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Sample records for low-dose x-ray computed

  1. Penalized weighted least-squares approach for low-dose x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    The noise of low-dose computed tomography (CT) sinogram follows approximately a Gaussian distribution with nonlinear dependence between the sample mean and variance. The noise is statistically uncorrelated among detector bins at any view angle. However the correlation coefficient matrix of data signal indicates a strong signal correlation among neighboring views. Based on above observations, Karhunen-Loeve (KL) transform can be used to de-correlate the signal among the neighboring views. In each KL component, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function can be constructed and optimal sinogram can be estimated by minimizing the objective function, followed by filtered backprojection (FBP) for CT image reconstruction. In this work, we compared the KL-PWLS method with an iterative image reconstruction algorithm, which uses the Gauss-Seidel iterative calculation to minimize the PWLS objective function in image domain. We also compared the KL-PWLS with an iterative sinogram smoothing algorithm, which uses the iterated conditional mode calculation to minimize the PWLS objective function in sinogram space, followed by FBP for image reconstruction. Phantom experiments show a comparable performance of these three PWLS methods in suppressing the noise-induced artifacts and preserving resolution in reconstructed images. Computer simulation concurs with the phantom experiments in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff and detectability in low contrast environment. The KL-PWLS noise reduction may have the advantage in computation for low-dose CT imaging, especially for dynamic high-resolution studies.

  2. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

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    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  3. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction.

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    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-07

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm.

  4. X-raying with low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malevich, E.E.; Kisel, E.M.; Shpita, I.D.; Lazovsky, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of the improvement of diagnostics quality and reduction of beam load on a patient in modern x-ray devices pulse x-raying is applied. It is based on the using of radiation pulses with various frequencies of intervals between them instead of continuous radiation. At pulse x-raying with the net control the principle of filling of an interval is used, when the information about the image, received with the last pulse, get into memory and is displayed before occurrence of other pulse. It creates impression of the continuous image even at low frequency of pulses. Due to the unique concept of the simultaneous (double) control, all of 3 parameters, which define the quality of the image (pressure(voltage), force of a current and length of a pulse), are adjusted automatically at each pulse, thus optimum adaptation to varied thickness of object during dynamic researches occurs. At x-raying pulse the presence of a free interval from x-ray radiation between two pulses results in the decrease of a radiation dose. Pulsing occurs some times per one second with equal intervals between pulses. Thus, the degree of decrease irradiation dose depends on duration of a pause between pulses. On the screen the image of last pulse before occurrence of the following is kept and repeats. The principle of x-raying pulse was realized in system Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy by the firm 'Philips Medi zin Systeme'. In the x-ray tube of this system inclusion and de energizing of radiation occurs directly on a source. Electron cloud is broken off by the special grid, which is located between the cathode and the anode and operates as a barrier. Thus the tube continues to be energized. In usual devices for pulses formation is used generator pulsation system, which at increase and attenuation of a x-ray pulse results in occurrence of the increasing and fading radiation which are not participating in the formation of the image, but creating beam load on the patient and the personnel. Thus

  5. Accelerating an Ordered-Subset Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction with a Power Factor and Total Variation Minimization.

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    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in low-dose X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in many fields, including dentistry, guided radiotherapy and small animal imaging. Despite reducing the radiation dose, low-dose CBCT has not gained widespread acceptance in routine clinical practice. In addition to performing more evaluation studies, developing a fast and high-quality reconstruction algorithm is required. In this work, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that accelerates ordered-subsets (OS) reconstruction using a power factor. Furthermore, we combine it with the total-variation (TV) minimization method. Both simulation and phantom studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can accelerate conventional OS methods, greatly increase the convergence speed in early iterations. Moreover, applying the TV minimization to the power acceleration scheme can further improve the image quality while preserving the fast convergence rate.

  6. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Sol Fernández, S.; García-Salcedo, R.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G.; Gaona, E.; León-Alfaro, M.A. de; Rivera-Montalvo, T.

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO_4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm"2 at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO_4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO_4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy - Highlights: • Low dose X-ray doses for personal dosimetry were measured. • Radiation dose (µGy ) for environmental dosimetry were determined. • Scattering radiation dose were measured by TLDs. • Linearity of pair TLD system was successful in the range of microgray. • Pair TLDs composed by CaSO_4:Dy and by LiF:Mg,Cu,P. is suggested for clinical dosimetry.

  7. Noise Estimation for Single-Slice Sinogram of Low-Dose X-Ray Computed Tomography Using Homogenous Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwu Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to estimate noise for a single-slice sinogram of low-dose CT based on the homogenous patches centered at a special pixel, called center point, which has the smallest variance among all sinogram pixels. The homogenous patch, composed by homogenous points, is formed by the points similar to the center point using similarity sorting, similarity decreasing searching, and variance analysis in a very large neighborhood (VLN to avoid manual selection of parameter for similarity measures.Homogenous pixels in the VLN allow us find the largest number of samples, who have the highest similarities to the center point, for noise estimation, and the noise level can be estimated according to unbiased estimation.Experimental results show that for the simulated noisy sinograms, the method proposed in this paper can obtain satisfied noise estimation results, especially for sinograms with relatively serious noises.

  8. Low-dose X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol.

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    Gao, Yang; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yunwan; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2014-06-16

    To realize low-dose imaging in X-ray computed tomography (CT) examination, lowering milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) or reducing the required number of projection views (sparse-view) per rotation around the body has been widely studied as an easy and effective approach. In this study, we are focusing on low-dose CT image reconstruction from the sinograms acquired with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol and propose a two-step image reconstruction strategy. Specifically, to suppress significant statistical noise in the noisy and insufficient sinograms, an adaptive sinogram restoration (ASR) method is first proposed with consideration of the statistical property of sinogram data, and then to further acquire a high-quality image, a total variation based projection onto convex sets (TV-POCS) method is adopted with a slight modification. For simplicity, the present reconstruction strategy was termed as "ASR-TV-POCS." To evaluate the present ASR-TV-POCS method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on a physical phantom. Experimental results have demonstrated that the present ASR-TV-POCS method can achieve promising gains over other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge detail preservation.

  9. Feasibility study for application of the compressed-sensing framework to interior computed tomography (ICT) for low-dose, high-accurate dental x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, U. K.; Cho, H. M.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Woo, T. H.; Choi, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new/next-generation type of CT examinations, the so-called Interior Computed Tomography (ICT), which may presumably lead to dose reduction to the patient outside the target region-of-interest (ROI), in dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray beam from each projection position covers only a relatively small ROI containing a target of diagnosis from the examined structure, leading to imaging benefits such as decreasing scatters and system cost as well as reducing imaging dose. We considered the compressed-sensing (CS) framework, rather than common filtered-backprojection (FBP)-based algorithms, for more accurate ICT reconstruction. We implemented a CS-based ICT algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to investigate the imaging characteristics. Simulation conditions of two ROI ratios of 0.28 and 0.14 between the target and the whole phantom sizes and four projection numbers of 360, 180, 90, and 45 were tested. We successfully reconstructed ICT images of substantially high image quality by using the CS framework even with few-view projection data, still preserving sharp edges in the images.

  10. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

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    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  11. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  12. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better understanding of the effects of radiation on osteoprogenitor cell populations could lead to more effective therapeutic interventions that protect bone integrity for individuals exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  13. Edge enhancement algorithm for low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic imaging.

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    Lee, Min Seok; Park, Chul Hee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy has continually evolved to reduce radiation risk to patients during clinical diagnosis and surgery. However, the reduction in dose exposure causes quality degradation of the acquired images. In general, an X-ray device has a time-average pre-processor to remove the generated quantum noise. However, this pre-processor causes blurring and artifacts within the moving edge regions, and noise remains in the image. During high-pass filtering (HPF) to enhance edge detail, this noise in the image is amplified. In this study, a 2D edge enhancement algorithm comprising region adaptive HPF with the transient improvement (TI) method, as well as artifacts and noise reduction (ANR), was developed for degraded X-ray fluoroscopic images. The proposed method was applied in a static scene pre-processed by a low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy device. First, the sharpness of the X-ray image was improved using region adaptive HPF with the TI method, which facilitates sharpening of edge details without overshoot problems. Then, an ANR filter that uses an edge directional kernel was developed to remove the artifacts and noise that can occur during sharpening, while preserving edge details. The quantitative and qualitative results obtained by applying the developed method to low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images and visually and numerically comparing the final images with images improved using conventional edge enhancement techniques indicate that the proposed method outperforms existing edge enhancement methods in terms of objective criteria and subjective visual perception of the actual X-ray fluoroscopic image. The developed edge enhancement algorithm performed well when applied to actual low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images, not only by improving the sharpness, but also by removing artifacts and noise, including overshoot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts.

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    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre; Dean, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial "pause" in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature.

  15. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon; Ureana, Cecilia Crane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers

  16. A deep convolutional neural network using directional wavelets for low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunhee; Min, Junhong; Ye, Jong Chul

    2017-10-01

    Due to the potential risk of inducing cancer, radiation exposure by X-ray CT devices should be reduced for routine patient scanning. However, in low-dose X-ray CT, severe artifacts typically occur due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and other causes, all of which decrease the reliability of the diagnosis. Thus, a high-quality reconstruction method from low-dose X-ray CT data has become a major research topic in the CT community. Conventional model-based de-noising approaches are, however, computationally very expensive, and image-domain de-noising approaches cannot readily remove CT-specific noise patterns. To tackle these problems, we want to develop a new low-dose X-ray CT algorithm based on a deep-learning approach. We propose an algorithm which uses a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) which is applied to the wavelet transform coefficients of low-dose CT images. More specifically, using a directional wavelet transform to extract the directional component of artifacts and exploit the intra- and inter- band correlations, our deep network can effectively suppress CT-specific noise. In addition, our CNN is designed with a residual learning architecture for faster network training and better performance. Experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm effectively removes complex noise patterns from CT images derived from a reduced X-ray dose. In addition, we show that the wavelet-domain CNN is efficient when used to remove noise from low-dose CT compared to existing approaches. Our results were rigorously evaluated by several radiologists at the Mayo Clinic and won second place at the 2016 "Low-Dose CT Grand Challenge." To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first deep-learning architecture for low-dose CT reconstruction which has been rigorously evaluated and proven to be effective. In addition, the proposed algorithm, in contrast to existing model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods, has considerable potential to benefit from

  17. Response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, L.

    1982-01-01

    The response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays was studied by the yields of dicentrics in first division metaphases. For both species, the dose-response curve was best fitted to the linear-quadratic model with a linear component predominating up to 67 and 42 rad respectively for man and rabbit. A calibration curve (5-400 rad) was obtained by combining the present results on man with previous data at higher doses. On the other hand, it appears that, at low doses, the radiosentivity of human lymphocytes is significantly higher than that of rabbit lymphocytes [fr

  18. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  19. Low-dose multiple-information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentian; Huang Zhifeng; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Jiang Xiaolei; Kang Kejun; Yin Hongxia; Wang Zhenchang; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The present work proposes a low dose information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based multiple-information imaging (GB-MII) method, which can retrieve the attenuation, refraction and scattering information of samples by only three images. This algorithm aims at reducing the exposure time and the doses delivered to the sample. The multiple-information retrieval problem in GB-MII is solved by transforming a nonlinear equations set to a linear equations and adopting the nature of the trigonometric functions. The proposed algorithm is validated by experiments both on conventional X-ray source and synchrotron X-ray source, and compared with the traditional multiple-image-based retrieval algorithm. The experimental results show that our algorithm is comparable with the traditional retrieval algorithm and especially suitable for high Signal-to-Noise system.

  20. Low Dose X-Ray Speckle Visibility Spectroscopy Reveals Nanoscale Dynamics in Radiation Sensitive Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwohlt, Jan; Reiser, Mario; Randolph, Lisa; Matic, Aleksandar; Medina, Luis Aguilera; Madsen, Anders; Sprung, Michael; Zozulya, Alexey; Gutt, Christian

    2018-04-01

    X-ray radiation damage provides a serious bottleneck for investigating microsecond to second dynamics on nanometer length scales employing x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. This limitation hinders the investigation of real time dynamics in most soft matter and biological materials which can tolerate only x-ray doses of kGy and below. Here, we show that this bottleneck can be overcome by low dose x-ray speckle visibility spectroscopy. Employing x-ray doses of 22-438 kGy and analyzing the sparse speckle pattern of count rates as low as 6.7 ×10-3 per pixel, we follow the slow nanoscale dynamics of an ionic liquid (IL) at the glass transition. At the prepeak of nanoscale order in the IL, we observe complex dynamics upon approaching the glass transition temperature TG with a freezing in of the alpha relaxation and a multitude of millisecond local relaxations existing well below TG . We identify this fast relaxation as being responsible for the increasing development of nanoscale order observed in ILs at temperatures below TG .

  1. A nanovehicle developed for treating deep-seated bacteria using low-dose X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Lin; Chen, Ming-Hong; Tung, Fu-I; Liu, Tse-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Many non-antibiotic strategies, such as photocatalysis and photodynamic therapy, have been proposed to inhibit and/or kill bacteria. However, these approaches still have drawbacks such as insufficient bacterial specificity and the limited penetration depth of ultraviolet and near-infrared light. To overcome these limitations, we developed a bacteria-specific anti-bacterial technique via using low-dose X-ray. Graphene oxide quantum dots (GQDs, a multifunctional vehicle) conjugated with vancomycin (Van, a bacteria-targeting ligand) were assembled with Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a photo/radiation sensitizer) to yield a novel Van-GQDs/PpIX complex that specifically attached to Escherichia coli and efficiently generated intracellular reactive oxygen species following X-ray activation. Delivery using GQDs increased the PpIX/Van ratio in the target bacterial cell, damaged bacterial cell wall, and enhanced X-ray-induced PpIX activation. Hence, this approach allowed for the use of a low-dose X-ray to efficiently activate the Van-GQDs/PpIX complex to exert its bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli without damaging normal cells. Furthermore, the E. coli did not develop resistance to the proposed approach for at least 7 rounds of repeated administration during one week. Thus, this proposed vehicle exhibiting bacteria-specific X-ray-triggered toxicity is a promising alternative to antibiotics for treating serious bacterial infections occurring in deep-seated tissues/organs (e.g., osteomyelitis and peritonitis). Administration of antibiotics is the most common treatment modality for bacterial infections. However, in some cases, patient attributes such as age, health, tolerance to antibiotics do not allow for the use of high-dose antibiotics. In addition, some bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics because of improper and long-term use of these agents. Therefore, non-antibiotic strategies to treat deeply situated bacterial infections, such as osteomyelitis, are urgently

  2. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  3. Effect of low dose X-ray irradiation on apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) with different doses of X-rays on the apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of male Kunming mouse testes. The time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in the different stages of spermatogenic cell cycles of mouse testis after LDR with different doses of X-rays were studied with light microscope using the methods of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and HE staining. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR had a remarkable regularity in cell types. When the dose was 0.025 Gy, spermatogonium apoptosis was taken as main. With the dose increase of irradiation (0.025-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic rate of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after irradiation with low dose. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR has a regular change, which provides a further experimental evidence for the mechanism study of hormesis by LDR

  4. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk; Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Munro, P. R. T. [Optical + Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia and Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation, and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  5. Low-dose x-ray phase-contrast and absorption CT using equally sloped tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Cloetens, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projections is often desirable in transmission CT modalities for purposes of low-dose tomography and fast acquisition imaging. However under such conditions, due to the violation of the Nyquist sampling criteria and the presence of noise, reconstructions with acceptable accuracy may not be possible. Recent experiments in transmission electron tomography and coherent diffraction microscopy have shown that the technique of equally sloped tomography (EST), an exact tomographic method utilizing an oversampling iterative Fourier-based reconstruction, provides more accurate image reconstructions when the number of projections is significantly undersampled relative to filtered back projection and algebraic iterative methods. Here we extend this technique by developing new reconstruction algorithms which allow for the incorporation of advanced mathematical regularization constraints, such as the nonlocal means total variational model, in a manner that is consistent with experimental projections. We then evaluate the resulting image quality of the developed algorithm through simulations and experiments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility on image quality phantoms using the x-ray absorption and phase contrast CT modalities. Both our simulation and experimental results have indicated that the method can reduce the number of projections by 60-75% in parallel beam modalities, while achieving comparable or better image quality than the conventional reconstructions. As large-scale and compact synchrotron radiation facilities are currently under rapid development worldwide, the implementation of low-dose x-ray absorption and phase-contrast CT can find broad applications in biology and medicine using these advanced x-ray sources.

  6. Printable organometallic perovskite enables large-area, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Churl; Kim, Kwang Hee; Son, Dae-Yong; Jeong, Dong-Nyuk; Seo, Ja-Young; Choi, Yeong Suk; Han, In Taek; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Medical X-ray imaging procedures require digital flat detectors operating at low doses to reduce radiation health risks. Solution-processed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have characteristics that make them good candidates for the photoconductive layer of such sensitive detectors. However, such detectors have not yet been built on thin-film transistor arrays because it has been difficult to prepare thick perovskite films (more than a few hundred micrometres) over large areas (a detector is typically 50 centimetres by 50 centimetres). We report here an all-solution-based (in contrast to conventional vacuum processing) synthetic route to producing printable polycrystalline perovskites with sharply faceted large grains having morphologies and optoelectronic properties comparable to those of single crystals. High sensitivities of up to 11 microcoulombs per air KERMA of milligray per square centimetre (μC mGyair-1 cm-2) are achieved under irradiation with a 100-kilovolt bremsstrahlung source, which are at least one order of magnitude higher than the sensitivities achieved with currently used amorphous selenium or thallium-doped cesium iodide detectors. We demonstrate X-ray imaging in a conventional thin-film transistor substrate by embedding an 830-micrometre-thick perovskite film and an additional two interlayers of polymer/perovskite composites to provide conformal interfaces between perovskite films and electrodes that control dark currents and temporal charge carrier transportation. Such an all-solution-based perovskite detector could enable low-dose X-ray imaging, and could also be used in photoconductive devices for radiation imaging, sensing and energy harvesting.

  7. Printable organometallic perovskite enables large-area, low-dose X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Churl; Kim, Kwang Hee; Son, Dae-Yong; Jeong, Dong-Nyuk; Seo, Ja-Young; Choi, Yeong Suk; Han, In Taek; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-10-04

    Medical X-ray imaging procedures require digital flat detectors operating at low doses to reduce radiation health risks. Solution-processed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have characteristics that make them good candidates for the photoconductive layer of such sensitive detectors. However, such detectors have not yet been built on thin-film transistor arrays because it has been difficult to prepare thick perovskite films (more than a few hundred micrometres) over large areas (a detector is typically 50 centimetres by 50 centimetres). We report here an all-solution-based (in contrast to conventional vacuum processing) synthetic route to producing printable polycrystalline perovskites with sharply faceted large grains having morphologies and optoelectronic properties comparable to those of single crystals. High sensitivities of up to 11 microcoulombs per air KERMA of milligray per square centimetre (μC mGy air -1 cm -2 ) are achieved under irradiation with a 100-kilovolt bremsstrahlung source, which are at least one order of magnitude higher than the sensitivities achieved with currently used amorphous selenium or thallium-doped cesium iodide detectors. We demonstrate X-ray imaging in a conventional thin-film transistor substrate by embedding an 830-micrometre-thick perovskite film and an additional two interlayers of polymer/perovskite composites to provide conformal interfaces between perovskite films and electrodes that control dark currents and temporal charge carrier transportation. Such an all-solution-based perovskite detector could enable low-dose X-ray imaging, and could also be used in photoconductive devices for radiation imaging, sensing and energy harvesting.

  8. X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A

    2006-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  9. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses. Minimizing X-ray exposure with spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Wolfgang [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192 x 0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 x 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDI{sub vol} 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. (orig.)

  10. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng [Nambu Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Bae [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10{sup 6}, 13.901 x 10{sup 6}, 14.153 x 10{sup 6}, 13.831 x 10{sup 6}, 14.137 x 10{sup 6}, 14.677 x 10{sup 6} respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body.

  11. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng; Park, Jong Bae

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10 6 , 13.901 x 10 6 , 14.153 x 10 6 , 13.831 x 10 6 , 14.137 x 10 6 , 14.677 x 10 6 respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body

  12. Survival of V79 cells after low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Fowler, J.F.; Hodgkiss, R.J.; Jones, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    Doses of X-rays of the order 1-3 Gy are used in clinical multifraction regimes. Reduction in oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) and sensitizer enhancement ratios have been reported for CHO cells. The errors in determining low levels of cell kill are largely influenced by sampling and dilution errors. The authors have aimed to reduce these errors by increasing the sample size and reducing dilutions. To further assess the uncertainties involved in these experiments the data were pooled from three independent series of experiments. Asynchronous log phase Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells have been irradiated attached to glass Petri dishes in Eagle's MEM + 10% fcs at a dose rate of 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ under air + 5% CO/sub 2/ or nitrogen + 5% CO/sub 2/ at 18 0 C. Survival in the range 10/sup -1/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ surviving fraction (SF) was identical at 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ and 3.93 Gy min/sup -1/. Many previous experiments have given an OER = 3.1 at 10/sup -2/-10/sup -3/ survival. Least squares fit to the linear quadratic function log S = -(αD + βD/sup 2/) gave an OER≅3.2 at SF = 10/sup -2/. Below 6 Gy air dose (>0.2 SF) OER was reduced, but was still ≅ 2.4 at 2 Gy. The linear quadratic function gave an OER for a ≅ 1.5 (the limiting low-dose OER) and √β≅3.2

  13. Monochromatic x-rays for low-dose digital mammography: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Kwon, Young Man; Choi, Byoung-Jung; Son, Hyun Hwa; Ryu, Cheol Woo; Chon, Kwon Su; Park, Seong Hoon; Juhng, Sun Kwan

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of using monochromatic x-ray imaging generated from an x-ray tube and a multilayer reflector for digital mammography with a low radiation dose was examined. A multilayer mirror was designed to select the x-ray peak with an energy of 21.5 keV generated from an x-ray tube with a tungsten target and was fabricated by the ion-beam sputtering deposition system. Monochromatic x-ray images were obtained from an experimental digital mammography setup with a scanning stage. The performance of the system was evaluated using a breast phantom, a spectrometer, and a radiation dosimeter. We measured the contrast-to-noise ratio and performed the 10% modulation function test to determine image quality and resolution. The monochromatic beam from the multilayer reflector had a full-width-at-half-maximum of 0.9 keV at 21.5 keV, and the reflectivity was 0.70, which was 90% of the designed value. The polychromatic and monochromatic x-rays showed radiation doses of 0.497 and 0.0415 mGy, respectively. The monochromatic x-ray image shows fibers, calcifications, and masses more clearly than the polychromatic x-ray images do. The image contrast of the monochromatic x-rays was 1.85 times higher than that of the polychromatic x-rays. The experimental mammography setup had a spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm with both x-rays. Monochromatic x-rays generated using a multilayer mirror may be a useful diagnostic tool for breast examination by providing high contrast imaging with a low radiation dose.

  14. Physics of x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akutagawa, W.M.; Huth, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    Sections are included on theoretical limits of x-ray computed tomography and the relationship of these limits to human organ imaging and specific disease diagnosis; potential of x-ray computed tomography in detection of small calcified particles in early breast cancer detection; early lung cancer measurement and detection; advanced materials for ionizing radiation detection; positron system with circular ring transaxial tomographic camera; contrast mechanism of transmission scanner and algorithms; and status of design on a 200 keV scanning proton microprobe

  15. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  16. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-01-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 μm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10 5 electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 μm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at ∼0.44 μC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to structured CsI:Tl can

  17. Biochemical and molecular study of genetic stability in tomatoes plants rom seeds treated with low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R; Gonzalez, LM; Chavez, Licet; Camejo, Yanelis; Gonzalez, Maria C; Fernandez, Arais

    2008-01-01

    For the extensive agricultural exploitation of vegetable radio stimulation, it is indispensable to study the genetic stability of treated varieties, having in mind X ray potentialities of inducing not only physiological but genetic changes as well. Therefore, biochemical and molecular markers were employed in tomato plants derived from irradiated seeds at low doses of X rays. For the biochemical analysis, peroxidases, polyphenoloxidases and dismutase superoxide isoenzymes were determined whereas the Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used for the molecular analysis. When comparing the electrophoretic patterns from the control and irradiated treatments applied to the three enzymatic systems, there were not appreciable variations on the number of bands and their intensities, indicating the little variability induced in these systems by the low X ray doses. Also, from the molecular viewpoint, electrophoretic patterns showed a clear amplification of DNA by generating a total of 155 bands in all varieties studied. This molecular marker showed a high monomorphism independently of the treatments applied, with values ranging between 86 and 97 %, indicating that irradiation at low doses did not induce an important genetic variability and confirming its possible practical usefulness for stimulating some physiological processes without causing. (Author)

  18. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice modulates oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Zakaria, Ainul Mardhiyah; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure.

  19. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Michael W.M.; Dearnley, Megan K.; Riessen, Grant A. van; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Tilley, Leann

    2014-01-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging

  20. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W.M., E-mail: michael.jones@latrobe.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Dearnley, Megan K. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Riessen, Grant A. van [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Abbey, Brian [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Putkunz, Corey T. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Junker, Mark D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Vine, David J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Centre for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nugent, Keith A. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Tilley, Leann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging.

  1. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnav R. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s. The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1 and dynamic (group 2 modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3, digital intraoral radiography (group 4, and CBCT scan (group 5 using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α=0.01 in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future.

  2. Chromosome aberrations induced by low doses of X-rays in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemba-Zoltowska, B.; Bocian, E.; Rosiek, O.; Sablinski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Curves derived from the dose-response data for the yield of aberrations in human lymphocytes can be represented by a quadratic equation at all but low dose ranges. A calibration curve has therefore been determined at a low dose range of X-radiation (11.5 to 57.5 rad). The frequencies of dicentrics plus centric rings, and of acentrics were better fitted by linear dose-response models than quadratic. The linearity of the relationship indicated that asymmetrical chromosome exchanges at low doses of radiation are produced predominantly by a single track mechanism. A dose-response curve for dicentrics plus centric rings (5 to 60 rad) has also been derived by pooling published data with the results of this study. This calibration curve is relevant to cytogenetic dosimetry in radiological protection. (UK)

  3. The interaction of platinum complexes with low doses of X-rays in hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skov, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is not clear why electron affinic compounds (O2, nitroimidazoles) should be more effective sensitizers at high doses (modify double events, 6, 16) while platinum complexes interact to a greater extent at low doses (modification of single-events). The possibility that crosslinks are involved requires further consideration. While DNA intrastrand crosslinks do not appear essential, future low dose experiments are planned to determine the role of interstrand and DNA-protein crosslinks in modifying response at clinical doses. (author). 31 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Single cell low dose studies of bystander cell killing with targeted ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettino, G.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Michael, B.D.; Wu, L.; Held, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Bystander responses have attracted considerable interest in the recent years and several investigations have reported a binary behavior with the effect triggered by very small doses and immediately reaching a plateau. The Ultrasoft X-ray Microprobe in operation at the GCI is a facility designed to precisely assess the biological response of individual cells in vitro irradiated with a sub-micron size X-ray beam . Although recent improvements have upgrade the facility with AlK and TiK X-rays, most of the bystander studies have been performed using CK X-rays of 278 eV. The high sensitivity and the accurate irradiation and revisiting of the individual samples allowed us to investigate specific characteristics of the bystander phenomenon. In particular, evidences of a dose dependency of cell killing by bystander effect have been found at doses below 0.2 Gy where no differences is observed between all cell and single cell irradiation. Recent improvements have also allowed us to individually identify the phase of the cell cycle of all samples exposed. Although the G2-S phase have been found the most sensitive in responding to the bystander signal (a factor of 1.3), cells in the G1 phase also respond significantly while the phase of the irradiated cell doesn't seem to play a critical role. The time scale of the bystander effect has also been investigated by irradiating the same sample(s) twice with a few hours gap between exposures. Results indicate that the bystander signal is transmitted within a few minutes from the irradiation as replacing the medium immediately after irradiation does not influence the response, and it doesn't depend on the number of cells irradiated (up to 5). However, after a resting time of a few hours (3 h), the system seems to reset itself and a second irradiation has been shown to trigger a further bystander effect. Finally, by considering the total amount of energy deposited in to the sample population as critical parameter (instead

  5. Effect of low doses of X-rays on grain and straw yield of Setaria italica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fendrik, I.

    1976-01-01

    Dry or pre-soaked seeds were irradiated with 250-1,500 R/h of X-rays at a dose rate of 1,000 R/h and sown into pots. Till harvest normal cultural practices were employed. A stimulation of grain and straw yield was only obtained by irradiation of dry seeds. Irradiation of pre-soaked seeds was ineffective or somewhat harmful. The absence of any effects in post-soaked seeds indicated that early hydration of seeds after irradiation results in a stabilization of the damage. (MG) [de

  6. Induction of somatic mutations by low-dose X-rays: the challenge in recognizing radiation-induced events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Haruki; Shiraishi, Kumiko; Ohkawa, Saori; Sakamoto, Yuki; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya; Tachibana, Akira; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-19

    It is difficult to distinguish radiation-induced events from spontaneous events during induction of stochastic effects, especially in the case of low-dose or low-dose-rate exposures. By using a hypersensitive system for detecting somatic mutations at the HPRT1 locus, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by low-dose X-rays. The mutant frequencies induced by doses of >0.15 Gy were statistically significant when compared with the spontaneous frequency, and a clear dose dependency was also observed for mutant frequencies at doses of >0.15 Gy. In contrast, mutant frequencies at doses of 0.2 Gy. Our observations suggest that there could be a critical dose for mutation induction at between 0.1 Gy and 0.2 Gy, where mutagenic events are induced by multiple DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These observations also suggest that low-dose radiation delivered at doses of <0.1 Gy may not result in DSB-induced mutations but may enhance spontaneous mutagenesis events. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Inhibitory effects of prior low-dose X-ray irradiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in acatalasemic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Wang, Da-Hong; Mori, Shuji; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kira, Shohei; Nomura, Takaharu

    2004-01-01

    The catalase activities in blood and organs of the acatalasemic (C3H/AnLCs b Cs b ) mouse of C3H strain are lower than those of the normal (C3H/AnLCs a Cs a ) mouse. We examined the effects of prior low-dose (0.5 Gy) X-ray irradiation, which reduced the oxidative damage under carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in the acatalasemic or normal mice. The acatalasemic mice showed a significantly lower catalase activity and a significantly higher glutathione peroxidase activity compared with those in the normal mice. Moreover, low-dose irradiation increased the catalase activity in the acatalasemic mouse liver to a level similar to that of the normal mouse liver. Pathological examinations and analyses of blood glutamic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyruvic transaminase activity and lipid peroxide levels showed that carbon tetrachloride induced hepatopathy was inhibited by low-dose irradiation. These findings may indicate that the free radical reaction induced by the lack of catalase and the administration of carbon tetrachloride is more properly neutralized by high glutathione peroxidase activity and low-dose irradiation in the acatalasemic mouse liver. (author)

  8. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  9. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  10. Adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis selectively induced by low dose X-ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Dong Lihua; Liu Yang; Lv Zhe; Liu Shuchun; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The adaptive response of spermatogenic cell apoptosis induced by whole-body X-ray irradiation at low doses was studied in mice. Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with an inductive dose (D1:75 mGy) and/or a challenging dose (D2:1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 Gy). Different kinds of spermatogenic cells were separated using density gradient centrifugation and their apoptotic percentages were analysed using flow cytometry (FCM). Results: When the mice were irradiated with D1 6 h before irradiation with D2, the apoptotic percentages of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes declined rapidly as compared with those in the groups irradiated with D2 only, and those of spermatids and spermatozoa showed no significant changes. When the interval times between D1 and D2 was 3, 6, 12 or 24 h, the apoptotic percentages in spermatogonia and spermatocytes reduced early, significantly and continued for a longer duration after smaller D2(1.0 and 2.0 Gy) irradiation, while the apoptotic percentages did not change after larger D2(3.0 Gy) irradiation. Conclusion: The adaptive response of apoptosis in spermatogonia and spermatocytes could be selectively induced by low dose X-ray irradiation. The adaptive response could be closely related to the D2 dose and interval time between D1 and D2

  11. Cytogenetic adaptive response of cultured fish cells to low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Etoh, Hisami; Rienkjkarn, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptive response was examining chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus in cultured fish cells, ULF-23 (mudminnow) and CAF-31 (gold fish). When cultured fish cells were first irradiated with small doses of X-rays, they became less sensitive to subsequent exposures to high doses. The effective adaptive dose was 4.8 cGy-9.5 cGy. Adaptive doses given cells in the G1 phase were more effective than when given in the S phase. The adaptive response was maximal at 5 hours and disappeared at 10 hours after the adaptive dose. The expression of the response was inhibited by treatment with 3-aminobenzamide, as reported for mammalian cells, and with arabinofuranoside cytosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. Caffeine, an inhibitor of post-replicational repair, had no effect on the response. (author)

  12. Cytogenetic adaptive response of cultured fish cells to low doses of X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Etoh, Hisami (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Rienkjkarn, M.

