow field with computational fluid dynamics software and an analysis of the pressure field of the running rotor. The results showed that overcompression was significant in the compression end stage of the supercharger, resulting in a surge in airflow to a supersonic speed and the production of shock waves that resulted in loud noise. On the basis of these findings, optimization of the supercharger is proposed, including expansion of the supercharger exhaust orifice and creation of a slot along the direction of the rotor spiral normal line at the exhaust port, so as to reduce the compression end pressure, improve the exhaust flow channel, and weaken the source of the noise. Experimental results showed that the noise level value of the improved twin-screw supercharger was significantly lower at the same speed than the original model, with an average decrease of about 5 dB (A.

  9. Boundary Layer Flow Control by an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hirt, S. M.; Bencic, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for the effect of ramp-shaped vortex generators (VG) on a turbulent boundary layer are presented. The experiments are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel and the data are acquired primarily by hot-wire anemometry. Distributions of mean velocity and turbulent stresses as well as streamwise vorticity, on cross-sectional planes at various downstream locations, are obtained. These detailed flow field properties, including the boundary layer characteristics, are documented with the primary objective of aiding possible computational investigations. The results show that VG orientation with apex upstream, that produces a downwash directly behind it, yields a stronger pair of streamwise vortices. This is in contrast to the case with apex downstream that produces a pair of vortices of opposite sense. Thus, an array of VG s with the former orientation, usually considered for film-cooling application, may also be superior for mixing enhancement and boundary layer separation control. The data files can be found on a supplemental CD.

  10. Determination of mean pressure from PIV in compressible flows using the Reynolds-averaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, Paul L.; van Oudheusden, Bas W.; Schrijer, Ferry F. J.

    2018-03-01

    The feasibility of computing the flow pressure on the basis of PIV velocity data has been demonstrated abundantly for low-speed conditions. The added complications occurring for high-speed compressible flows have, however, so far proved to be largely inhibitive for the accurate experimental determination of instantaneous pressure. Obtaining mean pressure may remain a worthwhile and realistic goal to pursue. In a previous study, a Reynolds-averaging procedure was developed for this, under the moderate-Mach-number assumption that density fluctuations can be neglected. The present communication addresses the accuracy of this assumption, and the consistency of its implementation, by evaluating of the relevance of the different contributions resulting from the Reynolds-averaging. The methodology involves a theoretical order-of-magnitude analysis, complemented with a quantitative assessment based on a simulated and a real PIV experiment. The assessments show that it is sufficient to account for spatial variations in the mean velocity and the Reynolds-stresses and that temporal and spatial density variations (fluctuations and gradients) are of secondary importance and comparable order-of-magnitude. This result permits to simplify the calculation of mean pressure from PIV velocity data and to validate the approximation of neglecting temporal and spatial density variations without having access to reference pressure data.

  11. Modelling heat transfer during flow through a random packed bed of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Per E. C.; Frishfelds, Vilnis; Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan; Marjavaara, B. Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Heat transfer in a random packed bed of monosized iron ore pellets is modelled with both a discrete three-dimensional system of spheres and a continuous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Results show a good agreement between the two models for average values over a cross section of the bed for an even temperature profiles at the inlet. The advantage with the discrete model is that it captures local effects such as decreased heat transfer in sections with low speed. The disadvantage is that it is computationally heavy for larger systems of pellets. If averaged values are sufficient, the CFD model is an attractive alternative that is easy to couple to the physics up- and downstream the packed bed. The good agreement between the discrete and continuous model furthermore indicates that the discrete model may be used also on non-Stokian flow in the transitional region between laminar and turbulent flow, as turbulent effects show little influence of the overall heat transfer rates in the continuous model.

  12. Noise characteristics and flow field of an impinging jet on a conical obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Xie, Junlong; Shu, Shuiming; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: hustxjl@163.com [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2017-12-15

    The noise characteristics and flow field of a low-speed impinging jet on a conical obstacle have been numerically simulated using the kinetic energy transport subgrid-scale model of the large-eddy simulation method. Noise measurement is carried out to validate the proposed simulation method. The effects of the impinging distance on the development, separation and diffusion of vortices on the back of the conical obstacle are investigated. The jet structure is better preserved and the vorticity value becomes larger as the impinging distance increases. Simulation results of the noise spectrums and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) agree well with the experimental data. The noise spectrums are analyzed and combined with simulation results for the flow field. When the impinging distance is small, the main acoustic sources with the broadband characteristic consist of the dipole source produced by pressure fluctuation on the surface of the obstacle, and the quadrupole source produced by vortices. As the impinging distance increases, the quadrupole source becomes the major acoustic source with low-frequency characteristics. In addition, the OASPL of the impinging jet is obtained at different impinging distances. (paper)

  13. Development of Advanced High Lift Leading Edge Technology for Laminar Flow Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Korntheuer, Andrea; Komadina, Steve; Lin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced High Lift Leading Edge (AHLLE) task performed by Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Aerospace Systems (NGAS) for the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project in an effort to develop enabling high-lift technology for laminar flow wings. Based on a known laminar cruise airfoil that incorporated an NGAS-developed integrated slot design, this effort involved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis and quality function deployment (QFD) analysis on several leading edge concepts, and subsequently down-selected to two blown leading-edge concepts for testing. A 7-foot-span AHLLE airfoil model was designed and fabricated at NGAS and then tested at the NGAS 7 x 10 Low Speed Wind Tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. The model configurations tested included: baseline, deflected trailing edge, blown deflected trailing edge, blown leading edge, morphed leading edge, and blown/morphed leading edge. A successful demonstration of high lift leading edge technology was achieved, and the target goals for improved lift were exceeded by 30% with a maximum section lift coefficient (Cl) of 5.2. Maximum incremental section lift coefficients ( Cl) of 3.5 and 3.1 were achieved for a blown drooped (morphed) leading edge concept and a non-drooped leading edge blowing concept, respectively. The most effective AHLLE design yielded an estimated 94% lift improvement over the conventional high lift Krueger flap configurations while providing laminar flow capability on the cruise configuration.

  14. PIV measurement of turbulent bubbly mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Based on experimental investigation of single-phase turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives, bubbly mixing layer was experimentally investigated by PIV. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number based on the velocity difference of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges is 73333. Gas bubbles with about 0.5% gas fraction were injected into pure water mixing layer with/without polymer additives from three different parts at the end of the splitter plate. The comparison between single phase and bubbly mixing layer shows clearly that the dynamic development of mixing layer is great influenced by the bubble injection. Similar with single phase, the Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central mixing flow field part and the width will increase with increasing the Reynolds number. Mean Reynolds stress will decrease with bubble injection in high Reynolds numbers and the decreasing of Reynolds stress with polymer additives is much more than pure water case.

  15. Make peak flow a habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... 2014:chap 55. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program website. How to use a peak flow meter. ...

  16. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  17. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  18. Defining Quantum Control Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Mingsheng; Yu, Nengkun; Feng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A remarkable difference between quantum and classical programs is that the control flow of the former can be either classical or quantum. One of the key issues in the theory of quantum programming languages is defining and understanding quantum control flow. A functional language with quantum control flow was defined by Altenkirch and Grattage [\\textit{Proc. LICS'05}, pp. 249-258]. This paper extends their work, and we introduce a general quantum control structure by defining three new quantu...

  19. Microparticle Flow Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The microparticle flow sensor (MFS) is a system for identifying and counting microscopic particles entrained in a flowing liquid. The MFS includes a transparent, optoelectronically instrumented laminar-flow chamber (see figure) and a computer for processing instrument-readout data. The MFS could be used to count microparticles (including micro-organisms) in diverse applications -- for example, production of microcapsules, treatment of wastewater, pumping of industrial chemicals, and identification of ownership of liquid products.

  20. Flow patterns in vertical two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuillan, K.W.; Whalley, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the flow patterns which occur in upwards gas-liquid two-phase flow in vertical tubes. The basic flow patterns are described and the use of flow patter maps is discussed. The transition between plug flow and churn flow is modelled under the assumption that flooding of the falling liquid film limits the stability of plug flow. The resulting equation is combined with other flow pattern transition equations to produce theoretical flow pattern maps, which are then tested against experimental flow pattern data. Encouraging agreement is obtained

  1. Forecasting freight flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Trade patterns and transport markets are changing as a result of the growth and globalization of international trade, and forecasting future freight flow has to rely on trade forecasts. Forecasting freight flows is critical for matching infrastructure supply to demand and for assessing investment...... constitute a valuable input to freight models for forecasting future capacity problems.......Trade patterns and transport markets are changing as a result of the growth and globalization of international trade, and forecasting future freight flow has to rely on trade forecasts. Forecasting freight flows is critical for matching infrastructure supply to demand and for assessing investment...

  2. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...... is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V...

  3. Opposed-Flow Flame Spread over Thin Solid Fuels in a Narrow Channel under Different Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Yu, Yong; Wan, Shixin; Wei, Minggang; Hu, Wen-Rui

    Flame spread over solid surface is critical in combustion science due to its importance in fire safety in both ground and manned spacecraft. Eliminating potential fuels from materials is the basic method to protect spacecraft from fire. The criterion of material screening is its flamma-bility [1]. Since gas flow speed has strong effect on flame spread, the combustion behaviors of materials in normal and microgravity will be different due to their different natural convec-tion. To evaluate the flammability of materials used in the manned spacecraft, tests should be performed under microgravity. Nevertheless, the cost is high, so apparatus to simulate mi-crogravity combustion under normal gravity was developed. The narrow channel is such an apparatus in which the buoyant flow is restricted effectively [2, 3]. The experimental results of the horizontal narrow channel are consistent qualitatively with those of Mir Space Station. Quantitatively, there still are obvious differences. However, the effect of the channel size on flame spread has only attracted little attention, in which concurrent-flow flame spread over thin solid in microgravity is numerically studied[4], while the similarity of flame spread in different gravity is still an open question. In addition, the flame spread experiments under microgravity are generally carried out in large wind tunnels without considering the effects of the tunnel size [5]. Actually, the materials are always used in finite space. Therefore, the flammability given by experiments using large wind tunnels will not correctly predict the flammability of materials in the real environment. In the present paper, the effect of the channel size on opposed-flow flame spread over thin solid fuels in both normal and microgravity was investigated and compared. In the horizontal narrow channel, the flame spread rate increased before decreased as forced flow speed increased. In low speed gas flows, flame spread appeared the same trend as that in

  4. The NASA Low-Pressure Turbine Flow Physics Program: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E.

    2002-01-01

    that was made since and will introduce newly started projects. The LPT program is focused on three areas: acquisition of experimental and numerical databases and on modeling and computation. Priority was initially given to experiments. There are three classes of experiments: simulated LPT passages, linear cascade, both with and without wakes, and low-speed rotating rig. They are being conducted as follows: At NASA GRC on a flat surface with blade pressure distribution, at the US Naval Academy on a curved surface. The addition of wakes is studied at the University of Minnesota in a curved passage with a retractable wake generator, and at Texas A&M University in a linear cascade with continuously running wake generator. The pressure distribution of the Pratt & Whitney blade 'Pak B' is used in all these experiments. Experiments have been performed also in the GEAE Low-Speed Rotating Turbine (LSRT) rig with GE-designed airfoils. Work on numerically generated database is in progress at the University of Kentucky, using the DNS/LES code LESTool developed there. Turbulence/transition model assessment and development is performed also at the University of Kentucky, where a new intermittency transport model was developed and many experimental test cases have been numerically computed. Assessments of models using simulations of multistage LPT experiments were performed at Virginia Commonwealth University using the Corsair code. Work on suction surface separation delay, using passive and active flow-control, has also been initiated. Following the overview, Principal Investigators attending the workshop will present in detail several of the projects supported by NASA.

