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Sample records for low-dose-rate 125i seeds

  1. The biological effect of 125I seed continuous low dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells

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    Zhuang Hong-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of 125I seed continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on colonic cell line CL187 in vitro. Methods The CL187 cell line was exposed to radiation of 60Coγ ray at high dose rate of 2 Gy/min and 125I seed at low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Radiation responses to different doses and dose rates were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Under 125I seed low dose rate irradiation, a total of 12 culture dishes were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group, and 2, 5, and 10 Gy irradiation groups. At 48 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by Annexin and Propidium iodide (PI staining. Cell cycle arrests were detected by PI staining. In order to investigate the influence of low dose rate irradiation on the MAPK signal transduction, the expression changes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Raf under continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDR and/or EGFR monoclonal antibodies were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Results The relative biological effect (RBE for 125I seeds compared with 60Co γ ray was 1.41. Apoptosis rates of CL187 cancer cells were 13.74% ± 1.63%, 32.58% ± 3.61%, and 46.27% ± 3.82% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 1.67% ± 0.19%. G2/M cell cycle arrests of CL187 cancer cells were 42.59% ± 3.21%, 59.84% ± 4.96%, and 34.61% ± 2.79% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 26.44% ± 2.53%. P 2/M cell cycle arrest. After low dose rate irradiation, EGFR and Raf expression increased, but when EGFR was blocked by a monoclonal antibody, EGFR and Raf expression did not change. Conclusion 125I seeds resulted in more effective inhibition than 60Co γ ray high dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells. Apoptosis following G2/M cell cycle arrest was the main mechanism of cell-killing effects under low dose rate irradiation. CLDR could

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of 125I seeds for low-dose-rate irradiation of PANC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jidong; Wang Junjie; Zhuang Hongqing; Liao Anyan; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relative biological effectiveness(RBE) of National Model 6711 125 I seeds and the response patterns of PANC-1 exposed to 125 I seeds irradiation. Methods: PANC-1 cells in exponential growth were irradiated at initial dose rate of 2.59 cGy/h in vitro and exposed to 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. Meanwhile, the other part of cells were exposed to the same doses by 60 Co at dose rate of 2.21 Gy/min. After irradiation, the cells were stained by trypan blue to measure the cellular mortality rate and to compare the changes along with plating times of 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after 4 Gy. The colonies were counted to obtain the plating efficiencies by colony-forming assay and the cell surviving faction was calculated to plot cell survival curves, and RBE of 125 I seeds relative to 60 Co was determined. Results: The cell death rate for continuous low- dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds was greater than 60 Co at the same doses above or equal to 4 Gy. After 4 Gy irradiation, the cellular mortality rates were increased with times. The difference was significant between 125 I seeds and 60 Co. The survival fractions of 125 I were lower than those of 60 Co, and the RBE of 125 I relative to 60 Co was determined to be 1.45. Conclusion: The cell-killing effects for continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds are greater than acute high-dose-rate of 60 Co. (authors)

  3. Bystander effects of exposure to low-dose-rate 125I seeds on human lung cancers cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Rongfei; Chen Honghong; Yu Lei; Zhao Meijia; Shao Chunlin; Cheng Wenying

    2007-01-01

    The bystander effects induced by continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seeds radiation on damage of human lung cancer cells were investigated. Human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, which have different sensitivities to high-dose rate (HDR) external irradiation, were exposed directly to 125 I seeds in vitro and co-cultured with unirradiated cells for 24 h. Using cytokinesis-blocking micronucleus method and γ H2AX fluorescence immunoassay, bystander effects induced by 2Gy and 4Gy 125 I seed irradiation on micronucleus formation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of human lung cancer cells were detected and evaluated. The results showed that irradiation with 125 I seeds can induce medium-mediated bystander effects in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, exhibiting that both micronuclei formation and γ H2AX focus formation in bystander cells were increased significantly compared with non-irradiated cells. The extent of DNA damage induced by bystander effects was correlated with accumulated radiation dose and radiosensitive of tumor cells. NCI-H446 cells that were sensitive to HDR γ irradiation were more sensitive to continuous LDR irradiation and bystander effects than A549. However, a comparison between the bystander effects and direct effects elicits the intensity of bystander responses of A549 cells was higher than that of NCI-H446 cells. A dose-related reduction in bystander responses was observed both in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, suggesting that the signaling factors involved in the bystander signaling pathways may decrease with the increase of cell damages. (authors)

  4. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.; Jia, R.F.; Yu, L.; Zhao, M.J.; Shao, C.L.; Cheng, W.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125 I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125 I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125 I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  5. The direct biologic effects of radioactive 125I seeds on pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1, at continuous low-dose rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jidong; Wang, Junjie; Liao, Anyan; Zhuang, Hongqing; Zhao, Yong

    2009-08-01

    The relative biologic effectiveness of model 6711 125I seeds (Ningbo Junan Pharmaceutical Technology Company,Ningbo, China) and their effects on growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 were examined in the present study. PANC-1 cells were exposed to the absorbed doses of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 Gyeither with 125I seeds (initial dose rate, 2.59 cGy=h) or with 60Co g-ray irradiation (dose rate, 221 cGy=min),respectively. Significantly greater numbers of apoptotic PANC-1 cells were detected following the continuouslow-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation of 125I seeds, compared with cells irradiated with identical doses of 60Co g-ray. The D(0) for 60Co g-ray and 125I seed irradiation were 2.30 and 1.66, respectively. The survival fraction after 125Iseed irradiation was significantly lower than that of 60Co g-ray, with a relative biologic effectiveness of 1.39.PANC-1 cells were dose dependently arrested in the S-phase by 60Co g-rays and in the G2=M phase by 125I seeds,24 hour after irradiation. CLDR irradiation by 125I seeds was more effective in inducing cell apoptosis in PANC-1cells than acute high-dose-rate 60Co g irradiation. Interestingly, CLDR irradiation by 125I seeds can cause PANC-1cell-cycle arrest at the G2=M phase and induce apoptosis, which may be an important mechanism underlying 125Iseed-induced PANC-1 cell inhibition.

  6. Spectroscopic output of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd low dose rate brachytherapy sources

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    Usher-Moga, Jacqueline; Beach, Stephen M.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Global Physics Solutions, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    The spectroscopic output of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources is dependent on the physical design and construction of the source. Characterization of the emitted photons from 12 {sup 125}I and 3 {sup 103}Pd LDR brachytherapy source models is presented. Photon spectra, both along the transverse bisector and at several polar angles, were measured in air with a high-purity reverse electrode germanium (REGe) detector. Measured spectra were corrected to in vacuo conditions via Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The tabulated and plotted spectroscopic data provide a more complete understanding of each source model's output characteristics than can be obtained with other measurement techniques. The variation in fluorescence yield of the {sup 125}I sources containing silver caused greater differences in the emitted spectra and average energies among these seed models than was observed for the {sup 103}Pd sources or the {sup 125}I sources that do not contain silver. Angular spectroscopic data further highlighted the effects of source construction unique to each model, as well as the asymmetric output of many seeds. These data demonstrate the need for the incorporation of such physically measured output characteristics in the Monte Carlo modeling process.

  7. Direct determination of the absorbed dose to water from 125I low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds using the new absorbed dose primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toni, M.P.; Pimpinella, M.; Pinto, M.; Quini, M.; Cappadozzi, G.; Silvestri, C.; Bottauscio, O.

    2012-01-01

    Low-intensity radioactive sources emitting low-energy photons are used in the clinic for low dose-rate brachytherapy treatments of tumours. The dosimetry of these sources is based on reference air kerma rate measurements. The absorbed dose rate to water at the reference depth d 0 = 1 cm, D w , 1 cm, is then obtained by a conversion procedure with a large relative standard uncertainty of about 5%. This paper describes a primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI to directly measure D w , 1 cm due to LDR sources. The standard is based on a large-angle and variable-volume ionization chamber, embedded in a graphite phantom and operating under 'wall-less air chamber' conditions. A set of correction and conversion factors, based on experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, are determined to obtain the value of D w , 1 cm from measurements of increment of ionization current with increasing chamber volume. The relative standard uncertainty on D w , 1 cm is 2.6%, which is appreciably lower than the current uncertainty. Characteristics of the standard, its associated uncertainty budget, and some experimental results are given for 125 I BEBIG I25.S16.C brachytherapy seeds. Finally, results of the experimental determination of the dose-rate constant 1 cm, traceable to the D w , 1 cm and the low-energy air kerma ENEA-INMRI standards, are given. The relative standard uncertainty on 1 cm is 2.9%, appreciably lower than the typical uncertainty (4.8%) of the values available in the literature. (authors)

  8. COMP report: CPQR technical quality control guidelines for low-dose-rate permanent seed brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Radford, Dee-Ann; Eduardo Villarreal-Barajas, J

    2018-03-14

    The Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists (COMP), in close partnership with the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy (CPQR) has developed a series of Technical Quality Control (TQC) guidelines for radiation treatment equipment. These guidelines outline the performance objectives that equipment should meet in order to ensure an acceptable level of radiation treatment quality. The TQC guidelines have been rigorously reviewed and field tested in a variety of Canadian radiation treatment facilities. The development process enables rapid review and update to keep the guidelines current with changes in technology. This article contains detailed performance objectives and safety criteria for low-dose-rate (LDR) permanent seed brachytherapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Application of 125I seed permanent plantation in osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fujun; Wu Peihong; Lu Mingjian; Li Kui; Zhang Liang; Huang Jinhua; Fan Weijun; Zhao Ming; Gu Yangkui; Liu Jian; Wang Junjie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of 125 I permanent plantation in treating osseous metastases. Methods: Twenty-two patients with osseous metastases were accepted radioactive seeds 125 I permanent plantation. The curative effect was appraised according to the degree of ostalgia relieving and the changing of the radiology imaging in patients. Results: Accepted radioactive seeds 125 I permanent plantation, relief of pain was obtained and the effective rate is 91% (20/22). However none of the patients showed severe side-effect. Among 32 lesions in 22 cases followed-up by CT in 2 months, 4 obtained CR, 18 obtained PR, 10 NC and 0 PD. The responsive rate was 68.7%. Conclusion: 125 I permanent plantation procedure can be a safe and effective method in treating osseous metastases and obtaining good clinical effects with minimal damage and few complications. (authors)

  10. Methodology of quality control for brachytherapy {sup 125}I seeds

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    Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmoura@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology of quality control of {sup 125}I seeds used for brachytherapy. The {sup 125}I seeds are millimeter titanium capsules widely used in permanent implants of prostate cancer, allowing a high dose within the tumour and a low dose on the surrounding tissues, with very low harm to the other tissues. Besides, with this procedure, the patients have a low impotence rate and a small incidence of urinary incontinence. To meet the medical standards, an efficient quality control is necessary, showing values with the minimum uncertainness possible, concerning the seeds dimensions and their respective activities. The medical needles are used to insert the seeds inside the prostate. The needles used in brachytherapy have an internal diameter of 1.0 mm, so it is necessary {sup 125}I seeds with an external maximum diameter of 0.85 mm. For the seeds and the spacer positioning on the planning sheet, the seeds must have a length between 4.5 and 5.0 mm. The activities must not vary more than 5% in each batch of {sup 125}I seeds. For this methodology, we used two ionization chamber detectors and one caliper. In this paper, the methodology using one control batch with 75 seeds manufactured by GE Health care Ltd is presented. (author)

  11. Assessment of I-125 seed implant accuracy when using the live-planning technique for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorrees Joshua

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low risk prostate cancers are commonly treated with low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy involving I-125 seeds. The implementation of a ‘live-planning’ technique at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH in 2007 enabled the completion of the whole procedure (i.e. scanning, planning and implant in one sitting. ‘Live-planning’ has the advantage of a more reliable delivery of the planned treatment compared to the ‘traditional pre-plan’ technique (where patient is scanned and planned in the weeks prior to implant. During live planning, the actual implanted needle positions are updated real-time on the treatment planning system and the dosimetry is automatically recalculated. The aim of this investigation was to assess the differences and clinical relevance between the planned dosimetry and the updated real-time implant dosimetry. Methods A number of 162 patients were included in this dosimetric study. A paired t-test was performed on the D90, V100, V150 and V200 target parameters and the differences between the planned and implanted dose distributions were analysed. Similarly, dosimetric differences for the organs at risk (OAR were also evaluated. Results Small differences between the primary dosimetric parameters for the target were found. Still, the incidence of hotspots was increased with approximately 20% for V200. Statistically significant increases were observed in the doses delivered to the OAR between the planned and implanted data; however, these increases were consistently below 3% thus probably without clinical consequences. Conclusions The current study assessed the accuracy of prostate implants with I-125 seeds when compared to initial plans. The results confirmed the precision of the implant technique which RAH has in place. Nevertheless, geographical misses, anatomical restrictions and needle displacements during implant can have repercussions for centres without live-planning option if dosimetric changes are not

  12. First symposium seed implant 125I and high rate of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The First symposium seed implant 125 I and high rate of prostate, was organized by the Marie Curie Foundation, between the 12 to april 2012, in the Cordoba city of Argentina. In this event were presented several documents in different topics: patients selection for impacts of 125 I seeds; high doses radiation in radiotherapy; brachytherapy for prostate cancer; prostate implant technique with 125 I seeds; implant dosimetric aspects; radioprotection of 125 I seeds.

  13. Efficacies of 125I seed implantation in advanced stage central lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianguo; An Liqing; Cheng Jinguang; Zhang Yufen; Guo Xiaokui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the temporal curative effect of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer. Methods: 125 I seed was implanted in 56 patients confirmed advanced stage central type lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope and all cases were fellow up in certain duration to explore their efficacies and the adverse reaction. Results: Total efficient rate was 76.78% in 56 patients. Lung reexpanded rate was 90.90%. Conclusion: The therapy of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer is safe and available. (authors)

  14. Combination of multi-disciplinary techniques with 125I seeds in treating malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xueming; Xu Jianhui; Lang Jianhua; Tian Xiurong; Dong Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effectiveness and safety of the combined multi-disciplinary techniques with 125 I seeds to treat the malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: 18 cases:of malignant obstructive jaundice were divided into 2 groups. A group with ERBD technique followed by CT-guided interstitial 125 I seeds implantation, B group with 125 I seeds implantation during the operation and gallbladder-intestine anastomosis later on. After 2 months amelioration (CR, PR,SD, PD) of the obstructive jaundice was observed with inspection of liver functions. Results: All cases were ameliorated with 44% patients in group A and 56% patients in group B, showing no significant statistical difference (P>0.05); and the liver functions were also relieved in both groups with no statistical significance (P>0.05). Conclusion: Multi-disciplinary techniques combined with 125 I seeds implantation is effective in the management of the malignant obstructive jaundice. No significant difference for relief and liver function were found between CT-guided and during operation interstitial 125 I seeds implantations, but it seems more quickly relief or recovery was achieved in the latter. (authors)

  15. Effect of 125I seeds and 103Pd stents on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Zhu Ruisen

    2004-01-01

    To establish the theoretical and practical base for implementing radioactive stents aft PTCA in order to prevent restenosis, in vitro observation was taken over the effects of 12 '5I-seeds and 103 Pd-implanted stents on the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. In vitro VSMC model from guinea-pig aortic arteries was established using adherent cell culture methods. The effects of 125 I-seeds and 103 Pd-implanted stents on the VSMC proliferation, with or without fetal bovine serum (FCS), were investigated through cell counting methods and 3 H-TDR implementation tests. It was shown that (1) 10% FCS significantly promoted the DNA synthesis of VSMC (P 125 I-seeds and 103 Pd-implanted stents inhibited the VSMC DNA synthesis in dose-dependent manner, regardless of 10% FCS inducement. At lower radioactive doses, neither 125 I-seeds (18.5-74 kBq) nor 103 Pd-implanted stents (1.48-2.96 MBq) exhibited distinctive effects on the VSMC DNA synthesis (P>0.05); and (3) 48 hour exposure from 125 I-seeds at 128 kBq or 10 '3Pd-implanted stents at 7.4 MBq did not result in VSMC morphological alteration, but 125 I-seeds at 370 kBq caused cells' morphological changes. Therefore both 125 I-seeds and 103 Pd-implanted stents inhibit the in vitro VSMC DNA synthesis, and the inhibition effects are significantly related to their exposure duration and doses. (authors)

  16. Ten cases of metastatic cervical cancer with the treatment of permanent 125I seeds interstitial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongwei; Li Naibin; Li Qingxin; Liu Huiping; Meng Hui; Chao Dong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of permanent 125 I seeds interstitial implants for metastatic cervical cancer. Methods: Under the guidance of the B-sonography, 125 I seeds were implanted into the eleven cervical lymph nodes of ten patients who had been given tumor resection. The pain relief and tumor size were observed in regular follow-up after one-month treatment. Results: All the patients were followed up for 6-14 months,and the postoperative recovery was good with no complication. One month after the implantation, the pain symptom was alleviated entirely in two nodes and partly in nine nodes. The tumor size shrank in ten nodes while there was no change in one node after one month. Conclusion: Permanent 125 I seeds interstitial implants for metastatic cervical cancer is a safe, minimally invasive and effective treatment. (authors)

  17. Clinical efficacy of CT-guided 125I seed implantation therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Lu Jian; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Zhang Liyun; Huang Gang; Chen Kemin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical efficacy of CT-guided radioactive 125 I seed implantation treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods: Forty patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study, including 25 males and 15 females with an median age of 69 years (38-89 years). Treatment planning system (TPS) was used to reconstruct 3-dimensional images of pancreatic tumor and to define the quantity and distribution of 125 I seeds. The radioactivity of 125 I seeds was 0.5 - 0.8 mCi / seed. The seeds were implanted into pancreatic tumor under CT guidance at intervals of 1 cm and were kept away from vessels, pancreatic duct and other adjacent important organs. The tumor matched peripheral dose (MPD) was 60-140 Gy. The median amount of implanted 125 I seeds was 36 (18-68) in number. CT scan was performed immediately after the procedure to check the quality of the seeds. In addition, 10 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with arterial infusion of gemcitabin and 5-fluororacil (5-Fu) for 3 to 4 therapeutic courses. Results: The median diameter of the tumors was 4.9 cm. The follow-up period was 2 to 28 months. After the treatment the refractory pain was significantly relieved (P 125 I seed implantation is a safe, effective and minimally-invasive brachytherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer with reliable short-term efficacy. It has an excellent anti-pain effect. The curative results can be further improved when chemotherapy is employed together. However, its long-term efficacy needs to be observed. (authors)

  18. Study on apoptosis of prostate cancer cell induced by 125I seed irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Anyan; Wang Junjie; Wang Jidong; Zhuang Hongqing; Zhao Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of apoptosis induced by 125 I seed irradiation on PC3 cells. Methods: Human prostate cancer cell line PC3 was treated by irradiation of 125 I (2.77 cGy/h) with various dose. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA and flows cytometry were used to detect the apoptosis of PC3 cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2. The activity of Caspase-3 was measured by Caspase Colorimetric Assay Kits. Results: Apoptosis of PC3 cells could be efficiently induced by 125 I seed irradiation. The apoptotic peaks were found by flow cytometry and DNA ladder appeared on 1.8% agarose gel. The activity of Caspase-3 on PC3 cells treated by 125 I seed irradiation was not changed significantly. Bcl-2 gene expression was down-regulated with the sample concentration increased. Conclusion: 125 I irradiation can induce the apoptosis of PC3 cells and the mechanism of apoptosis is related with down regulation of Bcl-2 gene expression and is not related with Caspase-3 activity. (authors)

  19. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D 90 of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD 2 ) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD 2 ) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  20. Investigation on curative efficacy for malignant tumor by implantation '125I permanent brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shu; Gao Zhou; Jia Shaowei; Cheng Xianyi; Chen Junhui; Yin Weihua; Sun Desheng

    2011-01-01

    Twenty inpatients suffered from malignant tumors with twenty-four lesions were treated with 125 I permanent brachytherapy seed in Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, and the feasibility, curative effect and adverse effect of the treatment were observed. Before 125 I seeds implantation, the three-dimensional treatment planning was preconcerted. There were two methods to implant 125 I seeds. One was to insert the seeds in the location of residual focus and metastatic lesions of the tumors directly in ordinary operations or through laparoscopy under general anesthesia. The other w as to implant the seeds into the tumors through percutaneous needles by the guidance of CT scanning or color doppler ultrasonography under local anesthesia. The implantations for all of the 20 patients (24 lesions) were performed successfully. During and one week after the implantation, the distributions of the planted seeds were approximately the same as the scheduled three-dimensional treatment planning, and no seed migration was found. Adverse reactions during and after the operation were slight and recovered after correlative treatments. Clinical symptoms were palliated and ser um tumor marker decreased to a different extent among most patients. The complete remission (CR) rate is 20.00% (4/20 patients ), the partial emission (PR) rate is 35.00% (7/20 patients), the stable disease (SD) rate is 30.00% (6/20 patients), the progressive disease (PD) rate is 15.00% (3/20 patients), and the overall response rate (CR + PR) is 53.33% (8 patients). 125 I seeds implantation for targeted therapy is convenient, safe and effective on malignant tumor, and is well worth advanced application. (authors)

  1. Dosimetric study of permanent prostate brachytherapy utilizing 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ruijie; Wang Junjie; Zhang Hongzhi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric differences of permanent prostate brachytherapy utilizing 131 Cs, 125 I and 103 Pd seeds. Methods: Twenty-five patients with T 1 -T 2 c prostate cancer who had previously implanted with 125 I seeds were randomly selected in our study. The patients were re-planned with 131 Cs, 125 I and 103 Pd seeds by using the Prowess Brachytherapy 3.1 planning system to the prescription doses of 115 Gy, 145 Gy and 125 Gy, respectively. The seed strengths were 1.8 U,0.5 U and 1.8 U, respectively. The prostate, prostatic urethra and anterior wall of the rectum were contoured on trans-rectal ultrasound images. PTV was outlined based on the prostate volume with no margin applied. The attempted planning goals were that V 100 (the percentage volume of the prostate receiving at least 100% of the prescription doses)= 95%, D 90 (the minimum percentage dose covering 90% of the prostate volume) ≥100%, and prostatic urethra UD 10 (the maximum percentage dose receiving by 10% of the contoured urethra) ≤150%. For the plan comparison, we also computed prostate V 150 , prostatic urethra UV 120 , rectum RV 100 , and the number of implanted seeds and needles. The significance of the differences was tested using one way analysis of variance. Results: The average V 200 in the 103 Pd, 125 I and 131 Cs plans were 28.7%, 20.9% and 19.6% (F=42.50, P=0.000); the average V 150 were 51.9%, 42.1% and 39.4% (F=26.15, P=0.000); the average UV 120 were 26.9%, 29.5% and 23.8% (F=0.37, P=0.691); and the average rectum RV 100 were 0.31 cm 3 , 0.22 cm 3 and 0.19 cm 3 (F=0.43, P=0.652). For 103 Pd, 125 I and 131 Cs, the average number of implanted seeds per cm 3 prostate were 2.02, 2.01 and 1.87 (F=1.92, P=0.154), and the average number of needles were 33.6, 32.9 and 31.6 (F=0.26,P=0.772). Conclusions: Comparing to 125 I and 103 Pd seeds used in permanent prostate brachytherapy, 131 Cs seeds has better dose homogeneity, and possible better sparing of the urethra and rectum

  2. SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, S; Merino, T; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Safigholi, H; Soliman, A [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expanded contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.

  3. SU-F-J-157: Effect of Contouring Uncertainty in Post Implant Dosimetry of Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Permanent Seed Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, S; Merino, T; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W; Safigholi, H; Soliman, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expanded contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.

  4. Dosimetry and treatment planning of Occu-Prosta 125I seeds for intraocular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Suresh; Deshpande, Sudesh; Anand, Vivek; De, Sandeep; Kannan, V.; Saxena, Sanjay; Dash, A.; Basu, Mahua; Samant, Preetam

    2008-01-01

    Intraocular malignant lesions are frequently encountered in clinical practice. Plaque brachytherapy represents an effective means of treatment for intraocular lesions. Recently Radiopharmaceutical Division, BARC, Mumbai, has indigenously fabricated reasonable-cost 125 I sources. Here we are presenting the preliminary experience of dosimetry of sources, configuration of treatment planning system (TPS) and quality assurance (QA) for eye plaque therapy with Occu-Prosta 125 I seeds, treated in our hospital, for a patient with ocular lesions. 125 I seeds were calibrated using well-type chamber. BrachyVision TPS was configured with Monte Carlo computed radial dose functions and anisotropy functions for 125 I sources. Dose calculated by TPS at different points in central axis and off axis was compared with manually calculated dose. Eye plaque was fabricated of 17 karat pure gold, locally. The seeds were arranged in an outer ring near the edge of the plaque and in concentric rings throughout the plaque. The sources were manually digitized on the TPS, and dose distribution was calculated in three dimensions. Measured activity using cross-calibrated well-type chamber was within ± 10% of the activity specified by the supplier. Difference in TPS-calculated dose and manually calculated dose was within 5%. Treatment time calculated by TPS was in concordance with published data for similar plaque arrangement. (author)

  5. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie, E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D{sub 90} of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD{sub 2}) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD{sub 2}) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  6. Incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125I seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Akitomo; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nakashima, Jun; Kunieda, Etsuo; Nagata, Hirohiko; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kouta, Ryuichi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to determine the incidence of seed migration not only to the chest, but also to the abdomen and pelvis after transperineal interstitial prostate brachytherapy with loose 125 I seeds. We reviewed the records of 267 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with loose 125 I seeds. After seed implantation, orthogonal chest radiographs, an abdominal radiograph, and a pelvic radiograph were undertaken routinely to document the occurrence and sites of seed migration. The incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was calculated. All patients who had seed migration to the abdomen and pelvis subsequently underwent a computed tomography scan to identify the exact location of the migrated seeds. Postimplant dosimetric analysis was undertaken, and dosimetric results were compared between patients with and without seed migration. A total of 19,236 seeds were implanted in 267 patients. Overall, 91 of 19,236 (0.47%) seeds migrated in 66 of 267 (24.7%) patients. Sixty-nine (0.36%) seeds migrated to the chest in 54 (20.2%) patients. Seven (0.036%) seeds migrated to the abdomen in six (2.2%) patients. Fifteen (0.078%) seeds migrated to the pelvis in 15 (5.6%) patients. Seed migration occurred predominantly within two weeks after seed implantation. None of the 66 patients had symptoms related to the migrated seeds. Postimplant prostate D90 was not significantly different between patients with and without seed migration. We showed the incidence of seed migration to the chest, abdomen and pelvis. Seed migration did not have a significant effect on postimplant prostate D90

  7. Effects of gold and silver backings on the dose rate around an 125I seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygler, J.; Szanto, J.; Soubra, M.; Rogers, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the effect of either gold or silver backing on the dose rate around an 125I seed were performed using a Therados RFA7 dosimetry system and a small diode detector which was 2.5 mm in diameter and 0.06 mm thick. It was found that the presence of the gold or silver backing modifies the diode response on the side of the 125I seed away from the backing. The effect depends on the backing material and the distance from the seed. There is a small increase close to the gold backing but a decrease further away. This decrease at distances greater than 10 mm from the seed is uniformly 10%, the same as found when the seed is backed by air. There is an increase of up to 25% observed with silver backing the seed and this increase remains significant more than 30 mm from the seed. When the response increases, the results are hard to interpret quantitatively because of variations in the diode response per unit dose with photon energy and extreme sensitivity to geometric changes. Nonetheless, except for the increase at close distances with the gold, the results are in agreement with EGS4 Monte Carlo photon transport simulations which are for a simplified geometry and account for x-ray fluorescence from the K-shell. Furthermore, the increase in the gold-backed case is qualitatively explained by Williamson's Monte Carlo calculations which take into account the L-shell fluorescent x-rays from gold

  8. Influence of 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy on recovery of facial nerve function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Tieli; Zheng Lei; Zhang Jie; Cai Zhigang; Yang Zhaohui; Yu Guangyan; Zhang Jianguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of 125 I seed interstitial brachytherapy in parotid region on the recovery of facial nerve function. Methods: A total of the data of 21 patients with primary parotid carcinoma were treated with resection and 125 I interstitial brachytherapy. All the patients had no facial palsy before operation and the prescribed dose was 60 Gy. During 4 years of follow-up, the House-Brackmann grading scales and ENoG were used to evaluate the function of facial nerve. According to the modified regional House-Brackmann grading scales, the facial nerve branches of patients in affected side were divided into normal and abnormal groups, and were compared with those in contra-lateral side. Results: Post-operation facial palsy occurred in all the patients, but the facial palsy recovered within 6 months. The latency time differences between affected side and contralateral side were statistically significant in abnormal group from 1 week to 6 months after treatment (t=2.362, P=0.028), and were also different in normal group 1 week after treatment (t=2.522, P=0.027). Conclusions: 125 I interstitital brachytherapy has no influence on recovery of facial nerve function after tumor resection and no delayed facial nerve damage. (authors)

  9. Development of procedure using plasma welding process to produce 125I seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, Anselmo

    2006-01-01

    The prostate cancer, which is the second cause of death by cancer in men, overcome only by lung cancer, is a problem of public health in Brazil. Brachytherapy is among the possible available treatments for prostate cancer, in which small seeds containing 125 I radioisotope are implanted in the prostate. The seed consists of a titanium sealed capsule with 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, containing a central silver wire with adsorbed 125 I. The plasma arc welding is one of the viable techniques for the sealing process. The equipment used in this technique is less costly than in other processes. The main objective of this work was the development and the validation of the welding procedure using plasma welding process and the elaboration of a sealing routine according to Good Manufacturing Practices. The development of this work has presented the following phases: cut and cleaning of the titanium material, determination of the welding parameters, development of a device for holding the titanium tube during the welding process, validation of sealed sources according to ISO 2919 Sealed Radioactive Sources - General Requirements and Classification, leakage test according to ISO 9978 Sealed Radioactive Sources - Leakage Test Methods and metallographic assays. The developed procedure, to seal 125 I seeds using plasma welding process, has shown to be efficient, satisfying all the established requirements of ISO 2919. The results obtained in this work have given the possibility to establish a routine production process according to the orientations presented in resolution RDC number 59 - Good Manufacturing Practices do Medical Products of the ANVISA - Brazilian Nacional Agency of Sanitary Surveillance. (author)

  10. CT-guided interstitial 125I seed implantation for intractable pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhenwen; Chu Hong; Kong Jian; Dou Yongchong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of CT-guided interstitial 125 I seed implantation in treating intractable pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinomas. Methods: During the period from April 2010 to September 2010 CT-guided interstitial 125 I seed implantation was carried out in 11 patients with pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma which developed after the patients had received comprehensive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical symptoms, the tumor size and the quality of life (QOL) before the treatment and at two and six months after the treatment were recorded, and the complications were observed. The results were compared. All the patients were followed up for six months. Results: At two and six months after the treatment, the improvement rate of the clinical symptoms was 100.0% (11/11) and 90.9% (10/11) respectively, while the effective reduction of the tumor size was 90.9% (10/11) and 81.8% (9/11) respectively. At two and six months after the treatment the QOL score was (56.0±3.66) and (54.4±5.41) respectively, both of which were higher than the QOL score determined before the treatment (42.5±6.93), the difference between them was statistically significant (P 125 I seed implantation has satisfactory short-term effect. This treatment is also quite safe and effective for patients who are unbearable to external radiation therapy due to the tissue dose restriction. (authors)

  11. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=V p (1+M exp(-0.693T/T e )) where V p is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and T e is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical S k Δg(r) φ-bar an /r 2 , where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r 0.4 and 1/r 0.8 for 125 I and 103 Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days

  12. The clinical application of TACE together with RFA and 125I seed implantation in treating hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoxi; Lu Yinxiang; Zhang Hongxin; Zhang Shengchu; Zhou Jianwei; Zhang Guodong; Wang Xiaowei; Yang Liping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to assess the clinical value of the combined treatment of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and radioactive 125 I seed implantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: During the period from March 2008 to Dec. 2010, 15 patients with HCC were admitted to the hospital. A total of 25 hepatic lesions were detected with the size of 1-8 cm. TACE was carried out first, which was followed by CT-guided RFA and radioactive 125 I seed implantation. With the help of treat plan system (TPS), the radioactive 125 I seed implantation was conducted to make additional management for the same lesion when RFA was finished, or the radioactive 125 I seeds were directly implanted into the areas where RFA could not reach. The radioactive dose was 60-100 Gy. All the patients were followed up and were kept under observation for the signs of related complications. The therapeutic results were evaluated. Results: The combined treatment was successfully accomplished in all patients. All patients were followed up for 3-28 months (mean of 10.6 months). The complete necrosis rate of the tumor was 96%. No serious complications occurred except the immigration of 125 I seeds in 1 case. Conclusion: The combined treatment of TACE and CT-guided RFA together with 125 I seed implantation is a safe, reliable and effective therapy for HCC with excellent short-term result. (authors)

  13. Self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds: Feasibility and safety in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Jinhe [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Teng Gaojun [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com; Zhu Guangyu [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); He Shicheng [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Deng Gang [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); He Jie [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2007-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate technical feasibility and acute and subacute radiotolerance of a self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds in the rabbit esophagus. Methods: A self-expandable stent designed for esophageal application was made of 0.16 mm nitinol wire and loaded with {sup 125}I seeds (CIAE-6711). Twenty-seven stents with three different radioactive dosages (n = 9 in each dosage group) were implanted in the esophagus of healthy rabbits, while nine stents alone were used as controls. The stents were perorally deployed into the esophagus under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiological follow-up included plain chest film, CT scan, and barium esophagography which were undertaken in all rabbits of each group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, which were correlated to histopathological findings. The stented esophageal segments along with their adjacent tissues were harvested for histopathological examinations. Results: The stent was successfully deployed into the targeted esophageal segment in all rabbits. Neither {sup 125}I seeds dislodged from the stent during the deployment, nor they did during the follow-up period. The greatest (16.2 Gy) absorbed dose was found in the tissue 10 mm from {sup 125}I seeds at 8 weeks. Slight epithelial hyperplasia on the stent surface and submucosal inflammatory process developed at 2 weeks, which reached the peak at 8 weeks after the procedure. Significant thickness of the esophageal muscular layer was found at 8 weeks only in the groups with {sup 125}I seeds. On radiologic follow-up, moderate strictures on both ends of the stents developed at 4 weeks and became severe at 8 weeks after the procedure in all groups. Conclusion: Deployment of a self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds is technically feasible and safe within the first 8 weeks. Acute and subacute radiotolerance of the treated esophagus and its adjacent tissues by {sup 125}I seeds is well preserved in a healthy rabbit model.

  14. Radiation safety and protection of close contacts from radiators after implantation of radioactive 125I seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Aixia; Li Jianmin; Tang Fulong; Zhang Hongtao; Ren Ju'na; Pang Linbin; Xia Haishui; Gao Zhen; Wu Lili; Wang Juan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the effective dose and precaution time of the irradiation of the close contact from the radiators who underwent implantation of radioactive 125 I seeds so as to guide scientifically people how to avoid radiation damage. Methods: Twenty patients with different types of cancer underwent implantation of radioactive 125 I seeds with the median value of implantation depth of 2.16 cm. Within 24 h after the operations the dose rates 30 cm and 100 cm from the skin were measured with pocket-size radiometer so as to imitate the situations of the close contacts. The effective doses and precaution times of different persons were calculated according to relevant formula. Results: The dose rate a person received at the same time points (1, 54, 78, and 109 d, respectively) decreased along with the increase of the distance from the skin (t=5.962, 5.961, 5.961, 5.962, P<0.05), and the dose rate a person received at the same distance from the skin decreased along with the extension of time (30 cm: t=6.236, 6.236, 6.235, P<0.05; 100 cm: t=7.310, 7.315, 7.314, P<0.05). At different time points, the dose rates at 30 cm distance point were all significant higher than those at the 100 cm point (P <0.05). The adult living together, minors and pregnant women sharing the room, colleagues,adults who slept together with the patients began to reach the 50% dose constraint values 0, 54, 78 and 109 days after the operation. Conclusions: After their precaution time, it's safe to contact with the patients for the groups; otherwise, it's necessary to take some protect works within the precaution time. (authors)

  15. Clinical analysis of 125I seed implants in worst-casts of the malignant tumors after radiography and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhijun; Tu Xinhua; Zhou Aiqing; Wang Xueqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the curative effect and side reaction after 125 I seed implanted among tissue were treated the malignant neoplasm by radiography and chemotherapy. Methods: Retrospective analysis the cancerous sufferer after the failure of radiography and chemotherapy, percutaneous puncture or intraoperative under gaze forward 125 I seed were implanted the bed of the tumour forever. Follow-up blood routine examination, symptom, sign, using USG or CT observe the change of the tumour and the distribution of the particles etc. Results: In 3 cases, treat 2 cases, tumour reduced obviously, symptoms improved obviously, the face of the ulcer cured, the particles did not shift, hemogram did not decline obviously. Conclusion: 125 I seed among the tissue implanted forever for the unsuccessful case after radiography and chemotherapy supply a new therapeutic methods. In the neat future curative effect is exactly, toxic reaction is small, which can remedy the deficiency of the treatment for radiography and chemotherapy. (authors)

  16. Nursing care for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer after CT-guided 125I seed implantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Li; Wei Fan; Ren Caifeng; Tu Mingmei; Qian Guixiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer who has been treated with CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with local recurrent rectal cancer received a series of nursing interventions, including comfort care and pain care. The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: The therapy was smoothly accomplished in all patients. The pain was remarkably relived and the anxiety was alleviated. No displacement of implanted 125 I seed occurred. Conclusion: For patients with local recurrent rectal cancer occurred after CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy, careful nursing can effectively relieve the pain and anxiety feeling,and the living quality can also be markedly improved. (authors)

  17. Dosimetric studies, spectrometric, radiographic, metallographic of a new argentinean seed of 125 I used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, R.; Saravi, M.; Banchik, D.; Munoz, C.

    2006-01-01

    A new source of 125 I model Braquibac TM has been developed in Argentina for applications in interstitial brachytherapy. The AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) recommends that dosimetric characteristics of new sources of brachytherapy of Iodine-125 have been theoretically and experimentally determined before its clinical use. The objectives outlined in this work were the study of the design of the new seed, the calculation of dosimetric parameters and the photons spectra analysis. Its were carried out radiographic and metallographic studies to determine the physical characteristics of the source. For the realization of the dosimetric calculations it was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Values of the radial dose function, g(r), of the constant of dose rate, Λ, of the function of anisotropy of two dimensions, F(r, θ), of the factor and constant of anisotropy its were obtained simulating the source in water according to the recommended methodology in TG-43. The constant of dose rate is similar to 0,880 ± 0,080 c Gy h -1 U -1 . The kerma in air rate of reference, S K , was calculated as 1,036 c Gy cm 2 h -1 mCi -1 simulating the seed in dry air. Its were carried out spectrometric studies using a semiconductor planar detector of HPGe (high purity germanium). Photons spectra showed characteristic x-rays of 125 I with energies of 27,20 keV, 27,47 keV, 31 keV and 31,70 keV gamma photons of 35,5 keV, and x-ray fluorescent coming from the silver nucleus of 22,10 keV, 24,94 keV and 25,45 keV. The angular dependence of the intensity of photons around the seed and in air it was analyzed with the planar detector. This was carried out to study the anisotropy in the photons flow due to variation in the thickness of the titanium wall and of the welding, movements of the silver tube inside the source and deposition of the radioactive material on the silver tube. (Author)

  18. Self-expandable medical memorial metallic stent with 125I seeds for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuo; Lu Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the curative effect and safety of the implantation of self-expandable medical memorial metallic stent with 125 I seeds for the treatment of advanced esophageal carcinomas. Methods: Implantation of self-expandable medical memorial metallic stent with 125 I seeds was performed in 32 patients with advanced esophageal canner. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The technical success rate, the operation time, the immediate and mid-term effectiveness, the survival time, the complications, the body weight, the blood picture, the immune indexes, the average hospitalization days and hospitalization expenses were analyzed. Results: The average operation time was (18±5) minutes. Successful stent implantation was achieved in all 32 patients (100%). No 125 I seeds fell off during the procedure. The remission rate of dysphagia was 100%. Esophageal restenosis occurred in four patients, and displacement of the stent was seed in one patient. One month after the treatment, 90% of patients had a Karnofsky performance score over 60. The mean survival time was (8.7±6.6) months. The average hospitalization time was (7.8±3.7) days and the mean hospitalization cost was (12±3) thousand Chinese Yuan. Conclusion: For the treatment of esophageal carcinomas, the implantation of self-expandable medical memorial metallic stent with 125 I seeds is safe, effective and simple. This treatment can markedly improve the symptom of dysphagia and significantly prolong the patient's survival time. (authors)

  19. Histology study on the dorsal root ganglia of rats with 125I seed brachytherapy at intervertebral foramen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenyi; Wang Huixing; Ding Yanqiu; Qu Ximei; Wang Liqin; Liu Zhongchao; Cui Songye; Jiao Ling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of the histological changes on rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after 125 I seed brachytherapy.Methods Twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (150-180 g each) were randomly divided into 6 groups, 125 I seeds with different activities of 0 (Titanium shell), 14.8, 18.5, 22.2, 25.9 and 29.6 MBq were implanted to 6 groups of rats respectively and the behavioral changes of rats were observed. The rats were killed in different periods after implantation,the morphological changes in DRG and surrounding muscle tissue were observed with an Olympus BX51 optical microscope and then the irradiation doses were estimated. Results: After 125 I seed implantation, the movement function of rats was not affected and the weight of rats gained after 7 days. After the titanium shell implantation, very few mild swelling was induced in neuroganglion cells that still had clear nucleolus and normal cytoplasm. At 14 days after 18.5 MBq seed implantation, cell swelling was more serious and cell dehydrating, nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation appeared after 30 days. At 60 days after 29.6 MBq of seed implantation, nuclear dissolution and cytoplasmic shrinkage were induced in a large number of cells.In general, the severity of fibrosis was aggravated with the time post-irradiation and the dose in the muscles around the ganglion. Conclusions: After 125 I seed implantation,the injury degree of DRG tissue is dose-dependent, and the 125 I seed irradiation would have analgesic effect on releasing intractable pain. (authors)

  20. A proteomics analysis for certain signature proteins of rabbit lacrimal passages after 125I seeds brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dandan; Liu Lin; Gao Shi; Qi Liangchen; Ma Qingjie; Jin Longyun

    2010-01-01

    To search for certain signature proteins and the expression profiles in lacrimal passage stenosis, rabbit models of lacrimal passage stenosis were treated by 125 I seed brachytherapy. All the signature proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and identified by mass spectrometry. The results show that the up-regulated proteins are peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIase A), and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP), while the down-regulated proteins are myosin light chain 1 (isomer of skeletal muscle), myosin light polypeptide 6 (isomer 1 of smooth muscle and non-muscle), myosin light chain 1 (isomer of slow-twitch muscle A), isomer 2 of ERC protein 2, and α-crystalline family protein. The proteins may play a role in healing the wound and regulating synaptic active zone of neurons due to correlation to cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cell. These provide molecular mechanism for preventing stenosis and restenosis of lacrimal passage. (authors)

  1. Radiation protective nursing intervene of 125I seed implantation in non-small cell lung carcinoma guided by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Li; Zhang Zuncheng; Yu Zhaochen; Zheng Guangjun; Tian Meirong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To research radiation protective nursing intervene and important notice of 125 I seeds minimally invasive implantation in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) by CT. Methods: Under the system of therapy planning system (TPS) and posologic validation, 125 I seeds were implanted in 89 cases of NSCLC patients. The consistent radiation protective nursing intervene was used in perioperative period management. The operative successful rate, therapeutic effect and complication rate, therapeutic effect and complication rate was observed. Results: The scientific radiation protective nursing intervene can ensure that the radioactive dose distribution of 125 I seed implantation brachytherapy is consistent with the principles of effective and minimally invasive. The operative successful rate was 100%. The local control rate and 1 year survival rate respectively was 97.4% and 92.2%. But the early and later incidence rate of radioactive damaging effect was 14.6% and 1.1% respectively. Leakage of radioactive contamination has not occurred. Conclusion: The consistent TPS and posologic validation 125 I seeds implantation integrated scientific radiation protective nursing intervene. It is very important to improve the therapeutic effect of NSCLC and reduce the incidence of complications. (authors)

  2. Effect of improved TLD dosimetry on the determination of dose rate constants for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately account for the relative intrinsic energy dependence and relative absorbed-dose energy dependence of TLDs when used to measure dose rate constants (DRCs) for 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds, to thereby establish revised “measured values” for all seeds and compare the revised values with Monte Carlo and consensus values. Methods: The relative absorbed-dose energy dependence, f rel , for TLDs and the phantom correction, P phant , are calculated for 125 I and 103 Pd seeds using the EGSnrc BrachyDose and DOSXYZnrc codes. The original energy dependence and phantom corrections applied to DRC measurements are replaced by calculated (f rel ) −1 and P phant values for 24 different seed models. By comparing the modified measured DRCs to the MC values, an appropriate relative intrinsic energy dependence, k bq rel , is determined. The new P phant values and relative absorbed-dose sensitivities, S AD rel , calculated as the product of (f rel ) −1 and (k bq rel ) −1 , are used to individually revise the measured DRCs for comparison with Monte Carlo calculated values and TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1 consensus values. Results: In general, f rel is sensitive to the energy spectra and models of the brachytherapy seeds. Values may vary up to 8.4% among 125 I and 103 Pd seed models and common TLD shapes. P phant values depend primarily on the isotope used. Deduced (k bq rel ) −1 values are 1.074 ± 0.015 and 1.084 ± 0.026 for 125 I and 103 Pd seeds, respectively. For (1 mm) 3 chips, this implies an overall absorbed-dose sensitivity relative to 60 Co or 6 MV calibrations of 1.51 ± 1% and 1.47 ± 2% for 125 I and 103 Pd seeds, respectively, as opposed to the widely used value of 1.41. Values of P phant calculated here have much lower statistical uncertainties than literature values, but systematic uncertainties from density and composition uncertainties are significant. Using these revised values with the literature’s DRC measurements, the

  3. Development of measurement method using TLD for workers occupation personally exposed to 125I seed source in the implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Suming; He Zhijian; Yuan Jilong; Yue Baorong; Wei Kedao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method for measuring and calculating both absorbed dose and effective dose received in organ and tissues of occupational workers by using TLDs for the implantation of 125 I seed sources. Methods The experiments with 60 Co γ-rays were carried out for the stability. A group of TLD chips was exposed to 125 I seed sources to establish standard dose curve for air kerma. During the 125 I seed implantation, the TLD chips were pasted to 13 locations like thyroid inside and outside the lead aprons worn by occupational workers to measure average absorbed dose and calculate the absorbed doses and effective to organs and tissues. Results: For 3 cases of prostate cancers with implantation of 125 I seeds, the worker's organs and tissues received the absorbed dose 0.02 -3.80 μ Gy and effective dose 0.06- 1.81 μSv outside lead aprons and the highest absorbed dose 2.35 μ Gy and effective 0.02 μSv inside lead aprons, respectively, with more than 65.9% of rays shielded. For 3 cases of brain cancers with implantation of 125 I seeds, the workers received the absorbed dose 0.23 - 11.31 μGy and effective dose 0.88-4.07 μSv outside lead aprons and the highest absorbed dose 2.22 μ Gy and effective dose 0.09 μSv inside lead aprons, respectively, with more than 54.5% of rays shielded. For 3 cases of lung cancers with implantation of 125 I seeds, the workers received the absorbed dose 0.03 - 14.78 μGy and effective dose 0.35 -7.59 μSv outside lead aprons and the highest absorbed dose 4.09 μGy and effective 0.22 μSv inside lead aprons, respectively, with more than 58.4% of rays shielded. For 2 cases of mediastinum cancers with implantation of 125 Iseeds, the workers received the absorbed dose 0.06 - 74.91 μGy and effective dose 0.83-17.96 μSv outside lead aprons and the highest absorbed dose 10.29 μGy and effective 0.5 μSv inside lead aprons, respectively, with more than 85% of rays shielded. For one case of ovary cancer with implantation of 125

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Stephen M.