    1992-12-01

    The adaptive response was examining chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus in cultured fish cells, ULF-23 (mudminnow) and CAF-31 (gold fish). When cultured fish cells were first irradiated with small doses of X-rays, they became less sensitive to subsequent exposures to high doses. The effective adaptive dose was 4.8 cGy-9.5 cGy. Adaptive doses given cells in the G1 phase were more effective than when given in the S phase. The adaptive response was maximal at 5 hours and disappeared at 10 hours after the adaptive dose. The expression of the response was inhibited by treatment with 3-aminobenzamide, as reported for mammalian cells, and with arabinofuranoside cytosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. Caffeine, an inhibitor of post-replicational repair, had no effect on the response. (author).

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  15. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  16. Poisson–Gaussian Noise Analysis and Estimation for Low-Dose X-ray Images in the NSCT Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Min Seok; Kang, Moon Gi

    2018-01-01

    The noise distribution of images obtained by X-ray sensors in low-dosage situations can be analyzed using the Poisson and Gaussian mixture model. Multiscale conversion is one of the most popular noise reduction methods used in recent years. Estimation of the noise distribution of each subband in the multiscale domain is the most important factor in performing noise reduction, with non-subsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) representing an effective method for scale and direction decomposition. In this study, we use artificially generated noise to analyze and estimate the Poisson–Gaussian noise of low-dose X-ray images in the NSCT domain. The noise distribution of the subband coefficients is analyzed using the noiseless low-band coefficients and the variance of the noisy subband coefficients. The noise-after-transform also follows a Poisson–Gaussian distribution, and the relationship between the noise parameters of the subband and the full-band image is identified. We then analyze noise of actual images to validate the theoretical analysis. Comparison of the proposed noise estimation method with an existing noise reduction method confirms that the proposed method outperforms traditional methods. PMID:29596335

  17. Poisson-Gaussian Noise Analysis and Estimation for Low-Dose X-ray Images in the NSCT Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Min Seok; Kang, Moon Gi

    2018-03-29

    The noise distribution of images obtained by X-ray sensors in low-dosage situations can be analyzed using the Poisson and Gaussian mixture model. Multiscale conversion is one of the most popular noise reduction methods used in recent years. Estimation of the noise distribution of each subband in the multiscale domain is the most important factor in performing noise reduction, with non-subsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) representing an effective method for scale and direction decomposition. In this study, we use artificially generated noise to analyze and estimate the Poisson-Gaussian noise of low-dose X-ray images in the NSCT domain. The noise distribution of the subband coefficients is analyzed using the noiseless low-band coefficients and the variance of the noisy subband coefficients. The noise-after-transform also follows a Poisson-Gaussian distribution, and the relationship between the noise parameters of the subband and the full-band image is identified. We then analyze noise of actual images to validate the theoretical analysis. Comparison of the proposed noise estimation method with an existing noise reduction method confirms that the proposed method outperforms traditional methods.

  18. Computer radiography-X-ray with vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waitiki, C.

    2006-01-01

    Computer radiography describes an entire process of creating a digital image including acquiring, processing, presenting and managing the image data. the cassettes are special in that they use an imaging plate instead of films. the imaging plate is coated with storage phosphors which captures x-ray as they pass through the patient. the imaging plate is read with a bar code reader and the imaging plate number recorded in the computer. The cassette is then loaded in the reader unit where it is read using infra-red light which excites the particles on the plate which in turn illuminates and picked by photo-sensors which converts the signal into digital pulses. the pulses then run through a board which converts it into an image which is then displayed on the control console. The plate then runs through the erasure section where it is exposed to yellow light, which erases the plate. The IP is then put back in the cassette and locked and can be reused for the next episode

  19. A feasibility study for image guided radiotherapy using low dose, high speed, cone beam X-ray volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Czajka, Jadwiga; Moore, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Image Guidance of patient set-up for radiotherapy can be achieved by acquiring X-ray volumetric images (XVI) with Elekta Synergy and registering these to the planning CT scan. This enables full 3D registration of structures from similar 3D imaging modalities and offers superior image quality, rotational set-up information and a large field of view. This study uses the head section of the Rando phantom to demonstrate a new paradigm of faster, lower dose XVI that still allows registration to high precision. Materials and methods: One high exposure XVI scan and one low exposure XVI scan were performed with a Rando Head Phantom. The second scan was used to simulate ultra low dose, fast acquisition, full and half scans by discarding a large number of projections before reconstruction. Dose measurements were performed using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and an ion chamber. The reconstructed XVI scans were automatically registered with a helical CT scan of the Rando Head using the volumetric, grey-level, cross-correlation algorithm implemented in the Syntegra software package (Philips Medical Systems). Reproducibility of the registration process was investigated. Results: In both XVI scans the body surface, bone-tissue and tissue air interfaces were clearly visible. Although the subjective image quality of the low dose cone beam scan was reduced, registration of both cone beam scans with the planning CT scan agreed within 0.1 mm and 0.1 deg. Dose to the patient was reduced from 28 mGy to less than 1 mGy and the equivalent scan speed reduced to one minute or less. Conclusions: Automatic 3D registration of high speed, ultra low dose XVI scans with the planning CT scan can be used for precision 3D patient set-up verification/image guidance on a daily basis with out loss of accuracy when compared to higher dose XVI scans

  20. Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography based on x-ray absorption dosage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshuai; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Lu, Hongbing

    2018-02-01

    With the advances of x-ray excitable nanophosphors, x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising hybrid imaging modality. In particular, a cone-beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) system has demonstrated its potential in in vivo imaging with the advantage of fast imaging speed over other XLCT systems. Currently, the imaging models of most XLCT systems assume that nanophosphors emit light based on the intensity distribution of x-ray within the object, not completely reflecting the nature of the x-ray excitation process. To improve the imaging quality of CB-XLCT, an imaging model that adopts an excitation model of nanophosphors based on x-ray absorption dosage is proposed in this study. To solve the ill-posed inverse problem, a reconstruction algorithm that combines the adaptive Tikhonov regularization method with the imaging model is implemented for CB-XLCT reconstruction. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments indicate that compared with the traditional forward model based on x-ray intensity, the proposed dose-based model could improve the image quality of CB-XLCT significantly in terms of target shape, localization accuracy, and image contrast. In addition, the proposed model behaves better in distinguishing closer targets, demonstrating its advantage in improving spatial resolution.

  1. Adrenergic pathways in dopamine modulation of K+ transport in cortex slices after low dose X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikova, I.A.; Dvoretsky, A.I.

    1997-01-01

    Using the method of surviving brain cortex slices it has been shown that prolonged whole body acute or chronic 25 cGy X-irradiation (1 cGy/day at dose rate of 2.22 mGy/min) essentially modified dopamine (DA) modulating influence upon Na, K-pump in nervous tissue. Obtained results pointed to that normally DA had the defined biphasic effect upon active K + transport with lower level activation (by 24.0 %) and higher level inhibition (by 42.1 %). The patterns of the Na,K-pump reaction to DA was not changed after irradiation, but percentage of the total DA suppression was increased by 15.1 % in average after single X-ray exposure and by 34.5 % after chronic one. The decisive role of β-adrenergic mechanisms in realization of postirradiation interaction between systems of catecholamine and active K + transfer across neuronal membrane has been determined. Experimental data obtained with the use of 10 μM phentolamine and 10 μM propranolol, respectively α- and β-adrenergic antagonists, supported that metabolic DA effect was mediated via α-AR normally, and via β-AR after low dose-rate irradiation. (authors)

  2. Three-dimensional measurements of the lower extremity in children and adolescents using a low-dose biplanar X-ray device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheno, Ramon; Nectoux, Eric; Herbaux, Bernard; Baldisserotto, Matteo; Glock, Luiz; Cotten, Anne; Boutry, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the lower extremity using a biplanar low-dose X-ray device in children and adolescents. Firstly, 3D measurements of eight dried bones were analysed by a biplanar low-dose X-ray device (LDX) using stereoscopic software and compared with 3D computed tomography (CT). Secondly, 47 lower limbs of children and adolescents were studied using LDX two-dimensional (2D) and 3D measurements. Both parts were evaluated for femoral and tibial lengths and mechanical angles, frontal and lateral knee angulations, and the femoral neck-shaft angle. The 3D specimen comparison between LDX and CT measurements showed no significant differences: femoral length (P = 0.069), tibial length (P = 0.059), femoral mechanical angle (P = 0.475), tibial mechanical angle (P = 0.067), frontal knee angulation (P = 0.198), lateral knee angulation (P = 0.646) and femoral neck-shaft angle (P = 0.068). The comparison between LDX 2D and 3D measurements showed significant differences in tibial length (P = 0.003), femoral mechanical angle (P < 0.001) and femoral neck-shaft angle (P = 0.001); other parameters were unremarkable. The 3D LDX system presented reliable measurements compared with 3D CT. Differences between LDX 2D and 3D measurements were noted in the femoral mechanical angle, femoral neck-shaft angle and tibial length. Moderate to good interobserver agreement for the 3D LDX measurements were found. (orig.)

  3. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray; Dosimetria citogenetica: curva dosis-respuesta para bajas dosis de rayos-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon, E-mail: venovall.15@hotmail.com, E-mail: wrpineda@misena.edu.co, E-mail: vmpabonr@udistrital.edu.co [Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas (UD), Bogota (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear; Ureana, Cecilia Crane, E-mail: cecicrane@yahoo.com [Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS), Bogota (Colombia). Laboratorio de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers.

  4. Systematic Errors in Dimensional X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that it is possible to compensate them. In dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT), many physical quantities influence the final result. However, it is important to know which factors in CT measurements potentially lead to systematic errors. In this talk, typical error sources in dimensional X-ray CT are discussed...

  5. Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components and its application to phase analysis and hydration performance of OPC cement. Rohan Jadhav N C Debnath. Volume 34 Issue 5 August 2011 pp 1137- ... Keywords. Portland cement; X-ray diffraction; crystal structure; characterization; Rietveld method.

  6. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  7. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevicins, Luiza; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria de; Almeida da Silva, Ana Paula; Ventura dos Passos, Flavia; Santos Ferreira, Evelin dos; Menks Ribeiro, Maria Cecilia; G David, Mariano; J Pires, Evandro; Ferreira-Machado, Samara Cristina; Vassetzky, Yegor

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells

  8. Polarized X-ray excitation for scatter reduction in X-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses X-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized X-rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized X-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent X-rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered X-rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic X-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an X-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  9. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  10. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  11. Genome-wide screen of DNA methylation changes induced by low dose X-ray radiation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzi Wang

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in non-targeted effects of radiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate global hypomethylation and promoter hypermethylation of particular genes induced by low dose radiation (LDR. Thirty male BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups: control, acutely exposed (0.5 Gy X-rays, and chronic exposure for 10 days (0.05Gy/d×10d. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and MeDIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were used to study methylation profiles. DNMT1 and MBD2 expression was determined by qPCR and western blot assays. Methylation and expression of Rad23b and Ddit3 were determined by bisulfate sequencing primers (BSP and qPCR, respectively. The results show that LDR induced genomic hypomethylation in blood 2 h postirraditaion, but was not retained at 1-month. DNMT1 and MBD2 were downregulated in a tissue-specific manner but did not persist. Specific hypermethylation was observed for 811 regions in the group receiving chronic exposure, which covered almost all key biological processes as indicated by GO and KEGG pathway analysis. Eight hypermethylated genes (Rad23b, Tdg, Ccnd1, Ddit3, Llgl1, Rasl11a, Tbx2, Scl6a15 were verified by MeDIP-qPCR. Among them, Rad23b and Ddit3 gene displayed tissue-specific methylation and downregulation, which persisted for 1-month postirradiation. Thus, LDR induced global hypomethylation and tissue-specific promoter hypermethylation of particular genes. Promoter hypermethylation, rather than global hypomethylation, was relatively stable. Dysregulation of methylation might be correlated with down-regulation of DNMT1 and MBD2, but much better understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process will require further study.

  12. X-ray computer tomography in geotechnics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blaheta, Radim; Kohut, Roman; Kolcun, Alexej; Souček, Kamil; Staš, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2011), s. 12-12 ISSN 1213-3825. [Defektoskopie 2011 - Mezinárodní konference /41./. 09.07.2011-11.11.2011, Ostrava] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/1830 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03/0082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Source of funding: O - operačné programy Keywords : X-ray CT * geocomposite * FEM * homogenization Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools

  13. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Jayasri

    1996-01-01

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  14. X-ray Computed Tomography of Ultralightweight Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, John

    2001-01-01

    .... To date, the imaging capabilities of x-ray computed tomography have not been generally employed to nondestructively examine the internal structure of the products formed by these various processes...

  15. X-ray Computed Tomography Image Quality Indicator (IQI) Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase one of the program is to identify suitable x-ray Computed Tomography (CT) Image Quality Indicator (IQI) design(s) that can be used to adequately capture CT...

  16. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B; Grossbach, A; Gruber-Rouh, T; Zangos, S; Vogl, Th J; Eichler, K

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26-292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic errors and additional need for CT. Instead, a single abdominal low-dose

  17. The relative biological effectiveness of 60Co γ-rays, 55 kVp X-rays, 250 kVp X-rays, and 11 MeV electrons at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadinger, I.; Palcic, B.

    1992-01-01

    The RBE of selected low-LET radiation modalities (55 kVp X- rays, 250 kVp X-rays, 60 Co γ-rays, and 11 MeV electrons) was investigated for survival of two cell lines (V79 and CHO). Detailed measurements were made in the 0 to 3 Gy dose range using an image cytometry device to accurately determine the number of cells assayed at each dose point. Data were also collected in the high dose range (0 to 10 Gy) using conventional counting and plating techniques. RBE values (#+- #1 SE) varied from 1.0±0.07 (V79 cells) and 1.2± 0.05 (CHO cells) at high doses to 1.3±0.07 (V79) and 1.4±0.1 (CHO) at low doses for 55 kVp X-rays, from 1.1±0.05 (V79) and 1.1±0.04 (CHO) at high doses to 1.1±0.06 (V79) and 1.2±0.2 (CHO) at low doses for 250 kVp X-rays, and from 1.1±0.08 (V79) and 1.0±0.04 (CHO) at high doses to 1.0±0.06 (V79) and 0.9±0.1 (CHO) at low doses for 11 MeV electrons. Only the low and high dose RBEs for 55 kVp X-rays relative to 60 Co γ-rays were significantly different. (author)

  18. Very low dose and dose-rate X-ray induced adaptive response in human lymphocytes at various cell cycle stages against bleomycin induced chromatid aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein Mozdarani; Moghadam, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To study the adaptive response induced by very low doses of X-rays at very low dose rate in human lymphocytes at different cell cycle stages followed by a challenge dose of bleomycin sulphate at G2 phase. Materials and Methods: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes before (G0) and after PHA stimulation (G1 and G2) were exposed to 1 and 5 cGy X-rays generated by a fluoroscopy unit with a dose rate of 5.56 mGy/min and challenged with 5 μg/ml bleomycin sulphate (BLM) 48 hours after culture initiation. Mitotic cells were arrested at metaphase by addition of colcemid in cultures 1.5 h before harvesting. Harvesting and slide preparation was performed using standard method. 100 well spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromatid type aberrations for each sample. Results: Results obtained indicate that there is a linear relationship between the dose of BLM and chromatid aberrations below 5 μg/ml (R=0.93, p<0.0001). The results also show that pretreatment of lymphocytes with low dose X-rays at G0, G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle significantly reduced the sensitivity of lymphocytes to the clastogenic effects of BLM in G2. Much lower frequencies of chromatid aberrations were observed in X-ray irradiated lymphocytes following BLM treatment (p<0.05). The magnitudes of adaptation induced at different phases of the cell cycle were not significantly different. Furthermore, there was no a significant difference in the magnitude of adaptive response induced by either 1 or 5 cGy X-rays. Conclusion: These observations might indicate that resistance of pre-exposure of lymphocytes to very low doses of X-rays protects them from clastogenic effects of BLM. This effect might be due to initial DNA damage induced in these cells leading to provocation of an active DNA repair mechanism independent of cell cycle stage.

  19. X-ray spectrometer instrumentation with a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaarup, P.; Vogeley, E.

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of an instrumentation for control of an X-ray spectrometer used in solid state physics experiments. The instrumentation includes a personal computer (PC) and a European Computer Bus (ECB) interface system. Details are given of the operating software. (author)

  20. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, B.; Grossbach, A.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, Th. J.; Eichler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Results: Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26–292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). Conclusion: X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic

  1. Computer assisted analysis of medical x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ewert

    1996-01-01

    X-rays were originally used to expose film. The early computers did not have enough capacity to handle images with useful resolution. The rapid development of computer technology over the last few decades has, however, led to the introduction of computers into radiology. In this overview paper, the various possible roles of computers in radiology are examined. The state of the art is briefly presented, and some predictions about the future are made.

  2. Quantitative x-ray dark-field computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, M; Pfeiffer, F; Bunk, O; Donath, T; David, C; Feidenhans'l, R

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles of x-ray image formation in radiology have remained essentially unchanged since Roentgen first discovered x-rays over a hundred years ago. The conventional approach relies on x-ray attenuation as the sole source of contrast and draws exclusively on ray or geometrical optics to describe and interpret image formation. Phase-contrast or coherent scatter imaging techniques, which can be understood using wave optics rather than ray optics, offer ways to augment or complement the conventional approach by incorporating the wave-optical interaction of x-rays with the specimen. With a recently developed approach based on x-ray optical gratings, advanced phase-contrast and dark-field scatter imaging modalities are now in reach for routine medical imaging and non-destructive testing applications. To quantitatively assess the new potential of particularly the grating-based dark-field imaging modality, we here introduce a mathematical formalism together with a material-dependent parameter, the so-called linear diffusion coefficient and show that this description can yield quantitative dark-field computed tomography (QDFCT) images of experimental test phantoms.

  3. X-ray-induced acoustic computed tomography of concrete infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Ramseyer, Chris; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2018-02-01

    X-ray-induced Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT) takes advantage of both X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality by making use of the thermoacoustic effect. In XACT, X-ray absorption by defects and other structures in concrete create thermally induced pressure jumps that launch ultrasonic waves, which are then received by acoustic detectors to form images. In this research, XACT imaging was used to non-destructively test and identify defects in concrete. For concrete structures, we conclude that XACT imaging allows multiscale imaging at depths ranging from centimeters to meters, with spatial resolutions from sub-millimeter to centimeters. XACT imaging also holds promise for single-side testing of concrete infrastructure and provides an optimal solution for nondestructive inspection of existing bridges, pavement, nuclear power plants, and other concrete infrastructure.

  4. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.; Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  5. Introduction to the foundations of X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, G.T.

    1979-01-01

    The author gives a brief survey of a small fraction of the existing literature on the foundations of X-ray computed tomography. While the selection is biased by the interests of the author, taken in conjunction with the other articles in this book, it should provide the means for getting acquainted with this very active field of applicable research. (Auth.)

  6. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Paper Dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging aims at reconstructing image sequences where the dynamic nature of the living human body is of primary interest. Main concerned applications are image-guided interventional procedures, functional studies and cardiac imaging. The introduction of ultra-fast rotating gantries along with multi-row detectors and in near future area detectors allows a huge progress toward the imaging of moving organs with low-contrast resolution. This paper gives an overview of the different concepts used in dynamic CT. A new reconstruction algorithm based on a voxel-specific dynamic evolution compensation is also presented. It provides four-dimensional image sequences with accurate spatio-temporal information, where each frame is reconstructed using a long-scan acquisition mode on several half-turns. In the same time, this technique permits to reduce the dose delivered per rotation while keeping the same signal to noise ratio for every frame using an adaptive motion-compensated temporal averaging. Results are illustrated on simulated data. (authors)

  7. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended to...

  8. Hemo rheological Changes Associated with Occupational Exposure to Low Doses Radiation from X-Ray Inspection Machines Influenced by Smoking Habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.A.M.; El-khatib, A.M.; Naim, M.A.; Ali, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of low dose x-ray radiation on some rheological parameters of blood were investigated in 30 male x-ray workers and 20 healthy volunteers not occupationally exposed to any type of radiation and match in age. Each group was classified according to smoking habits. The analysis of the flow curve of all subjects was performed by applying power-law model and Bingham plastic model. The results indicated elevates in whole blood viscosity and yield stress in smoker subjects as compared with non-smoker subjects and also showed that the elevation of blood viscosity of smoker radiation workers are related to work duration in the radiation field.We have observed that cigarette smoking increases the hazardous effects of radiation through the increase of blood viscosity, which excess the risk of cardiovascular disease. So it is recommended to consider blood viscosity measurements to be included in routine medical investigation for occupational workers and rheological

  9. Effect of seed treatment using low doses of X-rays in peppers plants (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Fonseca, Alexander; Chavez Suarez, Licet; Ramirez Fernandez, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The influence of seed treatment with X-rays radiation on the growth and yield of peppers plants of the California Wonder variety was studied. The seeds were irradiated with X- rays irradiation source of low potency (11.47 Gy/min), with doses of 5, 10, 20 y 30 Gy, using untreated seeds as controls. Plant height (mm), root length (mm), stem diameter (mm), polar average diameter (mm) ecuatorial mean diameter (mm), mean fruit mass (g) and yield per plant (kg.plant''1 ) were evaluated. The results showed a significant improvement (p≤ 0.001) in the indicators of plants height (15%), root length (12%), stem diameter (7%), equatorial mean diameter (47%), mean fruit mass (16%) and yield per plant (107%), compared to control

  10. Effect of low dose of X rays about the tolerance to the salinity and the agricultural yield in cultivations of economic importance for Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Fernandez, Ramiro; Gonzalez Nunnez, Luis Manuel; Garcia Rodriguez, Blanca; Licea Castro, Luis; Porras Leon, Elia

    1999-01-01

    The effect of low dose of X rays on rice and lettuce plant salt tolerance and on the agricultural yield in plants of cucumber and tomato was studied. The results showed a meaningful increase in the tolerance of the plants to salt stress in both crops for some of the applied dose and were determined the better doses for the increment of the crop yield of the studied varieties. Also was carried out an analysis of regression that showed a high correlation between the variables of the growth and the agricultural yield and on this base it is discussed the possibility of selecting the stimulant dose range during the early plants growth stages

  11. Quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography by the balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    A quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) system utilizing balanced filters has recently been developed for acquiring quantitative CT images. This system consisted of basic components such as a conventional x-ray generator for radiography, a stage for mounting and rotating objects, and an x-ray line sensor camera. Metallic sheets of Er and Yb were used as the balanced filters for obtaining quasimonochromatic incident x rays that include the characteristic lines of the W Kα doublet from a tungsten target. The mean energy and energy width of the quasimonochromatic x rays were determined to be 59.0 and 1.9 keV, respectively, from x-ray spectroscopic measurements using a high-purity Ge detector. The usefulness of the present x-ray CT system was demonstrated by obtaining spatial distributions of the linear attenuation coefficients of three selected samples--a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom, a 3.5 cm diameter aluminum rod, and a human head phantom. The results clearly indicate that this apparatus is surprisingly effective for estimating the distribution of the linear attenuation coefficients without any correction of the beam-hardening effect. Thus, implementing the balanced filter method on an x-ray CT scanner has promise in producing highly quantitative CT images

  12. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10–200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1–5 mGy X-rays. PMID:25209403

  13. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-11-06

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10-200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1-5 mGy X-rays.

  14. SU-F-I-12: Region-Specific Dictionary Learning for Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q; Han, H; Xing, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dictionary learning based method has attracted more and more attentions in low-dose CT due to the superior performance on suppressing noise and preserving structural details. Considering the structures and noise vary from region to region in one imaging object, we propose a region-specific dictionary learning method to improve the low-dose CT reconstruction. Methods: A set of normal-dose images was used for dictionary learning. Segmentations were performed on these images, so that the training patch sets corresponding to different regions can be extracted out. After that, region-specific dictionaries were learned from these training sets. For the low-dose CT reconstruction, a conventional reconstruction, such as filtered back-projection (FBP), was performed firstly, and then segmentation was followed to segment the image into different regions. Sparsity constraints of each region based on its dictionary were used as regularization terms. The regularization parameters were selected adaptively according to different regions. A low-dose human thorax dataset was used to evaluate the proposed method. The single dictionary based method was performed for comparison. Results: Since the lung region is very different from the other part of thorax, two dictionaries corresponding to lung region and the rest part of thorax respectively were learned to better express the structural details and avoid artifacts. With only one dictionary some artifact appeared in the body region caused by the spot atoms corresponding to the structures in the lung region. And also some structure in the lung regions cannot be recovered well by only one dictionary. The quantitative indices of the result by the proposed method were also improved a little compared to the single dictionary based method. Conclusion: Region-specific dictionary can make the dictionary more adaptive to different region characteristics, which is much desirable for enhancing the performance of dictionary learning

  15. SU-F-I-12: Region-Specific Dictionary Learning for Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q; Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dictionary learning based method has attracted more and more attentions in low-dose CT due to the superior performance on suppressing noise and preserving structural details. Considering the structures and noise vary from region to region in one imaging object, we propose a region-specific dictionary learning method to improve the low-dose CT reconstruction. Methods: A set of normal-dose images was used for dictionary learning. Segmentations were performed on these images, so that the training patch sets corresponding to different regions can be extracted out. After that, region-specific dictionaries were learned from these training sets. For the low-dose CT reconstruction, a conventional reconstruction, such as filtered back-projection (FBP), was performed firstly, and then segmentation was followed to segment the image into different regions. Sparsity constraints of each region based on its dictionary were used as regularization terms. The regularization parameters were selected adaptively according to different regions. A low-dose human thorax dataset was used to evaluate the proposed method. The single dictionary based method was performed for comparison. Results: Since the lung region is very different from the other part of thorax, two dictionaries corresponding to lung region and the rest part of thorax respectively were learned to better express the structural details and avoid artifacts. With only one dictionary some artifact appeared in the body region caused by the spot atoms corresponding to the structures in the lung region. And also some structure in the lung regions cannot be recovered well by only one dictionary. The quantitative indices of the result by the proposed method were also improved a little compared to the single dictionary based method. Conclusion: Region-specific dictionary can make the dictionary more adaptive to different region characteristics, which is much desirable for enhancing the performance of dictionary learning

  16. Effects of low-dose irradiation of X-rays on IUdR incorporation into mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misonoh, J.; Ishii, K.; Yoshida, M.; Okumura, Y.; Kodama, S.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that biological responses get smaller when a radiation dose gets lower, and it makes it difficult to detect them with significant differences from background levels. Therefore we know little about biological effects arisen from very low-dose radiation in mammals and mammalian cells. Feinendegen et al. detected a significant reduction of 125 I-UdR uptake in bone marrow cells at doses below 0.01 Gy. Using this extremely sensitive biological response, they also indicated that cells of mice irradiated twice with an interval of 4 hours did not show any reaction after the second irradiation. This meant that cells became radio-resistant after whole-body irradiation with low-doses. This phenomenon, an acquired radio-resistance after low-dose irradiation, is explained as an adaptive response to radiation , which is recently well documented in cytogenic studies. In order to confirm that whether it is common in the cell renewal systems, IUdR incorporation into mouse spleen and the other tissues were studied after whole-body irradiation. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Analgesia induced by repeated exposure to low dose X-rays in mice, and involvement of the accessory olfactory system in modulation of the radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, Yukihisa; Yamada, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low-dose X-rays on mouse nociceptive behavior were examined using a formalin injected test which rated the amount of time the animals spent licking the injected hind-paw. Male ICR White Swiss mice showed a marked suppression of licking behavior after repeated low-dose X-irradiation (5 cGy/day, 6 consecutive days). The most profound effect was observed on the day 30 after irradiation. The decline of licking behavior, however, was not observed at all following olfactory bulbectomy or vomeronasal tract cut. The analgesic effects could be observed in writhing animals administered acetic-acid intraperitoneally. Moreover, analgesia was totally blocked by the administration of N-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to accessory olfactory bulbs prior to the exposure. The present results indicate that the olfactory system plays an important role in modulation of radiation-induced analgesia, and a possible involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of recognition memory subjected to repeated X-rays. Relatively higher doses (5 cGy x 9 days, 5 cGy x 12 days), however, did not induce such effects, namely, the decline of nociceptive response was limited to the animals irradiated with the smaller dose. (author)

  18. Effect of a low-dose x-ray irradiation on the development and differentiation of the cerebral cortex, (15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Yasushi; Hoshino, Kiyoshi; Hayasaka, Shizuka; Kameyama, Yoshiro

    1981-01-01

    Mice of 17 day's gestation received x-rays of 10 R, 25 R, or 100 R, and those of 13 or 15 day's gestation received 10 R in a single exposure. These irradiated fetuses were examined for the weight of the brain, thickness of the cerebral cortex, density of the cortical cells and branching of the pyramidal cells in the fifth layer of the cortex 12 weeks after birth. Decrease in the thickness of the cortex was observed in the mice which received 100 R at 17 day's gestation. A decrease in the branching index of the pyramidal cells was found in the mice which received 100 R. Although a decreasing tendency of the branching index was also recognized in those which received 10 R at 13 days of gestation, showing no statistically significant difference. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Digital computed radiography in industrial X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Onel, Y.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2001-01-01

    Computed radiography is used for X-ray testing in many industrial applications. There are different systems depending on the application, e.g. fast systems for detection of material inhomogeneities and slower systems with higher local resolution for detection of cracks and fine details, e.g. in highly stressed areas or in welded seams. The method is more dynamic than film methods, and digital image processing is possible during testing [de

  20. Selective brain responses to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray irradiation in males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silasi, Greg; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Besplug, Jill; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Titov, Viktor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2004-01-01

    Radiation exposure is known to have profound effects on the brain, leading to precursor cell dysfunction and debilitating cognitive declines [Nat. Med. 8 (2002) 955]. Although a plethora of data exist on the effects of high radiation doses, the effects of low-dose irradiation, such as ones received during repetitive diagnostic and therapeutic exposures, are still under-investigated [Am. J. Otolaryngol. 23 (2002) 215; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 889; Curr. Opin. Neurol. 16 (2003) 129]. Furthermore, most studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have been performed using a single acute dose, while clinically and environmentally relevant exposures occur predominantly under chronic/repetitive conditions. Here, we have used a mouse model to compare the effects of chronic/repetitive and acute low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure (0.5 Gy) to ionizing radiation on the brain in vivo. We examined the LDR effects on p42/44 MAPK (ERK1/ERK2), CaMKII, and AKT signaling-the interconnected pathways that have been previously shown to be crucial for neuronal survival upon irradiation. We report perturbations in ERK1/2, AKT, and CREB upon acute and chronic/repetitive low-dose exposure in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These studies were paralleled by the analysis of radiation effects on neurogenesis and cellular proliferation. Repetitive exposure had a much more pronounced effect on cellular signaling and neurogenesis than acute exposure. These results suggest that studies of single acute exposures might be limited in terms of their predictive value. We also present the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced signaling in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We show the role of estrogens in brain radiation responses and discuss the implications of the observed changes

  1. Low doses of X-rays induce prolonged and ATM-independent persistence of γH2AX foci in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Pustovalova, Margarita; Grekhova, Anna; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyova, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry Y; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Diagnostic imaging delivering low doses of radiation often accompany human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies. However, effects of low dose radiation on MSCs are poorly characterized. Here we examine patterns of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and phospho-S1981 ATM (pATM) foci formation in human gingiva-derived MSCs exposed to X-rays in time-course and dose-response experiments. Both γH2AX and pATM foci accumulated linearly with dose early after irradiation (5-60 min), with a maximum induction observed at 30-60 min (37 ± 3 and 32 ± 3 foci/cell/Gy for γH2AX and pATM, respectively). The number of γH2AX foci produced by intermediate doses (160 and 250 mGy) significantly decreased (40-60%) between 60 and 240 min post-irradiation, indicating rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, γH2AX foci produced by low doses (20-80 mGy) did not change after 60 min. The number of pATM foci between 60 and 240 min decreased down to control values in a dose-independent manner. Similar kinetics was observed for pATM foci co-localized with γH2AX foci. Collectively, our results suggest differential DNA double-strand break signaling and processing in response to low vs. intermediate doses of X-rays in human MSCs. Furthermore, mechanisms governing the prolonged persistence of γH2AX foci in these cells appear to be ATM-independent.