  5. Flow chemistry is starting to flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duisterwinkel, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    One good thing about this symposium on flow chemistry is that at least half of the papers was on actual applications: summarized one member of the audience of the IPIT symposium in Rotterdam, 25 May 2012. This remark can be viewed as a compliment to the organizer, TNO, a Dutch contract research

  6. Near-wake flow structure downwind of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D. [University of Minnesota, Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Porte-Agel, Fernando [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), ENAC-IIE-WIRE, Wind Engineering and Renewable Energy Laboratory (WIRE), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Wind turbines operate in the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer, where they are subjected to strong wind shear and relatively high turbulence levels. These incoming boundary layer flow characteristics are expected to affect the structure of wind turbine wakes. The near-wake region is characterized by a complex coupled vortex system (including helicoidal tip vortices), unsteadiness and strong turbulence heterogeneity. Limited information about the spatial distribution of turbulence in the near wake, the vortex behavior and their influence on the downwind development of the far wake hinders our capability to predict wind turbine power production and fatigue loads in wind farms. This calls for a better understanding of the spatial distribution of the 3D flow and coherent turbulence structures in the near wake. Systematic wind-tunnel experiments were designed and carried out to characterize the structure of the near-wake flow downwind of a model wind turbine placed in a neutral boundary layer flow. A horizontal-axis, three-blade wind turbine model, with a rotor diameter of 13 cm and the hub height at 10.5 cm, occupied the lowest one-third of the boundary layer. High-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure velocities in multiple vertical stream-wise planes (x-z) and vertical span-wise planes (y-z). In particular, we identified localized regions of strong vorticity and swirling strength, which are the signature of helicoidal tip vortices. These vortices are most pronounced at the top-tip level and persist up to a distance of two to three rotor diameters downwind. The measurements also reveal strong flow rotation and a highly non-axisymmetric distribution of the mean flow and turbulence structure in the near wake. The results provide new insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the development of the near wake of a wind turbine immersed in a neutral boundary layer. They also serve as important data for the development and

  7. Tetrahedral-Mesh Simulation of Turbulent Flows with the Space-Time Conservative Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji; Cheng, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    isotropic turbulent flow decay, at a relatively high turbulent Mach number, show a nicely behaved spectral decay rate for medium to high wave numbers. The high-order CESE schemes offer very robust solutions even with the presence of strong shocks or widespread shocklets. The explicit formulation in conjunction with a close to unity theoretical upper Courant number bound has the potential to offer an efficient numerical framework for general compressible turbulent flow simulations with unstructured meshes.

  8. Experimental Investigation of 3-D flow fields around the mouth of the Dwarf Seahorse during attacks on planktonic prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad; Buskey, Edward; Sheng, Jian

    2009-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for fish species. High predation has led to the development of effective escape responses with short reaction times (less than 2 ms), maximum escape velocities of over 500 body lengths per second and shear sensitivity as low as 1.5s-1. Using high speed digital holography (2 kfps), we measure 3-D distributions of velocity generated by a dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its copepod prey, Acartia tonsa. It is found that successful attacks often produce smaller or even no detectable hydrodynamic disturbances around the strike zone, when compared to unsuccessful attempts. In this paper, we will provide quantitative characterization of this ``low-flow'' zone. Further, to elucidate the role of a possible geometrical advantage of the seahorse's head in minimizing its bow wave, high-speed time resolved PIV measurements are conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. On-going analysis will provide insights and implications in understanding the dynamics of flows around the stagnation point at high Reynolds number flow. Sponsored by NSF.

  9. Control of Flow Structure on Non-Slender Delta Wing: Bio-inspired Edge Modifications, Passive Bleeding, and Pulsed Blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mehmet Metin; Celik, Alper; Cetin, Cenk

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, different flow control approaches including bio-inspired edge modifications, passive bleeding, and pulsed blowing are introduced and applied for the flow over non-slender delta wing. Experiments are conducted in a low speed wind tunnel for a 45 degree swept delta wing using qualitative and quantitative measurement techniques including laser illuminated smoke visualization, particle image velocimety (PIV), and surface pressure measurements. For the bio-inspired edge modifications, the edges of the wing are modified to dolphin fluke geometry. In addition, the concept of flexion ratio, a ratio depending on the flexible length of animal propulsors such as wings, is introduced. For passive bleeding, directing the free stream air from the pressure side of the planform to the suction side of the wing is applied. For pulsed blowing, periodic air injection through the leading edge of the wing is performed in a square waveform with 25% duty cycle at different excitation frequencies and compared with the steady and no blowing cases. The results indicate that each control approach is quite effective in terms of altering the overall flow structure on the planform. However, the success level, considering the elimination of stall or delaying the vortex breakdown, depends on the parameters in each method.

  10. Flow Around Steep Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Flow around steep topography T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, M...tall, steep, submarine topography and islands. During the Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography (FLEAT) DRI, investigators will determine: • Whether...estimates from making accurate statistical/deterministic predictions at ᝺ km resolution around submarine topography and islands? How can we

  11. Biomimetic Flow Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, J.; Liu, Chang; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic flow sensors are biologically inspired devices that measure the speed and direction of fluids. This survey starts by describing the role and functioning of airflow-sensing hairs in arthropods and in fishes, carries on with the biomimetic MEMS implementations, both for air and water flow

  12. Pressure Driven Poiseuille Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stotz, Ingo Leonardo; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific plate is thought to be driven mainly by slab pull, associated with subduction along the Aleutians–Japan, Marianas–Izu–Bonin and Tonga–Kermadec trenches. This implies that viscous flow within the sub–Pacific asthenosphere is mainly generated by overlying plate motion (i.e. Couette flow...

  13. Flow cytometry protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaroszeski, Mark J; Heller, Richard

    1998-01-01

    ... are individually analyzed, and it is typical for flow cytometers to quantitatively process thousands of individual particles in a matter of seconds. This a powerful analytic feat particularly if one relates it to the time required to examine several thousand individual cells using a microscope. This leaves little doubt regarding why the field of flow cytometry has...

  14. Airport Network Flow Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    The Airport Network Flow Simulator is a FORTRAN IV simulation of the flow of air traffic in the nation's 600 commercial airports. It calculates for any group of selected airports: (a) the landing and take-off (Type A) delays; and (b) the gate departu...

  15. Flow visualization using bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    Soap bubbles were used for visualizing flows. The tests effected allowed some characteristics of flows around models in blow tunnels to be precised at mean velocities V 0 5 . The velocity of a bubble is measured by chronophotography, the bulk envelope of the trajectories is also registered [fr

  16. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  17. Elementary chaotic snap flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munmuangsaen, Buncha; Srisuchinwong, Banlue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Five new elementary chaotic snap flows and a generalization of an existing chaotic snap flow have been presented. → Three of all are conservative systems whilst three others are dissipative systems. → Four cases need only a single control parameter and a single nonlinearity. → A cubic case in a jerk representation requires only two terms and a single nonlinearity. - Abstract: Hyperjerk systems with 4th-order derivative of the form x .... =f(x ... ,x .. ,x . ,x) have been referred to as snap systems. Five new elementary chaotic snap flows and a generalization of an existing flow are presented through an extensive numerical search. Four of these flows demonstrate elegant simplicity of a single control parameter based on a single nonlinearity of a quadratic, a piecewise-linear or an exponential type. Two others demonstrate elegant simplicity of all unity-in-magnitude parameters based on either a single cubic nonlinearity or three cubic nonlinearities. The chaotic snap flow with a single cubic nonlinearity requires only two terms and can be transformed to its equivalent dynamical form of only five terms which have a single nonlinearity. An advantage is that such a chaotic flow offers only five terms even though the (four) dimension is high. Three of the chaotic snap flows are characterized as conservative systems whilst three others are dissipative systems. Basic dynamical properties are described.

  18. Elbow mass flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  19. Numerical solution for gate induced vibration due to under flow cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrnezhad, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    Among the many forces to which hydraulic structures are exposed to, the forces induced by cavitation incident are of typical hydrodynamic unknown forces. The aim of this study is to define these forces as coupled fluid-structure interaction under two dynamic effects. The first dynamic effect which incorporates facilities for dealing with cavitation fluid is based on the appearance and bursting of vapor bubbles. The second hydrodynamic effect is dynamic excitation mechanism of the structure. In fluid-structure interaction, both the structure behavior and fluid are considered linear. Fluids can take some tension the extent of which depends on concentration and size of micro bubbles present; nevertheless, if the absolute pressure drops to a value close to the vapor pressure of the fluid, bubbles are formed and cavitation phenomena occurs. In this paper a fixed-wheel gate under the head pressure of a reservoir is considered to be affected by under flow cavitation. Normally, partially opened gates induce energy dissipation resulting in high turbulence, causing negative pressure and cavitation at the back and this exits the gate vibration. Moreover, there are several mechanisms which may cause heavy, self-excited vibration. According to the proposed method, a time function presenting the oscillation and pressure fluctuation in the vicinity of gate lip is estimated. This estimation is based on the parameters obtained from a two dimensional solution of flow under the gate lip. Accordingly, periodic time variable nodal forces are calculated and applied to gate lip element nodes. A transient dynamic solution of the gate, while its lip is sustaining nodal forces is estimated as time function. The results for the most server modal deformation of the structure time history of some critical elements and variation of equivalent force versus time are presented

  20. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  1. Pengalaman Flow dalam Belajar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Purwantini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Flow is a condition when individual merges within his/her activity. When a person in flow state, he/she can develop his/her abilities and more success in learning. The purpose of the study is to understand flow experience in learning among undergraduate student. The study used case study qualitative approach. Informant of this research was an undergraduate student which had flow experience. Data was collected by an interview. According to the result, the subject did not experience flow in the learning process, as likes he was in meditation. It happened because when he learned something, he felt be pressed by tasks. It’s important for individual to relax when they are learning.