    The low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds employed in permanent radioactive-source implant treatments usually use one of two radionuclides, 125I or 103Pd. The theoretically expected source spectroscopic output from these sources can be obtained via Monte Carlo calculation based upon seed dimensions and materials as well as the bare-source photon emissions for that specific radionuclide. However the discrepancies resulting from inconsistent manufacturing of sources in comparison to each other within model groups and simplified Monte Carlo calculational geometries ultimately result in undesirably large uncertainties in the Monte Carlo calculated values. This dissertation describes experimentally attained spectroscopic outputs of the clinically used brachytherapy sources in air and in liquid water. Such knowledge can then be applied to characterize these sources by a more fundamental and metro logically-pure classification, that of energy-based dosimetry. The spectroscopic results contained within this dissertation can be utilized in the verification and benchmarking of Monte Carlo calculational models of these brachytherapy sources. This body of work was undertaken to establish a usable spectroscopy system and analysis methods for the meaningful study of LDR brachytherapy seeds. The development of a correction algorithm and the analysis of the resultant spectroscopic measurements are presented. The characterization of the spectrometer and the subsequent deconvolution of the measured spectrum to obtain the true spectrum free of any perturbations caused by the spectrometer itself is an important contribution of this work. The approach of spectroscopic deconvolution that was applied in this work is derived in detail and it is applied to the physical measurements. In addition, the spectroscopically based analogs to the LDR dosimetry parameters that are currently employed are detailed, as well as the development of the theory and measurement methods to arrive at these

  5. Electroless Sliver-Plating Process in the Preparation of 103Pd-125I Hybrid Brachytherapy Seed Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhong-yong1,2;CHEN Bin-da1;Lv Xiao-zhou1;LU Jin-hui1;CUI Hai-ping1,2

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroless 103Pd plating and electroless Ag plating and chemical 125I depositing were took place on the surface of carbon rods in turn, which was a reliable method for the preparation of 103Pd-125I hybrid brachytherapy seed cores. 103Pd and 125I were deposited on the same substrate effectively through silver coating as a bridge. The process of electroless Ag plating was a novel and important step in the preparation of 103Pd-125I hybrid seed. In this work, the process of electroless Ag plating was studied using 0.5×3.0 mm carbon rods with palladium coating as substrate, silver-ammino complex as precursor, 110mAg as radioactive tracer, and hydrazine as reductant. The optimum conditions were AgNO3 2g/L,Na2EDTA 40 g/L,NH3•H2O 16.25%,H4N2•H2O 5‰,pH=10,t=60 min,and T=35 ℃. Sliver deposited on each carbon rod was uniform, and sliver-coating was white and smooth.

  6. Three-dimensional verification of 125I seed stability after permanent implantation in the parotid gland and periparotid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate seed stability after permanent implantation in the parotid gland and periparotid region via a three-dimensional reconstruction of CT data. Fifteen patients treated from June 2008 to June 2012 at Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology for parotid gland tumors with postoperative adjunctive 125 I interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Serial CT data were obtained during follow-up. Mimics and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and stability analysis, respectively. Seed loss and/or migration outside of the treated area were absent in all patients during follow-up (23–71 months). Total seed cluster volume was maximized on day 1 post-implantation due to edema and decreased significantly by an average of 13.5 % (SD = 9.80 %; 95 % CI, 6.82–17.68 %) during the first two months and an average of 4.5 % (SD = 3.60 %; 95 % CI, 2.29–6.29 %) during the next four months. Volume stabilized over the subsequent six months. 125 I seed number and location were stable with a general volumetric shrinkage tendency in the parotid gland and periparotid region. Three-dimensional seed reconstruction of CT images is feasible for visualization and verification of implanted seeds in parotid brachytherapy

  7. {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy for the treatment of parotid gland cancers in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Song, T.; Zhang, J.; Yu, G.; Zhang, Y. [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2013-05-15

    Background and purpose: There is a lack of optimal treatment strategies for managing salivary gland cancers in children and adolescents. This study is aimed at assessing the effect of {sup 125}I seed implantation for the treatment of parotid cancers in children and adolescents. Patients and methods: A total of 12 patients younger than 16 years with parotid gland malignant tumors underwent {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy between October 2003 and November 2008. All patients were assessed after treatment and at the local tumor control appointments. Facial nerve function, maxillofacial development, and radioactive side-effects were assessed. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 41-104 months. One patient with T4b died of pulmonary metastasis. The other patients were alive during the follow-up period. There were no serious radiation-related complications. The treatment did not affect facial nerve function and dentofacial growth in any of the children. Conclusion: For parotid gland cancers in children, {sup 125}I seed implant brachytherapy may be an acceptable treatment without serious complications and with satisfactory short-term effects. (orig.)

  8. The effect of interstitial 125I seeds implantation on intestinal wall: a pathological observation in experimental dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Houfa; Zhang Fenglian; Shen An; Cao Guiwen; Cui Xinjiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the radiation injury of the bowel wall due to the implantation of interstitial 125 I seeds in experimental dogs. Methods: A total of 12 healthy male dogs were randomly and equally divided into 3 experimental groups and 1 control group, with 3 dogs in each group.In the experimental groups, two 125 I seeds with the active radiation dose of 0.8mCi were symmetrically implanted under the serous membrane of the dog's small intestinal wall. The dogs were fed for 14 days (group A), for one month (group B) and for two months (group C) respectively when the animals were scheduled to be sacrificed. The dogs' general condition was observed till they were sacrificed. The seed-implanting intestinal segments were then removed and dyed with HE staining method for electronic microscopic exam. The histopathologic findings were recorded and the results were compared between four groups. Results: No obvious histopathological changes were found in the dog's bowel wall 14 days after the implantation. One month after the procedure cellular injury was observed under electronic microscope, and two months after the operation partial fibrosis of the intestinal wall appeared but no ulceration or perforation occurred. Conclusion: The implantation of 125 I seeds can cause reversible cellular injuries of the intestinal wall in experimental dogs, the degree of the damage reaches its peak at one month after the implant when the partial fibrosis of bowel wall becomes evident. However, the seeds do not cause any serious complications, such as ulceration or perforation. (authors)

  9. CT-guided radioactive 125I-seed implantation for the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma: a clinical observation of 19 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jian; Zheng Yunfeng; Zhang Huan; Wang Zhongmin; Chen Kemin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of serum tumor markers after CT-guided radioactive 125 I-seed implantation treatment in patients with pancreatic carcinoma and to assess the therapeutic effectiveness of 125 I-seed implantation. Methods: CT-guided radioactive 125 I-seed implantation was performed in 19 patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer. Treatment planning system was used to reconstruct 3-dimentional images of the tumor, and the quantity and distribution of 125 I-seeds to be implanted were thus determined. Under CT guidance 125 I-seeds were embedded into pancreatic cancer. Before and after the 125 I-seed implantation the levels of serum tumor markers, including CEA, CA19-9 and CA50, were determined by using radioimmunoassay method. The clinical effects were observed and the therapeutic results were statistically analyzed. Results: The pain stared to be relieved 2 to 5 days after implantation. The total effective rate (CR + PR) at one and three months after treatment was 68.42% (13 /19) and 63.16% (12 /19) respectively. One month after 125 I-seed implantation, the levels of serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA50 were significantly different to that determined before implantation in all cases (P 125 I-seed implantation is a safe and effective interventional treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer with reliable short-term result and remarkable pain-relieving effect. Moreover, this therapy can significantly lower the levels of many serum tumor markers, which play some suggestive roles in evaluating the clinical curativeness. (authors)

  10. Dosimetry study of three-dimensional print template-guided precision 125I seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The postplan and preplan dose parameters of 3D print template-guided seed implantation were nearly consistent. The dose parameters of template group superior to the traditional group. The seeds can be implanted accurately with 3D print template.

  11. Effect of Foley catheters on seed positions and urethral dose in 125I and 103Pd prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezovich, Ivan A.; Pareek, Prem N.; Duan, Jun; Fiveash, John

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the perturbation of seed position and urethral dose, subsequent to withdrawal of urethral catheters. Methods and Materials: A mathematical model based on the volume incompressibility of tissues was used to compute seed positions and doses following removal of the Foley. The model assumed that the central axis of the urethra remains stationary, and that prostate tissue and seeds move radially toward the center of the urethra to fill the void left by the catheter. Seed motion has also been measured using transrectal ultrasound. Results: Based on the computations, seeds located originally close to the urethra travel relatively large distances toward the urethra upon Foley removal, whereas seeds located further away move substantially less. This seed motion leads to higher urethral doses than shown in a standard treatment plan. Dose enhancements increase with catheter size, decrease with increasing prostate volume, are more pronounced for 103 Pd than for 125 I, and range between 3.5% and 32.4%. Postimplant dosimetry is equally affected if images are taken with urethral catheters in place, showing lower urethral doses than actually delivered. Preliminary ultrasound based measurements of seed motion agree with the theory. Conclusion: During the implantation procedure, 12 fr or smaller urethral catheters are preferable to larger diameter catheters if urine drainage is sufficient. Treatment planners should avoid planning seeds at 5 mm or closer from the urethra. Special caution is indicated in prostates having about 20 cm 3 or smaller volumes, and when 103 Pd is used. Postimplant dosimetry is susceptible to the same errors

  12. Optimum timing for image-based dose evaluation of 125I and 103Pd prostate seed implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Peschel, Richard; Dicker, Adam P.; Waterman, Frank M.; Nath, Ravinder

    1999-01-01

    timing for conventional postimplant dose evaluation was identified as the time at which a minimum difference between the conventional DVH and the dynamic model DVH was achieved. The analysis was done on 29 prostate seed implant patients for both 125 I and 103 Pd. The edema magnitude was assumed to be 30%, 40%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of original prostate volume, and the half-life of edema was assumed to be 4, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 25 days. In this study, the original volume of prostate varied from 17 cm 3 to 91 cm 3 , and number of seeds in the implants varied from 57 to 119. Results: The optimum timing was mainly dependent on the half-lives of edema and radionuclides, and varied slightly with edema magnitude, prostate volume, and number of seeds. It can be expressed as a function of edema half-life in the form of C 0 + C 1 exp(-C 2 T e ). However, if the dose evaluation was performed based on the image scans taken too early or too late, the error became larger, as the edema magnitude was larger. By averaging all 29 patients and various edemas, it was found that for 125 I seed implants, if the postimplant dose evaluation is performed based on image scans taken between 5 and 9 weeks, the average error will be less than 5%, with a maximum possible error less than 10% in 80% coverage dose; for 103 Pd seed implants, if the postimplant dose evaluation is performed based on image scans taken between 2 and 4 weeks, the average error will be less than 5%, with a maximum error less than 15% in 80% coverage dose. Because of edema, a conventional preimplant plan also overestimates dose coverage of prostate. On the average, a standard preimplant planning overestimates dose coverage by about 6% for 125 I implants and 14% for 103 Pd implants in our study. Conclusion: Based on the dynamic model, the optimum timing of image scans for postimplant dose evaluation of prostate seed implantation is 7 weeks postimplantation for 125 I implants and about 3 weeks for 103 Pd implants. The time-window for

  13. Clinical Study on Using 125I Seeds Articles Combined with Biliary Stent Implantation in the Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Song, Xue-Peng; Sun, Bo-Lin; Jiang, Wen-Jin; Wang, Li-Gang

    2017-08-01

    Aim: To study the feasibility and curative effect of 125 I seeds articles combined with biliary stent implantation in the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients with malignant obstructive jaundice were included. Twenty-four were treated by biliary stent implantation combined with intraluminal brachytherapy by 125 I seeds articles as the experimental group, while the remaining 26 were treated by biliary stent implantation only as the control group. The goal of this study was to evaluate total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and tumor markers (cancer antigen (CA)-199, CA-242 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)), as well as biliary stent patency status and survival time before and after surgery. Results: Jaundice improved greatly in both groups. The decreases of CA-199 and CA-242 had statistical significance (p=0.003 and p=0.004) in the experimental group. The ratio of biliary stent patency was 83.3% (20/24) in the experimental group and 57.7% (15/26) in the control group (p=0.048). The biliary stent patency time in the experimental group was 1~15.5 (mean=9.84) months. The biliary stent patency time in the control group was 0.8~9 (mean=5.57) months, which was statistically significant (p=0.018). The median survival time was 10.2 months in the experimental group, while 5.4 months in control group (pjaundice possibly by inhibiting the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and the growth of tumor. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Permanent 125I-seed prostate brachytherapy: early prostate specific antigen value as a predictor of PSA bounce occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazeron Renaud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate predictive factors for PSA bounce after 125I permanent seed prostate brachytherapy and identify criteria that distinguish between benign bounces and biochemical relapses. Materials and methods Men treated with exclusive permanent 125I seed brachytherapy from November 1999, with at least a 36 months follow-up were included. Bounce was defined as an increase ≥ 0.2 ng/ml above the nadir, followed by a spontaneous return to the nadir. Biochemical failure (BF was defined using the criteria of the Phoenix conference: nadir +2 ng/ml. Results 198 men were included. After a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 21 patients experienced a BF, and 35.9% had at least one bounce which occurred after a median period of 17 months after implantation (4-50. Bounce amplitude was 0.6 ng/ml (0.2-5.1, and duration was 13.6 months (4.0-44.9. In 12.5%, bounce magnitude exceeded the threshold defining BF. Age at the time of treatment and high PSA level assessed at 6 weeks were significantly correlated with bounce but not with BF. Bounce patients had a higher BF free survival than the others (100% versus 92%, p = 0,007. In case of PSA increase, PSA doubling time and velocity were not significantly different between bounce and BF patients. Bounces occurred significantly earlier than relapses and than nadir + 0.2 ng/ml in BF patients (17 vs 27.8 months, p Conclusion High PSA value assessed 6 weeks after brachytherapy and young age were significantly associated to a higher risk of bounces but not to BF. Long delays between brachytherapy and PSA increase are more indicative of BF.

  15. Study of percutaneous 125I seeds implantation guided by CT in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Mingyao; Yong Yazhi; Luo Bingqing; Wu Xuemei; Chen Lingling; Xie Hongqi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy, feasibility and safety of CT guided percutaneous 125 I seeds implantation in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Clinical data of 16 elderly peripheral stage I NSCLC patients (10 squamous carcinoma and 6 adenocarcinoma; 13 stage I A and 3 stage I B ) who received radioactive 125 I seeds implantation because of refusal or being unsuited to operation or external radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Prescribed dose was 140 - 160 Gy. Under CT guidance, 125 I seeds were implanted percutaneously into tumors for interstitial radiotherapy according to treatment plan system. Results: Mean number of 125 I seeds each patient received was 21.1. 12 complete response (CR) and 4 partial response (PR) were achieved. Total response rate (CR + PR) was 100%. 100% patients completed 10 to 56 months of follow-up, 15, 13, 8 and 6 patients completed 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-years' follow-up, respectively. The median local progression free time was 14 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-year overall survival rate were 60%, 54%, 50% and 33%, respectively (median : 14 months). 7 cases died of non-tumor disease and 5 died of metastasis. No severe complications were observed. Conclusions: CT guided 125 I seeds implantation is a safe, reliable and effective radical treatment method for elderly stage I peripheral NSCLC patients, who refuse to or are unsuitable to operation or external radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Development of procedure using plasma welding process to produce {sup 125}I seeds; Desenvolvimento de procedimento utilizando processo de soldagem plasma para confeccao de sementes de {sup 125}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Anselmo

    2006-07-01

    The prostate cancer, which is the second cause of death by cancer in men, overcome only by lung cancer, is a problem of public health in Brazil. Brachytherapy is among the possible available treatments for prostate cancer, in which small seeds containing {sup 125}I radioisotope are implanted in the prostate. The seed consists of a titanium sealed capsule with 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, containing a central silver wire with adsorbed {sup 125}I. The plasma arc welding is one of the viable techniques for the sealing process. The equipment used in this technique is less costly than in other processes. The main objective of this work was the development and the validation of the welding procedure using plasma welding process and the elaboration of a sealing routine according to Good Manufacturing Practices. The development of this work has presented the following phases: cut and cleaning of the titanium material, determination of the welding parameters, development of a device for holding the titanium tube during the welding process, validation of sealed sources according to ISO 2919 Sealed Radioactive Sources - General Requirements and Classification, leakage test according to ISO 9978 Sealed Radioactive Sources - Leakage Test Methods and metallographic assays. The developed procedure, to seal {sup 125}I seeds using plasma welding process, has shown to be efficient, satisfying all the established requirements of ISO 2919. The results obtained in this work have given the possibility to establish a routine production process according to the orientations presented in resolution RDC number 59 - Good Manufacturing Practices do Medical Products of the ANVISA - Brazilian Nacional Agency of Sanitary Surveillance. (author)

  17. Effect of implanted radioactive 125I seeds on normal tissue structures of bronchus, esophagus, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and alveolus in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Liangchen; Han Zhenguo; Yang Bin; Heersitai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of implanted radioactive 125 I seeds on normal tissue structures of bronchus, esophagus, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and alveolus in dogs. Methods: Nine healthy male dogs weighing 17-21 kg were randomly divided into three groups: 30 d, 60 d experimental groups and control group. Radioactive 125 I seeds (3.7 x 10 7 Bg, 1.0 mCi) were implanted into the sides of bronchus, esophagus, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein respectively, the samples of bronchus, esophagus, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein were taken 30 and 60 d after transplantation, HE staining was used to observe the pathologic changes of the tissues under light microscope. Results: The damages of normal bronchus, esophagus, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and alveolus after radioactive 125 I seeds implantation in 30 d group were weaker than those in control group and 60 d group, there were no complications such as perforation, hemorrhage, necrosis, etc. Histopathological score indicated that the scores of bronchus, esophagus and alveolar in 30 d group and 60 d group were higher than those in control group (P 0.05); there was no significant difference in histopathological score of pulmonary vein among all groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The implanted radioactive 125 I seeds can damage all kinds of tissues at different degrees, but this kind of damage is reversible, the dog may repair the damage through its own repair ability, its clinical application is safe. (authors)

  18. Cooperation of Ad-hING4 and 125I seed in tumor-suppression on human pancreatic cancer xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Hongyan; Fa Yihua; Su Chenghai; Yang Jicheng; Sheng Weihua; Xie Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    This work is to investigate the combined tumor-suppression effect of Adenovirus-mediated human ING4 (Ad-hING4) and 125 I seed on human pancreatic cancer xenograft and the possible mechanisms. Ad-hING4 recombinant adenovirus vector was transected into QBI-293A cells and high titre adenovirus was obtained. Subcutaneous tumor models were established with 25 nude mice with human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1. They were randomly divided into 5 groups: PBS control group, Ad carrier group, 125 I seed brachytherapy group, Ad-hING4 gene treatment group, combined 125 I seed and Ad-hING4 group. The tumor volumes were measured every 5 days after treatment, and were sacrificed on the 20th day. The tumors were measured and weighed to determine the ratio of tumor-suppression and Jin-Shi q value. Morphological changes of tumor cells,the tissue injury and apoptotic index AI were examined on pathological sections. MVD, Survivin and Caspase3 were tested in immunohistochemistry. The results show that the tumor-suppressive ratio of the 125 I seed group, Ad-hING4 group, combined treatment group were,respectively, 34.19%(P 0.05). It can be concluded that 125 I seed and Ad-hING4 inhibit the growth of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer on nude mice significantly. These indicate a synergy of the combined treatments in tumor-suppression and Ad-hING4 is a promising novel radiosensitizer. The mechanisms of tumor-suppressive may be multi-pathways such as down-regulation the expression of Survivin and up-regulation the expression of Caspase3 to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. (authors)

  19. CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with 125I-seed implantation for metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal: analysis of 23 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoxi; Lu Yinxiang; Ji Yong; Wang Xiaowei; Zhang Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with 125 I-seed implantation for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. Methods: A total of 28 involved vertebrae were detected in 23 patients with metastatic vertebral carcinoma. Each patient had 1-2 diseased vertebrae. The lesions included cervical vertebra (n=4), thoracic vertebra (n=13) and lumbar vertebra (n=11). Destroyed posterior vertebral wall was seen in all involved vertebrae. Thirteen vertebrae found in 12 patients showed involvement of the epidural space. According to treatment planning system (TPS) CT-guided implantation of 125 I seeds was carried out first for cervical lesions, which was followed by PVP. For the thoracic and lumbar lesions, unilateral or bilateral puncturing with several particle needles was employed to implant the 125 I seeds, then, PVP with bone cement injection was performed. The complications and the clinical efficacy were analyzed. Results: Successful operation was obtained in all patients. The number of implanted 125 I seeds ranged from 4 to 30 per vertebra, and the volume of injected bone cement was 1-6 ml per vertebra. After the operation the pain relief rate was 86.9% (n=20). The incidence of bone cement leakage was 17.8% (5/28). One patient had radicular pain caused by neuropore leakage, which was relieved after medication. No serious complications, such as spinal cord injury or radiation myelitis, occurred. Conclusion: CT-guided PVP combined with 125 I-seed implantation is effective and safe for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. This therapy can effectively relieve the pain and control the deterioration of tumor, besides, the incidence of bone cement leakage is very low. (authors)

  20. Postoperative [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy in the treatment of acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid gland. With associated risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Ming-hui; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Shu-ming; Huang, Ming-wei; Shi, Yan [Peking Univ. School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2014-11-15

    This retrospective study was undertaken to analyze data from patients receiving iodine-125 ([{sup 125}I]) seed brachytherapy postoperatively for the treatment of acinic cell carcinoma (ACC) of the parotid gland along with the following risk factors: residual tumor, recurrent tumor, facial nerve invasion, positive resection margins, advanced tumor stage, or tumor spillage. Twenty-nine patients with ACC (17 females, 12 males; age range, 13-73 years; median age, 37.3 years) were included. Median follow-up was 58.2 months (range, 14-122 months). Patients received [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy (median actuarial D90, 177 Gy) 3-41 days (median, 14 days) following surgery. Radioactivity was 18.5-33.3 MBq per seed, and the prescription dose was 80-120 Gy. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year rates of local control were 93.1, 88.7, and 88.7 %, respectively; overall survival was 96.6, 92, and 92 %; disease-free survival was 93.1, 88.4, and 88.4 %; and freedom from distant metastasis was 96.6, 91.2, and 91.2 %. Lymph node metastases were absent in all patients, although two patients died with distant metastases. Facial nerve recovery was quick, and no severe radiotherapy-related complications were noted. Recurrence history, local recurrence, and distant metastasis significantly affected overall survival. Postoperative [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy is effective in treating ACC and has minor complications. Patients with a history of recurrence showed poor prognosis and were more likely to experience disease recurrence and develop metastases. (orig.) [German] Diese retrospektive Studie wurde durchgefuehrt, um die Daten von Patienten zu analysieren, die postoperativ eine Seed-Brachytherapie mit Iod-125 ([{sup 125}I]) zur Behandlung von Azinuszellkarzinomen der Ohrspeicheldruese mit begleitenden Risikofaktoren, wie Residualtumor, Rezidivtumor, Invasion in den N. facialis, positive (= nicht tumorfreie) Resektionsraender, fortgeschrittenes Tumorstadium oder lokale Verbreitung von Tumorzellen

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution around the 125I model 6711 seed as function of radius of the silver cylinder using the Penelope code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerio, U.; Chica, L.; Paul, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is applied to find the dose rates distribution in tissue around 125 I seeds model 6711 as a function of the silver cylinder radius, R sc (0.017, 0.021, 0.025, 0.029 and 0.033) cm are used as radius values. It is found here that the dose rate at any point within the tissue decreases as R sc increases. The relative difference of dose rate that produced by the standard R sc seed, is less than 5%, for seeds with Rsc between 0.017 and 0.033 cm. (author)

  2. A Novel Self-Expandable, Radioactive Airway Stent Loaded with 125I Seeds: A Feasibility and Safety Study in Healthy Beagle Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Guo, Jin-He; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Zhu, Hai-Dong; Chen, Li; Lu, Jian; Wang, Chao; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2017-07-01

    Airway stent placement is an effective treatment for the immediate palliation of malignant airway obstruction. However, restenosis caused by tumor ingrowth and/or overgrowth after stenting is common. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a novel self-expandable stent loaded with 125 I seeds in healthy beagle dog. Under fluoroscopic guidance, forty-eight self-expandable airway stents loaded with 125 I seeds were perorally placed in the main trachea of 48 healthy beagle dogs, who were randomly divided into four groups (Group A: 0.3 mCi; Group B: 0.6 mCi; Group C: 0.9 mCi; Control group: 0 mCi). The estimated radiation dose was calculated using the isotropic point source approximation. Radiological follow-up examinations and histopathological examinations of stented tracheal segments and their adjacent organs and tissues were performed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks following the stenting. All stents were successfully deployed in the targeted tracheal segment in the beagle dogs without procedure-related complications. Tracheal stenosis became severe gradually in all the four groups, which was not associated with the radioactivity of 125 I seeds (p > 0.05). The tracheal injury scores increased along with the higher dose of radioactive seeds which reached peak at 8 weeks and then turned back slightly at 16 weeks. The adjacent tissue did not show pathohistological changes under microscope, while mild and reversible ultrastructure changes were showed under electronic microscope. This study demonstrates that it is feasible and safe to insert this novel self-expandable airway stent loaded with 125 I seeds in healthy beagle dog.

  3. The Effect of Scattering from Leg Region on Organ Doses in Prostate Brachytherapy for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Milad Vahabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dose calculation of tumor and surrounding tissues is essential during prostate brachytherapy. Three radioisotopes, namely, 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs, are extensively used in this method. In this study, we aimed to calculate the received doses by the prostate and critical organs using the aforementioned radioactive seeds and to investigate the effect of scattering contribution for the legs on dose calculations. Materials and Methods The doses to organs of interest were calculated using MCNPX code and ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantom. Results Doses to the prostate as a source of radiation for 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs were approximately 108.9, 97.7, and 81.5 Gy, respectively. Bladder, sigmoid colon, and testes received higher doses than other organs due to proximity to the prostate. Differences between the doses when tallying with the legs intact and with the legs voided were significant for testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall because of their proximity to the prostate. There was also a good consistency between our results and the data published by Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine for the prostate. Conclusion Scattering from leg region had a significant effect on doses to testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall in the pelvic region, and prostate and the other organs were unaffected. Brachytherapy treatment plans using 131Cs seeds allow for better sparing of critical tissues, with a comparable number of, or fewer, seeds required, compared to 125I seeds.

  4. Dosimetric studies, spectrometric, radiographic, metallographic of a new argentinean seed of {sup 125} I used in brachytherapy; Estudios dosimetricos, espectrometricos, radiograficos, metalograficos de una nueva semilla argentina de {sup 125}I empleada en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirchio, R.; Saravi, M.; Banchik, D.; Munoz, C. [CNEA, Pbro. J. Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15 (B1802AYA), Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: pirchio@cae.cnea.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    A new source of {sup 125} I model Braquibac{sup TM} has been developed in Argentina for applications in interstitial brachytherapy. The AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) recommends that dosimetric characteristics of new sources of brachytherapy of Iodine-125 have been theoretically and experimentally determined before its clinical use. The objectives outlined in this work were the study of the design of the new seed, the calculation of dosimetric parameters and the photons spectra analysis. Its were carried out radiographic and metallographic studies to determine the physical characteristics of the source. For the realization of the dosimetric calculations it was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Values of the radial dose function, g(r), of the constant of dose rate, {lambda}, of the function of anisotropy of two dimensions, F(r, {theta}), of the factor and constant of anisotropy its were obtained simulating the source in water according to the recommended methodology in TG-43. The constant of dose rate is similar to 0,880 {+-} 0,080 c Gy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The kerma in air rate of reference, S{sub K}, was calculated as 1,036 c Gy cm{sup 2}h{sup -1} mCi{sup -1} simulating the seed in dry air. Its were carried out spectrometric studies using a semiconductor planar detector of HPGe (high purity germanium). Photons spectra showed characteristic x-rays of {sup 125} I with energies of 27,20 keV, 27,47 keV, 31 keV and 31,70 keV gamma photons of 35,5 keV, and x-ray fluorescent coming from the silver nucleus of 22,10 keV, 24,94 keV and 25,45 keV. The angular dependence of the intensity of photons around the seed and in air it was analyzed with the planar detector. This was carried out to study the anisotropy in the photons flow due to variation in the thickness of the titanium wall and of the welding, movements of the silver tube inside the source and deposition of the radioactive material on the silver tube. (Author)

  5. Dynamic observation on changes of serum tumor markers levels after implantation of 125I radioactive seeds as treatment for several malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qihe; Yang Jiali; Gao Mingzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamic changes of serum levels of several tumor markers after implantation of 125 I seeds as treatment for breast, prostate and lung malignancies. Methods: Serum CA15-3 (in 48 cases of breast cancer), PSA (in 59 cases of prostate cancer) and CYFRA21-1 (in 59 cases of lung cancer) levels were measured with RIA both before and after implantation of 125 I seeds as treatment. Furthermore, dynamic observation on the serum markers levels was carried out every 3 months in ten patients in each category. Results: After treatment, levels of these markers dropped significantly. Dynamic observation revealed that in the 10 cases of breast cancer, the levels of CA15-3 dropped continually. However, in the 10 cases of prostatic cancer, the disease got worse and the PSA levels kept increasing. In the lung cancer group, the CYFRA21-1 levels rose markedly and all patients expired before 9 months. Conclusion: Dynamic observation on changes of serum tumor markers (CA15-3, PSA, CYFRA21-1) levels after 125 I seed implantation treatment was of definite prognostic value. (authors)

  6. The impact of body mass index on dosimetric quality in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Echevarria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy has been established as an effective and safe treatment option for men with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer. In this retrospective analysis, we sought to study the effect of body mass index (BMI on post-implant dosimetric quality. Material and methods : After institutional approval, records of patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer treated in Puerto Rico with LDR brachytherapy during 2008-2013 were reviewed. All patients were implanted with 125I seeds to a prescription dose of 145 Gy. Computed tomography (CT based dosimetry was performed 1 month after implant. Patients with at least 1 year of prostate-specific antigen (PSA follow-up were included. Factors predictive of adequate D90 coverage (≥ 140 Gy were compared via the Pearson χ2 or Wilcoxon rank-sum test as appropriate. Results : One-hundred and four patients were included in this study, with 53 (51% patients having a D90 ≥ 140 Gy. The only factor associated with a dosimetric coverage detriment (D90 < 140 Gy was BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (p = 0.03. Prostate volume (p = 0.26, initial PSA (p = 0.236, age (p = 0.49, hormone use (p = 0.93, percent of cores positive (p = 0.95, risk group (p = 0.24, tumor stage (p = 0.66, and Gleason score (p = 0.61 did not predict D90. Conclusions : In this study we show that BMI is a significant pre-implant predictor of D90 (< 140 Gy vs. ≥ 140 Gy. Although other studies have reported that prostate volume also affects D90, our study did not find this correlation to be statistically significant, likely because all of our patients had a prostate volume 140 Gy.

  7. SU-F-T-46: The Effect of Inter-Seed Attenuation and Tissue Composition in Prostate 125I Brachytherapy Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, K; Araki, F; Ohno, T [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the difference of dose distributions with/without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and tissue compositions in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations, using Monte Carlo simulations of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). Methods: The dose distributions in {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy were calculated using PHITS for non-simultaneous and simultaneous alignments of STM1251 sources in water or prostate phantom for six patients. The PHITS input file was created from DICOM-RT file which includes source coordinates and structures for clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of urethra and rectum, using in-house Matlab software. Photon and electron cutoff energies were set to 1 keV and 100 MeV, respectively. The dose distributions were calculated with the kerma approximation and the voxel size of 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3}. The number of incident photon was set to be the statistical uncertainty (1σ) of less than 1%. The effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions was evaluated from dose volume histograms (DVHs) for each structure, by comparing to results of the AAPM TG-43 dose calculation (without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions). Results: The dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation by source capsules was approximately 2% for CTV and OARs compared to those of TG-43. In additions, by considering prostate tissue composition, the D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} of CTV reduced by 6% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: It needs to consider the dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation and tissue composition in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations.

  8. Early therapy monitoring of 125I seed interstitial implant in a pancreatic cancer xenograft by 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Liu Yu; Chen Kemin; Lu Jian; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Zhang Liyun; Liu Fenju

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of early evaluation and monitoring of 125 I interstitial implantation in a pancreatic cancer xenograft. Methods: Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of Sw 1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into the right hind limbs of the immunodeficient BABL/c nude mice. The tumors size were about 8-10 mm after two weeks. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups,including control group (n=4), empty seed implantation group (n=4) and 125 I implantation group (n=4). Before treatment and one week after treatment, 18 F-FDG Micro-PET/CT scan was performed and then maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ), mean standardized uptake values (SUV mean ), tumor size and necrosis rate were measured. HE staining and TK1 immunohistochemistry examination were carried out in the paraffin-embedded sample. Results: Before treatment the SUV max and SUV mean values of three groups did not reach statistical significance. One week after treatment the SUV max and SUV mean values of three groups were 3.53±1.20 and 0.57±0.26 vs. 3.83±2.13 and 0.59 ±0.24 vs. 0.29±0.23 and 0.016±0.001, respectively, with a significant difference (F=7.62, P=0.01; F=10.34, P=0.005). The SUV max and SUV mean values of 125 I implant group were significantly lower than empty seed implant group and control group and were significantly lower than before treatment. Before treatment, tumor necrosis rate of three groups were not significantly different. Immunohistochemical staining found the TK1 positive staining index of three groups were respectively (64.25±1.71)%, (62.25±2.22)% and (38.25±1.71)% with statistically significant difference (F=233.67, P<0.001). The TK1 positive staining index of 125 I implant group was significantly lower than empty seed implant group and control group. The SUV max values had some positive correlation with TK1 positive staining index (r=0.85, P=0.001). Conclusions: 18 F-FDG Micro-PET/CT may be useful as a

  9. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  10. Therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted 125I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors

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    Han T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tao Han,1,* Xiaodan Yang,1,* Ying Xu,2,* Zhendong Zheng,1,* Ying Yan,2 Ning Wang2 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Radiotherapy, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Shenyang, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To explore the therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted 125I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors.Materials and methods: Fifteen liver cancer patients with 47 total lesions were treated with 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation (group A, and 25 liver-tumor patients with 66 total lesions were treated with 125I-seed implantation without a template auxiliary (group B. Operation time, in-hospital time, operation complications, dose distribution, and response rate (number were compared between the two groups. Results: Shorter operation times and better dose distribution were observed in group A than in group B, and the differences were statistically significant. The response rate after 2 months was 86.7% (13 of 15 in group A and 84% (21 of 25 in group B; differences between the two groups were not significant.Conclusion: Application of 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors can help shorten operation time and optimize radiation-dose distribution, is worthy of further study, and has clinical significance. Keywords: brachytherapy, stereotactic techniques, iodine isotopes, liver, carcinoma 

  11. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  12. Killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy on ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue

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    Ai-Sheng Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy on ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue. Methods: A total of 78 patients with ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received EGFR-TKI treatment and observation group received EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy. Differences in apoptosis gene, invasion gene and autophagy gene expression in lung tissue were compared between two groups after 1 month of treatment. Results: Apoptosis genes PDCD5, bax and bcl-xS mRNA expression levels in lung tissue of observation group after 1 month of treatment were higher than those of control group while Bag-1, survivin and bcl-xL mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group; invasion genes CD147, EGFR and DDX17 mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group while Bin1, E-cadherin and Ovol2 mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group; autophagy genes ARHI, Beclin1, Atg5, LC3B, pULK and PI3KC3 mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusions: EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy can enhance the tumor killing effect on patients with ⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer, and contribute to the optimization of overall condition and the extension of survival time.

  13. Evaluation of material heterogeneity dosimetric effects using radiochromic film for COMS eye plaques loaded with 125I seeds (model I25.S16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, Hilal; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Özbay, İsmail; Kemikler, Gönül; Tuncer, Samuray

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To measure absolute dose distributions in eye phantom for COMS eye plaques with 125 I seeds (model I25.S16) using radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. (2) To determine the dose correction function for calculations involving the TG-43 formalism to account for the presence of the COMS eye plaque using Monte Carlo (MC) method specific to this seed model. (3) To test the heterogeneous dose calculation accuracy of the new version of Plaque Simulator (v5.3.9) against the EBT film data for this seed model. Methods: Using EBT film, absolute doses were measured for 125 I seeds (model I25.S16) in COMS eye plaques (1) along the plaque's central axis for (a) uniformly loaded plaques (14–20 mm in diameter) and (b) a 20 mm plaque with single seed, and (2) in off-axis direction at depths of 5 and 12 mm for all four plaque sizes. The EBT film calibration was performed at 125 I photon energy. MC calculations using MCNP5 code for a single seed at the center of a 20 mm plaque in homogeneous water and polystyrene medium were performed. The heterogeneity dose correction function was determined from the MC calculations. These function values at various depths were entered into PS software (v5.3.9) to calculate the heterogeneous dose distributions for the uniformly loaded plaques (of all four sizes). The dose distributions with homogeneous water assumptions were also calculated using PS for comparison. The EBT film measured absolute dose rate values (film) were compared with those calculated using PS with homogeneous assumption (PS Homo) and heterogeneity correction (PS Hetero). The values of dose ratio (film/PS Homo) and (film/PS Hetero) were obtained. Results: The central axis depth dose rate values for a single seed in 20 mm plaque measured using EBT film and calculated with MCNP5 code (both in ploystyrene phantom) were compared, and agreement within 9% was found. The dose ratio (film/PS Homo) values were substantially lower than unity (mostly between 0.8 and 0.9) for all

  14. The effectiveness of 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice: an experiment in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Qi; Liu Yu; Wang Zhongmin; Huang Wei; Lu Jian; Chen Kemin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effectiveness and therapeutic mechanism of 125 I interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice. Methods: The human pancreatic cell line Sw1990 was subcutaneously injected into the right lower limb partially dorsal area next to the groin of the immunodeficient BABL /c nude mice. The tumor was removed and cut into small pieces after it was formed,then the tumor pieces were inoculated in nude mice. The tumor developed to 8-10 mm in size after six weeks. A total of 16 nude mice with the suitable tumor size were used in this study. The 16 experimental mice were randomly and equally divided into two groups. The mice in study group (n = 8) were implanted with 125 I seeds, while the mice in control group (n = 8) were implanted with ghost seeds. After the implantation both the long and short diameter of the tumors as well as the mouse body weight were measured every 4 days. The tumor weight was measured when the mouse was sacrificed. The paraffin-embedded samples were sent for histopathological examination. Apoptotic cells were checked with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was detected with immuno-histochemical staining. Results: The tumor grew slowly in the study group, but rapidly in the control group. The tumor weight in the study group and the control group was (2.68 ± 0.70)g and (4.68 ± 1.45)g, respectively, the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.021). The tumor inhibition rate was about 42.66%. No significant difference in body weight of nude mice existed between two groups both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). Marked tumor necrosis was seen in study group, but no obvious, or only a little, tumor necrosis could be observed in the control group. The apoptotic index checked with the TUENL method in the study group and control group was (23.2 ± 1.9)% and

  15. High-resolution 3D dose distribution measured for two low-energy x-ray brachytherapy seeds: 125I and 103Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massillon-JL, G.; Minniti, R.; Mitch, M.G.; Soares, C.G.; Hearn, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the 3D absorbed dose distribution around 125 I and 103 Pd low-energy photon brachytherapy seeds using a high-spatial-resolution gel scanning system to address the current difficulty in measuring absorbed dose at close distances to these sources as a consequence of high dose rate gradient. A new version of BANG-gel coupled with a small format laser CT scanner has been used. Measurements were performed with 100 μm resolution in all dimensions. In particular, radial dose function and absorbed dose rate in the plane parallel to the sources longitudinal-axis were derived at radial distances smaller than or equal to 1 cm. In addition, the energy dependence was evaluated, finding that, within measurement uncertainties, the gel response is independent of the energy for energy photon values between 20 keV and 1250 keV. We have observed that at distances larger than 1.4 mm from the source, the delivered dose is similar to predictions from published Monte Carlo calculations (MC) for the 125 I seed. For distances between 1 mm and 3 mm, differences in magnitude and shape are significant for the 103 Pd seed, where an enhancement is observed. In the enhancement region, a difference of up to 70% in the radial dose function was obtained. Such observation suggests a contribution from other radionuclides emitting beta-particles or electrons, and not considered by MC. To understand the effect, spectrometry measurements were performed. A small contribution of 102 Rh/ 102m Rh radionuclide relative to 103 Pd was observed and its importance on the absorbed dose measured at close distances to the seed is time dependent and consequently, avoids reproducible measurements. Finally, the results obtained in this work underscore the importance of using high-spatial-resolution and water-equivalent detectors for measuring absorbed dose in low-energy photon radiation fields.

  16. Results of a dummy run of postimplant dosimetry between multi-institutional centers in prostate brachytherapy with 125I seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yorozu, Atsunori; Dokiya, Takushi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility and precision of postimplant dosimetry following 125 I prostate brachytherapy (PB) and to evaluate the effects of learning and experience in CT-based postimplant dosimetry. One-month postimplant CT data from two patients who underwent PB alone or combined therapy (PB+external beam radiation therapy (EBRT)) were sent to 28 institutions for postimplant dosimetry and analyzed in 2006 (study 1). Similarly, 1-month postimplant CT data from two other patients were also analyzed in 2008 (study 2; 23 institutions). For both modalities in studies 1 and 2, the variance of the difference between CT-based D90 at each institution and CT/MRI fusion-based D90 was estimated. In monotherapy, F test and Mann-Whitney U test revealed no significant difference in the variance in studies 1 and 2 (P=0.72, 0.46). In combined therapy, the variance significantly converged in study 2 compared with study 1 (P<0.05). Even in the two studies, however, the difference between the median CT-based D90 and fusion-based D90 was at least 20-30 Gy. Marked interobserver variability was seen in the prostate volume and D90 with CT alone. The precision of postimplant dosimetry based on CT alone was revealed to be limited. (author)

  17. A dynamic model for the estimation of optimum timing of computed tomography scan for dose evaluation of 125I or 103Pd seed implant of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Dicker, Adam P.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Nath, Ravinder; Waterman, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of permanent 125 I or 103 Pd prostate implant is based on the assumption that both prostate and seeds are static throughout the entire treatment time which lasts months. However, the prostate is often edematous after the surgical implantation of seeds. Therefore, both the volume of the prostate and the seed locations change dynamically as the edema resolves. This effect has impact on the validity of postimplant analysis based upon a CT scan. If a CT scan is taken too early after implantation while there is edema in the prostate, the dose delivered by the implant may be underestimated. If the imaging is delayed too long, the dose may be overestimated. The magnitude of this effect depends on both of the half-life of the isotope used and the half-life and magnitude of the edema. This study describes a dynamic biomathematical model which takes edema into account in calculating the dose delivered by the implant and is used to investigate the optimum time to obtain the postimplant CT scan. Materials and Methods: The dynamic biomathematical model is a numerical integration of the accumulated dose in which the prostate dimensions, the seed locations, and the source strength are all functions of time. The function which describes the change in prostate dimensions and seed locations as a function of time was determined in a separate study by analysis of serial postimplant CT scans. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the prostate for the total dose generated by the dynamic model are compared to DVHs generated by CT scans simulated for postimplant intervals ranging from 0 to 300 days after the implantation for 30 different combinations of the magnitude and duration of edema. Results: DVHs of the prostate calculated by taking edema into account show that the time of obtaining a CT scan for postimplant analysis is critical to the accuracy of dose evaluations. The comparison of the DVHs generated by the dynamic model to those generated by

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. Effects of radioactive 125I seeds on A549 cell line and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS cultivated in vitro and assessment of its clinical safety dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Wenchao; Qi Liangchen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the cell count changes of A549 cell line and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS after irradiated by 125 I seeds with different doses, and to study the growth inhibition of 125 I on this two kinds of cell lines, and to determine its clinical safety dose in treatment of non-small cell lung. Methods: 125 I seeds with different doses (low dose: 0.2 mCi, mediate dose: 0.4 mCi, high dose: 0.8 mCi) were chosen and put into A549 cells and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS in vitro, the cells on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th days after irradiation were collected, the alive cells were counted by cells dyeing experiments, then the growth curves were drawn, and the IC 50 of the radioactive 125 I seeds to both two cell lines were calculated. Results: Compared with blank and control groups, the cell proliferation trend of A549 cells in low dose group was not significantly influenced (P>0.05), but the growth of A549 cells in mediate and high dose groups were inhibited in a time-dependent manner, there were significant differences (P<0.05), the most obvious change was on the 6th day. The IC 50 of the radioactive 125 I seeds to A549 cells was about .04 mCi. While the growth inhibition of 125 I 2BS had no statistically significant differences between various dose groups (P>0.05), and the IC 50 of the radioactive 125 I seeds to 2BS cell line was about 1.65 mCi. Conclusion: 0.4 mCi of radioactive 125 I seeds has already had the obvious damage effect on A549 cell, 0.8 mCi of radioactive 125 I seeds has the stronger effect. The IC 50 of the radioactive 125 I seeds to 2BS cells is about 1.65 mCi, so the clinical safety dosage is 0.4-0.8 mCi. (authors)

  20. Disease-related effects of perioperative blood transfusions associated with 125I seed implantation for prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, J.P.; Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    In some retrospective studies perioperative transfusions during oncologic surgery have been shown to decrease the time interval between surgery and local and/or distant recurrence of cancer. This study examines the disease-related effect, if any, of perioperative blood transfusions among 108 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate treated by radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation of the prostate and lymphadenectomy. When all subjects were analyzed, there was no statistical difference of local and distant failure between the transfused and nontransfused groups. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had statistically fewer local recurrences (0% vs 22%, p = 0.036) if they were transfused perioperatively. However, the difference in distant metastases (0% vs 11%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). In contrast, patients with moderately and poorly differentiated disease receiving transfusions had more local recurrences and metastases, though this was not statistically significant. Our data suggest that there is no obvious evidence that perioperative blood transfusions have an adverse effect on local recurrence or distant metastases for iodine-125 seed implantation of carcinoma of the prostate

  1. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to γ radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D 0 ) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury

  2. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40......%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these...

  3. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    %), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is less than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these......Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months....... Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40...

  4. Long term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H [Depts. of Urology and Ultrasound, Herlev Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Distant metastases have developed in 18 patients, of whom 11 have died from prostatic cancer. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35%. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after 1-4 years, revealing still malignant histology in 10 (40%), of whom 8 have developed distant metastases or died from prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in five cases. Nine patients are presently free of progression and prostate specific antigen is bigger than 0.5 ng/ml in 8 of these. The future role of ultrasonically guided implantation in the management of prostatic cancer is discussed. (au).