  2. Effect of continuous irradiation with low dose X-rays on the reproductive complications in male diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Xu Songbai; Li Pengwu; Wang Zhicheng; Lin Chenghe; Gong Shouliang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of 75 mGy irradiation on the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells and antioxidant capacity of serum and testis and hormone levels in male rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Rats were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (STZ) to develop diabetes. The diabetic rats were irradiated with 75 mGy X-rays every other day for 4 weeks. Their survival rate and body weight were recorded 12 weeks after development of diabetes. The apeptosis percentage of germ cells was measured with flow cytometry and TUNEL method. The changes of anti-oxidation and gonadal hormone levels in serum and testis were measured with kits. Results: After the rats suffered from diabetes for 12 weeks, the survival rate in DM group was 25% (6/24), 100% in normal control group (16116). The survival rate in 75 mGy + DM group (9/16,56.25%) was obviously higher than that in the DM group (χ 2 = 4.00,P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of apaptotic spermatogenic cells in the diabetic rats was significantly larger than those in the normal control and irradiation groups (F = 5.496, P < 0.05). MDA and NO levels in serum and testis of diabetic rats were higher in varying degrees than that in the normal control, while the serum and testis MDA content in the 75 mGy + DM group were lower than those in the DM group especially in the testis (F = 10.644, P < 0.01). 75 mGy X-ray irradiation decreased NO content in the diabetic rats serum significantly (F = 14.379, P < 0.05) and increased NOS activity and TS, FSH level (F = 9.676, 43.194 and 5.282, respectively, P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). Conclusions: LDR could decrease the MDA level and NO content, and increase the antioxidant enzyme activity and TS and FSH levels in testis and serum of diabetic rats. (authors)

  3. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  4. Quantitative analysis by computer controlled X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, T.V.; Angelo, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has become a widely accepted method in the metallurgical field for analysis of both minor and major elements. As encountered in many other analytical techniques, the problem of matrix effect generally known as the interelemental effects is to be dealt with effectively in order to make the analysis accurate. There are several methods by which the effects of matrix on the analyte are minimised or corrected for and the mathematical correction is one among them. In this method the characteristic secondary X-ray intensities are measured from standard samples and correction coefficients. If any, for interelemental effects are evaluated by mathematical calculations. This paper describes attempts to evaluate the correction coefficients for interelemental effects by multiple linear regression programmes using a computer for the quantitative analysis of stainless steel and a nickel base cast alloy. The quantitative results obtained using this method for a standard stainless steel sample are compared with the given certified values. (author)

  5. Shieldings for X-ray radiotherapy facilities calculated by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo S.; Farias, Marcos S.; Gavazza, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for calculation of X-ray shielding in facilities of radiotherapy with help of computer. Even today, in Brazil, the calculation of shielding for X-ray radiotherapy is done based on NCRP-49 recommendation establishing a methodology for calculating required to the elaboration of a project of shielding. With regard to high energies, where is necessary the construction of a labyrinth, the NCRP-49 is not very clear, so that in this field, studies were made resulting in an article that proposes a solution to the problem. It was developed a friendly program in Delphi programming language that, through the manual data entry of a basic design of architecture and some parameters, interprets the geometry and calculates the shields of the walls, ceiling and floor of on X-ray radiation therapy facility. As the final product, this program provides a graphical screen on the computer with all the input data and the calculation of shieldings and the calculation memory. The program can be applied in practical implementation of shielding projects for radiotherapy facilities and can be used in a didactic way compared to NCRP-49.

  6. High Energy Resolution Hyperspectral X-Ray Imaging for Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Saifuddin, Sarene C; Ferreira, Filipa I M; Henthorn, Nicholas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J; Stratmann, Philipp; Veale, Matthew C; Wilson, Matthew D; Cernik, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) is an alternative to conventional X-ray mammography for imaging dense breasts. However, conventional approaches to CEDM require a double exposure of the patient, implying higher dose, and risk of incorrect image registration due to motion artifacts. A novel approach is presented, based on hyperspectral imaging, where a detector combining positional and high-resolution spectral information (in this case based on Cadmium Telluride) is used. This allows simultaneous acquisition of the two images required for CEDM. The approach was tested on a custom breast-equivalent phantom containing iodinated contrast agent (Niopam 150®). Two algorithms were used to obtain images of the contrast agent distribution: K-edge subtraction (KES), providing images of the distribution of the contrast agent with the background structures removed, and a dual-energy (DE) algorithm, providing an iodine-equivalent image and a water-equivalent image. The high energy resolution of the detector allowed the selection of two close-by energies, maximising the signal in KES images, and enhancing the visibility of details with the low surface concentration of contrast agent. DE performed consistently better than KES in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio of the details; moreover, it allowed a correct reconstruction of the surface concentration of the contrast agent in the iodine image. Comparison with CEDM with a conventional detector proved the superior performance of hyperspectral CEDM in terms of the image quality/dose tradeoff.

  7. EFFECT OF POLYPHENOLIC COMPLEX FROM WINE ON RATS ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES ACTIVITY AT X-RAY IRRADIATION LOW DOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. Datsyuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the consumption of natural polyphenolic complex from grape wine in drinking water in the daily dose 2.5 ± 1.1 mg polyphenols/kg body mass of rats during the 10 day before exposure to radiation leads to increased of superoxide dismutase and gluthathione reductase activities in peripheral blood on 24 and 48 hours after full body X-ray irradiation (30 cGy. The of catalase, gluthathione peroxidase activities and the of the reactive thiobarbituric acid substances content in total lysates of peripheral blood within 72 hours after exposure are comparable to those in control rats. Marked decreased of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at 24, 48 and 24 hours, respectively, was observed after exposure to ionizing radiation and increased content of lipid peroxidation products in all above mentioned time points. The decreased of superoxide dismutase and gluthathione peroxidase activities in lysates of rats aorta at 48 hour and increased content of the reactive thiobarbituric acid substances during 72 hours after radiation exposure were observed. The consumption of polyphenolic complex from wine did not change the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in lysates of aorta rats treated with ionizing radiation, whereas gluthathione reductase and gluthathione peroxidase activities was increased during 72 hours after radiation influence. The content of TBA reactive substances was significantly decreased in lysates of aorta rats that were exposed to radiation and polyphenols of grape wine, compared with those of animals that were exposed to radiation alone.

  8. Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Peng; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Wang Cuilan; Li Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro. Methods: The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro. The DCs were divided into 3 groups, group A: DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B: DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture, the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction), and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated. MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells. IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA. Results: After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays, the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t=2.79 and 3.71, P<0.05), but significantly increased in group B (t=3.60 and 3.11, P<0.05). The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t=2.89 and 2.91, P<0.05), but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t=2.91 and 2.82, P<0.05). Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t=4.44 and 6.93, P<0.05), but was increased in group B (t=3.51 and 4.12, P<0.05). Conclusions: The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose (<0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs, but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture. (authors)

  9. Investigation of optimal scanning protocol for X-ray computed tomography polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellakumar, P. [Bangalore Institute of Oncology, 44-45/2, II Cross, RRMR Extension, Bangalore 560 027 (India)], E-mail: psellakumar@rediffmail.com; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E. [School of Science and Humanities, VIT University, Vellore 632 014 (India); Supe, Sanjay S. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Hosur Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)

    2007-11-15

    X-ray computed tomography is one of the potential tool used to evaluate the polymer gel dosimeters in three dimensions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which affect the image noise for X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. A cylindrical water filled phantom was imaged with single slice Siemens Somatom Emotion CT scanner. The imaging parameters like tube voltage, tube current, slice scan time, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were varied independently to study the dependence of noise on each other. Reductions of noise with number of images to be averaged and spatial uniformity of the image were also investigated. Normoxic polymer gel PAGAT was manufactured and irradiated using Siemens Primus linear accelerator. The radiation induced change in CT number was evaluated using X-ray CT scanner. From this study it is clear that image noise is reduced with increase in tube voltage, tube current, slice scan time, slice thickness and also reduced with increasing the number of images averaged. However to reduce the tube load and total scan time, it was concluded that tube voltage of 130 kV, tube current of 200 mA, scan time of 1.5 s, slice thickness of 3 mm for high dose gradient and 5 mm for low dose gradient were optimal scanning protocols for this scanner. Optimum number of images to be averaged was concluded to be 25 for X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. Choice of reconstruction algorithm was also critical. From the study it is also clear that CT number increase with imaging tube voltage and shows the energy dependency of polymer gel dosimeter. Hence for evaluation of polymer gel dosimeters with X-ray CT scanner needs the optimization of scanning protocols to reduce the image noise.

  10. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT.

  11. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  12. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  13. Principles of image reconstruction in X-ray computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwierz, G.; Haerer, W.; Ruehrnschopf, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The presented geometrical interpretation elucidates the convergence behavior of the classical iteration technique in X-ray computer tomography. The filter techniques nowadays used in preference are derived from a concept of linear system theory which excels due to its particular clarity. The one-dimensional form of the filtering is of decisive importance for immediate image reproduction as realized by both Siemens systems, the SIRETOM 2000 head scanner and the SOMATOM whole-body machine, as such unique to date for whole-body machines. The equivalence of discrete and continuous filtering when dealing with frequency-band-limited projections is proved. (orig.) [de

  14. SU-G-IeP3-02: Characteristics of In-Vivo MOSFET Dosimeters for Diagnostic X-Ray Low-Dose Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S; Ali, S; Harper, K; Liang, Q; Serratore, D [Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To correct in-vivo metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters dependence on X-ray energy, dose and dose rate, and temperature in order to measure doses or exposures on several anatomic points of interest undergoing some routine radiographs. Methods: A mobile MOSFET system (BEST Medical) was carefully calibrated with X-ray at kVp of 70, 80, 100, 120, and 138 kVp, phantom temperatures at 0, 21, and 43 oC, and exposure range from 0.01 to 10 R confirmed with Raysafe and RadCal dosimeters. The MOSFETS were placed on the midline bladder or uterus, left pelvic iliac artery, left abdominal above iliac crest, abdominal midline anterior at inferior margin of stomach, and left pectoral of a large and a small body-size cadavers undergoing AP/PA chest and lumber spine radiographs using manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) with and without lead shielding. MOSTFETs and TLD chips were also placed on the stomach, sigmoid, pubic symphysis, left and right pelvic walls of another cadaver for AP pelvic manual or AEC radiography prior to and after a left hip metal implant. Results: Individual MOSFET detectors had various low-dose limits in ranged from 0.03 to 0.08 R, nonlinear response to X-ray energy, and significant temperature effect of 15%. By accumulating 10 manual exposures and 20 AEC exposures, we achieved dose measured accuracy of 6%. There were up to 8 fold increases for AEC exposure of spine and chest X-ray procedure from no shielding to with shielding. For pelvic radiography, exposure to public symphysis was the highest even higher than that of the skin. After hip implant, AEC pelvic radiograph increase exposure by 30 to 200% consistent with results of TLDs. Conclusion: Dependence of energy, temperature and dose limit were accurately corrected. We have found significant exposure for those clinical pr°ocedures and the study provided evidences for developing new clinical procedures.

  15. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Matthias; Frikel, Jürgen; Vogel, Jakob; Eggl, Elena; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz; Demaret, Laurent; Lasser, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method's strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  16. Computer-supported quality control in X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, W.; Klotz, E.

    1989-01-01

    Quality control of X-ray facilities in radiological departments of large hospitals is possible only if the instrumentation used for measurements is interfaced to a computer. The central computer helps to organize the measurements as well as analyse and record the results. It can also be connected to a densitometer and camera for evaluating radiographs of test devices. Other quality control tests are supported by a mobile station with equipment for non-invasive dosimetry measurements. Experience with a computer-supported system in quality control of film and film processing is described and the evaluation methods of ANSI and the German industrial standard DIN are compared. The disadvantage of these methods is the exclusion of film quality parameters, which can make processing control almost worthless. (author)

  17. Recent observations with phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tu, Jinhong; Hirano, Keiichi

    1999-09-01

    Recent development in phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography using an X-ray interferometer is reported. To observe larger samples than is possible with our previous X-ray interferometer, a large monolithic X-ray interferometer and a separated-type X-ray interferometer were studied. At the present time, 2.5 cm X 1.5 cm interference patterns have been generated with the X-ray interferometers using synchrotron X-rays. The large monolithic X-ray interferometer has produced interference fringes with 80% visibility, and has been used to measure various tissues. To produce images with higher spatial resolution, we fabricated another X-ray interferometer whose wafer was partially thinned by chemical etching. A preliminary test suggested that the spatial resolution has been improved.

  18. Computed tomography of x-ray images using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Lloyd G.; Jones, Martin H.; Sheats, Matthew J.; Davis, Anthony W.

    2000-03-01

    Traditional CT reconstruction is done using the technique of Filtered Backprojection. While this technique is widely employed in industrial and medical applications, it is not generally understood that FB has a fundamental flaw. Gibbs phenomena states any Fourier reconstruction will produce errors in the vicinity of all discontinuities, and that the error will equal 28 percent of the discontinuity. A number of years back, one of the authors proposed a biological perception model whereby biological neural networks perceive 3D images from stereo vision. The perception model proports an internal hard-wired neural network which emulates the external physical process. A process is repeated whereby erroneous unknown internal values are used to generate an emulated signal with is compared to external sensed data, generating an error signal. Feedback from the error signal is then sued to update the erroneous internal values. The process is repeated until the error signal no longer decrease. It was soon realized that the same method could be used to obtain CT from x-rays without having to do Fourier transforms. Neural networks have the additional potential for handling non-linearities and missing data. The technique has been applied to some coral images, collected at the Los Alamos high-energy x-ray facility. The initial images show considerable promise, in some instances showing more detail than the FB images obtained from the same data. Although routine production using this new method would require a massively parallel computer, the method shows promise, especially where refined detail is required.

  19. X-ray machine vision and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This survey examines how 2-D x-ray machine vision and 3-D computed tomography will be used in industry in the 1988-1995 timeframe. Specific applications are described and rank-ordered in importance. The types of companies selling and using 2-D and 3-D systems are profiled, and markets are forecast for 1988 to 1995. It is known that many machine vision and automation companies are now considering entering this field. This report looks at the potential pitfalls and whether recent market problems similar to those recently experienced by the machine vision industry will likely occur in this field. FTS will publish approximately 100 other surveys in 1988 on emerging technology in the fields of AI, manufacturing, computers, sensors, photonics, energy, bioengineering, and materials

  20. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  1. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The 'smart' pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients. (paper)

  2. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  3. A review of X-ray computed axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.

    1989-01-01

    A review of Computed axial tomography (CAT) scanning literature outlining the theoretical and practical aspects of this technique with application in both medical diagnosis and industrial non-destructive inspection (NDI) is presented. Practical aspects of CAT scanning discussed include : radiation sources, currently available spatial and contrast resolution limits and the evolution of the computerized tomography (CT) system. It was found that monochromatic gamma rays are preferred to X-rays, especially for very high density materials, and that in medical CAT scanning, the special resolution is only, 0.5 mm while spatial resolutions of less than 50μm have been achieved in NDI. An increased number of scientific and industrial applications are anticipated (e.g. for studying sintering reactions), as the capital cost of CAT scanning decreased. 13 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Study of brain atrophy using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Masayoshi

    1987-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid space-cranial cavity ratio (CCR) of 811 subjects with no brain damage were investigated using X-ray computed tomography. Brain volume of healthy adults aged 20 - 59 years was almost constant and decreased gradually after 60 years. CCR of men aged 20 - 49 years kept constant value and increased with aging after 50 years. CCR of women aged 20 - 59 years kept equal value and CCR increased with aging after 60 years. Brain atrophy with aging was investigated in this study also. In retrospective study, CCR of patients in any age diagnosed brain atrophy in daily CT reports were beyond the normal range of CCR of healthy subjects aged 20 - 49 years. In 48 patients with Parkinson's disease, almost of CCR of them were included within normal range of CCR in age-matched control. (author)

  5. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel 2 slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method

  6. Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography for observing biological specimens and organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-02-01

    A novel three-dimensional x-ray imaging method has been developed by combining a phase-contrast x-ray imaging technique with x-ray computed tomography. This phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography (PCX-CT) provides sectional images of organic specimens that would produce absorption-contrast x-ray CT images with little contrast. Comparing PCX-CT images of rat cerebellum and cancerous rabbit liver specimens with corresponding absorption-contrast CT images shows that PCX-CT is much more sensitive to the internal structure of organic specimens.

  7. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use

  8. Observation of human tissue with phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tu, Jinhong; Hirano, Keiichi

    1999-05-01

    Human tissues obtained from cancerous kidneys fixed in formalin were observed with phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) using 17.7-keV synchrotron X-rays. By measuring the distributions of the X-ray phase shift caused by samples using an X-ray interferometer, sectional images that map the distribution of the refractive index were reconstructed. Because of the high sensitivity of phase- contrast X-ray CT, a cancerous lesion was differentiated from normal tissue and a variety of other structures were revealed without the need for staining.

  9. Iterative reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography using prior-image induced nonlocal regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying; Feng, Qianjin; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2014-09-01

    Repeated X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans are often required in several specific applications such as perfusion imaging, image-guided biopsy needle, image-guided intervention, and radiotherapy with noticeable benefits. However, the associated cumulative radiation dose significantly increases as comparison with that used in the conventional CT scan, which has raised major concerns in patients. In this study, to realize radiation dose reduction by reducing the X-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) in repeated CT scans, we propose a prior-image induced nonlocal (PINL) regularization for statistical iterative reconstruction via the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria, which we refer to as "PWLS-PINL". Specifically, the PINL regularization utilizes the redundant information in the prior image and the weighted least-squares term considers a data-dependent variance estimation, aiming to improve current low-dose image quality. Subsequently, a modified iterative successive overrelaxation algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on both phantom and patient data show that the present PWLS-PINL method can achieve promising gains over the other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, low-contrast object detection, and edge detail preservation.

  10. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  11. Computed tomography for light materials using a monochromatic X-ray beam produced by parametric X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Y., E-mail: yahayak@lebra.nihon-u.ac.jp [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Inagaki, M. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Kaneda, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Nakao, K.; Nogami, K. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Sakae, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Sakai, T.; Sato, I. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba 305-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for light materials such as soft biological tissues was performed using a monochromatic X-ray beam provided by a parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) source at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) of Nihon University. Using a high-efficiency flat panel detector (FPD), each projection image for CT was taken with exposure times of 5 or 10 s, and 60–360 projection images in each run were obtained with total measurement time of 5 min to 1 h. CT images were obtained from the projection images using the conventional calculation method. The typical tomograms obtained had sharp outlines, which are likely attributable to the propagation-based phase contrast.

  12. Computer program for diagnostic X-ray exposure conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a computer program designed to convert any given set of diagnostic X-ray exposure factors sequentially into another, yielding either an equivalent photographic density or one increased or decreased by a specifiable proportion. In addition to containing the wherewithal with which to manipulate a set of exposure factors, the facility to print hard (paper) copy is included enabling the results to be pasted into a notebook and used at any time. This program was originally written as an investigative exercise into examining the potential use of computers for practical radiographic purposes as conventionally encountered. At the same time, its possible use as an educational tool was borne in mind. To these ends, the current version of this program may be used as a means whereby exposure factors used in a diagnostic department may be altered to suit a particular requirement or may be used in the school as a mathematical model to describe the behaviour of exposure factors under manipulation without patient exposure. (author)

  13. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests

  14. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  15. Development of industrial x-ray computed tomography and its application to refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiba, Yoshiro; Oki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shigeo; Fujii, Masashi.

    1985-01-01

    An industrial X-ray computed tomography was developed under the influence of the rapid spread of the use of the X-ray CT scanner in the medical field and improvements of the equipment. Although current nondestructive testing machines of refractories use the ultrasonic inspection method or the X-ray fluoroscopic method, these equipments cannot produce a tomogram or cannot carry out quantitative evaluation. By using an industrial X-ray computed tomography, submerged nozzles for continuous casting of steel were analyzed with interesting results. The features of the industrial X-ray computed tomography applied for refractory nozzles are as follows: (1) It promptly detects interior defects. (2) It can measure dimensions and shapes. (3) It can numerically express the distribution of density. Accordingly, it is expected that the industrial X-ray computed tomography will widely be used in the fields of development and quality control of refractories and advanced ceramic materials. (author)

  16. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  17. Measuring physiological and pathological femoral anteversion using a biplanar low-dose X-ray system: validity, reliability, and discriminative ability in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thepaut, Matthias [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de chirurgie pediatrique, Brest (France); Brochard, Sylvain [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Leboucher, Julien [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Lempereur, Mathieu [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, Hopital Morvan, Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, Brest (France); Stindel, Eric [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); CHRU de Brest, La Cavale Blanche, Service d' Orthopedie-Traumatologie, Brest (France); Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Tissot, Valentin [CHRU de Brest, Service de radiologie, Brest (France); Borotikar, Bhushan S. [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale, INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Institut Mines-Telecom, Telecom Bretagne, Brest (France)

    2016-02-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the concurrent validity and reliability of a low-dose biplanar X-ray system (Ld-BPR) for the measurement of femoral anteversion (FA) by comparing Ld-BPR-based three-dimensional measures with CT-scan-based measures and to assess the discriminative ability of this method in children with cerebral palsy. Fifty dry femora were scanned using both a CT scan and the Ld-BPR system. Ten femora were artificially modified to mimic a range of anteversion from -30 to +60 and scanned by both modalities. FA was quantified using the images from both modalities and statistically compared for concurrent validity. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of the Ld-BPR system was also determined. Further, Ld-BPR data from 16 hemiplegic and 22 diplegic children were analyzed for its discriminative ability. The concurrent validity between the Ld-BPR and CT-scan measures was excellent (R {sup 2} = 0.83-0.84) and no significant differences were found. The intra- and inter-trial reliability were excellent (ICCs = 0.98 and 0.97) with limits of agreement of (-2.28 ; +2.65 ) and (-2.76 ; +3.38 ) respectively. Further, no significant effects of angle or method were found in the sample of modified femora. Ld-BPR measures for FA were significantly different between healthy and impaired femora. The excellent concurrent validity with the CT scan modality, the excellent reliability, and the ability to discriminate pathological conditions evaluated by this study make this radiological method suitable for a validated use across hospitals and research institutes. (orig.)

  18. Flash X-Ray Apparatus With Spectrum Control Functions For Medical Use And Fuji Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Sato, E.; Hayasi, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Arima, H.; Hoshino, F.

    1985-02-01

    Flash radiographic bio-medical studies at sub-microsecond intervals were performed by using both a new type of flash X-ray(FX) apparatus with spectrum control functions and Fuji Computed Radiography(FCR). This single flasher tends to have a comparatively long exposure time and the electric pulse width of the FX wave form is about 0.3,usec. The maximum FX dose is about 50mR at 1m per pulse, and the effective focal spot varies according to condenser charging voltage, A-C distance, etc., ranging from 1.0 to 3.0mm in diameter, but in the low dose rate region it can be reduced to less than 1.0mm in diameter. The FX dose is determined by the condenser charging voltage and the A-C distance, while the FX spectrum is determined by the average voltage of the FX tube and filters. Various clear FX images were obtained by controlling the spectrum and dose. FCR is a new storage medium for medical radiography developed by the Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. and this apparatus has various image forming functions: low dose radiography, film density control, image contrast control, subtraction management and others. We have used this new apparatus in conjunction with our FX radiography and have obtained some new and interesting biomedical radiograms: the edge enhancement image, the instantaneous enlarged image, and the single exposure energy subtraction image using the FX spectrum distribution.

  19. Computer code for shielding calculations of x-rays rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, R.R.W.; Borges, D. da S.; Lava, D.D.; Moreira, M. de L.; Guimarães, A.C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The building an effective barrier against ionizing radiation present in radiographic rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for thickness specification of primary and secondary, barrier of a traditional radiographic room, considers the following factors: Use Factor, Occupational Factor, distance between the source and the wall, Workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the source. With these data it was possible to develop a computer code, which aims to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions provided by NCRP-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) report, for shielding calculation of room walls, and the walls of the dark room and adjacent areas. With the implemented methodology, it was made a code validation by comparison of results with a study case provided by the report. The obtained values for thickness comprise different materials such as concrete, lead and glass. After validation it was made a case study of an arbitrary radiographic room.The development of the code resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in september/2011. (authors)

  20. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A; Maskery, I; Leach, R K

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM. (topical review)

  1. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  2. Basic technological aspects and optimization problems in X-ray computed tomography (C.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.

    1987-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of physical performance are analysed and the optimization problems are approached for X-ray computed tomography. It is concluded that as long as clinical interest in computed tomography continues, technical advances can be expected in the near future to improve the density resolution, the spatial resolution and the X-ray exposure time. (Auth.)

  3. Comparison of radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort and financial break-even of standard digital radiography and a novel biplanar low-dose X-ray system for upright full-length lower limb and whole spine radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, Tobias J.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Pankalla, Katja; Buck, Florian M.; Schwab, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    To compare the radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort, and financial break-even of a standard digital radiography and a biplanar low-dose X-ray system. A standard digital radiography system (Ysio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was compared with a biplanar X-ray unit (EOS, EOS imaging, Paris, France) consisting of two X-ray tubes and slot-scanning detectors, arranged at an angle of 90 allowing simultaneous vertical biplanar linear scanning in the upright patient position. We compared data of standing full-length lower limb radiographs and whole spine radiographs of both X-ray systems. Dose-area product was significantly lower for radiographs of the biplanar X-ray system than for the standard digital radiography system (e.g. whole spine radiographs; standard digital radiography system: 392.2 ± 231.7 cGy*cm 2 versus biplanar X-ray system: 158.4 ± 103.8 cGy*cm 2 ). The mean examination time was significantly shorter for biplanar radiographs compared with standard digital radiographs (e.g. whole spine radiographs: 449 s vs 248 s). Patients' comfort regarding noise was significantly higher for the standard digital radiography system. The financial break-even point was 2,602 radiographs/year for the standard digital radiography system compared with 4,077 radiographs/year for the biplanar X-ray unit. The biplanar X-ray unit reduces radiation exposure and increases subjective noise exposure to patients. The biplanar X-ray unit demands a higher number of examinations per year for the financial break-even point, despite the lower labour cost per examination due to the shorter examination time. (orig.)

  4. Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1997-10-01

    We have shown so far that 3D structures in biological sot tissues such as cancer can be revealed by phase-contrast x- ray computed tomography using an x-ray interferometer. As a next step, we aim at applications of this technique to in vivo observation, including radiographic applications. For this purpose, the size of view field is desired to be more than a few centimeters. Therefore, a larger x-ray interferometer should be used with x-rays of higher energy. We have evaluated the optimal x-ray energy from an aspect of does as a function of sample size. Moreover, desired spatial resolution to an image sensor is discussed as functions of x-ray energy and sample size, basing on a requirement in the analysis of interference fringes.

  5. Synthesis, quantum chemical computations and x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benyza N

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... manganese (+II) co-ordination with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide oxime. We report here the synthesis, the single crystal X-ray structure of the complex and the Optimization of the structure using ... Absorption coefficient (mm. -1. ).

  6. Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott A; Rose, Evan A

    2017-03-07

    A miniature, portable x-ray system may be configured to scan images stored on a phosphor. A flash circuit may be configured to project red light onto a phosphor and receive blue light from the phosphor. A digital monochrome camera may be configured to receive the blue light to capture an article near the phosphor.

  7. JAX: a micro-computer based X-ray diffractometer controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naval, P.C. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a micro-computer based X-ray diffractometer controller and explores its possibilities in simplifying acquisition and analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. The interrupt-driven controller can operate in both present time and present count data acquisition modes and allows a data analysis program to execute concurrently with data collection. (Auth.). 16 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. BraX-Ray: an X-ray of the Brazilian computer science graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiampietri, Luciano A; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O S; Malheiro, Ana P R; Meira, Dânia N O; Franco, Laryssa F; Oliveira, Leonardo B

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009.

  9. Exposure to low-dose X-rays promotes peculiar autophagic cell death in Drosophila melanogaster, an effect that can be regulated by the inducible expression of Hml dsRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanao, Tomoko [Department of Radiological Sciences, International University of Health and Welfare, Kitakanemaru 2600-1, Ohtawara-shi, Tochigi-ken 324-8501 (Japan); Miyachi, Yukihisa [Department of Radiological Sciences, International University of Health and Welfare, Kitakanemaru 2600-1, Ohtawara-shi, Tochigi-ken 324-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: ymiyachi@iuhw.ac.jp

    2006-03-20

    We previously reported that to induce an early emergence effect with low-dose X-irradiation in Drosophila, exposure during the prepupae stage is necessary. The present study examined the mechanism by which low-dose radiation rapidly eliminates larval cells and activates the formation of the imaginal discs during metamorphosis. Upon exposure to 0.5 Gy X-rays at 2 h after puparium formation (APF), the larval salivary glands swelled and were surrounded by remarkably thick structures containing an acid phosphatase (Acph) enzyme, implicating a peculiar autophagic cell death. TUNEL staining revealed the presence of DNA fragmentations compared with cells from sham controls which remained unchanged until 12 h APF. Additionally, the salivary glands of exposed flies were completely destroyed by 10 h APF. Furthermore, exposure to 0.5 Gy X-rays also facilitated the activity of the engulfment function of dendritic cells (DCs); they were generated in the larval salivary glands, engulfed the cell corpses and finally moved to the fat body. Data from an experiment demonstrating the inducible expression of Hml double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) indicate that a slow rate of engulfment of larval cells results in a longer time to emergence. Thus, the animals subjected to low-dose X-rays activated autophagic processes, resulting in significantly faster adult eclosion.