  2. Flow in bedrock canyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Jeremy G; Rennie, Colin D; Bomhof, James; Bradley, Ryan W; Little, Malcolm; Church, Michael

    2014-09-25

    Bedrock erosion in rivers sets the pace of landscape evolution, influences the evolution of orogens and determines the size, shape and relief of mountains. A variety of models link fluid flow and sediment transport processes to bedrock incision in canyons. The model components that represent sediment transport processes are increasingly well developed. In contrast, the model components being used to represent fluid flow are largely untested because there are no observations of the flow structure in bedrock canyons. Here we present a 524-kilometre, continuous centreline, acoustic Doppler current profiler survey of the Fraser Canyon in western Canada, which includes 42 individual bedrock canyons. Our observations of three-dimensional flow structure reveal that, as water enters the canyons, a high-velocity core follows the bed surface, causing a velocity inversion (high velocities near the bed and low velocities at the surface). The plunging water then upwells along the canyon walls, resulting in counter-rotating, along-stream coherent flow structures that diverge near the bed. The resulting flow structure promotes deep scour in the bedrock channel floor and undercutting of the canyon walls. This provides a mechanism for channel widening and ensures that the base of the walls is swept clear of the debris that is often deposited there, keeping the walls nearly vertical. These observations reveal that the flow structure in bedrock canyons is more complex than assumed in the models presently used. Fluid flow models that capture the essence of the three-dimensional flow field, using simple phenomenological rules that are computationally tractable, are required to capture the dynamic coupling between flow, bedrock erosion and solid-Earth dynamics.

  3. A Study of Slipper and Rail Wear Interaction at Low Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    moves. The use of lubricants was found even before the previous statue example, as an Egyptian tomb dated at 3000 BC, was discovered containing a...shown by[6] over 170 Egyptian slaves are 3 depicted dragging a large stone statue into place on sleds with men pouring lubricants under the sled as it

  4. Low-speed impacts between rubble piles modeled as collections of polyhedra, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, Erik

    2009-11-01

    We present the results of additional calculations involving the collisions of km-scale rubble piles. In new work, we used the Open Dynamics Engine (ODE), an open-source library for the simulation of rigid-body dynamics that incorporates a sophisticated collision-detection and resolution routine. We found that using ODE resulted in a speed-up of approximately a factor of 30 compared with previous code. In this paper we report on the results of almost 1200 separate runs, the bulk of which were carried out with 1000-2000 elements. We carried out calculations with three different combinations of the coefficients of friction η and (normal) restitution ɛ: low (η=0,ɛ=0.8), medium (η=0,ɛ=0.5), and high (η=0.5,ɛ=0.5) dissipation. For target objects of ˜1 km in radius, we found reduced critical disruption energy values QRD∗ in head-on collisions from 2 to 100 J kg -1 depending on dissipation and impactor/target mass ratio. Monodisperse objects disrupted somewhat more easily than power-law objects in general. For oblique collisions of equal-mass objects, mildly off-center collisions (b/b0=0.5) seemed to be as efficient or possibly more efficient at collisional disruption as head-on collisions. More oblique collisions were less efficient and the most oblique collisions we tried (b/b0=0.866) required up to ˜200 J kg -1 for high-dissipation power-law objects. For calculations with smaller numbers of elements (total impactor ni+targetnT=20 or 200 elements) we found that collisions were more efficient for smaller numbers of more massive elements, with QRD∗ values as low as 0.4Jkg for low-dissipation cases. We also analyzed our results in terms of the relations proposed by Stewart and Leinhardt [Stewart, S.T., Leinhardt, Z.M., 2009. Astrophys. J. 691, L133-L137] where m1/(mi+mT)=1-QR/2QRD∗ where QR is the impact kinetic energy per unit total mass mi+mT. Although there is a significant amount of scatter, our results generally bear out the suggested relation.

  5. CFD analysis for H-rotor Darrieus turbine as a low speed wind energy converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertical axis wind turbines like the Darrieus turbine appear to be promising for the conditions of low wind speed, but suffer from a low efficiency compared to horizontal axis turbines. A fully detailed numerical analysis is introduced in this work to improve the global performance of this wind turbine. A comparison between ANSYS Workbench and Gambit meshing tools for the numerical modeling is performed to summarize a final numerical sequence for the Darrieus rotor performance. Then, this model sequence is applied for different blade airfoils to obtain the best performance. Unsteady simulations performed for different speed ratios and based on URANS turbulent calculations using sliding mesh approach. Results show that the accuracy of ANSYS Workbench meshing is improved by using SST K-omega model but it is not recommended for other turbulence models. Moreover, this CFD procedure is used in this paper to assess the turbine performance with different airfoil shapes (25 airfoils. The results introduced new shapes for this turbine with higher efficiency than the regular airfoils by 10%. In addition, blade pitch angle has been studied and the results indicated that the zero pitch angle gives best performance.

  6. 49 CFR 571.500 - Standard No. 500; Low-speed vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... replacement of any component is allowed after the start of the first performance test. S6.3.3. Tire inflation.... General test conditions. Each vehicle must meet the performance limit specified in S5(a) under the... standard reference test tire that meets the specifications of American Society for Testing and Materials...

  7. Low-Speed Model Support Interference - Elements of an Expert System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsten, B.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel support interference is one of the constraints affecting the quality of wind tunnel measurements. Several methods to determine the interference are experimental- empirical- and numerical methods. Experimental methods are often time consuming and costly. This also holds for empirical

  8. Analysis of eddy current induced in track on medium-low speed maglev train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanchun; Jia, Zhen; He, Guang; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EMS) maglev train relies on the attraction between the electromagnets and rails which are mounted on the train to achieve suspension. During the movement, the magnetic field generated by the electromagnet will induce the eddy current in the orbit and the eddy current will weaken the suspended magnetic field. Which leads to the attenuation of the levitation force, the increases of suspension current and the degradation the suspension performance. In this paper, the influence of eddy current on the air gap magnetic field is solved by theoretical analysis, and the correction coefficient of air gap magnetic field is fitted according to the finite element data. The levitation force and current are calculated by the modified formula, and the velocity curves of the levitation force and current are obtained. The results show that the eddy current effect increases the load power by 61.9% in the case of heavy loads.

  9. Very-low-speed variable-structure control of sensorless induction machine drives without signal injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Christian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A sensorless induction machine drive is presented, in which the principles of variable-structure control and direct torque control (DTC) are combined to ensure high-performance operation in the steady state and under transient conditions. The drive employs a new torque and flux controller......, the "linear and variable-structure control", which realizes accurate and robust control in a wide speed range. Conventional DTC transient merits are preserved, while the steady-state behavior is significantly improved. The full-order state observer is a sliding-mode one, which does not require the rotor speed...

  10. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    The major attractions of the pulsed drift-tubes are that they are non-resonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the non-resonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse power modulators used to drive the drift-tubes are inexpensive compared to r.f. sources with equivalent peak-power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low

  11. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed drift-tube accelerating structure for use in Heavy Ion Fusion applications is described. Possible arrangements of components in such a structure, the injector design needs, and the influence of the existing state of component technology on drift-tube structure design are considered. It is concluded that the major attractions of the pulsed drift tubes are that they are nonresonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the nonresonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse-power modulators used to drive the drift tubes are inexpensive compared with rf sources of equivalent peak power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low. (U.K.)

  12. Response of PMHS to high- and low-speed oblique and lateral pneumatic ram impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhule, Heather; Suntay, Brian; Herriott, Rodney; Amenson, Tara; Stricklin, Jim; Bolte, John H

    2011-11-01

    In ISO Technical Report 9790 (1999) normalized lateral and oblique thoracic force-time responses of PMHS subjected to blunt pendulum impacts at 4.3 m/s were deemed sufficiently similar to be grouped together in a single biomechanical response corridor. Shaw et al. (2006) presented results of paired oblique and lateral thoracic pneumatic ram impact tests to opposite sides of seven PMHS at sub-injurious speed (2.5 m/s). Normalized responses showed that oblique impacts resulted in more deflection and less force, whereas lateral impacts resulted in less deflection and more force. This study presents results of oblique and lateral thoracic impacts to PMHS at higher speeds (4.5 and 5.5 m/s) to assess whether lateral relative to oblique responses are different as observed by Shaw et al. or similar as observed by ISO. Twelve PMHS were impacted by a 23 kg pneumatic ram with a 152.4 mmx304.8 mm rectangular face plate at the level of the xyphoid process in either the pure lateral or 30° anterior-to-lateral oblique direction. Because these tests were potentially injurious, only one test per subject was conducted. Normalized responses demonstrate similar characteristics for both lateral and oblique impacts, indicating that it may be reasonable to combine lateral and oblique responses together at these higher speeds to define characteristic PMHS response as was done by ISO. The small number of tests conducted indicates that less chest compression may be required to obtain serious thoracic injury in oblique impacts as compared to lateral impacts at speeds of 4.5 or 5.5 m/s.