  5. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  6. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  7. Comparison of CT- and radiograph-based post-implant dosimetry for transperineal 125I prostate brachytherapy using single seeds and a commercial treatment-planning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, F.A.; Kohr, P.; Kovacs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: the objective of this investigation was a direct comparison of the dosimetry of CT-based and radiograph-based postplanning procedures for seed implants. Patients and methods: CT- and radiograph-based postplans were carried out for eight iodine-125 ( 125 I) seed implant patients with a commercial treatment-planning system (TPS). To assess a direct comparison of the dosimetric indices (D90, V100, V400), the radiograph-based seed coordinates were transformed to the coordinate system of the CT postplan. Afterwards, the CT-based seed positions were replaced by the radiograph-based coordinates in the TPS and the dose distribution was recalculated. Results: the computations demonstrated that the radiograph-based dosimetric values for the prostate (D p 90, V p 100, and V p 400) were on average lower than the values of the CT postplan. Normalized to the CT postplan the following mean values were found: D p 90: 90.6% (standard deviation [SD]: 9.0%), V p 100: 86.1% (SD: 14.7%), and V p 400: 79.4% (SD: 14.4%). For three out of the eight patients the D p 90 decreased to 90% of the initial CT postplan values. The reason for this dosimetric difference is supposed to be evoked by an error of the reconstruction software used. It was detected that the TPS algorithm assigned some sources to wrong coordinates, partly out of the prostate gland. Conclusion: the radiograph-based postplanning technique of the investigated TPS should only be used in combination with CT postplanning. Furthermore, complex testing procedures of reconstruction algorithms are recommended to minimize calculation errors. (orig.)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution around the {sup 125}I model 6711 seed as function of radius of the silver cylinder using the Penelope code; Simulacion por el Metodo de Monte Carlo de la distribucion de dosis alrededor de la semilla de {sup 125}I modelo 6711 en funcion del radio del cilindro de plata usando el codigo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nerio, U. [Universidad de Cordoba, Monteria (Colombia); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Bogota (Colombia); Chica, L. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Paul, A. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Marseille (France)

    2004-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method is applied to find the dose rates distribution in tissue around {sup 125} I seeds model 6711 as a function of the silver cylinder radius, R{sub sc} (0.017, 0.021, 0.025, 0.029 and 0.033) cm are used as radius values. It is found here that the dose rate at any point within the tissue decreases as R{sub sc} increases. The relative difference of dose rate that produced by the standard R{sub sc} seed, is less than 5%, for seeds with Rsc between 0.017 and 0.033 cm. (author)

  9. Dosimetric and volumetric criteria for selecting a source activity and a source type (125I or 103Pd) in the presence of irregular seed placement in permanent prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C.-S.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Schiff, Peter B.; Lee, Eva K.; Zaider, Marco

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric merit of a permanent prostate implant relies on two factors: the quality of the plan itself, and the fidelity of its implementation. The former factor depends on source type and on source strength, while the latter is a combination of skill and experience. The purpose of this study is to offer criteria by which to select a source type ( 125 I or 103 Pd) and activity. Methods and Materials: Given a prescription dose and potential seed positions along needles, treatment plans were designed for a number of seed types and activities, specifically for 125 I with activities ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 mCi, and for 103 Pd with activities in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 mCi. To avoid human planner bias, an automated computerized planning system based on integer programming was used to obtain optimal seed configurations for each seed type and activity. To simulate the effect of seed-placement inaccuracies, random seed-displacement 'errors' were generated for all plans. The displacement errors were assumed to be uniformly distributed within a cube with side equal to 2no. sigmano. The resulting treatment plans were assessed using two volumetric and two dosimetric indices. Results: For 125 I implants a coverage index (CI) of 98.5% or higher can be achieved for all activities (CI is the fraction of the target volume receiving the prescribed or larger dose). The external volume index (EI) (i.e., the amount of healthy tissue, as percentage of the target volume, receiving the prescribed or larger dose) increases from 13.9% to 20% as the activity increases from 0.3 to 0.7 mCi. For implants using 103 Pd, the external volume index increases from 10.2% to 13.9% whenever CI exceeds 98.5%. Volumetric and dosimetric indices (coverage index, external volume index, D90, and D80) are all sensitive to seed displacement, although the activity dependence of these indices is more pronounced for 125 I than for 103 Pd implants. Conclusions: For both isotopes, the lower activities

  10. [125I]Iodopride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janowsky, A.; Ebert, M.H.; De Paulis, T.; Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN; Kessler, R.M.; Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Substituted benzamides are currently among the most selective antagonists at dopamine D-2 receptors, and high affinity ligands have been developed by substituting halogens into the aromatic ring of the benzamides. The authors report the high affinity, stereoselective, reversible, and sodium dependent binding of a new iodine-substituted benzamide, called [ 125 I]iodopride, to a membrane preparation from rat corpus striatum. 5 refs.; 1 figure

  11. DuraSeal® as a spacer to reduce rectal doses in low-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkilä, Vesa-Pekka; Kärnä, Aarno; Vaarala, Markku H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of off-label use of DuraSeal® polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel in low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy seed implantation to reduce rectal doses. Diluted DuraSeal® was easy to use and, in spite of a clearance effect, useful in decreasing D 2cc rectal doses

  12. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  13. High and low dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    For the brachytherapy component of the r[iation treatment of cervical carcinoma, high dose rate (HDR) is slowly replacing conventional low dose rate (LDR) due primarily to r[iation safety and other physical benefits attributed to the HDR modality. Many r[iation oncologists are reluctant to make this change because of perceived r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR. However, in clinical practice HDR appears to be as effective as LDR but with a lower risk of late complications, as demonstrated by one randomized clinical trial and two comprehensive literature and practice surveys. The reason for this appears to be that the r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR are outweighed by the physical [vantages. (orig.)

  14. The contamination on farm products from 125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenhu; Xu Shiming; Hou Lanxin

    1990-02-01

    The 125 I contamination on 15 farm products have been investigated. The effects of 12 farm crops (wheat, bean, eggplants and other vegetables) contaminated by 125 I during the growing stage on their fruits and seeds have been studied. The results show that the 125 I radioactive substance is mainly concentrated on the fruit surface, and the radioactivity rapidly decreased towards its kernel. The fruits and seeds would not be contaminated when plants were contaminated in the seedling stage

  15. The incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship in parotid gland cancer patients treated with 125I seed brachytherapy. Incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shu-ming; Huang, Ming-wei; Shi, Yan [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jian-Guo [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian (China)

    2014-09-09

    We studied the incidence and dose-response relationship of radioepidermitis in parotid gland carcinoma patients treated with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy in the hopes of designing an optimized pre-implant treatment plan that would reduce the incidence and severity of radioepidermitis in patients receiving this therapy. Between January 2007 and May 2010, 100 parotid gland cancer patients were treated postoperatively with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy. The matched peripheral dose (MPD) was 80-140 Gy, and [{sup 125}I] seed activity was 0.7-0.8 mCi. The mean dose delivered to the skin was calculated in the post-implant CT on day 0 following implantation. Grades of acute and late dermatitis were evaluated at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months post-implantation. Most patients experienced grade 0-2 acute and late skin side effects (86 and 97 %, respectively), though a small subset developed severe complications. Most grade 1-3 effects resolved within 6 months of implantation, though some grade 1-3 effects and all grade 4 effects remained unchanged throughout the 18-month follow-up period. Grade 3 and 4 effects were most prominent (75 and 25 %, respectively) with doses of 110-140 Gy; doses higher than 140 Gy produced only grade 4 effects. [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy produced acceptable levels of acute and late radioepidermitis with a good clinical outcome. A mean dose under 100 Gy delivered to the skin was safe, though doses of 110-140 Gy should be given with caution and extra monitoring; doses greater than 140 Gy are dangerous and likely to produce grade 4-5 effects. (orig.) [German] Wir untersuchten die Inzidenz und die Dosis-Wirkung-Beziehung bei Patienten mit Ohrspeicheldruesenkrebs, die mit [{sup 125}I]-Seed-Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, in der Hoffnung, eine optimierte praeimplantologische Behandlung zu entwickeln, welche die Inzidenz und Schwere der Radioepidermitis bei Patienten, die diese Therapie erhalten haben, reduziert. Zwischen Januar 2007 und Mai 2010

  16. High versus low-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sonali S; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Ananth, Cande V; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003-2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (Puse of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  18. Modeling low-dose-rate effects in irradiated bipolar-base oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, R.J.; Cirba, C.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Michez, A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Witczak, S.C.

    1997-02-01

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in BJTs. Simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for the low-dose-rate enhancement

  19. Monte Carlo calculation of dosimetric parameters of a {sup 125}I brachytherapy seed encapsulation with biocompatible polymer and a ceramic matrix as radiographic marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Lucas P.; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: lpr@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Dosimetria e Simulacao Computacional; Facure, Alessandro, E-mail: facure@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    For prostate cancer treatments, there is an increasing interest in the permanent radioactive seeds implant technique. Currently, in Brazil, the seeds are imported at high prices, which prohibit their use in public hospitals. One of the seed models that have been developed at CDTN has a ceramic matrix as a radioisotope carrier and a radiographic marker; the seed is encapsulated with biocompatible polymer. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to assess the dose distributions generated by the prototype seed model. The obtained data was assessed as described in the TG-43U1 report by the AAPM. The dosimetric parameters dose rate constant, {Lambda}, radial dose function, g{sub L}(r), and anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), were derived from simulations using the MCNP5 code. The function g(r) shows that the seed has a lower decrease in dose rate on its transverse axis when compared to the 6711 model (one of the most used seeds in permanent prostate implants). F(r,{theta}) shows that CDTN's seed anisotropy curves are smoother than the 6711 model curves for {theta}{<=}20 deg and 0.25{<=}r{<=}1 cm. As well, the {Lambda} value is 15% lower than the {Lambda} value of 6711. The results show that CDTN's seed model can deposit a more isotropic dose. Because of the model's characteristics, the seeds can be impregnated with iodine of lower specific activity which would help reducing costs. (author)

  20. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  1. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for 125I brachytherapy seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring 125 I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity in Discrete Bipolar Junction Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Ladbury Raymond; LaBel, Kenneth; Topper, Alyson; Ladbury, Raymond; Triggs, Brian; Kazmakites, Tony

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the low dose rate sensitivity in several families of discrete bipolar transistors across device parameter, quality assurance level, and irradiation bias configuration. The 2N2222 showed the most significant low dose rate sensitivity, with low dose rate enhancement factor of 3.91 after 100 krad(Si). The 2N2907 also showed critical degradation levels. The devices irradiated at 10 mrad(Si)/s exceeded specifications after 40 and 50 krad(Si) for the 2N2222 and 2N2907 devices, respectively.

  3. ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following continuous low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Quelin; Du Duanming; Chen Zaizhong; Liu Pengcheng; Yang Jianyong; Li Yanhao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following a continuous low dose-rate irradiation. Methods: Cells were persistently exposed to low dose-rate (8.28 cGy/h) irradiation. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to detect the expression of ATM phosphorylated proteins. Colony forming assay was used to observe the effect of a low dose-rate irradiation on HepG2 cell survival. Results: After 30 min of low dose-rate irradiation, the phosphorylation of ATM occurred. After 6 h persistent irradiation, the expression of ATM phosphorylated protein reached the peak value, then gradually decreased. After ATM phosphorylation was inhibited with Wortmannin, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells was lower than that of the irradiation alone group at each time point (P<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous low dose-rate irradiation attenuated ATM phosphorylation, suggesting that continuous low dose-rate irradiation has a potential effect for increasing the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells. (authors)

  4. Comparison of radiosensitization by 41 deg. C hyperthermia during low dose rate irradiation and during pulsed simulated low dose rate irradiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G. Peter; Ng, Cheng E.; Shahine, Bilal

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Long duration mild hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer when given concurrently with low dose rate irradiation. Pulsed simulated low dose rate (PSLDR) is now being used clinically, and we have set out to determine whether concurrent mild hyperthermia can be an effective radiosensitizer for the PSLDR protocol. Materials and Methods: Human glioma cells (U-87MG) were grown to plateau phase and treated in plateau phase in order to minimize cell cycle redistribution during protracted treatments. Low dose rate (LDR) irradiation and 41 deg. C hyperthermia were delivered by having a radium irradiator inside a temperature-controlled incubator. PSLDR was given using a 150 kVp X-ray unit and maintaining the cells at 41 deg. C between irradiations. The duration of irradiation and concurrent heating depended on total dose and extended up to 48 h. Results: When 41 deg. C hyperthermia was given currently with LDR or PSLDR, the thermal enhancement ratios (TER) were about the same if the average dose rate for PSLDR was the same as for LDR. At higher average dose rates for PSLDR the TERs became less. Conclusions: Our data show that concurrent mild hyperthermia can be an effective sensitizer for PSLDR. This sensitization can be as effective as for LDR if the same average dose rate is used and the TER increases with decreasing dose rate. Thus mild hyperthermia combined with PSLDR may be an effective clinical protocol

  5. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kyung Mi

    2012-01-01

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ( 137 Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  6. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ({sup 137}Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  7. Low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer in Italy: practice and outcome analysis in a series of 2237 patients from 11 institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellin, Giovanni; Mirri, Maria A; Santoro, Luigi; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Divan, Claudio; Mussari, Salvatore; Ziglio, Francesco; La Face, Beniamino; Barbera, Fernando; Buglione, Michela; Bandera, Laura; Ghedi, Barbara; Di Muzio, Nadia G; Losa, Andrea; Mangili, Paola; Nava, Luciano; Chiarlone, Renato; Ciscognetti, Nunzia; Gastaldi, Emilio; Cattani, Federica; Spoto, Ruggero; Vavassori, Andrea; Giglioli, Francesca R; Guarneri, Alessia; Cerboneschi, Valentina; Mignogna, Marcello; Paoluzzi, Mauro; Ravaglia, Valentina; Chiumento, Costanza; Clemente, Stefania; Fusco, Vincenzo; Santini, Roberto; Stefanacci, Marco; Mangiacotti, Francesco P; Martini, Marco; Palloni, Tiziana; Schinaia, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Grazia; Silvano, Giovanni; Magrini, Stefano; Ricardi, Umberto; Santoni, Riccardo; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) in localized prostate cancer is available since 15 years in Italy. We realized the first national multicentre and multidisciplinary data collection to evaluate LDR-BT practice, given as monotherapy, and outcome in terms of biochemical failure. Between May 1998 and December 2011, 2237 patients with early-stage prostate cancer from 11 Italian community and academic hospitals were treated with iodine-125 ((125)I) or palladium-103 LDR-BT as monotherapy and followed up for at least 2 years. (125)I seeds were implanted in 97.7% of the patients: the mean dose received by 90% of target volume was 145 Gy; the mean target volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100) was 91.1%. Biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test and multivariable Cox regression were used to evaluate the relationship of covariates with outcomes. Median follow-up time was 65 months. 5- and 7-year DSS, OS and BFFS were 99 and 98%, 94 and 89%, and 92 and 88%, respectively. At multivariate analysis, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network score (p LDR-BT. This first multicentre Italian report confirms LDR-BT as an excellent curative modality for low-/intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Multidisciplinary teams may help to select adequately patients to be treated with brachytherapy, with a direct impact on the implant quality and, possibly, on outcome.

  8. Nutritional prognostic scores in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting combined with 125I seed intracavitary irradiation: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peiyuan; Pang, Qing; Wang, Yong; Qian, Zhen; Hu, Xiaosi; Wang, Wei; Li, Zongkuang; Zhou, Lei; Man, Zhongran; Yang, Song; Jin, Hao; Liu, Huichun

    2018-06-01

    We mainly aimed to preliminarily explore the prognostic values of nutrition-based prognostic scores in patients with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA).We retrospectively analyzed 73 cases of HCCA, who underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) combined with I seed intracavitary irradiation from November 2012 to April 2017 in our department. The postoperative changes of total bilirubin (TBIL), direct bilirubin (DBIL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and albumin (ALB) were observed. The preoperative clinical data were collected to calculate the nutrition-based scores, including controlling nutritional status (CONUT), C-reactive protein/albumin ratio (CAR), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI). Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox regression model were used for overall survival (OS) analyses.The serum levels of TBIL, DBIL, ALT, AST, and ALP significantly reduced, and ALB significantly increased at 1 month and 3 months postoperatively. The median survival time of the cohort was 12 months and the 1-year survival rate was 53.1%. Univariate analysis revealed that the statistically significant factors related to OS were CA19-9, TBIL, ALB, CONUT, and PNI. Multivariate analysis further identified CA19-9, CONUT, and PNI as independent prognostic factors.Nutrition-based prognostic scores, CONUT and PNI in particular, can be used as predictors of survival in unresectable HCCA.

  9. Enhanced low dose rate radiation effect test on typical bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Minbo; Chen Wei; Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Huang Shaoyan; Sheng Jiangkun; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun

    2014-01-01

    Two types of bipolar transistors and nine types bipolar integrated circuit were selected in the irradiation experiment at different "6"0Co γ dose rate. The base current of bipolar transistor and input bias current of amplifier and comparator was measured, low dose enhance factor of test device was obtained. The results show that bipolar device have enhanced low dose rate sensitivity, enhancement factor of bipolar integrated circuit was bigger than that of transistor, and enhanced low dose rate sensitivity greatly varied with different structure and process of bipolar device. (authors)

  10. Bioassay in BALB/c mice exposed to low dose rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Km, Sung Dae; Gong, Eun Ji; Bae, Min Ji; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kim, Joong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of low-dose-rate irradiation in BALB/c mice. Twenty mice of each sex were randomly assigned to four groups of five mice each and were exposed to 0 (sham), 0.02, 0.2, or 2 Gy, equivalents to low-dose-rate irradiation to 3.49 mGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Urine, blood, and blood biochemistry were analyzed, and organ weight was measured. The low-dose-rate irradiation did not induce any toxicologically significant changes in mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food and water consumption, urinalysis, and serum biochemistry. However, the weights of reproductive organs including the testis, ovary, and uterus decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiation at 2 Gy significantly decreased the testis, ovary, and uterus weights, but did not change the weights of other organs. There were no adverse effects on hematology in any irradiated group and only the number of neutrophils increased dose dependently. The low-dose-rate irradiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in mice at dose levels of 2 Gy or less, but the reproductive systems of male and female mice showed toxic effects.

  11. Measurement bias dependence of enhanced bipolar gain degradation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witczak, S.C.; Lacoe, R.C.; Mayer, D.C.; Fleetwood, D.M.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide trapped charge, field effects from emitter metallization, and high level injection phenomena moderate enhanced gain degradation of lateral pnp transistors at low dose rates. Hardness assurance tests at elevated irradiation temperatures require larger design margins for low power measurement biases

  12. Low-dose-rate total lymphoid irradiation: a new method of rapid immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.E.; de Silva, S.M.; Rachman, D.B.; Order, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) has been successful in inducing immunosuppression in experimental and clinical applications. However, both the experimental and clinical utility of TLI are hampered by the prolonged treatment courses required (23 days in rats and 30-60 days in humans). Low-dose-rate TLI has the potential of reducing overall treatment time while achieving comparable immunosuppression. This study examines the immunosuppressive activity and treatment toxicity of conventional-dose-rate (23 days) vs low-dose-rate (2-7 days) TLI. Seven groups of Lewis rats were given TLI with 60Co. One group was treated at conventional-dose-rates (80-110 cGy/min) and received 3400 cGy in 17 fractions over 23 days. Six groups were treated at low-dose-rate (7 cGy/min) and received total doses of 800, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, and 3400 cGy over 2-7 days. Rats treated at conventional-dose-rates over 23 days and at low-dose-rate over 2-7 days tolerated radiation with minimal toxicity. The level of immunosuppression was tested using allogeneic (Brown-Norway) skin graft survival. Control animals retained allogeneic skin grafts for a mean of 14 days (range 8-21 days). Conventional-dose-rate treated animals (3400 cGy in 23 days) kept their grafts 60 days (range 50-66 days) (p less than .001). Low-dose-rate treated rats (800 to 3400 cGy total dose over 2-7 days) also had prolongation of allogeneic graft survival times following TLI with a dose-response curve established. The graft survival time for the 3400 cGy low-dose-rate group (66 days, range 52-78 days) was not significantly different from the 3400 cGy conventional-dose-rate group (p less than 0.10). When the total dose given was equivalent, low-dose-rate TLI demonstrated an advantage of reduced overall treatment time compared to conventional-dose-rate TLI (7 days vs. 23 days) with no increase in toxicity

  13. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  14. A traceability establishment for the 125I IsoSeed I25.S06 source from Bebig at the hospital level; Propuesta de obtencion de trazabilidad a nivel hospitalario para la fuente de 125I IsoSeed I25.S06 de Bebig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Bejar, M.J.; Lliso, F.; Colmenares, R.; Fernandez, J.; Andrassy, M.; Carmona, V.; Ferrer, N.; Vivanco, J.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work has been on one side to solve the traceability problem in hospitals for the I25.S06 seed users, already solved for other seeds, and on the other to design a holder in order to allow the measurement of the reference air-kerma rate for the strand by means of a well-type ionization chamber, widely used in brachytherapy in hospitals. At a joint calibration-measurement session of the involved institutions the following steps were performed: calibration of the HDR 1000 and SourceCheck detectors with a standard source from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB); reference air-kerma rate measurements for the 5 seeds strand provided by Bebig with the SourceCheck detector and with the HDR 1000 detector and the new insert holder by SIHO (Spain); separation of the stranded seeds by the specialist from Bebig who dissolved the plastic; reference air-kerma rate measurement of each of the seeds of the strand with one of the of HDR 1000 detectors previously calibrated. We present the calibration factors obtained and the analysis of the uncertainties associated with the process. (Author).

  15. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  16. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  17. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  18. Life span and tumorigenesis in mice exposed to continuous low dose-rate gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Braga-Tanaka III, Ignacia; Takabatake, Takashi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Kimio; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Sato, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation. 1: Late effects of chronic low dose-rate gamma-ray irradiation on SPF mice, using life span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation for approximately 400 days was performed using 137 Cs gamma-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until their natural death. Statistical analyses show that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day (p<0.0001) and of females irradiated at 1 mGy/day (p<0.05) were significantly shorter than those of the control group. There was no evidence of lengthened life span in mice continuously exposed to very low dose-rates of gama-rays. Pathodological examinations showed that the most frequently observed lethal neoplasms in males were malignant lymphomas, liver, lung, and soft tissue neoplasms, whereas, in females, malignant lymphomas and soft tissue neoplasms were common. No significant difference in the causes of death and mortality rates between groups. Hematopoietic neoplasms (malignant lymphoma and myeloid leukemia), liver, lung and soft tissue neoplasms, showed a tendency to appear at a younger age in both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day. Experiment 2: effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate gamma-ray irradiated SPF mice: preliminary study. No significant difference was observed between non-irradiated group and irradiated group with regards to litter size, sex ratio and causes of death in F1 and F2 mice. (author)

  19. Intracavitary after loading techniques, advantages and disadvantages with high and low dose-rate methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstam, Rune

    1980-01-01

    Even though suggested as early as 1903, it is only when suitable sealed gamma sources became available, afterloading methods could be developed for interstitial as well as intracavitary work. Manual afterloading technique can be used only for low dose rate irradiation, while remote controlled afterloading technique can be used for both low and high dose-rate irradiation. Afterloading units used at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, are described, and experience of their use is narrated briefly. (M.G.B.)

  20. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, we are conducting two experiments. Experiment 1 - Late effects of chronic low dose-rate g-rays irradiation on SPF mice, using life-span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation with g-rays for 400 days was performed using 137 Cs γ-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8,000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. As of 2002 March 31, 3,999 of the total 4,000 mice have died. Preliminary analyses of data show that 20 mGy/day suggested a shortened life span in both sexes. Partial results show that the most common lethal neoplasms in the pooled data of non-irradiated control and irradiated male mice, in order of frequency, were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, and endocrine system were common. Experiment 2 - Effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate g-ray irradiated SPF mice: pilot study, was started in 1999 and is currently in progress. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced attenuation in polarization maintaining fibers: low dose rate response, stress, and materials effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Hickey, S.J.; Brambani, L.A.; Onstott, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The loss induced in polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers by low dose rate <0.01 Gy/h, where 1 Gy = 100 rads(Si) radiation exposure has been found to vary from <0.4 to ∼6 dB/km-10 Gy, depending on the wavelength of measurement and the fiber. Correlations have been established between low dose rate response and the ''permanent'' induced loss determined by fitting the recovery of the induced loss following high dose rate exposure to nth-order kinetics. Using this technique, both 0.85- and 1.3-μm PM fibers have been found which show virtually no permanent incremental loss and would therefore appear to be resistant to low dose rate radiation environments. The asymmetric stress inherent in PM fibers has been shown to reduce the permanent induced loss, while the recovery of the radiation-induced attenuation was found to be enhanced in fibers with Ge-F-doped silica clads

  2. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  3. Role of TPS in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Ling; Dai Haojie; Li Quan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of TPS in 125 I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Methods: Sixty-six patients with orbital tumor treated with 125 I seeds from 2005 to 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Forty-three patients were treated using TPS guided brachytherapy and the prescribed dose was 140 Gy. Other 23 patients were treated without TPS but simply implanted with 125 I seeds at 1 cm intervals in parallel with each other intraoperatively. CT and TPS quality verification were performed postoperatively in all patients. Also, CT and (or) MRI examination were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after brachytherapy for follow-up. χ 2 test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank significance test were used with SPSS 17.0. Results: A total of 1070 125 I seeds were implanted in 66 cases, on average, (16.2 ± 7.3) seeds for each patient. The satisfaction rates of postoperative quality verification in patients with and without TPS pre-plans were 79.07% (34/43) and 43.48% (10/23) respectively (χ 2 =8.542, P=0.003). Ten patients were lost in follow-up. Local recurrence rates in patients with favorable postoperative quality verification were 0 (0/37) in 3 months, 6.25% (2/32) in 6 months, 13.64% (3/22) in 12 months and 3/9 in 24 months respectively, which were significantly different from those (5.26% (1/19), 16.67% (3/18), 30.77% (4/13), 6/6) in the patients with inferior postoperative quality verification (χ 2 =9.017, P=0.0003). Conclusions: TPS plays an important role in 125 I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Also, postoperative quality verification by TPS may help predict the local recurrence after brachytherapy. (authors)

  4. The brachytherapy with low dose-rate iridium for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, Tetsuo; Saito, Shiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Toya, Kazuhito; Dokiya, Takushi; Murai, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy as an option for the treatment of prostate cancer has been commonly performed in USA. As the permanent seeding of the radioactive materials is strictly restricted by the law in Japan, brachytherapy must be performed by the temporary implant. This treatment has been performed at a few facilities in Japan mostly using high dose-rate iridium. Only our facility has been using low dose-rate iridium (LDR-Ir) for prostate cancer. This study evaluates the clinical results of the treatment. Since December 1997 to December 1999, 26 patients with histologically diagnosed as prostate cancer (Stage B, 92%; Stage C, 8%) underwent brachytherapy. Twenty-two patients received brachytherapy alone, three were treated with a combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and one was treated with a combination of brachytherapy and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients ranged in age from 61 to 84 (median 76) years old. Treatment was initiated with perineal needle placement. From 10 to 14 needles were placed through the holes on the template which was fixed to the stabilizer of the transrectal ultrasound probe. After the needle placement, CT scan was performed to draw distribution curves for the treatment planning. LDR-Ir wires were introduced to the sheath and indwelled during the time calculated from dosimetry. Peripheral dose was 70 Gy for the monotherapy of brachytherapy. For the combination therapy, 40 Gy was given by brachytherapy and 36 Gy with ERT afterwards. LDR-Ir wires were removed after completion of the radiation and patients were followed with serum PSA level and annual biopsy. During 2 to 26 (median 12) months follow-up, 8 out of 9 patients with initial PSA level above 20 ng/ml showed PSA failure. All 13 patients with initial PSA level lower than 20 ng/ml were free from PSA failure. Eight out of 11 patients with Gleason's score 7 or higher showed PSA failure, and all 14 patients (including three patients with combined therapy) with

  5. Pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate blunted p53 response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Asakawa, I.; Tamamoto, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Yuki, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Tachibana, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied whether the p53-centered signal transduction pathway induced by acute radiation is interfered with chronic pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate in human cultured cells and whole body of mice. In squamous cell carcinoma cells, we found that a challenge irradiation with X-ray immediately after chronic irradiation resulted in lower levels of p53 than those observed after the challenge irradiation alone. In addition, the induction of p53-centered apoptosis and the accumulation of its related proteins after the challenge irradiation were strongly correlated with the above-mentioned phenomena. In mouse spleen, the induction of apoptosis and the accumulation of p53 and Bax were observed dose-dependently at 12 h after a challenge irradiation. In contrast, we found significant suppression of them induced by challenge irradiation at a high dose-rate when mice were pre-irradiated with chronic irradiation at a low dose-rate. These findings suggest that chronic pre-irradiation suppressed the p53 function through radiation-induced p53-dependent signal transduction processes. There are numerous papers about p53 functions in apoptosis, radiosensitivity, genomic instability and cancer incidence in cultured cells or animals. According to our data and other findings, since p53 can prevent carcinogenesis, pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate might enhance the predisposition to cancer. Therefore, it is possible that different maximal permissible dose equivalents for the public populations are appropriate. Furthermore, concerning health of human beings, studies of the adaptive responses to radiation are quite important, because the radiation response strongly depends on experience of prior exposure to radiation

  6. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  7. Synthesis of (125) I-lamivudine and (125) I-lamivudine-ursodeoxycholic acid codrug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaleb, M A; Abo-Kul, M; Ibrahim, Samy M; Saad, Shokry M; Arafat, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of (125) I-lamivudine ((125) I-3TC) and (125) I-lamivudine-ursodeoxycholic acid codrug ((125) I-3TC-UDCA), suitable for comparative biodistribution studies, is described. The synthesis of the unlabeled precursor 3TC-UDCA proceeds in an 11.6% yield, and the radiolabelling yields for (125) I-3TC and (125) I-3TC-UDCA were 89 and 92%, respectively. The final products are radiochemically pure (greater than 98%). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Suppression of carcinogenesis in mice by adaptive responses to low dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Hoshi, Yuko; Nomura, Takaharu; Ina, Yasuhiro; Tanooka, Hiroshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Low Dose Radiation Research Center, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Effects of prolonged low-dose-rate irradiation on the process of carcinogenesis were examined in mice treated with chemical carcinogen or irradiated with high doses of X-rays. Female ICR mice, 5 week-old, 35 in each group, were exposed to gamma-rays from a {sup 137}Cs source in the long-term low dose rate irradiation facility at CRIEPI. The dose rate was 2.6 mGy/hr (A), 0.96 mGy/hr (B), or 0.30 mGy/hr (C). Thirty-five days later, the mice were injected into the groin with 0.5 mg of methylcholanthrene (MC) dissolved in olive oil and irradiation was continued. Cumulative tumor incidences after 216 days following MC injection were 89% in group A, 76% in group B, and 94% in group C. That in non-irradiated control group was 94%. The difference in the tumor incidence between the control and position B was statistically significant, indicating the suppressive effect of the low dose rate irradiation on the process of MC-induced carcinogenesis with an optimum dose rate around 1 mGy/hr. In B6C3F1 mice, although the suppression of tumor incidence was not observed, there was a significant delay in tumor appearance in the irradiated mice between 100-150 days after MC injection. A group of 20 female C57BL/6N mice, 5 weeks old, were exposed to gamma-rays at 0.95 mGy/hr for 5 weeks. Then, they were exposed weekly to 1.8 Gy whole body X-irradiation (300 kVp) for consecutive 4 weeks to induce thymic lymphoma. Another group received only the fractionated irradiation. The first mouse died from thymic lymphoma appeared 89 days after the last irradiation in the group received only the fractionated irradiation, while 110 days in the group combined with the low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  9. The fitting parameters extraction of conversion model of the low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakerenkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) in bipolar devices consists of in base current degradation of NPN and PNP transistors increase as the dose rate is decreased. As a result of almost 20-year studying, the some physical models of effect are developed, being described in detail. Accelerated test methods, based on these models use in standards. The conversion model of the effect, that allows to describe the inverse S-shaped excess base current dependence versus dose rate, was proposed. This paper presents the problem of conversion model fitting parameters extraction.

  10. Gynecological brachytherapy - from low-dose-rate to high-tech. Gynaekologische Brachytherapie - von Low-dose-rate zu High-tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, T. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Christen, N. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Alheit, H.D. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    The transition from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading treatment is in progress in most centres of radiation therapy. First reports of studies comparing HDR and LDR treatment in cervix cancer demonstrate nearly equal local control. In our own investigations on 319 patients with primary irradiated carcinoma of the cervix (125 HDR/194 LDR) we found the following control rates: Stage FIGO I 95.4%/82.9% (HDR versus LDR), stage FIGO II 71.4%/73.7%, stage FIGO III 57.9%/38.5%. The results are not significant. The side effects - scored after EORT/RTOG criteria - showed no significant differences between both therapies for serious radiogenic late effects on intestine, bladder and vagina. The study and findings from the literature confirm the advantage of the HDR-procedure for patient and radiooncologist and for radiation protection showing at least the same results as in the LDR-area. As for radiobiolgical point of view it is important to consider that the use of fractionation in the HDR-treatment is essential for the sparing of normal tissues and therefore a greater number of small fractionation doses in the brachytherapy should be desirable too. On the other hand the rules, which are true for fractionated percutaneous irradiation therapy (overall treatment time as short as possible to avoid reppopulation of tumor cells) should be taken into consideration in combined brachy-teletherapy regime in gynecologic tumors. The first step in this direction may be accelerated regime with a daily application of both treatment procedures. The central blocking of the brachytherapy region from the whole percutaneous treatment target volume should be critically reflected, especially in the case of advanced tumors. (orig.)

  11. Towards clinical application of RayStretch for heterogeneity corrections in LDR permanent 125I prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Siebert, Frank-André; Vijande, Javier

    RayStretch is a simple algorithm proposed for heterogeneity corrections in low-dose-rate brachytherapy. It is built on top of TG-43 consensus data, and it has been validated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In this study, we take a real clinical prostate implant with 71 125 I seeds as reference and we apply RayStretch to analyze its performance in worst-case scenarios. To do so, we design two cases where large calcifications are located in the prostate lobules. RayStretch resilience under various calcification density values is also explored. Comparisons against MC calculations are performed. Dose-volume histogram-related parameters like prostate D 90 , rectum D 2cc , or urethra D 10 obtained with RayStretch agree within a few percent with the detailed MC results for all cases considered. The robustness and compatibility of RayStretch with commercial treatment planning systems indicate its applicability in clinical practice for dosimetric corrections in prostate calcifications. Its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning is foreseen. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of emitter junction and passive base region on low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershenkov, V.S.; Cherepko, S.V.; Maslov, V.B.; Belyakov, V.V.; Sogoyan, A.V.; Ulimov, N.; Emelianov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Low dose rate effect in bipolar devices consists in the increase of peripheral surface recombination current with dose rate decrease. This is due to the more rapid positive oxide charge and interface trap density build-up as the dose rate becomes lower. High dose rate elevated temperature irradiation is proposed for simulation if the low dose rate effect. In the present we tried to separate the effect of radiation-induced charge in the thick passivation oxide over the emitter junction and passive base regions of npn bipolar transistor. Its goal is to improve bipolar device design for use in space environments and nuclear installations. Three experiments were made during this work. 1. Experiment on radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) effect under elevated temperature was performed to show transistor degradation dependence on emitter-base bias. 2. High dose rate elevated and room temperature irradiation of bipolar transistors were performed to separate effects of emitter-junction and passive base regions. 3. Pre- and post- irradiation hydrogen ambient storage was used to investigate its effect on radiation-induced charge build-up over the passive base region. All experiments were performed with npn and pnp transistors. (authors)

  13. Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy preserves good quality of life in buccal mucosa cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayier, A.; Hayashi, Keiji; Yoshimura, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results and long-term changes in radiation toxicity of stage I-II buccal mucosa cancer patients treated by low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with 198 Au grains. A total of 133 stage I-II buccal mucosa carcinomas patients received 198 Au grain implantation brachytherapy between January 1982 and July 2005: 75 of them were treated by 198 Au grain implantation alone and 58 were treated by 198 Au implantation in combination with external irradiation. The average 198 Au-grain dose was 70 Gy in 7 days. Gross tumor areas ranged from 2.4 cm 2 to 9 cm 2 , and the clinical target areas ranged from 6 cm 2 to 15 cm 2 . The follow-up periods ranged from 3 months to 20 years (mean: 5 years 11 months and median: 5 years 1 months). Failure at the site of the primary lesion occurred in 17 patients. Post-treatment mucosal ulceration developed in 15 patients, and all were cured within 25 months by conservative treatment. Osteoradionecrosis was diagnosed in 8 patients, but only one patient required surgical treatment. No severe complications or aggravation of complications developed more than 10 years after treatment. The results of low-dose-rate (LDR)-brachytherapy (BT) alone and LDR-BT in combination with external irradiation at a total dose of 25 Gy were acceptable from the standpoint of cure rate and quality of life (QOL). (author)

  14. Cellular sensitivity and low dose-rate recovery in Fanconi anaemia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, N.G.; Wurm, R.; Tait, D.M.; Peacock, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare inherited condition characterized by developmental abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure, which requires bone marrow transplantation for successful treatment. This involves the use of alkylating agents and total body or thoraco-abdominal irradiation. Both chemical clastogens and irradiation cause increased chromosome damage in FA cells compared with controls. In some studies FA fibroblasts have been found to be more radiosensitive than normal. From these data it has been inferred that patients with FA might be more sensitive than normal to radiotherapy. However, increased radiosensitivity of FA fibroblasts has not been a uniform finding. The radiosensitivity of fibroblasts from two FA patients was studied at high and low dose-rate (LDR), and their sensitivity compared with normal strains. Both FA strains fell at the sensitive end of the range, but both demonstrated marked dose-rate sparing, with D 0.01 recovery factors of 1.23 and 1.27, similar to the normal strains. These recovery factors are inconsistent with the suggestion that FA patients are recovery deficient. The data indicate that at least some FA strains are capable of LDR recovery, and imply that these patients would probably have a clinical benefit from fractionated or low dose-rate total body irradiation. (Author)

  15. Regeneration of Murine Hair Follicles is Inhibited by Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ishihara, Yoshie; Inoue, Sonoe

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether the effects of low-dose-rate gamma (γ) irradiation are identifiable in the regeneration of murine hair follicles, we irradiated whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the first telogen phase of the hair cycle with 137 Cs γ-rays. The mice were examined for effects on hair follicles, including number, morphology, and pigmentation in the second anagen phase. Effects of γ-radiation on melanocyte stem cells were also investigated by the indirect immunolabeling of tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2). Irradiated skin showed a decrease in hair follicle density and the induction of curved hair follicles along with the presence of white hairs and hypopigmented hair bulbs. There was a small, but not significant, change in the number of TRP2-positive melanocyte stem cells in the hair bulge region of the irradiated skin. These results suggest that low-dose rate γ-irradiation does not deplete melanocyte stem cells, but can damage stem cells and progenitors for both keratinocytes and melanocytes, thereby affecting the structure and pigmentation of regenerated hair follicles in the 2 nd anagen phase.

  16. Cellular sensitivity and low dose-rate recovery in Fanconi anaemia fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnet, N.G.; Wurm, R.; Tait, D.M.; Peacock, J.H. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom). Surrey Branch Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    1994-06-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare inherited condition characterized by developmental abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure, which requires bone marrow transplantation for successful treatment. This involves the use of alkylating agents and total body or thoraco-abdominal irradiation. Both chemical clastogens and irradiation cause increased chromosome damage in FA cells compared with controls. In some studies FA fibroblasts have been found to be more radiosensitive than normal. From these data it has been inferred that patients with FA might be more sensitive than normal to radiotherapy. However, increased radiosensitivity of FA fibroblasts has not been a uniform finding. The radiosensitivity of fibroblasts from two FA patients was studied at high and low dose-rate (LDR), and their sensitivity compared with normal strains. Both FA strains fell at the sensitive end of the range, but both demonstrated marked dose-rate sparing, with D[sub 0.01] recovery factors of 1.23 and 1.27, similar to the normal strains. These recovery factors are inconsistent with the suggestion that FA patients are recovery deficient. The data indicate that at least some FA strains are capable of LDR recovery, and imply that these patients would probably have a clinical benefit from fractionated or low dose-rate total body irradiation. (Author).

  17. Effect of low dose rate irradiation on doped silica core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.; Askins, C.G.; Gingerich, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The optical attenuation induced in multimode doped silica core optical fiber waveguides by a year's exposure to low dose rate (1 rad/day) ionizing radiation was studied, allowing a characterization of fibers deployed in these environments and a determination of the permanent induced loss in the waveguides. Variations in the induced attenuation at 0.85 μm have been observed with changes in the dose rate between 1 rad/day and 9000 rads/min. These dose rate dependences have been found to derive directly from the recovery that occurs during the exposure; the recovery data predict little or no dose rate dependence of the damage at 1.3 μm. The low dose rate exposure has been found to induce significant permanent attenuation in the 0.7-1.7-μm spectral region in all fibers containing P in the core, whether doped uniformly across the diameter or constrained to a narrow spike on the centerline. Whereas permanent loss was induced at 0.85 μm in a P-free binary Ge-doped silica core fiber by the year's exposure, virtually no damage was observed at 1.3 μm

  18. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  19. Characteristics of Noble Gas-filled Ionization Chambers for a Low Dose Rate Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Park, Se Hwan; Ha, Jan Ho; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Nam Ho; Kim, Jung Bok; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Cho, Seung Yeon

    2007-01-01

    An ionization chamber is still widely used in fields such as an environmental radiation monitoring, a Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) in nuclear facilities, and an industrial application due to its operational stability for a long period and its designs for its applications. Ionization chambers for RMS and an environmental radiation monitoring are requested to detect a low dose rate at as low as 10-2 mR/h and several 3R/h, respectively. Filling gas and its pressure are two of the important factors for an ionization chamber development to use it in these fields, because these can increase the sensitivity of an ionization chamber. We developed cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers for a low dose rate monitoring. Response of a cylindrical ionization chamber, which has a 1 L active volume, was compared when it was filled with Air, Ar, and Xe gas respectively. Response of a spherical ionization chamber was also compared in the case of 9 atm and 25 atm filling-pressures. An inter-comparison with a commercially available high pressure Ar ionization chamber and a fabricated ionization chamber was also performed. A High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) ionization chamber, which was configured with a shielding mesh to eliminate an induced charge of positive ions, was fabricated both for the measurement of an environmental dose rate and for the measurement of an energy spectrum

  20. Periodical assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2013-01-01

    To compare the periodical incidence rates of genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients who underwent prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy between the monotherapy group (seed implantation alone) and the boost group (in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT)). A total of 218 patients with a median follow-up of 42.5 months were enrolled. The patients were divided into 2 groups by treatment modality, namely, the monotherapy group (155 patients) and the boost group (63 patients). The periodical incidence rates of GU and GI toxicity were separately evaluated and compared between the monotherapy group and the boost group using the National Cancer Institute - Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. To elucidate an independent factor among clinical and postdosimetric parameters to predict grade 2 or higher GU and GI toxicity in the acute and late phases, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Of all patients, 78.0% showed acute GU toxicity, and 7.8% showed acute GI toxicity, while 63.8% showed late GU toxicity, and 21.1% showed late GI toxicity. The incidence rates of late GU and GI toxicity were significantly higher in the boost group. Multivariate analysis showed that the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before seed implantation was a significant parameter to predict acute GU toxicity, while there were no significant predictive parameters for acute GI toxicity. On the other hand, combination with EBRT was a significant predictive parameter for late GU toxicity, and rectal volume (mL) receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (R100) was a significant predictive parameter for late GI toxicity. The boost group showed higher incidence rates of both GU and GI toxicity. Higher IPSS before seed implantation, combination with EBRT and a higher R100 were significant predictors for acute GU, late GU and late GI toxicity

  1. The Effect of Dose and Quality Assurance in Early Prostate Cancer Treated with Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, A M; Rodda, S L; Mason, M; Musunuru, H; Al-Qaisieh, B; Bownes, P; Smith, J; Franks, K; Carey, B; Bottomley, D

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationship between post-implant computed tomography dosimetry and long-term prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival in patients treated with iodine 125 (I-125) low dose rate prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy and, second, to audit recent practice against Royal College of Radiologists' (RCR) guidelines after the re-introduction of post-implant dosimetry for all patients in our centre. Between March 1995 and September 2007, 2157 consecutive patients with localised prostate cancer underwent I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy in a single UK centre. All patients were transrectal ultrasound planned delivering a 145 Gy (TG 43) minimum peripheral dose. None received supplemental external beam radiotherapy. Post-implant computed tomography-based dosimetry was undertaken between 4 and 6 weeks after treatment and was available for 711 (33%). Outcomes were analysed in terms of the relationship of D90 to prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival (nadir 2+ definition) and all patients had a minimum follow-up of 5 years. For contemporary patients from 2011, quality metrics from post-implant computed tomography as defined by RCR guidelines are presented. A mean D90 of 138.7 Gy (standard deviation 24.7) was achieved for the historic cohort. Biochemical control at 10 years was 76% in patients with D90 > 140 Gy and 68% in those with D90 standard deviation) D90 has increased from 154 (15.3) Gy in 2011 to 164 (13.5) Gy in 2013. Similarly, an increase in the mean (standard deviation) V100 from 92 (4.4) to 95 (3.2) % is noted over time. No difference between clinicians was noted. D90 values of less than 140 Gy continue to be predictive of increased risk of recurrence of prostate cancer across risk groups with longer follow-up. Quality assurance can be used to ensure improved and consistent implant quality in a team with multiple clinicians. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. Tumor therapy with 125I-octreotide and 125I-UdR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, W.; Zhu, R.; Yang, C.; Sun, J.J.; Xu, Y.J.; Zhang, Y.J.; Wu, M.J.; Wang, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the tumor cell damage effect with Auger-electron emitter 125 I in different chemical states. Methods: (1) [Tyr 3 ] octreotide (TOC) and UdR are labeled with 125 I,respectively. (2) Receptor analysis of 125 I-TOC on small cell lung cancer (SCLC) NCI-H446 cell lines is performed comparing with normal lymph cells. NCI-H446 cells added various dose of 125 I-TOC are incubated for different time with 125 I-Nal and non-labeled TOC as control. The capacity of NCI-H446 cell lines bound and internalization of 125 I TOC are determined. The radiation damage of tumor cells is measured by MTF methods. (3) The killing effects of 125 I-UdR in human pancreatic cancer cell line Bax-Pc and Sca-BER bladder carcinoma cells are evaluated with the similar methods. I-UdR penetrating into the Sca-BER cell nucleus is observed with confocal microscope. The grow suppression and clonogenic formation of Sca-BER cells after incubation with 125 I-UdR are analyzed. Proliferation fraction and S phase cell fraction of Sca-BER cell added 125 I-UdR is measured with flow cytometric analysis. Results: (1) Kd=(0.56∼2.0) x 10 -11 mol/L and B max =(1.17∼2.0) x 10 5 cell site are obtained by receptor analysis of 125 I-TOC on NCI-H446 cells. Comparatively, the difference between total binding and non-specific binding is low and there is no saturation of specific binding for normal lymphocyte. About 50% of 125 I-TOC is internalized into the NCI-H446 cell nucleus at 24h after incubation. The damige of NCI-H446 cells by 125 I-TOC is clearly observed. (2) The penetration amount of 125 I-UdR into cell nucleus increases with the incubate time when the concentration of 125 I-UdR is in the range of 10∼500 kBq/mL and reaches the peak fraction of 94% at 36 h after incubation. The radioactivity of 125 I-UdR is then achieved equelibration and no more increased with time. The linear correlation with γ=0.867∼0.978 between the concentration of 125 I-UdR in cell nucleus and the incubation time

  3. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  4. Consequences of the exposure at low dose rates-contribution of animal experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    1990-01-01

    The exposure of laboratory animals to the various types of radiations will induce cancers in relation with the tissue absorbed doses. The shape of the dose-effet relationship is most variable. It is important to distinguish which tumours are comparable to human tumours. Those showing more analogies answer but seldom to the classical lineo-quadratic relationship; however, a strong attenuation of induction is demonstrated at low dose rates. Quasi-threshold relationships are seen after the exposure of some tissues to high-LET radiations. These observations question the validity of generalizing the radiobiologists' dual action theory, setting the origin of the dose-effect relationship in the induction of events within the DNA molecule. There is an alternative in the cellular collaboration events; it assumes that the effectiveness per dose unit decreases constantly as an inverse function of the dose rate [fr

  5. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  6. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in bone marrow was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases of the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. However, there were no remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells. (author)

  7. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of CFU-S colonies on day 12, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  8. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures.