  10. Exposure to low-dose X-rays promotes peculiar autophagic cell death in Drosophila melanogaster, an effect that can be regulated by the inducible expression of Hml dsRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanao, Tomoko; Miyachi, Yukihisa

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that to induce an early emergence effect with low-dose X-irradiation in Drosophila, exposure during the prepupae stage is necessary. The present study examined the mechanism by which low-dose radiation rapidly eliminates larval cells and activates the formation of the imaginal discs during metamorphosis. Upon exposure to 0.5 Gy X-rays at 2 h after puparium formation (APF), the larval salivary glands swelled and were surrounded by remarkably thick structures containing an acid phosphatase (Acph) enzyme, implicating a peculiar autophagic cell death. TUNEL staining revealed the presence of DNA fragmentations compared with cells from sham controls which remained unchanged until 12 h APF. Additionally, the salivary glands of exposed flies were completely destroyed by 10 h APF. Furthermore, exposure to 0.5 Gy X-rays also facilitated the activity of the engulfment function of dendritic cells (DCs); they were generated in the larval salivary glands, engulfed the cell corpses and finally moved to the fat body. Data from an experiment demonstrating the inducible expression of Hml double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) indicate that a slow rate of engulfment of larval cells results in a longer time to emergence. Thus, the animals subjected to low-dose X-rays activated autophagic processes, resulting in significantly faster adult eclosion

  11. The elimination of low-dose hypersensitivity in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells by pretreatment with X rays or hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marples, B.; Joiner, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    To explain increased radioresistance over the X-ray dose range ∼ 0.5-1 Gy an inducible radioprotective mechanism triggered by DNA damage was proposed; hypersensitivity to doses much-lt Gy reflected the response prior to the activation of this system. To test this hypothesis, cells were pre-exposed to DNA-damaging agents in an attempt to induce the process prematurely. An increase in survival was evident at X-ray doses below 0.3 Gy after a priming treatment of X rays (0.05, 0.2, 1 Gy) given 6 h earlier. The protective effect was found to be transitory, requiring time for development and diminishing after two to three cell cycle times. Cycloheximide administered in the interval between the priming and challenge doses of X rays abolished the protection conferred by pretreatment, indicating the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. Oxidative damage by nontoxic doses of hydrogen peroxide (10 -4 M, but not 10 -6 M) also produced a protective effect against subsequent X irradiation. These experiments indicate survival in the hyper-radiosensitive region (much-lt 0.5 Gy) can be modified by pretreatment with agents known to affect DNA repair. In addition, the development of increased radioresistance after single doses of X rays was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. These studies provide evidence to support the explanations proposed previously for the phenomena of increased radioresistance and hyper-radiosensitivity observed at very low X-ray doses. 57 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  12. X-ray computed tomography imaging method which is immune to beam hardening effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Uesaka, Akio; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki

    2009-01-01

    For the easy treatment of cancers, early finding of them is an important theme of study. X-ray transmission measurement and computed tomography (CT) are powerful tools for finding cancers. The x-ray CT shows cross sectional view of human body and is able to detect small cancers such as 1 cm in diameter. The CT, however, gives very high dose exposure to human body: some 10 to 1000 times higher dose exposure than the chest radiography. It is not possible to have medical health check using CT frequently, in view of both individual and public accumulated dose exposures. The authors have been working on the reduction of dose exposure in x-ray transmission measurements in case of detecting iodine contrast media, which concentrates in cancers. In our method, energy information of x-rays is employed: in conventional x-ray transmission measurements, x-rays are measured as current and the energy of each x-ray is ignored. The numbers of x-ray events, φ 1 and φ 2 , of which energies are lower and higher than the one of iodine K-edge, respectively, are used for the estimation of iodine thickness in cancers. Moreover, high energy x-rays, which are not sensitive to the absorption by iodine, are cut by a filter made of higher atomic number material than iodine. We call this method filtered x-ray energy subtraction (FIX-ES) method. This FIX-ES method was shown twice as sensitive to iodine than current measurement method. With the choice of filter thickness, minimum dose exposure in FIX-ES is 30% of that when white x-rays are employed. In the study described above, we concentrated on the observation of cancer part. In this study, a cancer phantom in normal tissue is observed by FIX-ES method. The results are compared with the ones obtained by current measurement method. (author)

  13. TH-AB-209-07: High Resolution X-Ray-Induced Acoustic Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, L; Tang, S [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Ahmad, M [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: X-ray radiographic absorption imaging is an invaluable tool in medical diagnostics, biology and materials science. However, the use of conventional CT is limited by two factors: the detection sensitivity to weak absorption material and the radiation dose from CT scanning. The purpose of this study is to explore X-ray induced acoustic computed tomography (XACT), a new imaging modality, which combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution to address these challenges. Methods: First, theoretical models was built to analyze the XACT sensitivity to X-ray absorption and calculate the minimal radiation dose in XACT imaging. Then, an XACT system comprised of an ultrashort X-ray pulse, a low noise ultrasound detector and a signal acquisition system was built to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation. A piece of chicken bone and a phantom with two golden fiducial markers were exposed to 270 kVp X-ray source with 60 ns exposure time, and the X-ray induced acoustic signal was received by a 2.25MHz ultrasound transducer in 200 positions. XACT images were reconstructed by a filtered back-projection algorithm. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signals have 100% relative sensitivity to X-ray absorption, but not to X-ray scattering. Applying this innovative technology to breast imaging, we can reduce radiation dose by a factor of 50 compared with newly FDA approved breast CT. The reconstructed images of chicken bone and golden fiducial marker phantom reveal that the spatial resolution of the built XACT system is 350µm. Conclusion: In XACT, the imaging sensitivity to X-ray absorption is improved and the imaging dose is dramatically reduced by using ultrashort pulsed X-ray. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, we can also perform 3D imaging with a single X-ray pulse. This new modality has the potential to revolutionize x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology.

  14. Imaging of Composites by Helical X-Ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ying; Pyka, Grzegorz; Jespersen, Kristine Munk

    Understanding the fatigue damage mechanisms of composite materials used in wind turbine rotor blades could potentially enhance the reliability and energy efficiency of wind turbines by improving the structure design. In this paper, the fatigue damage propagating mechanisms of unidirectional glass...... fibre composites was characterised by helical X-ray CT. The staining approach was used and it was effective to enhance the visibility of thin matrix cracks and partly closed fibre breaks instead of widely opened cracks. Fibre breaks in the centre UD bundle were found to occur locally, instead of being...

  15. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  16. Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography to visualize specific material distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Atsunori; Akiba, Masahiro; Uchida, Akira; Kazama, Masahiro; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Akatsuka, Takao; Itai, Yuji

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT systems consists of a silicon channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. At 37 keV Monte Carlo simulation showed almost complete separation between Compton scattering and the K(alpha) line. Actual experiments revealed small contamination of Compton scattering on the K(alpha) line. A clear FXCT image of a phantom was obtained. Using this system the minimal detectable dose of iodine was 30 ng in a volume of 1 mm3, and a linear relationship was demonstrated between photon counts of fluorescent x-rays and the concentration of iodine contrast material. The use of high incident x-ray energy allows an increase in the signal to noise ratio by reducing the Compton scattering on the K(alpha) line.

  17. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; Monteiro de Souza, Edmilson; Silva, Ademir Xaxier da; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved. - Highlights: • Computational Model was developed to X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology. • The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. • The energy range was 40–100 kV. • Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the Dental Radiology and reference X-ray tubes

  18. Model-based image reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech Bartosz

    2006-01-01

    The thesis investigates the applications of iterative, statistical reconstruction (SR) algorithms in X-ray Computed Tomography. Emphasis is put on various aspects of system modeling in statistical reconstruction. Fundamental issues such as effects of object discretization and algorithm

  19. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Paolo; Stanco, Filippo [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Matematica ed Informatica, Catania (Italy); Ciliberto, Enrico [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Catania (Italy); Petrillo, Giuseppe; Trombatore, Claudia [Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche Chirurgiche e Tecnologie Avanzate, Catania (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet. (orig.)

  20. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Paolo; Stanco, Filippo; Ciliberto, Enrico; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet. (orig.)

  1. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Enrico; Ciliberto, Paolo; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Stanco, Filippo; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet.

  2. Use of micro X-ray computed tomography for development and research into waterjets

    OpenAIRE

    Souček, K. (Kamil); Sitek, L. (Libor); Gurková, L. (Lucie); Georgiovská, L. (Lucie)

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive methods for analysis of various types of materials have been increasingly applied recently. One of these methods is the industrial micro X-ray computed tomography (CT). This paper presents an overview of experience in using the industrial micro X-ray computed tomography during research activities at the Institute of Geonics of the CAS. It discusses possibilities of the nondestructive visualization of the inner structures of a wide range of materials and objects, includin...

  3. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  4. Direct integration of the inverse Radon equation for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, E E; Chakhlov, S V; Trinca, D

    2016-11-22

    A new mathematical appoach using the inverse Radon equation for restoration of images in problems of linear two-dimensional x-ray tomography is formulated. In this approach, Fourier transformation is not used, and it gives the chance to create the practical computing algorithms having more reliable mathematical substantiation. Results of software implementation show that for especially for low number of projections, the described approach performs better than standard X-ray tomographic reconstruction algorithms.

  5. Metrological study of CFRP drilled holes with x-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kourra, Nadia; Warnett, Jason M.; Attridge, Alex; Kiraci, Ercihan; Gupta, Aniruddha; Barnes, Stuart; Williams, M. A. (Mark A.)

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of composite materials is continuously growing with new varieties being developed and tested with different machining processes to establish their suitability. Destructive as well as non-destructive methods, such as ultrasonics, X-ray radiography and eddy-current, have previously been used to ensure that the combination of particular machining methods and composites provide the required quality that can allow the required lifespan of the final product. X-ray computed tomography...

  6. Fast and low-dose computed laminography using compressive sensing based technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Sajid; Park, Miran; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-03-01

    Computed laminography (CL) is well known for inspecting microstructures in the materials, weldments and soldering defects in high density packed components or multilayer printed circuit boards. The overload problem on x-ray tube and gross failure of the radio-sensitive electronics devices during a scan are among important issues in CL which needs to be addressed. The sparse-view CL can be one of the viable option to overcome such issues. In this work a numerical aluminum welding phantom was simulated to collect sparsely sampled projection data at only 40 views using a conventional CL scanning scheme i.e. oblique scan. A compressive-sensing inspired total-variation (TV) minimization algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the images. It is found that the images reconstructed using sparse view data are visually comparable with the images reconstructed using full scan data set i.e. at 360 views on regular interval. We have quantitatively confirmed that tiny structures such as copper and tungsten slags, and copper flakes in the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data are comparable with the corresponding structure present in the fully sampled data case. A blurring effect can be seen near the edges of few pores at the bottom of the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data, despite the overall image quality is reasonable for fast and low-dose NDT.

  7. Fast and low-dose computed laminography using compressive sensing based technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Sajid, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Miran, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-31

    Computed laminography (CL) is well known for inspecting microstructures in the materials, weldments and soldering defects in high density packed components or multilayer printed circuit boards. The overload problem on x-ray tube and gross failure of the radio-sensitive electronics devices during a scan are among important issues in CL which needs to be addressed. The sparse-view CL can be one of the viable option to overcome such issues. In this work a numerical aluminum welding phantom was simulated to collect sparsely sampled projection data at only 40 views using a conventional CL scanning scheme i.e. oblique scan. A compressive-sensing inspired total-variation (TV) minimization algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the images. It is found that the images reconstructed using sparse view data are visually comparable with the images reconstructed using full scan data set i.e. at 360 views on regular interval. We have quantitatively confirmed that tiny structures such as copper and tungsten slags, and copper flakes in the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data are comparable with the corresponding structure present in the fully sampled data case. A blurring effect can be seen near the edges of few pores at the bottom of the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data, despite the overall image quality is reasonable for fast and low-dose NDT.

  8. Fast and low-dose computed laminography using compressive sensing based technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Sajid; Park, Miran; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-01-01

    Computed laminography (CL) is well known for inspecting microstructures in the materials, weldments and soldering defects in high density packed components or multilayer printed circuit boards. The overload problem on x-ray tube and gross failure of the radio-sensitive electronics devices during a scan are among important issues in CL which needs to be addressed. The sparse-view CL can be one of the viable option to overcome such issues. In this work a numerical aluminum welding phantom was simulated to collect sparsely sampled projection data at only 40 views using a conventional CL scanning scheme i.e. oblique scan. A compressive-sensing inspired total-variation (TV) minimization algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the images. It is found that the images reconstructed using sparse view data are visually comparable with the images reconstructed using full scan data set i.e. at 360 views on regular interval. We have quantitatively confirmed that tiny structures such as copper and tungsten slags, and copper flakes in the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data are comparable with the corresponding structure present in the fully sampled data case. A blurring effect can be seen near the edges of few pores at the bottom of the reconstructed images from sparsely sampled data, despite the overall image quality is reasonable for fast and low-dose NDT

  9. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations

  10. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M [Univ Florida, Jacksonville Beach, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  11. Design, development and integration of a large scale multiple source X-ray computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, Andrew A.; Liu, Tong; Ng, Ivan Kee Beng; Teng, Wei Yuen; Yap, Tsi Tung; Wan, Siew Ping; Kong, Chun Jeng

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows visualisation of the physical structures in the interior of an object without physically opening or cutting it. This technology supports a wide range of applications in the non-destructive testing, failure analysis or performance evaluation of industrial products and components. Of the numerous factors that influence the performance characteristics of an X-ray CT system the energy level in the X-ray spectrum to be used is one of the most significant. The ability of the X-ray beam to penetrate a given thickness of a specific material is directly related to the maximum available energy level in the beam. Higher energy levels allow penetration of thicker components made of more dense materials. In response to local industry demand and in support of on-going research activity in the area of 3D X-ray imaging for industrial inspection the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) engaged in the design, development and integration of large scale multiple source X-ray computed tomography system based on X-ray sources operating at higher energies than previously available in the Institute. The system consists of a large area direct digital X-ray detector (410 x 410 mm), a multiple-axis manipulator system, a 225 kV open tube microfocus X-ray source and a 450 kV closed tube millifocus X-ray source. The 225 kV X-ray source can be operated in either transmission or reflection mode. The body of the 6-axis manipulator system is fabricated from heavy-duty steel onto which high precision linear and rotary motors have been mounted in order to achieve high accuracy, stability and repeatability. A source-detector distance of up to 2.5 m can be achieved. The system is controlled by a proprietary X-ray CT operating system developed by SIMTech. The system currently can accommodate samples up to 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m in size with weight up to 50 kg. These specifications will be increased to 1.0 x 1.0 x 1.0 m and 100 kg in future

  12. Dynamic angle selection in X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabravolski, Andrei, E-mail: andrei.dabravolski@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, Kees Joost, E-mail: joost.batenburg@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sijbers, Jan, E-mail: jan.sijbers@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We propose the dynamic angle selection algorithm for CT scanning. • The approach is based on the concept of information gain over a set of solutions. • Projection angles are selected based on the already available projection data. • The approach can lead to more accurate results from fewer projections. - Abstract: In X-ray tomography, a number of radiographs (projections) are recorded from which a tomogram is then reconstructed. Conventionally, these projections are acquired equiangularly, resulting in an unbiased sampling of the Radon space. However, especially in case when only a limited number of projections can be acquired, the selection of the angles has a large impact on the quality of the reconstructed image. In this paper, a dynamic algorithm is proposed, in which new projection angles are selected by maximizing the information gain about the object, given the set of possible new angles. Experiments show that this approach can select projection angles for which the accuracy of the reconstructed image is significantly higher compared to the standard angle selections schemes.

  13. Dynamic angle selection in X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabravolski, Andrei; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose the dynamic angle selection algorithm for CT scanning. • The approach is based on the concept of information gain over a set of solutions. • Projection angles are selected based on the already available projection data. • The approach can lead to more accurate results from fewer projections. - Abstract: In X-ray tomography, a number of radiographs (projections) are recorded from which a tomogram is then reconstructed. Conventionally, these projections are acquired equiangularly, resulting in an unbiased sampling of the Radon space. However, especially in case when only a limited number of projections can be acquired, the selection of the angles has a large impact on the quality of the reconstructed image. In this paper, a dynamic algorithm is proposed, in which new projection angles are selected by maximizing the information gain about the object, given the set of possible new angles. Experiments show that this approach can select projection angles for which the accuracy of the reconstructed image is significantly higher compared to the standard angle selections schemes

  14. Three dimensional subsurface elemental identification of minerals using confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Seshadri, Srivatsan; Havrilla, George J.; Yuan, Xiaoli; Feser, Michael; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Current non-destructive elemental characterization methods, such as scanning electron microscopy-based energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (MXRF), are limited to either elemental identification at the surface (SEM–EDS) or suffer from an inability to discriminate between surface or depth information (MXRF). Thus, a non-destructive elemental characterization of individual embedded particles beneath the surface is impossible with either of these techniques. This limitation can be overcome by using laboratory-based 3D confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (confocal MXRF). This technique utilizes focusing optics on the X-ray source and detector which allows for spatial discrimination in all three dimensions. However, the voxel-by-voxel serial acquisition of a 3D elemental scan can be very time-intensive (~ 1 to 4 weeks) if it is necessary to locate individual embedded particles of interest. As an example, if each point takes a 5 s measurement time, a small volume of 50 × 50 × 50 pixels leads to an acquisition time of approximately 174 h, not including sample stage movement time. Initially screening the samples for particles of interest using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) can significantly reduce the time required to spatially locate these particles. Once located, these individual particles can be elementally characterized with confocal MXRF. Herein, we report the elemental identification of high atomic number surface and subsurface particles embedded in a mineralogical matrix by coupling micro-CT and confocal MXRF. Synergistically, these two X-ray based techniques first rapidly locate and then elementally identify individual subsurface particles. - Highlights: • Coupling of confocal X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray computed tomography • Qualitative elemental identification of surface and subsurface mineral particles • Non-destructive particle size measurements • Utilization of

  15. Three dimensional subsurface elemental identification of minerals using confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L., E-mail: ncordes@lanl.gov [Polymers and Coatings Group, Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Seshadri, Srivatsan, E-mail: srivatsan.seshadri@zeiss.com [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Havrilla, George J. [Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering, Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yuan, Xiaoli [Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre, University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Brisbane, QLD 4068 (Australia); Feser, Michael [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Patterson, Brian M. [Polymers and Coatings Group, Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current non-destructive elemental characterization methods, such as scanning electron microscopy-based energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (MXRF), are limited to either elemental identification at the surface (SEM–EDS) or suffer from an inability to discriminate between surface or depth information (MXRF). Thus, a non-destructive elemental characterization of individual embedded particles beneath the surface is impossible with either of these techniques. This limitation can be overcome by using laboratory-based 3D confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (confocal MXRF). This technique utilizes focusing optics on the X-ray source and detector which allows for spatial discrimination in all three dimensions. However, the voxel-by-voxel serial acquisition of a 3D elemental scan can be very time-intensive (~ 1 to 4 weeks) if it is necessary to locate individual embedded particles of interest. As an example, if each point takes a 5 s measurement time, a small volume of 50 × 50 × 50 pixels leads to an acquisition time of approximately 174 h, not including sample stage movement time. Initially screening the samples for particles of interest using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) can significantly reduce the time required to spatially locate these particles. Once located, these individual particles can be elementally characterized with confocal MXRF. Herein, we report the elemental identification of high atomic number surface and subsurface particles embedded in a mineralogical matrix by coupling micro-CT and confocal MXRF. Synergistically, these two X-ray based techniques first rapidly locate and then elementally identify individual subsurface particles. - Highlights: • Coupling of confocal X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray computed tomography • Qualitative elemental identification of surface and subsurface mineral particles • Non-destructive particle size measurements • Utilization of

  16. X-ray image processing software for computing object size and object location coordinates from acquired optical and x-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Akash; Tiwari, Shyam Sunder; Tiwari, Railesha; Panday, Lokesh; Panday, Jeet; Suri, Nitin

    2004-01-01

    X-ray and Visible image data processing software has been developed in Visual Basic for real time online and offline image information processing for NDT and Medical Applications. Software computes two dimension image size parameters from its sharp boundary lines by raster scanning the image contrast data. Code accepts bit map image data and hunts for multiple tumors of different sizes that may be present in the image definition and then computes size of each tumor and locates its approximate center for registering its location coordinates. Presence of foreign metal and glass balls industrial product such as chocolate and other food items imaged out using x-ray imaging technique are detected by the software and their size and position co-ordinates are computed by the software. Paper discusses ways and means to compute size and coordinated of air bubble like objects present in the x-ray and optical images and their multiple existences in image of interest. (author)

  17. What can we learn by computing 13Cα chemical shifts for X-ray protein models?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnautova, Yelena A.; Vila, Jorge A.; Martin, Osvaldo A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    The room-temperature X-ray structures of two proteins, solved at 1.8 and 1.9 Å resolution, are used to investigate whether a set of conformations, rather than a single X-ray structure, provides better agreement with both the X-ray data and the observed 13 C α chemical shifts in solution. The room-temperature X-ray structures of ubiquitin and of the RNA-binding domain of nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus solved at 1.8 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively, were used to investigate whether a set of conformations rather than a single X-ray structure provides better agreement with both the X-ray data and the observed 13 C α chemical shifts in solution. For this purpose, a set of new conformations for each of these proteins was generated by fitting them to the experimental X-ray data deposited in the PDB. For each of the generated structures, which show R and R free factors similar to those of the deposited X-ray structure, the 13 C α chemical shifts of all residues in the sequence were computed at the DFT level of theory. The sets of conformations were then evaluated by their ability to reproduce the observed 13 C α chemical shifts by using the conformational average root-mean-square-deviation (ca-r.m.s.d.). For ubiquitin, the computed set of conformations is a better representation of the observed 13 C α chemical shifts in terms of the ca-r.m.s.d. than a single X-ray-derived structure. However, for the RNA-binding domain of nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus, consideration of an ensemble of conformations does not improve the agreement with the observed 13 C α chemical shifts. Whether an ensemble of conformations rather than any single structure is a more accurate representation of a protein structure in the crystal as well as of the observed 13 C α chemical shifts is determined by the dispersion of coordinates, in terms of the all-atom r.m.s.d. among the generated models; these generated models satisfy the experimental X-ray data with

  18. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchian T.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils. Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration. Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  19. Estimation of effective doses in pediatric X-ray computed tomography examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Hideki; Takahashi, Midori; Kudou, Kazuya; Mariya, Yasushi; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2017-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) images are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines. In Japan, the number of facilities that own diagnostic CT equipment, the number of CT examinations and the number of CT scanners increased by ~1.4-fold between 2005 and 2011. CT operators (medical radiological technologists, medical physicists and physicians) must understand the effective doses for examinations at their own institutions and carefully approach each examination. In addition, the patients undergoing the examination (as well as his/her family) must understand the effective dose of each examination in the context of the cumulative dose. In the present study, the numbers of pediatric patients (aged 0-5 years) and total patients who underwent CT at Hirosaki University Hospital (Hirosaki, Japan) between January 2011 and December 2013 were surveyed, and effective doses administered to children aged 0, 1 and 5 years were evaluated. Age- and region-specific conversion factors and dose-length products obtained from the CT scanner were used to estimate the effective doses. The numbers of CT examinations performed in 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 16,662, 17,491 and 17,649, respectively, of which 613 (1.2%) of the overall total involved children aged 0-5 years. The estimated effective doses per examination to children aged 0, 1 and 5 years were 6.3±4.8, 4.9±3.8 and 2.7±3.0 mSv, respectively. This large variation was attributed to several factors associated with scan methods and ranges in actual setting. In conclusion, the requirement for individual patient prospective exposure management systems and estimations of low-dose radiation exposure should be considered in light of the harmful effects of exposure.

  20. Using X-ray computed tomography to predict carcass leanness in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, P.; Kover, Gy.; Paszthy, Gy.; Berenyi, E.; Repa, I; Kovacs, G.

    1996-01-01

    Just one hundred years ago. Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen published his paper in Wurzburg describing X-rays and their effects, earning him the first Nobel Prize in Physics, presented in 1901. X-ray based diagnostic equipment revolutionized human diagnostics. A new milestone in the development of radiology was when Godfrey Hotmufield proposed to get additional anatomical information from a cross-sectional plane of the body by computer aided mathematical synthesis of an image from X-ray transmission data obtained from many different angles through the plane in consideration. The idea of the X-ray Computer Aided Tomography (CAT) was born, and the dramatic development of X-ray CAT imaging technology began, enhancing efficiency and scope of human diagnostics in human medicine. The numbers used to characterize the X-ray absorption in each picture element (pixel) of the CAT image are called ''CT'' or Hounsfield numbers (Hounsfield, 1979). The Nobel Prize was awarded to Hounsfield in 1979. X-ray Computer Aided Tomography system and software used were developed for humen medical purposes - mainly to detect anatomical physiological disorders - by all leading high-tech manufacturers in the world. As early as 1980, the potential of the new technique to be utilized in animal science was first recognized in Norway (Skjervold et al., 1981). In 1982, the Agricultural University of Norway acquired a Siemens Somatom 2 CAT system, and pioneering work started to apply X-ray CAT techniques in animal science. Based on the promising results obtained and published by the ''Norwegian school'' (Sehested, 1 984 Vangen, 1984 Allen and Vangen, 1984: Vangen and Standal, 1984), a research project proposal was prepared for the Hungarian Ministry of Agriculture and Food and the World Bank in 1985 to set up a digital imaging center at our Institute. The project was approved in 1986 (Horn, 1991a). The new digital imaging and diagnostic center started its operation in 1990, equipped first with a Siemens

  1. Virtual Colonoscopy Screening With Ultra Low-Dose CT and Less-Stressful Bowel Preparation: A Computer Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Su; Li, Lihong; Fan, Yi; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2008-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) or CT-based virtual colonoscopy (VC) is an emerging tool for detection of colonic polyps. Compared to the conventional fiber-optic colonoscopy, VC has demonstrated the potential to become a mass screening modality in terms of safety, cost, and patient compliance. However, current CTC delivers excessive X-ray radiation to the patient during data acquisition. The radiation is a major concern for screening application of CTC. In this work, we performed a simulation study to demonstrate a possible ultra low-dose CT technique for VC. The ultra low-dose abdominal CT images were simulated by adding noise to the sinograms of the patient CTC images acquired with normal dose scans at 100 mA s levels. The simulated noisy sinogram or projection data were first processed by a Karhunen-Loeve domain penalized weighted least-squares (KL-PWLS) restoration method and then reconstructed by a filtered backprojection algorithm for the ultra low-dose CT images. The patient-specific virtual colon lumen was constructed and navigated by a VC system after electronic colon cleansing of the orally-tagged residue stool and fluid. By the KL-PWLS noise reduction, the colon lumen can successfully be constructed and the colonic polyp can be detected in an ultra low-dose level below 50 mA s. Polyp detection can be found more easily by the KL-PWLS noise reduction compared to the results using the conventional noise filters, such as Hanning filter. These promising results indicate the feasibility of an ultra low-dose CTC pipeline for colon screening with less-stressful bowel preparation by fecal tagging with oral contrast.

  2. High frequencies of chromatid aberrations produced during G/sub 2/ in human lymphocytes by very low doses (0. 025-0. 4 Gy) of X-rays in combination with inhibitors of DNA synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, H.C.; Kihlman, B.A. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Genetics)

    1984-09-01

    Whole-blood cultures of human lymphocytes were exposed in the G/sub 2/-phase (3.5 h before harvesting) to various doses of X-rays and post-treated for 3 h with inhibitors of DNA synthesis. The inhibitors used were 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), hydroxyurea (HU) and 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). To prevent deamination of dAdo by adenosine deaminase (ADA), the dAdo treatments were carried out in the presence of the ADA inhibitor coformycin. HU and ara-C were used either alone or in combination. After the 3-h inhibitor treatments, the cultures were harvested and slides prepared and analyzed for chromatid aberrations in metaphase. When the inhibitors were used at concentrations high enough to cause marked chromosome damage by themselves, very low doses of X-rays (0.025-0.2 Gy) were sufficient to produce a dramatic increase in the frequency of chromatid aberrations. High frequencies of chromatid aberrations were also obtained when cultures that had received moderate doses of X-rays (0.4-0.8 Gy) were post-treated with low inhibitor concentrations that produce no or only a few aberrations by themselves.

  3. Applications of X-ray Computed Tomography and Emission Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seletchi, Emilia Dana; Sutac, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Computed Tomography is a non-destructive imaging method that allows visualization of internal features within non-transparent objects such as sedimentary rocks. Filtering techniques have been applied to circumvent the artifacts and achieve high-quality images for quantitative analysis. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) can be used to identify the position of the growth axis in speleothems by detecting subtle changes in calcite density between growth bands. HRXCT imagery reveals the three-dimensional variability of coral banding providing information on coral growth and climate over the past several centuries. The Nuclear Medicine imaging technique uses a radioactive tracer, several radiation detectors, and sophisticated computer technologies to understand the biochemical basis of normal and abnormal functions within the brain. The goal of Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) is to accurately determine the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution resulting from the radiopharmaceutical uptake inside the patient instead of the attenuation coefficient distribution from different tissues as obtained from X-ray Computer Tomography. ECT is a very useful tool for investigating the cognitive functions. Because of the low radiation doses associated with Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this technique has been applied in clinical research, allowing the direct study of human neurological diseases. (authors)

  4. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers, and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  5. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering-density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization-to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers, and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  6. Characterization of scalar mixing in dense gaseous jets using X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnmon, Jared; Sobhani, Sadaf; Kim, Tae Wook; Kovscek, Anthony; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    An experimental technique based on X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is used to characterize scalar mixing of a krypton jet with air at turbulent conditions. The high radiodensity of the krypton gas enables non-intrusive volumetric measurements of gas density and mixture composition based on spatial variations in X-ray attenuation. Comparisons of these measurements to both computational results from large-eddy simulations and data from previous experiments are presented, and the viability of this diagnostic technique is assessed. Important aspects of X-ray attenuation theory, XCT practice, and relevant error analysis are considered in data processing, and their impacts on the future development of this technique are discussed.

  7. Three-dimensional monochromatic x-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tokumori, Kenji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Uyama, Chikao

    1998-08-01

    We describe a technique of 3D computed tomography (3D CT) using monochromatic x rays generated by synchrotron radiation, which performs a direct reconstruction of a 3D volume image of an object from its cone-beam projections. For the development, we propose a practical scanning orbit of the x-ray source to obtain complete 3D information on an object, and its corresponding 3D image reconstruction algorithm. The validity and usefulness of the proposed scanning orbit and reconstruction algorithm were confirmed by computer simulation studies. Based on these investigations, we have developed a prototype 3D monochromatic x-ray CT using synchrotron radiation, which provides exact 3D reconstruction and material-selective imaging by using the K-edge energy subtraction technique.

  8. Studying fatigue damage evolution in uni-directional composites using x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    , it will be possible to lower the costs of energy for wind energy based electricity. In the present work, a lab-source x-ray computed tomography equipment (Zeiss Xradia 520 Versa) has been used in connection with ex-situ fatigue testing of uni-directional composites in order to identify fibre failure during...... comparable x-ray studies) have been used in order to ensure a representative test volume during the ex-situ fatigue testing. Using the ability of the x-ray computed tomography to zoom into regions of interest, non-destructive, the fatigue damage evolution in a repeating ex-situ fatigue loaded test sample has...... improving the fatigue resistance of non-crimp fabric used in the wind turbine industry can be made....

  9. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  10. Development of x-ray computed tomographic scanner for iron and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Isamu; Nakamura, Shigeo.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is extensively used in medicine, but has rarely been applied to non-medical purposes. Steel specimens pose particularly difficult problems-very poor transmission of X-rays and the need for high resolving capability. There has thus been no effective tomographic method of examining steel specimens. Due to the growing need for non-destructive, non-contact methods for observing and analyzing the internal conditions of steel microscopically, however, we have developed an X-ray Computed Tomographic Scanner for Steel (CTS) system, specifically for examination of steel specimens. Its major specifications and functions are as follows. Type: the second-generation CT, 8-channels, Scanning method: 6 0 revolution, 30-times traversing, Slice width: 0.5 mm, Resolving capability: 0.25 x 0.25 mm, X-ray source: 420 kV, 3 mA, X-ray detector: BGO scintillator, Standard specimen shape: 50 mm dia., 100 mm high, Measuring time: 10.5 min. Porosity of a stainless steel (SUS 304) bloom was examined three-dimensionally by the CTS system. Corrosion procedure of a steel slab was also examined. (author)

  11. X-ray-based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Beyer, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    A synergy of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners is the use of the CT data for x-ray-based attenuation correction of the PET emission data. Current methods of measuring transmission use positron sources, gamma-ray sources, or x-ray sources. Each of the types of transmission scans involves different trade-offs of noise versus bias, with positron transmission scans having the highest noise but lowest bias, whereas x-ray scans have negligible noise but the potential for increased quantitative errors. The use of x-ray-based attenuation correction, however, has other advantages, including a lack of bias introduced from post-injection transmission scanning, which is an important practical consideration for clinical scanners, as well as reduced scan times. The sensitivity of x-ray-based attenuation correction to artifacts and quantitative errors depends on the method of translating the CT image from the effective x-ray energy of approximately 70 keV to attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. These translation methods are usually based on segmentation and/or scaling techniques. Errors in the PET emission image arise from positional mismatches caused by patient motion or respiration differences between the PET and CT scans; incorrect calculation of attenuation coefficients for CT contrast agents or metallic implants; or keeping the patient's arms in the field of view, which leads to truncation and/or beam-hardening (or x-ray scatter) artifacts. Proper interpretation of PET emission images corrected for attenuation by using the CT image relies on an understanding of the potential artifacts. In cases where an artifact or bias is suspected, careful inspection of all three available images (CT and PET emission with and without attenuation correction) is recommended. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Gakuji; Ishiwata, Yusuke; Yamashita, Toshinori; Iida, Takashi; Moro, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography (CR) are discussed. Computed radiography is a digital radiography system in which an imaging plate is used as an X-ray detector and a final image is displayed on the film. In the angiograms performed with CR, the spatial frequency components can be enhanced for the easy analysis of fine blood vessels. Computed radiography has an automatic sensitivity and a latitude-setting mechanism, thus serving as an 'automatic camera.' This mechanism is useful for radiography with a mobile X-ray unit in hospital wards, intensive care units, or operating rooms where the appropriate setting of exposure conditions is difficult. We applied this mechanism to direct percutaneous carotid angiography and intravenous digital subtraction angiography with a mobile X-ray unit. Direct percutaneous carotid angiography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit were taken after the manual injection of a small amount of a contrast material through a fine needle. We performed direct percutaneous carotid angiography with this method 68 times on 25 cases from August 1986 to December 1987. Of the 68 angiograms, 61 were evaluated as good, compared with conventional angiography. Though the remaining seven were evaluated as poor, they were still diagnostically effective. This method is found useful for carotid angiography in emergency rooms, intensive care units, or operating rooms. Cerebral venography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit was done after the manual injection of a contrast material through the bilateral cubital veins. The cerebral venous system could be visualized from 16 to 24 seconds after the beginning of the injection of the contrast material. We performed cerebral venography with this method 14 times on six cases. These venograms were better than conventional angiograms in all cases. This method may be useful in managing patients suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  13. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Burke, Paula; Besplug, Jill; Slovack, Mark; Filkowski, Jody; Pogribny, Igor

    2004-01-01

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16 INKa and DNA repair gene O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16 INKa promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16 INKa promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16 INKa promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16 INKa and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure

  14. Hybrid setup for micro- and nano-computed tomography in the hard X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Hanke, Randolf; Last, Arndt; Zabler, Simon

    2017-12-01

    With increasing miniaturization in industry and medical technology, non-destructive testing techniques are an area of ever-increasing importance. In this framework, X-ray microscopy offers an efficient tool for the analysis, understanding, and quality assurance of microscopic samples, in particular as it allows reconstructing three-dimensional data sets of the whole sample's volume via computed tomography (CT). The following article describes a compact X-ray microscope in the hard X-ray regime around 9 keV, based on a highly brilliant liquid-metal-jet source. In comparison to commercially available instruments, it is a hybrid that works in two different modes. The first one is a micro-CT mode without optics, which uses a high-resolution detector to allow scans of samples in the millimeter range with a resolution of 1 μm. The second mode is a microscope, which contains an X-ray optical element to magnify the sample and allows resolving 150 nm features. Changing between the modes is possible without moving the sample. Thus, the instrument represents an important step towards establishing high-resolution laboratory-based multi-mode X-ray microscopy as a standard investigation method.