  13. Evaluation of the EPA Drift Reduction Technology (DRT) Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics in a Spray Using Optical Nonimaging Light-Scattering by ASTM Int’l (all rights reserved); Thu May 7 10:08:26 EDT 2009 ed/printed by itz...Spray Using Optical Nonimaging Light-Scattering Instruments,” Annual Book of ASTM Standards, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2003. 9

  14. Scaling properties of the aerodynamic noise generated by low-speed fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    The spectral decomposition algorithm presented in the paper may be applied to selected parts of the SPL spectrum, i.e. to specific noise generating mechanisms. It yields the propagation and the generation functions, and indeed the Mach number scaling exponent associated with each mechanism as a function of the Strouhal number. The input data are SPL spectra obtained from measurements taken during speed ramps. Firstly, the basic theory and the implemented algorithm are described. Then, the behaviour of the new method is analysed with reference to numerically generated spectral data and the results are compared with the ones of an existing method based on the assumption that the scaling exponent is constant. Guidelines for the employment of both methods are provided. Finally, the method is applied to measurements taken on a cooling fan mounted on a test plenum designed following the ISO 10302 standards. The most common noise generating mechanisms are present and attention is focused on the low-frequency part of the spectrum, where the mechanisms are superposed. Generally, both propagation and generation functions are determined with better accuracy than the scaling exponent, whose values are usually consistent with expectations based on coherence and compactness of the acoustic sources. For periodic noise, the computed exponent is less accurate, as the related SPL data set has usually a limited size. The scaling exponent is very sensitive to the details of the experimental data, e.g. to slight inconsistencies or random errors.

  15. Enabling Advanced Wind-Tunnel Research Methods Using the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, Ronald C.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Croom, Mark A.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Grafton, Sue B.; O-Neal, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Design of Experiment (DOE) testing methods were used to gather wind tunnel data characterizing the aerodynamic and propulsion forces and moments acting on a complex vehicle configuration with 10 motor-driven propellers, 9 control surfaces, a tilt wing, and a tilt tail. This paper describes the potential benefits and practical implications of using DOE methods for wind tunnel testing - with an emphasis on describing how it can affect model hardware, facility hardware, and software for control and data acquisition. With up to 23 independent variables (19 model and 2 tunnel) for some vehicle configurations, this recent test also provides an excellent example of using DOE methods to assess critical coupling effects in a reasonable timeframe for complex vehicle configurations. Results for an exploratory test using conventional angle of attack sweeps to assess aerodynamic hysteresis is summarized, and DOE results are presented for an exploratory test used to set the data sampling time for the overall test. DOE results are also shown for one production test characterizing normal force in the Cruise mode for the vehicle.

  16. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerant Control with Application on a Wind Turbine Low Speed Shaft Encoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa

    2015-01-01

    tolerant control of wind turbines using a benchmark model. In this paper, the fault diagnosis scheme is improved and integrated with a fault accommodation scheme which enables and disables the individual pitch algorithm based on the fault detection. In this way, the blade and tower loads are not increased...

  17. Sensorless Stator Field-Oriented Controlled IM Drive at Low Speed with Rr Estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Pu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pertains to a technique of a sensorless indirect stator field-oriented induction motor control, which prevents the accumulative errors incurred by the integrator and the problem relating to the stability of the control system caused by the stator resistance susceptible to temperature variations while conducting the flux estimation directly and computing the synchronous rotary speed. The research adds an adaptive flux observer to estimate the speed of the rotor and uses the fixed trace algorithm (FTA to execute an online estimation of the slip difference, thereby improving the system of stability under the low rotary speed at regenerating mode and the influence of the rotor resistance on the slip angle. Finally, the paper conducts simulations by Simulink of MATLAB and practices to verify the correctness of the result the paper presents.

  18. An Investigation on the Efficiency Correction Method of the Turbocharger at Low Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Eun Chung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer in the turbocharger occurs due to the temperature difference between the exhaust gas and intake air, coolant, and oil. This heat transfer causes the efficiency of the compressor and turbine to be distorted, which is known to be exacerbated during low rotational speeds. Thus, this study proposes a method to mitigate the distortion of the test result data caused by heat transfer in the turbocharger. With this method, the representative compressor temperature is defined and the heat transfer rate of the compressor is calculated by considering the effect of the oil and turbine inlet temperatures at low rotation speeds, when the cold and the hot gas test are simultaneously performed. The correction of compressor efficiency, depending on the turbine inlet temperature, was performed through both hot and cold gas tests and the results showed a maximum of 16% error prior to correction and a maximum of 3% error after the correction. In addition, it shows that it is possible to correct the efficiency distortion of the turbocharger by heat transfer by correcting to the combined turbine efficiency based on the corrected compressor efficiency.

  19. An improved torque density Modulated Pole Machine for low speed high torque applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washington, J. G.; Atkinson, G. J.; Baker, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new topology for three-phase Modulated Pole Machines. This new topology the “Combined Phase Modulated Pole Machine” is analysed and compared to the more traditional technology of three separate single phase units stacked axially with a separation between phases. Three......- dimensional Finite Element calculations are used to compare performance of the machines under the same conditions, it is shown that the new Combined Phase topology produces a greater torque whilst reducing the number of components required to assemble the machine and increasing its mechanical integrity....

  20. Integration of CFD and Experimental Results at VKI in Low-Speed Aerodynamic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    erosion in wind tunnel behind the building Today, almost all modern Antartic stations have undergone aerodynamic studies at different stages of design...2] J. Sanz Rodrigo, C. Gorle, J. van Beeck, P. Planquart: Aerodynamic Design of the Princess Elizabeth Antartic Research Station, 17th

  1. The Legal Status of Low Speed, Electric, Automated Vehicles in Texas : Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores whether vehicles that are both Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) and Automated Vehicles (AVs) may operate legally on public roads in Texas. First is an examination of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles and how they are governed i...

  2. Gas Flow Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  3. Pulsatile pipe flow transition: Flow waveform effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindise, Melissa C.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2018-01-01

    Although transition is known to exist in various hemodynamic environments, the mechanisms that govern this flow regime and their subsequent effects on biological parameters are not well understood. Previous studies have investigated transition in pulsatile pipe flow using non-physiological sinusoidal waveforms at various Womersley numbers but have produced conflicting results, and multiple input waveform shapes have yet to be explored. In this work, we investigate the effect of the input pulsatile waveform shape on the mechanisms that drive the onset and development of transition using particle image velocimetry, three pulsatile waveforms, and six mean Reynolds numbers. The turbulent kinetic energy budget including dissipation rate, production, and pressure diffusion was computed. The results show that the waveform with a longer deceleration phase duration induced the earliest onset of transition, while the waveform with a longer acceleration period delayed the onset of transition. In accord with the findings of prior studies, for all test cases, turbulence was observed to be produced at the wall and either dissipated or redistributed into the core flow by pressure waves, depending on the mean Reynolds number. Turbulent production increased with increasing temporal velocity gradients until an asymptotic limit was reached. The turbulence dissipation rate was shown to be independent of mean Reynolds number, but a relationship between the temporal gradients of the input velocity waveform and the rate of turbulence dissipation was found. In general, these results demonstrated that the shape of the input pulsatile waveform directly affected the onset and development of transition.

  4. Flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Mayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    For power upgrading VVER-440 reactors we need to know exactly how the temperature measured by the thermocouples is related to the average outlet temperature of the fuel assemblies. Accordingly, detailed knowledge on mixing process in the rod bundles and in the fuel assembly head have great importance. Here we study the hydrodynamics of rod bundles based on the results of direct numerical and large eddy simulation of flows in subchannels. It is shown that secondary flow and flow pulsation phenomena can be observed using both methodologies. Some consequences of these observations are briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those

  6. Initiation of slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise).

  7. Experimental study of MHD effects on turbulent flow of flibe simulant fluid in a circular pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Junichi; Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.; Satake, Shin-ichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of MHD turbulent pipe flow of Flibe simulant fluid have been conducted as a part of US-Japan JUPITER-II collaboration. Flibe is considered as a promising candidate for coolant and tritium breeder in some fusion reactor design concepts because of its low electrical conductivity compared to liquid metals. This reduces the MHD pressure drop to a negligible level; however, turbulence can be significantly suppressed by MHD effects in fusion reactor magnetic field conditions. Heat transfer in the Flibe coolant is characterized by its high Prandtl number. In order to achieve sufficient heat transfer and to prevent localized heat concentration in a high Prandtl number coolant, high turbulence is essential. Even though accurate prediction of the MHD effects on heat transfer for high Prandtl number fluids in the fusion environment is very important, reliable data is not available. In these experiments, an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide is used as a simulant fluid for Flibe. This paper presents the experimental results obtained by flow field measurement using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The PIV measurements provide 2-dimensional 2-velocity component information on the MHD flow field. The test section is a circular pipe with 89 mm inner diameter and 7.0 m in length, which is 79 times pipe diameter. This relatively large diameter pipe is selected in order to maximize the MHD effects measured by Hartmann number (Ha=BL(sigma/mu)1/2), and to allow better resolution of the flow in the near-wall region. The test section is placed under maximum 2 Tesla magnetic fields for 1.4m of the axial length. The hydrodynamic developing length under the magnetic field is expected to be 1.2 m. In order to apply PIV technique in the magnetic field condition, special optical devices and visualization sections were created. PIV measurements are performed for Re = 11600 with variable Hartmann numbers. The turbulence statistics of the MHD turbulent flow

  8. Refrigeration. Two-Phase Flow. Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans-Jørgen Høgaard

    2002-01-01

    The note gives the basic definitions used in two-phase flow. Flow regimes and flow regimes map are introduced. The different contributions to the pressure drop are stated together with an imperical correlation from the litterature.......The note gives the basic definitions used in two-phase flow. Flow regimes and flow regimes map are introduced. The different contributions to the pressure drop are stated together with an imperical correlation from the litterature....

  9. Flow Cytometry Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary goal of the Flow Cytometry Section is to provide the services of state-of-the-art multi-parameter cellular analysis and cell sorting for researchers and...

  10. The disappearance of flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, S.; Hartnack, C.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the disappearance of collective flow in the reaction plane in heavy-ion collisions within a microscopic model (QMD). A systematic study of the impact parameter dependence is performed for the system Ca+Ca. The balance energy strongly increases with impact parameter. Momentum dependent interactions reduce the balance energies for intermediate impact parameters b∼4.5 fm. Dynamical negative flow is not visible in the laboratory frame but does exist in the contact frame for the heavy system Au+Au. For semi-peripheral collisions of Ca+Ca with b∼6.5 fm a new two-component flow is discussed. Azimuthal distributions exhibit strong collectiv flow signals, even at the balance energy. (orig.)

  11. Border information flow architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This brochure describes the Border Information Flow Architecture (BIFA). The Transportation Border Working Group, a bi-national group that works to enhance coordination and planning between the United States and Canada, identified collaboration on th...