  9. Preparation of 125I FSH hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro de Sabbatini, D.; Nieto de Nunez, G.; Mitta, A.E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Labelling of human FSH of pituitary origin with 125 I and its purification are described. Suitable parameters are selected for the use of radioimmunologic technique for FSH dosage in human serum. (author) [es

  10. Application of 125I in micropipettor check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Xiaoyu; Gao Yunchao; Yang Yadong; Lu Hankui

    2006-01-01

    Gravimetric test is one of authoritative methods for the measurement and validation of the accuracy and precision of micropipettors. The feasibility of radioactive measurement in the check of micropipettors is studied. There are no significant difference in radioactive count rates of 125 I aspirated between 2 qualified micropipettors, but significant difference are recorded between qualified and unqualified micropipettors. So 125 I radiometry agrees with gravimetric tests, and can be used as a laboratory constant test of micropipettors. (authors)

  11. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  12. The use of anisotropic data in 125I prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.A.; Haworth, A.; Mina, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The report recently published by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 43 (TG43) recommends the use of a two dimensional dose distribution function for the dosimetry associated with 125 I, 192 Ir and 103 Pd sources. For commercial planning systems that cannot be readily adapted to use a two dimensional function, a point source approximation is provided. The dose distribution around an array of 125 I seeds has been calculated using the two dimensional model and the point source approximation. Isodose distributions through selected planes and dose volume histograms of selected cubic volumes show that differences between the two models for this array are insignificant, particularly in view of the uncertainties associated with using the data which is provided by TG43 for the two dimensional anisotropy function and that it should be retained for planning prostrate treatments with 125 I seeds. It is recommended that each application must be examined separately to establish the extent to which an isotropic dose distribution is applicable

  13. Dose rate effect of 125I irradiation on normal rabbit eyes and experimental choroidal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.M.; Olsen, K.R.; Schwade, J.G.; Houdek, P.V.; Markoe, A.M.; Pisciotta, V.; Xiaodong Wu

    1993-01-01

    The dose rate effect of radiation by 125 I plaque on choroidal melanoma and normal intraocular tissue was studied. In the first part of the experiment, high activity plaques (HAP) and low activity plagues (LAP) were implanted on rabbit eyes with experimental Greene choroidal melanoma to deliver a total dose of 10 000 cGy to the tumor apex. The mean dose rate calculated at 0.5 mm from the inner sclera in eight eyes with high activity plaques was 3341.5 cGy hr -1 while that in ten eyes with low activity plaques was 239.9 cGy hr -1 . For tumors less than 1.0 mm in height, both groups showed complete tumor regression at the tumor implantation site after plaque treatment. For tumours more than 1.0 mm in height, two out of two eyes in the low activity plaque group and one of four eyes in the high activity plaque group failed to show complete tumor regression. In the second part of the experiment, 125 I plaques were implanted on the sclera of 12 normal rabbits' eyes. Six received high dose rate plaque treatment, while the other six received low dose rate plaque treatment. Clinical and histologic examinations demonstrated more damaging effects to the normal chorioretinal tissues at the plaque implantation site in the high dose rate plaque group. These results suggest that high dose rate plaques are more effective than low dose rate plaques when tumor height is statistically controlled. (Author)

  14. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  15. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  16. Dose Response Model of Biological Reaction to Low Dose Rate Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furikawa, C.; Hoshi, Y.; Kawakami, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to use reproducible and stable indicators to evaluate biological responses to long term irradiation at low dose-rate. They should be simple and quantitative enough to produce the results statistically accurate, because we have to analyze the subtle changes of biological responses around background level at low dose. For these purposes we chose micronucleus formation of U2OS, a human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological responses. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation rom bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide, respectively. the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was counted under a fluorescence microscope. Dose rate in the irradiation room was measured with PLD. Dose response of PLD is linear between 1 mGy to 10 Gy, and standard deviation of triplicate count was several percent of mean value. We fitted statistically dose response curves to the data, and they were plotted on the coordinate of linearly scale response and dose. The results followed to the straight line passing through the origin of the coordinate axes between 0.1-5 Gy, and dose and does rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) was less than 2 when cells were irradiated for 1-10 min. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose above 0.1 Gy when 5,000 binuclear cells were analyzed. In contrast, dose response curves never followed LNT, when cells were irradiated for 7 to 124 days. Difference of the percent binuclear cells bearing micronucleus between irradiated cells and control cells was not statistically significant at the dose below 6 Gy, when cells were continuously irradiated for 124 days. These results suggest that dose response curve of biological reaction is remarkably affected by exposure

  17. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  18. Combination therapy with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and low dose rate radiation in the 9L rat brain tumor and spheroid models: implications for brain tumor brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutin, P.H.; Bernstein, M.; Sano, Y.; Deen, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of combination treatment with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and low dose rate radiation were studied in the 9L rat brain tumor in vivo model and the 9L multicellular tumor spheroid model. F-344 rats bearing intracerebral 9L gliosarcomas were implanted with removable 125 I sources. Minimal (peripheral) tumor doses of 6387 rad produced an increased life-span (ILS) of 28% over that of control rats implanted with dummy sources, BCNU alone (13.3 mg/kg) produced in an ILS of 67%, and combination treatment with BCNU and implanted 125 I sources produced an ILS of 167%. As measured by a colony-forming efficiency assay, the greatest cell kill in 9L spheroids occurred when BCNU was administered 24 hours before irradiation from a 137 Cs source at a low dose rate of 5 rad/minute. At a higher dose rate of 210 rad/minute, the time dependence of the effects of combination treatment was identical and therefore independent of dose rate

  19. Pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate blunted p53 response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa

    2002-01-01

    We investigated whether chronic irradiation at a low dose-rate interferes with the p53-centered signal transduction pathyway induced by radiation in human cultured cells and C57BL/6N mice. In in vitro experiments, we found that a challenge with X-ray irradiation immediately after chronic irradiation resulted in lower levels of p53 than those observed after the challenge alone in glioblastoma cells (A-172). In addition, the levels of p53-centered apoptosis and its related proteins after the challenge were strongly correlated with the above-mentioned phenomena in squamous cell carcinoma cells (SAS/neo). In in vivo experiments, the accumulation of p53 and Bax, and the induction of apoptosis were observed dose-dependently in mouse spleen at 12 h after a challenge with X-rays (3.0 Gy). However, we found significant suppression of p53 and Bax accumulation and the induction of apoptosis 12 h after challenge irradiation at 3.0 Gy with a high doses-rate following chronic pre-irradiation (1.5 Gy, 0.001 Gy/min). These findings suggest that chronic pre-irradiation suppressed the p53 function through radiation-induced signaling and/or p53 stability. (author)

  20. Modified Exponential (MOE) Models: statistical Models for Risk Estimation of Low dose Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose-rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose-rates, since biological responses to radiation are complex processes that depend both on irradiation time and total dose. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose,dose-rate and irradiation time to estimate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and (3H) thymidine uptake in U2OS, human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological response to gamma radiation. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a florescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and (3h) thymidine was pulsed for 4h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/dose-rate. (Author)

  1. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO_2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different "1"3"7Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662 keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. - Highlights: • A gamma irradiation facility for chronic exposures of cells was set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. • The dose rate uniformity and the percentage of primary 662 keV photons on the sample are greater than 92% and 80%, respectively. • The GEANT4 code was used to design the facility. • Good agreement between simulation and experimental dose rate measurements has been obtained. • The facility will allow to safely investigate different issues about low dose rate effects on cultured cells.

  2. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J.

    2000-01-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 ± 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 ± 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  3. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  4. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.; Salinas, B.; Hernandez O, O.; Santillan B, L.; Molero M, C.; Montoya M, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ≤ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%

  5. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on life span prolongation of human premature-aging syndrome model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that Type II diabetes model mice prolonged of their life span by life long low dose rate irradiation. We also found that antioxidant function in variety tissues of some strain of mice were enhancement after low dose/low dose rate irradiation. The prolongation of life span might depend on certain damaged level of reactive oxygen species. We thought the effect of the prolongation was due to the enhancement of the antioxidant activities after irradiation. We investigated whether the enhancement of antioxidant activities after low dose rate irradiation had an effect on life span prolongation. Four-week-old female human premature-aging syndrome model mice, kl/kl (klotho) mice, which the life span of this model mouse is about 65 days, were irradiated with gamma rays at 0.35, 0.70 or 1.2 mGy/hr. The 0.70 mGy/hr-irradiated group remarkably effected on the prolongation of their life span. Some mice of the group were extremely survived for about and more 100 days. Antioxidant activities in the irradiated groups were enhancement by low dose rate irradiation, however the dependence of the dose rates were not clearly difference. These results suggest that the antioxidant activities in this model mouse were enhanced by the low dose rate irradiation, and may make it possible to prolong the life span of this mouse. (author)

  6. Impact of doped boron concentration in emitter on high- and low-dose-rate damage in lateral PNP transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yuzhan; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Wang Yiyuan; Wang Zhikuan; Yang Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation damage under a high or low dose rate in lateral PNP transistors with a heavily or lightly doped emitter is investigated. Experimental results show that as the total dose increases, the base current of transistors would increase and the current gain decreases. Furthermore, more degradation has been found in lightly-doped PNP transistors, and an abnormal effect is observed in heavily doped transistors. The role of radiation defects, especially the double effects of oxide trapped charge, is discussed in heavily or lightly doped transistors. Finally, through comparison between the high- and low-dose-rate response of the collector current in heavily doped lateral PNP transistors, the abnormal effect can be attributed to the annealing of the oxide trapped charge. The response of the collector current, in heavily doped PNP transistors under high- and low-dose-rate irradiation is described in detail. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  7. Physical mechanisms contributing to enhanced bipolar gain degradation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Winokur, P.S.; Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Wei, A.; DeLaus, M.; Combs, W.E.; Pease, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have performed capacitance-voltage (C-V) and thermally-stimulated-current (TSC) measurements on non-radiation-hard MOS capacitors simulating screen oxides of modern bipolar technologies. For 0-V irradiation of ∼25 C, the net trapped-positive-charge density (N ox ) inferred from midgap C-V shifts is ∼25--40% greater for low-dose-rate ( 2 )/s) than for high-dose-rate (> 100 rad(SiO 2 )/s) exposure. Device modeling shows that such a difference in screen-oxide N ox is enough to account for the enhanced low-rate gain degradation often observed in bipolar devices, due to the ∼ exp(N ox 2 ) dependence of the excess base current. At the higher rates, TSC measurements reveal a ∼10% decrease in trapped-hole density over low rates. Also, at high rates, up to ∼2.5-times as many trapped holes are compensated by electrons in border traps than at low rates for these devices and irradiation conditions. Both the reduction in trapped-hole density and increased charge compensation reduce the high-rate midgap shift. A physical model is developed which suggests that both effects are caused by time-dependent space charge in the bulk of these soft oxides associated with slowly transporting and/or metastably trapped holes (e.g., in Eδ' centers). On the basis of this model, bipolar transistors and screen-oxide capacitors were irradiated at 60 C at 200 rad(SiO 2 )/s in a successful effort to match low-rate damage. these surprising results provide insight into enhanced low-rate bipolar gain degradation and suggest potentially promising new approaches to bipolar and BiCMOS hardness assurance for space applications

  8. Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year

  9. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on induction of myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the induction of myeloid leukemia and other kinds of neoplasias in C3H male mice irradiated at several dose rate levels. We compared the incidence of neoplasias among these groups, obtained dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF) for myeloid leukemia. C3H/He male mice were exposed to whole body gamma-ray irradiation at 8 weeks of age. All mice were maintained for their entire life span and teh pathologically examined after their death. Radiation at a high dose-rate of 882 mGy/min (group H), a medium dose-rate of 95.6 mGy/min (group M), and low dose-rates of 0.298 mGy/min (group L-A), 0.067 mGy/min (group L-B) or 0.016 mGy/min (group L-C) were delivered from 137 Cs sources. The mice in group L were irradiated continuously for 22 hours daily up to total doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 Gy over a period of 3 days to 200 days. As for the induction of neoplasias, myeloid leukemia developed significantly more frequently in irradiated groups than in unirradiated groups. The time distribution of mice dying from myeloid leukemia did not show a difference between groups H and L. The incidence of myeloid leukemia showed a greater increase in the high dose-rate groups than in the low and medium dose-rate groups in the dose range over 2 Gy, it also showed significant increases in the groups irradiated with 1 Gy of various dose rate, but the difference between these groups was not clear. These dose effect curves had their highest values on each curve at about 3 Gy. We obtained DDREF values of 2-3 by linear fittings for their dose response curves of dose ranges in which leukemia incidences were increasing. (author)

  10. The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Mak, Tytus D.; Chen, Congju; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Brenner, David J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics has been shown to have utility in assessing responses to exposure by ionizing radiation (IR) in easily accessible biofluids such as urine. Most studies to date from our laboratory and others have employed γ-irradiation at relatively high dose rates (HDR), but many environmental exposure scenarios will probably be at relatively low dose rates (LDR). There are well-documented differences in the biologic responses to LDR compared to HDR, so an important question is to assess LDR effects at the metabolomics level. Our study took advantage of a modern mass spectrometry approach in exploring the effects of dose rate on the urinary excretion levels of metabolites 2 days after IR in mice. A wide variety of statistical tools were employed to further focus on metabolites, which showed responses to LDR IR exposure (0.00309 Gy/min) distinguishable from those of HDR. From a total of 709 detected spectral features, more than 100 were determined to be statistically significant when comparing urine from mice irradiated with 1.1 or 4.45 Gy to that of sham-irradiated mice 2 days post-exposure. The results of this study show that LDR and HDR exposures perturb many of the same pathways such as TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, which also have been implicated in our previous IR studies. However, it is important to note that dose rate did affect the levels of particular metabolites. Differences in urinary excretion levels of such metabolites could potentially be used to assess an individual's exposure in a radiobiological event and thus would have utility for both triage and injury assessment. (orig.)

  11. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  12. The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J.

    1997-12-01

    This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly

  13. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Brömme, Jens O.; Geretschläger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3–23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  14. Treatment outcome with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage oral tongue cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalavat Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Although radical radiotherapy is known to be equally effective for early-stage oral tongue cancers (T1-2 N0 with the added advantage of organ and function preservation, surgery remains the preferred treatment. We present outcome of patients treated with brachytherapy (BT either radical or boost. Materials and Methods : Fifty-seven patients (T1/T2 31/26 were studied. Seventeen patients (30% were treated with radical BT (50-67 Gy while 40 (70% with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT + BT (36-56 Gy + 15-38 Gy]. Low-dose-rate (LDR BT was delivered with 192 Ir wires, using plastic bead technique with varied dose rates (< 60 cGy/h in 29 patients, 60-90 cGy/h in 17, and> 90 cGy/h in 11. Results : The overall local control (LCR was achieved in 59.7% (34/57 patients. LCR for T1 and T2 was 67.8% and 50%, respectively. A total of 23 patients had failures [local: 20 (T1: 8; T2: 12 patients, node: 5 (T1:2; T2: 3, and local + nodal: 3]. Overall 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival (OAS were 51% and 67%, respectively and those for T1 and T2 was 64.5/77.4% and 38.5/54% respectively (P = 0.002. All 16 patients were salvaged. Median survival after salvage treatment was 13.5 months (6-100 months. Soft tissue necrosis was observed in 12.3% (7/57 and osteoradionecrosis in two patients. Conclusion : BT, as an integral part of radical radiation therapy in early-stage tongue cancers, appears to be an effective alternative treatment modality with preservation of the organ and function without jeopardizing the outcome.

  15. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  16. Phase III trial of high and low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Fuchihata, Hajime; Furukawa, Souhei

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Oral tongue carcinomas are highly curable with radiotherapy. In the past, patients with tongue carcinoma have usually been treated with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. This Phase III study was designed to compare the treatment results obtained with LDR with those obtained with high dose rate (HDR) interstitial radiotherapy for tongue carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The criteria for patient selection for the Phase III study were: (a) presence of a T1T2N0 tumor that could be treated with single-plane implantation, (b) localization of tumor at the lateral tongue border, (c) tumor thickness of 10 mm or less, (d) performance status between O and 3, and (e) absence of any severe concurrent disease. From April 1992 through December 1993, 15 patients in the LDR group (70 Gy/4 to 9 days) and 14 patients in the HDR group (60 Gy/10 fractions/6 days) were accrued. The time interval between two fractions of the HDR brachytherapy was more than 6 h. Results: Local recurrence occurred in two patients treated with LDR brachytherapy but in none of the patients treated with HDR. One- and 2-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were both 86%, compared with 100% in the HDR group (p = 0.157). There were four patients with nodal metastasis in the LDR group and three in the HDR group. Local recurrence occurred in two of the four patients with nodal metastases in the LDR group. One- and 2-year nodal control rates for patients in the LDR group are were 85%, compared with 79% in the HDR group. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to traditional LDR brachytherapy for early tongue cancer and eliminate the radiation exposure for medical staffs

  17. Overview of Radiosensitivity of Human Tumor Cells to Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jerry R.; Zhang Yonggang; Zhou Haoming; Gridley, Daila S.; Koch, Cameron J.; Slater, James M.; Little, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We compared clonogenic survival in 27 human tumor cell lines that vary in genotype after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose rate (HDR) irradiation. We measured susceptibility to LDR-induced redistribution in the cell cycle in eight of these cell lines. Methods and Materials: We measured clonogenic survival after up to 96 hours of LDR (0.25 Gy/h) irradiation. We compared these with clonogenic survival after HDR irradiation (50 Gy/h). Using flow cytometry, we measured LDR-induced redistribution as a function of time during LDR irradiation in eight of these cell lines. Results: Coefficients that describe clonogenic survival after both LDR and HDR irradiation segregate into four radiosensitivity groups that associate with cell genotype: mutant (mut)ATM, wild-type TP53, mutTP53, and an unidentified gene in radioresistant glioma cells. The LDR and HDR radiosensitivity correlates at lower doses (∼2 Gy HDR, ∼6 Gy LDR), but not at higher doses (HDR > 4 Gy; LDR > 6 Gy). The rate of LDR-induced loss of clonogenic survival changes at approximately 24 hours; wild-type TP53 cells become more resistant and mutTP53 cells become more sensitive. Redistribution induced by LDR irradiation also changes at approximately 24 hours. Conclusions: Radiosensitivity of human tumor cells to both LDR and HDR irradiation is genotype dependent. Analysis of coefficients that describe cellular radiosensitivity segregates 27 cell lines into four statistically distinct groups, each associating with specific genotypes. Changes in cellular radiosensitivity and redistribution in the cell cycle are strongly time dependent. Our data establish a genotype-dependent time-dependent model that predicts clonogenic survival, explains the inverse dose-rate effect, and suggests possible clinical applications

  18. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  19. Absorbed dose to mice in prolonged irradiation by low-dose rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, Akihiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saitou, Mikio; Kudo, Iwao [and others

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the dose absorbed by mice was evaluated as a preliminary study of the late effects of prolonged continuous irradiation of mice with low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Eight-week-old male and female SPF C3H/HeN mice in three irradiation rooms were exposed to irradiation at 8000, 400, and 20 mGy, respectively, using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-source. Nine racks were arranged in a circle approximately 2.5 m from the source in each room, and 10 cages were arranged on the 4 shelves of each rack. Dose distributions, such as in air at the source level, in the three rooms were estimated by using ionization chambers, and the absorbed dose distributions in the room and relative dose distributions in the cages in relation to the distance of the cage center were examined. The mean abdomen doses of the mice measured by TLD were compared with the absorbed doses in the cages. The absorbed dose distributions showed not only inverse-inverse-square-law behavior with distance from the source, but geometric symmetry in every room. The inherent scattering and absorption in each room are responsible for such behavior and asymmetry. Comparison of relative dose distributions revealed cage positions that are not suitable for experiments with high precision doses, but all positions can be used for prolonged continuous irradiation experiments if the position of the cages is rotated regularly. The mean abdomen doses of the mice were similar in each cage. The mean abdomen doses of the mice and the absorbed doses in a cage were almost the same in all cages. Except for errors concerning the positions of the racks and cages, the uncertainties in the exposure doses were estimated to be about {+-}12% for 8000 mGy group, 17% for 400 mGy group, and 35% for 20 mGy group. (K.H.)

  20. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  1. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  2. Low dose rate radiation favors apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, Albert D.; Rupnow, Brent; Knox, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated promising results in the treatment of chemotherapy refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The radiation associated with this therapy is emitted in a continuous fashion at low dose rates (LDR). Results from studies comparing the relative efficacy of LDR radiation and high dose rate (HDR) radiation on malignant cell killing have been variable. This variability may be due in part to the relative contribution of different mechanisms of cell killing (apoptosis or necrosis) at different dose rates. Materials and Methods: In order to test this hypothesis, the relative efficacy of LDR (16.7 cGy/hr) and HDR radiation (422 cGy/min) were compared using a human B cell lymphoma cell line (PW) and a PW clone (c26) stably transfected to overexpress the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2. The endpoints evaluated included the relative amount of cell killing, the fraction of cell killing attributable to apoptosis versus necrosis, and the impact of Bcl-2 overexpression on both overall cell killing and the fraction of killing attributable to apoptosis. Results: HDR and LDR radiation resulted in similar overall cell killing in the PW wild type cell line. In contrast, killing of clone c26 cells was dose rate dependent. One third less killing was seen following LDR irradiation of c26 cells compared with equivalent doses of HDR radiation. Analysis of the relative mechanisms of killing following LDR irradiation revealed a relative increase in the proportion of killing attributable to apoptosis. Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in PW cells, LDR radiation appears to be highly dependent on apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death. These findings may have implications for the selection of patients for RIT, and for the treatment of tumors that overexpress Bcl-2. They may also help form the basis for future rational design of effective combined modality therapies utilizing RIT

  3. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  4. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestaut, Matthew M.; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J.; Hasan, Salman A.; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  5. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  6. High versus low dose rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Chul; Loh, John J.K.; Kim, Gwi-Eon; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and to compare them with the effects of LDR brachytherapy. From January 1971 to December 1992, 104 patients suffering from adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 34 patients and HDR brachytherapy on 70 patients. In the LDR group, eight patients were in stage IB, six in IIA, 12 in IIB, three in IIIA and five in IIIB. External radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-rays, 2 Gy fraction per day, total dose of whole pelvis 36-52 Gy (median 46 Gy). LDR radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with a Henschke applicator, 37-59 Gy targeted at point A (median 43 Gy). In the HDR group, there were 16 patients in stage IB, six in IIA, 32 in IIB and 16 in IIIB. The total whole pelvis dose of external radiation was 40-50 Gy (median 44 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with a remotely controlled after-loading system (RALS), 30-48 Gy (median 39 Gy) targeted at point A, three times per week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in the LDR group was 72.9, 61.9 and 35.7% in stage I, II and III, respectively and the corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1, 58.3 and 43.8% (p 0.05). No prognostic factors were evident in the comparison between the two groups. There was no difference in terms of 5-year survival rate in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix between those treated with HDR and those treated with LDR brachytherapy. Even though late complication rates were higher in the HDR group, most of them were classified as grade I. This retrospective study suggests that HDR

  7. Positional variation of applicators during low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Ponni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to know the effect of variation in position of applicators to the dose received by the tumor volume, critical organs such as rectum and bladder and the correlation of variation on the clinical outcome.Material and methods: 36 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer, undergoing intracavitary brachythe - rapy (ICBT from October 2005 to December 2006 were the subjects of the study. Two pairs of orthogonal X-ray films were taken: one prior to loading of sources and the other after removal of sources. These patients were followed up as per the RTOG criteria.Results: The median duration of insertion was 25 hours with a median follow up period of 6.7 months. The translational variation of the applicator position for all patients was 3 mm and 1 mm (2 SD, respectively, in the patient’s lateral and antero-posterior direction. The rotational variation was 3 and 4 degrees (2 SD in the patient’s transverse and sagittal planes. Detailed analysis of source movement showed following changes in median dose: point A: 14%, point B: 2%, point P: 1%, Rectum 1: 3.5%, Rectum 2: 4% and Bladder: 9.1%. The incidence of rectal toxicity was 6/36(16.7% and that of bladder was 1/36 (2.8%. When the variables were grouped to evaluate the relationship, our study showed statistically significant relationship between: R2 and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.002, point A and rectal toxicity (Pearson: 0.792, lateral displacement/anteroposterior displacement and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.012/0.003, beta angle and R2 (p value: 0.002.Conclusions: The geometric relationships between the ICBT applicators and the critical structures vary during the course of low dose rate brachytherapy. Source movement does result in significant dose alterations in terms of increased rate of complications, but its impact on cure rates needs to be studied in the future.

  8. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Chao, Clifford; Erickson, Beth; Fowler, Jeffery; Gupta, Nilendu; Martinez, Alvaro; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  9. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  10. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  11. Evaluation of the dose distribution for prostate implants using various 125I and 103Pd sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Luerman, Christine M.; Sowards, Keith T.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, several different models of 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources have been introduced in order to meet the increasing demand for prostate seed implants. These sources have different internal structures; hence, their TG-43 dosimetric parameters are not the same. In this study, the effects of the dosimetric differences among the sources on their clinical applications were evaluated. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations were performed by comparisons of dose distributions and dose volume histograms of prostate implants calculated for various designs of 125 I and 103 Pd sources. These comparisons were made for an identical implant scheme with the same number of seeds for each source. The results were compared with the Amersham model 6711 seed for 125 I and the Theragenics model 200 seed for 103 Pd using the same implant scheme.

  12. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  13. More accurate fitting of 125I and 103Pd radial dose functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-01-01

    In this study an improved functional form for fitting the radial dose functions, g(r), of 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds is presented. The new function is capable of accurately fitting radial dose functions over ranges as large as 0.05 cm≤r≤10 cm for 125 I seeds and 0.10 cm≤r≤10 cm for 103 Pd seeds. The average discrepancies between fit and calculated data are less than 0.5% over the full range of fit and maximum discrepancies are 2% or less. The fitting function is also capable of accounting for the sharp increase in g(r) (upturn) seen for some sources for r 125 I seeds and 9 103 Pd seeds using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose. Fitting coefficients of the new function are tabulated for all 27 seeds. Extrapolation characteristics of the function are also investigated. The new functional form is an improvement over currently used fitting functions with its main strength being the ability to accurately fit the rapidly varying radial dose function at small distances. The new function is an excellent candidate for fitting the radial dose function of all 103 Pd and 125 I brachytherapy seeds and will increase the accuracy of dose distributions calculated around brachytherapy seeds using the TG-43 protocol over a wider range of data. More accurate values of g(r) for r<0.5 cm may be particularly important in the treatment of ocular melanoma

  14. Preparation of 125I labelled compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Beiki, D.; Matlubi, M.; Jalilian, A.R.; Motamedi, F.; Karimian, A.R.; Najafi, R.; Babaei, M.; Kamali Dehghan, M.; Shah-Hossaini, G.R.; Shafahi, S.K.; Keshavarzi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Iodinated compounds with 131 I, 125 I and 123 I have been widely used for biochemical function studies. In conjunction with SPECT, [ 123 I] labelled proteins have various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine. In this study, synthesis and quality control of [ 18 F]radiofluorinated and radioiodinated of some proteins and peptides as well as their biological behaviors are considered to be investigated. (author)

  15. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolae, Alexandru [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast City Hospital, Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Lu, Lin [Department of Radiation Therapy, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heath, Emily [Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.ravi@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  16. Evaluation of a Machine-Learning Algorithm for Treatment Planning in Prostate Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolae, Alexandru; Morton, Gerard; Chung, Hans; Loblaw, Andrew; Jain, Suneil; Mitchell, Darren; Lu, Lin; Helou, Joelle; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem; Heath, Emily; Ravi, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the application of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to automatically generate high-quality, prostate low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy treatment plans. The ML algorithm can mimic characteristics of preoperative treatment plans deemed clinically acceptable by brachytherapists. The planning efficiency, dosimetry, and quality (as assessed by experts) of preoperative plans generated with an ML planning approach was retrospectively evaluated in this study. Methods and Materials: Preimplantation and postimplantation treatment plans were extracted from 100 high-quality LDR treatments and stored within a training database. The ML training algorithm matches similar features from a new LDR case to those within the training database to rapidly obtain an initial seed distribution; plans were then further fine-tuned using stochastic optimization. Preimplantation treatment plans generated by the ML algorithm were compared with brachytherapist (BT) treatment plans in terms of planning time (Wilcoxon rank sum, α = 0.05) and dosimetry (1-way analysis of variance, α = 0.05). Qualitative preimplantation plan quality was evaluated by expert LDR radiation oncologists using a Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The average planning time for the ML approach was 0.84 ± 0.57 minutes, compared with 17.88 ± 8.76 minutes for the expert planner (P=.020). Preimplantation plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the BT plans; the average prostate V150% was 4% lower for ML plans (P=.002), although the difference was not clinically significant. Respondents ranked the ML-generated plans as equivalent to expert BT treatment plans in terms of target coverage, normal tissue avoidance, implant confidence, and the need for plan modifications. Respondents had difficulty differentiating between plans generated by a human or those generated by the ML algorithm. Conclusions: Prostate LDR preimplantation treatment plans that have equivalent quality to plans created

  17. High versus low dose-rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Gwi Eon; Chung, Eun Ji; Suh, Chang Ok; Hong, Soon Won; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John Jk

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is low. Traditionally, Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment for patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effects of the High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix compared with the LDR. From January 1971 to December 1992, 106 patients of adenocarcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University with curative intent. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 35 patients and 71 patients were treated with HDR brachytherapy. In LDR Group, 8 patients were in stage I, 18 in stage II and 9 in stage III. external radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-ray, daily 2 Gy fractionation, total dose 40-46 Gy (median 48 Gy). And LDR Radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with Henschke applicator, 22-56 Gy to point A (median 43 Gy). In HDR Group, there were 16 patients in stage I, 38 in stage II and 17 in stage III. The total dose of external radiation was 40-61 Gy (median 45 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with RALS(Remote Afterloading System), 30-57 Gy (median 39 Gy) to point A, 3 times a week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in LDR Group was 72.9%, 61.9%, 45.0% in stage I, II, III, respectively and corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1%, 58.3%, 41.2%, respectively (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference in terms of the 5-year overall survival rate between HDR Group and LDR Group in adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. There was 11% of late complication rates in LDR Group and 27% in HDR Group. There were no prognostic factors compared HDR with LDR group. The incidence of the late complication rate in HDR Group stage II, III was higher than that in LDR Group (16.7% vs. 31.6% in stage II, 11.1% vs. 35.3% in stage III, p>0

  18. Half-life determination of 125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felice, P.; Ientile, P.; Zicari, C.

    1990-01-01

    The half-life of 125 I was determined by measuring the activity of an initial 3 kBq source at several times. Over a period of two months, 96 absolute measurements were performed, using the sum-peak method to give a half-life of (59.38±0.03) d. A discussion is presented on the effect of correcting for accidental coincidences on the half-life measurements by comparing the results with and without this correction. (orig.)

  19. The half-life of 125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.R.S.; Meyer, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) organized an international comparison of activity measurements of a solution of 125 I. The half-life value adopted was 59.5±0.4d. The large uncertainty took account of a recently published value (Schrader, 1986) which is considerably lower than the widely used value of 60.0±0.1d. The present work, which was undertaken at the suggestion of the BIPM, has yielded a value which confirms the lower measurement. (author)

  20. Scintillator performance at low dose rates and low temperatures for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci-Tam, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance, especially for forward calorimetry, and highlights the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The upgrade includes both electromagnetic and hadronic components, with the latter using a mixture of silicon sensors (in the highest radiation regions at high pseudorapidity) and scintillator as its active components. The scintillator will nevertheless receive large doses accumulated at low dose rates, and will have to operate at low temperature - around -30 degrees Celsius. We discuss measurements of scintillator radiation tolerance, from in-situ measurements from the current CMS endcap calorimeters, and from measurements at low temperature and low dose-rate at gamma sources in the laboratory.

  1. Correlations of post-implant regional dosimetric parameters at 24 hours and one month, with clinical results of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Okazaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the correlations of post-implant regional dosimetrics at 24 hours (24 h and 1 month after implant procedures, with clinical outcomes of low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods : Between January 2008 and December 2014, 130 consecutive patients treated for localized prostate cancer, receiving definitive iodine-125 ( 125 I brachytherapy treatment were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent post-implant CT imaging for dosimetric analysis at 24 h and 1 month after implantation procedure. Prostate contours were divided into quadrants: anterior-superior (ASQ, posterior-superior (PSQ, anterior-inferior (AIQ, and posterior-inferior (PIQ. Predictive factors and cut-off values of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS and toxicities of LDR brachytherapy were analyzed. Results : The median follow-up time was 69.5 months. Seven patients (5.4% had biochemical failure. The 3-year and 5-year BFFS rates were 96.7% and 93.1%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score were significant prognostic factors for biochemical failure. D 90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the volume of PSQ and PIQ at 24 h, and D 90 of PSQ at 1 month were also significant factors. The cut-off values of PSQ D 90 were 145 Gy at 24 h and 160 Gy at 1 month. D 90 of the whole prostate was not significant at 24 h and at 1 month. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month was a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage. Conclusions : Post-implant D 90 of PSQ is significantly associated with BFFS for localized prostate cancer not only at 1 month, but also at 24 hours. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month is also a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage.

  2. Preparation of sup 125 I-creatine phosphokinase-MM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingxian, Su; Jingmin, Ma [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1988-09-01

    {sup 125}I-creatine phosphokinase-MM ({sup 125}I-CPK-MM) was prepared by {sup 125}I-labelled Bolton-Hunter reagent (HPNS). Iodinating conditions of HPNS and its conjugation to protein were studied. {sup 125}I-CPK-MM with immune activity was obtained and used to establish the {sup 125}I-CPK-MM radioimmunoassay method by the General Hospital of PLA. {sup 125}I-CPK-MM in PBS-G solution containing 0.015 mol/l ethyl mercaptan at 4-10 deg C can be used for one month.

  3. Impacts of low dose rate irradiation on the fertility, fecundity and hatchling survival of Japanese rice fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Coughlin, D.P.; Marsh, L.C.; Yi, Yi; Winn, R.

    2004-01-01

    A renewed international interest in the effects on biota from low dose rate irradiation has recently occurred. Much of that interest is centered on the relevance of previously accepted dose rate guidelines (e.g. 10 mGy d -1 for aquatic biota) suggested by the ICRP and IAEA. All parties concerned seem to agree that additional data are needed on population level impacts from chronic low-level exposures to radionuclides. Using a Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LoDIF), we conducted an experiment on the fecundity, fertility and hatchling survival of Japanese Rice Fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes). Fish were exposed externally to 137 Cs from juvenile through adulthood at mean dose rates of 3.5, 35 and 350 mGy d -1 . Fish were bred at maturity and the following endpoints were examined: 1) the number of eggs produced; 2) the percent of eggs that hatched; and 3) the survival of hatchlings 20-days post hatch. The influence of gender was examined by breeding irradiated males with control females; control males with irradiated females; irradiated males with irradiated females; and control males with control females. The data contribute to our understanding the impacts of low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  4. Postenucleation orbits in retinoblastoma: treatment with 125I brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare; Sealy, Ross; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Lecuona, Karin; Reddi, V. Bala

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Children with retinoblastoma that extends into or through the choroid, sclera, or optic nerve are at risk of developing orbital disease, as well as metastases. Previously, these enucleated orbits were treated with external beam radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy for tumors in and around the eye was pioneered by Sealy in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1974. In 1983, he developed a technique to irradiate the contents of the orbit while limiting the dose to the bony orbit and eyelids. Methods and Materials: Six nylon tubes containing 125 I seeds were implanted through the eyelids around the periphery of the orbit. Each contained a metal gutter that screens the outer part of the seeds from the bony orbit. A seventh unscreened tube was placed in the center, and a metal disc with 125 I seeds on its posterior surface was secured beneath the eyelids. Between 1983 and 2000, 57 orbits were treated in 56 children with retinoblastoma. Thirty-six were treated prophylactically and 21, with tumor at the resection line of the nerve, extrascleral tumor, or metastases, were treated therapeutically. They received a median dose of 34 Gy in 70 h; 30 also received chemotherapy. Children with tumor at the resection line of the nerve also received treatment to the craniospinal axis. Results: The median follow-up of the 35 patients treated prophylactically was 35 months (range 0-187). Seven patients died, 6 of metastases, at a median of 10 months (range 4-29) after the implant. Eight of the 13 patients with microscopic extraocular tumor survived a median of 29 months (range 5-156). None of the 8 patients presenting with orbital tumor or metastases survived. No orbital recurrences developed in any of the patients. Cosmesis was considerably improved compared with previous forms of irradiation. Conclusion: Orbital brachytherapy is an effective method of irradiating the orbit to prevent recurrent tumor, the treatment time is short, and the cosmesis is much more

  5. BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Meikle, S.; Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J.; Bucci, J. A.; Zaider, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5–3 mm for a 10–60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for

  6. BrachyView: proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petasecca, M; Loo, K J; Safavi-Naeini, M; Han, Z; Metcalfe, P E; Meikle, S; Pospisil, S; Jakubek, J; Bucci, J A; Zaider, M; Lerch, M L F; Qi, Y; Rosenfeld, A B

    2013-04-01

    The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s

  7. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  8. Effect of continuous exposure to very low dose rates of gamma rays on life span and neoplasia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, I.B. III; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Oghiso, Yoichi; Sato, Fumiaki; Matsushita, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Late effects of continuous exposure to ionizing radiation are potential hazards to workers in radiation facilities as well as to the general public. In the recent years, low-dose-rate and low-dose effects have become a serious concern. Using a total of 4,000 mice, we studied the late biological effects of chronic exposure to low-dose-rate radiation on life span and neoplasia. Two thousand male and 2000 female 8-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) B6C3F1 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups, one non-irradiated (control) and three irradiated. The irradiated groups were exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at dose-rates of 21, 1.1 and 0.05 mGy day -1 for approximately 400 days with total doses equivalent to 8000, 400 and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept under SPF conditions until natural death and pathological examination was performed to determine the cause of death. Statistical analyses showed that the life spans of mice of both sexes irradiated with 21 mGy day -1 (P -1 (P 86.7% of all deaths. Compared to the non-irradiated controls, incidences of lethal neoplasms were significantly increased for myeloid leukaemia and hemangiosarcoma in males, soft tissue neoplasms and malignant granulosa cell tumors in females exposed to 21 mGy day -1 . The number of multiple primary neoplasms per mouse was significantly increased in mice irradiated at 21 mGy day -1 . Our results suggest that life shortening in mice continuously exposed to low dose-rate gamma rays is due to early death from a variety of neoplasms and not from increased incidence of specific lethal neoplasms. (author)

  9. Effects of low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the lymphocyte subpopulations of peripheral blood in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Yifang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of rats. Methods: Ninety-six rats were randomly divided into control group and irradiated group exposed to low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf,0.35 mGy/h) for 20.5 h every day. At days 14,28,42,56 and 70 d after irradiation and 35 d after stopping irradiation, After 8 rats of each group were killed, WBC and lymphocyte subpopulations of CD4 + CD3 + , CD8 + CD3 + and CD45RA + /CD161α + in peripheral blood were estimated respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, WBC was reduced significantly at dose of 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy (P + CD3 - was evidently higher compared with control group at doses of 0.1,0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation (P + CD3 - was obviously higher compared with control group at dose of 0.2 and 0.3 Gy (P + CD3 + at dose of 0.1 Gy (P + CD3 + at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 Gy (P + CD45RA - ) was increased significantly at doses of 0.2-0.3 Gy, and peripheral blood B cells(CD161α - CD45RA + ) was reduced remarkably at doses of 0.1-0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation compared with the control group. Conclusions: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could make TCR (T-cell-receptor) mutant, therefore, WBC, B cells in peripheral blood significantly reduced and NK cells increased. These changes may could not recover at 35 d after Stopping irradiation. (authors)

  10. Effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Xufang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats. Methods: 96 rats were randomly divided into the control group and the irradiation group with low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf, 0.35 mGy/h) irradiation 20.5 h every day. 8 rats of each group were killed at 14 d, 28 d, 42d, 56d, 70d after irradiation and 35d after the irradiation, and their peripheral hematological cells were tested respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, peripheral blood WBC was reduced significantly at the dose of 0.3Gy and 0.4Gy (P < 0.05), and was reduced remarkably at dose of 0.5Gy (P<0.01) and 35d after stopping irradiation(P<0.01). At dose of 0.2Gy, Peripheral blood RBC was abnormally higher comparing with the control group (P<0.01), accompanying with higher HCT and HGB, which suggests condensed blood. At the other point, RBC tend to become lower, but only at dose 0.5Gy, and the difference is significant comparing with control group(P <0.05). At dose of 0.3Gy, 0.4Gy and 0.5Gy, HCT were significantly lower comparing with control group. Comparing with control group, MCV was higher at 35d after stopping irradiation, and PLT was significantly lower in dose of 0.2Gy. Conclusion: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could significantly reduce peripheral blood WBC, with less effects on RBC and PLT. The reduced WBC could not recover at 35d after stopping irradiation. (authors)

  11. MRI-based preplanning in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakano, Masahiro; Kubota, Yasuaki; Maeda, Sunaho; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results between MRI-based and TRUS-based preplanning in permanent prostate brachytherapy, and to estimate the accuracy of MRI-based preplanning by comparing with CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Methods and materials: Twenty-one patients were entered in this prospective study with written informed consent. MRI-based and TRUS-based preplanning were performed. The seed and needle locations were identical according to MRI-based and TRUS-based preplanning. MRI-based and TRUS-based preplanning were compared using DVH-related parameters. Following brachytherapy, the accuracy of the MRI-based preplanning was evaluated by comparing it with CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Results: Mean MRI-based prostate volume was slightly underestimated (0.73 cc in mean volume) in comparison to TRUS-based volume. There were no significant differences in the mean DVH-related parameters except with rectal V 100 (cc) between TRUS-based and MRI-based preplanning. Mean rectal V 100 (cc) was 0.74 cc in TRUS-based and 0.29 cc in MRI-based preplanning, respectively, and the values demonstrated a statistical difference. There was no statistical difference in mean rectal V 150 (cc), and rectal V 100 (cc) between MRI-based preplanning and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Conclusion: Prostate volume estimation and DVH-related parameters in MRI-based preplanning were almost identical to TRUS-based preplanning. From the results of CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry, MRI-based preplanning was therefore found to be a reliable and useful modality, as well as being helpful for TRUS-based preplanning. MRI-based preplanning can more accurately predict postimplant rectal dose than TRUS-based preplanning

  12. The effects of environmental factors and experimental method on the results of low dose rate microprocessor irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, A; Gerard, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IPSN, Centre d' Etudes de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Gauthier, G; Henry, J Y; Le Meur, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1992-02-01

    As part of the safety studies of nuclear facilities, a series of experiments have been in progress over a number of years to determine the principal parameters for which allowance needs to be made in the testing of microprocessors in low dose rate nuclear irradiation environments. This paper contains a brief description of the results already published, followed by a review of the latest results obtained, specifically as concerns the effects of temperature, the origin of the batch, the angle of incidence of the radiation and the test routine used. (author)

  13. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  14. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  15. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  16. Conditioned instrumental behaviour in the rat: Effects of prenatal irradiation with various low dose-rate doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, H.

    1986-01-01

    4 groups of rats of the Wistar-strain were subjected to γ-irradiation on the 16th day of gestation. 5 rats received 0,6 Gy low dose rate irradiation, 5 animals received 0,9 Gy low dose and 6 high dose irradiation, 3 females were shamirradiated. The male offspring of these 3 irradiation groups and 1 control group were tested for locomotor coordination on parallel bars and in a water maze. The female offspring were used in an operant conditioning test. The locomotor test showed slight impairment of locomotor coordination in those animals irradiated with 0,9 Gy high dose rate. Swimming ability was significantly impaired by irradiation with 0,9 Gy high dose rate. Performance in the operant conditioning task was improved by irradiation with 0,9 Gy both low and high dose rate. The 0,9 Gy high dose rate group learned faster than all the other groups. For the dose of 0,9 Gy a significant dose rate effect could be observed. For the dose of 0,6 Gy a similar tendency was observed, differences between 0,6 Gy high and low dose rate and controls not being significant. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Assessment of the feasibility of using transrectal ultrasound for postimplant dosimetry in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Rhian Siân, E-mail: rhian.s.davies@wales.nhs.uk; Perrett, Teresa; Powell, Jane; Barber, Jim; Tanguay, Jacob; Button, Michael; Cochlin, Dennis; Smith, Christian; Lester, Jason Francis

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed to establish whether transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-based postimplant dosimetry (PID) is both practically feasible and comparable to computed tomography (CT)-based PID, recommended in current published guidelines. In total, 22 patients treated consecutively at a single cancer center with low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer had a transrectal ultrasound performed immediately after implant (d0-TRUS) and computed tomography scan 30 days after implant (d30-CT). Postimplant dosimetry planning was performed on both image sets and the results were compared. The interobserver reproducibility of the transrectal ultrasound postimplant dosimetry planning technique was also assessed. It was noticed that there was no significant difference in mean prostate D{sub 90} (136.5 Gy and 144.4 Gy, p = 0.2197), V{sub 100} (86.4% and 89.1%, p = 0.1480) and V{sub 150} (52.0% and 47.8%, p = 0.1657) for d30-CT and d0-TRUS, respectively. Rectal doses were significantly higher for d0-TRUS than d30-CT. Urethral doses were available with d0-TRUS only. We have shown that d0-TRUS PID is a useful tool for assessing the quality of an implant after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy and is comparable to d30-CT PID. There are clear advantages to its use in terms of resource and time efficiency both for the clinical team and the patient.

  18. The novel nomogram of Gleason sum upgrade: possible application for the eligible criteria of low dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budäus, Lars; Graefen, Markus; Salomon, Georg; Isbarn, Hendrik; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Sun, Maxine; Chun, Felix K H; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steuber, Thomas; Haese, Alexander; Koellermann, Jens; Sauter, Guido; Fisch, Margit; Heinzer, Hans; Huland, Hartwig; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2010-10-01

    To examine the rate of Gleason sum upgrading (GSU) from a sum of 6 to a Gleason sum of ≥7 in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), who fulfilled the recommendations for low dose rate brachytherapy (Gleason sum 6, prostate-specific antigen ≤10 ng/mL, clinical stage ≤T2a and prostate volume ≤50 mL), and to test the performance of an existing nomogram for prediction of GSU in this specific cohort of patients. The analysis focused on 414 patients, who fulfilled the European Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology and American Brachytherapy Society criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy (LD-BT) and underwent a 10-core prostate biopsy followed by RP. The rate of GSU was tabulated and the ability of available clinical and pathological parameters for predicting GSU was tested. Finally, the performance of an existing GSU nomogram was explored. The overall rate of GSU was 35.5%. When applied to LD-BT candidates, the existing nomogram was 65.8% accurate versus 70.8% for the new nomogram. In decision curve analysis tests, the new nomogram fared substantially better than the assumption that no patient is upgraded and better than the existing nomogram. GSU represents an important issue in LD-BT candidates. The new nomogram might improve patient selection for LD-BT and cancer control outcome by excluding patients with an elevated probability of GSU. © 2010 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Decontamination of 125I in Medical Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Geleel, M.; Tawfeek, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    A radiological laboratory for diagnoses was contaminated by 125 I. A large-scale survey of gamma-radiation has been made in different locations of the floors and walls of the lab to determine the contaminated area and its activity. The activity level before decontamination for the wall and floor was 1400 and 2000 Bq/cm 2 respectively. Decontamination was carried out by using ethyl alcohol, potassium permanganate, ethylene diamine tetracetic acid and tissue papers. Decontamination factor has been calculated and it was 175 and 200 for the wall and floor respectively. D and D computer code has been used to calculate Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). TEDE from the wall and floor before decontamination were 3.05 and 4.35 ( mSv/yr ) while after decontamination were 18 and 23μSv/yr respectively. These results are lower than the Egyptian and the international regulations (10 mSv/y for the public ) according to International Atomic Energy agency, IAEA, Safety Series, SS, no. 115 (1994).