  15. Eigenvector decomposition of full-spectrum x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Brian J; Lalush, David S

    2012-03-07

    Energy-discriminated x-ray computed tomography (CT) data were projected onto a set of basis functions to suppress the noise in filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstructions. The x-ray CT data were acquired using a novel x-ray system which incorporated a single-pixel photon-counting x-ray detector to measure the x-ray spectrum for each projection ray. A matrix of the spectral response of different materials was decomposed using eigenvalue decomposition to form the basis functions. Projection of FBP onto basis functions created a de facto image segmentation of multiple contrast agents. Final reconstructions showed significant noise suppression while preserving important energy-axis data. The noise suppression was demonstrated by a marked improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) along the energy axis for multiple regions of interest in the reconstructed images. Basis functions used on a more coarsely sampled energy axis still showed an improved SNR. We conclude that the noise-resolution trade off along the energy axis was significantly improved using the eigenvalue decomposition basis functions.

  16. Adaptive zooming in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabravolski, Andrei; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the source-detector system commonly rotates around the object in a circular trajectory. Such a trajectory does not allow to exploit a detector fully when scanning elongated objects. Increase the spatial resolution of the reconstructed image by optimal zooming during scanning. A new approach is proposed, in which the full width of the detector is exploited for every projection angle. This approach is based on the use of prior information about the object's convex hull to move the source as close as possible to the object, while avoiding truncation of the projections. Experiments show that the proposed approach can significantly improve reconstruction quality, producing reconstructions with smaller errors and revealing more details in the object. The proposed approach can lead to more accurate reconstructions and increased spatial resolution in the object compared to the conventional circular trajectory.

  17. SAVLOC, computer program for automatic control and analysis of X-ray fluorescence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program for a PDP-15 computer is presented which provides for control and analysis of trace element determinations by using X-ray fluorescence. The program simultaneously handles data accumulation for one sample and analysis of data from previous samples. Data accumulation consists of sample changing, timing, and data storage. Analysis requires the locating of peaks in X-ray spectra, determination of intensities of peaks, identification of origins of peaks, and determination of a real density of the element responsible for each peak. The program may be run in either a manual (supervised) mode or an automatic (unsupervised) mode.

  18. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  19. OBSERVATIONS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Corcoran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography (XCT is a rising technology within many industries and sectors with a demand for dimensional metrology, defect, void analysis and reverse engineering. There are many variables that can affect the dimensional metrology of objects imaged using XCT, this paper focusses on the effects of beam hardening due to the orientation of the workpiece, in this case a holeplate, and the volume of material the X-rays travel through. Measurements discussed include unidirectional and bidirectional dimensions, radii of cylinders, fit point deviations of the fitted shapes and cylindricity. Results indicate that accuracy and precision of these dimensional measurements are affected in varying amounts, both by the amount of material the X-rays have travelled through and the orientation of the object.

  20. Observations on the Performance of X-Ray Computed Tomography for Dimensional Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, H. C.; Brown, S. B.; Robson, S.; Speller, R. D.; McCarthy, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is a rising technology within many industries and sectors with a demand for dimensional metrology, defect, void analysis and reverse engineering. There are many variables that can affect the dimensional metrology of objects imaged using XCT, this paper focusses on the effects of beam hardening due to the orientation of the workpiece, in this case a holeplate, and the volume of material the X-rays travel through. Measurements discussed include unidirectional and bidirectional dimensions, radii of cylinders, fit point deviations of the fitted shapes and cylindricity. Results indicate that accuracy and precision of these dimensional measurements are affected in varying amounts, both by the amount of material the X-rays have travelled through and the orientation of the object.

  1. [The digital reprocessing of under- and overexposed x-ray films with a personal computer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, R; Diedrich, P

    1993-02-01

    An image processing work station for digitalizing and interactively manipulating under- and overexposed X-rays was set up by adding modules to an IBM compatible personal computer. Overexposed X-rays can be qualitatively enhanced by means of controlled manipulation of contrast and brightness and by means of the use of various digital filtering techniques. With underexposed X-rays an equalized grey scale can be achieved by means of regulating contrast and brightness. Digital filtering is not required. To assure a high degree of anatomical detail (periodontal ligament) in the digitalized image a maximum pixel of 0.1 mm was defined as a qualitative norm. Since in every digitalization process resolution is diminished, it proved best to select for interactive manipulation out of the total image only the section of interest.

  2. Characterization of feed channel spacer performance using geometries obtained by X-ray computed tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Haaksman, Viktor A.; Siddiqui, Amber; Schellenberg, Carsten; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    design from X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The method revealed that the filaments of industrial spacers have a highly variable cross-section size and shape, which impact the flow characteristics in the feed channel. The pressure drop and friction

  3. A Monte Carlo simulation of scattering reduction in spectral x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation plays an important role in the accurate reconstruction of the inspected object, leading to a loss of contrast between the different materials in the reconstruction volume and cupping artifacts in the images. We present a Monte Carlo simulation...

  4. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. II. Image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient head characteristics, as well as the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect lesion contrast and noise values in computed tomography (CT) images. Head sizes and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images for five classes of patients ranging from the newborn to adults. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV were used to compute the average photon energy, and energy fluence, transmitted through the heads of patients of varying size. Image contrast, and the corresponding contrast to noise ratios (CNRs), were determined for lesions of fat, muscle, and iodine relative to a uniform water background. Maintaining a constant image CNR for each lesion, the patient energy imparted was also computed to identify the x-ray tube voltage that minimized the radiation dose. For adults, increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV changed the iodine HU from 2.62x10 5 to 1.27x10 5 , the fat HU from -138 to -108, and the muscle HU from 37.1 to 33.0. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the percentage energy fluence transmission by up to a factor of 2. For a fixed x-ray tube voltage, the percentage transmitted energy fluence in adults was more than a factor of 4 lower than for newborns. For adults, increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV improved the CNR for muscle lesions by 130%, for fat lesions by a factor of 2, and for iodine lesions by 25%. As the size of the patient increased from newborn to adults, lesion CNR was reduced by about a factor of 2. The mAs value can be reduced by 80% when scanning newborns while maintaining the same lesion CNR as for adults. Maintaining the CNR of an iodine lesion at a constant level, use of 140 kV increases the energy imparted to an adult patient by nearly a factor of 3.5 in comparison to 80 kV. For fat and muscle lesions, raising the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV at a constant CNR increased the patient dose by 37% and 7

  5. Structural changes in mammalian cell DNA induced by low-dose x-ray damage and subsequent postirradiation incubation in the presence and absence of caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wun, K.L.W.; Shafer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    DNA damage and postirradiation incubation effects from X-ray doses of 30-2000 rad delivered to rat 9L cells in vitro were detemined by viscoelastic analysis of neutral (pH 7) cell lysates. Damage studies showed first an increase in the principal viscoelastic retardation time, T, with increasing dose, followed by a decrease, with the maximum retardation time occurring at 1000 rad. Also, the variation of retardation time with increasing postirradiation incubation time at 37 0 C was determined. At doses greater than 50 rad, this variation was quite complicated; e.g., following 100 rad, the retardation time showed a minimum followed by a maximum as a function of incubation time. All doses showed an initial return of T to close to control values at early times. Following 50 rad, control viscoelastic behavior was recovered in 1 hr. For doses of 100 rad and higher, 5 hr or more were required for complete return to control behavior has determined by both the value of T and the viscoelastic response to a probe dose of 200 rad immediately prior to lysis. These results are analyzed in terms of the dependence of the principal retardation time T on DNA molecular weight and conformation. Evidence is discussed indicating that the observed changes in T during postirradiation incubation reflect repair of DNA damage. Postirradiation incubation in the presence of 0.5 mM caffeine appeared to result in an inhibition of repair. In this case, both 30- and 50-rad doses required 5 hr for complete recovery of control behavior and showed the minimum and maximum in the T vs incubation time curve observed for incubation in the absence of caffeine following a dose of 100 rad

  6. Cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Yi, Huangjian; Zhang, Xianghan; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-03-01

    The appearance of x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging by x ray. In the previous XLCT system, the sample was irradiated by a sequence of narrow x-ray beams and the x-ray luminescence was measured by a highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera. This resulted in a relatively long sampling time and relatively low utilization of the x-ray beam. In this paper, a novel cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography strategy is proposed, which can fully utilize the x-ray dose and shorten the scanning time. The imaging model and reconstruction method are described. The validity of the imaging strategy has been studied in this paper. In the cone beam XLCT system, the cone beam x ray was adopted to illuminate the sample and a highly sensitive CCD camera was utilized to acquire luminescent photons emitted from the sample. Photons scattering in biological tissues makes it an ill-posed problem to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the x-ray luminescent sample in the cone beam XLCT. In order to overcome this issue, the authors used the diffusion approximation model to describe the photon propagation in tissues, and employed the sparse regularization method for reconstruction. An incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method and permissible region strategy were used for reconstruction. Meanwhile, traditional x-ray CT imaging could also be performed in this system. The x-ray attenuation effect has been considered in their imaging model, which is helpful in improving the reconstruction accuracy. First, simulation experiments with cylinder phantoms were carried out to illustrate the validity of the proposed compensated method. The experimental results showed that the location error of the compensated algorithm was smaller than that of the uncompensated method. The permissible region strategy was applied and reduced the reconstruction error to less than 2 mm. The robustness and stability were then

  7. Comparison of x-ray computed tomography, through-transmission ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging for characterizing green-state ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.A.; Ellingson, W.A.; Vannier, M.W.

    1985-06-01

    Green-state MgAl 2 O 4 compact disk specimens have been studied by x-ray computed tomography (CT), through-transmission pulsed ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging to compare the abilities of these nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods to detect flaws and density variations. X-ray computed tomographic images were obtained from a 125-kV (peak) imaging system with a 512 x 512 matrix and a pixel size of 100 μm. A 3- to 10- MHz focused-beam ultrasonic transducer was used, together with special immersion techniques, to obtain topographical maps of acoustic attenuation and phase velocity; a 30 x 30 matrix was used in the ultrasonic scans. A 35-kV x-ray system with high-resolution type RR film was used to obtain conventional radiographs. Large-scale nonuniform density gradients were detected with CT and ultrasonics in supposedly uniform ceramic disks. In addition, inclusions in the green-state samples were detected by all three methods, with each method providing certain advantages. The influence of grain structure and other ceramic powder characteristics will be examined in the future. 5 refs., 9 figs

  8. Incoherent-scatter computed tomography with monochromatic synchrotron x ray: feasibility of multi-CT imaging system for simultaneous measurement-of fluorescent and incoherent scatter x rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, T.; Akiba, M.; Takeda, T.; Kazama, M.; Hoshino, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, T.; Itai, Y.

    1997-10-01

    We describe a new system of incoherent scatter computed tomography (ISCT) using monochromatic synchrotron X rays, and we discuss its potential to be used in in vivo imaging for medical use. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) of the first generation. The reconstruction method for ISCT uses the least squares method with singular value decomposition. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan. An acrylic cylindrical phantom of 20-mm diameter containing a cross-shaped channel was imaged. The channel was filled with a diluted iodine solution with a concentration of 200 /spl mu/gI/ml. Spectra obtained with the system's high purity germanium (HPGe) detector separated the incoherent X-ray line from the other notable peaks, i.e., the iK/sub /spl alpha// and K/sub /spl beta/1/ X-ray fluorescent lines and the coherent scattering peak. CT images were reconstructed from projections generated by integrating the counts In the energy window centering around the incoherent scattering peak and whose width was approximately 2 keV. The reconstruction routine employed an X-ray attenuation correction algorithm. The resulting image showed more homogeneity than one without the attenuation correction.

  9. Dose evaluation for paediatric chest x-ray examinations in Brazil and Sudan: low doses and reliable examinations can be achieved in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadain, K E M; Rosa, L A R da; Azevedo, A C P; Guebel, M R N; Boechat, M C B; Habani, F

    2004-01-01

    Radiation protection in paediatric radiology deserves special attention since it is assumed that children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. The aim of this work is to estimate the entrance skin dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) for chest x-ray exposure of paediatric patients in five large units, three in Sudan and two in Brazil, and to compare the results obtained in both countries with each other and with other values obtained by some European countries. Two examination projections have been investigated, namely, postero-anterior (PA) and antero-posterior (AP). The age intervals considered were: 0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. The results have been obtained with the use of a software called DoseCal. Results of mean ESD for the age interval 1-5 years and AP projection are: 66 μGy (Instituto de Pediatria e Puericultura Martagao Gesteira-IPPMG Hospital), 41, 86 and 68 μGy (Instituto Fernandes Figueira-IFF Hospital), 161 μGy (Omdurman Hospital), 395 μGy (Khartoum Hospital) and 23 μGy (Ahmed Gasim Hospital). In the case of the IFF Hospital, the results refer, respectively, to rooms 1, 2 and for the six mobile equipments. The reference dose values given by the European Guidelines were exceeded in the Khartoum Hospital whilst in all the other hospitals results obtained were below CEC reference values and comparable with the results found in Sweden, Germany, Spain and Italy. The mean E for the same age interval was 11 μSv in the IPPMG, 6, 15 and 11 μSv in the IFF, respectively for rooms 1, 2 and the 6 mobiles, 25 μSv in the Omdurman Hospital, 45 μSv in the Khartoum Hospital and 3 μSv in the Ahmed Gasim Hospital. These are some examples of the large discrepancies that have been detected in this survey

  10. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved.

  11. LBP-based penalized weighted least-squares approach to low-dose cone-beam computed tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Wang, Huafeng; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Xianfeng; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has attracted growing interest of researchers in image reconstruction. The mAs level of the X-ray tube current, in practical application of CBCT, is mitigated in order to reduce the CBCT dose. The lowering of the X-ray tube current, however, results in the degradation of image quality. Thus, low-dose CBCT image reconstruction is in effect a noise problem. To acquire clinically acceptable quality of image, and keep the X-ray tube current as low as achievable in the meanwhile, some penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS)-based image reconstruction algorithms have been developed. One representative strategy in previous work is to model the prior information for solution regularization using an anisotropic penalty term. To enhance the edge preserving and noise suppressing in a finer scale, a novel algorithm combining the local binary pattern (LBP) with penalized weighted leastsquares (PWLS), called LBP-PWLS-based image reconstruction algorithm, is proposed in this work. The proposed LBP-PWLS-based algorithm adaptively encourages strong diffusion on the local spot/flat region around a voxel and less diffusion on edge/corner ones by adjusting the penalty for cost function, after the LBP is utilized to detect the region around the voxel as spot, flat and edge ones. The LBP-PWLS-based reconstruction algorithm was evaluated using the sinogram data acquired by a clinical CT scanner from the CatPhan® 600 phantom. Experimental results on the noiseresolution tradeoff measurement and other quantitative measurements demonstrated its feasibility and effectiveness in edge preserving and noise suppressing in comparison with a previous PWLS reconstruction algorithm.

  12. Data transmission from the DRON-2 X-ray diffractometers to a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.G.; Monov, N.A.; Sazonov, V.F.; Chernomorskaya, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    The circuit of data transmission from DRON-2 X-ray diffractometer to a measurement-computation complex based on UVK SM-3 computer and CAMAC crate is described. The data is transmitted along two-wire TRP 1x2 telephone line of 'current loop type'. Pulses from intensity channel outlet are transmitted as unipolar mark pulses of ∼1 μs duration. The channels are separated by amplitudes

  13. Differences in male and female spino-pelvic alignment in asymptomatic young adults: a three-dimensional analysis using upright low-dose digital biplanar X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Michiel M A; Drevelle, Xavier; Humbert, Ludovic; Skalli, Wafa; Castelein, René M

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in 60 asymptomatic young adult males and females. To analyze the differences in sagittal spino-pelvic alignment in a group of asymptomatic young adult males and females and describe gender specific reference values. Several spinal disorders like idiopathic scoliosis and Scheuermann's disease have a well-known sex-related prevalence ratio. As spino-pelvic alignment plays an important role in spinal biomechanics, it is imperative to analyze possible differences between the male and female spino-pelvic alignment. Furthermore, in spinal fusion surgery, normal sagittal balance should be recreated as closely as possible. An innovative biplanar ultra low-dose radiographic technique was used to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of the spine (T1-L5), sacrum, and pelvis in a freestanding position of 30 asymptomatic young male and 30 young female adults. Values were calculated for thoracic kyphosis (T4-T12), lumbar lordosis (L1-S1), total and regional lumbopelvic lordosis (PRT12, PRL2, PRL4, and PRL5), sagittal plumb line of T1, T4, and T9 (HAT1, HAT4, and HAT9), T1-L5 sagittal spinal inclination, T9 sagittal offset, and pelvic parameters (pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic incidence). In addition, vertebral inclination in the sagittal plane of each vertebra was measured. Differences in spino-pelvic alignment between the sexes were analyzed. The female spine was more dorsally inclined (11 degrees vs. 8 degrees ; P = 0.003). High thoracic and thoracolumbar vertebrae were more dorsally inclined in women than in men. Thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, regional lumbopelvic lordosis, sagittal plumb lines, T9 sagittal offset, and pelvic parameters were not statistically different between the sexes. These results indicate that the female spine is definitely different from the male spine. The spine as whole and individual vertebrae in certain regions of the normal spine is more backwardly inclined in females than in

  14. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China); Zhu, Li-juan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases and Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215021 (China); Zhu, Lun-qing, E-mail: xiaodongwangsz@163.com [The Center of Diagnosis and Treatment for Children’s Bone Diseases, The Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China); Zhou, Xiao-zhong, E-mail: zhouxz@suda.edu.cn [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  15. Demonstration of iodine K-edge imaging by use of an energy-discrimination X-ray computed tomography system with a cadmium telluride detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Kameda, Masashi; Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    An energy-discrimination K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target region by utilizing contrast media. The CT system has a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector, and a projection curve is obtained by linear scanning with use of the CdTe detector in conjunction with an X-stage. An object is rotated by a rotation step angle with use of a turntable between the linear scans. Thus, CT is carried out by repetition of the linear scanning and the rotation of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced with use of charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both the photon energy and the energy width are selected by use of a multi-channel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. For performing energy discrimination, a low-dose-rate X-ray generator for photon counting was developed; the maximum tube voltage and the minimum tube current were 110 kV and 1.0 microA, respectively. In energy-discrimination CT, the tube voltage and the current were 60 kV and 20.0 microA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 0.735 microGy/s at 1.0 m from the source and with a tube voltage of 60 kV. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selection of photons with energies just beyond the iodine K-edge energy of 33.2 keV.

  16. Present situation and necessity of computer programmed X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Hatagawa, Masakatsu

    1989-01-01

    In order to take radiographic photos, it is necessary to know a great deal of information. For example, mA, kV, exposure time, screen, grid, phototimer, etc. In this study, we examined 4 widely-used types computer-programmed X-ray equipment. These computer-assisted processes are designed to look at the data and make programmed individual decisions. The purpose is to reduce the differences in radiographic quality and the risk of retaking caused by the differences in experience among technicians. We concluded that none of them has ideal functions but each can be used as a source supply information, if a little remodeling is done, and we confirm that computer-programmed X-ray equipment is, and will continue to go be, necessary. (author)

  17. Three dimensional reconstruction of fossils with X-ray CT and computer graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Takashi; Tateno, Satoko (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences); Suzuki, Naoki

    1991-12-01

    We have developed a method for three dimensional (3D) visualization of fossils such as trilobites and ammonites by non-destructive measurement and computer graphics. The imaging techniques in the medical sciences are applied for fossils by us to have quantitative data analyses on the structural and functional features of some extinct creatures. These methods are composed of a high resolutional X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) and computer graphics. We are able to observe not only outer shape but also inner structure of fossils as a 3D image by this method. Consequently, the shape and volume are measurable on these 3D image quantitatively. In addition to that, it is able to reconstruct an ideal figure from the deformed fossils by graphical treatments of the data. Such a 3D reconstruction method is useful to obtain a new information from the paleontological standpoint. (author).

  18. Three dimensional reconstruction of fossils with X-ray CT and computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Takashi; Tateno, Satoko; Suzuki, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a method for three dimensional (3D) visualization of fossils such as trilobites and ammonites by non-destructive measurement and computer graphics. The imaging techniques in the medical sciences are applied for fossils by us to have quantitative data analyses on the structural and functional features of some extinct creatures. These methods are composed of a high resolutional X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) and computer graphics. We are able to observe not only outer shape but also inner structure of fossils as a 3D image by this method. Consequently, the shape and volume are measurable on these 3D image quantitatively. In addition to that, it is able to reconstruct an ideal figure from the deformed fossils by graphical treatments of the data. Such a 3D reconstruction method is useful to obtain a new information from the paleontological standpoint. (author)

  19. Low-dose computed tomographic imaging in orbital trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, A.; Whitehouse, R.W. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1993-08-01

    The authors review findings in 75 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 66 patients with orbital trauma who were imaged using a low-radiation-dose CT technique. Imaging was performed using a dynamic scan mode and exposure factors of 120 kVp and 80 mAs resulting in a skin dose of 11 mGy with an effective dose-equivalent of 0.22 mSv. Image quality was diagnostic in all cases and excellent in 73 examinations. Soft-tissue abnormalities within the orbit including muscle adhesions were well demonstrated both on primary axial and reconstructed multiplanar images. The benefits of multiplanar reconstructions are stressed and the contribution of soft-tissue injuries to symptomatic diplopia examined. (author).

  20. Computer simulation tools for X-ray analysis scattering and diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Morelhão, Sérgio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to break down the huge barrier of difficulties faced by beginners from many fields (Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Medicine, Material Science, etc.) in using X-rays as an analytical tool in their research. Besides fundamental concepts, MatLab routines are provided, showing how to test and implement the concepts. The major difficult in analyzing materials by X-ray techniques is that it strongly depends on simulation software. This book teaches the users on how to construct a library of routines to simulate scattering and diffraction by almost any kind of samples. It provides to a young student the knowledge that would take more than 20 years to acquire by working on X-rays and relying on the available textbooks. In this book, fundamental concepts in applied X-ray physics are demonstrated through available computer simulation tools. Using MatLab, more than eighty routines are developed for solving the proposed exercises, most of which can be directly used in experimental...

  1. A hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography system for enhanced material identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Qian; Ma, Jinlei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Po; Fang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can distinguish different materials according to their absorption characteristics. The hyperspectral X-ray CT (HXCT) system proposed in the present work reconstructs each voxel according to its X-ray absorption spectral characteristics. In contrast to a dual-energy or multi-energy CT system, HXCT employs cadmium telluride (CdTe) as the x-ray detector, which provides higher spectral resolution and separate spectral lines according to the material's photon-counter working principle. In this paper, a specimen containing ten different polymer materials randomly arranged was adopted for material identification by HXCT. The filtered back-projection algorithm was applied for image and spectral reconstruction. The first step was to sort the individual material components of the specimen according to their cross-sectional image intensity. The second step was to classify materials with similar intensities according to their reconstructed spectral characteristics. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed material identification process and indicated that the proposed HXCT system has good prospects for a wide range of biomedical and industrial nondestructive testing applications.

  2. Progress in Cell Marking for Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Sturm, Erica; Schultke, Elisabeth; Arfelli, Fulvia; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Astolfo, Alberto; Juurlink, Bernhard H. J.

    2010-07-01

    Recently there has been an increase in research activity into finding ways of marking cells in live animals for pre-clinical trials. Development of certain drugs and other therapies crucially depend on tracking particular cells or cell types in living systems. Therefore cell marking techniques are required which will enable longitudinal studies, where individuals can be examined several times over the course of a therapy or study. The benefits of being able to study both disease and therapy progression in individuals, rather than cohorts are clear. The need for high contrast 3-D imaging, without harming or altering the biological system requires a non-invasive yet penetrating imaging technique. The technique will also have to provide an appropriate spatial and contrast resolution. X-ray computed tomography offers rapid acquisition of 3-D images and is set to become one of the principal imaging techniques in this area. Work by our group over the last few years has shown that marking cells with gold nano-particles (GNP) is an effective means of visualising marked cells in-vivo using x-ray CT. Here we report the latest results from these studies. Synchrotron X-ray CT images of brain lesions in rats taken using the SYRMEP facility at the Elettra synchrotron in 2009 have been compared with histological examination of the tissues. Some deductions are drawn about the visibility of the gold loaded cells in both light microscopy and x-ray imaging.

  3. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  4. Metal artifact removal (MAR) analysis for the security inspections using the X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyo Sung; Woo, Tae Ho; Park, Chul Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Using the metal artifact property, it is analyzed for the X-ray computed tomography (CT) in the aspect of the security on the examined places like airport and surveillance areas. Since the importance of terror prevention strategy has been increased, the security application of X-ray CT has the significant remark. One shot X-ray image has the limitation to find out the exact shape to property in the closed box, which could be solved by the CT scanning without the tearing off the box in this work. Cleaner images can be obtained by the advanced technology if the CT scanning is utilized in the security purposes on the secured areas. A metal sample is treated by the metal artifact removal (MAR) method for the enhanced image. The mimicked explosive is experimented for the imaging processing application where the cleaner one is obtained. The procedure is explained and the further study is discussed. - Highlights: • The X-ray image is used for the nuclear inspections which are made by the image processing. • Nuclear security has been performed for counterterrorism. • Easy and fast inspections are needed. • Metal shows the characteristics of the noises.

  5. Characterization of breast tissue using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, S.; Cook, E.J.; Horrocks, J.A.; Jones, J.L.; Speller, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for sample characterization using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography (EDXRDCT) is presented. The procedures for extracting diffraction patterns from the data and the corrections applied are discussed. The procedures were applied to the characterization of breast tissue samples, 6 mm in diameter. Comparison with histological sections of the samples confirmed the possibility of grouping the patterns into five families, corresponding to adipose tissue, fibrosis, poorly differentiated cancer, well differentiated cancer and benign tumour.

  6. Three dimensional analysis of coelacanth body structure by computer graphics and X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hamada, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional imaging processes were applied for the structural and functional analyses of the modern coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae). Visualization of the obtained images is performed with computer graphics on the basis of serial images by an X-ray CT scanning method. Reconstruction of three dimensional images of the body structure of coelacanth using the volume rendering and surface rendering methods provides us various information about external and internal shapes of this exquisite fish. (author)

  7. Three Dimensional Digital Sieving of Asphalt Mixture Based on X-ray Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chichun Hu; Jiexian Ma; M. Emin Kutay

    2017-01-01

    In order to perform three-dimensional digital sieving based on X-ray computed tomography images, the definition of digital sieve size (DSS) was proposed, which was defined as the minimum length of the minimum bounding squares of all possible orthographic projections of an aggregate. The corresponding program was developed to reconstruct aggregate structure and to obtain DSS. Laboratory experiments consisting of epoxy-filled aggregate specimens were conducted to investigate the difference betw...

  8. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, X.; Aliasghari, S.; Němcová, A.; Burnett, T.L.; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, G.; Skeldon, P.; Withers, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 13 (2016), s. 8801-8810 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : plasma electrolytic oxidation * porosity * scanning electron microscopy * titanium * X-ray computed tomography Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.6b00274

  9. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-10-01

    To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the investigated range of 81-100 ke

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering...... properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists...... of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually...

  11. X-ray computed tomography of the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom; Rawson, Shelley; Castro, Simon Joseph; Balint, Richard; Bradley, Robert Stephen; Lowe, Tristan; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Lee, Peter David; Cartmell, Sarah Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Summary The effect of phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and iodine solution (IKI) staining was investigated as a method of enhancing contrast in the X-ray computed tomography of porcine anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) and patellar tendons (PT). We show that PTA enhanced surface contrast, but was ineffective at penetrating samples, whereas IKI penetrated more effectively and enhanced contrast after 70 hours of staining. Contrast enhancement was compared when using laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources. Using the laboratory source, PT fascicles were tracked and their alignment was measured. Individual ACL fascicles could not be identified, but identifiable features were evident that were tracked. Higher resolution scans of fascicle bundles from the PT and ACL were obtained using synchrotron imaging techniques. These scans exhibited greater contrast between the fascicles and matrix in the PT sample, facilitating the identification of the fascicle edges; however, it was still not possible to detect individual fascicles in the ACL. PMID:25332942

  12. Characterization of nanophase materials by x-ray diffraction and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, L.J.

    1989-06-01

    X-ray diffraction experiments on nanophase Pd have been performed with the primary goal of determining the nature of grain boundary structures in nanophase materials. A kinematical diffraction analysis has been developed to interpret x-ray θ--2θ data by comparing actual scans with scans produced by computer simulation. This simulation program has been used to explore the effects on diffracted intensity of a variety of microstructural and grain boundary structural parameters such as void concentration, grain size, grain boundary width, and changes in interplanar spacing and density in grain boundary regions. It has been found that a reasonable match to experimental data is produced by at least two model structures; in one, the material contains randomly positioned voids or vacancies, while in the other, the interplanar spacings in grain boundary regions are varied with respect to the spacings found in the grain interiors. 7 refs., 4 figs

  13. A computer programme to monitor the performance of an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpolo, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    A BASIC computer programme has been developed that measures the long- and short-term stability of an X-ray spectrometer and operational errors (and compares them with the limits specified by the manufacturer) and the dead time of the associated detectors. The programme also carries out checks on the spectrometer with regard to the performance of different combinations of the crystals, the detectors, the collimators, the sin 2 THETA angles, the apertures, the tracking of the sin 2 THETA amplifier, the operation of the second-order spectrum circuits, the operation of the automatic pulse-height analyser, the condition of the detectors, the condition of the X-ray tube, spectral contamination by the tube spectrum, and physical contamination by analytical specimens. Although the measurements take 15 hours, there is no disruption to normal, routine laboratory work since the measurements can be made automatically after routine work has been completed. Only four sample positions are required for this monitoring programme

  14. Multiple energy computed tomography with monochromatic x rays from the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Nachaliel, E.; Garrett, R.F.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, L.D.; Moulin, H.R.; Oversluizen, T.; Rarback, H.M.; Rivers, M.; Spanne, P.; Thompson, A.C.; Zeman, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    We used monochromatic x rays from the X17 superconducting wiggler beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, for dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (CT) of a 27 mm-diameter phantom containing solutions of different KOH concentrations in cylindrical holes of 5-mm diameter. The CT configuration was a fixed horizontal fan-shaped beam of 1.5 mm height and 30 mm width, and a subject rotating around a vertical axis. The transmitted x rays were detected by a linear-array Si(Li) detector with 120 elements of 0.25 mm width each. We used a two-crystal Bragg-Bragg fixed-exit monochromator with Si crystals. Dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) CT data were taken at 20 and 38 keV. The reconstructed phantom images show the potential of the system for quantitative CT

  15. Evaluation of a computer aided X-ray fluorographic system: Part II - image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, S.F.; Cocking, S.J.