  12. Upscaling of Forchheimer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Aulisa, Eugenio; Bloshanskaya, Lidia I.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Ibragimov, Akif I.

    2014-01-01

    analytical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1] and formulate the resulting system in terms of a degenerate nonlinear flow equation for the pressure with the nonlinearity depending on the pressure gradient. The coarse scale parameters for the steady state

  13. Flow in data racks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoch Lukáš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the flow in data racks. The aim of this work is to find a new arrangement of elements regulating the flow in the data rack so that the aerodynamic losses and the recirculation zones were minimized. The main reason for solving this problem is to reduce the costs of data racks cooling. Another problem to be solved is a reverse flow in the servers, thus not cooled, occuring due to the underpressure in the recirculation zones. In order to solve the problem, the experimental and numerical model of 27U data rack fitted with 10 pieces of server models with a total input of 10 kW was created. Different configurations of layout of elements affecting the flow in the inlet area of the data rack were compared. Depending on the results achieved, design solutions for the improvement of existing solutions were adopted and verified by numerical simulations.

  14. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  15. Water Flow Experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    year undergraduate student at Ashoka University,. Sonipat, Haryana. This article studies how the height of water varies with time when water ... Experiment using a one-bottle system with a small bore tube at- tached to .... restricting free flow.

  16. Flow energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargsyan, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    A cost-effective hydropower system called here Flow Energy Converter was developed, patented, manufactured and tested for water pumping, electricity generation and other purposes especially useful for the rural communities. The system consists of water-driven turbine with plane-surface blades, power transmission means and pump and/or generator. Working sample of the Flow Energy Converter was designed and manufactured at the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics

  17. Stability of parallel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Betchov, R

    2012-01-01

    Stability of Parallel Flows provides information pertinent to hydrodynamical stability. This book explores the stability problems that occur in various fields, including electronics, mechanics, oceanography, administration, economics, as well as naval and aeronautical engineering. Organized into two parts encompassing 10 chapters, this book starts with an overview of the general equations of a two-dimensional incompressible flow. This text then explores the stability of a laminar boundary layer and presents the equation of the inviscid approximation. Other chapters present the general equation

  18. Stability of radial swirl flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, H S; Khoo, B C

    2012-01-01

    The energy gradient theory is used to examine the stability of radial swirl flows. It is found that the flow of free vortex is always stable, while the introduction of a radial flow will induce the flow to be unstable. It is also shown that the pure radial flow is stable. Thus, there is a flow angle between the pure circumferential flow and the pure radial flow at which the flow is most unstable. It is demonstrated that the magnitude of this flow angle is related to the Re number based on the radial flow rate, and it is near the pure circumferential flow. The result obtained in this study is useful for the design of vaneless diffusers of centrifugal compressors and pumps as well as other industrial devices.

  19. Hydrodynamical description of collective flow

    OpenAIRE

    Huovinen, Pasi

    2003-01-01

    I review how hydrodynamical flow is related to the observed flow in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions and how initial conditions, equation of state and freeze-out temperature affect flow in hydrodynamical models.

  20. PIV, 2D-LIF and 1D-Raman measurements of flow field, composition and temperature in premixed gas turbine flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopper, U.; Aigner, M.; Ax, H.; Meier, W.; Sadanandan, R.; Stoehr, M. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Combustion Technology, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Bonaldo, A. [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Combustion Group, P. O. Box 1, Waterside South, Lincoln LN5 7FD (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Several laser diagnostic measurement techniques have been applied to study the lean premixed natural gas/air flames of an industrial swirl burner. This was made possible by equipping the burner with an optical combustion chamber that was installed in the high-pressure test rig facility at the DLR Institute of Combustion Technology in Stuttgart. The burner was operated with preheated air at various operating conditions with pressures up to p = 6 bar and a maximum thermal power of P = 1 MW. The instantaneous planar flow field inside the combustor was studied with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals on a single-shot basis was used to determine the shape and the location of the flame front as well as the spatial distribution of reaction products. 1D laser Raman spectroscopy was successfully applied for the measurement of the temperature and the concentration of major species under realistic gas turbine conditions. Results of the flow field analysis show the shape and the size of the main flow regimes: the inflow region, the inner and the outer recirculation zone. The highly turbulent flow field of the inner shear layer is found to be dominated by small and medium sized vortices. High RMS fluctuations of the flow velocity in the exhaust gas indicate the existence of a rotating exhaust gas swirl. From the PLIF images it is seen that the primary reactions happened in the shear layers between inflow and the recirculation zones and that the appearance of the reaction zones changed with flame parameters. The results of the multiscalar Raman measurements show a strong variation of the local mixture fraction allowing conclusions to be drawn about the premix quality. Furthermore, mixing effects of unburnt fuel and air with fully reacted combustion products are studied giving insights into the processes of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. (author)

  1. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  2. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sætre, C.; Johansen, G.A.; Tjugum, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: ► Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. ► High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow pattern and gas fraction. ► Dual modality

  3. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saetre, C., E-mail: camilla@ift.uib.no [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Johansen, G.A. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Tjugum, S.A. [Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Roxar Flow Measurement, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow

  4. Radiotracer techniques for measuring fluid flow and calibrating flow meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, E.L.

    1987-08-01

    Radiotracer techniques can be used to measure accurately both gas and liquid flow rates under operating conditions in a wide range of flow systems. They are ideally suited for calibrating flow meters as well as for measuring unmetered flows in industrial plants. Applications of these techniques range from measuring the flows of fuels and process fluids for energy and mass balance studies to measuring the flows of liquid and airborne effluents for pollution control. This report describes the various radiotracer techniques which can be used to measure fluid flows. The range of application and inherent accuracy of each technique is discussed

  5. Rapid flow imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelc, N.J.; Spritzer, C.E.; Lee, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid, phase-contrast, MR imaging method of imaging flow has been implemented. The method, called VIGRE (velocity imaging with gradient recalled echoes), consists of two interleaved, narrow flip angle, gradient-recalled acquisitions. One is flow compensated while the second has a specified flow encoding (both peak velocity and direction) that causes signals to contain additional phase in proportion to velocity in the specified direction. Complex image data from the first acquisition are used as a phase reference for the second, yielding immunity from phase accumulation due to causes other than motion. Images with pixel values equal to MΔΘ where M is the magnitude of the flow compensated image and ΔΘ is the phase difference at the pixel, are produced. The magnitude weighting provides additional vessel contrast, suppresses background noise, maintains the flow direction information, and still allows quantitative data to be retrieved. The method has been validated with phantoms and is undergoing initial clinical evaluation. Early results are extremely encouraging

  6. Upscaling of Forchheimer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Aulisa, Eugenio

    2014-08-01

    In this work we propose upscaling method for nonlinear Forchheimer flow in heterogeneous porous media. The generalized Forchheimer law is considered for incompressible and slightly-compressible single-phase flows. We use recently developed analytical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1] and formulate the resulting system in terms of a degenerate nonlinear flow equation for the pressure with the nonlinearity depending on the pressure gradient. The coarse scale parameters for the steady state problem are determined so that the volumetric average of velocity of the flow in the domain on fine scale and on coarse scale are close. A flow-based coarsening approach is used, where the equivalent permeability tensor is first evaluated following streamline methods for linear cases, and modified in order to take into account the nonlinear effects. Compared to previous works (Garibotti and Peszynska, 2009) [2], (Durlofsky and Karimi-Fard) [3], this approach can be combined with rigorous mathematical upscaling theory for monotone operators, (Efendiev et al., 2004) [4], using our recent theoretical results (Aulisa et al., 2009) [1]. The developed upscaling algorithm for nonlinear steady state problems is effectively used for variety of heterogeneities in the domain of computation. Direct numerical computations for average velocity and productivity index justify the usage of the coarse scale parameters obtained for the special steady state case in the fully transient problem. For nonlinear case analytical upscaling formulas in stratified domain are obtained. Numerical results were compared to these analytical formulas and proved to be highly accurate. © 2014.

  7. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  8. Turbine flow meter response in two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, W.J.; Dougherty, T.J.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest a simple method of calibrating turbine flow meters to measure the flow rates of each phase in a two-phase flow. The response of two 50.8 mm (2 inch) turbine flow meters to air-water, two-phase mixtures flowing vertically in a 57 mm I.D. (2.25 inch) polycarbonate tube has been investigated for both upflow and downflow. The flow meters were connected in series with an intervening valve to provide an adjustable pressure difference between them. Void fractions were measured by two gamma densitometers, one upstream of the flow meters and the other downstream. The output signal of the turbine flow meters was found to depend only on the actual volumetric flow rate of the gas, F G , and liquid, F L , at the location of the flow meter

  9. AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF “FAN-IN-FIN” SYSTEM IN CONDITION OF FLOWING UNDER ZERO ATTACK ANGLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fan-in-fin system can be used as single-rotor helicopter fenestrons propulsion system of low-speed airplanes and dirigibles as well as vehicles with remote control.The article suggests way to continue the author’s research in the field of fan-in-fin system aerodynamics.It also offers a method of aerodynamic characteristics of “fan-in-fin” (fenestron system with cylindrical diffuser of limited length in flow regime under zero angle of attack calculation. The article gives some formula to calculate the flow velocity through the disk area which decrease with the increase of the defusser and air speed.Correlation between fan thrust power and ring thrust on these regimes and momentum drag are found. Momentum drag is high enough, this fact leads to back deviation of total aerodynamic force system. This angle increases with increase of the diffuser length and at medium speed it can reach 30°.Certainty of suggested algorithms is proved by comparison with experiments for helicopter fenestron and un- manned air vehicle by tests in wind tunnel of MAI.