  20. Optimization of 125I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrahan, M.A.; Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Liggett, P.E.; Petrovich, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Episcleral plaques containing 125 I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged

  1. Determination of radiochemical purity of 125I-TOC and 125I-F-PGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Keya; Fan Wo; Zhang Youjiu; Xu Yujie; Zhu Ran; Hu Mingjiang

    2006-01-01

    To explore whether there is accordance among three determination methods of the radiochemical purity of [Tyr 3 ] octreotide (TOC) and folate-penicillin G amidase conjugate (F-PGA), which are both labeled with 125 I by Iodogen method, the RCP of the labelings are determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), paper chromatography and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, in which four different concentrations of proteins are used to investigate the effect of them on the determination of RCP. It is shown that both HPLC and paper chromatography can separate the labelings from free iodine efficiently, though HPLC is the most precise and reliable method to determinate RCP of such labelings. In TCA precipitation, the RCP measured with 0.2%BSA is the lowest, but those with three other concentrations of the BSA are similar (P>0.05). When RCP 0.05), whereas higher than that with HPLC (P 10%, the RCP of 125 I-TOC obtained by TCA precipitation is a bit lower than those by two other methods (P 0.05), and there are no significant differences to determinate the RCP of 125 I-F-PGA (P>0.05). The three methods are correlated each other (r=0.0996-0.999, P<0.001). (authors)

  2. 125I eye plaque dose distribution including penumbra characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Zerda, A; Chiu-Tsao, S T; Lin, J; Boulay, L L; Kanna, I; Kim, J H; Tsao, H S

    1996-03-01

    The two main purposes of this work are (1) to determine the penumbra characteristics for 125I eye plaque and the relative influence of the plaque and eye-air interface on the dose distribution, and (2) to initiate development of a treatment planning algorithm for clinical dose calculations. Dose was measured in a newly designed solid water eye phantom for an 125I (6711) seed at the center of a 20 mm COMS eye plaque using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) "cubes" and "minichips" inside and outside the eye, in the longitudinal and transverse central planes. TLD cubes were used in most locations, except for short distances from the seed and in the penumbra region. In the presence of both the plaque and the eye-air interface, the dose along the central axis was found to be reduced by 10% at 1 cm and up to 20% at 2.5 cm, relative to the bulk homogeneous phantom case. In addition, the overall dose reduction was greater for larger off-axis coordinates at a given depth. The penumbra characteristics due to the lip collimation were quantified, particularly the dependence of penumbra center and width on depth. Only small differences were observed between the profiles in the transverse and longitudinal planes. In the bulk geometry (without the eye-air interface), the dose reduction due to the presence of the plaque alone was found to be 7% at a depth of 2.5 cm. The additional reduction of 13% observed, with the presence of eye-air interface (20% combined), can be attributed to the lack of backscattering from the air in front of the eye. The dose-reduction effect due to the anterior air interface alone became unnoticeable at a depth of 1.1 cm (1.5 cm from the eye-air interface). An analytic fit to measured data was developed for clinical dose calculations for a centrally loaded seed. The central axis values of the dose rates multiplied by distance squared, Dr2, were fitted with a double exponential function of depth. The off-axis profile of Dr2, at a given depth, was

  3. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localised prostate cancer in men with a high risk of disease relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Robert; Uribe, Jennifer; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Money-Kyrle, Julian; Perna, Carla; Chintzoglou, Stylianos; Khaksar, Sara; Langley, Stephen E M

    2018-04-01

    To report clinical outcomes of 125 I low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) as monotherapy or combined with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in high-risk localised prostate cancer. Analysis of clinical outcomes from a prospective cohort of patients treated with LDR-PB alone or combined treatment in a single institution. Men with a high risk of disease relapse were identified by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) criteria or by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. Relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and metastases-free survival (MFS), were analysed together with patient-reported symptom scores and physician-reported adverse events. The NICE and NCCN criteria identified 267 and 202 high-risk patients, respectively. NICE-defined patients had significantly lower pre-treatment PSA levels, Gleason scores LDR-PB monotherapy. At 9 years after implantation RFS was 89% and 87% in the NICE and NCCN groups, respectively (log-rank P = 0.637), and OS 93% and 94%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.481). All of the survival estimates were similar between LDR-PB monotherapy and combined therapies. Cox proportional hazards regression confirmed RFS was similar between the treatment types. Treatment-related toxicity was also similar between the treatment methods. LDR-PB is effective at controlling localised prostate cancer in patients with a high risk of disease relapse. As the present study was not randomised, it is not possible to define those patients who need the addition of ADT and/or EBRT. However, the NICE criteria appear suitable to define treatment options where patients could benefit from LDR-PB as monotherapy or combined treatment. This choice should be discussed with the patient taking into account comorbidities and presence of multiple high-risk factors. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International

  4. Sensitization of rat 9L gliosarcoma cells to low dose rate irradiation by long duration 41 degrees C hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, E P; Wang, Z H; Corry, P M; Martinez, A

    1991-06-15

    Modification of survival by long duration, 41 degrees C hyperthermia in combination with low dose rate radiation (0.5 Gy/h) was determined in rat 9L gliosarcoma cells. Cells were exposed to radiation in a manner that simulated continuous irradiation at a dose rate relevant to clinical brachytherapy. High dose rate X-irradiation was fractionated in 1.0-Gy fractions at 2-h intervals (FLDRI). Previous studies had demonstrated that 9L cells exposed to FLDRI with these parameters have survival characteristics that are equivalent to continuous low dose rate irradiation. Cells exposed to 41 degrees C throughout FLDRI were sensitized significantly (thermal enhancement ratio of 2.07) compared with cells irradiated at 37 degrees C. Incubation for 24 h at 41 degrees C before and/or after FLDRI at either 37 degrees C or 41 degrees C did not increase the slope of the radiation survival curves but did reduce the shoulder. Similarly, heating at 43 degrees C for 30 or 60 min before and/or after irradiation at 0.5 Gy/h also did not enhance cell sensitivity. Survival of cells after irradiation at high dose rate (60 Gy/h) was independent of the temperature during irradiation. Preheat at 41 degrees C for 24 h did not sensitize cells to high dose rate irradiation by increasing the slope of the survival curve, although a loss of shoulder was observed. Sensitization of cells heated at 43 degrees C for 30 or 60 min before high dose rate irradiation was expressed as classical slope modification. Our results demonstrate that 41 degrees C heating during FLDRI greatly sensitizes cells to radiation-induced killing for exposure durations up to 36 h. Heating 9L cells at 41 degrees C or 43 degrees C adjacent to FLDRI at 0.5 Gy/h resulted in no additional enhancement of terminal sensitivity, although shoulder modification was observed. The sensitization by simultaneous heating described above occurred even though thermotolerance developed during extended incubation at 41 degrees C. These in vitro

  5. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  6. Metabolism in the isolated rat heart: comparison of 125I-BMIPP with 125I-IPPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shaoliang; Cheng Aiping; Xu Lanwen; Qiao Weiwei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The fatty acid metabolism in myocardium is recently one of the most interesting subjects in nuclear cardiology. The purpose of this study was to clarify the metabolic fate of 125 I-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R, S)-methyl-pentadecanoic acid ( 125 I-BMIPP) and 15-(p-[ 125 I] iodophenyl) pentadecanoic acid ( 125 I-IPPA) by means of isolated rat hearts. Methods: Ten isolated rat hearts were prepared and perfused with 125 I-BMIPP (5 rats) or 125 I-IPPA (5 rats) for 3 h following a basic perfusion of 30 min. After perfusion, the radioactivity in the recirculated buffer was measured. The metabolites in the buffer were then extracted and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Results: At the beginning (5 rain) of 125 I-BMIPP perfusion, the main radioactive peak appeared on HPLC at 37 min, which remained after 3 h perfusion. Several small peaks eluting were found before the parent peak at 30, 26, 21, 16, 12 and 9 min, respectively. At the beginning (5 min) of 125 I-IPPA perfusion, the main peak appeared on HPLC at 33 min, which disappeared after 3 h. Conclusions: 125 I-BMIPP strongly inhibited beta-oxidation, therefore appeared suitable for myocardial metabolic imaging. 125 I-IPPA was metabolized rapidly. (authors)

  7. Clinical effects of FP and Addie injection combined with 125I seed implantation in treating advanced primary liver cancer%FP+艾迪注射液联合125I粒子植入治疗中晚期原发性肝癌的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大为; 何津; 吴会静; 张海光; 张青芸; 马一夫; 马龙滨; 陈宝明

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical effects of FP (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and Addie injection combined with 125I seed implantation in treating advanced primary liver cancer. Methods Ninety-five patients with pri-mary liver cancer who were admitted in People's Hospital of Tangshan City between February 2012 and July 2015 were selected as subjects and were randomized into observation group (n=50) and control group (n=45) by random number ta-ble method. The control group was treated with FP combined with 125I seed implantation. On the basis, the observation group was treated additionally with Addie injection, for 2 courses of treatment. The clinical remission rate, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores and peripheral blood white blood cell count before and after treatment, incidence of ad-verse reactions, 1-year and 2-year survival rates were compared between the two groups. Results After treatment, the clinical remission rate in observation group (36.0%) was significantly higher than that in control group of 17.8%, P0.05). After treatment, KPS scores of the two groups were increased to (85.3±5.0) and (79.3±5.2) respectively, while peripheral blood white blood cell count were decreased to (5.0±1.6)×109/L and (3.1 ± 1.3) × 109/L, respectively, with statistically significant difference compared with those before treatment and be-tween the two groups (all P0.05);治疗后,观察组与对照组患者的KPS评分分别升高至(85.3±5.0)分、(79.3±5.2)分,外周血白细胞计数分别减少至(5.0±1.6)×109/L、(3.1±1.3)×109/L,较治疗前均改善明显,且观察组治疗后的KPS评分、外周血白细胞计数均高于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 FP+艾迪注射液联合125I粒子植入治疗中晚期原发性肝癌能明显提高临床缓解率与KPS评分,抑制白细胞减少,生存时间得以延长,值得临床推广应用.

  8. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. R.

    1974-01-01

    Cellular response and cell population kinetics were studied during lymphopoiesis in the thymus of the mouse under continuous gamma irradiation using autoradiographic techniques and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine. On the basis of tissue weights, it is concluded that the response of both the thymus and spleen to continuous low dose-rate irradiation is multiphasic. That is, alternating periods of steady state growth, followed by collapse, which in turn is followed by another period of homeostasis. Since there are two populations of lymphocytes - short lived and long-lived, it may be that different phases of steady state growth are mediated by different lymphocytes. The spleen is affected to a greater extent with shorter periods of steady-state growth than exhibited by the thymus.

  9. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  10. Stimulation effects of low dose-rate irradiation on pancreatic antioxidant activity in type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of low dose-rate gamma irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in BKS.Cg-+Lepr db /+Lepr db /Jcl (DB mice). Ten-week-old female DB mice (5 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma ray at 0.35, 0.70, or 1.2 mGy/hr. During the course of the 12 weeks the glucose level slightly increased with little difference between the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. The plasma insulin concentration decreased within the first 4 weeks in all groups. The level was kept low in the non-irradiated mice; while the insulin level in the irradiated groups showed a tendency to increase. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group the increase was statistically significant after 12 weeks of irradiation. Total activity of SOD, one of antioxidative enzymes, decreased both in non-irradiated and irradiated groups; however the decrease was less in the irradiated groups, especially 0.70 mGy/hr group. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group Mn-SOD activity, one of the components of total SOD activity, increased after 12-week irradiation. A pathological examination of the pancreas revealed that damage to β cells responsible for the secretion of insulin was much less in the 0.70 mGy/hr group compared to that in the non-irradiated group. These results indicated that the low dose-rate irradiation increase the antioxidative capacity in the pancreas to protect β cells from oxidative damage, and the to increase the insulin level. This mechanism would lead the mice to the recovery from the disease and the prolongation of the life span as is demonstrated in our previous report. (author)

  11. 1251 seed calibration using afterloading equipment Seed Selectron. Practical solution to meet the recommendations of the AAPM; Calibracion de semillas de {sup 1}25I usando el equipo de carga difereida SeedSelectron. Solucion practica para cumplir las recomendaciones de la AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Richart, J.; Perez-Garcia, J.; Guirado, D.; Ballester, F.; Rodriguez, S.; Santos, M.; Depiaggio, M.; Carmona, V.; Lliso, F.; Camacho, C.; Pujades, M. C.

    2011-07-01

    Seed Selectron is a system used in the after loader permanent implant brachytherapy seeds 1-125 interstitial prostate. Two aspects are critical when you can meet the recommendations of the AAPM: a practical difficulty to check the quantity of seed required, and the great uncertainty of all measured diodes. The purpose of this paper is to present a practical solution that has been adopted to implement the recommendations of the AAPM.

  12. Synthesis and binding of [125I2]philanthotoxin-343, [125I2]philanthotoxin-343-lysine, and [125I2]philanthotoxin-343-arginine to rat brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodnow, R.A. Jr.; Bukownik, R.; Nakanishi, K.; Usherwood, P.N.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Anis, N.A.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    125I2-iodinated philanthotoxin-343 (PhTX-343), [125I2]PhTX-343-arginine, and [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine were synthesized and evaluated as probes for glutamate receptors in rat brain synaptic membranes. It was found that these probes were not specific for the glutamate receptors but may be useful for investigating the polyamine binding site. Filtration assays with Whatman GF/B fiber glass filters were unsuitable because the iodinated PhTX-343 analogues exhibited high nonspecific binding to the filters, thus hindering detection of specific binding to membranes. When binding was measured by a centrifugal assay, [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine bound with low affinity (KD = 11.4 ± 2 microM) to a large number of sites (37.2 ± 9.1 nmol/mg of protein). The binding of [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine was sensitive only to the polyamines spermine and spermidine, which displaced [125I2]PhTX-343-lysine with Ki values of (3.77 ± 1.4) x 10(-5) M and (7.51 ± 0.77) x 10(-5) M, respectively. The binding was insensitive to glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists. Binding results with [125I2]PhTX-343-arginine were similar to those of [125I2]-PhTX-343-lysine. Considering the high number of toxin binding sites (10000-fold more than glutamate) in these membranes and the insensitivity of the binding to almost all drugs that bind to glutamate receptors, it is evident that most of the binding observed is not to glutamate receptors. On the other hand, PhTX analogues with photoaffinity labels may be useful in the isolation/purification of various glutamate and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors; they could also be useful in structural studies of receptors and their binding sites

  13. Fragmentation of chromatin with 125I radioactive disintegrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.N.; Nobis, P.; Dewey, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The DNA in Chinese hamster cells was labeled first for 3 h with [ 3 H]TdR and then for 3 h with [ 125 I]UdR. Chromatin was extracted, frozen, and stored at -30 0 C until 1.0 x 10 17 and 1.25 x 10 17 disintegrations/g of labeled DNA occurred for 125 I and 3 H, respectively. Velocity sedimentation of chromatin (DNA with associated chromosomal proteins) in neutral sucrose gradients indicated that the localized energy from the 125 I disintegrations, which gave about 1 double-strand break/disintegration plus an additional 1.3 single strand breaks, selectively fragmented the [ 125 I] chromatin into pieces smaller than the [ 3 H] chromatin. In other words, 125 I disintegrations caused much more localized damage in the chromatin labeled with 125 I than in the chromatin labeled with 3 H, and fragments induced in DNA by 125 I disintegrations were not held together by the associated chromosomal proteins. Use of this 125 I technique for studying chromosomal proteins associated with different regions in the cellular DNA is discussed. For these studies, the number of disintegrations required for fragmenting DNA molecules of different sizes is illustrated

  14. Quality asurance of iodinated (125 I) human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vines, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    The radiopharmaceutical iodinated ( 125 I) human fibrinogen is currently used for the detection of deep vein thrombosis in the legs, a fairly common post-surgical complication. A comprehensive quality assurance programme for ( 125 I) - human fibrinogen has been determined for routine use at the Australian Radiation Laboratory, with adaptions necessary for hospital quality control testing

  15. Immunoreactivity of 125I-papain labelled by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, P.; Fukal, L.; Kas, J.; Tykva, R.

    1984-01-01

    Three different methods of papain iodination (with chloramine-T, lactoperoxidase and conjugation with Bolton-Hunter reagent) have been compared. The highest yield of 125 I-papain could be obtained using lactoperoxidase which enabled to achieve the highest immunoreactivity. 125 I-papain, labelled this way, is suitable for the radioimmunoassay of papain. (author)

  16. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  17. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Low-Dose-Rate Radioimmunotherapy by the Alpha-Emitting Radioimmunoconjugate Thorium-227-DOTA-Rituximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahle, Jostein; Krogh, Cecilie; Melhus, Katrine B.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Larsen, Roy H.; Kvinnsland, Yngve

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the low-dose-rate α-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate 227 Th-1,4,7,10-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-rituximab can be used to inactivate lymphoma cells growing as single cells and small colonies. Methods and Materials: CD20-positive lymphoma cell lines were treated with 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab for 1-5 weeks. To simulate the in vivo situation with continuous but decreasing supply of radioimmunoconjugates from the blood pool, the cells were not washed after incubation with 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab, but half of the medium was replaced with fresh medium, and cell concentration and cell-bound activity were determined every other day after start of incubation. A microdosimetric model was established to estimate the average number of hits in the nucleus for different localizations of activity. Results: There was a specific targeted effect on cell growth of the 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab treatment. Although the cells were not washed after incubation with 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab, the average contribution of activity in the medium to the mean dose was only 6%, whereas the average contribution from activity on the cells' own surface was 78%. The mean dose rates after incubation with 800 Bq/mL 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab varied from 0.01 to 0.03 cGy/min. The average delay in growing from 10 5 to 10 7 cells/mL was 15 days when the cells were treated with a mean absorbed radiation dose of 2 Gy α-particle radiation from 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab, whereas it was 11 days when the cells were irradiated with 6 Gy of X-radiation. The relative biologic effect of the treatment was estimated to be 2.9-3.4. Conclusions: The low-dose-rate radioimmunoconjugate 227 Th-DOTA-rituximab is suitable for inactivation of single lymphoma cells and small colonies of lymphoma cells.

  18. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  19. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  20. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria; Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  1. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanisch, Per Henrik; Furre, Torbjoern; Olsen, Dag Rune; Pettersen, Erik O.

    2007-01-01

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T 1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  2. Phase III trial of high- vs. low-dose-rate interstitial radiotherapy for early mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Shigetoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobile tongue cancer can be controlled with interstitial radiotherapy (ISRT). We carried out a Phase III trial to compare the treatment results of low-dose-rate (Ld) ISRT and high-dose-rate (HDR) ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 1992 through October 1996, 59 patients with cancer of the early mobile tongue were registered in this Phase III study. Eight patients were excluded from the evaluation because of violations of the requirements for this study. Of 51 eligible patients, 26 patients were treated with LDR-ISRT (70 Gy/4-9 days) and 25 patients with HDR-ISRT (60 Gy/10 fractions/1 week). For the hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT, the time interval between 2 fractions was more than 6 h. Results: Five-year local control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 84% and 87% respectively. Nodal metastasis occurred in 6 patients in each group. Five-year nodal control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 77% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer has the same local control compared with continuous LDR-ISRT. Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT is an alternative treatment for continuous LDR-ISRT

  3. Cost minimization analysis of high-dose-rate versus low-dose-rate brachytherapy in endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinilla, James

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Endometrial cancer is a common, usually curable malignancy whose treatment frequently involves low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. These treatments involve substantial resource commitments and this is increasingly important. This paper presents a cost minimization analysis of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The perspective of the analysis is that of the payor, in this case the Ministry of Health. One course of LDR treatment is compared to two courses of HDR treatment. The two alternatives are considered to be comparable with respect to local control, survival, and toxicities. Labor, overhead, and capital costs are accounted for and carefully measured. A 5% inflation rate is used where applicable. A univariate sensitivity analysis is performed. Results: The HDR regime is 22% less expensive compared to the LDR regime. This is $991.66 per patient or, based on the current workload of this department (30 patients per year) over the useful lifetime of the after loader, $297,498 over 10 years in 1997 dollars. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy minimizes costs in the treatment of endometrial cancer relative to LDR brachytherapy. These results may be used by other centers to make rational decisions regarding brachytherapy equipment replacement or acquisition

  4. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Liu

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer.A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies.Only randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III were of interest.Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01, overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66 and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42.This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  5. Macroarray analysis of gene expression in hematopoietic tissues from mice continuously irradiated by low dose-rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Nakamura, Shingo; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We found that the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow and spleen from 4 - 8 Gy-irradiated mice decreased about 50%, in spite of no change in the number of peripheral blood cells. To evaluate the effects of chronic irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression in mice hematopoietic cells from bone marrow and spleen, the RNA expressions of more than 500 genes such as cytokine genes and oncogenes were measured on the membranes by the RNA macroarray analysis method at accumulated doses at 4.7 and 8 Gy in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the dose rate of 20 mGy/day. The RNA macroarray analysis in spleens from 8 Gy-irradiated mice showed that the expressions in 16 genes including noggin were more than 1.5 times larger than that of control, while those in 64 genes including shh (sonic hedgehog) and BMP-4 (bone morphogenesis protein 4) were more than 1.5 times smaller than that of control. (author)

  6. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K.; Powell, Matthew A.; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group

  7. Enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in a voltage comparator which only utilizes complementary vertical NPN and PNP transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, J.F.; Titus, J.L.; Emily, D.; Gehlhausen, M.; Swonger, J.; Platteter, D.

    1999-01-01

    For the first time, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) is reported in a vertical bipolar process. A radiation hardness assurance (RHA) test method was successfully demonstrated on a linear circuit, the HS139RH quad comparator, and its discrete transistor elements. This circuit only uses vertical NPN and PNP transistors. Radiation tests on the HS139RH were performed at 25 C using dose rates of 50 rd(Si)/s, 100 mrd(Si)/s and 10 mrd(Si)/s, and at 100 C using a dose rate of 10 rd(Si)/s. Tests at dose rates of 50 rd(Si)/s at 25 C and 10 rd(Si)/s at 100 C were performed on discrete vertical NPN and PNP transistor elements which comprise the HS139RH. Transistor and circuit responses were evaluated. The die's passivation overcoat layers were varied to examine the effect of removing a nitride layer and thinning a deposited SiO 2 (silox) layer

  8. Genetic effect of low dose rate radiation on human cells immortalized with the hTERT gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fukami, Hiroko; Hayashi, Yuko; Kiyono, Tohru; Ishizaki, Kanji; Tachibana, Akira; Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2003-01-01

    We established immortal human cells by introducing the hTERT gene into skin fibroblast cells obtained from normal (SuSa) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT: AT1OS) individuals of Japanese origin. These immortalized cells showed the same characteristics as the original cells except expanded life span. We irradiated SuSa/T-n and AT1OS/T-n cells with low-dose-rate (LDR; 0.3 mGy/min) irradiation at confluent state in low-serum medium. Then, survival rate and micronucleus frequency of each cell line were analyzed. In SuSa/T-n cells, frequency of HPRT mutation induction was also determined by 6TG selection. In SuSa/T-n cells, survival rate and micronucleus frequency showed higher resistance after irradiation with LDR than high-dose-rate (HDR; 2 Gy/min) irradiation. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in survival and micronucleus induction in AT1OS/T-n cells between HDR and LDR irradiation, suggesting that AT1OS/T-n cells may have some defect in DNA repair activity. In SuSa/T-n cells, the frequency of HPRT mutation after LDR irradiation decreased to approximately one eighth that after HDR irradiation. (author)

  9. The effect of low dose rate irradiation on the swelling of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), stainless steel components are irradiated at temperatures that may reach 400 C due to gamma heating. If large amounts of swelling (>10%) occur in these reactor internals, significant swelling related embrittlement may occur. Although fast reactor studies indicate that swelling should be insignificant at PWR temperatures, the low dose rate conditions experienced by PWR components may possibly lead to significant swelling. To address these issues, JNC and ANL have collaborated to analyze swelling in 316 stainless steel, irradiated in the EBR-II reactor at temperatures from 376-444 C, at dose rates between 4.9 x 10 -8 and 5.8 x 10 -7 dpa/s, and to doses of 56 dpa. For these irradiation conditions, the swelling decreases markedly at temperatures less than approximately 386 C, with the extrapolated swelling at 100 dpa being around 3%. For temperatures greater than 386 C, the swelling extrapolated to 100 dpa is around 9%. For a factor of two difference in dose rate, no statistically significant effect of dose rate on swelling was seen. For the range of dose rates analyzed, the swelling measurements do not support significant (>10%) swelling of 316 stainless steel in PWRs

  10. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  11. A comparison of larval density and low dose rate irradiation effects on amphibian body size at metamorphosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, K.; Scott, D.E.; Tsyusko, O.; Coughlin, D.P.; Hinton, T.G.

    2008-07-01

    Amphibian larvae undergo substantial morphological and physiological changes as they metamorphose into adults. This period of rapid change and enhanced cell division could increase their sensitivity to external stressors. In this study, we were interested in possible differences between natural and anthropogenic stressor effects during the period just prior to metamorphosis. We studied this by exposing late-stage Scaphiopus holbrookii tadpoles in different larval densities to four irradiation dose rates (0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1) from 137Cs. Life history traits important for population dynamics, such as body size at metamorphosis and development rate, were measured. Results suggest that the ecological factor larval density had a much more profound effect on juvenile body size at metamorphosis than low-dose rate radiation. The development rate measured as age at metamorphosis was not effected by the two stressors. Radiation had no impact on the endpoints we measured; giving credence to the IAEA guidance that a dose rate smaller than 10 mGy d-1 is protective of aquatic biota. (author)(tk)

  12. A comparison of larval density and low dose rate irradiation effects on amphibian body size at metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, K.; Scott, D.E.; Tsyusko, O.; Coughlin, D.P.; Hinton, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Amphibian larvae undergo substantial morphological and physiological changes as they metamorphose into adults. This period of rapid change and enhanced cell division could increase their sensitivity to external stressors. In this study, we were interested in possible differences between natural and anthropogenic stressor effects during the period just prior to metamorphosis. We studied this by exposing late-stage Scaphiopus holbrookii tadpoles in different larval densities to four irradiation dose rates (0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d -1 ) from 137 Cs. Life history traits important for population dynamics, such as body size at metamorphosis and development rate, were measured. Results suggest that the ecological factor larval density had a much more profound effect on juvenile body size at metamorphosis than low-dose rate radiation. The development rate measured as age at metamorphosis was not effected by the two stressors. Radiation had no impact on the endpoints we measured; giving credence to the IAEA guidance that a dose rate smaller than 10 mGy d -1 is protective of aquatic biota. (author)(tk)

  13. Biologically effective dose (BED) for interstitial seed implants containing a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tool for evaluating interstitial seed implants that contain a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives and to demonstrate its utility by examining the clinical implications of prescribing to an isodose surface for such an implant. Methods and Materials: A linear-quadratic model for continuous low dose rate irradiation was developed for permanent implants containing a mixture of radionuclides. Using a generalized equation for the biologically effective dose (BED), the effects of cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair were examined systematically for implants containing a mixture of radionuclides. A head-and-neck permanent seed implant that contained a mixture of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds was used to demonstrate the utility of the generalized BED. Results: An equation of BED for implants containing a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives was obtained. In such an implant, the effective cell kill was shown to depend strongly on the relative dose contributions from each radionuclide type; dose delivered by radionuclides with shorter half-life always resulted in more cell kill for any given sublethal damage repair and cell proliferation rates. Application of the BED formula to an implant containing a mixture of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds demonstrates that the conventional dose prescription to an isodose surface is not unique for such an implant. When the prescription dose was based on existing clinical experience of using 125 I seeds alone, mixing 103 Pd seeds with 125 I seeds would increase the cell kill. On the other hand, if the prescription dose were based on existing clinical experience of using 103 Pd seeds alone, mixing 125 I seeds with 103 Pd seeds in the same implant would create radiobiologically 'cold' spots (i.e., an increase in cell survival) at locations where a major portion of the prescription dose is contributed by the 125 I seeds. For fast-growing tumors, these 'cold' spots can become significant

  14. Preparation and evaluation of serotonin labelled with 125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, N.; Geetha, R.; Ghodke, A.S.; Karmalkar, C.P.; Pilkhwal, N.S.; Sarnaik, J.S.; Borkute, S.D.; Nadkarni, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabelled serotonin is an important tool for studying serotonin receptors and estimating serotonin levels in plants and animals. In this paper we report the synthesis of serotonin - 125 I. Tyrosine Methyl Ester (TME) was first labelled with 125 I using chloramine-T method. 125 I-TME was then conjugated with serotonin using carbodimide. The labelled conjugate was purified using gel filtration. Yield and radiochemical purity were estimated using electrophoresis and ITLC in different solvent systems. The binding of the purified tracer to serotonin receptors and serotonin antibodies was studied. (author)

  15. Microdosimetric evaluation of relative biological effectiveness for 103PD, 125I, 241AM, and 192IR brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C.S.; Kliauga, P.; Zaider, M.; Amols, H.I.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the microdosimetric-derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 103 Pd, 125 I, 241 Am, and 192 Ir brachytherapy sources at low doses and/or low dose rates. Methods and Materials: The Theory of Dual Radiation Action can be used to predict expected RBE values based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition at microscopic levels from these sources. Single-event lineal energy spectra for these isotopes have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically. A grid-defined wall-less proportional counter was used to measure the lineal energy distributions. Unlike conventional Rossi proportional counters, the counter used in these measurements has a conducting nylon fiber as the central collecting anode and has no metal parts. Thus, the Z-dependence of the photoelectric effect is eliminated as a source of measurement error. Single-event spectra for these brachytherapy sources have been also calculated by: (a) the Monte Carlo code MCNP to generate the electron slowing down spectrum, (b) transport of monoenergetic electron tracks, event by event, with our Monte Carlo code DELTA, (c) using the concept of associated volume to obtain the lineal energy distribution f(y) for each monoenergetic electron, and (d) obtaining the composite lineal energy spectrum for a given brachytherapy source based on the electron spectrum calculated at step (a). Results: Relative to 60 Co, the RBE values obtained from this study are: 2.3 for 103 Pd, 2.1 for 125 I, 2.1 for 241 Am, and 1.3 for 192 Ir. Conclusions: These values are consistent with available data from in vitro cell survival experiments. We suggest that, at least for these brachytherapy sources, microdosimetry may be used as a credible alternative to time-consuming (and often uncertain) radiobiological experiments to obtain information on radition quality and make reliable predictions of RBE in low dose rate brachytherapy

  16. The optimal fraction size in high-dose-rate brachytherapy: dependency on tissue repair kinetics and low-dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Fowler, Jack F.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Indications of the existence of long repair half-times on the order of 2-4 h for late-responding human normal tissues have been obtained from continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). Recently, these data were used to explain, on the basis of the biologically effective dose (BED), the potential superiority of fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) with large fraction sizes of 5-7 Gy over continuous low-dose rate (LDR) irradiation at 0.5 Gy/h in cervical carcinoma. We investigated the optimal fraction size in HDR brachytherapy and its dependency on treatment choices (overall treatment time, number of HDR fractions, and time interval between fractions) and treatment conditions (reference low-dose rate, tissue repair characteristics). Methods and Materials: Radiobiologic model calculations were performed using the linear-quadratic model for incomplete mono-exponential repair. An irradiation dose of 20 Gy was assumed to be applied either with HDR in 2-12 fractions or continuously with LDR for a range of dose rates. HDR and LDR treatment regimens were compared on the basis of the BED and BED ratio of normal tissue and tumor, assuming repair half-times between 1 h and 4 h. Results: With the assumption that the repair half-time of normal tissue was three times longer than that of the tumor, hypofractionation in HDR relative to LDR could result in relative normal tissue sparing if the optimum fraction size is selected. By dose reduction while keeping the tumor BED constant, absolute normal tissue sparing might therefore be achieved. This optimum HDR fraction size was found to be largely dependent on the LDR dose rate. On the basis of the BED NT/TUM ratio of HDR over LDR, 3 x 6.7 Gy would be the optimal HDR fractionation scheme for replacement of an LDR scheme of 20 Gy in 10-30 h (dose rate 2-0.67 Gy/h), while at a lower dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h, four fractions of 5 Gy would be preferential, still assuming large differences between tumor

  17. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,θ), Λ, g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), φ{sub an}(r), and φ{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,θ), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, φ{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup −2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose

  18. Detection Limits Of The 125I Air Sampler ''RIS125''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaish, I.; Levinson, S.; German, U.; Kravchik, T.

    1999-01-01

    A system for 125 I monitoring in air (RIS-125) was designed and manufactured at NRCN. The main features of the system are described elsewhere. The system can monitor 125 I air contamination in gaseous and aerosol forms. An air monitoring system should have a fast response and the lowest available Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). The present work presents the characteristic MDA values of the system

  19. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  20. Impact of point A asymmetry on local control and survival for low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opfermann, Krisha J; Wahlquist, Amy; Watkins, John; Kohler, Matthew; Jenrette, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate whether Point A asymmetry in low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy is associated with local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). A retrospective analysis of disease control and survival outcomes was conducted for patients who underwent LDR brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer. Institutional protocol entailed concurrent chemotherapy and whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) over 5 weeks, followed by placement of Fletcher-Suit tandem and colpostat applicators at weeks 6 and 8. Objective Point A doses, 80-85 Gy, were accomplished by placement of Cesium-137 (Cs-137) sources. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess associations between disease control and survival endpoints with variables of interest. The records of 50 patients with FIGO stage IB1-IVA cervical cancer undergoing LDR brachytherapy at our institution were identified. Thirty of these patients had asymmetry > 2.5%, and 11 patients had asymmetry > 5%. At a median survivor follow-up of 20.25 months, 15 patients had experienced disease failure (including 5 cervical/vaginal apex only failures and 2 failures encompassing the local site). Right/left dose asymmetry at Point A was associated with statistically significantly inferior LC (p = 0.035) and inferior DFS (p = 0.011) for patients with mean Point A dose of > 80 Gy. Insufficient evidence existed to conclude an association with OS. LDR brachytherapy may be associated with clinically significant dose asymmetry. The present study demonstrates that patients with Point A asymmetry have a higher risk of failure for DFS and LC.

  1. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  2. Precipitate evolution in low-nickel austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at very low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M.; Garner, F.; Okita, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Not all components of a fusion reactor will be subjected to high atomic displacement rates. Some components outside the plasma containment may experience relatively low displacement rates but data generated under long-term irradiation at low dpa rates is hard to obtain. In another study the neutron-induced microstructural evolution in response to long term irradiation at very low dose rates was studied for a Russian low-nickel austenitic stainless steel that is analogous to AISI 304. The irradiated samples were obtained from an out-of-core anti-crush support column for the BN-600 fast reactor with doses ranging from 1.5 to 22 dpa generated at 3x10 -9 to 4x10 -8 dpa/s. The irradiation temperatures were in a very narrow range of 370-375 deg. C. Microstructural observation showed that in addition to voids and dislocations, an unexpectedly high density of small carbide precipitates was formed that are not usually observed at higher dpa rates in this temperature range. These results required us to ask if such unexpected precipitation was anomalous or was a general feature of low-flux, long-term irradiation. It is shown in this paper that a similar behavior was observed in a western stainless steel, namely AISI 304 stainless steel, irradiated at similar temperatures and dpa rates in the EBR-II fast reactor, indicating that irradiation at low dpa rates for many years leads to a different precipitate microstructure and therefore different associated changes in matrix composition than are generated at higher dpa rates. One consequence of this precipitation is a reduced lattice parameter of the alloy matrix, leading to densification that increases in strength with increasing temperature and dose. A. non-destructive method to evaluate these precipitates is under development and is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  3. Low-dose-rate intraoperative brachytherapy combined with external beam irradiation in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delannes, M.; Thomas, L.; Martel, P.; Bonnevialle, P.; Stoeckle, E.; Chevreau, Ch.; Bui, B.N.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.; Pigneux, J.; Kantor, G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas most often implies combination of surgical resection and irradiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate low-dose-rate intraoperative brachytherapy, delivered as a boost, in the local control of primary tumors, with special concern about treatment complications. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 1995, 112 patients underwent intraoperative implant. This report focuses on the group of 58 patients with primary sarcomas treated by combination of conservative surgery, intraoperative brachytherapy, and external irradiation. Most of the tumors were located in the lower limbs (46/58--79%). Median size of the tumor was 10 cm, most of the lesions being T2-T3 (51/58--88%), Grade 2 or 3 (48/58--83%). The mean brachytherapy dose was 20 Gy and external beam irradiation dose 45 Gy. In 36/58 cases, iridium wires had to be placed on contact with neurovascular structures. Results: With a median follow-up of 54 months, the 5-year actuarial survival was 64.9%, with a 5-year actuarial local control of 89%. Of the 6 patients with local relapse, 3 were salvaged. Acute side effects, essentially wound healing problems, occurred in 20/58 patients, late side effects in 16/58 patients (7 neuropathies G2 to G4). No amputation was required. The only significant factor correlated with early side effects was the location of the tumor in the lower limb (p = 0.003), and with late side effects the vicinity of the tumor with neurovascular structures (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Brachytherapy allows early delivery of a boost dose in a reduced volume of tissue, precisely mapped by the intraoperative procedure. Combined with external beam irradiation, it is a safe and efficient treatment technique leading to high local control rates and limited functional impairment

  4. Prediction of response to continuous irradiation at low dose rate for repeated administrations in radiotherapy with beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Carlos; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Quesada, Waldo

    2009-01-01

    The absorbed dose to tumors after systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals is not sufficient to achieve acceptable levels of probability of tumor control without compromising on critical tissue toxicity (kidney and / or bone marrow (BM)). There are reports of trials with multiple administrations, about tolerance level inter-administration intervals to allow recovery of the BM, with good results. The biokinetic behavior of some radiopharmaceuticals known makes possible the application of several administrations with short intervals of time.It is the present work combines two kinetic models of tumor growth and cell kinetics in the BM for predicting the response to continuous irradiation at low dose rate. The estimation of the effects of irradiation on tumor and kidneys was done using a formulation of the linear-quadratic model functions suitable for dose rate and multi-exponential repair. The estimation of the response in WB performed using a compartmental model previously reported. The absorbed dose to organs were calculated using the MIRD formulation taking into account the effect of irradiation cross. Biokinetic data were used for therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals 90Y, 131I and 177Lu, as well as radiobiological parameters reported for experimental animals. The effect on the response by the variation of inter-administration interval in slow-growing tumors and fast, so as the radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. You can set conditions irradiation to an acceptable level of thrombocytopenia (onset and duration of the minimum in the curve) and renal irradiation below the limit of tolerance. It is possible to design experiments evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals with a greater degree of refinement. (author)

  5. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  6. Health effects of prolonged low-dose rate gamma-irradiation of a human population in Taiwan, 1983-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W. P.; Hsieh, W. A.; Lin, Y. P.; Huang, S.; Hwang, B. F.; Lee, S. D.; Chen, J. C.; Tsai, M.; Yen, N. P.

    2004-01-01

    Health effects of low dose-rate , low LET irradiation on large numbers of human population have been rare and less well known and studied. However, the standards for safety and health regulation for radiation exposure depend on solid observations of related studies. during 1983 to mid 1990s, an unusual contamination occurred that was derived from several lost Co-60 orphan sources and un-intentionally recycled into thousands tons construction steels, eventually employed for construction in several cities in Taiwan. Continuous studies on the immediate and prolonged health effects of these 7,000 subjects, with more than 60% have been exposed during prenatal, childhood, and adolescents periods, have been able to form a stron scientific avenue to provide evidences for unusual observation on a human population in natural environments. Moreover, an exposure reconstruction program, co-joined with scientists in National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and Oregan State University in the U. S.; were initiated and continued throughout the study program that critically provided dose response analysis feasible. These studies include bone marrow/hematological changes, lens opacities, thyroid function and thyroid glands abnormalities, growth and development in physical parameters, helper and suppressor T cell populations, serum p53 protein levels, and cancer incidences and risks. Moreover, several cytogenetic markers have been employed to analyze the subtle changes in the somatic tissues. These include frequencies of micronuclei formation, chromosomal aberrations and chromosomal translocations on circulating T-lymphocytes. Functional studies including IQ testing on prenatally exposed children and the reproductive potential as time-to-pregnancy, TTP, were also observed in married couples with offspring. The observations, published in more than 20 manuscripts, will be summarized and presented for future collaborative studies, based on the established database, case

  7. A comparative study of 19-iodocholesterol-''125I 3-acetate and Na''125I in liquid scintillation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos Merino, J.M.; Grau Carles, A.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of performance of 19-iodocholesterol-''125I 3-acetate and sodium iodine samples labelled with ''125 I is presented for liquid scintillation counting measurements. Quench effect, count rate stability and spectral evolution of samples have been followed for several weeks in Toluene, Hisafe II, Instagel, Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol scintillators. Organic samples have negligible quench effect in the interval of I''-concentration of 0-90 ug and inorganic samples only show a very small variation, lower than 12%, for Dioxane-naphthalene, in the same range of concentration. Satisfactory stability is obtained in general for both, organic and inorganic samples, but small counting losses, 0.03% for 19-iodocholesterol-''125I 3-acetate samples in Toluene-alcohol and 0.04% for Na''125I samples in Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol, have been reported. (Author) 8 refs

  8. {sup 125}I brachytherapy in younger prostate cancer patients. Outcomes in low- and intermediate-risk disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Stellamans, Karin; Lambrecht, Antoon [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kortrijk (Belgium); Billiet, Ignace [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Urology, Kortrijk (Belgium); Pottel, Hans [Catholic University Leuven Kulak, Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate local recurrence in younger men treated with low-dose-rate (LDR) {sup 125}I brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. A total of 192 patients (≤65-years-old) were treated with LDR {sup 125}I-BT ± hormone therapy. Local failure was defined as any prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rise leading to salvage treatment or biochemical failure according to the Phoenix definition. A bounce was defined as a rise in the nadir of ≥0.2 ng/mL followed by spontaneous return. Proportions were compared using Fisher's exact tests; continuous variables using the unpaired t-test or its non-parametric equivalent. Cox proportional hazards models were applied for multivariable survival analysis. Median follow-up was 66 months. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 96.1%. Biopsy-proven local recurrence developed in 13 patients, 4 had a Phoenix-defined recurrence at the last follow-up. Androgen deprivation therapy was started in 1 patient without proven recurrence. Univariable risk factors for local recurrence were: at least 50% positive biopsies, intermediate risk, treatment with neoadjuvant hormone therapy, low preimplantation volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose, and no bounce development. Hormone-naive patients not attaining a PSA value <0.5 ng/mL during follow-up also had a higher risk of local recurrences. Cox regression demonstrated that the variables ''at least 50% positive biopsies'' and ''bounce'' significantly impacted local failure (hazard ratio, HR 1.02 and 11.59, respectively). A bounce developed in 70 patients (36%). Younger patients and those treated with a lower activity per volume had a higher chance of developing a bounce in the Cox model (HR 0.99 and 0.04, respectively). For younger men, LDR BT is a valid primary curative treatment option in low-risk and is to consider in intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Bestimmung der Lokalrezidivrate bei juengeren Patienten

  9. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  10. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities

  11. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  12. Molecular characterization of non-thymic lymphomas in mice exposed to continuous low-dose-rate g-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabatake, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Nakamura, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, I.; Tanaka-Braga III, I.; Sunaga, Y.; Ichinoche, K.; Sato, F.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effects of continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on life span and neoplasm incidence, SPE B6C3 F1 mice were irradiated with 137Cs-ray at dose-rates of 20, 1 and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000, 40 and 20 mGy, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day, respectively. Examination of a total of 3,000 irradiated and 1,000 non-irradiated control mice showed that the life spans of the both sexes irradiated at 20 mGy/day were significantly shorter than that of the non-irradiated group. No significant difference in the cause of death and mortality rates was found between the groups. However, non-thymic lymphomas, the most common lethal neoplasm, showed a tendency to develop at an earlier age in mice irradiated with 20 mGy/day, regardless of sex. to obtain clues on the molecular mechanisms underlying the earlier development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group, detailed molecular characterizations of non-thymic lymphomas with respect to B-cell or T-cell origin was done by detecting rearrangements in immunoglobulin heavy gene and in T-cell receptor b-and g chain genes by Southem hybridization method. to determine whether the early development of non-thymic lymphomas in 20 mGy/day irradiated group is associated wi the any recurrent chromosomal imbalance such as deletions and amplifications, the genome-wide scanning is also currently in progress by both LOH and array CGH methods. Present data obtained by LOH method show that deletions in parts of chromosomes 11 and 12 were more frequent than in chromosomes 2, 4 and 14 in both the non-irradiated control and 20 mGy/day irradiated groups. this work is supported by grants from Aomori Prefecture, Japan. (Author)

  13. Analysis of complications in a prospective randomized trial comparing two brachytherapy low dose rates in cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-30

    The analysis of complications in a prospective randomized trial comparing two preoperative brachytherapy low-dose rates in early stage cervical cancer is presented. The objective of this trial was to determine the benefits, if any, of the higher-dose rate within the therapeutic aresenal for this patient population, in terms of survival, local control, and complications. Overall survival, 85% at 2 years and local control, 93% at 2 years, were similarly distributed between the two groups. Regardless of their nature and severity, 139 and 175 complications were observed among 63% and 75% of patients, in the 0.4 and 0.8 Gy/h dose rate groups respectively. Gynecologic and urinary complications were the most frequent (38% and 28% of all complications), followed by vascular (15%), digestive (10%), nervous (5%), and cutaneous (5%). A total of 14 and 17 severe complications (Grade 3) were observed in 7% and 13% of patients, respectively in the 0.4 and 0.8 Gy/h dose rate groups (p = 0.12) Nonparametric survival methods used to compare the time to the first complication did not show a significant difference between the two groups: 62% and 72% at 2 years (p = 0.27). When the first complication and its evolution were considered (early complications), the prevalence of complications was not significantly different between the two groups: 28% vs. 34% at 2 years (p = 0.31). In this prospective trial, patients were regularly followed-up and complications of varying nature and severity were observed in succession during follow-up. When successive complications and their evolution were taken into account, the prevalence of complications was significantly greater in the higher-dose rate group: 30% vs 45% at 2 years (p = 0.03). The results of this trial showed that long-term effects of treatment, when represented by prevalence of complications over time, were more frequent in the higher dose rate group. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Comparison of traditional low-dose-rate to optimized and nonoptimized high-dose-rate tandem and ovoid dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, William E.; Erickson, Beth; Albano, Katherine; Gillin, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Few dose specification guidelines exist when attempting to perform high-dose-rate (HDR) dosimetry. The purpose of this study was to model low-dose-rate (LDR) dosimetry, using parameters common in HDR dosimetry, to achieve the 'pear-shape' dose distribution achieved with LDR tandem and ovoid applications. Methods and Materials: Radiographs of Fletcher-Suit LDR applicators and Nucletron 'Fletcher-like' HDR applicators were taken with the applicators in an idealized geometry. Traditional Fletcher loadings of 3M Cs-137 sources and the Theratronics Planning System were used for LDR dosimetry. HDR dosimetry was performed using the Nucletron Microselectron HDR UPS V11.22 with an Ir-192 source. Dose optimization points were initially located along a line 2 cm lateral to the tandem, beginning at the tandem tip at 0.5-cm intervals, ending at the sail, and optimized to 100% of the point A dose. A single dose optimization point was also placed laterally from the center of each ovoid equal to the radius of the ovoid (ovoid surface dose). For purposes of comparison, dose was also calculated for points A and B, and a point located 1 cm superior to the tandem tip in the plane of the tandem, (point F). Four- and 6-cm tandem lengths and 2.0-, 2.5-, and 3.0-cm ovoid diameters were used for this study. Based on initial findings, dose optimization schemes were developed to best approximate LDR dosimetry. Finally, radiographs were obtained of HDR applications in two patients. These radiographs were used to compare the optimization schemes with 'nonoptimized' treatment plans. Results: Calculated doses for points A and B were similar for LDR, optimized HDR, and nonoptimized HDR. The optimization scheme that used tapered dose points at the tandem tip and optimized a single ovoid surface point on each ovoid to 170% of point A resulted in a good approximation of LDR dosimetry. Nonoptimized HDR resulted in higher doses at point F, the bladder, and at points lateral to the tandem tip

  15. Low-dose-rate radiation exposure leads to testicular damage with decreases in DNMT1 and HDAC1 in the murine testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Eun Ji; Son, Tae Gen; Yang, Kwangmo; Heo, Kyu; Kim, Joong Sun; Shin, In Sik

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of continuous low-dose-rate radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) of gamma rays on mice testicles. C57BL/6 mice were divided into sham and radiation groups (n = 8 each), and were exposed to either sham irradiation or 2 Gy for 21 days, 0.2 Gy for 2 days, or 0.02 Gy for 6 h of low-dose-rate irradiation. Testicular weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, and seminiferous epithelial depth were significantly decreased in the mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure. Moreover, the low-dose-rate radiation exposure induced an increase in malondialdehyde levels, and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity in the testis of mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure. The sperm count and motility in the epididymis also decreased in mice irradiated with 2 Gy at 1 and 9 days after exposure, whereas there was no significant effect on the proportion of abnormal sperm. The expressions of DNA methlytransferases-1 and histone deacetylases 1 in testes irradiated with 2 Gy were significantly decreased compared with the sham group. In conclusion, the damage exerted on the testes and epididymis largely depended on the total dose of low-dose-rate radiation. (author)

  16. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE-/- Alzheimer's mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, S. J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula...