    1981-12-01

    The TV imagery from a computer aided X-ray fluorographic system has been digitally processed with an I 2 S model 70E image processor, controlled by a PDP 11/60 minicomputer. The image processor allowed valuable processing for detection of defects in cast components to be carried out at television frame rates. Summation of TV frames was used to reduce noise, and hence improve the thickness sensitivity of the system. A displaced differencing technique and interactive contrast enhancement were then used to improve the reliability of inspection by removing spurious blemishes and interference lines, while simultaneously enhancing the visibility of real defects. The times required for these operations are given, and the benefits provided for X-ray fluorography are illustrated by the results from inspection of aero engine castings. (author)

  16. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  17. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2009-01-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 μA, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 μA, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  18. Fluorescent X-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation for imaging nonradioactive tracer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Uchida, Akira; Akatsuka, Takao [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Electrical and Information of Engineering; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Itai, Yuji

    1997-09-01

    We describe a system of fluorescent X-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation (SR-FXCT) to image nonradioactive contrast materials. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) scanned by the pencil beam. In the previous experiment, we have imaged an acrylic cylindrical phantom with cross-shaped channel, filled with a diluted iodine-based tracer material of 200 {mu}g/ml. This research is aimed to improve image quality, to select the optimum energy of the incident X-ray, to confirm quantitative evaluation of the image, and to demonstrate FXCT image for living body. First, we simulated output energy profile by the Monte Carlo simulation and confirmed to predetermine the incident X-ray energy at 37 keV, in order to separate the fluorescent photons from background scattering components. Next, the imaging experiment was performed by using conventional CT algorithm under the optimum parameter at the Tristan Accumulation Ring, KEK, Japan. An acrylic phantom containing five paraxial channels of 5 and 4 mm in diameter, could be imaged; where each channel was respectively filled with diluted iodine-based contrast materials of 50, 100, 200 and 500 {mu}g/ml. From the reconstructed image, we confirmed quantitativity in the FXCT image. Finally, a rat`s brain was imaged in vitro by FXCT and monochromatic transmission CT. The comparison between these results showed that the iodine-rich region in the FXCT image corresponded with that in the monochromatic transmission CT image. (author)

  19. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  20. Optimal Contrast Agent Staining of Ligaments and Tendons for X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Lowe, Tristan; Shearer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography has become an important tool for studying the microstructures of biological soft tissues, such as ligaments and tendons. Due to the low X-ray attenuation of such tissues, chemical contrast agents are often necessary to enhance contrast during scanning. In this article, the effects of using three different contrast agents--iodine potassium iodide solution, phosphotungstic acid and phosphomolybdic acid--are evaluated and compared. Porcine anterior cruciate ligaments, patellar tendons, medial collateral ligaments and lateral collateral ligaments were used as the basis of the study. Three samples of each of the four ligament/tendon types were each assigned a different contrast agent (giving a total of twelve samples), and the progression of that agent through the tissue was monitored by performing a scan every day for a total period of five days (giving a total of sixty scans). Since the samples were unstained on day one, they had been stained for a total of four days by the time of the final scans. The relative contrast enhancement and tissue deformation were measured. It was observed that the iodine potassium iodide solution penetrated the samples fastest and caused the least sample shrinkage on average (although significant deformation was observed by the time of the final scans), whereas the phosphomolybdic acid caused the greatest sample shrinkage. Equations describing the observed behaviour of the contrast agents, which can be used to predict optimal staining times for ligament and tendon X-ray computed tomography, are presented.

  1. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Anton du, E-mail: anton2@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Roux, Stephan Gerhard le, E-mail: lerouxsg@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Guelpa, Anina, E-mail: aninag@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory’s first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  2. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], e-mail: ccalza@lin.ufrj.br; Pedreira, Andrea [Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 {mu}A, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 {mu}A, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  3. FDTD parallel computational analysis of grid-type scattering filter characteristics for medical X-ray image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu; Goto, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis depends on the intensity of transmitted and scattered waves in X-ray propagation in biomedical media. X-ray is scattered and absorbed by tissues, such as fat, bone and internal organs. However, image processing for medical diagnosis, based on the scattering and absorption characteristics of these tissues in X-ray spectrum is not so much studied. To obtain precise information of tissues in a living body, the accurate characteristics of scattering and absorption are required. In this paper, X-ray scattering and absorption in biomedical media are studied using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In FDTD method, the size of analysis space is very limited by the performance of available computers. To overcome this limitation, parallel and successive FDTD method is introduced. As a result of computer simulation, the amplitude of transmitted and scattered waves are presented numerically. The fundamental filtering characteristics of grid-type filter are also shown numerically. (author)

  4. Combined X-ray fluorescence and absorption computed tomography using a synchrotron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using synchrotron sources are both useful tools in biomedical imaging research. Synchrotron CT (SRCT) in its various forms is considered an important technique for biomedical imaging since the phase coherence of SR beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. Using a synchrotron as the source for FXCT ensures a fluorescence signal that is optimally detectable by exploiting the beam monochromaticity and polarisation. The ability to combine these techniques so that SRCT and FXCT images are collected simultaneously, would bring distinct benefits to certain biomedical experiments. Simultaneous image acquisition would alleviate some of the registration difficulties which comes from collecting separate data, and it would provide increased information about the sample: functional X-ray images from the FXCT, with the morphological information from the SRCT. A method is presented for generating simultaneous SRCT and FXCT images. Proof of principle modelling has been used to show that it is possible to recover a fluorescence image of a point-like source from an SRCT apparatus by suitably modulating the illuminating planar X-ray beam. The projection image can be successfully used for reconstruction by removing the static modulation from the sinogram in the normal flat and dark field processing. Detection of the modulated fluorescence signal using an energy resolving detector allows the position of a fluorescent marker to be obtained using inverse reconstruction techniques. A discussion is made of particular reconstruction methods which might be applied by utilising both the CT and FXCT data.

  5. Sensitivity of photon-counting based K-edge imaging in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ewald; Brendel, Bernhard; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of K-edge imaging using energy-resolved, photon-counting transmission measurements in X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments. The method is based on probing the discontinuities of the attenuation coefficient of heavy elements above and below the K-edge energy by using energy-sensitive, photon counting X-ray detectors. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the sensitivity of K-edge imaging on the atomic number Z of the contrast material, on the object diameter D , on the spectral response of the X-ray detector and on the X-ray tube voltage. We assume a photon-counting detector equipped with six adjustable energy thresholds. Physical effects leading to a degradation of the energy resolution of the detector are taken into account using the concept of a spectral response function R(E,U) for which we assume four different models. As a validation of our analytical considerations and in order to investigate the influence of elliptically shaped phantoms, we provide CT simulations of an anthropomorphic Forbild-Abdomen phantom containing a gold-contrast agent. The dependence on the values of the energy thresholds is taken into account by optimizing the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with respect to the threshold values. We find that for a given X-ray spectrum and object size the SNR in the heavy element's basis material image peaks for a certain atomic number Z. The dependence of the SNR in the high- Z basis-material image on the object diameter is the natural, exponential decrease with particularly deteriorating effects in the case where the attenuation from the object itself causes a total signal loss below the K-edge. The influence of the energy-response of the detector is very important. We observed that the optimal SNR values obtained with an ideal detector and with a CdTe pixel detector whose response, showing significant tailing, has been determined at a synchrotron differ by factors of

  6. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  7. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18x7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186±8 mm and 147±8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209±40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of ∼60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is ∼20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors

  8. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  9. Data processing of X-ray fluorescence analysis using an electronic computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, A.L.; Przhiyalovskij, S.M.; Tsameryan, G.N.; Golubnichij, G.V.; Nikitin, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are problems of data processing of multi-element (for 17 elements) X-ray fluorescence analysis of tungsten and molybdenum ores. The analysis was carried out using silicon-lithium spectrometer with the energy resolution of about 300 eV and a 1024-channel analyzer. A characteristic radiation of elements was excited with two 109 Cd radioisotope sources, their general activity being 10 mCi. The period of measurements was 400 s. The data obtained were processed with a computer using the ''Proba-1'' and ''Proba-2'' programs. Data processing algorithms and computer calculation results are presented

  10. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  11. Evaluation of a computer aided X-ray fluorographic system: part 1 - system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, S.F.; Cocking, S.J.

    1982-02-01

    A computer aided, X-ray fluorographic (CAF) system has been assembled for application in non-destructive testing. The fluorographic hardware comprises a rare earth phosphor viewed with a low-light level SIT (Silicon intensifier target) TV camera, suitable for real time imaging in an industrial environment. A digital image processor allows integration to reduce noise and hence increase the thickness sensitivity. It also provides image modification for optimum visual detection of defects. Measurements of the resolution of the system and the noise on the fluorographic images are presented. Observations of wire type IQIs gave subjective thickness sensitivities of 2 to 4% for steel specimens up to 9mm thick. The observed noise was caused primarily by the camera rather than by the fundamental limit expected from X-ray photon statistics. The present system has, in practical applications, shown a capability to detect small (0.5mm) volumetric defects in castings. Further developments of the system are also discussed. It is concluded that a micro-focus X-ray set should be used with the existing hardware to investigate projection magnification fluoroscopy. (author)

  12. Computed tomographic images using tube source of x rays: interior properties of the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Seltzer, S. M.; Hubbell, John H.; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Akatsuka, Takao; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2002-01-01

    An image intensifier based computed tomography scanner and a tube source of x-rays are used to obtain the images of small objects, plastics, wood and soft materials in order to know the interior properties of the material. A new method is developed to estimate the degree of monochromacy, total solid angle, efficiency and geometrical effects of the measuring system and the way to produce monoenergetic radiation. The flux emitted by the x-ray tube is filtered using the appropriate filters at the chosen optimum energy and reasonable monochromacy is achieved and the images are acceptably distinct. Much attention has been focused on the imaging of small objects of weakly attenuating materials at optimum value. At optimum value it is possible to calculate the three-dimensional representation of inner and outer surfaces of the object. The image contrast between soft materials could be significantly enhanced by optimal selection of the energy of the x-rays by Monte Carlo methods. The imaging system is compact, reasonably economic, has a good contrast resolution, simple operation and routine availability and explores the use of optimizing tomography for various applications.

  13. Contribute to quantitative identification of casting defects based on computer analysis of X-ray images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The forecast of structure and properties of casting is based on results of computer simulation of physical processes which are carried out during the casting processes. For the effective using of simulation system it is necessary to validate mathematica-physical models describing process of casting formation and the creation of local discontinues, witch determinate the casting properties.In the paper the proposition for quantitative validation of VP system using solidification casting defects by information sources of II group (methods of NDT was introduced. It was named the VP/RT validation (virtual prototyping/radiographic testing validation. Nowadays identification of casting defects noticeable on X-ray images bases on comparison of X-ray image of casting with relates to the ASTM. The results of this comparison are often not conclusive because based on operator’s subjective assessment. In the paper the system of quantitative identification of iron casting defects on X-ray images and classification this defects to ASTM class is presented. The methods of pattern recognition and machine learning were applied.

  14. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velroyen, A; Yaroshenko, A; Hahn, D; Fehringer, A; Tapfer, A; Müller, M; Noël, P B; Pauwels, B; Sasov, A; Yildirim, A Ö; Eickelberg, O; Hellbach, K; Auweter, S D; Meinel, F G; Reiser, M F; Bech, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2015-10-01

    Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT), based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural - and thus indirectly functional - changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU) scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue.

  15. Development of a computer code for shielding calculation in X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of an effective barrier against the interaction of ionizing radiation present in X-ray rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for specifying the thickness of primary and secondary shielding of an traditional X-ray room considers the following factors: factor of use, occupational factor, distance between the source and the wall, workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the receptor. With these data it was possible the development of a computer program in order to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions offered by NCRP Report-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) for the calculation of shielding of the room walls as well as the wall of the darkroom and adjacent areas. With the built methodology, a program validation is done through comparing results with a base case provided by that report. The thickness of the obtained values comprise various materials such as steel, wood and concrete. After validation is made an application in a real case of radiographic room. His visual construction is done with the help of software used in modeling of indoor and outdoor. The construction of barriers for calculating program resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in September / 2011

  16. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Gregor; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Gerlach, Martin; Cibik, Levent; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Rabe, Johannis; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wedell, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. Materials and methods: The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. Results: The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten Kα-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. Conclusion: An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT

  17. Performance study of monochromatic synchrotron X-ray computed tomography using a linear array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazama, Masahiro; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Akatsuka, Takao

    1997-09-01

    Monochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) using synchrotron radiation (SR) is being developed for detection of non-radioactive contrast materials at low concentration for application in clinical diagnosis. A new SR-CT system with improved contrast resolution, was constructed using a linear array detector which provides wide dynamic ranges and a double monochromator. The performance of this system was evaluated in a phantom and a rat model of brain ischemia. This system consists of a silicon (111) double crystal monochromator, an x-ray shutter, an ionization chamber, x-ray slits, a scanning table for the target organ, and an x-ray linear array detector. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan. In this experiment, the reconstructed image of the spatial-resolution phantom clearly showed the 1 mm holes. At 1 mm slice thickness, the above K-edge image of the phantom showed contrast resolution at the concentration of 200 {mu}g/ml iodine-based contrast materials whereas the K-edge energy subtraction image showed contrast resolution at the concentration of 500 {mu}g/ml contrast materials. The cerebral arteries filled with iodine microspheres were clearly revealed, and the ischemic regions at the right temporal lobe and frontal lobe were depicted as non-vascular regions. The measured minimal detectable concentration of iodine on the above K-edge image is about 6 times higher than the expected value of 35.3 {mu}g/ml because of the high dark current of this detector. Thus, the use of a CCD detector which is cooled by liquid nitrogen to improve the dynamic range of the detector, is being under construction. (author)

  18. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Gerlach, Martin; Cibik, Levent; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Rabe, Johannis; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wedell, Reiner; Luedemann, Lutz; Wust, Peter; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2008-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten K alpha-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT.

  19. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: gregor.jost@bayerhealthcare.com; Golfier, Sven [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: sven.golfier@bayerhealthcare.com; Lawaczeck, Ruediger [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: ruediger.lawaczeck@bayerhealthcare.com; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: hanns-joachim.weinmann@bayerhealthcare.com; Gerlach, Martin [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: martin.gerlach@ptb.de; Cibik, Levent [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: levent.cibik@ptb.de; Krumrey, Michael [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: michael.krumrey@ptb.de; Fratzscher, Daniel [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Fratzscher@ifg-adlershof.de; Rabe, Johannis [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Rabe@ifg-adlershof.de; Arkadiev, Vladimir [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Arkadiev@ifg-adlershof.de; Haschke, Michael [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Haschke@ifg-adlershof.de; Langhoff, Norbert [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Langhoff@ifg-adlershof.de; Wedell, Reiner [Institut fuer angewandte Photonik e.V., Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: wedell-iap@ifg-adlershof.de (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. Materials and methods: The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. Results: The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten K{alpha}-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. Conclusion: An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT.

  20. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Wilson, David L., E-mail: dlw@case.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P{sub C}. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit

  1. Imaging biofilm in porous media using X-ray computed microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Y; Iltis, G; Debenest, G; Veran-Tissoires, S; Wildenschild, D; Gerino, M; Quintard, M

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a new technique for three-dimensional imaging of biofilm within porous media using X-ray computed microtomography is presented. Due to the similarity in X-ray absorption coefficients for the porous media (plastic), biofilm and aqueous phase, an X-ray contrast agent is required to image biofilm within the experimental matrix using X-ray computed tomography. The presented technique utilizes a medical suspension of barium sulphate to differentiate between the aqueous phase and the biofilm. Potassium iodide is added to the suspension to aid in delineation between the biofilm and the experimental porous medium. The iodide readily diffuses into the biofilm while the barium sulphate suspension remains in the aqueous phase. This allows for effective differentiation of the three phases within the experimental systems utilized in this study. The behaviour of the two contrast agents, in particular of the barium sulphate, is addressed by comparing two-dimensional images of biofilm within a pore network obtained by (1) optical visualization and (2) X-ray absorption radiography. We show that the contrast mixture provides contrast between the biofilm, the aqueous-phase and the solid-phase (beads). The imaging method is then applied to two three-dimensional packed-bead columns within which biofilm was grown. Examples of reconstructed images are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. Limitations and applications of the technique are discussed. A key benefit, associated with the presented method, is that it captures a substantial amount of information regarding the topology of the pore-scale transport processes. For example, the quantification of changes in porous media effective parameters, such as dispersion or permeability, induced by biofilm growth, is possible using specific upscaling techniques and numerical analysis. We emphasize that the results presented here serve as a first test of this novel approach; issues with accurate segmentation of

  2. Revising the lower statistical limit of x-ray grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography (PCCT) is currently investigated as an interesting extension of conventional CT, providing high soft-tissue contrast even if examining weakly absorbing specimen. Until now, the potential for dose reduction was thought to be limited compared to attenuation CT, since meaningful phase retrieval fails for scans with very low photon counts when using the conventional phase retrieval method via phase stepping. In this work, we examine the statistical behaviour of the reverse projection method, an alternative phase retrieval approach and compare the results to the conventional phase retrieval technique. We investigate the noise levels in the projections as well as the image quality and quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed tomographic volumes. The results of our study show that this method performs better in a low-dose scenario than the conventional phase retrieval approach, resulting in lower noise levels, enhanced image quality and more accurate quantitative values. Overall, we demonstrate that the lower statistical limit of the phase stepping procedure as proposed by recent literature does not apply to this alternative phase retrieval technique. However, further development is necessary to overcome experimental challenges posed by this method which would enable mainstream or even clinical application of PCCT.

  3. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  4. [Contribution of X-ray computed tomography in the evaluation of kidney performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Rognant, Nicolas; Collet-Benzaquen, Diane; Juillard, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    X-ray computer assisted tomography scanner is an imaging method based on the use of X-ray attenuation in tissue. This attenuation is proportional to the density of the tissue (without or after contrast media injection) in each pixel image of the image. Spiral scanner, the electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) scanner and multidetector computed tomography scanner allow renal anatomical measurements, such as cortical and medullary volume, but also the measurement of renal functional parameters, such as regional renal perfusion, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. These functional parameters are extracted from the modeling of the kinetics of the contrast media concentration in the vascular space and the renal tissue, using two main mathematical models (the gamma variate model and the Patlak model). Renal functional imaging allows measuring quantitative parameters on each kidney separately, in a non-invasive manner, providing significant opportunities in nephrology, both for experimental and clinical studies. However, this method uses contrast media that may alter renal function, thus limiting its use in patients with chronic renal failure. Moreover, the increase irradiation delivered to the patient with multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Computer simulations of X-ray six-beam diffraction in a perfect silicon crystal. I

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohn, V.G.; Khikhlukha, Danila

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, May (2016), s. 349-356 ISSN 2053-2733 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray diffraction * silicon crystal * six-beam diffraction * section topography * computer simulations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 5.725, year: 2016

  6. Using x-ray computed tomography in hydrology: Systems, resolutions, and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Hopmans, J.W.; Vaz, C.M.P.

    2002-01-01

    media, obtained with different scanning systems and sample sizes, to illustrate advantages and limitations of these various systems, including topics of spatial resolution and contrast. In addition, we present examples of our most recent three-dimensional high-resolution images, for which......A combination of advances in experimental techniques and mathematical analysis has made it possible to characterize phase distribution and pore geometry in porous media using non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT). We present qualitative and quantitative CT results for partially saturated...

  7. Inside marginal adaptation of crowns by X-ray micro-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, T. M.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R. T.; Author, S. B. Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to access dental arcade by using X-ray micro-computed tomography. For this purpose high resolution system was used and three groups were studied: Zirkonzahn CAD-CAM system, IPS e.max Press, and metal ceramic. The three systems assessed in this study showed results of marginal and discrepancy gaps clinically accepted. The great result of 2D and 3D evaluations showed that the used technique is a powerful method to investigate quantitative characteristics of dental arcade. (authors)

  8. Inside marginal adaptation of crowns by X-ray micro-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, T. M.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R. T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brazil); Author, S. B. Jr. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to access dental arcade by using X-ray micro-computed tomography. For this purpose high resolution system was used and three groups were studied: Zirkonzahn CAD-CAM system, IPS e.max Press, and metal ceramic. The three systems assessed in this study showed results of marginal and discrepancy gaps clinically accepted. The great result of 2D and 3D evaluations showed that the used technique is a powerful method to investigate quantitative characteristics of dental arcade. (authors)

  9. Quantitative analysis of scaling error compensation methods in dimensional X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, P.; Hiller, Jochen; Dai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has become an important technology for quality control of industrial components. As with other technologies, e.g., tactile coordinate measurements or optical measurements, CT is influenced by numerous quantities which may have negative impact on the accuracy...... errors of the manipulator system (magnification axis). This article also introduces a new compensation method for scaling errors using a database of reference scaling factors and discusses its advantages and disadvantages. In total, three methods for the correction of scaling errors – using the CT ball...

  10. Chest X-ray and computed tomography in the evaluation of pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Porto, Nelson da Silva; Santana, Pablo Rydz

    2007-01-01

    Emphysema is a condition of the lung, characterized by the abnormal increase in the size of the airspace distal to the terminal bronchioles. Currently, emphysema is the fourth leading cause of death in the USA, affecting 14 million people. The present article describes the principal tools in the imaging diagnosis of emphysema, from the early days until the present. We describe traditional techniques, such as chest X-ray, together with the evolution of computed tomography (CT) to more advanced forms, such as high resolution CT, as well as three-dimensional CT densitometry and volumetric assessment. (author)

  11. Computer simulation for synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescent microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Biao; Yu Xiaohan; Xu Hongjie

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation based fluorescent microtomography (SR-XFMT) is a nondestructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen with high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and will be an optional experimental technique at SSRF hard X-ray micro-focusing beamline now under construction. In this paper, the principles and developments of SR-XFMT are briefly introduced. Computer simulation of SR-XFMT experiment is performed. The image of the simulated sample is reconstructed using Filtered Back Projection (FBP), Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques (ART) and modified FBP with absorption correction. The qualities of the reconstructed images are analyzed and compared. The validity of these reconstruction techniques is discussed. (authors)

  12. Computing segmentations directly from x-ray projection data via parametric deformable curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Hansen, Per Christian

    2018-01-01

    We describe an efficient algorithm that computes a segmented reconstruction directly from x-ray projection data. Our algorithm uses a parametric curve to define the segmentation. Unlike similar approaches which are based on level-sets, our method avoids a pixel or voxel grid; hence the number...... of unknowns is reduced to the set of points that define the curve, and attenuation coefficients of the segments. Our current implementation uses a simple closed curve and is capable of separating one object from the background. However, our basic algorithm can be applied to an arbitrary topology and multiple...

  13. Artifact Elimination Technique in Tomogram of X-ray Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasif Mohd Zain

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts of tomogram are main commonly problems occurred in x-ray computed tomography. The artifacts will be appearing in tomogram due to noise, beam hardening, and scattered radiation. The study has been carried out using CdTe time pix detector. The new technique has been developed to eliminate the artifact occurred in hardware and software. The hardware setup involved the careful alignment all of the components of the system and the introduction of a collimator beam. Meanwhile, in software development deal with the flat field correction, noise filter and data projection algorithm. The results show the technique developed produce good quality images and eliminate the artifacts. (author)

  14. Calibration-free quantification of interior properties of porous media with x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Esam M.A.; Agbogun, H.M.D.; Al, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for interpreting the values of x-ray attenuation coefficients reconstructed in computed tomography of porous media, while overcoming the ambiguity caused by the multichromatic nature of x-rays, dilution by void, and material heterogeneity. The method enables determination of porosity without relying on calibration or image segmentation or thresholding to discriminate pores from solid material. It distinguishes between solution-accessible and inaccessible pores, and provides the spatial and frequency distributions of solid-matrix material in a heterogeneous medium. This is accomplished by matching an image of a sample saturated with a contrast solution with that saturated with a transparent solution. Voxels occupied with solid-material and inaccessible pores are identified by the fact that they maintain the same location and image attributes in both images, with voxels containing inaccessible pores appearing empty in both images. Fully porous and accessible voxels exhibit the maximum contrast, while the rest are porous voxels containing mixtures of pore solutions and solid. This matching process is performed with an image registration computer code, and image processing software that requires only simple subtraction and multiplication (scaling) processes. The process is demonstrated in dolomite (non-uniform void distribution, homogeneous solid matrix) and sandstone (nearly uniform void distribution, heterogeneous solid matrix) samples, and its overall performance is shown to compare favorably with a method based on calibration and thresholding. - Highlights: • A method is presented for quantifying x-ray CT data for porous media. • The method neither requires calibration nor segmentation nor thresholding. • We use voxel matching between images of a sample saturated with two distinct solutions. • Method is demonstrated for micro-CT images of dolomite and sandstone samples. • Overall performance compares favorably with a calibration

  15. A multiresolution approach to iterative reconstruction algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Yoni; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2010-09-01

    In computed tomography, the application of iterative reconstruction methods in practical situations is impeded by their high computational demands. Especially in high resolution X-ray computed tomography, where reconstruction volumes contain a high number of volume elements (several giga voxels), this computational burden prevents their actual breakthrough. Besides the large amount of calculations, iterative algorithms require the entire volume to be kept in memory during reconstruction, which quickly becomes cumbersome for large data sets. To overcome this obstacle, we present a novel multiresolution reconstruction, which greatly reduces the required amount of memory without significantly affecting the reconstructed image quality. It is shown that, combined with an efficient implementation on a graphical processing unit, the multiresolution approach enables the application of iterative algorithms in the reconstruction of large volumes at an acceptable speed using only limited resources.

  16. Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation using fan collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Hoshino, Atsunori; Watanabe, Yuuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Akatsuka, Takao; Itai, Yuji

    1996-04-01

    We describe a new system of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography applied to image nonradioactive contrast materials in vivo. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) of the first generation. The experiment was also simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending-magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in Kek, Japan. An acrylic cylindrical phantom containing five paraxial channels of 5 and 4 mm diameters was imaged. The channels were filled with a diluted iodine-based contrast material, with iodine concentrations of 2 mg/ml and 500 (mu) g/ml. Spectra obtained with the system's high purity germanium (HPGe) detector separated clearly the K(alpha ) and K(beta 1) x-ray fluorescent lines, and the Compton scattering. CT images were reconstructed from projections generated by integrating the counts in these spectral lines. The method had adequate sensitivity and detection power, as shown by the experiment and predicted by the simulations, to show the iodine content of the phantom channels, which corresponded to 1 and 4 (mu) g iodine content per pixel in the reconstructed images.

  17. Estimation of dose to patients undergoing computed radiography x-ray examinations in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badri, Fatima Abulgasiem Abdulrhman

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma to the patient during x-ray examination to (chest PA, lumbar spine AP and Lat, pelvis AP) by using computed radiography (CR) in different three hospitals in Khartoum. Three x-ray machines were covered. A total of 135 patients were evaluated. The entrance surface air kerma was calculated for each patient from the exposure parameters using cal dose software version 3.5. The obtained results showed that, the entrance surface air kerma range founded to be (0.28-1.59) for chest PA, (1.98-2.62) for lumbar spine and (0.438-2.47) for pelvis AP. The higher entrance surface air kerma for all projections were observed in Center 1, except for pelvis it is higher in center 2. And the lower entrance surface air kerma were observed in center 3. This study recommends that CR operator must to be used to achieve optimize the patient dose by use the best strategies available for reducing radiation dose, computed radiography must be used with high level of training for medical staff to reduce the dose, each radiology department should implement a patient dose measurement quality assurance programme, doses to the patients should be regularly monitored and the proposed national DRLs should be taken as guidance for optimization.(Author)

  18. Calibration-free quantification of interior properties of porous media with x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Esam M A; Agbogun, H M D; Al, Tom A

    2015-03-01

    A method is presented for interpreting the values of x-ray attenuation coefficients reconstructed in computed tomography of porous media, while overcoming the ambiguity caused by the multichromatic nature of x-rays, dilution by void, and material heterogeneity. The method enables determination of porosity without relying on calibration or image segmentation or thresholding to discriminate pores from solid material. It distinguishes between solution-accessible and inaccessible pores, and provides the spatial and frequency distributions of solid-matrix material in a heterogeneous medium. This is accomplished by matching an image of a sample saturated with a contrast solution with that saturated with a transparent solution. Voxels occupied with solid-material and inaccessible pores are identified by the fact that they maintain the same location and image attributes in both images, with voxels containing inaccessible pores appearing empty in both images. Fully porous and accessible voxels exhibit the maximum contrast, while the rest are porous voxels containing mixtures of pore solutions and solid. This matching process is performed with an image registration computer code, and image processing software that requires only simple subtraction and multiplication (scaling) processes. The process is demonstrated in dolomite (non-uniform void distribution, homogeneous solid matrix) and sandstone (nearly uniform void distribution, heterogeneous solid matrix) samples, and its overall performance is shown to compare favorably with a method based on calibration and thresholding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal iodine staining of cardiac tissue for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Timothy D; Castro, Simon J; Lowe, Tristan; Zhang, Yanmin; Lei, Ming; Withers, Philip J; Zhang, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been shown to be an effective imaging technique for a variety of materials. Due to the relatively low differential attenuation of X-rays in biological tissue, a high density contrast agent is often required to obtain optimal contrast. The contrast agent, iodine potassium iodide ([Formula: see text]), has been used in several biological studies to augment the use of XCT scanning. Recently I2KI was used in XCT scans of animal hearts to study cardiac structure and to generate 3D anatomical computer models. However, to date there has been no thorough study into the optimal use of I2KI as a contrast agent in cardiac muscle with respect to the staining times required, which has been shown to impact significantly upon the quality of results. In this study we address this issue by systematically scanning samples at various stages of the staining process. To achieve this, mouse hearts were stained for up to 58 hours and scanned at regular intervals of 6-7 hours throughout this process. Optimal staining was found to depend upon the thickness of the tissue; a simple empirical exponential relationship was derived to allow calculation of the required staining time for cardiac samples of an arbitrary size.