  10. Numerical simulation of flow around the NREL S826 airfoil at moderate Reynolds number using delayed detached Eddy simulation (DDES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytz, Erik R.; Huuse, Øyvind; Müller, Bernhard; Bartl, Jan; Sætran, Lars Roar

    2017-07-01

    Turbulent flow at Reynolds numbers 5 . 104 to 106 around the NREL S826 airfoil used for wind turbine blades is simulated using delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The 3D domain is built as a replica of the low speed wind tunnel at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) with the wind tunnel walls considered as slip walls. The subgrid turbulent kinetic energy is used to model the sub-grid scale in the large eddy simulation (LES) part of DDES. Different Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are tested in ANSYS Fluent. The realizable k - ∈ model as the RANS model in DDES is found to yield the best agreement of simulated pressure distributions with the experimental data both from NTNU and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the latter for a shorter spanwise domain. The present DDES results are in excellent agreement with LES results from DTU. Since DDES requires much fewer cells in the RANS region near the wing surface than LES, DDES is computationally much more efficient than LES. Whereas DDES is able to predict lift and drag in close agreement with experiment up to stall, pure 2D RANS simulations fail near stall. After testing different numerical settings, time step sizes and grids for DDES, a Reynolds number study is conducted. Near stall, separated flow structures, so-called stall cells, are observed in the DDES results.

  11. Particles in flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, Giovanni; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to face particles in flows from many different, but essentially interconnected sides and points of view. Thus the selection of authors and topics represented in the chapters, ranges from deep mathematical analysis of the associated models, through the techniques of their numerical solution, towards real applications and physical implications. The scope and structure of the book as well as the selection of authors was motivated by the very successful summer course and workshop "Particles in Flows'' that was held in Prague in the August of 2014. This meeting revealed the need for a book dealing with this specific and challenging multidisciplinary subject, i.e. particles in industrial, environmental and biomedical flows and the combination of fluid mechanics, solid body mechanics with various aspects of specific applications.

  12. Two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, J.

    1990-01-01

    The design, operation and safety of nuclear components requires increasingly accurate knowledge of two-phase flows. This knowledge is also necessary for some studies related to electricity applications. The author presents some concrete examples showing the range of problems and the complexity of the phenomena involved in these types of flows. Then, the basic principles of their numerical modelling are explained, as well as the new tendency to use increasingly local and refined models. The newest computer codes developed at EDF are briefly presented. Experimental studies dealing with twophase flow are also referred to, and their connections to numerical modelling are explained. Emphasis is placed on the major efforts devoted to the development of new test rigs and instrumentation [fr

  13. Robust Optical Flow Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez Pérez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available n this work, we describe an implementation of the variational method proposed by Brox etal. in 2004, which yields accurate optical flows with low running times. It has several benefitswith respect to the method of Horn and Schunck: it is more robust to the presence of outliers,produces piecewise-smooth flow fields and can cope with constant brightness changes. Thismethod relies on the brightness and gradient constancy assumptions, using the information ofthe image intensities and the image gradients to find correspondences. It also generalizes theuse of continuous L1 functionals, which help mitigate the effect of outliers and create a TotalVariation (TV regularization. Additionally, it introduces a simple temporal regularizationscheme that enforces a continuous temporal coherence of the flow fields.

  14. Designing reliability information flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkova, Valia T.; Lu Yuan; Ion, Roxana A.; Sander, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    It is well-known [Reliab. Eng. Syst. Saf. 75 (2002) 295] that in modern development processes it is essential to have an information flow structure that facilitates fast feedback from product users (customers) to departments at the front end, in particular development and production. As information is only relevant if it is used when taking decisions, this paper presents a guideline for building field feedback information flows that facilitate the decision taking during the product creation and realisation process. The guideline takes into consideration that the type of decisions depends on the span-of-control, therefore following Parsons [Structure and Process in Modern Societies (1990)] the span-of-control is subdivided into the following three levels: strategic, tactic, and executive. The guideline is illustrated with a case in which it is used for analysing the quality of existing field feedback flows

  15. Hypogenetic chaotic jerk flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chunbiao; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Xing, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Removing the amplitude or polarity information in the feedback loop of a jerk structure shows that special nonlinearities with partial information in the variable can also lead to chaos. Some striking properties are found for this kind of hypogenetic chaotic jerk flow, including multistability of symmetric coexisting attractors from an asymmetric structure, hidden attractors with respect to equilibria but with global attraction, easy amplitude control, and phase reversal which is convenient for chaos applications. - Highlights: • Hypogenetic chaotic jerk flows with incomplete feedback of amplitude or polarity are obtained. • Multistability of symmetric coexisting attractors from an asymmetric structure is found. • Some jerk systems have hidden attractors with respect to equilibria but have global attraction. • These chaotic jerk flows have the properties of amplitude control and phase reversal.

  16. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  17. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large-on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue

  18. Flow Rate Measurement in Multiphase Flow Rig: Radiotracer and Conventional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazrul Hizam Yusoff; Noraishah Othman; Nurliyana Abdullah; Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos; Rasif Mohd Zain; Roslan Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Applications of radiotracer technology are prevalent throughout oil refineries worldwide, and this industry is one of the main users and beneficiaries of the technology. Radioactive tracers have been used to a great extent in many applications i.e. flow rate measurement, RTD, plant integrity evaluation and enhancing oil production in oil fields. Chemical and petrochemical plants are generally continuously operating and technically complex where the radiotracer techniques are very competitive and largely applied for troubleshooting inspection and process analysis. Flow rate measurement is a typical application of radiotracers. For flow measurements, tracer data are important, rather than the RTD models. Research is going on in refining the existing methods for single phase flow measurement, and in developing new methods for multiphase flow without sampling. The tracer techniques for single phase flow measurements are recognized as ISO standards. This paper presents technical aspect of laboratory experiments, which have been carried out using Molybdenum-99 - Mo99 (radiotracer) to study and determine the flow rate of liquid in multiphase flow rig. The multiphase flow rig consists of 58.7 m long and 20 cm diameter pipeline that can accommodate about 0.296 m 3 of liquid. Tap water was used as liquid flow in pipeline and conventional flow meters were also installed at the flow rig. The flow rate results; radiotracer and conventional flow meter were compared. The total count method was applied for radiotracer technique and showed the comparable results with conventional flow meter. (author)

  19. Three-Dimensional Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Vitor; Viana, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this book, the authors present the elements of a general theory for flows on three-dimensional compact boundaryless manifolds, encompassing flows with equilibria accumulated by regular orbits. The book aims to provide a global perspective of this theory and make it easier for the reader to digest the growing literature on this subject. This is not the first book on the subject of dynamical systems, but there are distinct aspects which together make this book unique. Firstly, this book treats mostly continuous time dynamical systems, instead of its discrete counterpart, exhaustively treated

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic flow phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbeth, G.; Mutschke, G.; Eckert, S.

    1995-01-01

    The MHD group of the Institute of Safety Research performs basic studies on fluid dynamics and heat/mass transfer in fluids, particularly for electrically conducting fluids (liquid metals) exposed to external magnetic fields (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD). Such a contactless influence on transport phenomena is of principal importance for a variety of applied problems including safety and design aspects in liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, fast reactors, and chemical systems. Any electrically conducting flow can be influenced without any contact by means of an external electromagnetic field. This, of course, can change the known hydromechanically flow patterns considerably. In the following two examples of such magnetic field influence are presented. (orig.)

  1. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  2. 3-D numerical study of the effect of Reynolds number and baffle angle on heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow of air through rectangular duct of very small height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Present article illustrates a computational study of three-dimensional steady state heat transfer and high turbulent flow characteristics through a rectangular duct with constant heat fluxed upper wall and single rectangular cross-sectioned baffle insertion at different angles. RNG k–ɛ model along with standard wall function based computations has been accomplished applying the finite volume method, and SIMPLE algorithm has been executed for solving the governing equations. For a Reynolds number, Re of 10,000 to 50,000, Prandtl Number, Pr of 0.707 and baffle angle, α of 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°, computational studies are executed, centred onto the hydraulic diameter, Dh, test section and hydrodynamic entry length of the duct. Flow field has been solved using Ansys Fluent 14.0 software. Study exposes that baffled rectangular duct has a higher average Nusselt number, Nu and Darcy friction factor, f compared to a smooth rectangular duct. Nu as well as f are found to be maximum at 90° baffle angle. Results illustrate that both α and Re play a significant role in heat transfer as well as flow characteristics and also effects TEF. The correctness of the results attained in this study is corroborated by comparing the results with those existing in the literature for smooth rectangular duct within a precision of ±2% for f and ±4% for Nu.

  3. Transient two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Y.Y.

    1974-01-01

    The following papers related to two-phase flow are summarized: current assumptions made in two-phase flow modeling; two-phase unsteady blowdown from pipes, flow pattern in Laval nozzle and two-phase flow dynamics; dependence of radial heat and momentum diffusion; transient behavior of the liquid film around the expanding gas slug in a vertical tube; flooding phenomena in BWR fuel bundles; and transient effects in bubble two-phase flow. (U.S.)

  4. Using Crossflow for Flow Measurements and Flow Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, A.; Chudnovsky, L.; Lopeza, A. [Advanced Measurement and Analysis Group Inc., Ontario (Canada); Park, M. H. [Sungjin Nuclear Engineering Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Ultrasonic Cross Correlation Flow Measurements are based on a flow measurement method that is based on measuring the transport time of turbulent structures. The cross correlation flow meter CROSSFLOW is designed and manufactured by Advanced Measurement and Analysis Group Inc. (AMAG), and is used around the world for various flow measurements. Particularly, CROSSFLOW has been used for boiler feedwater flow measurements, including Measurement Uncertainty Recovery (MUR) reactor power uprate in 14 nuclear reactors in the United States and in Europe. More than 100 CROSSFLOW transducers are currently installed in CANDU reactors around the world, including Wolsung NPP in Korea, for flow verification in ShutDown System (SDS) channels. Other CROSSFLOW applications include reactor coolant gross flow measurements, reactor channel flow measurements in all channels in CANDU reactors, boiler blowdown flow measurement, and service water flow measurement. Cross correlation flow measurement is a robust ultrasonic flow measurement tool used in nuclear power plants around the world for various applications. Mathematical modeling of the CROSSFLOW agrees well with laboratory test results and can be used as a tool in determining the effect of flow conditions on CROSSFLOW output and on designing and optimizing laboratory testing, in order to ensure traceability of field flow measurements to laboratory testing within desirable uncertainty.