  17. Comparison of thermoradiosensitization in two human melanoma cell lines and one fibroblast cell line by concurrent mild hyperthermia and low-dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Bussey, A.; Heller, D.P.; Ng, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Two human melanoma cell lines, one radioresistant (Sk-MEL-3) and one radiosensitive (HT-144), and a normal human fibroblast line (AG1522) were evaluated for thermoradiosensitization of low-dose-rate irradiation by concurrent mild hyperthermia (39-41 degrees C). None of the cell lines expressed chronic thermotolerance during heating at 39-41 degrees C. The SK-MEL-3 cells were the most heat sensitive, while AG1522 and HT-144 cells had the same sensitivity at 39 and 40 degrees C but HT-144 cells were more sensitive at 41 degrees C. All cell lines expressed thermal enhancement of radiosensitivity with heating during irradiation which increased with heating temperature. The SK-MEL-3 cells, which were the most resistant to radiation and demonstrated the greatest repair of sublethal damage (SLD) during low-dose-rate irradiation, had the greatest thermal enhancement of radiosensitivity, while the HT144 cells, which were the most sensitive and expressed little repair of SLD during low-dose-rate irradiation, had the smallest thermal enhancement of radiosensitivity. These data show that concurrent mild hyperthermia during low-dose-rate irradiation may be most efficacious in radiation-resistant tumor cells which express resistance through an enhanced capacity for repair of SLD. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. Theoretical analysis of microdosimetric spectra and cluster formation for 103Pd and 125I photon emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reniers, B; Vynckier, S; Verhaegen, F

    2004-01-01

    In this work we have compared 125 I or 103 Pd from a microdosimetric point of view. The photon spectra at different positions around the seeds have first been calculated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. These photon spectra are used as input for the event-by-event MC code TRION to calculate the microdosimetric lineal energy (y) distribution for each isotope. The microdosimetric dose average lineal energy, y D , calculated in a sphere of 1 μm is 3.5 keV μm -1 for 125 I and 4.0 keV μm -1 for 103 Pd, agreeing well with values reported in the literature. y D in a 1 μm sphere diminishes slightly with the distance from the seed for 103 Pd. This is due to the spectral hardening caused by the presence of a gamma-ray of 357.5 keV in the initial spectrum of 103 Pd. In parallel with the calculation of the microdosimetric spectra, we have analysed the distribution of the size of the energy deposition clusters generated by these low energy photons in structures of 2 and 10 nm of radius. Due to Compton interactions, the fraction of very low energy electrons ( 125 I photons is 51%, whereas it is only 27% for 103 Pd. As these electrons deposit their energy very locally, the pattern of energy depositions contains more clusters of a few nm of radius for 125 I than for 103 Pd; the mean cluster orders are respectively 3.3 and 3.0 for 10 nm clusters. This is in opposition with the prediction based on the microdosimetric spectrum and the parameter y D and could be of importance for the damage to the cells

  20. 125I-β-CIT biodistribution study in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ping

    2000-01-01

    The purpose is to study the preparation and biodistribution in animal of dopamine transporter imaging agent 125 I-β-CIT. β-CIT was 125 I radioiodinated with Iodogen method, the dynamic distribution of 125 I-β-CIT in brain and critical organs were studied with SD rat (autoradiography) and NIH mice respectively. The radiolabelling yield of 125 I-β-CIT was 84%, the radiochemical purity was better than 98%. Blood clearance could be explained by two-compartment model with a duration of 12h, (α = 3.87, T 1/2α = 0.179, β = 0.162, T 1/2β = 4.276) and three-compartment model in 24 h, (Pi = 5.28, T 1/2Pi = 0.131, α = 0.403, T 1/2α = 1.719, β 0.040, T 1/2β = 17.298). The maxim uptake rate of brain (9.1% +- 1.0%) was reaches at 1h, while at 24h, the target/noise ratio was higher . Critical organs liver, lung, spleen and kidney had high uptake rate [(9.88 +- 1.43) - (16.29 +- 1.72)], except liver, other organs showed quick clearance (T 1/2 125 I-β-CIT has a high striatum uptake and good stability in vivo, can provide good SPECT images, the best acquisition time of SPECT may be about 20h after i.v

  1. Late Urinary Side Effects 10 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Population-Based Results From a Multiphysician Practice Treating With a Standardized Protocol and Uniform Dosimetric Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, Mira; Miller, Stacy; Pickles, Tom; Halperin, Ross; Kwan, Winkle; Lapointe, Vincent; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid; Pai, Howard; Chan, Elisa K.; Morris, W. James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine late urinary toxicity (>12 months) in a large cohort of uniformly treated low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2009, 2709 patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–defined low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with Iodine 125 ( 125 I) low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy; 2011 patients with a minimum of 25 months of follow-up were included in the study. Baseline patients, treatment, implant factors, and late urinary toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grading system and International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]) were recorded prospectively. Time to IPSS resolution, late RTOG genitourinary toxicity was examined with Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression was done for individual covariates and multivariable models. Results: Median follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 2-13 years). Actuarial toxicity rates reached 27% and 10% (RTOG ≥2 and ≥3, respectively) at 9-13 years. Symptoms resolved quickly in the majority of patients (88% in 6-12 months). The prevalence of RTOG 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 toxicity with a minimum of 7 years' follow-up was 70%, 21%, 6.4%, 2.3%, and 0.08%, respectively. Patients with a larger prostate volume, higher baseline IPSS, higher D90, acute toxicity, and age >70 years had more late RTOG ≥2 toxicity (all P≤.02). The IPSS resolved slower in patients with lower baseline IPSS and larger ultrasound prostate volume, those not receiving androgen deprivation therapy, and those with higher D90. The crude rate of RTOG 3 toxicity was 6%. Overall the rate of transurethral resection of the prostate was 1.9%; strictures, 2%; incontinence, 1.3%; severe symptoms, 1.8%; late catheterization, 1.3%; and hematuria, 0.8%. The majority (80%) resolved their symptoms in 6-12 months. Conclusion: Long-term urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is low. Although actuarial rates increase with longer follow

  2. Late Urinary Side Effects 10 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Population-Based Results From a Multiphysician Practice Treating With a Standardized Protocol and Uniform Dosimetric Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Mira, E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Miller, Stacy; Pickles, Tom; Halperin, Ross; Kwan, Winkle; Lapointe, Vincent; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid; Pai, Howard; Chan, Elisa K.; Morris, W. James

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine late urinary toxicity (>12 months) in a large cohort of uniformly treated low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2009, 2709 patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–defined low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy; 2011 patients with a minimum of 25 months of follow-up were included in the study. Baseline patients, treatment, implant factors, and late urinary toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grading system and International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]) were recorded prospectively. Time to IPSS resolution, late RTOG genitourinary toxicity was examined with Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression was done for individual covariates and multivariable models. Results: Median follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 2-13 years). Actuarial toxicity rates reached 27% and 10% (RTOG ≥2 and ≥3, respectively) at 9-13 years. Symptoms resolved quickly in the majority of patients (88% in 6-12 months). The prevalence of RTOG 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 toxicity with a minimum of 7 years' follow-up was 70%, 21%, 6.4%, 2.3%, and 0.08%, respectively. Patients with a larger prostate volume, higher baseline IPSS, higher D90, acute toxicity, and age >70 years had more late RTOG ≥2 toxicity (all P≤.02). The IPSS resolved slower in patients with lower baseline IPSS and larger ultrasound prostate volume, those not receiving androgen deprivation therapy, and those with higher D90. The crude rate of RTOG 3 toxicity was 6%. Overall the rate of transurethral resection of the prostate was 1.9%; strictures, 2%; incontinence, 1.3%; severe symptoms, 1.8%; late catheterization, 1.3%; and hematuria, 0.8%. The majority (80%) resolved their symptoms in 6-12 months. Conclusion: Long-term urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is low. Although actuarial rates increase with longer

  3. Cytotoxicity of an 125I-labelled DNA ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, T.C.; Lobachevsky, P.N.; Martin, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of a DNA-binding ligand [ 125 I]-Hoechst 33258 following incubation of K562 cells with the drug was investigated. The ability of a radical scavenger, dimethyl sulphoxide, to protect cells from the 125 I-decay induced cell death was also studied. Three different concentrations and specific activities of the drug were used to provide different ligand : DNA binding ratios. The results demonstrated a trend toward improved delivery of the ligand to the nucleus and to chromatin at higher ligand concentrations, with concomitant increased sensitivity to 125 I-decay induced cytotoxicity and decreased protection by dimethyl sulphoxide. This correlation of radiobiological parameters with subcellular drug distribution is consistent with the classical dogma that attributes cytotoxicity to DNA double-stranded breakage in the vicinity of the site of decay, where the high LET nature of the damage confers minimal sensitivity to radical scavenging

  4. Effect of organic matter on 125I diffusion in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Wu; Qing Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Through-diffusion method was conducted to investigate the diffusion behavior of 125 I in bentonite in present of organic matter, such as polyaminopolycarboxylate EDTA, oxalic acid, hydrazine and humic acid HA. The effective diffusion coefficient D e value and rock capacity factor α were (2.32.6) × 10 -11 m 2 /s and 0.040-0.052, respectively. The small difference showed that iodine was preferentially associated with silicoaluminate mineral as an inorganic form. In present of HA, the D a value of 125 I was almost two orders of magnitude higher than that of HA and humic substances HS. The D e and α derived from the experiments were used to simulate its diffusion in the designed bentonite obstacle of high-level radioactive waste repository and the results showed that 125 I can be transported from 30 to 50 cm thickness of bentonite to the far-field of repository in several years. (author)

  5. Improved tissue assignment using dual-energy computed tomography in low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Côté, Nicolas [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Bedwani, Stéphane [Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Carrier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.carrier.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: An improvement in tissue assignment for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDRB) patients using more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation was accomplished with a metallic artifact reduction (MAR) method specific to dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Methods: The proposed MAR algorithm followed a four-step procedure. The first step involved applying a weighted blend of both DECT scans (I {sub H/L}) to generate a new image (I {sub Mix}). This action minimized Hounsfield unit (HU) variations surrounding the brachytherapy seeds. In the second step, the mean HU of the prostate in I {sub Mix} was calculated and shifted toward the mean HU of the two original DECT images (I {sub H/L}). The third step involved smoothing the newly shifted I {sub Mix} and the two original I {sub H/L}, followed by a subtraction of both, generating an image that represented the metallic artifact (I {sub A,(H/L)}) of reduced noise levels. The final step consisted of subtracting the original I {sub H/L} from the newly generated I {sub A,(H/L)} and obtaining a final image corrected for metallic artifacts. Following the completion of the algorithm, a DECT stoichiometric method was used to extract the relative electronic density (ρ{sub e}) and effective atomic number (Z {sub eff}) at each voxel of the corrected scans. Tissue assignment could then be determined with these two newly acquired physical parameters. Each voxel was assigned the tissue bearing the closest resemblance in terms of ρ{sub e} and Z {sub eff}, comparing with values from the ICRU 42 database. A MC study was then performed to compare the dosimetric impacts of alternative MAR algorithms. Results: An improvement in tissue assignment was observed with the DECT MAR algorithm, compared to the single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach. In a phantom study, tissue misassignment was found to reach 0.05% of voxels using the DECT approach, compared with 0.40% using the SECT method. Comparison of the DECT and SECT D

  6. SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therriault-Proulx, F; Bruno, T; Beddar, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec, Quebec, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate in a water phantom the use of plastic scintillation detectors to measure dose to the urethra and the rectal wall during a clinically realistic low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy implant. Methods: A template was designed to replicate a clinically realistic LDR brachytherapy prostate implant inside a water phantom. Twenty-two catheters were inserted, including one mimicking the urethra and another the rectal wall. The needles inserted in the remaining 20 catheters were composed of thin-walled nylon tubes in which I-125 radioactive seeds (Air Kerma Strengths of (0.328±0.020)U) were abutted together with plastic spacers to replicate a typical loading. A plastic scintillation detector (PSD) with a 5-mm long × 1-mm diameter sensitive element was first placed inside the urethra and 1-second measurements were performed for 60s after each needle implant. Measurements were also performed at multiple positions along the urethra once all the needles were inserted. The procedure was then repeated with the PSD placed at the rectal wall. Results: Individual dose-rates ranging from 0.07µGy/s to 1.5µGy/s were measured after each needle implant. The average absolute relative differences were (6.2±3.6)% and (6.9±6.5)% to the values calculated with the TG-43 formalism, for the urethra and rectal wall respectively. These results are within expectations from the error uncertainty budget once accounting for uncertainties in seeds’ strength and positioning. Interestingly, the PSD allowed for unplanned error detection as the study was performed. Finally, the measured dose after the full implant at different positions along the mimicked organs at risk were in agreement with TG-43 values for all of the positions tested. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation detectors could be used as in vivo detectors for LDR brachytherapy as they would provide accurate dose information after each needle implant as well as along the organs at risk at the end of the implant.

  7. High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial irradiation (IRT) of the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Lucas A.M.; Plas, Mirjam van der; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Hanssen, Alex E.J.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a newly developed technique to study radiation tolerance of rat spinal cord to continuous interstitial irradiation (IRT) at different dose rates. Material and methods: Two parallel catheters are inserted just laterally on each side of the vertebral bodies from the level of Th 10 to L 4 . These catheters are afterloaded with two 192 Ir wires of 4 cm length each (activity 1-2.3 mCi/cm) for the low dose rate (LDR) IRT or connected to the HDR micro-Selectron for the high dose rate (HDR) IRT. Spinal cord target volume is located at the level of Th 12 -L 2 . Due to the rapid dose fall-off around the implanted sources, a dose inhomogeneity across the spinal cord thickness is obtained in the dorso-ventral direction. Using the 100% reference dose (rate) at the ventral side of the spinal cord to prescribe the dose, experiments have been carried out to obtain complete dose response curves at average dose rates of 0.49, 0.96 and 120 Gy/h. Paralysis of the hind-legs after 5-6 months and histopathological examination of the spinal cord of each irradiated rat are used as experimental endpoints. Results: The histopathological damage seen after irradiation is clearly reflected the inhomogeneous dose distribution around the implanted catheters, with the damage predominantly located in the dorsal tract of the cord or dorsal roots. With each reduction in average dose rate, spinal cord radiation tolerance is significantly increased. When the dose is prescribed at the 100% reference dose rate, the ED 50 (induction of paresis in 50% of the animals) for the HDR-IRT is 17.3 Gy. If the average dose rate is reduced from 120 Gy/h to 0.96 or 0.49 Gy/h, a 2.9- or 4.7-fold increase in the ED 50 values to 50.3 Gy and 80.9 Gy is observed; for the dose prescribed at the 150% reference dose rate (dorsal side of cord) ED 50 values are 26.0, 75.5 and 121.4 Gy, respectively. Using different types of analysis and in dependence of the dose prescription and reference dose rate, the

  8. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  9. Beta-decay 125I → 125Te

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kurteva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Beta-decay of the nucleus 125I and spectroscopic characteristics of the daughter nucleus are described within the framework of the dynamic collective model. Quasiparticle and multiphonon states, as well as vacuum fluctuations of quasiparticles are taken into account. The comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data is performed.

  10. Preclinical pharmacological study on 125 I-IPPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Ji Shuren; Fang Ping; Zhou Xiang; He Yongjun; Cao Guoxian

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial uptake of 125 I-IPPA in rats showed a peak of 4.4% of injected dose per gram. The half elimination time of myocardium was 3.8 min and the maximal uptake of thyroid is only 0.005%ID/organ at 120 min. The initial half time of 2.7 min in rabbits was obtained from the elimination curve of radioactivity in blood. In vitro binding test for 125 I-IPPA to HSA showed rather constant level of activation during tow hours. The second peak of extraction was observed in major organs of rats, in rabbits' elimination of radioactivity and in binding test for 125 I-IPPA to albumin in vivo. Toxicity trial was up to standard. The tolerance of a mouse to IPPA was 560 times as high as that of a person to IPPA. It demonstrated that 125 I-IPPA could be quickly extracted by myocardium, and its catabolite were excreted in the urine with almost no iodine loss. All the results were found to agree with the expectations based on the principal metabolic path of phenyl fatty acid

  11. In Vivo Thyroid 125I Monitoring with Radioluminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, K.; Saze, T.; Yamashita, H.; Etoh, M.

    1999-01-01

    The counting features of an in vivo thyroid monitoring system with an imaging plate (IP) were investigated by using an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom. The realistic thyroid phantoms loaded with 125 I solution were embedded in a neck phantom. The IP was fixed on the neck phantom and exposed to 125 I photons emitted from the thyroid phantom by changing the pre-thyroid tissue thickness at the front of the thyroid. A clear thyroid image was obtained at short tissue thicknesses. A region of interest (ROI) was set so that the ROI contained the thyroid image. The count within the ROI was regarded as the number of 125 I photons detected by the IP. The IP counting efficiency was about 0.6% at maximum. Monitoring with IP has the advantage of allowing the worker to move freely during the monitoring period by wearing the IP on his neck. Radioluminography with IP has shown itself to be useful when monitoring thyroid 125 I. (author)

  12. COMS eye plaque brachytherapy dosimetry simulations for 103Pd, 125I, and 131Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions for Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaques. Brachytherapy seed models 200, 6711, and CS-1 Rev2 carrying 103 Pd, 125 I, and 131 Cs radionuclides, respectively, were modeled and benchmarked against previously published values. Calculated dose rate constants MC Λ were 0.684, 0.924, and 1.052 cGy h -1 U -1 (±2.6%, k=1 uncertainty) for models 200, 6711, and CS-1 Rev2, respectively. The seeds were distributed into 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 mm-diameter COMS eye plaques. Simulations were performed in both heterogeneous and homogeneous environments, where the latter were in-water and the former included the silastic seed carrier insert and gold-alloy plaque. MC-based homogenous central axis dose distributions agreed within 2%±1% (±1 s.d.) to hand-calculated values. For heterogeneous simulations, notable photon attenuation was observed, with dose reduction at 5 mm of 19%, 11%, and 9% for 103 Pd, 125 I, and 131 Cs, respectively. A depth-dependent correction factor was derived to correct homogenous central-axis dose distributions for plaque component heterogeneities, which were found to be significant at short radial distances

  13. Changes of chromosome aberration rate and micronucleus frequency along with accumulated dose in continuously irradiated mice with a low dose rate of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Izumi, Jun; Yanai, Takanori; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations in chronically exposed workers in nuclear facilities and medical radiologists have been reported. However chronological change of chromosome aberration rates along with accumulated dose has not been well studied. Chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in spleen lymphocytes were observed serially in mice continuously irradiated with a low dose rate of 20 mGy/day up to 400 days. Chromosome aberration rates were rapidly increased to 11.1% at 1 Gy, while micronucleus incidence increased at 5 Gy. After these doses their increase rates were saturated. Micronucleus incidence in bone marrow erythroblasts was higher than in spleen cells. These chronological changes of cytogenetic aberrations seem to be induced through a balance between developments of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, and life span of spleen lymphocytes. These results will be helpful for risk assessment in low dose rate radiation exposure. (author)

  14. A generalised formulation of the 'incomplete-repair' model for cell survival and tissue response to fractionated low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized equation for cell survival or tissue effects after fractionated low dose-rate irradiations, when there is incomplete repair between fractions and significant repair during fractions, is derived in terms of the h- and g-functions of the 'incomplete-repair' (IR) model. The model is critically dependent on α/β, repair half-time, treatment time and interfraction interval, and should therefore be regarded primarily as a tool for the analysis of fractionation and dose-rate effects in carefully designed radiobiological experiments, although it should also be useful in exploring, in a general way, the feasibility of clinical treatment protocols using fractionated low dose-rate treatments. (author)

  15. A Cs-137 afterloading device. Preliminary results of cell kinetic effects of low dose-rate irradiation in an experimental tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutgers, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    A Cs-137 afterloading technique is described which can be used in experimental tumours. Preliminary results, obtained with the human cervical carcinoma ME-180 xenografted to nude athymic mice, demonstrated that 20 Gy of low dose-rate irradiation induced an important redistribution of cells over cell cycle. The proportion of cells in G2-phase increased from 14.4% to 44.2% at 140 hours after irradiation. This method allows an accurate calculation of the dose-rate distribution in the tumour. Investigations of the cell kinetic effects of low dose-rate irradiation, at different dose-rates and different total doses, are therefore facilitated by the technique. (orig.) [de

  16. Treatment results by uneven fractionated irradiation, low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    The prognosis of malignant glioma is extremely poor. We applied conventionally fractionated irradiation combined with 1-(4-aminio-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU), uneven fractionated irradiation with ACNU, low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation against 110 malignant gliomas to investigate the efficacy of these methods as alternative treatments for malignant glioma. Although local tumor control by uneven fractionated irradiation was better than that by the other methods, no significant improvement was obtained in survival rates. As a result of multiple regression analysis, age and histology were major factors for survival rates, and the difference of treatment methods was not important. Both low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost and intraoperative irradiation showed little advantage because of the high risk of brain necrosis associated with them. (author).

  17. Performance evaluation and dose verification of the low dose rate permanent prostrate brachytherapy system at the korle-bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenso, Y.A.

    2015-07-01

    Low dose rate prostate brachytherapy equipment that is newly acquired or substantially upgraded requires acceptance testing before being put into clinical service as well as Quality control after installation and when in use. Thus, quality control tests typically are periodic repetitions, partial or full, of acceptance and commissioning tests. The ultrasound system is the most important equipment used in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The AAPM TG 128 provides a set of instructions for quality control testing of an ultrasound system with a specific focus on those tests applicable to image guidance during a prostate implant procedure. Following the AAPM TG 128 protocol and CIRS 045 brachytherapy QA phantom as well as other protocols, eight experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of the system. The overall average axial distance in the B and F columns were found to be 10.12 ± 0.1 mm and 10.10 ± 0.11 mm respectively deviating by approximately 1.2 % and 1.0 % respectively from a standard inter- target distance of 10 mm. Also the lateral distance measured along the rows 1, 2, 3 and 4 resulted in an average distance of 10.07 ± 0.06 mm along rows B4 – C4, deviating from the standard inter- target distance of 10 mm by approximately 0.07 mm or ± 0.7 %, that of B3 – D3 also was 20.01 ± 0.07, deviating from 20 mm standard inter- target distance by 0.01 mm or 0.05 %, targets along B2 – E2 recorded an average distance of 29.56 ± 0.33 mm deviating from 30 mm standard inter- target distance by approximately -0.44 mm or -1.47 % and the last which is B1 – F1 also recorded an average distance of 39.54 ± 0.38 mm deviating from 40 mm standard inter- target distance by approximately -0.46 mm or – 1.15 %. Volume measurement accuracy of the three standard volumes, 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 produced average measurements of 3.97 ± 0.16 cm 3 , 8.86 ± 0.29 cm 3 and 20.11 ± 1.04 cm 3 resulting in approximate deviations of -0.75 %, -1.56 % and 0

  18. Dose-rate effects and chronological changes of chromosome aberration rates in spleen cells from mice that are chronically exposed to gamma-ray at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kohda, Atsushi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Oghiso, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dose-rate effects have not been examined in the low dose-rate regions of less than 60-600 mGy/h. Mice were chronically exposed to gamma-ray at 20 mGy/day (approximately 1 mGy/h) up to 700 days and at 1 mGy/day (approximately 0.05 mGy/h) for 500 days under SPF conditions. Chronological changes of chromosome aberration rates in spleen cells were observed along with accumulated doses at both low dose-rates. Unstable aberrations increased in a biphasic manner within 0-2 Gy and 4-14 Gy in 20 mGy/day irradiation. They slightly increased up to 0.5 Gy in 1 mGy/day irradiation. Chromosome aberration rates at 20 mGy/day and 1 mGy/day were compared at the same total doses of 0.5 Gy and 0.25 Gy. They were 2.0 vs. 0.53, and 1.0 vs. 0.47 respectively. Thus, dose-rate effects were observed in these low dose-rate regions. (author)

  19. Up-regulation of calreticulin in mouse liver tissues after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lan; Hu, Nan; Yin, Jie; Sun, Jing; Mu, Hongxiang; Dai, Keren; Ding, Dexin

    2017-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation on normal tissues has attracted attention. Based on previous research, we observed the morphology of liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice that received irradiation dose rates increased. Additionally, differential protein expression in liver tissues was analyzed using a proteomics approach. Compared with the matched group in the 2D gel analysis of the irradiated groups, 69 proteins had ≥ 1.5-fold changes in expression. Twenty-three proteins were selected based on ≥2.5-fold change in expression, and 22 of them were meaningful for bioinformatics and protein fingerprinting analysis. These molecules were relevant to cytoskeleton processes, cell metabolism, biological defense, mitochondrial damage, detoxification and tumorigenesis. The results from real-time PCR and western blot (WB) analyses showed that calreticulin (CRT) was up-regulated in the irradiated groups, which indicates that CRT may be relevant to stress reactions when mouse livers are exposed to low-dose irradiation and that low-dose-rate ionizing radiation may pose a cancer risk. The CRT protein can be a potential candidate for low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation early-warning biomarkers. However, the underlying mechanism requires further investigation.

  20. Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone: Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kanglun; Doherty, Alison H.; Genik, Paula C.; Gookin, Sara E.; Roteliuk, Danielle M.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Weil, Michael M.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2017-11-01

    During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

  1. A comparison study on of tumor cell-killing effects between low-dose-rate β-irradiation of 32P and γ-irradiation of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiru; Tian Jiahe; Ding Weimin; Zhang Jinming; Chen Yingmao

    2004-01-01

    The paper is to elucidate radiobiological characteristics and radiobiological mechanism in killing tumor cells with low dose rate β-rays and high dose rate γ-rays. HeLa cells were exposed to low-rate β-irradiation of 32 P or high-dose-rate γ-irradiation of 60 Co. Cell response-patterns were compared between two the types of radiations in terms of their inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle blockage, evaluated by trypanblue excluded method and flow cytometry, respectively. Results show that there is a different way in growth inhibition effect on HeLa cells between low-dose-rate irradiation of 32 P and high-dose-rate irradiation of 60 Co γ. In exposure to 32 P, the inhibition of cell proliferation in HeLa cell was a prolong course, whereas and the effect was in a more serious and quick way in 60 Co irradiation. Cell cycle arrest in G 2 phase induced by 32 P was lower and more prolong than that induced by 60 Co. The inhibition effect on tumor cells between the two types of radiations is different. Impaired DNA repair system by continuous low-dose-rate radiation might contribute to the final radiation effect of 32 P

  2. Preparation of {sup 125}I-labeled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm using lactoperoxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huaifen, Li; Huisheng, Niu; Mingyue, Yuan; Yongzhi, Huang [Chinese Acaolemy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin (China). Inst. of Radiation Medicine

    1994-11-01

    {sup 125}I-labelled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm ({sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4}) is prepared using lactoperoxidase. The in-vivo radioactive distribution of {sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4} in bare mice shows that {sup 125}I-L{sub 4}B{sub 4} concentrates in the tumour.

  3. Preparation of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm using lactoperoxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huaifen; Niu Huisheng; Yuan Mingyue; Huang Yongzhi

    1994-01-01

    125 I-labelled monoclonal antibody of bladder neoplasm ( 125 I-L 4 B 4 ) is prepared using lactoperoxidase. The in-vivo radioactive distribution of 125 I-L 4 B 4 in bare mice shows that 125 I-L 4 B 4 concentrates in the tumour

  4. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J. L.; Micka, J. A.; Culberson, W. S.; DeWerd, L. A.; Rasmussen, B. E.; Davis, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60 Co. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a 60 Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 125 I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 125 I seed, and the Best 2335 103 Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the 60 Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the 60 Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125 I and 103 Pd relative to 60 Co. Results: The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to 60 Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. Conclusions: The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%–15% for 125 I and 103 Pd sources relative to 60 Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy

  5. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy sources relative to 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J L; Rasmussen, B E; Davis, S D; Micka, J A; Culberson, W S; DeWerd, L A

    2014-12-01

    To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources relative to (60)Co. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a (60)Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 (125)I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 (125)I seed, and the Best 2335 (103)Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the (60)Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the (60)Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for (125)I and (103)Pd relative to (60)Co. The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to (60)Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%-15% for (125)I and (103)Pd sources relative to (60)Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around (125)I and (103)Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy.

  6. Preparation of 19-iodocholesterol labelled with 125 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Rebollo, D. V.; Ruiz, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a new method of synthesis of 19-iodo cholesterol labelled with ''125 I, from commercial cholesterol, is described. Its high chemical (96%) and radiochemical (99.9%) purities high yield and short time of preparation permit us to dispose or a more accessible labelled compound, which results appropriates for clinical investigations and in the diagnosis of disturbances of the suprarenal glands. (Author) 9 refs

  7. Long term results of 125I for treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremner, W.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Greig, W.R.; Ratcliffe, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    125 I emits very low energy conversion and Auger electrons. This radionuclide has been used in place of 131 I with the hope of reducing the incidence of post treatment hypothyroidism. 303 of 360 patients treated have been reviewed. Originally very large doses of 125 I were prescribed (751-1,600 μCi/g) but 9 out of 15 patients (60%) became hypothyroid, therefore 4 smaller therapeutic regimes were employed. (1) 55 patients received doses of 200 μCi or less/g thyroid, 69% are euthyroid and 24% hypothyroid after an average of 33 months from treatment. (2) 87 patients received doses of 201-350 μCi/g thyroid, 67% are euthyroid and 21% hypothyroid after an average follow up of 30 months. (3) 70 patients received doses of 351-500 μCi/g thyroid, 77% are euthyroid and 18% hypothyroid 36 months after treatment and (4) 76 patients received doses of 501-750 μCi/g, 41% are euthyroid and 56% hypothyroid 49 months after therapy. No long term complications such as thyroid cancer or leukaemia have occurred but because 125 I does not eliminate or reduce the incidence of post treatment hypothyroidism it probably should not be used in preference to 131 I for the routine treatment of hyperthyroidism

  8. {sup 125}I Labelling of Protein Using Immobilized Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Park, Kyung Bae; Awh, Ok Doo [Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    For an effective solid-phase labelling of protein with {sup 125}I, studies on the immobilization of lactoperoxidase (LPO) on the inner wall of polystyrene tubes were carried out. Labelling of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and insulin was also practiced using the LPO immobilized tubes. The immobilized enzyme of about 2.5 mu g/tube was sufficient for small scale labelling since the results of radio-paper chromatography of the labelling mixture of insulin indicated that the yields were sufficiently high (80%) even in the reactions conducted at room temperature for 60 sec. The results of the Sephadex column chromatography indicated that the labelled products were not contaminated with LPO-{sup 125}I, and the radiochemical purity of the products was more than 90%. In considering the general trend that the {sup 125}I labelled protein obtained by using LPO maintains its intactness better than those obtained by using chloramine-T, together with the tendency of yield enhancing with increase of reactants-concentration, the LPO immobilized tube method is estimated to be one of the simple methods of labelling. The product might be applicable without further purification.

  9. Labeling Lanreotide with 125I and 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Hongsheng

    2000-01-01

    Lanreotide is a new somatostatin analogue. It can bind to human somatostatin receptor (hSSTR) subtype 2 through 5 with high affinity and to hSSTR subtype I with low affinity. We investigate labeling condition, quality control and stability in vitro of 125 I-Lanreotide and 188 Re-lanreotide respectively. (A) Lanreotide is labeled with 125 I using Chloramine T. The effect of reaction condition (such as reaction time, pH value, Lanreotide amount, quantity of Chloramine T and reaction volume) on labeling yield is investigated in detail. (B) The labeling yield and radiochemical purity (RP) is measured with paper chromatography (PC) and Sep-Pak C 18 Cartridge. (C) The stability of 125 I-Lanreotide in vitro is investigated by labeling compound incubating for 48 hours at 37 deg C in the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and RP is tested by PC at specific time intervals. (D) Lanreotide is labeled directly with 188 Re via the mixture of citrate and tartate using stannous chloride as reduced agent. The influence of reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, amount of stannous chloride, amount of Lanreotide and reaction time on labeling yield is investigated in detail. At the time, the stability in vitro quality control and animal test are evaluated

  10. Labeling Lanreotide with 125I and 188Re. China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Hongsheng

    2000-01-01

    Lanreotide (D-β-Nal-Cys-Try-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Thr-NH2) is a new somatostatin analogue. It can bind to human somatostatin receptor (hSSTR) subtype 2 through 5 with high affinity and to hSSTR subtype 1 with low affinity. We investigate labeling condition, quality control and stability in vitro of 125 I-Lanreotide and 188 Re-lanreotide respectively. (A) Lanreotide is labeled with 125 I using Chloramine T. The effect of reaction condition (such as reaction time, pH value, Lanreotide amount, quantity of Chloramine T and reaction volume) on labeling yield is investigated in detail. (B) The labeling yield and radiochemical purity (RP) is measured with paper chromatography (PC) and Sep-Pak C 18 Cartridge. For PC method, 125 I-Lanreotide is spotted on the Whatman No.1 paper and developed in the mixture of CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH and CH 3 CH 2 OH and NH 4 OH (v/v/v=5:2:1), the Rf value of every component in the mobile phase is given in table 1. For Sep-Pak C 18 Cartridge methods each cartridge is washed with 10 ml of ethanol followed by 10 ml of iso-CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 OH solution. Aliquots of 0.1 mI sample is loaded onto the cartridge, unbound peptide (sodium iodine-125) is eluted with 5 ml of 0.5mol/L sodium acetate solution, 125 I-Lanreotide is eluted with 5 mI of 95% aqueous ethanol solution. (C) The stability of 125 I-Lanreotide in vitro is investigated by labeling compound incubating for 48 hours at 37 deg. C in the 0.9% sodium chloride solution and RP is tested by PC at specific time intervals. (D) Lanreotide is labeled directly with 188 Re via the mixture of citrate and tartate using stannous chloride as reduced agent. The influence of reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, amount of stannous chloride, amount of Lanreotide and reaction time on labeling yield is investigated in detail. At the time, the stability in vitro quality control and animal test are evaluated

  11. A comparative study of 19-iodo cholesterol-125I 3-acetate and Na 125I in liquid scintillation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Grau Carles, A.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of performance of 19-iodo cholesterol 1 25I 3-acetate and sodium iodide samples labeled with 125I is presented for liquid scintillation counting measurements. Quench effect, count rate stability and spectral evolution of samples have been followed for several weeks in Toluene, Hisafe II, Instagel, Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol scintillators. Organic samples have negligible quench effect in the interval of I concentration of 0-90 μg and inorganic samples only show a very small variation, lower than 12%, for Dioxane-naphthalene, in the same range of concentration. Satisfactory stability is obtained in general for both, organic and inorganic samples, but small counting losses, 0.03% for 19-iodocholesterol 1 I 3-acetate samples in Tolue ne-alcohol and 0 .04% for Na 125I samples in Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol, have been reported. (Author) 8 refs

  12. Preparation of 19-iodo cholesterol labelled with 125 I; Preparacion del 19-yodocolesterol marcado con 125 I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L.; Rebollo, D. V.; Ruiz, J. M.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper a new method of synthesis of 19-iodo cholesterol labelled with ''125 I, from commercial cholesterol, is described. Its high chemical (96%) and radiochemical (99.9%) purities high yield and short time of preparation permit us to dispose or a more accessible labelled compound, which results appropriates for clinical investigations and in the diagnosis of disturbances of the suprarenal glands. (Author) 9 refs.

  13. Preparation of 19-iodo cholesterol labelled with 125 I; Preparacion del 19-yodocolesterol marcado con 125 I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L; Rebollo, D V; Ruiz, J M

    1986-07-01

    In this paper a new method of synthesis of 19-iodo cholesterol labelled with ''125 I, from commercial cholesterol, is described. Its high chemical (96%) and radiochemical (99.9%) purities high yield and short time of preparation permit us to dispose or a more accessible labelled compound, which results appropriates for clinical investigations and in the diagnosis of disturbances of the suprarenal glands. (Author) 9 refs.

  14. Monte Carlo dosimetry for 125I and 103Pd eye plaque brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R. M.; Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of dosimetry for eye plaque brachytherapy is performed. BrachyDose, an EGSnrc user code which makes use of Yegin's multi-geometry package, is used to fully model 125 I (model 6711) and 103 Pd (model 200) brachytherapy seeds and the standardized plaques of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Three-dimensional dose distributions in the eye region are obtained. In general, dose to water is scored; however, the implications of replacing water with eye tissues are explored. The effect of the gold alloy (Modulay) backing is investigated and the dose is found to be sensitive to the elemental composition of the backing. The presence of the silicone polymer (Silastic) seed carrier results in substantial dose decreases relative to water, particularly for 103 Pd. For a 20 mm plaque with a Modulay backing and Silastic insert, fully loaded with 24 seeds, the dose decrease relative to water is of the order of 14% for 125 I and 20% for 103 Pd at a distance of 1 cm from the inner sclera along the plaque's central axis. For the configurations of seeds used in COMS plaques, interseed attenuation is a small effect within the eye region. The introduction of an air interface results in a dose reduction in its vicinity which depends on the plaque's position within the eye and the radionuclide. Introducing bone in the eye's vicinity also causes dose reductions. The dose distributions in the eye for the two different radionuclides are compared and, for the same prescription dose, 103 Pd generally offers a lower dose to critical normal structures. BrachyDose is sufficiently fast to allow full Monte Carlo dose calculations for routine clinical treatment planning.

  15. Immunological network activation by low-dose rate irradiation. Analysis of cell populations and cell surface molecules in whole body irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ina, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate whole body irradiation on biodefense and immunological systems were investigated using female C57BL/6 (B6) mice. These B6 mice were exposed continuously to γ-rays from a 137 Cs source in the long-term low-dose rate irradiation facility at CRIEPI for 0 - 12 weeks at a dose rate of 0.95 mGy/hr. In the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood of the irradiated mice, changes in cell populations and cell surface molecules were examined. The cell surface functional molecules (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD45R/B220, ICAM-1, Fas, NK-1.1, CXCR4, and CCR5), and activation molecules (THAM, CD28, CD40, CD44H, CD70, B7-1, B7-2, OX-40 antigen, CTLA-4, CD30 ligand, and CD40 ligand) were analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of CD4 + T cells and cell surface CD8 molecule expressions on the CD8 + T cells increased significantly to 120-130% after 3 weeks of the irradiation, compared to non-irradiated control mice. On the other hand, the percentage of CD45R/B220 + CD40 + B cells, which is one of the immunological markers of inflammation, infection, tumor, and autoimmune disease, decreased significantly to 80-90% between the 3rd to 5th week of irradiation. There was no significant difference in other cell population rates and cell surface molecule expression. Furthermore, abnormal T cells bearing mutated T cell receptors induced by high-dose rate irradiation were not observed throughout this study. These results suggest that low-dose rate irradiation activates the immunological status of the whole body. (author)

  16. Effect of low-intensity low-dose rate irradiation on the incidence and the development of spontaneous leukosis in AKR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlakova, E.B.; Erokhin, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    Development of spontaneous leukosis in AKR mice is accelerated by irradiation with low doses of 1.2-2.4 cGy and low dose rate 0.06 cGy/day. The leukoses incidence rate increases. Deaths of the animals from leukosis occurs earlier, shortening the average and maximum life-spans of the animals. The dynamics of changes in the mass of organs of the immune systems (thymus and spleen) shows extrema. The moment of reaching the extremum correlates with the maximum rate of animals' deaths [ru

  17. Long-term results of exclusive low-dose rate curie-therapy for a high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, P.; Monnier, L.; Dumas, I.; Azoury, F.; Mazeron, R.; Haie-Meder, C.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the results of an exclusive low dose rate curie therapy for female patients treated for a grade 3 vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. They reviewed the medical files of patients treated since 1983, i.e. 28 women. They analysed demographic characteristics, the clinic description of lesions, possible treatments which occurred before this high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, possible previous history of cervical or endometrial cancer, curie therapy detailed data, presence of tumorous relapse. According to that, they conclude that a 60 Gy exclusive low- vaginal dose-rate curie-therapy is an efficient and well tolerated treatment for high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. Short communication

  18. An evaluation of a Low-Dose-Rate (LDR) brachytherapy procedure using a systems engineering & error analysis methodology for health care (SEABH) - (SAVE)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chadwick, Liam

    2012-03-12

    Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HFMEA®) is an established tool for risk assessment in health care. A number of deficiencies have been identified in the method. A new method called Systems and Error Analysis Bundle for Health Care (SEABH) was developed to address these deficiencies. SEABH has been applied to a number of medical processes as part of its validation and testing. One of these, Low Dose Rate (LDR) prostate Brachytherapy is reported in this paper. The case study supported the validity of SEABH with respect to its capacity to address the weaknesses of (HFMEA®).

  19. Activity of acid phosphatase in tissues of dogs exposed to γ-radiation at low dose rates and treated with adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichejkina, N.I.; Tikhomirova, M.V.; Romantsev, E.F.; Rogozkin, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the activity of acid phosphatase in the liver, spleen and blood of dogs under various experimental conditions: (a) exposure to γ-rays at low dose rates, (b) preventive and therapeutic application of ATP and (c) administration of ATP to intact animals. It was demonstrated that the activity of acid phosphatase in the liver and spleen was invariable after the first 24 h and decreased after 72 h of observation in each of the experimental variants. Preventive and therapeutic administration of ATP to dogs not substantially influence the activity of acid phosphatase throughout the entire period of observation

  20. Study on agroecology contamination from 125I gas and control measures in a simulated ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenhu; Li Chuanzhao; Xu Shiming; Hou Lanxin; Shang Zhaorong; Li Xia

    1995-09-01

    The study was made in an air-tight space in which a simulated agricultural ecosystem was contaminated from 125 I gas. The contents of the study were summarized as follows: The space and time distribution of 125 I gas, contamination of foliage of the plants, accumulation and transfer of 125 I fallen on the soil and entered into the plants from the roots of crops and vegetables, the time distribution of 125 I in crops in water contaminated from 125 I fallout, distribution, accumulation and transfer of 125 I in chickens and rabbits which inhaled 125 I gas or fed the fodder contaminated from 125 I. The control measures of contamination in agroenvironment from 125 I were discussed. (7 refs., 20 figs., 29 tabs.)

  1. Radiation protection measures in case of 125I incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobelt, W.

    1976-01-01

    Thyroid measurements were performed on members of the scientific staff in the whole body counter of the Giessen Radiation Center with an aluminium encapsulated 3'' x 3'' dia. NaI(T1) detector; the personnel under investigation comprised those persons who either handled major quantities of 125 I or worked in the controlled area. The measuring setup, phantom calibration and the limits of measurement that can be attained are discussed. In a few cases of incorporation the effective halflife was determined. The radiation exposure was calculated by the absorbed fractions concept. A hazard is encountered almost exclusively in the iodization of the test substances. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Treatment of hyperthyroidism: use of 131I and 125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Factors related to late hypothyroidism following the use of 131 I for treatment of hyperthyroidism are discussed with regard to age of patient, size of dose, previous surgery, immune status, and others. Possible reasons for the post-therapeutic hypothyroidism are discussed with regard to effects of radiation on the reproductive capacity of thyroid cells, effects of radiation on blood vessels, and dose distribution of radioiodine. The following therapeutic strategies are discussed: reduction of initial dose; multiple small doses; high dose radioiodine followed by replacement therapy; the use of external beam irradiation; and the use of 125 I

  3. Novel high resolution 125I brachytherapy source dosimetry using Ge-doped optical fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, Fatma; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Nisbet, Andrew; Bradley, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The steep dose gradients close to brachytherapy sources limit the ability to obtain accurate measurements of dose. Here we use a novel high spatial resolution dosimeter to measure dose around a 125 I source and compare against simulations. Ge-doped optical fibres, used as thermoluminescent dosimeters, offer sub-mm spatial resolution, linear response from 10 cGy to >1 kGy and dose-rate independence. For a 125 I brachytherapy seed in a PMMA phantom, doses were obtained for source-dosimeter separations from 0.1 cm up to several cm, supported by EGSnrc/DOSRZznrc Monte Carlo simulations and treatment planning system data. The measurements agree with simulations to within 2.3%±0.3% along the transverse and perpendicular axes and within 3.0%±0.5% for measurements investigating anisotropy in angular dose distribution. Measured and Veriseed™ brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) values agreed to within 2.7%±0.5%. Ge-doped optical fibre dosimeters allow detailed dose mapping around brachytherapy sources, not least in situations of high dose gradient. - Highlights: • We evaluate fall-off in dose for distances from an 125 I source of 1 mm to 60 mm. • The TL of optical fibres accommodate high dose gradients and doses that reduce by a factor of 10 3 across the range of separations. • We verify measured values using DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code simulations and the Variseed™ Treatment Planning System. • Measured radial and angular dose are obtained with ≤3% uncertainty

  4. [Technique of intraoperative planning in prostatic brachytherapy with permanent implants of 125I or 103Pd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Gómez, Pedro José; Juan Rijo, Germán; Hevia Suarez, Miguel; Abascal García, José María; Abascal García, Ramón

    2002-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent 125I or 123Pd seeds implantation is a therapeutic option for organ-confined prostate cancer. We analyze the technique based on previous planning, our current intraoperative planning procedure and the reasons that moved us to introduce this change. Changes in prostate volume and spatial localization observed between previous planning and intraoperative images, and possible difficulties for seed implantation due to pubic arch interference are some of the reasons that induce us to change technique. Before the operation, we calculate the prostatic volume by transrectal ultrasound; with this information we determine the total implant activity following Wu's nomogram, and per-seed activity; therefore, it is an individual process for each patient. We perform a peripheral implant, placing 75-80% of the seeds within the peripheral prostatic zone, generally through 12-15 needles, the rest of the seeds are placed in the central prostatic zone using a maximum of 3-4 needles in high volume prostates. The day of intervention, after positioning and catheter insertion, volumetry is re-checked. Ultrasound images (from base to apex every 5 mm) are transferred to the planner were a suitable seed distribution is determined. Implantation is then performed placing all needles unloaded, and then intraoperative post-planning to allow us to check implant precision is performed after cistoscopically check that there is no urethral or bladder penetration by any needle. We finish with the insertion of seeds into the prostate. Total time for the procedure is around 90 minutes. Intraoperative planning is an additional step for the treatment of prostate cancer with permanent seeds brachytherapy, which avoids the disadvantages of previous planning and improves tumor inclusion in the ideal irradiation dose area, which will translate into better local disease control.