  20. Photoelectronic radiology 1983; X-ray imaging with the computer-assisted technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaoui, J.; Sylvestre, J.; Robillard, P.; Dussault, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the discipline of radiology has continued to progress from initial images depicting the structure of organs, to the exploration of dynamic and physiologic phenomena, improvements in the power of X-ray generators and with the refinement of non-toxic contrast media. Until the early part of the 1970s, radiology consisted in extrapolations from a two-dimensional image of a three-dimensional organ, and advances in diagnostic quality related chiefly to improvements in spatial resolution of the flat image. With the advent of cross-sectional imaging using computer reconstruction the emphasis has shifted to contrast resolution, to the acquisition of ''pure'' images in the XY plane and to an area-related approach in diagnosis, rather than to the traditional organ-oriented method. This new trend has only been made possible because of the influence of recent developments in the digital and electronics industry. This history of diagnostic radiology up to 1972 is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the major areas of interaction between X-ray and the computer, as represented by the major leading edge technologies that have already received broad acceptance by the health care profession. (author)

  1. X-ray and gamma-ray transmission computed tomographic imaging of archaeological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah; Susan Maria Sipaun

    2004-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-section images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography or computed-aided tomography. The invention of CT techniques revolutionised the field of medical diagnostic imaging because it provided more detailed and useful information than any previous non-invasive imaging techniques. The method is increasingly being used in industry, aerospace, geosciences and archaeology. This paper presents a brief overview of X-ray or gamma-ray transmission tomography. It is not intended to be a technical treatise but is hoped that it would raise awareness and promote opportunities for further collaboration amongst the nuclear research community, including archaeologists and those in the conservation profession. The theoretical aspects of CT scanner, the system configurations and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. In addition, a few examples of CT images for archaeological objects are presented. The examples were purposely chosen to illustrate clearly and precisely the fundamental concepts of this sophisticated field. (Author)

  2. Introduction: a brief overview of iterative algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, M; Pengpen, T

    2015-06-13

    This paper presents a brief overview of some basic iterative algorithms, and more sophisticated methods are presented in the research papers in this issue. A range of algebraic iterative algorithms are covered here including ART, SART and OS-SART. A major limitation of the traditional iterative methods is their computational time. The Krylov subspace based methods such as the conjugate gradients (CG) algorithm and its variants can be used to solve linear systems of equations arising from large-scale CT with possible implementation using modern high-performance computing tools. The overall aim of this theme issue is to stimulate international efforts to develop the next generation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction software. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Computer simulation of the CSPAD, ePix10k, and RayonixMX170HS X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-21

    The invention of free-electron lasers (FELs) has opened a door to an entirely new level of scientific research. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is an X-ray FEL that houses several instruments, each with its own unique X-ray applications. This light source is revolutionary in that while its properties allow for a whole new range of scientific opportunities, it also poses numerous challenges. For example, the intensity of a focused X-ray beam is enough to damage a sample in one mere pulse; however, the pulse speed and extreme brightness of the source together are enough to obtain enough information about that sample, so that no further measurements are necessary. An important device in the radiation detection process, particularly for X-ray imaging, is the detector. The power of the LCLS X-rays has instigated a need for better performing detectors. The research conducted for this project consisted of the study of X-ray detectors to imitate their behaviors in a computer program. The analysis of the Rayonix MX170-HS, CSPAD, and ePix10k in particular helped to understand their properties. This program simulated the interaction of X-ray photons with these detectors to discern the patterns of their responses. A scientist’s selection process of a detector for a specific experiment is simplified from the characterization of the detectors in the program.

  4. X-ray Computed Tomography Assessment of Air Void Distribution in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haizhu

    Air void size and spatial distribution have long been regarded as critical parameters in the frost resistance of concrete. In cement-based materials, entrained air void systems play an important role in performance as related to durability, permeability, and heat transfer. Many efforts have been made to measure air void parameters in a more efficient and reliable manner in the past several decades. Standardized measurement techniques based on optical microscopy and stereology on flat cut and polished surfaces are widely used in research as well as in quality assurance and quality control applications. Other more automated methods using image processing have also been utilized, but still starting from flat cut and polished surfaces. The emergence of X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques provides the capability of capturing the inner microstructure of materials at the micrometer and nanometer scale. X-ray CT's less demanding sample preparation and capability to measure 3D distributions of air voids directly provide ample prospects for its wider use in air void characterization in cement-based materials. However, due to the huge number of air voids that can exist within a limited volume, errors can easily arise in the absence of a formalized data processing procedure. In this study, air void parameters in selected types of cement-based materials (lightweight concrete, structural concrete elements, pavements, and laboratory mortars) have been measured using micro X-ray CT. The focus of this study is to propose a unified procedure for processing the data and to provide solutions to deal with common problems that arise when measuring air void parameters: primarily the reliable segmentation of objects of interest, uncertainty estimation of measured parameters, and the comparison of competing segmentation parameters.

  5. Analysis of inner structure changes of concretes exposed to high temperatures using micro X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, L. (Libor); Bodnárová, L.; Souček, K. (Kamil); Staš, L. (Lubomír); Gurková, L. (Lucie)

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) repr esents a progressive non-destructive metho d of analysing the inner structure of materials. The method was used for monitoring changes in inner structure of concrete samples of different composition before and after their exposure to various thermal loads. Eight types of concrete samples were prepared which differed by cement and aggregate types. We intentionally used such composition of concrete mixtures which increased their resist...

  6. The feasibility study on 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using the pinhole effect for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (CT) pinhole collimator, aimed at providing molecular imaging with quantifiable measures and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept and investigate imaging properties such as spatial resolution, contrast resolution and quantifiable measures, by imaging physical phantoms using a preliminary imaging system developed with monochromatic synchrotron x rays constructed at the BLNE-7A experimental line at KEK, Japan.

  7. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.poirier@cancercare.mb.ca [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tambasco, Mauro, E-mail: mtambasco@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  8. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FENG, H.; JONES, K.W.; MCGUIGAN, M.; SMITH, G.J.; SPILETIC, J.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data

  9. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; MCGUIGAN,M.; SMITH,G.J.; SPILETIC,J.

    2001-10-12

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data.

  10. Technical Note. The Concept of a Computer System for Interpretation of Tight Rocks Using X-Ray Computed Tomography Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habrat Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the concept of a computer system for interpreting unconventional oil and gas deposits with the use of X-ray computed tomography results. The functional principles of the solution proposed are presented in the article. The main goal is to design a product which is a complex and useful tool in a form of a specialist computer software for qualitative and quantitative interpretation of images obtained from X-ray computed tomography. It is devoted to the issues of prospecting and identification of unconventional hydrocarbon deposits. The article focuses on the idea of X-ray computed tomography use as a basis for the analysis of tight rocks, considering especially functional principles of the system, which will be developed by the authors. The functional principles include the issues of graphical visualization of rock structure, qualitative and quantitative interpretation of model for visualizing rock samples, interpretation and a description of the parameters within realizing the module of quantitative interpretation.

  11. L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging has been focused on the detection of K-shell x-rays. The potential utility of L-shell x-ray XFCT is, however, not well studied. Here we report the first Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of preclinical L-shell XFCT imaging of Cisplatin. We built MC models for both L- and K-shell XFCT with different excitation energies (15 and 30 keV for L-shell and 80 keV for K-shell XFCT). Two small-animal sized imaging phantoms of 2 and 4 cm diameter containing a series of objects of 0.6 to 2.7 mm in diameter at 0.7 to 16 mm depths with 10 to 250 µg mL −1  concentrations of Pt are used in the study. Transmitted and scattered x-rays were collected with photon-integrating transmission detector and photon-counting detector arc, respectively. Collected data were rearranged into XFCT and transmission CT sinograms for image reconstruction. XFCT images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection and with iterative maximum-likelihood expectation maximization without and with attenuation correction. While K-shell XFCT was capable of providing an accurate measurement of Cisplatin concentration, its sensitivity was 4.4 and 3.0 times lower than that of L-shell XFCT with 15 keV excitation beam for the 2 cm and 4 cm diameter phantom, respectively. With the inclusion of excitation and fluorescence beam attenuation correction, we found that L-shell XFCT was capable of providing fairly accurate information of Cisplatin concentration distribution. With a dose of 29 and 58 mGy, clinically relevant Cisplatin Pt concentrations of 10 µg mg −1  could be imaged with L-shell XFCT inside a 2 cm and 4 cm diameter object, respectively. (paper)

  12. Quantitative evaluation of the disintegration of orally rapid disintegrating tablets by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Yamanaka, Azusa; Uchino, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Kuniko; Sadamoto, Kiyomi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    To measure the rapid disintegration of Oral Disintegrating Tablets (ODT), a new test (XCT) was developed using X-ray computing tomography (X-ray CT). Placebo ODT, rapid disintegration candy (RDC) and Gaster®-D-Tablets (GAS) were used as model samples. All these ODTs were used to measure oral disintegration time (DT) in distilled water at 37±2°C by XCT. DTs were affected by the width of mesh screens, and degree to which the tablet holder vibrated from air bubbles. An in-vivo tablet disintegration test was performed for RDC using 11 volunteers. DT by the in-vivo method was significantly longer than that using the conventional tester. The experimental conditions for XCT such as the width of the mesh screen and degree of vibration were adjusted to be consistent with human DT values. Since DTs by the XCT method were almost the same as the human data, this method was able to quantitatively evaluate the rapid disintegration of ODT under the same conditions as inside the oral cavity. The DTs of four commercially available ODTs were comparatively evaluated by the XCT method, conventional tablet disintegration test and in-vivo method.

  13. Description of CORSET: a computer program for quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, F.V.

    1980-08-01

    Quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis requires a method of correcting for absorption and secondary fluorescence effects due to the sample matrix. The computer program CORSET carries out these corrections without requiring a knowledge of the spectral distribution of the x-ray source, and only requires one standard per element or one standard containing all the elements. Sandia's version of CORSET has been divided into three separate programs to fit Sandia's specific requirements for on-line analysis in a melt facility. The melt facility is used to fabricate new alloys with very variable compositions and requires very rapid analyses during a run. Therefore, the standards must be analyzed several days in advance. Program DAT1 is used to set up a permanent file consisting of all the data related to the standards. Program UNINT is used to set up a permanent file with the intensities, background counts and counting times of the unknowns. Program CORSET uses the files created in UNINT and DAT1 to carry out the analysis. This report contains descriptions, listings, and sample runs for these programs. The accuracy of the analyses carried out with these three programs is about 1 to 2% relative with an elemental concentration of about 10 wt %

  14. Application of X-ray Computed Tomography to Cultural Heritage diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morigi, M.P.; Casali, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; D'Errico, V.

    2010-01-01

    Physical methods of diagnosis are more and more frequently applied in the field of Cultural Heritage either for scientific investigations or for restoration and conservation purposes. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most powerful non-destructive testing techniques for the full-volume inspection of an object, as it is able to give morphological and physical information on the inner structure of the investigated sample. The great variety of size and composition that characterizes archaeological findings and art objects requires the development of tomographic systems specifically designed for Cultural Heritage analysis. In the last few years our research group has developed several acquisition systems for Digital Radiography and X-ray CT. We are able to perform high resolution micro-tomography of small objects (voxel size of few microns) as well as CT of large objects (up to 2 m of size). In this paper we will mainly focus the attention on the results of the investigation recently performed on two Japanese wooden statues with our CT system for large works of art. The CT analysis was carried out on site at the Conservation and Restoration Center ''La Venaria Reale'', where the statues have been restored before their exposition at the Oriental Art Museum in Turin. (orig.)

  15. Assessing potato tuber diel growth by means of X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, Eduardo; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Pfeifer, Johannes; Walter, Achim

    2015-11-01

    The formation and development of belowground organs is difficult to study. X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides the possibility to analyse and interpret subtle volumetric changes of belowground organs such as tubers, storage roots and nodules. Here, we report on the establishment of a method based on a voxel dimension of 240 μm and precision (standard deviation) of 30 μL that allows interpreting growth differences among potato tubers happening within 3 h. Plants were not stressed by the application of X-ray radiation, which was shown both by morphological comparison with control plants and by analysis of lipid peroxidation as a measure of oxidative stress. Diel (24 h) tuber growth fluctuations of three potato genotypes were monitored in soil-filled pots of 10 L. In contrast to the results from previous reports, most tubers grew at similar rates during day and night. Tuber growth was not related to the developmental stage of plants and tubers. Pronounced differences were observed between average growth rates in different tubers within a plant. These results are discussed in the context of restrictions of past methods to study tuber growth and in the context of their potential for the characterization of the formation and development of other belowground plant organs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Characteristics of high-energy X-rays using computed radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Yoshinobu

    1993-01-01

    A computed radiography (CR) with storage phosphor technology has advanced remarkably. Its application has been also discussed regarding the field of radiotherapy and studies have been made to shift from the film/screen system to the portal film using the CR system. The authors started to research CR portal imaging with high energy X-ray (10MV) on a regular scale in 1989. This paper deals with characteristics of high energy X-rays using the CR system. The digital characteristic curve corresponded with calculated value for dynamic range (L-value). The monitor unit (MU) counts at pixel (digital) value saturation point were L-value 0.5:28 MU, L-value 1.0:50 MU, L-value 2.0:167 MU, L-value 3.0:450 MU, L-value 4.0:1614 MU. The image contrast with the Mix-Dp phantom was L-value 0.5: about a 300 pixel value and L-value 4.0: about a 30 pixel value by a phantom 10 to 18 cm in thickness. Optimum L-value was 0.5, and tone-scale was the straight type of CR portal imaging using the graphy count mode. Optimum L-value was 4.0, and tone-scale was a rectangular wave type of CR portal imaging using therapeutic doses, and those were also described by the histogram analysis. (author)

  17. High energy x-ray radiography and computed tomography of bridge pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R E; Logan, C M; Martz, H E; Updike, E; Waters, A M

    1999-01-01

    Bridge pins were used in the hanger assemblies for some multi-span steel bridges built prior to the 1980's, and are sometimes considered fracture critical elements of a bridge. During a test on a bridge conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ultrasonic field inspection results indicated that at least two pins contained cracks. Several pins were removed and selected for further examination. This provided an excellent opportunity to learn more about these pins and the application of x-ray systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as to learn more about the application of different detectors recently obtained by LLNL. Digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were used to characterize the bridge pins, using a LINAC x-ray source with a 9-MV bremsstrahlung spectrum. We will describe the performance of two different digital radiographic detectors. One is a detector system frequently used at LLNL consisting of a scintillator glass optically coupled to a CCD camera. The other detector is a new amorphous silicon detector recently acquired by LLNL

  18. ENDIX. A computer program to simulate energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovestreydt, E.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Parthe, E.; Benedict, U.

    1987-01-01

    A Fortran 77 computer program is described which allows the simulation of energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams. The input consists of structural data (space group, unit cell dimensions, atomic positional and displacement parameters) and information on the experimental conditions (chosen Bragg angle, type of X-ray tube and applied voltage or operating power of synchrotron radiation source). The output consists of the normalized intensities of the diffraction lines, listed by increasing energy (in keV), and of an optional intensity-energy plot. The intensities are calculated with due consideration of the wave-length dependence of both the anomalous dispersion and the absorption coefficients. For a better agreement between observed and calculated spectra provision is made to optionally superimpose, on the calculated diffraction line spectrum, all additional lines such as fluorescence and emission lines and escape peaks. The different effects which have been considered in the simulation are discussed in some detail. A sample calculation of the energy dispersive powder diffraction pattern of UPt 3 (Ni 3 Sn structure type) is given. Warning: the user of ENDIX should be aware that for a successful application it is necessary to adapt the program to correspond to the actual experimental conditions. Even then, due to the only approximately known values of certain functions, the agreement between observed and calculated intensities will not be as good as for angle dispersive diffraction methods

  19. Evaluation on correction factor for in-line X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Mingli; Huang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ran [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging; Yin, Hongxia; Liu, Yunfu; Wang, Zhenchang [Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China). Medical Imaging Center; Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Inst. of Applied Physics

    2011-07-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast computed tomography (CT) is an effective nondestructive tool, providing 3D distribution of the refractive index of weakly absorbing low-Z object with high resolution and image contrast, especially with high-brilliance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. Modified Bronnikov's algorithm (MBA), one of the in-line phase contrast CT reconstruction algorithms, can reconstruct the refractive index distribution of a pure phase object with a single computed tomographic data set. The key idea of the MBA is to use a correction factor in the filter function to stabilize the behavior at low frequencies. In this paper, we evaluate the influences of the correction factor to the final reconstruction results of the absorption-phase-mixed objects with analytical simulation and actual experiments. The limitations of the MBA are discussed finally. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of parameters for the quality control of X-ray units by using PIN diodes and a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, F.; Gaytan, E.; Mercado, I.; Estrada, M.; Cerdeira, A.

    2000-01-01

    The design of a new system for the measurement of the main parameters of X-ray units used in medicine is presented. The system measures automatically the exposure time, high voltage applied, waveform of the detected signal, exposure ratio and the total exposure (dose). The X-ray detectors employed are PIN diodes developed at CINVESTAV, the measurements are done in one single shot, without invasion of the X-ray unit. The results are shown in the screen of the computer and can be saved in a file for later analysis. The proposed system is intended to be used in the quality control of X-rays units for clinical radio-diagnosis. It is a simple and inexpensive equipment if compared with available commercial equipment that uses ionization chambers and accurate electrometers that small facilities and hospitals cannot afford

  1. Accelerating statistical image reconstruction algorithms for fan-beam x-ray CT using cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Somesh; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Sheinin, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms potentially offer many advantages to x-ray computed tomography (CT), e.g. lower radiation dose. But, their adoption in practical CT scanners requires extra computation power, which is traditionally provided by incorporating additional computing hardware (e.g. CPU-clusters, GPUs, FPGAs etc.) into a scanner. An alternative solution is to access the required computation power over the internet from a cloud computing service, which is orders-of-magnitude more cost-effective. This is because users only pay a small pay-as-you-go fee for the computation resources used (i.e. CPU time, storage etc.), and completely avoid purchase, maintenance and upgrade costs. In this paper, we investigate the benefits and shortcomings of using cloud computing for statistical image reconstruction. We parallelized the most time-consuming parts of our application, the forward and back projectors, using MapReduce, the standard parallelization library on clouds. From preliminary investigations, we found that a large speedup is possible at a very low cost. But, communication overheads inside MapReduce can limit the maximum speedup, and a better MapReduce implementation might become necessary in the future. All the experiments for this paper, including development and testing, were completed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for less than $20.

  2. Validation of a low dose simulation technique for computed tomography images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT images from an original higher dose scan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection. Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10-80 mAs were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. RESULTS: Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was -1.2% (range -9% to 3.2% and -0.2% (range -8.2% to 3.2%, respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9-10.2 HU (noise and 1.9-13.4 HU (CT values, without significant differences (p>0.05. Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. CONCLUSION: Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques.

  3. Computed microtomography and X-ray fluorescence analysis for comprehensive analysis of structural changes in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzmakov, Alexey; Chukalina, Marina; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Schaefer, Gerald; Gulimova, Victoria; Saveliev, Sergey; Tereschenko, Elena; Seregin, Alexey; Senin, Roman; Prun, Victor; Zolotov, Denis; Asadchikov, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive analysis of structural changes in the caudal vertebrae of Turner's thick-toed geckos by computer microtomography and X-ray fluorescence analysis. We present algorithms used for the reconstruction of tomographic images which allow to work with high noise level projections that represent typical conditions dictated by the nature of the samples. Reptiles, due to their ruggedness, small size, belonging to the amniote and a number of other valuable features, are an attractive model object for long-orbital experiments on unmanned spacecraft. Issues of possible changes in their bone tissue under the influence of spaceflight are the subject of discussions between biologists from different laboratories around the world.

  4. Study on Sintering Mechanism of Stainless Steel Fiber Felts by X-ray Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure evolution of Fe-17 wt. % Cr-12 wt. % Ni-2 wt. % Mo stainless steel fiber felts during the fast sintering process was investigated by the synchrotron radiation X-ray computed tomography technique. The equation of dynamics of stable inter-fiber neck growth was established for the first time based on the geometry model of sintering joints of two fibers and Kucsynski’s two-sphere model. The specific evolutions of different kinds of sintering joints were observed in the three-dimensional images. The sintering mechanisms during sintering were proposed as plastic flow and grain boundary diffusion, the former leading to a quick growth of sintering joints.

  5. A convolutional neural network approach to calibrating the rotation axis for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaogang; De Carlo, Francesco; Phatak, Charudatta; Gürsoy, Dogˇa

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calibrate the center-of-rotation for X-ray tomography by using a machine learning approach, the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The algorithm shows excellent accuracy from the evaluation of synthetic data with various noise ratios. It is further validated with experimental data of four different shale samples measured at the Advanced Photon Source and at the Swiss Light Source. The results are as good as those determined by visual inspection and show better robustness than conventional methods. CNN has also great potential for reducing or removing other artifacts caused by instrument instability, detector non-linearity, etc. An open-source toolbox, which integrates the CNN methods described in this paper, is freely available through GitHub at tomography/xlearn and can be easily integrated into existing computational pipelines available at various synchrotron facilities. Source code, documentation and information on how to contribute are also provided.

  6. Feature-based analysis for quality assessment of x-ray computed tomography measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardelli, Vitor C; Arenhart, Francisco A; Donatelli, Gustavo D; Porath, Maurício C; Niggemann, Christian; Schmitt, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to assess the quality of the data extracted with computed tomography (CT) measuring systems to perform geometrical evaluations. The approach consists in analyzing the error features introduced by the CT measuring system during the extraction operation. The analysis of the features is performed qualitatively (using graphical analysis tools) and/or quantitatively (by means of the root-mean-square deviation parameter of the error features). The approach was used to analyze four sets of measurements performed with an industrial x-ray cone beam CT measuring system. Three test parts were used in the experiments: a high accuracy manufacturing multi-wave standard, a calibrated step cylinder and a calibrated production part. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to gain knowledge on CT measuring processes and improve the quality of CT geometrical evaluations. Advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed. (paper)

  7. X-ray computed tomography datasets for forensic analysis of vertebrate fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Timothy B.; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Ketcham, Richard A.; Maisano, Jessica A.; Colbert, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets from three specimens recovered from Early Cretaceous lakebeds of China that illustrate the forensic interpretation of CT imagery for paleontology. Fossil vertebrates from thinly bedded sediments often shatter upon discovery and are commonly repaired as amalgamated mosaics grouted to a solid backing slab of rock or plaster. Such methods are prone to inadvertent error and willful forgery, and once required potentially destructive methods to identify mistakes in reconstruction. CT is an efficient, nondestructive alternative that can disclose many clues about how a specimen was handled and repaired. These annotated datasets illustrate the power of CT in documenting specimen integrity and are intended as a reference in applying CT more broadly to evaluating the authenticity of comparable fossils. PMID:27272251

  8. Prediction of intramuscular fat levels in Texel lamb loins using X-ray computed tomography scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clelland, N; Bunger, L; McLean, K A; Conington, J; Maltin, C; Knott, S; Lambe, N R

    2014-10-01

    For the consumer, tenderness, juiciness and flavour are often described as the most important factors for meat eating quality, all of which have a close association with intramuscular fat (IMF). X-ray computed tomography (CT) can measure fat, muscle and bone volumes and weights, in vivo in sheep and CT predictions of carcass composition have been used in UK sheep breeding programmes over the last few decades. This study aimed to determine the most accurate combination of CT variables to predict IMF percentage of M. longissimus lumborum in Texel lambs. As expected, predicted carcass fat alone accounted for a moderate amount of the variation (R(2)=0.51) in IMF. Prediction accuracies were significantly improved (Adj R(2)>0.65) using information on fat and muscle densities measured from three CT reference scans, showing that CT can provide an accurate prediction of IMF in the loin of purebred Texel sheep. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. An algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Schleede, Simone; Tan, Renbo; Chen, Liyuan; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Gifford, Martin; Loewen, Rod; Ruth, Ronald; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-09-01

    Iterative reconstruction has a wide spectrum of proven advantages in the field of conventional X-ray absorption-based computed tomography (CT). In this paper, we report on an algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for grating-based differential phase-contrast CT (DPC-CT). Due to the differential nature of DPC-CT projections, a differential operator and a smoothing operator are added to the iterative reconstruction, compared to the one commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured at a two-grating interferometer setup. Since the algorithm is easy to implement and allows for the extension to various regularization possibilities, we expect a significant impact of the method for improving future medical and industrial DPC-CT applications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. Three dimensional characterization of laser ablation craters using high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmed, A. H.; du Plessis, A.; le Roux, S. G.; Hartnick, E.; Von Bergmann, H.; Maaza, M.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory X-ray computed tomography is an emerging technology for the 3D characterization and dimensional analysis of many types of materials. In this work we demonstrate the usefulness of this characterization method for the full three dimensional analysis of laser ablation craters, in the context of a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy setup. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy relies on laser ablation for sampling the material of interest. We demonstrate here qualitatively (in images) and quantitatively (in terms of crater cone angles, depths, diameters and volume) laser ablation crater analysis in 3D for metal (aluminum) and rock (false gold ore). We show the effect of a Gaussian beam profile on the resulting crater geometry, as well as the first visual evidence of undercutting in the rock sample, most likely due to ejection of relatively large grains. The method holds promise for optimization of laser ablation setups especially for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  11. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Marrow, T.J.; Reinhard, C.

    2016-01-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a 'node-bond' geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1∼ 9.3% closed micropores

  12. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma

  13. Statistical x-ray computed tomography imaging from photon-starved measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiqian; Zhang, Ruoqiao; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Sauer, Ken; Bouman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Dose reduction in clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT) causes low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in photonsparse situations. Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms have the advantage of retaining image quality while reducing input dosage, but they meet their limits of practicality when significant portions of the sinogram near photon starvation. The corruption of electronic noise leads to measured photon counts taking on negative values, posing a problem for the log() operation in preprocessing of data. In this paper, we propose two categories of projection correction methods: an adaptive denoising filter and Bayesian inference. The denoising filter is easy to implement and preserves local statistics, but it introduces correlation between channels and may affect image resolution. Bayesian inference is a point-wise estimation based on measurements and prior information. Both approaches help improve diagnostic image quality at dramatically reduced dosage.

  14. Reconstruction of computed tomographic image from a few x-ray projections by means of accelerative gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    A method of the reconstruction of computed tomographic images was proposed to reduce the exposure dose to X-ray. The method is the small number of X-ray projection method by accelerative gradient method. The procedures of computation are described. The algorithm of these procedures is simple, the convergence of the computation is fast, and the required memory capacity is small. Numerical simulation was carried out to conform the validity of this method. A sample of simple shape was considered, projection data were given, and the images were reconstructed from 6 views. Good results were obtained, and the method is considered to be useful. (Kato, T.)

  15. X-ray beam-shaping via deformable mirrors: Analytical computation of the required mirror profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiga, Daniele; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Svetina, Cristian; Zangrando, Marco

    2013-01-01

    X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are in use in both mirror modules for X-ray telescopes and in synchrotron and FEL (Free Electron Laser) beamlines. A degradation of the focus sharpness arises in general from geometrical deformations and surface roughness, the former usually described by geometrical optics and the latter by physical optics. In general, technological developments are aimed at a very tight focusing, which requires the mirror profile to comply with the nominal shape as much as possible and to keep the roughness at a negligible level. However, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators as done at the EIS-TIMEX beamline of FERMI@Elettra. The resulting profile can be characterized with a Long Trace Profilometer and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code. However, if the roughness contribution can be neglected, the computation can be performed via a ray-tracing routine, and, under opportune assumptions, the focal spot profile (the Point Spread Function, PSF) can even be predicted analytically. The advantage of this approach is that the analytical relation can be reversed; i.e., from the desired PSF the required mirror profile can be computed easily, thereby avoiding the use of complex and time-consuming numerical codes. The method can also be suited in the case of spatially inhomogeneous beam intensities, as commonly experienced at synchrotrons and FELs. In this work we expose the analytical method and the application to the beam shaping problem

  16. Computational Methods for Nanoscale X-ray Computed Tomography Image Analysis of Fuel Cell and Battery Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arjun S.

    Over the last fifteen years, there has been a rapid growth in the use of high resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) imaging in material science applications. We use it at nanoscale resolutions up to 50 nm (nano-CT) for key research problems in large scale operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in automotive applications. PEMFC are clean energy sources that electrochemically react with hydrogen gas to produce water and electricity. To reduce their costs, capturing their electrode nanostructure has become significant in modeling and optimizing their performance. For Li-ion batteries, a key challenge in increasing their scope for the automotive industry is Li metal dendrite growth. Li dendrites are structures of lithium with 100 nm features of interest that can grow chaotically within a battery and eventually lead to a short-circuit. HRXCT imaging is an effective diagnostics tool for such applications as it is a non-destructive method of capturing the 3D internal X-ray absorption coefficient of materials from a large series of 2D X-ray projections. Despite a recent push to use HRXCT for quantitative information on material samples, there is a relative dearth of computational tools in nano-CT image processing and analysis. Hence, we focus on developing computational methods for nano-CT image analysis of fuel cell and battery materials as required by the limitations in material samples and the imaging environment. The first problem we address is the segmentation of nano-CT Zernike phase contrast images. Nano-CT instruments are equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics to distinguish materials with a low difference in X-ray absorption coefficient by phase shifting the X-ray wave that is not diffracted by the sample. However, it creates image artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. To restore such images, we setup an inverse problem by modeling the X-ray phase contrast

  17. Characterization of impact damage in metallic/nonmetallic composites using x-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, William H.; Wells, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Characterizing internal impact damage in composites can be difficult, especially in structurally complex composites or those consisting of many materials. Many methods for nondestructive inspection/nondestructive testing (NDI/NDT) of materials have been known and in use for many years, including x-ray film, real-time, and digital radiographic techniques, and ultrasonic techniques. However, these techniques are generally not capable of three-dimensional (3D) mapping of complex damage patterns, which is necessary to visualize and understand damage cracking modes. Conventional x-ray radiography suffers from the loss of 3D information. Structural complexity and signal dispersion in materials with many interfaces significantly effect ultrasonic inspection techniques. This makes inspection scan interpretation difficult, especially in composites containing a number of different materials (i.e., polymer, ceramic, and metallic). X-ray computed tomography (CT) is broadly applicable to any material or test object through which a beam of penetrating radiation may be passed and detected, including metals, plastics, ceramics, metallic/nonmetallic composites, and assemblies. The principal advantage of CT is that it provides densitometric (that is, radiological density and geometry) images of thin cross sections through an object. Because of the absence of structural superposition, images are much easier to interpret than conventional radiological images. The user can quickly learn to read CT data because images correspond more closely to the way the human mind visualizes 3D structures than projection radiology (that is, film radiography, real-time radiography (RTR), and digital radiography (DR)). Any number of CT images, or slices, from scanning an object can be volumetrically reconstructed to produce a 3D attenuation map of the object. The 3D attenuation data can be rendered using multiplanar or 3D solid visualization. In multiplanar visualization there are four planes of view

  18. A measurement-based X-ray source model characterization for CT dosimetry computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Mitchell; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to show that the nominal peak tube voltage potential (kVp) and measured half-value layer (HVL) can be used to generate energy spectra and fluence profiles for characterizing a computed tomography (CT) X-ray source, and to validate the source model and an in-house kV X-ray dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc) for computing machine- and patient-specific CT dose. Spatial variation of the X-ray source spectra of a Philips Brilliance and a GE Optima Big Bore CT scanner were found by measuring the HVL along the direction of the internal bow-tie filter axes. Third-party software, Spektr, and the nominal kVp settings were used to generate the energy spectra. Beam fluence was calculated by dividing the integral product of the spectra and the in-air NIST mass-energy attenuation coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the filter axis. The authors found the optimal number of photons to seed in kVDoseCalc to achieve dose convergence. The Philips Brilliance beams were modeled for 90, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. The GE Optima beams were modeled for 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp tube settings. Relative doses measured using a Capintec Farmer-type ionization chamber (0.65 cc) placed in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and irradiated by the Philips Brilliance, were compared to those computed with kVDoseCalc. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. The number of photons required to reduce the average statistical uncertainty in dose to measurement over all 12 PMMA phantom positions was found to be 1.44%, 1.47%, and 1.41% for 90, 120, and 140 kVp, respectively. The maximum percent difference between calculation and measurement for all energies, measurement positions, and phantoms was less than 3.50%. Thirty-five out of a total of 36 simulation conditions were

  19. Microstructural analysis of TRISO particles using multi-scale X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, T., E-mail: tristan.lowe@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bradley, R.S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Yue, S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Barii, K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gelb, J. [Zeiss Xradia Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Rohbeck, N. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Turner, J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    TRISO particles, a composite nuclear fuel built up by ceramic and graphitic layers, have outstanding high temperature resistance. TRISO fuel is the key technology for High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) and the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) variant. TRISO offers unparalleled containment of fission products and is extremely robust during accident conditions. An understanding of the thermal performance and mechanical properties of TRISO fuel requires a detailed knowledge of pore sizes, their distribution and interconnectivity. Here 50 nm, nano-, and 1 μm resolution, micro-computed tomography (CT), have been used to quantify non-destructively porosity of a surrogate TRISO particle at the 0.3–10 μm and 3–100 μm scales respectively. This indicates that pore distributions can reliably be measured down to a size approximately 3 times the pixel size which is consistent with the segmentation process. Direct comparison with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) sections indicates that destructive sectioning can introduce significant levels of coarse damage, especially in the pyrolytic carbon layers. Further comparative work is required to identify means of minimizing such damage for SEM studies. Finally since it is non-destructive, multi-scale time-lapse X-ray CT opens the possibility of intermittently tracking the degradation of TRISO structure under thermal cycles or radiation conditions in order to validate models of degradation such as kernel movement. X-ray CT in-situ experimentation of TRISO particles under load and temperature could also be used to understand the internal changes that occur in the particles under accident conditions.