  5. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  6. Is flow verification necessary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetle, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Safeguards test statistics are used in an attempt to detect diversion of special nuclear material. Under assumptions concerning possible manipulation (falsification) of safeguards accounting data, the effects on the statistics due to diversion and data manipulation are described algebraically. A comprehensive set of statistics that is capable of detecting any diversion of material is defined in terms of the algebraic properties of the effects. When the assumptions exclude collusion between persons in two material balance areas, then three sets of accounting statistics are shown to be comprehensive. Two of the sets contain widely known accountancy statistics. One of them does not require physical flow verification - comparisons of operator and inspector data for receipts and shipments. The third set contains a single statistic which does not require physical flow verification. In addition to not requiring technically difficult and expensive flow verification, this single statistic has several advantages over other comprehensive sets of statistics. This algebraic approach as an alternative to flow verification for safeguards accountancy is discussed in this paper

  7. Flow of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, H.G.; Doss, K.G.R.; Gustafsson, H.A.

    1985-08-01

    The systems Nb + Nb and Au + Au have been measured at different energies at the Bevalac with the Plastic Ball spectrometer. Distributions of the flow angles as a function of charged particle multiplicity are presented. Also shown is a transverse momentum analysis for 400 MeV per nucleon Nb + Nb. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Heat flow method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yunmei

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we study the heat flow of harmonic maps between two compact Riemannian manifolds. The global existence of the regular solution and the weak solution, as well as the blow up of the weak solution are discussed. (author). 14 refs

  9. Lateral flow assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple version of immunochemical-based methods is the Lateral Flow Assay (LFA). It is a dry chemistry technique (reagents are included); the fluid from the sample runs through a porous membrane (often nitrocellulose) by capillary force. Typically the membrane is cut as a strip of 0.5*5 cm. In most

  10. Delta Flow Modulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, Eize; Lengkeek, W

    2015-01-01

    A support structure (2) is installed in or near a water (50). The support structure is holding a deltalike-wing (3) under an angle of incidence relative to an incoming flow (54), caused by at least a prevailing current in the water, thus generating a vortex (77). The action of the vortex is

  11. Flow cytometry apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, D.

    1987-11-30

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one-dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the obstruction directs flat cells near to the area of one-dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates. 6 figs.

  12. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  13. Proportionate Flow Shop Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Mosquera, M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a proportionate flow shop problem several jobs have to be processed through a fixed sequence of machines and the processing time of each job is equal on all machines.By identifying jobs with agents, whose costs linearly depend on the completion time of their jobs, and assuming an initial

  14. Probabilistic Load Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the probabilistic load flow (PLF) techniques. Applications of the PLF techniques in different areas of power system steady-state analysis are also discussed. The purpose of the review is to identify different available PLF techniques and their corresponding...

  15. Techniques of Flow Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    are sensitive. Within the bandwidth of their sensitivity, up to ten color hues may be discriminated by the eye. The visible edge between two colors...can be performed with conven- tional photography or cinematography . Video recording is of advantage for the further pro- cessing of the flow pictures

  16. Erosion in extruder flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Miron; Fodor, Petru S.

    A detailed analysis of the fluid flow in Tadmor's unwound channel model of the single screw extruder is performed by combining numerical and analytical methods. Using the analytical solution for the longitudinal velocity field (in the limit of zero Reynolds number) allows us to devote all the computational resources solely for a detailed numerical solution of the transversal velocity field. This high resolution 3D model of the fluid flow in a single-screw extruder allows us to identify the position and extent of Moffatt eddies that impede mixing. We further consider the erosion of particles (e.g. carbon-black agglomerates) advected by the polymeric flow. We assume a particle to be made of primary fragments bound together. In the erosion process a primary fragment breaks out of a given particle. Particles are advected by the laminar flow and they disperse because of the shear stresses imparted by the fluid. The time evolution of the numbers of particles of different sizes is described by the Bateman coupled differential equations used to model radioactivity. Using the particle size distribution we compute an entropic fragmentation index which varies from 0 for a monodisperse system to 1 for an extreme poly-disperse system.

  17. Upscaling of reactive flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    The thesis deals with the upscaling of reactive flows in complex geometry. The reactions which may include deposition or dissolution take place at a part of the boundary and depending on the size of the reaction domain, the changes in the pore structure that are due to the deposition process may or

  18. Flow analysis of HANARO flow simulated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Wu, Jong-Sub; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2002-01-01

    The HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor of 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under normal operation since its initial critical in February, 1995. Many experiments should be safely performed to activate the utilization of the NANARO. A flow simulated test facility is being developed for the endurance test of reactivity control units for extended life times and the verification of structural integrity of those experimental facilities prior to loading in the HANARO. This test facility is composed of three major parts; a half-core structure assembly, flow circulation system and support system. The half-core structure assembly is composed of plenum, grid plate, core channel with flow tubes, chimney and dummy pool. The flow channels are to be filled with flow orifices to simulate core channels. This test facility must simulate similar flow characteristics to the HANARO. This paper, therefore, describes an analytical analysis to study the flow behavior of the test facility. The computational flow analysis has been performed for the verification of flow structure and similarity of this test facility assuming that flow rates and pressure differences of the core channel are constant. The shapes of flow orifices were determined by the trial and error method based on the design requirements of core channel. The computer analysis program with standard k - ε turbulence model was applied to three-dimensional analysis. The results of flow simulation showed a similar flow characteristic with that of the HANARO and satisfied the design requirements of this test facility. The shape of flow orifices used in this numerical simulation can be adapted for manufacturing requirements. The flow rate and the pressure difference through core channel proved by this simulation can be used as the design requirements of the flow system. The analysis results will be verified with the results of the flow test after construction of the flow system. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of the transient cavitating turbulent flows around the Clark-Y hydrofoil using modified partially averaged Navier-Stokes method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Renfang; Luo, Xianwu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ji, Bin [Wuhan University, Hubei (China)

    2017-06-15

    This paper presents the implementation and assessment of a modified Partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) turbulence model which can successfully predict the transient cavitating turbulent flows. The proposed model treats the standard k-e model as the parent model, and its main distinctive features are to (1) formulate the unresolved-to-total kinetic energy ratio (f{sub k}) based on the local grid size as well as turbulence length scale, and (2) vary the f{sub k}-field both in space and time. Numerical simulation used the modified PANS model for the sheet/cloud cavitating flows around a three-dimensional Clark-Y hydrofoil. The available experimental data and calculations of the standard k-e model, the f{sub k} = 0.8 PANS model, the f{sub k} = 0.5 PANS model are also provided for comparisons. The results show that the modified PANS model accurately captures the transient cavitation features as observed in experiments, namely, the attached sheet cavity grows in the flow direction until to a maximum length and then it breaks into a highly turbulent cloud cavity with three-dimensional structures in nature. Time-averaged drag/lift coefficients together with the streamwise velocity profiles predicted by the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental data, and improvements are shown when compared with results of the standard k-e model, the f{sub k} = 0.8 PANS model and the f{sub k} = 0.5 PANS model. Overall, the modified PANS model shows its encouraging capability of predicting the transient cavitating turbulent flows.

  20. Visualization study of flow in axial flow inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1972-01-01

    A visualization study of the flow through a three ft dia model of a four bladed inducer, which is operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065, is reported in this paper. The flow near the blade surfaces, inside the rotating passages, downstream and upstream of the inducer is visualized by means of smoke, tufts, ammonia filament, and lampblack techniques. Flow is found to be highly three dimensional, with appreciable radial velocity throughout the entire passage. The secondary flows observed near the hub and annulus walls agree with qualitative predictions obtained from the inviscid secondary flow theory.

  1. Critical flow rate in a single phase flow. Blocking concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, Michel

    1978-01-01

    After referring to the phenomena accompanying the appearance of a critical flow rate in a nozzle and presenting equations governing single phase flows, the critical condition is defined. Several particular cases are then examined; the horizontal and vertical isentropic flow, Fanno's flow and Raleigh's and the isothermal flow. The entropy deviation is calculated on either side of a normal impact. To conclude, the link existing between the concepts of critical flow and the propagation rate of small perturbations is demonstrated. To do so, the method of perturbations, that of Prandtl and that of characteristic directions are applied in turn [fr

  2. Experimental and Computational Study of the Flow past a Simplified Geometry of an Engine/Pylon/Wing Installation at low velocity/moderate incidence flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Yannick; Lucas, Matthieu; Bonnaud, Cyril; Joly, Laurent; ISAE Team; Airbus Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the vortices that develop past a model geometry of a wing equipped with pylon-mounted engine at low speed/moderate incidence flight conditions. For such configuration, the presence of the powerplant installation under the wing initiates a complex, unsteady vortical flow field at the nacelle/pylon/wing junctions. Its interaction with the upper wing boundary layer causes a drop of aircraft performances. In order to decipher the underlying physics, this study is initially conducted on a simplified geometry at a Reynolds number of 200000, based on the chord wing and on the freestream velocity. Two configurations of angle of attack and side-slip angle are investigated. This work relies on unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes computations, oil flow visualizations and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The vortex dynamics thus produced is described in terms of vortex core position, intensity, size and turbulent intensity thanks to a vortex tracking approach. In addition, the analysis of the velocity flow fields obtained from PIV highlights the influence of the longitudinal vortex initiated at the pylon/wing junction on the separation process of the boundary layer near the upper wing leading-edge.

  3. An investigation of rotor tip leakage flows in the rear-block of a multistage compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossman, John Richard

    measurements during this investigation. A detailed investigation and sensitivity analysis of the inlet flow field found the influence by the inlet total temperature profile was important to performance calculations. This finding was significant and original as previous investigations have been conducted on low-speed machines where there is minimal temperature rise. The steady state performance of the baseline 1.5% tip clearance case was outlined at design speed and three off-design speeds. The leakage flow from the rear seal, the inlet flow field and a thermal boundary condition over the casing was recorded at each operating point. Stage 1 was found to be the limiting stage independent of speed. Few datasets exist on multistage compressor performance with full boundary condition definitions, especially with off-design operating points presenting this as a unique dataset for CFD comparison. The detailed unsteady pressure measurements were conducted over Rotor 1 at design and a near-stall operating condition to characterize the leakage trajectory and position. The leakage flow initial point closer to the leading edge and trajectory angle increased at the higher loading condition. The over-the-rotor static pressure field on Rotor 1 indicated similar trends between the computational model and the leakage trajectory.