  5. Mutation induction in cultured human cells after low-dose and low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiation. Detection by LOH analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umebayashi, Yukihiro; Iwaki, Masaya; Yatagai, Fumio; Honma, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2007-01-01

    To study the genetic effects of low-doses and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (IR), human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were exposed to 30 mGy of γ-rays at a dose-rate of 1.2 mGy/hr. The frequency of early mutations (EMs) in the thymidine kinase (TK) gene locus was determined to be 1.7 x 10 -6 , or 1.9-fold higher than the level seen in unirradiated controls. These mutations were analyzed with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection system, a methodology which has been shown to be sensitive to the effects of radiation. Among the 15 EMs observed after IR exposure, 8 were small interstitial-deletion events restricted to the TK gene locus. However, this specific type of event was not found in unirradiated controls. Although these results were observed under the limited conditions, they strongly suggest that the LOH detection system can be used for estimating the genetic effects of a low-dose IR exposure delivered at a low-dose-rate. (author)

  6. Enhancement of viability of radiosensitive (PBMC and resistant (MDA-MB-231 clones in low-dose-rate cobalt-60 radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lima Falcão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: In the present study, the authors investigated the in vitro behavior of radio-resistant breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 cells line and radiosensitive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, as a function of different radiation doses, dose rates and postirradiation time kinetics, with a view to the interest of clinical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The cells were irradiated with Co-60, at 2 and 10 Gy and two different exposure rates, 339.56 cGy.min–1 and the other corresponding to one fourth of the standard dose rates, present over a 10-year period of cobalt therapy. Post-irradiation sampling was performed at pre-established kinetics of 24, 48 and 72 hours. The optical density response in viability assay was evaluated and a morphological analysis was performed. Results: Radiosensitive PBMC showed decrease in viability at 2 Gy, and a more significant decrease at 10 Gy for both dose rates. MDAMB- 231 cells presented viability decrease only at higher dose and dose rate. The results showed MDA-MB-231 clone expansion at low dose rate after 48–72 hours post-radiation. Conclusion: Low dose rate shows a possible potential clinical impact involving decrease in management of radio-resistant and radiosensitive tumor cell lines in cobalt therapy for breast cancer.

  7. Impact peculiarities of long-term gamma-irradiation with low-dose rate on the development of laboratory rats and their sperm production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepko, A.V.; Motrina, O.A.; Vatlyitsova, O.S.; And Others

    2015-01-01

    The experiments were performed on laboratory white rats of 2.5 months in age. Animals were irradiated in gamma-field of 'Ethalon' device in a dose range 0.1-1.0 Gy. Testicles, epididymices, ventral prostate were retrieved from decapitated animal, each organ weight being determined for every exposure dose. Sperm quantities in testicles and epididymices were identified with aid of phase-contrast microscopy after tissue homogenization in saline containing Triton X-100 and NaN_3. Kinetic characteristics of spermatozoa were analyzed by video recording at 37 C. The longterm gamma-irradiation with low dose rate was shown to cause no effect on the dynamics of animal weight and weight of epididymices changes. However the testes weight was noticed to diminish at doses 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 Gy, the latter dose being stimulative for the ventral prostate growth and weight accumulation. Total sperm quantities in testicles and epididymices along with daily sperm production declined in gamma-irradiated rats compared to control. However curvilinear and straight line spermatozoid velocity as well as the frequency of tail oscillations tended to increase. Long-term gamma-irradiation of the rat whole body with low dose rate just insignificantly affects the development of testes and ventral prostate. Apart from this, radiation effects showed up in sperm production slight suppression, from the on hand, and sperm velocity along with tail oscillations intensification, from the other hand

  8. 125I iothalamate an ideal marker for glomerular filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odlind, B.; Haellgren, R.S.; Sohtell, M.; Lindstroem, B.

    1985-01-01

    The triiodinated angiographic contrast medium, iothalamate (usually labelled 125 I), has been used extensively as a marker for glomerular filtration. The authors have studied the renal handling of 125 I iothalamate (IOT) in vivo and in vitro in several species. In renal cortical slices from chicken, rabbit, rat, and monkey, the tissue-to-medium ratio of IOT was twice that of 51 Cr-EDTA (EDTA) at 37 degrees C; a difference that was abolished at 0 degree C and markedly reduced by added o-iodohippurate or iodipamide. In five chickens the steady-state renal clearance of IOT (CIOT) was twice that of EDTA (CEDTA) or 3 H inulin (C1); a difference that was abolished by administration of 100 mg/kg/hr of novobiocin, an organic anion transport inhibitor. CEDTA was similar to C1 before as well as after transport inhibition. Utilizing the Sperber technique the mean apparent tubular excretion fraction (ATEF) of IOT was 8%, while that of EDTA was 1%. After novobiocin coinfusion (new steady-state) ATEFIOT was significantly reduced and not different from that of EDTA (-1%). In the same animals the total urinary recovery of IOT was 84 and 57% before and after novobiocin, respectively, while corresponding values for EDTA was unchanged by the inhibitor. In seven rats the renal extraction of IOT was reduced from 29 to 17% by coinfusion of probenecid (5 mg/kg/hr). Corresponding extractions were 82 to 34% and 22% (unchanged) for PAH and EDTA, respectively

  9. Radioactive labelling with 125 I of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler Ch, M.; Farias O, G.; Kuznar H, J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to understand the interaction between a cellular receptor and a ligand the photochemical crosslinking method has been widely used. This method has been utilized as an approach to determine the presence or absence of virus receptors in susceptible cells. Successful detection of crosslinks is achieved if one of the components, in the crosslinked product, has been radioactively labeled. The incorporation of a radioactive isotope, in the virus-receptor complex, enables the identification of the receptor. To undertake this study in the future, in this communication the radioactive labeling of virus particles is presented. The infectious necrosis pancreatic virus (IPN virus) was the chosen moiety to be in vitro labeled with 125 I using a direct method. Three oxidizing agents were used in the iodination procedure for comparison: an enzyme, lactoperoxidase and two chemical reagents, N-Chloro-benceno-sulfonamide (Iodo-Beads) and 1,3,4,6-Tetra chloro-3a,6a-diphenyl glycouril (Iodo-Gen). The results are analysed to select the method which guarantee the incorporation of 125 I in the viral capsid protein, while preserving its full infectivity. (author)

  10. Exposure dose estimation of nursing personnel and visitors following "1"2"5I brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Hotta, Harumi; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2007-01-01

    An automated access management system to the controlled sickrooms for "1"2"5I brachytherapy was developed. The system consists of access control and video surveillance units. The patients implanted "1"2"5I seeds were isolated for about 20 h after surgery in the controlled sickrooms. The maximum doses and dose rates of the nurses and visitors were estimated by using the legal upper limit activity of 1,300 MBq, the measured longest staying time, and the shortest distance between the patients and individuals. Video analysis revealed activities of the nurses, patients, and visitors in the controlled sickroom, and relationships between the access frequency and staying time. The nurses' measured doses ranged from 1 to 3 μSv, and averaged 1.6 μSv. The nurses' maximum dose and dose rate were 16 μSv and 5.6 nSv·h"-"1·MBq"-"1. The visitors' maximum dose and dose rate were 6 μSv and 2.6 nSv·h"-"1·MBq"-"1. The nurses and visitors' exposure doses per patient were estimated to be negligible compared with the annual limit of the public. (author)

  11. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Gòra, Joanna; Kuess, Peter; Kragl, Gabriele; Berger, Daniel; Hegazy, Neamat; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ( 192 Ir) and LDR-BT ( 125 I) were D 90% ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D 90% ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D mean around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques were clearly superior in

  12. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  13. Dose response relationship for unstable-type chromosome aberration rate of spleen cells from mice continuously exposed to low-dose-rate gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Khoda, Atsushi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Oghiso, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that people who are chronically exposed to radiation such as nuclear facility workers and medical radiologists have slightly higher incidences of chromosome aberrations than non-exposed people. However, chronological changes of chromosome aberration rates related to accumulated doses and dose-rates for low dose-rate radiation exposures have not been well studied. Precise analyses of human populations are quite limited because confounding factors influence the results. For this reason, animal experiments are important for analyses. Mice were continuously exposed to gamma-rays at 400 mGy/22 hr/day for 10 days, 20 mGy/22 hr/day for about 400 days, and 1 mGy/22 hr/day for about 615 days under SPF conditions. Chronological changes of unstable-type chromosome aberration rates of spleen cells were observed along with accumulated doses at the middle dose rate and the two low-dose rates by conventional Giemsa-staining method. Aberrations such as dicentric chromosome, ring chromosome and fragment increased in a two-phase manner within 0-1.2 Gy and 2-8 Gy at 20 mGy/22 hr/day. They slightly increased up to 0.5 Gy at 1 mGy/22 hr/day. Aberration rates for 1, 2, 8 Gy at the 20 mGy/22 hr/day and for 0.5 Gy at 1 mGy/22 hr/day were 5.1, 9.6, 13.9 and 2.2 times higher than those of age-matched, non-irradiated control mice, respectively. Chromosome aberration rates at 400 mGy/22 hr/day were 2.7 times higher than that of 20 mGy/22 hr/day for the same total dose of 1.2 Gy. The results that unstable-type chromosome aberrations increased with accumulated dose of the low-dose rate radiation will be important to establish biological dosimetry for people who are chronically exposed to radiation. (author)

  14. (B1-/sup 125/I-desaminotyrosine)-insulin - A novel homogeneous insulin tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, S; Zahn, H; Brandenburg, D [Deutsches Wollforschungsinstitut, Aachen (Germany F.R.); Machulla, H -J; Dutschka, K [Institut fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Strahlenbiologie des Universitaetsklinikum, Essen (Germany F.R.)

    1980-10-28

    (B1-/sup 125/I-desaminotyrosine)-insulin (/sup 125/I-MII) was prepared with high specific activities (420 Ci/mmole) by exchanging B1-phenylalanine for /sup 125/I-p-hydroxyphenyl-propionic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (Bolton-Hunter reagent). Overall radiochemical yields were about 8%. Analytical quality control and purification were performed by means of radio high pressure liquid chromatography. The radiochemical purity of /sup 125/I-MII was >99%, and the immunoprecipitability was 97%.

  15. Standardisation of 125I using seven techniques for radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomme, S.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Van Ammel, R.; Sibbens, G.

    2005-01-01

    Seven methods of radioactivity measurement were used to standardise an 125 I solution within the frame of an international key comparison organised by BIPM: photon-photon coincidence counting with two NaI detectors, photon sum-peak counting in a NaI well detector and in a 4π CsI(Tl) sandwich spectrometer, total emission counting in a windowless 4π CsI(Tl) sandwich spectrometer, electron-X,γ coincidence counting and electron-X,γ sum counting in a pressurised proportional counter inside a NaI well detector and liquid scintillation counting with the CIEMAT/NIST method. The solid sources were prepared by quantitative drop deposition with addition of AgNO 3 . The measurement methods, the results and the applied corrections are described and discussed

  16. 106Ru and 125I radiation dose rate gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Swistowski, E.; Do Hoang Cuong

    2002-01-01

    Pulse count rate from plastic scintillator is a measure of the dose rate. Low dead time of measured channel and digital processing of measuring head signal with compensation of dead time enables correct registration of very high pulse count rate. The radiation source is set with an accuracy not worse than 0.1 mm in relation to the scintillator, and the movement of the source in horizontal and vertical direction is done with the accuracy of 0.01 mm. Additionally the gauge permits to measure the source activity and to check the uniform distribution of the radioactive material on the source surface. Random error due to pulse count rate fluctuation is negligible. The error due to instability of PTM gain is approx. 1,5% for 106 Ru and 5% for 125 I. (author)

  17. Biodistribution of gyroxin using 125I as radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves da Silva, J.A.; Ribela, M.T.C.P.; Rogero, J.R.; Camillo, M.A.P.; Muramoto, E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of radiotracers in the research of animal venom has been scarce, although it allows an excellent approach to follow the process of bioavailability, biodistribution and kinetics of toxins. The purpose of this study was to assess gyroxin action mechanism, transport, compartments and action sites. This toxin is a thrombin-like and causes the barrel rotation syndrome. The gyroxin was labeled with 125 I and used as a tracer for the in vivo assay in mice. Blood samples and organs were collected at different time intervals, weighed and analyzed in a gamma-counter. The data was related with tissues distribution of protease activated receptor (PAR). Biodistribution assay allowed dividing the organs into three groups. The first one with the organs that followed the blood kinetics, the second with the organs related to metabolisms and elimination, and the third with the organs in which the gyroxin concentration increased during the observation period. (author)

  18. 125I radioimmunoassay for primary conjugated bile salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spenney, J.G.; Johnson, B.J.; Hirschowitz, B.I.; Mihas, A.A.; Gibson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Cholylglycylhistamine, a derivative of cholic acid, has been synthesized and characterized. This derivative has been iodinated using Na125I and chloramine-T and purified free from unlabeled cholylglycylhistamine. Application of this iodinated bile salt derivative to radioimmunoassay of bile salts in human serum is reported. Antibody titers have uniformly increased over titers used in tritium-based assays; some antibodies are usable in dilutions of 1 : 80,000. The radioimmunoassay described here was found to measure predominantly the primary conjugated bile salts. Sensitivity has been maintained, with the least detectable amount being 0.5 pmoles per assay tube. Normal values in human serum are 3.47 +- 2.16 (SD) nmoles per ml

  19. Consumption of 125I labelled fibrinogen in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, B.; Camargo, E.E.; Reis, J.M.M. dos; Carvalho, N.; Leao, L.E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of iodine- 125 labeled human fibrinogen is studied by using three different sets of the radiopharmaceutical (0.9, 1.3 and 1.84 iodine atoms/fibrinogen molecule ratios) in 19 normal subjects. An aliquot of 40 μCi of fibrinogem- 125 I is injected in each subject, on normal dietary conditions and blood samples are withdrawn at 30, 60, 180, 36 and 720 minutes after the injection and, thereafter, one daily sample during 10 days. The compartmental distribution of the tracer is defined by plotting plasma and serum sample counts on a semilogarithmic graph paper. A rapid phase and 3 compartments are obtained. A 'rapid' consumption half-life and a 'real' consumption half-life are defined. The fibrinogen clottability is followed up to the last blood sample by checking the ratios of serum and plasma radioactivities [pt

  20. Solid phase 125I labelled radioimmunoassay for spermidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shimin

    1991-01-01

    Using 125 I labelled monoclonal antibody against spermidine and solid phase antigen spermidine-bovine serum albumin conjugate, the radioimmunoassay for spermidine was developed. The sensitivity of this method was about 8 times higher than that of liquid phase 14 C labelled spermidine radioimmunoassay, reaching detection limit of 10 ng/ml (0.5 ng/tube). The working range of standard curve was 0-10 5 ng/ml. The new method was suitable for spermidine measurements in saliva, stomach fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid. The coefficients of variation (CV) of within and between-assay were 4% and 13%, respectively. Preliminary clinical measurements showed that the spermidine levels in saliva of cancer patients and in cerebrospinal fluid of leukemia patients were significantly elevated

  1. Pharmacokinetics and organ distribution of 125I-aprindine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, H.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to label aprindine hydrochloride with I-125 by means of an exchange reaction. Organ distribution was determined in 10 rats where radioactivity was measured in the lung, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, brain, transverse muscle tissue and bone sections 5, 10, 30 and 60 min following i.v. injection. The high organ concentration was found in the lung, and also the maximum ratio organ: blood radioactivity was found for this organ. Whole body activity measurements revealed a half-life of nearly 6 hr. Excretion occurred primarily via the faeces. The pharmacokinetic properties of 14 C- and 125 I-aprindine hydrochloride do not therefore differ significantly. A whole body scintiscanning was carried out on an additional 12 rats and 6 rabbits. This revealed a marked enrichment in the lung compared to other organs in the time period 5 to 10 min. An image of relatively good quality was obtained compared to that of conventional perfusion scintiscanning with 131 I-HSA. It is assumed that 125 I-aprindine hydrochloride is concentrated in the lung parenchyma and is therefore largely unaffected by the immediate perfusion conditions. This is also confirmed in preliminary studies with 131 I-aprindine in the scintiscanning of rabbits where voids of pneumonia activity are shown in the aprindine scintigram whereas with the perfusion method these are not. As expected, the reverse was shown to be true following experimental pulmonary embolism where voids were seen in the perfusion scintigram whilst the 131 I-aprindine scintigram revealed hardly any areas of drops in activity. These properties possibly offer an improved diagnostic procedure for differentiating between pneumonia and lung infarct by combination with perfusion scintiscanning. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Dose characterization of the new Bebig IsoSeed'' (registered) I25.S17 using polymer gel and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelis, Evaggelos [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: vpantelis@phys.uoa.gr; Baltas, Dimos [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece): Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Georgiou, Evaggelos [Medical Physics Department, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Karaiskos, Pantelis [Medical Physics Department, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece): Medical Physics Department, Hygeia Hospital, Kiffisias Avenue and 4 Erythrou Stavrou, Marousi, 151 23 Athens (Greece); Lymperopoulou, Georgia [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Sakelliou, Loukas [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Seimenis, Ioannis [Philips Hellas Medical Systems, 44 Kifissias Ave., Maroussi 151 25, Athens (Greece); Stilliaris, Efstathios [Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece): Institute of Accelerating Systems and Applications (IASA), P.O. Box 17214, GR-10024, Athens (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    A new, molybdenum core, {sup 125}I interstitial brachytherapy seed is marketed by Bebig GmbH (IsoSeed'' (registered) I25.S17) and our group has performed its Dosimetric characterization using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) as recommended by the AAPM TG-43U1 prior to the clinical implementation of new low-energy seeds. This work presents the results of a supplementary experimental dosimetry study performed using PABIG polymer gel and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). One new I25.S17 seed and a commercially available, gold core, Bebig IsoSeed'' (registered) I25.S06 {sup 125}I seed were positioned at two different locations in a vial filled with water equivalent, PABIG-polymer gel. The gel with the sources in place was MR scanned in 3D at various time intervals after seed placement using a time efficient, 3D, dual echo Turbo Spin Echo pulse sequence. The consensus dosimetry parameters published in the TG-43U1 for the I25.S06 seed were used to derive the gel response calibration curve for each scanning session. The calibration data were then used to provide dosimetry results for the new I25.S17 seed. Experimental results for the new seed in the form of dose distributions as well as dosimetric quantities in the prevalent TG-43 dosimetric formalism were found to be in close agreement with corresponding MC and TLD results. This finding suggests that the polymer gel-MRI method could at least play a supplementary role to TLD dosimetry in the dose characterization of low energy/low dose rate brachytherapy sources, especially in view of its potential for measurements with a fine spatial resolution down to short distances which are inhibitory to conventional experimental techniques.

  3. Solar Variability and the Near-Earth Environment: Mining Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity Data From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turflinger, T.; Schmeichel, W.; Krieg, J.; Titus, J.; Campbell, A.; Reeves, M.; Marshall (P.); Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This effort is a detailed analysis of existing microelectronics and photonics test bed satellite data from one experiment, the bipolar test board, looking to improve our understanding of the enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) phenomenon. Over the past several years, extensive total dose irradiations of bipolar devices have demonstrated that many of these devices exhibited ELDRS. In sensitive bipolar transistors, ELDRS produced enhanced degradation of base current, resulting in enhanced gain degradation at dose rates 1 rd(Si)/s. This Technical Publication provides updated information about the test devices, the in-flight experiment, and both flight-and ground-based observations. Flight data are presented for the past 5 yr of the mission. These data are compared to ground-based data taken on devices from the same date code lots. Information about temperature fluctuations, power shutdowns, and other variables encountered during the space flight are documented.

  4. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  5. The study of hemopoietic cells. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose rate radiation on the hemopoiesis in the spleen of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Dept. of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assays, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of hemopoietic cells (CFU-S colonies and CFU-GM colonies) decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  6. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Sirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the dose dependency of the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H-HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}, and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice were measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  7. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  8. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  9. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  10. Estimates of Health Detriments and Tissue Weighting Factors for Hong Kong Populations from Low Dose, Low Dose Rate and Low LET Ionising Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    The total health detriments and the tissue weighting factors for the Hong Kong populations from low dose, low dose rate and low LET ionising radiation exposure are obtained according to the methodology recommended in ICRP Publication 60. The probabilities of fatal cancers for the general (ages 0-90) and working (ages 20-64) populations due to lifetime exposure at low dose and low dose rate are 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 3.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively, comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 5.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.0 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . The corresponding total health detriments for the general and working populations are 6.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 4.9 x 10 -2 Sv -1 respectively comparing with the ICRP 60 estimates of 7.3 x 10 -2 Sv -1 and 5.6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Tissue weighting factors for the general population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.02 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (bladder and breast), 0.08 (remainder), 0.10 (stomach), 0.11 (bone marrow), 0.15 (colon), 0.19 (lung) and 0.21 (gonads) and for the working population are 0.01 (bone surface and skin), 0.03 (liver, oesophagus and thyroid), 0.04 (breast), 0.06 (remainder), 0.07 (bladder), 0.08 (colon), 0.14 (bone marrow and stomach), 0.16 (lung) and 0.20 (gonads). (author)

  11. G2 arrest and apoptosis of cultured Raji cells by continuous low dose rate beta irradiation therapy with 188Re-perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, S. J.; Kim, E. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, K. S.; Jeong, W. S.; Choi, C. W.; Yim, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Beta emitting radionuclide therapy gives exponentially decreasing radiation dose rate and results in cell death presumably by apoptosis. We observed changes in DNA content and apoptosis in relatively low dose rate beta irradiation. Raji cells were cultured and incubated with 188Re-perrhenate (3.7MBq, or 370MBq/ml) for 4 hours to give irradiation dose of 0.4, 4, or 40 Gy. After changing the culture media, cells were cultured for 2,4,8,16, and 24 hours. The cells were stained with Trypan blue, Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide (PI) to observe cell viability, cell membrane alternation by apoptosis and changes in DNA content respectively. Flowcytometry was done for Annexin-V and PI to quantitate apoptosis and necrosis in the irradiated cells. DAPI(4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) stain was also done to observe the damage in the nucleus. Cell viability decreased with an increasing radiation dose. Cells irradiated in 40 Gy showed early uptake of both Annexin-V and PI suggesting cell death by necrosis. Cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy showed delayed uptake of Annexin-V only, and later on PI uptake suggesting cell death mainly by apoptosis. The cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy showed G2 arrest in 16 hours after irradiation, but the cells irradiated in 40 Gy showed early DNA fragmentation within 2 hours after irradiation. In DAPI stain, early nucleus damage was observed in the cells irradiated in 40 Gy. On the other hand, slowly increasing apoptotic bodies were observed in the cells irradiated in 0.4 Gy. These results suggest that continuous low-dose irradiation induces G2 arrest and progressive apoptosis in cells while continuous high-dose irradiation induces rapid necrosis. Therefore, we expect therapeutic effect by continuous low-dose rate irradiation with beta emitting radiopharmaceuticals

  12. Long term low dose rate irradiation causes recovery from type II diabetes and suppression of aging in type II diabetes-prone mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, T.; Oda, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low dose rate gamma irradiation on model C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice with Type II diabetes mellitus was investigated. These mice develop Type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age, due to obesity, and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. A group of 12 female 10-week old mice were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, a decrease in the glucose level was observed in three mice, one in the 35th week, another in the 52nd week and the third in the 80th week. No recovery from the diabetes was observed in the 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There was no systematic change of body weight or consumption of food and drinking water between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. Survival was better in the irradiated group. The surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75 % in the irradiated group but only 40 % in the non-irradiated. A marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin and tail. The irradiated group was in much better condition. Mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20-30 weeks compared with the control mice. These results suggest that the low dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, leading not only to recovery from diabetes, but also to suppression of the aging process

  13. Activation of 125I-Factor IX and 125I-Factor X: Effect of tissue factor and Factor VII, Factor Xsub(a) and thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterud, B.; Rapaport, S.I.

    Activation of Factor IX and Factor X was studied by adding 125 I-Factor IX or 125 I-Factor X to reaction mixtures and quantitating cleavage products by reduced sodium dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis. Thrombin failed to activate Factors IX or X; Factor Xsub(a) produced insignificant amounts of cleavage products of both factors. In contrast, the reaction product of tissue factor and Factor VII cleaved large amounts of both Factor IX and Factor X in purified systems and in plasma. In incubation mixtures of plasma containing added 125 I-Factor IX or 125 I-Factor X, tissue factor and Ca 2+ ions, the percentage of total radioactivity in the heavy chain peak of 125 I-IXsub(a) and the heavy chain of 125 I-Xsub(a) increased at a similar rate. When the tissue factor was diluted, similar curves were obtained for percent cleavage of 125 I-Factor IX and percent cleavage of 125 I-Factor X plotted against tissue factor concentration. These findings support the hypothesis that activation of Factor IX by the tissue factor-Factor VII reaction product represents a physiologically significant step in normal haemostasis. (author)

  14. Metabolism of (125I)tyramine cellobiose-labeled low density lipoproteins in squirrel monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portman, O.W.; Alexander, Manfred

    1985-01-01

    Low density lipoproteins labeled with ( 125 I)tyramine cellobiose (( 125 I)TC-LDL) were removed from the circulation of squirrel monkeys at a similar but slightly slower rate than LDLs labeled with 125 I, ( 125 I)hydroxypenyl propionic acid, or ( 3 H)leucine. After the simultaneous injection of (( 125 I)TC-LDL) and ( 131 I)LDL labeled with 131 ICI, the 125 I was also removed at a slightly slower rate than 131 I. Most of the radioactivity was retained in tissues and not excreted during the 24 h after injection of ( 125 I)TC-LDL. This finding supports the claim of Pittman et al. (18) that ( 125 I)TC-LDL can be used to determine the irreversible uptake of LDL by different tissues. The liver cleared more LDL than any other organ, but the adrenals and ovaries were more active per gram. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitated more than 80% of the radioactivity in the tissues that had low 125 I uptake, but only about 50% of the 125 I in more active tissues (liver, adrenals, ovaries and spleen). Only a small percentage of 125 I in urine and bile was TCA-precipitable. In the dual label experiment with ( 125 I)TC-LDL and ( 131 I)LDL there was a selective retention of 125 I in samples from liver, spleen, adrenals, and perhaps testes, and an almost complete selectivity for 125 I in bile and feces. The aortic intima plus inner media (AIM) cleared much less LDL than other tissues, but the uptake by the entire AIM was proportional to the cholesterol concentration and weight of the total AIM. There was, however, no correlation between either of the latter two measurements and the uptake of LDL per pram of AIM. (author)

  15. Optimization of sup 125 I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrahan, M.A.; Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Liggett, P.E.; Petrovich, Z. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Episcleral plaques containing {sup 125}I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged.

  16. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  17. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence

  18. Quantitative analysis of biological responses to low dose-rate γ-radiation, including dose, irradiation time, and dose-rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, J.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Ogata, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Because biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose, it is necessary to include dose, dose-rate and irradiation time simultaneously to predict the risk of low dose-rate irradiation. In this study, we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, irradiation time and dose-rate, using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells. For evaluation of chromosome breakage we assessed micronuclei induced by radiation. U2OS cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were exposed to gamma-ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60 Co. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide, and the number of binuclear cells bearing micronuclei was determined by fluorescent microscopy. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [3H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. Dose-rate in the irradiation room was measured with photoluminescence dosimeter. While irradiation time less than 24 h did not affect dose-response curves for both biological responses, they were remarkably attenuated as exposure time increased to more than 7 days. These biological responses were dependent on dose-rate rather than dose when cells were irradiated for 30 days. Moreover, percentage of micronucleus-forming cells cultured continuously for more than 60 days at the constant dose-rate, was gradually decreased in spite of the total dose accumulation. These results suggest that biological responses at low dose-rate, are remarkably affected by exposure time, that they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in the case of long-term irradiation, and that cells are getting resistant to radiation after the continuous irradiation for 2 months. It is necessary to include effect of irradiation time and dose-rate sufficiently to evaluate risk

  19. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Powell, Simon N.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Freer, Phoebe; Lawenda, Brian; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall’s tau (τ β ) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4–14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome (τ β 0.6, p β 0.5, p β 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias ≥1 cm 2 . Grade 3–4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose (τ β 0.3–0.5, p ≤ .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 70–97%), 72% (95% confidence interval, 54–86%), and 87% (95

  20. Pathology of Serially Sacrificed Female B6C3F1 Mice Continuously Exposed to Very Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, I B; Komura, J; Tanaka, S

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported on life span shortening as well as increased incidence rates in several neoplasms in B6C3F1 mice that were continuously exposed to 21 mGy/day of gamma rays for 400 days. To clarify whether the life shortening was due to early appearance of neoplasms (shortened latency) or increased promotion/progression, 8-week-old female specific-pathogen-free B6C3F1 mice were gamma-ray irradiated at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/day for 400 days. At 100 days postirradiation, 60-90 mice were sacrificed, and thereafter every 100 days alongside the age-matched nonirradiated controls, for 700 days. Additional groups were allowed to live out their natural life span. Pathological examination was performed on all mice to identify lesions, non-neoplastic and neoplastic, as well as to determine the cause of death. Body weights were significantly increased in irradiated mice from sacrifice days 200-500. Incidence rates for spontaneously occurring non-neoplastic lesions, such as adrenal subcapsular cell hyperplasia, fatty degeneration of the liver, atrophy and tubulostromal hyperplasia of the ovaries, were significantly increased in irradiated mice. Significantly increased incidence rates with no shortening of latency periods were observed in irradiated mice for malignant lymphomas, hepatocellular adenomas/carcinomas, bronchioloalveolar adenomas, harderian gland adenoma/adenocarcinoma. Shortened latencies with significantly increased incidence rates were observed for adrenal subcapsular cell adenomas and ovarian neoplasms (tubulostromal adenoma, granulosa cell tumors) in irradiated mice. Life span shortening in mice exposed to 20 mGy/day was mostly due to malignant lymphomas. Multiple primary neoplasms were significantly increased in mice exposed to 20 mGy/day from sacrifice days 400-700 and in the life span group. Our results confirm that continuous low-dose-rate gamma-ray irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice causes both cancer induction (shortened latency) and

  1. Localized whole eye radiotherapy for retinoblastoma using a 125I applicator, 'claws'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare; Sealy, Rossall; Hering, Egbert; Korrubel, Jan; Hill, John; Barron, Adrian; Knowles, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To treat children with retinoblastoma, who require whole eye radiotherapy, with a specially designed 125 I applicator that irradiates the eye while sparing the surrounding tissues. Methods and Materials: Under general anesthesia, a pericorneal ring is attached to the 4 extraocular muscles, and 4 appendages, each loaded with 125 I seeds, are inserted beneath the conjunctiva in-between each pair of muscles and attached anteriorly to the ring. Twenty-nine eyes were treated. Eighteen received a median dose of 28 Gy during 91 hours and 11 received 40 Gy during 122 hours, when the relative biologic effectiveness was taken as 1 instead of 1.5. Six had received prior chemotherapy. Results: Twenty-four eyes were followed up for 2-157 months (median 29). Although 22 eyes responded, local control was achieved in 13 patients, 3 of whom required additional treatment for new tumors; a further 3 required additional treatment for tumor recurrence as well as new tumors. One of these eyes was enucleated for neovascular glaucoma. All 6 Group I-III eyes and 6 of 18 Group V eyes were retained for 2-157 months (median 39), with good vision in 10 eyes. Three developed cataracts 7, 8, and 12 years later, 1 of which has been removed. Conclusions: This is a new way of irradiating the whole eye with a minimal dose to the surrounding tissues. The treatment time is only 5 days. It is effective in Groups I-III, but only 33% of Group V eyes retained vision. No late cosmetic defects occurred

  2. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  3. Relative biological effectiveness (R.B.E.) of Cf-252 vs. acute Co-60 and low dose rate Cs-137 irradiation by spleen weight loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Magura, C.; Beach, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    R.B.E. of Cf-252 on lymphoid tissue was assessed by radiation study of spleen weight loss following acute Co-60, and low dose rate (L.D.R.) Cs-137 and Cf-252 irradiations. Acute Co-60 and L.D.R. Cs-137 dose-response followed two component exponential curves with a 1.3-fold greater effect of L.D.R. Cs-137 vs. acute Co-60 on the first slope and 1.9-fold greater effect for the 2nd slope. L.D.R. Cf-252 response was 1.3 x greater than acute Co-60 but was 1.0 vs. L.D.R. Cs-137 for the first slope indicating a similar effect of Cf-252 mixed neutron/gamma radiation to L.D.R. gamma radiation in producing spleen shrinkage. There was no effect of different sequences and schedules of mixing acute Co-60 with Cf-252 irradiation observed by endogenous CFU-S survival. The R.B.E. of 1.0 - 1.9 indicates that lymphohemopoietic in vivo, presumably well oxygenated, does not respond acutely or as sensitively as hypoxic tumor where R.B.E. is 5 - 7. (author)

  4. Retrospective Dosimetric Comparison of Low-Dose-Rate and Pulsed-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy Using a Tandem and Mini-Ovoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourtada, Firas; Gifford, Kent A.; Berner, Paula A.; Horton, John L.; Price, Michael J.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the 137 Cs and 192 Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% ± 1% and 6% ± 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% ± 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the 192 Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% ± 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers

  5. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  6. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  7. Comparison of PSA value at last follow-up of patients who underwent low-dose rate brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2017-08-25

    To compare the PSA value at the last follow-up of patients who underwent prostate low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) with that of patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 610 prostate cancer patients (cT1c-3bN0M0) were enrolled, and 445 of them underwent LDR-BT, while 165 received IMRT (74-76 Gy). The median follow-up period of these two groups was 75 months (LDR-BT) and 78 months (IMRT), respectively. We also evaluated the biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free rate using two definitions (Phoenix definition and PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL). The percentage of patients who achieved PSA LDR-BT group and 49.7% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT group and 32.1% in the IMRT group (p LDR-BT groups was 89.5 and 95.0% (p LDR-BT groups, respectively (p LDR-BT was significantly lower than that of IMRT, and this result was particularly marked in patients with a normal testosterone level at the last follow-up.

  8. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  9. Greater sparing of stromal progenitor cells than of haemopoietic stem cells in γ-irradiated mouse marrow using low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.; Wang, S.B.; Testa, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Do value fibroblastoid colony-forming units in mouse bone-marrow increased from 1.7 Gy using γ-rays at 4.2 Gy/minute, to 2.6 Gy at 4.5 cGy/minute. In contrast, the sensitivity of bone-marrow stem cells was very little changed (Do approximately 0.9 Gy). At 7.5 Gy acute single dose, the dose sparing achieved for CFU-F using 4.5 cGy/minute was a factor of 1.4, inbetween the values reported for lung of 1.8 and for haemopoiesis of 1.2. Although the role of CFU-F in the haemopoietic environment has not been established, the content of CFU-F can predict the ability of irradiated marrow to sustain haemopoiesis in the long term. Hence the data imply that the haemopoiesis environment, as well as the dose-limiting lung, benefits from the use of low dose-rates for haemopoietic ablations in the treatment of leukaemia. No significant further sparing of CFU-F was achieved using a lower dose-rate of 1.4 cGy per minute

  10. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  11. Use of (3H) and (125I) tracers in steroid radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffcoate, S.L.

    1975-01-01

    The comparative use of 3 H and 125 I tracers in steroid radioimmunoassays will be discussed around the following points: - 3 H. Advantages: they can be purchased commercially and have a long shelf-life. Disadvantages: they may have reduced affinity for antibodies due to ''isotope effects''; the counting of β-emitters is more expensive and difficult; 3 H tracers are not available for all steroids. - 125 I. Advantages: gamma-counting is cheaper, simpler and more precise; 125 I tracers may have higher affinity for antibodies than unlabelled steroids; 125 I can be used to label any steroid. Disadvantages: 125 I tracers have a limited shelf-life (n.b. six months for 125 I histamine tracers). The high affinity of some tracers will be a big disadvantage if the unlabelled steroid cannot compete effectively

  12. Synthesis of [125I]iodoDPA-713: A new probe for imaging inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haofan; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    [ 125 I]IodoDPA-713 [ 125 I]1, which targets the translocator protein (TSPO, 18 kDa), was synthesized in seven steps from methyl-4-methoxybenzoate as a tool for quantification of inflammation in preclinical models. Preliminary in vitro autoradiography and in vivo small animal imaging were performed using [ 125 I]1 in a neurotoxicant-treated rat and in a murine model of lung inflammation, respectively. The radiochemical yield of [ 125 I]1 was 44 ± 6% with a specific radioactivity of 51.8 GBq/μmol (1400 mCi/μmol) and >99% radiochemical purity. Preliminary studies showed that [ 125 I]1 demonstrated increased specific binding to TSPO in a neurotoxicant-treated rat and increased radiopharmaceutical uptake in the lungs of an experimental inflammation model of lung inflammation. Compound [ 125 I]1 is a new, convenient probe for preclinical studies of TSPO activity.

  13. Influence of glucose and urea on 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroyoshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the influence of glucose and urea on the 125 I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane, the transmembrane potential, the fluxes, and the concentrations of 125 I, glucose and urea within the membrane were measured in the Na 125 I concentration-cell system containing glucose or urea. Glucose and urea increased the membrane/solution distribution of the iodide ion, but scarcely affected the diffusion process of iodide ion within the membrane

  14. Effects of lysosomal inhibitors on 125I-insulin and 125I-asialofetuin degradation by the isolated, perfused rat liver and isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, W.F.; Moss, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    To further evaluate the role of the lysosomal system in insulin degradation, the authors have compared the effects of inhibitors of lysosomal function on the degradation of 125 I-insulin with 125 I-asialofetuin, a lysosomally targeted molecule, by the intact, perfused rat liver and the isolated rat hepatocyte. The inhibitors employed were chloroquine ( 125 microM), NH 4 Cl (10 mM), and leupeptin (50 micrograms/ml). In the intact, perfused liver the observed inhibition of 125 I-asialofetuin degradation at 30 min was as follows: chloroquine, 38%; NH 4 Cl, 32%; and leupeptin, 86%. Chloroquine also inhibited 125 I-insulin degradation in the intact, perfused liver (29%), but NH 4 Cl and leupeptin had no effect. Using the isolated hepatocyte, the observed values for inhibition of 125I-asialofetuin at 60 min were: chloroquine, 85%; NH 4 Cl, 76%; and leupeptin, 81%. Chloroquine produced a 28% inhibition of 125I-insulin degradation, while NH 4 Cl and leupeptin had no effect. Chloroquine and NH 4 Cl decreased cell-associated radioactivity when isolated hepatocytes were incubated with 125I-asialofetuin (leupeptin had no effect), whereas chloroquine caused a 107% increase in cell-associated radioactivity when 125I-insulin was added to the incubation media (NH 4 Cl and leupeptin had no effect). These results indicate that the effects of chloroquine on insulin degradation are an extralysosomal action and that lysosomes appear not to be involved in the physiologic degradation of the insulin molecule

  15. Binding of in vivo administrated 125-I-triiodothyronine by the rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedorowicz, K.; Nauman, A.; Nauman, J.

    1979-01-01

    In vivo administrated 125 I-triiodothyronine ( 125 I-T 3 ) was bound by the rat liver mitochondria. About 10 % of hormone was bound with external mitochondrial membrane while the remaining part with matrix and inner mitochondrial membrane. The highest accumulation of 125 I-T 3 in mitochondria was observed 30 min after injection while in the whole liver homogenate the highest hormone accumulation appeared 15 min post injection. Mitochondrial binding sites have a great capacity for T 3 which makes impossible estimation of the kinetic parameters of triiodothyronine-mitochondrium interaction by means of saturation and displacement of 125 I-T 3 . (author)

  16. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo validation and optimisation of detector packaging for spectroscopic dosimetry for in vivo urethral dosimetry during low dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbehesht, L.K.; Cutajar, D.L.; Guatelli, S.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    The urethral mini-dosimeter, developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, uses spectroscopic dosimetry to provide real time point dose measurements along the urethra during low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Spectroscopic dosimetry uses the measured spectrum of the treatment isotope to estimate the dose rate at the point of measurement, however, the silicon mini-detectors employed in the urethral mini-dosimeter require water proof encapsulation which must be capable of providing electromagnetic shielding without greatly increasing the size of the probe. The introduction of non-tissue equivalent materials within the encapsulation can change the spectrum of radiation incident on the detector, which may influence the application of spectroscopic dosimetry within the urethral dosimeter. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was adopted to study the effect of encapsulation on the operation of the urethral mini-dosimeter, as well as to determine whether an appropriate thickness of aluminium shielding was possible for electromagnetic screening. The depth dose response and angular dependence of the urethral mini-dosimeter with three thicknesses of aluminium shielding (20, 50, 100 µm) was compared with the urethral mini-dosimeter without aluminium shielding. The aluminium shielding had the effect of increasing the depth dose response (up to 3 % within 30 mm and up to 5 % within 50 mm), slightly reduced the azimuth angular dependence and slightly increased the polar angular dependence. The 100 µm thick shielding provided the least azimuth angular dependence (±2 %) and provided a polar angular dependence of ±1.4 % within the angles of −45° to 45°.

  18. Age and sex dependence in tumorigenesis in mice by continuous low-dose-rate gamma-ray whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsu, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Furuse, Takeshi; Noda, Yuko; Shiragai, Akihiro; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the dependency of sex and age in mice in the induction of neoplasms by gamma-rays from cesium-137 at a low dose rate of 0.375Gy/22h/day. Thymic lymphomas occurred significantly at the same incidence in both sexes, and more frequently when younger mice were exposed to radiation. Strain C57BL/6J mice were divided into 8 groups, which were whole-body irradiated with a total dose of 39Gy for 105 days each. The exposure was begun at 28 days of age (male:AM1, female:AF1), and then stepwise increasing the starting age by 105 days, i.e., from 133 days (AM2 and AF2), from 238 days (AM3 and AF3), and from 343 days (AM4 and AF4), respectively. Unirradiated mice served as control (UM and UF). The incidence of thymic lymphomas was about 60 % in AM1, AM2, AF1 and AF2, 40 % in AM3 and AF3 and 20 % in AF4 and AF4, demonstrating no sex dependency, but a distinct age dependency, for lymphomogenesis. It was proven that mice showed a tendency to become less susceptible to radiation induced thymic lymphoma with increasing age. Concomitantly, life-shortening also was caused, and the greater the degree of life-shortening was, the younger the mice were the start of exposure. Life-shortening was attributed to thymic lymphoma, and hemorrhage and infectious diseases due to the depletion of bone marrow cells. (author)

  19. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  20. SU-G-TeP4-05: An Evaluation of a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure Using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, S-K; Kim, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is the application of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to access the risks for patients undergoing a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment. Methods: FMEA was applied to identify all the sub processes involved in the stages of identifying patient, source handling, treatment preparation, treatment delivery, and post treatment. These processes characterize the radiation treatment associated with LDR Prostate Brachytherapy. The potential failure modes together with their causes and effects were identified and ranked in order of their importance. Three indexes were assigned for each failure mode: the occurrence rating (O), the severity rating (S), and the detection rating (D). A ten-point scale was used to score each category, ten being the number indicating most severe, most frequent, and least detectable failure mode, respectively. The risk probability number (RPN) was calculated as a product of the three attributes: RPN = O X S x D. The analysis was carried out by a working group (WG) at UPMC. Results: The total of 56 failure modes were identified including 32 modes before the treatment, 13 modes during the treatment, and 11 modes after the treatment. In addition to the protocols already adopted in the clinical practice, the prioritized risk management will be implanted to the high risk procedures on the basis of RPN score. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the FMEA method was established. The FMEA methodology provides a structured and detailed assessment method for the risk analysis of the LDR Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure and can be applied to other radiation treatment modes.

  1. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  2. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kohno, Mari; Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women’s Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  3. Late effects of post-high-dose-rate brachytherapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma: are they severer than post-low-dose-rate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, T.; Koizumi, M.; Nishiyama, K.; Peiffert, D.; Lapeyre, M.; Hoffstetter, S.

    2004-01-01

    Background: late effects by high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have been believed severer than low-dose-rate (LDR) provided tumor control was constant. Local control of oropharyngeal carcinoma with HDR at Osaka Medical Center was comparable to LDR series from Centre Alexis Vautrin (82%, 79.5%, respectively). To assess the feasibility of HDR brachytherapy, the late effects were compared. Patients and methods: the data of 29 HDR and 24 LDR patients (median follow-up of 27 and 29.5 months, respectively; p = 0.89) were collected. The HDR schedule was 21 Gy/3.5 fractions/2 days following 46 Gy/23 fractions external beam, while 25 Gy/3 days following 50 Gy/25 fractions external beam was for LDR. Late changes were evaluated using RTOG/EORTC late morbidity scoring scheme. For subclinical late changes, mucosa chapter of Dische score was modified for brachytherapy. Scores were discussed through photos and were agreed on by authors. Late sequelae were estimated, by reviewing charts, concerning frequency, severity, and duration of mucosal damages (erosion and ulcer). Results: Late changes were of no difference (p = 0.12 for EORTC/RTOG, and p = 0.45, 0.47, 1.00, 0.12, 0.16, 0.95, 0.27, 0.21 for erythema, ulceration, edema, thinning, pallor, telangiectasia, mobility impairment of tongue/faucial pillars, respectively, of the modified Dische score). Late sequelae showed no differences (p = 0.90, 0.12, 0.40 for frequency, severity, duration, respectively, of mucosal damages). Conclusion: the late effects by HDR were not severer than by LDR. HDR oropharyngeal brachytherapy is as safe as LDR. (orig.)

  4. SU-G-TeP4-05: An Evaluation of a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure Using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, S-K; Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is the application of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to access the risks for patients undergoing a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment. Methods: FMEA was applied to identify all the sub processes involved in the stages of identifying patient, source handling, treatment preparation, treatment delivery, and post treatment. These processes characterize the radiation treatment associated with LDR Prostate Brachytherapy. The potential failure modes together with their causes and effects were identified and ranked in order of their importance. Three indexes were assigned for each failure mode: the occurrence rating (O), the severity rating (S), and the detection rating (D). A ten-point scale was used to score each category, ten being the number indicating most severe, most frequent, and least detectable failure mode, respectively. The risk probability number (RPN) was calculated as a product of the three attributes: RPN = O X S x D. The analysis was carried out by a working group (WG) at UPMC. Results: The total of 56 failure modes were identified including 32 modes before the treatment, 13 modes during the treatment, and 11 modes after the treatment. In addition to the protocols already adopted in the clinical practice, the prioritized risk management will be implanted to the high risk procedures on the basis of RPN score. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the FMEA method was established. The FMEA methodology provides a structured and detailed assessment method for the risk analysis of the LDR Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure and can be applied to other radiation treatment modes.