  4. Flow characteristics and scaling past highly porous wall-mounted fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2017-07-01

    An extensive characterization of the flow past wall-mounted highly porous fences based on single- and multi-scale geometries has been performed using hot-wire anemometry in a low-speed wind tunnel. Whilst drag properties (estimated from the time-averaged momentum equation) seem to be mostly dependent on the grids' blockage ratio; wakes of different size and orientation bars seem to generate distinct behaviours regarding turbulence properties. Far from the near-grid region, the flow is dominated by the presence of two well-differentiated layers: one close to the wall dominated by the near-wall behaviour and another one corresponding to the grid's wake and shear layer, originating from between this and the freestream. It is proposed that the effective thickness of the wall layer can be inferred from the wall-normal profile of root-mean-square streamwise velocity or, alternatively, from the wall-normal profile of streamwise velocity correlation. Using these definitions of wall-layer thickness enables us to collapse different trends of the turbulence behaviour inside this layer. In particular, the root-mean-square level of the wall shear stress fluctuations, longitudinal integral length scale, and spanwise turbulent structure is shown to display a satisfactory scaling with this thickness rather than with the whole thickness of the grid's wake. Moreover, it is shown that certain grids destroy the spanwise arrangement of large turbulence structures in the logarithmic region, which are then re-formed after a particular streamwise extent. It is finally shown that for fences subject to a boundary layer of thickness comparable to their height, the effective thickness of the wall layer scales with the incoming boundary layer thickness. Analogously, it is hypothesized that the growth rate of the internal layer is also partly dependent on the incoming boundary layer thickness.

  5. Experiments on mixing and combustion with low heat release in a turbulent shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungel, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    A new blowdown facility was built to study mixing and combustion in a turbulent shear layer. The system is capable of 100 m/s for three seconds in a 5 x 20 cm exit area on the high speed side, and 50 m/s in a 10 x 20 cm exit area on the low speed side. Dilute concentrations of hydrogen and fluorine, carried in an inert gas, react when both fluid streams meet at the tip of a splitter plate. The reaction is spontaneous, rapid, and highly exothermic. The resulting temperature field was studied using a rake of eight fast response thermometers placed across the width of the layer. Runs were performed for low heat release over a wide range of equivalence (concentration) ratios, at a Reynolds number of 30,800 based on velocity difference and vorticity thickness. The heat release is sufficiently low so that the overall properties of the mixing layer are not significantly changed from the cold case. The results show the presence of large, hot structures within the flow together with cool, irrotational tongues of freestream fluid that penetrate deep into the layer. Thus, it is possible for the entire width of the layer to be quite hot, owing to the passage of a large structure, or for the layer to be quite cool, owing to the presence of the cool fluid tongues. The mean temperature results from a duty cycle whereby a given point in the flow sees alternating hot and cool fluid which averages into the local mean. The results compare favorably with the recent theoretical model of Broadwell and Breidenthal for mixing and chemical reaction in a turbulent shear layer. With this model it is possible to bring the results for gases and liquids into quantitative agreement

  6. Structural power flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  7. Slow viscous flow

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, William E

    2014-01-01

    Leonardo wrote, 'Mechanics is the paradise of the mathematical sciences, because by means of it one comes to the fruits of mathematics' ; replace 'Mechanics' by 'Fluid mechanics' and here we are." -    from the Preface to the Second Edition Although the exponential growth of computer power has advanced the importance of simulations and visualization tools for elaborating new models, designs and technologies, the discipline of fluid mechanics is still large, and turbulence in flows remains a challenging problem in classical physics. Like its predecessor, the revised and expanded Second Edition of this book addresses the basic principles of fluid mechanics and solves fluid flow problems where viscous effects are the dominant physical phenomena. Much progress has occurred in the nearly half a century that has passed since the edition of 1964. As predicted, aspects of hydrodynamics once considered offbeat have risen to importance. For example, the authors have worked on problems where variations in viscosity a...

  8. Fracture flow code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, W; Herbert, A.; Long, J.

    1989-03-01

    The hydrology of the SCV site will be modelled utilizing discrete fracture flow models. These models are complex, and can not be fully cerified by comparison to analytical solutions. The best approach for verification of these codes is therefore cross-verification between different codes. This is complicated by the variation in assumptions and solution techniques utilized in different codes. Cross-verification procedures are defined which allow comparison of the codes developed by Harwell Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Golder Associates Inc. Six cross-verification datasets are defined for deterministic and stochastic verification of geometric and flow features of the codes. Additional datasets for verification of transport features will be documented in a future report. (13 figs., 7 tabs., 10 refs.) (authors)

  9. The Flow of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znidarsic, F.; Robertson, G. A.

    In this paper, the flow of energy in materials is presented as mechanical waves with a distinct velocity or speed of transition. This speed of transition came about through the observations of cold fusion experiments, i.e., Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) and superconductor gravity experiments, both assumed speculative by mainstream science. In consideration of superconductor junctions, the LENR experiments have a similar speed of transition, which seems to imply that the reactions in the LENR experiment are discrete quantized reactions (energy - burst vs. continuous). Here an attempt is made to quantify this new condition as it applies to electrons; toward the progression of quantized energy flows (discrete energy burst) as a new source of clean energy and force mechanisms (i.e, propulsion).

  10. Hawaii Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This sequence of ASTER nighttime thermal images shows the Pu'u O'o lava flows entering the sea at Kamokuna on the southeast side of the Island of Hawaii. Each image covers an area of 9 x 12 km. The acquisition dates are April 4 2000, May 13 2000, May 22 2000 (upper row) and June 30 2000, August 1 2000 and January 1 2001 (lower row). Thermal band 14 has been color coded from black (coldest) through blue, red, yellow and white (hottest). The first 5 images show a time sequence of a single eruptive phase; the last image shows flows from a later eruptive phase. The images are located at 19.3 degrees north latitude, 155 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Optimal Power Flow Pursuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Anese, Emiliano; Simonetto, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    This paper considers distribution networks featuring inverter-interfaced distributed energy resources, and develops distributed feedback controllers that continuously drive the inverter output powers to solutions of AC optimal power flow (OPF) problems. Particularly, the controllers update the power setpoints based on voltage measurements as well as given (time-varying) OPF targets, and entail elementary operations implementable onto low-cost microcontrollers that accompany power-electronics interfaces of gateways and inverters. The design of the control framework is based on suitable linear approximations of the AC power-flow equations as well as Lagrangian regularization methods. Convergence and OPF-target tracking capabilities of the controllers are analytically established. Overall, the proposed method allows to bypass traditional hierarchical setups where feedback control and optimization operate at distinct time scales, and to enable real-time optimization of distribution systems.

  12. Flow Control Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    known as Darrieus turbines or, after the German inventors of these devices, Voith-Schneider propellers. Their main advantage is the ability to produce... turbines (VAWT), named for the typical orientation of the main shaft. While their efficiency is similar to that of the more common horizontal axis wind ...Oscillating Systems’, Cambridge University Press, 2002 [11] G. M. Darrieus , ’ Turbine having its rotating shaft transverse to the flow of the current

  13. Flow Injection Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1998-01-01

    Learning objectives:* To provide an introduction to automated assays* To describe the basic principles of FIA * To demonstrate the capabilities of FIA in relation to batch assays and conventional continuous flow systems* To show that FIA allows one to augment existing analytical techniques* To sh...... how FIA offers novel analytical procedures which are not feasible by conventional means* To hightlight the potentials of FIA in selected practical assays...

  14. Invariant submanifold flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olver, Peter J [School of Mathematics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)], E-mail: olver@math.umn.edu

    2008-08-29

    Given a Lie group acting on a manifold, our aim is to analyze the evolution of differential invariants under invariant submanifold flows. The constructions are based on the equivariant method of moving frames and the induced invariant variational bicomplex. Applications to integrable soliton dynamics, and to the evolution of differential invariant signatures, used in equivalence problems and object recognition and symmetry detection in images, are discussed.

  15. Secondary Flow in Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Int. .7. Neat adMs rnfr 9 the auction Vo1. iS. p. 1.157, 12 1.7r aeTase WOW ugte 0In the comuted 2. Briley# V.R., umenrical Method for AW16 wereo at...S. ft, C.R., -A General Theory of Three saemnit u thecsg the rotation Dimensional Flow in subsonic -a super- injoes Wer sonic Turhasachines of Axial

  16. Flow in Pelton turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Furnes, Kjartan

    2013-01-01

    The flow in Pelton turbines is subsonic, turbulent, multiphase (water, air, and water vapor from cavitation), has high speeds, sharp gradients, free surface and dynamic boundary conditions. A static grid is unsuitable for modeling this mainly due to the turbine wheel and the liquid having a non-stationary relative motion.In recent times, significant progress in CFD simulation has been made, which also is relevant for Pelton turbines.Nevertheless, it is still common to perform costly model tes...

  17. Flow og fordybelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Frans Ørsted

    2010-01-01

    Artiklen handler om flow og fordybelse i et nyt tværfagligt / naturfagligt undervisningskoncept, "Overvågningens dilemma", til brug i folkeskolens 7.-9.kl. og på gymnasiale uddannelser. Konceptet sætter fokus på den overvågning der foregår og er mulig i nutidens IT og hi-tec samfund og der arbejd...

  18. Noncommutativity from spectral flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas; Ilderton, Anton [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-27

    We investigate the transition from second- to first-order systems. Quantum mechanically, this transforms configuration space into phase space and hence introduces noncommutativity in the former. This transition may be described in terms of spectral flow. Gaps in the energy or mass spectrum may become large which effectively truncates the available state space. Using both operator and path integral languages we explicitly discuss examples in quantum mechanics (light-front) quantum field theory and string theory.

  19. TensorFlow Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Joshua V.; Langmore, Ian; Tran, Dustin; Brevdo, Eugene; Vasudevan, Srinivas; Moore, Dave; Patton, Brian; Alemi, Alex; Hoffman, Matt; Saurous, Rif A.

    2017-01-01

    The TensorFlow Distributions library implements a vision of probability theory adapted to the modern deep-learning paradigm of end-to-end differentiable computation. Building on two basic abstractions, it offers flexible building blocks for probabilistic computation. Distributions provide fast, numerically stable methods for generating samples and computing statistics, e.g., log density. Bijectors provide composable volume-tracking transformations with automatic caching. Together these enable...

  20. TEP process flow diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, R Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Bryan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coons, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kubic, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of the proposed Process Flow Diagram (PFD) for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) of ITER. A brief review of design efforts leading up to the PFD is followed by a description of the hydrogen-like, air-like, and waterlike processes. Two new design values are described; the mostcommon and most-demanding design values. The proposed PFD is shown to meet specifications under the most-common and mostdemanding design values.