  5. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Eduardo J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52, local recurrence (p = 0.68, or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06 rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix

  6. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Gustavo A; Manta, Gustavo B; Stefano, Eduardo J; de Fendi, Ligia I

    2009-01-01

    Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients) of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52), local recurrence (p = 0.68), or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06) rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix cancer. PMID:19344527

  7. A review of data on the effects of low and low dose-rate radiation with special reference to the dose limit problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsudaira, Hiromichi

    1977-01-01

    This is a review of data pertaining to detection and quantification of the effects after exposure to low LET radiations delivered at low and low dose-rate, i.e., at a level of maximum permissible dose for the radiation workers, on experimental materials ranging from plant to rodents and on some human populations. Irradiation at a dose of a few rad is reported to induce mutation or malignant transformation in some selected model systems, with a linear dose-effect relationship. Moreover, the incidence of the chromosome aberrations in spermatocytes is reported to be elevated in the scorpiones (Tityus bahiensis) collected in a region of high natural background radiations (several rem/year). An increase in the incidence of childhood malignancies is reported among children exposed in utero to diagnostic X-rays. Appreciable increase in the incidence of genetic diseases due possibly to chromosome aberrations is also reported among population living in a region of high natural background radiations. Points are raised and discussed as to the interpretation and particularly application of these data to the estimation of somatic and genetic risks of human population from man-made radiations. Recent attempts of risk-benefit analysis with populations subjected to mass X-ray examination of the chest and stomac are referred to. Since we are unaware of the actual injuries due to the exposure even at the level of radiation workers (5 rem/year), it is out of the capacity of a biologist to afford the basis for the decision of limiting the exposure of general population due to the light water reactor operation to 5 mrem/year. (auth.)

  8. Predicting radiation effects on the development of leukemic stem cells based on studies of leukemias induced by high- and low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important causes of radiation-induced cancers, particularly leukemia, is gene mutations resulting from single and double strand breaks in the DNA. Tanaka et al. (2003) reported life shortening in specific pathogen free male and female B6C3F1 mice continuously exposed to γ rays at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/d for 400 days from 8 weeks of age. Early death due to cancer, mostly malignant lymphomas, was observed in both sexes. A significant increase in the incidence of myeloid leukemia, resulting in early death, was also reported in males. It is expected however, that at 20 mGy/22 h/d, which is equivalent to a dose of 15 μGy/min, DNA strand breaks induced in these cells are repaired soon after they occur. Murine leukemias induced by high-dose-rate radiation were also found in males, and 80% of the mice with leukemia had hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 around the PU.1 gene and they appeared to be derived from DNA strand breaks. Majority of these leukemia showing hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 revealed point mutations in the remaining alleles resulting in PU.1 inactivation, which was reported to be related to leukemogenesis. These point mutations are assumed to be independent of DNA strand breaks that occur immediately after irradiation, as they appear at later time after irradiation. This review discusses the effect of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and also mutagenesis induced independently of DNA strand breaks in hematopoietic cells contributing to the development of the first leukemic stem cell. (author)

  9. A model for inverse dose-rate effects - low dose-rate hyper-sensibility in response to targeted radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, I.; Mather, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival, developed for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), could be extended to targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) in order to predict dose-response relationships in a cell line exhibiting low dose hypersensitivity (LDH). Methods: aliquots of the PC-3 cancer cell line were treated with either EBRT or an in-vitro model of TRT (Irradiation of cell culture with Y-90 EDTA over 24, 48, 72 or 96 hours). Dosimetry for the TRT was calculated using radiation transport simulations with the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Clonogenic as well as functional biological assays were used to assess cell response. An extension of the LQ model was developed which incorporated a dose-rate threshold for activation of repair mechanisms. Results: accurate dosimetry for in-vitro exposures of cell cultures to radioactivity was established. LQ parameters of cell survival were established for the PC-3 cell line in response to EBRT. The standard LQ model did not predict survival in PC-3 cells exposed to Y 90 irradiation over periods of up to 96 hours. In fact cells were more sensitive to the same dose when irradiation was carried out over 96 hours than 24 hours. I.e. at a lower dose-rate. Deviations from the LQ predictions were most pronounced below a threshold dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/hr. These results led to an extension of the LQ model based upon a dose-rate dependent sigmoid model of single strand DNA repair. This extension to the model resulted in predicted cell survival curves that closely matched the experimental data. Conclusion: the LQ model of cell survival to radiation has been shown to be largely predictive of response to low dose-rate irradiation. However, in cells displaying LDH, further adaptation of the model was required. (authors)

  10. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative study of 19-iodo cholesterol-125I 3-acetate and Na 125I in liquid scintillation measurements; Estudio comparativo del acetato de 19-iodocolesterol- -125I con Nal25I en medidas por centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Grau Carles, A.

    1994-07-01

    A comparative study of performance of 19-iodo cholesterol {sup 1}25I 3-acetate and sodium iodide samples labeled with 125I is presented for liquid scintillation counting measurements. Quench effect, count rate stability and spectral evolution of samples have been followed for several weeks in Toluene, Hisafe II, Instagel, Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol scintillators. Organic samples have negligible quench effect in the interval of I concentration of 0-90 {mu}g and inorganic samples only show a very small variation, lower than 12%, for Dioxane-naphthalene, in the same range of concentration. Satisfactory stability is obtained in general for both, organic and inorganic samples, but small counting losses, 0.03% for 19-iodocholesterol 1 I 3-acetate samples in Tolue ne-alcohol and 0 .04% for Na 125I samples in Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol, have been reported. (Author) 8 refs.

  12. [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP are superior to [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT for dopamine transporter visualization: Autoradiographic evaluation in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Ilonka; Hall, Haakan; Halldin, Christer; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Sedvall, Goeran

    1997-10-01

    The binding of the three dopamine transporter radioligands ([{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT, [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE, and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP) was studied using whole-hemisphere autoradiography on postmortem human brains. The autoradiograms revealed an intense and homogeneous labeling of the nucleus caudatus and putamen but also to varying extent to serotonergic and noradrenergic transporters of neocortex and thalamus. The order of specificity estimated (striatum over neocortex ratios) was {beta}-CIT-FP > {beta}-CIT-FE >> {beta}-CIT, suggesting that {beta}-CIT-FE and {beta}-CIT-FP should be preferred for in vivo studies of the dopamine transporter in the human brain.

  13. Comparative study on biodistribution of domestic and imported 125I-β-CIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xingdang; Lin Xiangtong; Fang Ping; Chen Zhengping; Zhou Xiang; Wang Bocheng; Zhang Manda

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the kinetics and biodistribution of a domestically synthesized 125 I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-4-iodopheny1tropane (β-CIT ) and to compare it with that of 125 I-β-CIT imported from RBI company. Methods: 1)The biodistribution of domestic and RBI company produced 125 I-β-CIT in KM mice. Twenty groups of mice (group of 5) were injected into the tail vein with either one of 125 I-β-CIT products. Each group of both products was killed at 5,15,30 and 45 min, and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 h. 2)Autoradiography was performed on the brain of SD rats at 2 h after injection. Results: Domestic 125 I-β-CIT was primarily uptaked in the striatum, also in areas rich in 5-HTT such as the brain stem, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, temporal cortex, occipital cortex and hippocampus. Striatal uptake peaked at 2 h postinjection of 125 I-β-CIT. The ratio of specific to nonspecific binding in striatum peaked at 6 h. The highest radioactivity was in the lungs and the less radioactivity was in the liver, kidney, spleen and intestine. Autoradiography confirmed that 125 I-β-CIT primarily bound to striatum and lower room temperature significantly reduced the binding of the agent. Conclusion: The domestic 125 I-β-CIT binds primarily to dopamine transporters in the striatum in mice and rats and the maximum uptake is in the lungs

  14. Dose rate constants for 125I, 103Pd, 192Ir and 169Yb brachytherapy sources: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainegra, Ernesto; Capote, Roberto; Lopez, Ernesto

    1998-01-01

    An exhaustive revision of dosimetry data for 192 Ir, 125 I, 103 Pd and 169 Yb brachytherapy sources has been performed by means of the EGS4 simulation system. The DLC-136/PHOTX cross section library, water molecular form factors, bound Compton scattering and Doppler broadening of the Compton-scattered photon energy were considered in the calculations. The absorbed dose rate per unit contained activity in a medium at 1 cm in water and air-kerma strength per unit contained activity for each seed model were calculated, allowing the dose rate constant (DRC) Λ to be estimated. The influence of the calibration procedure on source strength for low-energy brachytherapy seeds is discussed. Conversion factors for 125 I and 103 Pd seeds to obtain the dose rate in liquid water from the dose rate measured in a solid water phantom with a detector calibrated for dose to water were calculated. A theoretical estimate of the DRC for a 103 Pd model 200 seed equal to 0.669±0.002 cGy h -1 U -1 is obtained. Comparison of obtained DRCs with measured and calculated published results shows agreement within 1.5% for 192 Ir, 169 Yb and 125 I sources. (author)

  15. Method of separating (125I)-L-thyroxine from mixture obtained by radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha, J.; Talan, P.; Dobias, M.

    1982-01-01

    ( 125 I)-L-thyroxine is separated by gel filtration on a column from the mixture of ( 125 I)-L-thyroxine, ( 125 I)-L-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and ( 125 I) - . The column is packed with a non-polar gel such as polydextran with particle size 25 to 100 μm. The mixture 1,2-propanediol/distilled water/concentrated (26%) aqueous ammonia solution, or 1,2-propanediol/concentrated (26%) aqueous ammonia solution is used as eluent. The concentration of the eluate containing ( 125 I)-L-thyroxine is adjusted with distilled water such as to establish a 50 vol.% concentration of 1,2-propanediol. (E.S.)

  16. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-tyr-somatostatin as labelled antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, A [CHUL, Quebec (Canada). Lab. of Molecular Endocrinology and Service of Gastro-Enterology; Coy, D H; Alvarado-Urbina, G; Cote, J; Meyers, C A; McManus, J; Barden, N; De Lean, A; Labrie, F

    1979-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin is described and compared with using (/sup 125/I)-Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. The minimum detectable amount of somatostatin using N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin as tracer was 0.1 to 0.5 pg, which is approximately 10-fold lower detection limit of the RIA using (/sup 125/I)-Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. Moreover, it was found that the shelf-life of N-(/sup 125/I)-Tyr-somatostatin was prolonged in comparison with labelled Tyr/sup 1/-somatostatin. Human pancreatic and gastric extracts displayed immunological similarity to synthetic somatostatin tetradecapeptide.

  17. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tward, Jonathan D., E-mail: Jonathan.Tward@hci.utah.edu [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Elliott, Sean [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  18. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tward, Jonathan D.; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Elliott, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Methods and Materials: Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Results: Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Conclusions: Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus

  19. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  20. SU-E-T-620: Planning and Dosimetry for Pulsed Low Dose Rate RT for Recurrent Lung, Spine, GYN and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, X; Luo, F; Liu, Y; Zhang, W; Xu, Q; Zhang, T; Li, J [3rd Affiliated Hospital of Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar (China); Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Extensive in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that pulsed low dose rate (PLDR) radiotherapy has potential to provide significant local tumor control and to reduce normal tissue toxicities. This work investigated the planning and dosimetry of PLDR re-irradiation for recurrent cancers. Methods: We analyzed the treatment plans and dosimetry for 13 recurrent patients who were treated with the PLDR technique in this study. All cases were planned with the 3DCRT technique with optimal beam angle selection. The treatment was performed on a Siemens accelerator using 6MV beams. The target volume ranged between 161 and 703cc. The previous RT dose was 40–60Gy while the re-irradiation dose was 16–60Gy. The interval between previous RT and re-irradiation was 13–336 months, and the follow-up time was up to 27months. The total prescription dose was administered in 2Gy/day fractions with the daily dose delivered in 10 sub-fractions (pulses) of 20cGy with a 3min interval between the pulses to achieve an effective dose rate of 6.7cGy/min. Results: The clinical outcome was analyzed based on the treatment plans. All pulses were kept with Dmax<40cGy. The PLDR treatments were effective (CR: 3 patients, PR: 10 patients). The acute and late toxicities were all acceptable (generally grade II or under). Two patients died three months after the PLDR re-irradiation, one due to massive cerebral infarction and the other due to acute cardiac failure. All others survived more than 8 months. Five patients showed good conditions at the last follow-up. Among them two recurrent lung cancer patients had survived 23 months and one nasopharyngeal cancer patient had survived 27 months. Conclusion: The PLDR technique was effective for the palliative treatment of head and neck, lung, spine and GYN cancers. Further phase II and III studies are warranted to quantify the efficacy of PLDR for recurrent cancers.

  1. Inverse dose-rate-effects on the expressions of extra-cellular matrix-related genes in low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiated murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Kimio; Oghiso, Yoichi; Murano, Hayato

    2008-01-01

    Based on the results of previous microarray analyses of murine NIH3T3/PG13Luc cells irradiated with continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-ray or end-high-dose-rate-irradiations (end-HDR) at the end of the LDR-irradiation period, the inverse dose-rate-effects on gene expression levels were observed. To compare differences of the effects between LDR-irradiation and HDR-irradiation, HDR-irradiations at 2 different times, one (ini-HDR) at the same time at the start of LDR-irradiation and the other (end-HDR), were performed. The up-regulated genes were classified into two types, in which one was up-regulated in LDR-, ini-HDR-, and end-HDR irradiation such as Cdkn1a and Ccng1, which were reported as p53-dependent genes, and the other was up-regulated in LDR- and ini-HDR irradiations such as pro-collagen TypeIa2/Colla2, TenascinC/Tnc, and Fibulin5/Fbln5, which were reported as extra-cellular matrix-related (ECM) genes. The time dependent gene expression patterns in LDR-irradiation were also classified into two types, in which one was an early response such as in Cdkn1a and Ccng1 and the other was a delayed response such as the ECM genes which have no linearity to total dose. The protein expression pattern of Cdkn1a increased dose dependently in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations, but those of p53Ser15/18 and MDM2 in LDR-irradiations were different from end-HDR-irradiations. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of the ECM genes in embryonic fibroblasts from p53-deficient mice were not increased by LDR- and end-HDR-irradiation, so the delayed expressions of the ECM genes seem to be regulated by p53. Consequently, the inverse dose-rate-effects on the expression levels of the ECM genes in LDR- and end-HDR-irradiations may be explained from different time responses by p53 status. (author)

  2. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    exposure. Our study finds a risk of leukemia associated with chronic external exposure and allows taking into account modifying factors of this relation. Additional follow-up allows to improve the precision of the estimated dose-response relationship. A combined analysis including the present cohort and other nuclear cohorts could quantify more precisely the risks associated with low doses at low dose rates, in order to validate current underlying hypotheses of the radiation protection system. (author)

  3. SU-G-201-06: Directional Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy: Determination of the TG-43 Dose-Rate Constant Analog for a New Pd-103 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aima, M; Culberson, W; Hammer, C; Micka, J; DeWerd, L [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to determine the TG-43 dose-rate constant analog for a new directional low-dose rate brachytherapy source based on experimental methods and comparison to Monte Carlo simulations. The CivaSheet™ is a new commercially available planar source array comprised of a variable number of discrete directional source elements called “CivaDots”. Given the directional nature and non-conventional design of the source, modifications to the AAPM TG-43 protocol for dosimetry are required. As a result, various parameters of the TG-43 dosimetric formalism have to be adapted to accommodate this source. This work focuses on the dose-rate constant analog determination for a CivaDot. Methods: Dose to water measurements of the CivaDot were performed in a polymethyl methacrylate phantom (20×20×12 cm{sup 3}) using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT3 film. The source was placed in the center of the phantom, and nine TLD micro-cubes were irradiated along its central axis at a distance of 1 cm. For the film measurements, the TLDs were substituted by a (3×3) cm{sup 2} EBT3 film. Primary air-kerma strength measurements of the source were performed using a variable-aperture free-air chamber. Finally, the source was modeled using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code 6. Results: Dose-rate constant analog observed for a total of eight CivaDots using TLDs and five CivaDots using EBT3 film was within ±7.0% and ±2.9% of the Monte Carlo predicted value respectively. The average difference observed was −4.8% and −0.1% with a standard deviation of 1.7% and 2.1% for the TLD and the film measurements respectively, which are both within the comparison uncertainty. Conclusion: A preliminary investigation to determine the doserate constant analog for a CivaDot was conducted successfully with good agreement between experimental and Monte Carlo based methods. This work will aid in the eventual realization of a clinically-viable dosimetric

  4. Late change of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate or low dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. A retrospective comparative study on oral and oropharyngeal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare late changes of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate (HDR) or low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy. For HDR group, 22 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by HDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Osaka (Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases and Osaka University Hospital) during June 1994 through April 2000 and came to the follow-up clinics during July 2000 through December 2000 were studied. For LDR group, 26 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by LDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Nancy (Centre Alexis Vautrin) during February 1989 through July 1998 and came to the follow-up clinics during April 1999 through July 1999 were studied. The standard HDR schedules were 54 Gy/9 fr/5-6 days for monotherapy and 18-24 Gy/3-4 fr/2-3 days following 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy. The standard LDR schedules were 65 Gy/5-6 days for monotherapy and 15-25 Gy/2-3 days following 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy. For evaluation of the late changes, we scored the mucosal and muscular changes inside the treated volume using the modified Dische score system and the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. For 6 items of the modified Dische score system, no significant difference was found between HDR and LDR groups. For the remaining 2 items (pallor, mobility impairment of faucial pillars), LDR group showed higher scores (p=0.010, 0.002). LDR group showed a trend toward higher scores for the RTOG/EORTC scheme (p=0.059). Some predict late effects by HDR interstitial brachytherapy to be severer than by LDR because no dose-rate effects can be expected. Our study, however, showed at least equivalent or even milder late changes by HDR. Appropriate fractionation schedule and extra geometrical sparing effects by optimized dose distribution of HDR group might result in milder late changes. With our

  5. Time Course and Accumulated Risk of Severe Urinary Adverse Events After High- Versus Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tward, Jonathan D; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Thorpe, Cameron; Shrieve, Dennis C; Elliott, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Severe urinary adverse events (UAEs) include surgical treatment of urethral stricture, urinary incontinence, and radiation cystitis. We compared the incidence of grade 3 UAEs, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, after low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, as well as after LDR plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and HDR plus EBRT. Men aged >65 years with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database who were treated with LDR (n=12,801), HDR (n=685), LDR plus EBRT (n=8518), or HDR plus EBRT (n=2392). The populations were balanced by propensity weighting, and the Kaplan-Meier incidence of severe UAEs was compared. Propensity-weighted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the adjusted hazard of UAEs. These UAEs were compared with those in a cohort of men not treated for prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. At 8 years, the propensity-weighted cumulative UAE incidence was highest after HDR plus EBRT (26.6% [95% confidence interval, 23.8%-29.7%]) and lowest after LDR (15.7% [95% confidence interval, 14.8%-16.6%]). The absolute excess risk over nontreated controls at 8 years was 1.9%, 3.8%, 8.4%, and 12.9% for LDR, HDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT, respectively. These represent numbers needed to harm of 53, 26, 12, and 8 persons, respectively. The additional risk of development of a UAE related to treatment for LDR, LDR plus EBRT, and HDR plus EBRT was greatest within the 2 years after treatment and then continued to decline over time. Beyond 4 years, the risk of development of a new severe UAE matched the baseline risk of the control population for all treatments. Toxicity differences were observed between LDR and HDR, but the differences did not meet statistical significance. However, combination radiation therapy (either HDR plus EBRT or LDR plus EBRT) increases the risk of severe UAEs compared with HDR

  6. Radiotherapy alone in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer with telecobalt and low-dose-rate brachytherapy: retrospective analysis of results and variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Campos de Oliveira Faria, Sergio Luis; Weltman, Eduardo; Salvajoli, Joao Victor; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Pastore, Ayrton; Nadalin, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis aims to report results and variables from patients with cervix cancer treated by radiation therapy alone with telecobalt and low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDRB). Methods and Materials: Between September 1989 and September 1995, 190 patients with histologic diagnosis of cervix carcinoma were treated with telecobalt for external beam radiotherapy (EBR), followed by one or two insertions of LDRB. Stage distribution according to patients was the following: IB, 12; IIA, 4; IIB, 105; and IIIB, 69. Median dose of EBR at whole pelvis was 40 Gy, and median parametrial doses for Stages II and III patients were 50 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively. Median doses of LDRB at point A for patients treated with one and two insertions were 38 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. Results: Median follow-up time was 70 months (range: 8-127 months). Overall survival, disease-free survival, and 5-year local control of patients at Stages I, II, and III were 83%, 78%, and 46%; 83%, 82%, and 49%; and 92%, 87%, and 58%, respectively. Overall incidence of late complications in the rectum, small bowel, and urinary tract was 15.3% (19/190), 4.2% (8/190), and 6.8% (13/190), respectively. The actuarial 5-year rectal, small bowel, and urinary incidence of late complications was 16.1%, 4.6%, and 7.6%, respectively. Clinical stage was the only significant variable for overall 5-year survival (p = 0.001), for disease-free survival (p=0.001), and for local control (p=0.001). Stage II patients more than 50 years old had better disease-free survival and local control at 5 years (p=0.004). None of the analyzed variables influenced the actuarial 5-year incidence of late complications. Conclusions: Results of this series suggest that the use of telecobalt equipment for EBR with doses up to 50 Gy at whole pelvis, prior to brachytherapy, is an acceptable technique for radiation therapy alone in the treatment of cervix cancer, especially in developing countries, including Brazil, where

  7. Prostate-Specific Antigen at 4 to 5 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Is a Strong Predictor of Disease-Free Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James; Lapointe, Vincent; Hamm, Jeremy; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prognostic utility of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at 45 to 60 months (48mPSA) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB); (2) the predictors of 48mPSA; and (3) the prognostic utility of directional trends between PSA levels at 24, 36, and 48 months after LDR-PB. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008, 2223 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer received LDR-PB monotherapy. A cohort of 1434 of these patients was identified with a documented 48mPSA and no evidence of disease relapse prior to the 48mPSA. In addition, a subset of this cohort (n=585) was identified with ≥72 months of follow-up and documented PSA values at both 24 and 36 months after implantation. Results: Median follow-up time was 76 months. Eight-year Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 100% vs 73.4% for patients with 48mPSA ≤0.2 vs those with >0.2 ng/mL; 99.1% versus 53.8% for a 48mPSA threshold of ≤0.4 versus >0.4 ng/mL, respectively; and 97.3% versus 0% for a threshold of ≤1.0 versus >1.0 ng/mL, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the only factor predictive of DFS was 48mPSA (P 0.2 ng/mL) between 24 and 36 months, 24 patients had a rise between 36 and 48 months, and 11 patients had rises over both intervals. Failure rates in these patients were 52%, 79%, and 100%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial PSA, androgen deprivation therapy, and dose to 90% of the prostate significantly correlated with 48mPSA but together accounted for only ∼5% of its total variance. Conclusions: The 48mPSA after LDR-PB is highly predictive of long-term DFS. Patients with 48mPSA ≤0.4 ng/mL had a 1.0 ng/mL relapsed. Consecutive PSA rises of >0.2 ng/mL from 24 to 36 months and from 36 to 48 months were also highly predictive of subsequent failure

  8. Total body irradiation (TBI) in pediatric patients. A single-center experience after 30 years of low-dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmeier, Claudia; Thoennessen, Daniel; Negretti, Laura; Streller, Tino; Luetolf, Urs Martin [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre [University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Oertel, Susanne [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2010-11-15

    TBI at the low-dose rate that was generally used here. Conditioning for bone marrow transplantation without radiation is an attractive option, but is not sufficiently effective to completely replace TBI for the most common pediatric indications. (orig.)

  9. 125I Monotherapy Using D90 Implant Doses of 180 Gy or Greater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Johnny; Stone, Nelson N.; Lavaf, Amir; Dumane, Vishruta; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stock, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the oncologic results and toxicity profile of patients treated with 125 I implants using the dose delivered to 90% of the gland from the dose-volume histogram (D90) of greater than 144 Gy. Methods and Materials: From June 1995 to Feb 2005, a total of 643 patients were treated with 125 I monotherapy for T1-T2 prostate cancer with a D90 of 180 Gy or greater (median, 197 Gy; range, 180-267 Gy). Implantations were performed using a real-time ultrasound-guided seed-placement method and intraoperative dosimetry to optimize target coverage and homogeneity by using modified peripheral loading. We analyzed biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) of 435 patients who had a minimum 2-year prostate-specific antigen follow-up (median follow-up, 6.7 years; range, 2.0-11.1 years). Results: Five-year bDFS rates for the entire cohort using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions were 96.9% and 96.5%, respectively. Using the Phoenix definition, 5-year bDFS rates were 97.3% for low-risk patients and 92.8% for intermediate/high-risk patients. The positive biopsy rate was 4.1%. The freedom rate from Grade 2 or higher rectal bleeding at 5 years was 88.5%. Acute urinary retention occurred in 10.7%, more commonly in patients with high pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scores (p < 0.01). In patients who were potent before treatment, 73.4% remained potent at 5 years after implantation. Conclusions: Patients with a minimum D90 of 180 Gy had outstanding local control based on prostate-specific antigen control and biopsy data. Toxicity profiles, particularly for long-term urinary and sexual function, were excellent and showed that D90 doses of 180 Gy or greater performed using the technique described were feasible and tolerable

  10. Exploration of dopamine transporter and D2 receptors in morphine dependent rats through 125I-β-CTT, 125I-IBZM cerebral autoradiography and the biodistribution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yansong; Fang Ping; Ding Shiyu; Chen Zhengping; Zhou Xiang; Hu Mingyang; Wang Bocheng; Zhang Manda; Wang Shizhen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the variation of cerebral dopamine (DA) transmitting system in morphine dependent (MD) rats using dopamine transporter (DAT) and D 2 receptors imaging agent. Methods: MD model rats were established by using a two-compartment (C1 and C2-morphine conditioned compartment) apparatus for assessing morphine conditioned place preferences in rats. 125 I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane ( 125 I-β-CIT) and 125 I-3-iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl] benzamide ( 125 I-IBZM) cerebral DAT and D 2 receptor autoradiography and biodistribution study were used to evaluate the variation of DAT and D 2 receptors in morphine dependent rats. Results: The mean time of MD rats entering from C1 to C2 was (0.84 +- 0.50) min after 6 days' conditioned place preference training, shorter than that of the control group [(2.40 +- 1.10) min, P 125 I-β-CIT uptake ratio of striatum (ST)/cerebellum (CB) and nucleus acumens (NAC)/CB in MD group were 4.76 +- 0.92 and 2.72 +- 0.96, significantly lower than that of control group (5.92 +- 0.67 and 4.16 +- 0.56, P 125 I-IBZM uptake ratio in MD group were 4.11 +- 0.56 and 2.64 +- 0.25, lower than that in control group (5.43 +- 0.74 and 3.49 +- 0.65, P 125 I-β-CIT, 125 I-IBZM biodistribution study also showed that the DAT and D 2 binding sites were reduced in ST of MD group by (21.68 +- 11.11)% and (18.69 +- 9.97)% comparing to the controls, respectively. Conclusions: The DAT and D 2 receptors in both ST and NAC were all involved and reduced to some extent in morphine dependent model rats, the DAT and D 2 receptor imaging agent could reflect the variation of DAT and D 2 receptors, this would afford the theoretical basis for D 2 receptors and DAT imaging in study on preventing drug addiction and on its abstinence

  11. (125I)Iodoazidococaine, a photoaffinity label for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahoun, J.R.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    A carrier-free radioiodinated cocaine photoaffinity label, (-)-3-( 125 I)iodo-4-azidococaine [( 125 I)IACoc], has been synthesized and used as a probe for cocaine-binding proteins. Photoaffinity labeling with 0.5 nM ( 125 I)IACoc resulted in selective derivatization of a 26-kDa polypeptide with the pharmacology of a sigma receptor in membranes derived from whole rat brain, rat liver, and human placenta. ( 125 I)IACoc labeling of the 26-kDa polypeptide was also inhibited by 10 μM imipramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, benztropine, and tetrabenazine. The size of the ( 125 I)I-ACoc-labeled proteins is consistent with the size of proteins photolabeled in guinea pig brain and liver membranes by using the sigma photolabel azido-[ 3 H]DTG. Kinetic analysis of ( 125 I)IACoc binding to rat liver microsomes revealed two sites with K d values of 19 and 126 pM, respectively. The presence or absence of proteolytic inhibitors during membrane preparation did not alter the size of the photolabeled sigma receptor, indicating that the 26-kDa polypeptide was not derived from a larger protein. In summary, ( 125 I)IACoc is a potent and highly specific photoaffinity label for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor and will be useful for its biochemical and molecular characterization

  12. Studies with encapsulated 125I sources: dosimetry for determination of relative biological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Freeman, M.L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    During the past year, members of this laboratory have measured the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of photons from encapsulated 125 I sources (mean energy = 28.33 keV) using 661.6 keV 137 Cs gamma rays as a standard for comparison. These experiments were performed at clinically relevant dose rates and used reduction of the reproductive viability of mammalian cells as an endpoint. This section will discuss how dosimetry problems special to 125 I influence the design of the apparatus and will describe the ionization chamber to be used for measuring dose rates from both 125 I and 137 Cs photons

  13. Variation in 125I-Insulin absorption and blood glucose concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, T.; Faber, O.K.; Binder, C.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption of monocomponent porcine 125 I-insulin Monotard and Isophane was studied in six insulin dependent diabetic patients over a period of 12 days. The absorption of insulin was measured as the disappearance of radioactivity from sites of injection. The daily 125 I-insulin doses ranged from 20 to 48 IU between patients. The insulin absorbed varied considerably within and between patients. The range of individual daily absorbed insulin varied from 19 to 104 per cent of the 125 I-insulin dose. A significant correlation (p [de

  14. Effect of fentanyl on 125I-β-CIT uptake in mice brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xingdang; Lin Xiangtong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of fentanyl on 125 I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane ( 125 I-β-CIT) uptake in mice brain. Methods: 1) KM mice groups of five were given different doses of fentanyl, and 10 min or 1 h later were given a dose of 125 I-β-CIT. 2)Two groups of animals were killed at 2 h after injection of 125 I-β-CIT. 3)One group of animals were killed at 1 h after injection of 125 I-β-CIT. Results: 1)In the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, brain stem, cerebellum and whole brain, a dose-dependent increase in uptake (%ID/g or %ID) of 125 I-β-CIT was detected at the fentanyl doses ranging from 125 to 300 μg/kg, and the uptakes of hippocampus and cerebellum were higher than that of the controls. There was a great difference in the value of %ID/g or %ID between the group treated with 250 μg/kg fentanyl and the control group; while at the doses from 12.5 to 100 μg/kg, a dose-dependent decrease in uptake in the same regions was observed and all the uptake levels were lower (hippocampus: except 62.5 and 12.5 μg/kg groups; brain stem: except 62.5 μg/kg group) than that of the controls. 2)The uptakes of 125 I-β-CIT in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, brain stem, cerebellum and whole brain in the groups injected with 125 I-β-CIT 10 min after fentanyl treatment were higher than that in the groups injected with 125 I-β-CIT 1 h after fentanyl treatment. 3)The binding of 125 I-β-CIT in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, brain stem, cerebellum and whole brain in the groups killed at 1 h after injection of 125 I-β-CIT was higher than that in the control group, but without significant difference. Conclusion: Fentanyl may have different effects on 125 I-β-CIT at various time points and doses

  15. In vivo study about specific captation of 125 I-insulin by rat brain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanvitto, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The specific captation of 125 I-insulin was evaluated by brain structures, as olfactory bulbous, hypothalamus and cerebellum in rats, from in vivo experiences that including two different aspects: captation measure of 125 I-insulin after the intravenous injection of the labelled hormone, in fed rats and in rats with 48 h of fast or convulsion, procedure by the pentylene tetrazole; captation measure of 125 I-insulin after intra-cerebral-ventricular injection of the labelled hormone in fed rats. (C.G.C.)

  16. m-[125I]iodoaniline: a useful reagent for radiolabeling biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawli, L.A.; Kassis, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    Biotinyl-m-[ 125 I]iodoanilide (BIA) was synthesized by coupling biotin to m-[ 125 I]iodoaniline via a mixed anhydride reaction. m-[ 125 I]Iodoaniline was produced from the tin precursor, which was prepared using a palladium catalyzed reaction of hexabutylditin with m-bromoaniline. The radioiodinated BIA derivative is characterized by a stable amide and/or intact ureido group on the biotin molecule, it may thus be a useful carrier for targeting radionuclides to avidin-conjugated antibodies previously localized on tumors. (author)

  17. High-dose-rate versus low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: analysis of tumor recurrence - the University of Wisconsin experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Potter, David M.; Schink, Julian C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the clinical outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) vs. low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred ninety-one LDR patients were treated from 1977 to 1988 and compared to 173 HDR patients treated from 1989 to 1996. Patients of similar stage and tumor volumes were treated with identical external beam fractionation schedules. Brachytherapy was given in either 1 or 2 LDR implants for the earlier patient cohort, and 5 HDR implants for the latter cohort. For both patient groups, Point A received a minimum total dose of 80 Gy. The linear-quadratic formula was used to calculate the LDR dose-equivalent contribution to Point A for the HDR treatments. The primary endpoints assessed were survival, pelvic control, relapse-free survival, and distant metastases. Endpoints were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparisons between treatment groups were performed using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months (2 to 208 months) in the LDR group and 22 months (1 to 85 months) in the HDR group. For all stages combined there was no difference in survival, pelvic control, relapse-free survival, or distant metastases between LDR and HDR patients. For Stage IB and II HDR patients, the pelvic control rates were 85% and 80% with survival rates of 86% and 65% at 3 years, respectively. In the LDR group, Stage IB and II patients had 91% and 78% pelvic control rates, with 82% and 58% survival rates at 3 years, respectively. No difference was seen in survival or pelvic control for bulky Stage I and II patients combined (> 5 cm). Pelvic control at 3 years was 44% (HDR) versus 75% (LDR) for Stage IIIB patients (p = 0.002). This difference in pelvic control was associated with a lower survival rate in the Stage IIIB HDR versus LDR population (33% versus 58%, p = 0.004). The only major difference, with regard to patient characteristics

  18. Comparison of one and two low dose rate brachytherapy insertions in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Faria, S.L.C.O.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare one and two intracavitary brachytherapy with low dose rate in the management of stage IIB cervix cancer through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1989 to December 1992, 81 patients with stage IIB cervix cancer were randomized in two arms according to the number of intracavitary brachytherapy insertion to be realized. Of these, 34 were treated by two intracavitary insertions (group A) and 47 by one insertion (group B). The external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was realized through a Cobalt unit at whole pelvis with total dose of 40Gy in 20 fractions of 2,0Gy, in box arrangement, followed by parametrial complementation of 10Gy. The brachytherapy was realized right after the end of EBRT. The patients from group A were underwent to two insertions of 25Gy, calculated at point A, defined by the Manchester system. The interval between each insertions was 2 weeks. The patients from group B were underwent to one insertion of 40 Gy at point A. The average dose rate was 60cGy per hour at point A. Results: With the follow up ranging from 36 to 75 months and medium of 55 months, the disease free survival of the patients from group A was not statistically different of those from group B, 70,6% and 72,3% respectively (p=0,711). Local recurrence occurred in four patients from group A (11,7%) and in eight from group B (17%). Distant metastasis occurred in one patient from group A (2,9%) and in two from group B (4,2%). Three patients from group A (8,8%) and three from group B (6,4%) were lost to follow up and considered as dead. The causes of death among patients from group A were progression of local disease in four, distant metastasis in one, complicated diabetes mellitus in one and actinic intestinal complications in other one. The cause of deaths among patients from group B were progression of local disease in eight and distant metastasis in two. The grade I and II rectal complications rate was 5,9% and 6,3% at

  19. Distribution and levels of [125I]IGF-I, [125I]IGF-II and [125I]insulin receptor binding sites in the hippocampus of aged memory-unimpaired and -impaired rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirion, R.; Rowe, W.; Kar, S.; Dore, S.

    1997-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) and insulin are localized within distinct brain regions and their respective functions are mediated by specific membrane receptors. High densities of binding sites for these growth factors are discretely and differentially distributed throughout the brain, with prominent levels localized to the hippocampal formation. IGFs and insulin, in addition to their growth promoting actions, are considered to play important roles in the development and maintenance of normal cell functions throughout life. We compared the anatomical distribution and levels of IGF and insulin receptors in young (five month) and aged (25 month) memory-impaired and memory-unimpaired male Long-Evans rats as determined in the Morris water maze task in order to determine if alterations in IGF and insulin activity may be related to the emergence of cognitive deficits in the aged memory-impaired rat. In the hippocampus, [ 125 I]IGF-I receptors are concentrated primarily in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 sub-field while high amounts of [ 125 I]IGF-II binding sites are localized to the pyramidal cell layer, and the granular cell layer of the DG. [ 125 I]insulin binding sites are mostly found in the molecular layer of the DG and the CA1 sub-field. No significant differences were found in [ 125 I]IGF-I, [ 125 I]IGF-II or [ 125 I]insulin binding levels in any regions or laminae of the hippocampus of young vs aged rats, and deficits in cognitive performance did not relate to altered levels of these receptors in aged memory-impaired vs aged memory-unimpaired rats. Other regions, including various cortical areas, were also examined and failed to reveal any significant differences between the three groups studied.It thus appears that IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin receptor sites are not markedly altered during the normal ageing process in the Long-Evans rat, in spite of significant learning deficits in a sub-group (memory-impaired) of aged animals. Hence

  20. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.E.; Graham, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125 I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  1. Report of a minor 125I exposure in a research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    In routine thyroid scanning of personnel whose work involved the use of 125 I in biological research, it was discovered that an individual who had been iodinating proteins periodically for over 6 months showed a high thyroid count rate. It was decided to monitor the individual's thyroid weekly and to curtail his work in the laboratory until the cause of the thyroid uptake could be determined. Initially the 125 I concentration in his thyroid decreased as expected but a subsequent scan on the 21st day showed an 125 I concentration even greater than the initial level despite his absence from the laboratory. However on monitoring his office space, it was discovered that a felt pen was grossly contaminated and that the individual habitually put the pen in his mouth during moments of cogitation. It was concluded that a contaminated glove had transferred some 125 I to the pen during the course of the experiment. (U.K.)

  2. Study of o-125I-benzoate excretion mechanisms in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, R.; Laznicek, M.; Kvetina, J.; Laznickova, A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanisms of renal clearance of o- 125 I-benzoate in the rabbit based on the inhibition of the secretory transport by probenecid showed that o- 125 I-benzoate was eliminated in the kidneys not only by glomerular filtration but also by tubular secretion. The total amount of the drug excreted in the urine was affected by tubular resorption (apparently by the process of passive diffusion), which exceeded tubular secretion. A comparison of the chromatograms of the plasma and the urine before and after the competitive inhibition of the tubular active transport by probenecid revealed a higher amount of o- 125 I-benzoylglucuronide in the urine in the case of inhibition. The results suggest that the kidneys participated in the total biotransformation of o- 125 I-benzoate. The excretion of the original drug and metabolites in the bile contributed less than 1% to the total clearance in rabbits. (author). 3 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  3. Proteolytic activity of beef liver determined by natural /sup 125/I-labelled substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahovec, J; Ondrus, I [Vysoka Skola Veterinarska, Kosice (Czechoslovakia)

    1975-07-01

    The method of determining the enzymatic activity of acid proteinases is described. The method is based on the use of /sup 125/I-labelled natural protein substrates. /sup 125/I-labelled albumin, /sup 125/I-globulin and /sup 125/I-insulin were tested for the determination of activities. All the substrates were hydrolyzed with the enzymes of the supernatant fraction (106,000 g) of beef liver homogenate in the acid pH zone. Optimum enzymatic reaction conditions were tested, the dependence of the reaction on the enzyme concentration, time and temperature was determined, pH optimum was ascertained for the individual substrates, and pH stability was determined. The results show that the method is suitable for determining the enzymatic activity of proteinases of cathepsin character.

  4. Inhibition effects of 125I-triplex forming oligonucleotide to hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Zhongwei; Hou Min; Cai Haidong; Yuan Xueyu; Yang Yuehua; Yuan Shidong; He Junmin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) has been reported as a new antigene strategy. The purpose of this study was to observe the inhibition effects of 125 I-TFO on hepatoma cells and to investigate the possibility of using 125 I-TFO as an antigene radiotherapy technique for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to HBV. Methods: TFO complementary to the initiator of S gene of HBV was synthesized and labeled with 125 I. HepG2.2.15 cells, in which HBV genome was integrated, were incubated with 125 I-TFO, TFO and 125 I respectively. After incubation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of each group were assayed with ELISA and the survival rate of cells in each group was determined with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Results: 125 I-TFO showed a high stability with a radiolabeling rate of >93%. The radiochemical purity of labeled compound was 90.8%, 81.1% and 73.2% respectively after 12, 48 and 72 h at 37 degree C. The peak inhibition effect of 125 I-TFO on synthesizing HBsAg and HBeAg by HepG2.2.15 cells were found at 48 h after transfection, with significantly the highest inhibition rate of 45.2% for HBsAg and 74.5% for HBeAg expression among the three groups(P 125 I-TFO may inhibit the antigen expression of HBV and the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells, thus it may provide a new approach to develop gene-based radiotherapeutic pharmaceuticals for anti-HBV and HCC. (authors)

  5. Selective binding of 2-[125I]iodo-nisoxetine to norepinephrine transporters in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, M.-P.; Choi, Seok-Rye; Hou, Catherine; Zhuang, Z.-P.; Foulon, Catherine; Kung, Hank F.

    2004-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand, (R)-N-methyl-(2-[ 125 I]iodo-phenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine, [ 125 I]2-INXT, targeting norepinephrine transporters (NET), was successfully prepared. A no-carrier-added product, [ 125 I]2-INXT, displayed a saturable binding with a high affinity (K d =0.06 nM) in the homogenates prepared from rat cortical tissues as well as from LLC-PK 1 cells expressing NET. A relatively low number of binding sties (B max =55 fmol/mg protein) measured with [ 125 I]2-INXT in rat cortical homogenates is consistent with the value reported for a known NET ligand, [ 3 H]nisoxetine. Competition studies with various compounds on [ 125 I]2-INXT binding clearly confirmed the pharmacological specificity and selectivity for NET binding sites. Following a tail-vein injection of [ 125 I]2-INXT in rats, a good initial brain uptake was observed (0.56% dose at 2 min) followed by a slow washout from the brain (0.2% remained at 3 hours post-injection). The hypothalamus (a NET-rich region) to striatum (a region devoid of NET) ratio was 1.5 at 3 hours post-i.v. injection. Pretreatment of rats with nisoxetine significantly inhibited the uptake of [ 125 I]2-INXT (70-100% inhibition) in locus coeruleus, hypothalamus and raphe nuclei, regions known to have a high density of NET; whereas escitalopram, a serotonin transporter ligand, did not show a similar effect. Ex vivo autoradiography of rat brain sections of [ 125 I]2-INXT (at 3 hours after an i.v. injection) displayed an excellent regional brain localization pattern corroborated to the specific NET distribution in the brain. The specific brain localization was significantly reduced by a dose of nisoxetine pretreatment. Taken together, the data suggest that [ 123 I]2-INXT may be useful for mapping NET binding sites in the brain

  6. Microchemical synthesis of the serotonin receptor ligand, 125I-LSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartig, P.R.; Krohn, A.M.; Hirschman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis and properties of 2-[ 125 I]-lysergic acid diethylamide, the first 125 I-labeled serotonin receptor ligand, are described. A novel microsynthesis apparatus was developed for this synthesis. The apparatus employs a micromanipulator and glass micro tools to handle microliter to nanoliter volumes on a microscope stage. This apparatus should be generally useful for the synthesis of radioligands and other compounds when limited amounts of material must be handled in small volumes

  7. Biodistribution analysis of 125I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b fusion protein in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yaoyuan; Zhang Rongjun; Cai Gangming; Gu Xiaobo; Jiang Mengjun; Zhang Bo; Yang Min; Cao Guoxian; Yang Jianliang

    2009-01-01

    125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b was prepared with the methods of Ch-T and purified with PD-10 column. The radiochemical purity was measured with TCA (trichloroacetic acid) precipitation. The antiviral activities of 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b and albumin-IFN-alpha2b were compared with WISH/VSV system in vitro. SD rats were injected with 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b subcutaneously and sacrificed at 0.5, 2, 6, 24, 48, 90, 180 and 300 h post-injection. Selected organs were dissected, weighed and their radioactivity was measured using γ-counter. The accumulated radioactivity in the tissues was calculated in terms of percentage of injected dose per gram organ (%ID·g -1 ). The labeling yield was 82.72%. The radiochemical purity of 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b was 95.53%, and its radioactivity was 0.26 MBq/μg. The antiviral bioactivities of albumin-IFN-alpha2b and 125 I-albumin- IFN-alpha2b did not change. Biodistribution analysis of 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b in rats showed that concentrated 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b in blood reached maximum at 6 h post injection, and eliminated slowly. No specific accumulation was seen in other tissues. 125 I-albumin-IFN-alpha2b could maintain in peripheral blood for a long time and it meant albumin-IFN-alpha2b would be an effective long-term interferon. (authors)

  8. Inhibition effects of {sup 125}I-triplex forming oligonucleotide to hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongwei, Lv; Min, Hou; Haidong, Cai; Xueyu, Yuan; Yuehua, Yang; Shidong, Yuan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China); Junmin, He

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) has been reported as a new antigene strategy. The purpose of this study was to observe the inhibition effects of {sup 125}I-TFO on hepatoma cells and to investigate the possibility of using {sup 125}I-TFO as an antigene radiotherapy technique for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related to HBV. Methods: TFO complementary to the initiator of S gene of HBV was synthesized and labeled with {sup 125}I. HepG2.2.15 cells, in which HBV genome was integrated, were incubated with {sup 125}I-TFO, TFO and {sup 125}I respectively. After incubation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of each group were assayed with ELISA and the survival rate of cells in each group was determined with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Results: {sup 125}I-TFO showed a high stability with a radiolabeling rate of >93%. The radiochemical purity of labeled compound was 90.8%, 81.1% and 73.2% respectively after 12, 48 and 72 h at 37 degree C. The peak inhibition effect of {sup 125}I-TFO on synthesizing HBsAg and HBeAg by HepG2.2.15 cells were found at 48 h after transfection, with significantly the highest inhibition rate of 45.2% for HBsAg and 74.5% for HBeAg expression among the three groups(P<0.01 ). As the transfection time prolonged its inhibition effects were stronger. Conclusion: {sup 125}I-TFO may inhibit the antigen expression of HBV and the growth of hepatocarcinoma cells, thus it may provide a new approach to develop gene-based radiotherapeutic pharmaceuticals for anti-HBV and HCC. (authors)

  9. Examining the relationship between pre- and postimplant geometry in prostate low-dose-rate brachytherapy and its correlation with dosimetric quality using the similarity concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Dorin A; Anscher, Mitchell S; Karlin, Jeremy D; Hagan, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This is a retrospective study in which we define multiple metrics for similarity and then inquire on the relationship between similarity and currently used dosimetric quantities describing preimplant and postimplant plans. We analyzed a unique cohort of 94 consecutively performed prostate seed implant patients, associated with excellent dosimetric and clinical outcomes. For each patient, an ultrasound (US) preimplant and two CT postimplant (Day 0 and Day 30) studies were available. Measures for similarity were created and computed using feature vectors based on two classes of moments: first, invariant to rotation and translation, and the second polar-radius moments invariant to rotation, translation, and scaling. Both similarity measures were calibrated using controlled perturbations (random and systematic