  20. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography: improvements and initial patient testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; D’Orsi, Carl J; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    A previously proposed x-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography was further developed and implemented so as to allow for initial patient testing. The method involves the acquisition of a complete second set of breast CT projections covering 360° with a perforated tungsten plate in the path of the x-ray beam. To make patient testing feasible, a wirelessly controlled electronic positioner for the tungsten plate was designed and added to a breast CT system. Other improvements to the algorithm were implemented, including automated exclusion of non-valid primary estimate points and the use of a different approximation method to estimate the full scatter signal. To evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm, evaluation of the resulting image quality was performed with a breast phantom and with nine patient images. The improvements in the algorithm resulted in the avoidance of introduction of artifacts, especially at the object borders, which was an issue in the previous implementation in some cases. Both contrast, in terms of signal difference and signal difference-to-noise ratio were improved with the proposed method, as opposed to with the correction algorithm incorporated in the system, which does not recover contrast. Patient image evaluation also showed enhanced contrast, better cupping correction, and more consistent voxel values for the different tissues. The algorithm also reduces artifacts present in reconstructions of non-regularly shaped breasts. With the implemented hardware and software improvements, the proposed method can be reliably used during patient breast CT imaging, resulting in improvement of image quality, no introduction of artifacts, and in some cases reduction of artifacts already present. The impact of the algorithm on actual clinical performance for detection, diagnosis and other clinical tasks in breast imaging remains to be evaluated. (paper)

  1. Detection of freeze-thaw weathering effect using X-ray micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2011-12-01

    Physical weathering caused by repeated freeze-thaw action of water inside rock pores or cracks was artificially simulated in laboratory. The tests were conducted on three rock types, i.e. diorite, basalt, and tuff, which are the major rock types around King Sejong Station of Korea located in Barton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The temperature of freeze-thaw cycle was also set with simulated the air temperature of the station, i.e. the maximum temperature was + 10 °C and the minimum temperature was - 20 °C. Three cylindrical specimens composed of one for each rock type with 24.6 mm diameter and 14.5 ~ 17.7 mm length were prepared, and 2 mm diameter and 7 mm shallow depth hole was drilled on the center of the specimens. To exaggerate the effect of the freeze-thaw weathering, all tests were conducted under completely saturated condition. 50 cycles of the freeze-thaw test was carried, and X-ray micro computed tomography (CT) images of each rock specimen were obtained after every 10 cycles. Using X-ray micro CT images, 3D structure was rendered and pore and crack structures were extracted. The changes of porosity, absorption rate and pore and crack structure were detected. Porosity of all specimens was decreased linearly and absorption rate of all specimens was increased linearly as weathering processes; the pore connection and crack propagation was detected in 3D rendering pore and crack structure. The change of tuff specimen is the most remarkable among three rock types used in the research, because of its relatively high initial absorption rate and low strength. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST) (No. 2011-0027520).

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Meinel, Felix G; Reiser, Maximilian; Yildirim, Önder; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually annotated to build an experimental dataset. System performance was assessed by: (i) determining the quality of the segmentations; (ii) validating emphysema and fibrosis recognition by a linear support vector machine using leave-one-out cross-validation. In terms of segmentation quality, we obtained an overlap percentage (Ω) 92.63  ±  3.65%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 89.74  ±  8.84% and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 82.39  ±  12.62%. For classification, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of diseased lung recognition was 100%. Classification between emphysema and fibrosis resulted in an accuracy of 93%, whilst the sensitivity was 94% and specificity 88%. In addition to the automatic classification of lungs, deviation maps created by the CAD scheme provide a visual aid for medical experts to further assess the severity of pulmonary disease in the lung, and highlights regions affected. (paper)

  3. Quantitative wood–adhesive penetration with X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A. (Oregon State U.); (Willamette Valley)

    2015-09-01

    Micro X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was used to analyze the 3D adhesive penetration behavior of different wood–adhesive bondlines. Three adhesives, a phenol formaldehyde (PF), a polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (pMDI), and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate (PVA), all tagged with iodine for enhanced X-ray attenuation, were used to prepare single-bondline laminates in two softwoods, Douglas-fir and loblolly pine, and one hardwood, a hybrid polar. Adhesive penetration depth was measured with two separate calculations, and results were compared with 2D fluorescent micrographs. A total of 54 XCT scans were collected, representing six replicates of each treatment type; each replicate, however, consisted of approximately 1500 individual, cross-section slices stacked along the specimen length. As these adhesives were highly modified, the presented results do not indicate typical behavior for their broader adhesive classes. Still, clear penetration differences were observed between each adhesive type, and between wood species bonded with both the PF and pMDI adhesives. Furthermore, penetration results depended on the calculation method used. Two adhesive types with noticeably different resin distributions in the cured bondline, showed relatively similar penetration depths when calculated with a traditional effective penetration equation. However, when the same data was calculated with a weighted penetration calculation, which accounts for both adhesive area and depth, the results appeared to better represent the different distributions depicted in the photomicrographs and tomograms. Additionally, individual replicate comparisons showed variation due to specimen anatomy, not easily observed or interpreted from 2D images. Finally, 3D views of segmented 3D adhesive phases offered unique, in-situ views of the cured adhesive structures. In particular, voids formed by CO2 bubbles generated during pMDI cure were clearly visible in penetrated columns of the solidified

  4. Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography of non-formalin fixed biological objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tohoru E-mail: ttakeda@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Momose, Atsushi; Wu, Jin; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Yu Quanwen; Thet Thet Lwin; Itai, Yuji

    2001-07-21

    Using a monolithic X-ray interferometer having the view size of 25 mmx25 mm, phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) was performed for non-formalin fixed livers of two normal rats and a rabbit transplanted with VX-2 cancer. PCCT images of liver and cancer lesions resembled well those obtained by formalin fixed samples.

  5. Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography of non-formalin fixed biological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Momose, Atsushi; Wu, Jin; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Yu, Quanwen; Thet-Thet-Lwin; Itai, Yuji

    2001-07-01

    Using a monolithic X-ray interferometer having the view size of 25 mm×25 mm, phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) was performed for non-formalin fixed livers of two normal rats and a rabbit transplanted with VX-2 cancer. PCCT images of liver and cancer lesions resembled well those obtained by formalin fixed samples.

  6. Custom Hardware Processor to Compute a Figure of Merit for the Fit of X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Pulido, P.J.A.; Vega-Rodriguez, M.A.; Sanchez-Perez, J.M.; Sanchez-Bajo, F.; Santos, S.P.D.

    2008-01-01

    A custom processor based on re configurable hardware technology is proposed in order to compute the figure of merit used to measure the quality of the fit of X-ray diffraction peaks. As the experimental X-ray profiles can present many peaks severely overlapped, it is necessary to select the best model among a large set of reasonably good solutions. Determining the best solution is computationally intensive, because this is a hard combinatorial optimization problem. The proposed processors, working in parallel, increase the performance relative to a software implementation.

  7. Revealing fatigue damage evolution in unidirectional composites for wind turbine blades using x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    ’. Thereby, it will be possible to lower the cost of energy for wind energy based electricity. In the presented work, a lab-source x-ray computed tomography equipment (Zeiss Xradia 520 Versa) has been used in connection with ex-situ fatigue testing of uni-directional composites in order to identify fibre...... to other comparable x-ray studies) have been used in order to ensure a representative test volume during the ex-situ fatigue testing. Using the ability of the x-ray computed tomography to zoom into regions of interest, non-destructive, the fatigue damage evolution in a repeating ex-situ fatigue loaded test...... improving the fatigue resistance of non-crimp fabric used in the wind turbine industry can be made....

  8. Development of an X-ray Computed Tomography System for Non-Invasive Imaging of Industrial Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, J.; Sipaun, S. M.; Mustapha, I.; Zain, R. M.; Rahman, M. F. A.; Mustapha, M.; Shaari, M. R.; Hassan, H.; Said, M. K. M.; Mohamad, G. H. P.; Ibrahim, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is a powerful non-invasive imaging technique for viewing an object's inner structures in two-dimensional cross-section images without the need to physically section it. The invention of CT techniques revolutionised the field of medical diagnostic imaging because it provided more detailed and useful information than any previous non-invasive imaging techniques. The method is increasingly being used in industry, aerospace, geosciences and archaeology. This paper describes the development of an X-ray computed tomography system for imaging of industrial materials. The theoretical aspects of CT scanner, the system configurations and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The penetrating rays from a 160 kV industrial X-ray machine were used to investigate structures that manifest in a manufactured component or product. Some results were presented in this paper

  9. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Soo Hyung [School of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, Jun; Wang Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Zheng Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 {+-} 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  10. TomoBank: a tomographic data repository for computational x-ray science

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Gürsoy, Doğa; Ching, Daniel J.; Joost Batenburg, K.; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Mancini, Lucia; Marone, Federica; Mokso, Rajmund; Pelt, Daniël M.; Sijbers, Jan; Rivers, Mark

    2018-03-01

    There is a widening gap between the fast advancement of computational methods for tomographic reconstruction and their successful implementation in production software at various synchrotron facilities. This is due in part to the lack of readily available instrument datasets and phantoms representative of real materials for validation and comparison of new numerical methods. Recent advancements in detector technology have made sub-second and multi-energy tomographic data collection possible (Gibbs et al 2015 Sci. Rep. 5 11824), but have also increased the demand to develop new reconstruction methods able to handle in situ (Pelt and Batenburg 2013 IEEE Trans. Image Process. 22 5238-51) and dynamic systems (Mohan et al 2015 IEEE Trans. Comput. Imaging 1 96-111) that can be quickly incorporated in beamline production software (Gürsoy et al 2014 J. Synchrotron Radiat. 21 1188-93). The x-ray tomography data bank, tomoBank, provides a repository of experimental and simulated datasets with the aim to foster collaboration among computational scientists, beamline scientists, and experimentalists and to accelerate the development and implementation of tomographic reconstruction methods for synchrotron facility production software by providing easy access to challenging datasets and their descriptors.

  11. Analysis of iterative region-of-interest image reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Kraemer, David N.; Roth, Erin G.; Ullberg, Christer; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. One of the challenges for iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is that such algorithms solve an imaging model implicitly, requiring a complete representation of the scanned subject within the viewing domain of the scanner. This requirement can place a prohibitively high computational burden for IIR applied to x-ray computed tomography (CT), especially when high-resolution tomographic volumes are required. In this work, we aim to develop an IIR algorithm for direct region-of-interest (ROI) image reconstruction. The proposed class of IIR algorithms is based on an optimization problem that incorporates a data fidelity term, which compares a derivative of the estimated data with the available projection data. In order to characterize this optimization problem, we apply it to computer-simulated two-dimensional fan-beam CT data, using both ideal noiseless data and realistic data containing a level of noise comparable to that of the breast CT application. The proposed method is demonstrated for both complete field-of-view and ROI imaging. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed ROI imaging method, it is applied to actual CT scanner data. PMID:25685824

  12. Analysis of iterative region-of-interest image reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Kraemer, David N; Roth, Erin G; Ullberg, Christer; Reiser, Ingrid S; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-10-03

    One of the challenges for iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is that such algorithms solve an imaging model implicitly, requiring a complete representation of the scanned subject within the viewing domain of the scanner. This requirement can place a prohibitively high computational burden for IIR applied to x-ray computed tomography (CT), especially when high-resolution tomographic volumes are required. In this work, we aim to develop an IIR algorithm for direct region-of-interest (ROI) image reconstruction. The proposed class of IIR algorithms is based on an optimization problem that incorporates a data fidelity term, which compares a derivative of the estimated data with the available projection data. In order to characterize this optimization problem, we apply it to computer-simulated two-dimensional fan-beam CT data, using both ideal noiseless data and realistic data containing a level of noise comparable to that of the breast CT application. The proposed method is demonstrated for both complete field-of-view and ROI imaging. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed ROI imaging method, it is applied to actual CT scanner data.

  13. Quantitative X-ray computed tomography peritoneography in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma patients receiving intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinwand, Joshua C; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan; Qi, Jing; Graziano, Joseph H; Slavkovic, Vesna N; Bates, Gleneara E; Lewin, Sharyn N; Allendorf, John D; Chabot, John A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Taub, Robert N

    2013-12-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is used to treat peritoneal surface-spreading malignancies. We sought to determine whether volume and surface area of the intraperitoneal chemotherapy compartments are associated with overall survival and posttreatment glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Thirty-eight MPM patients underwent X-ray computed tomography peritoneograms during outpatient intraperitoneal chemotherapy. We calculated volume and surface area of contrast-filled compartments by semiautomated computer algorithm. We tested whether these were associated with overall survival and posttreatment GFR. Decreased likelihood of mortality was associated with larger surface areas (p = 0.0201) and smaller contrast-filled compartment volumes (p = 0.0341), controlling for age, sex, histologic subtype, and presence of residual disease >0.5 cm postoperatively. Larger volumes were associated with higher posttreatment GFR, controlling for pretreatment GFR, body surface area, surface area, and the interaction between body surface area and volume (p = 0.0167). Computed tomography peritoneography is an appropriate modality to assess for maldistribution of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. In addition to identifying catheter failure and frank loculation, quantitative analysis of the contrast-filled compartment's surface area and volume may predict overall survival and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Prospective studies should be undertaken to confirm and extend these findings to other diseases, including advanced ovarian carcinoma.

  14. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    , a significant amount of glassy material interspersed among the gas bubbles will be excluded, thus underestimating the melt rate. Likewise, if they are drawn too high, many large voids will be counted as glass, thus overestimating the melt rate. As will be shown later in this report, there is also no guarantee that a given distribution of glass and gas bubbles along a particular sectioned plane will always be representative of the entire sample volume. Poor reproducibility seen in some LMR data may be related to these difficulties of the visual method. In addition, further improvement of the existing melt rate model requires that the overall impact of feed chemistry on melt rate be reflected on measured data at a greater quantitative resolution on a more consistent basis than the visual method can provide. An alternate method being pursued is X-ray computed tomography (CT). It involves X-ray scanning of glass samples, performing CT on the 2-D X-ray images to build 3-D volumetric data, and adaptive segmentation analysis of CT results to not only identify but quantify the distinct regions within each sample based on material density and morphologies. The main advantage of this new method is that it can determine the relative local density of the material remaining in the beaker after the heat treatment regardless of its morphological conditions by selectively excluding all the voids greater than a given volumetric pixel (voxel) size, thus eliminating much of the subjectivity involved in the visual method. As a result, the melt rate data obtained from CT scan will give quantitative descriptions not only on the fully-melted glass, but partially-melted and unmelted feed materials. Therefore, the CT data are presumed to be more reflective of the actual melt rate trends in continuously-fed melters than the visual data. In order to test the applicability of X-ray CT scan to the HLW glass melt rate study, several new series of HLW simulant/frit mixtures were melted in the

  15. Computed tomography of x-ray index of refraction using the diffraction enhanced imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Ren, B.; Wu, X.Y.; Orion, I.; Zhong, Z.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new, synchrotron-based, x-ray radiography method that uses monochromatic, fan-shaped beams, with an analyser crystal positioned between the subject and the detector. The analyser allows the detection of only those x-rays transmitted by the subject that fall into the acceptance angle (central part of the rocking curve) of the monochromator/analyser system. As shown by Chapman et al , in addition to the x-ray attenuation, the method provides information on the out-of-plane angular deviation of x-rays. New images result in which the image contrast depends on the x-ray index of refraction and on the yield of small-angle scattering, respectively. We implemented DEI in the tomography mode at the National Synchrotron Light Source using 22 keV x-rays, and imaged a cylindrical acrylic phantom that included oil-filled, slanted channels. The resulting 'refraction CT image' shows the pure image of the out-of-plane gradient of the x-ray index of refraction. No image artefacts were present, indicating that the CT projection data were a consistent set. The 'refraction CT image' signal is linear with the gradient of the refractive index, and its value is equal to that expected. The method, at the energy used or higher, has the potential for use in clinical radiography and in industry. (author)

  16. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  17. Computer programmes for the control and data manipulation of a sequential x-ray-fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spimpolo, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Two computer programmes have been written for use on a fully automated Siemens SRS200 sequential X-ray-fluorescence spectrometer. The first of these is used to control the spectrometer via an LC200 logic controller using a Data General Nova IV minicomputer; the second is used for the on-line evaluation of the intensity results and the printout of the analytical results. This system is an alternative to the systems offered by Siemens Ltd, which consist of a Process PR310 or Digital DEC PDP1103 computer and the Siemens Spectra 310 software package. The multibatch capabilities of the programmes, with the option of measuring one sample or a tray of samples before the results are calculated, give the new programmes a major advantage over the dedicated software and, together with the elimination of human error in calculation, have resulted in increased efficiency and quality in routine analyses. A description is given of the two programmes, as well as instruction and guidelines to the user

  18. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  19. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, E; Grandl, S; Sztrókay-Gaul, A; Barbone, G; Mittone, A; Gasilov, S; Bravin, A; Coan, P

    2014-11-01

    Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure's possible applications. A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  20. Accelerated Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis on a Heterogeneous High Performance Computing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, J; Bauer, M A, E-mail: qin.jinhui@gmail.com, E-mail: bauer@uwo.ca [Computer Science Department, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    The analysis of synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data has been used by scientists and engineers to understand and predict properties of materials. However, the large volume of XRD image data and the intensive computations involved in the data analysis makes it hard for researchers to quickly reach any conclusions about the images from an experiment when using conventional XRD data analysis software. Synchrotron time is valuable and delays in XRD data analysis can impact decisions about subsequent experiments or about materials that they are investigating. In order to improve the data analysis performance, ideally to achieve near real time data analysis during an XRD experiment, we designed and implemented software for accelerated XRD data analysis. The software has been developed for a heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) system, comprised of IBM PowerXCell 8i processors and Intel quad-core Xeon processors. This paper describes the software and reports on the improved performance. The results indicate that it is possible for XRD data to be analyzed at the rate it is being produced.

  1. Accelerated Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis on a Heterogeneous High Performance Computing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, J; Bauer, M A

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data has been used by scientists and engineers to understand and predict properties of materials. However, the large volume of XRD image data and the intensive computations involved in the data analysis makes it hard for researchers to quickly reach any conclusions about the images from an experiment when using conventional XRD data analysis software. Synchrotron time is valuable and delays in XRD data analysis can impact decisions about subsequent experiments or about materials that they are investigating. In order to improve the data analysis performance, ideally to achieve near real time data analysis during an XRD experiment, we designed and implemented software for accelerated XRD data analysis. The software has been developed for a heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) system, comprised of IBM PowerXCell 8i processors and Intel quad-core Xeon processors. This paper describes the software and reports on the improved performance. The results indicate that it is possible for XRD data to be analyzed at the rate it is being produced.

  2. Reconstruction of sparse-view X-ray computed tomography using adaptive iterative algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Lin, Weikai; Jin, Mingwu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose two reconstruction algorithms for sparse-view X-ray computed tomography (CT). Treating the reconstruction problems as data fidelity constrained total variation (TV) minimization, both algorithms adapt the alternate two-stage strategy: projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity and non-negativity constraints and steepest descent for TV minimization. The novelty of this work is to determine iterative parameters automatically from data, thus avoiding tedious manual parameter tuning. In TV minimization, the step sizes of steepest descent are adaptively adjusted according to the difference from POCS update in either the projection domain or the image domain, while the step size of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) in POCS is determined based on the data noise level. In addition, projection errors are used to compare with the error bound to decide whether to perform ART so as to reduce computational costs. The performance of the proposed methods is studied and evaluated using both simulated and physical phantom data. Our methods with automatic parameter tuning achieve similar, if not better, reconstruction performance compared to a representative two-stage algorithm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Computer simulation for the effect of target angle in diagnostic x-ray tube output and half-value layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayami, Akimune; Fuchihata, Hajime; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Mori, Yoshinobu; Ozeki, Syuji.

    1980-01-01

    The change of target angle of X-ray tube plays an important role in changing both the output and the quality of X-rays. A computer simulation was made to estimate the effect of target angle on the output and the quality (half-value layer: HVL) in the central ray using Storm's semiempirical formula. The data here presented are the values of output and HVL for the target angles of 10, 15, 20 and 30 degrees and for the total filtrations of 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm Al eq., at an increment of 10 kV steps of applied voltage between 50 and 150 kV. The output values and HVL's as a function of target angle, applied voltage and total filtration are shown for a full-wave rectified diagnostic X-ray generator. As a result, changes ranging from 17 to 76% in the output and 5 to 66% in the HVL were noted by varying the target angle from 10 to 30 degrees. Therefore, the target angle of X-ray tube should be clearly stated whenever the output and the quality (HVL) of X-ray generator are discussed. (author)

  4. Morphological Characterisation of Unstained and Intact Tissue Micro-architecture by X-ray Computed Micro- and Nano-Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Lucy A.; Bradley, Robert S.; Withers, Philip J.; Newton, Victoria L.; Watson, Rachel E. B.; Austin, Clare; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Characterisation and quantification of tissue structures is limited by sectioning-induced artefacts and by the difficulties of visualising and segmenting 3D volumes. Here we demonstrate that, even in the absence of X-ray contrast agents, X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) and nanotomography (nanoCT) can circumvent these problems by rapidly resolving compositionally discrete 3D tissue regions (such as the collagen-rich adventitia and elastin-rich lamellae in intact rat arteries) which in turn can be segmented due to their different X-ray opacities and morphologies. We then establish, using X-ray tomograms of both unpressurised and pressurised arteries that intra-luminal pressure not only increases lumen cross-sectional area and straightens medial elastic lamellae but also induces profound remodelling of the adventitial layer. Finally we apply microCT to another human organ (skin) to visualise the cell-rich epidermis and extracellular matrix-rich dermis and to show that conventional histological and immunohistochemical staining protocols are compatible with prior X-ray exposure. As a consequence we suggest that microCT could be combined with optical microscopy to characterise the 3D structure and composition of archival paraffin embedded biological materials and of mechanically stressed dynamic tissues such as the heart, lungs and tendons.

  5. Using soft-X-ray energy spectrum to measure electronic temperature Te and primary research with computer data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingyao; Zhang Guangyang

    1993-01-01

    The authors reported the application of SCORPIO--2000 Computer detecting system on a nuclear fusion equipment, to measure the energy spectrum of soft X-ray from which the plasma electronic temperature was calculated. The authors processed systematically the data of the energy area of 1-4 Kev soft X-ray. The program edited was mostly made in FORTRAN, but only one SUBSB was made in assembly language. The program worked normally with convincing operation and easy correction of the data. The result obtained from calculation is the same as what was expected and the diagram obtained is the same as the expected one

  6. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  7. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, L.; Appavou, M.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2017), s. 402-417 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : zinc phosphate cements * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray micro-computed tomography * X-ray powder diffraction * zinc oxide * acid-base cements Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0109564116305127

  8. Cybersecurity, massive data processing, community interaction, and other developments at WWW-based computational X-ray Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2013-03-01

    X-Ray Server (x-server.gmca.aps.anl.gov) is a WWW-based computational server for modeling of X-ray diffraction, reflection and scattering data. The modeling software operates directly on the server and can be accessed remotely either from web browsers or from user software. In the later case the server can be deployed as a software library or a data fitting engine. As the server recently surpassed the milestones of 15 years online and 1.5 million calculations, it accumulated a number of technical solutions that are discussed in this paper. The developed approaches to detecting physical model limits and user calculations failures, solutions to spam and firewall problems, ways to involve the community in replenishing databases and methods to teach users automated access to the server programs may be helpful for X-ray researchers interested in using the server or sharing their own software online.

  9. Cybersecurity, massive data processing, community interaction, and other developments at WWW-based computational X-ray Server

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    X-Ray Server (x-server.gmca.aps.anl.gov) is a WWW-based computational server for modeling of X-ray diffraction, reflection and scattering data. The modeling software operates directly on the server and can be accessed remotely either from web browsers or from user software. In the later case the server can be deployed as a software library or a data fitting engine. As the server recently surpassed the milestones of 15 years online and 1.5 million calculations, it accumulated a number of technical solutions that are discussed in this paper. The developed approaches to detecting physical model limits and user calculations failures, solutions to spam and firewall problems, ways to involve the community in replenishing databases and methods to teach users automated access to the server programs may be helpful for X-ray researchers interested in using the server or sharing their own software online.

  10. Fine Output Voltage Control Method considering Time-Delay of Digital Inverter System for X-ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Junji; Kaneko, Kazuhide; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Ando, Itaru; Ogawa, Mina; Takano, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new output voltage control for an inverter system, which has time-delay and nonlinear load. In the next generation X-ray computed tomography of a medical device (X-ray CT) that uses the contactless power transfer method, the feedback signal often contains time-delay due to AD/DA conversion and error detection/correction time. When the PID controller of the inverter system is received the adverse effects of the time-delay, the controller often has an overshoot and a oscillated response. In order to overcome this problem, this paper proposes a compensation method based on the Smith predictor for an inverter system having a time-delay and the nonlinear loads which are the diode bridge rectifier and X-ray tube. The proposed compensation method consists of the hybrid Smith predictor system based on an equivalent analog circuit and DSP. The experimental results confirm the validity of the proposed system.

  11. Evaluation of pore structures and cracking in cement paste exposed to elevated temperatures by X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Yeom, E-mail: kimky@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Tae Sup, E-mail: taesup@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Pil, E-mail: bamtol97@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    When cement-based materials are exposed to the high temperatures induced by fire, which can rapidly cause temperatures of over 1000 °C, the changes in pore structure and density prevail. In the present study, mortar specimens were subjected to a series of increasing temperatures to explore the temperature-dependent evolution of internal pore structure. High-performance X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe the evolution of temperature-induced discontinuities at the sub-millimeter level. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the cause of physical changes in the heated mortar specimens. Results exhibit the changes in pore structure caused by elevated temperatures, and thermally induced fractures. We discuss the progressive formation of thermally induced fracture networks, which is a prerequisite for spalling failure of cement-based materials by fire, based on visual observations of the 3D internal structures revealed by X-ray CT.

  12. Evaluation of pore structures and cracking in cement paste exposed to elevated temperatures by X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup; Park, Kwang Pil

    2013-01-01

    When cement-based materials are exposed to the high temperatures induced by fire, which can rapidly cause temperatures of over 1000 °C, the changes in pore structure and density prevail. In the present study, mortar specimens were subjected to a series of increasing temperatures to explore the temperature-dependent evolution of internal pore structure. High-performance X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe the evolution of temperature-induced discontinuities at the sub-millimeter level. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the cause of physical changes in the heated mortar specimens. Results exhibit the changes in pore structure caused by elevated temperatures, and thermally induced fractures. We discuss the progressive formation of thermally induced fracture networks, which is a prerequisite for spalling failure of cement-based materials by fire, based on visual observations of the 3D internal structures revealed by X-ray CT

  13. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Fix, Brian J.; Smith, Jerel A.; Brown, William D.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Martz, Harry E.

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are +/- 0.4 and +/- 0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 +/- 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer's quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9 % (typical) and 12 % (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10 % at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher energy (>60 keV) photons into a lower-energy ( 60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is

  14. Characterization of a spectroscopic detector for application in x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fix, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, W. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Recent advances in cadmium telluride (CdTe) energy-discriminating pixelated detectors have enabled the possibility of Multi-Spectral X-ray Computed Tomography (MSXCT) to incorporate spectroscopic information into CT. MultiX ME 100 V2 is a CdTe-based spectroscopic x-ray detector array capable of recording energies from 20 to 160 keV in 1.1 keV energy bin increments. Hardware and software have been designed to perform radiographic and computed tomography tasks with this spectroscopic detector. Energy calibration is examined using the end-point energy of a bremsstrahlung spectrum and radioisotope spectral lines. When measuring the spectrum from Am-241 across 500 detector elements, the standard deviation of the peak-location and FWHM measurements are ±0.4 and ±0.6 keV, respectively. As these values are within the energy bin size (1.1 keV), detector elements are consistent with each other. The count rate is characterized, using a nonparalyzable model with a dead time of 64 ± 5 ns. This is consistent with the manufacturer’s quoted per detector-element linear-deviation at 2 Mpps (million photons per sec) of 8.9% (typical) and 12% (max). When comparing measured and simulated spectra, a low-energy tail is visible in the measured data due to the spectral response of the detector. If no valid photon detections are expected in the low-energy tail, then a background subtraction may be applied to allow for a possible first-order correction. If photons are expected in the low-energy tail, a detailed model must be implemented. A radiograph of an aluminum step wedge with a maximum height of about 20 mm shows an underestimation of attenuation by about 10% at 60 keV. This error is due to partial energy deposition from higher-energy (> 60 keV) photons into a lower-energy (~60 keV) bin, reducing the apparent attenuation. A radiograph of a PTFE cylinder taken using a bremsstrahlung spectrum from an x-ray voltage of 100 kV filtered by 1.3 mm Cu is reconstructed using Abel inversion

  15. Three-Dimensional Printing of X-Ray Computed Tomography Datasets with Multiple Materials Using Open-Source Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ian M.; McGoldrick, Matthew T.; Helms, My N.; Betts, Aislinn; van Avermaete, Anthony; Owers, Elizabeth; Doney, Evan; Liepert, Taimi; Niebur, Glen; Liepert, Douglas; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing allow for digital files to be turned into a "printed" physical product. For example, complex anatomical models derived from clinical or pre-clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT) data of patients or research specimens can be constructed using various printable materials. Although 3D printing…

  16. Fatigue damage assessment of uni-directional non-crimp fabric reinforced polyester composite using X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Zangenberg Hansen, Jens; Lowe, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the progression of tension-tension fatigue (R=0.1) damage in a unidirectional (UD) composite made from a non-crimp glass fibre fabric used for wind turbine blades is investigated using multi-scale 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT). Initially, a representative volume is examined at ...

  17. Experimental investigation of the diffusion coefficients in porous media by application of X-ray computer tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhelezny, Petr; Shapiro, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The present work describes a new experimental method that makes it possible to investigate diffusion coefficients in a porous medium. The method is based on application of X-ray computed tomography (CT). The general applicability of this method for the determination of diffusion coefficients...

  18. Phase transitions in diglyceride monolayers studied by computer simulations, pressure-area isotherms and x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Toxværd, S.; Larsen, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    1,2-sn-diglyceride monolayers exhibit unique and complex phase transitions as a function of surface pressure. The dynamical response of the layer on expanding the film has been investigated by computer simulations, (π-A) isotherms and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. Good agreement is found b...

  19. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascio, D.; Cheran, S.C.; Chincarini, A.; De Nunzio, G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Gargano, G.; Gori, I.; Retico, A.; Masala, G.L.; Preite Martinez, A.; Santoro, M.; Spinelli, C.; Tarantino, T.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness (∝300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very high (75% range) even at 1-6 FP/scan. (orig.)

  20. The impact of technical conditions of X-ray imaging on reproducibility and precision of digital computer-assisted X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malich, A.; Boettcher, J.; Pfeil, A.; Sauner, D.; Heyne, J.P.; Petrovitch, A.; Hansch, A.; Kaiser, W.A.; Linss, W.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of imaging and analysis for bone mineral density (BMD) determination using digital computer-assisted X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR; Pronosco X-posure, version V.2, Sectra Pronosco, Denmark); to verify potential factors that influence BMD extrapolation such as tube voltage, film-focus distance (FFD), film quality and brand (Kodak T-MAT-Plus, Konika SRH, Agfa Scopix), imaging technology (conventional, digital), imaging system (Kodak, Agfa) and exposure level (mAs); and to clarify whether DXR analysis based on printouts of digital images is comparable to analysis of conventional images. The hand of a cadaver was X-rayed using varied parameters: 4-8 mAs, 40-52 kV, 90-130 cm FFD. Radiographs under standardised conditions were performed 10 times using a conventional machine (Philips Super 80 CP) and the printouts of a digital system (Digital Diagnost Philips Optimus) for the analysis of reproducibility. One image was scanned and analysed 10 times additionally for imaging reproducibility. Reliability error of the system for the imaging process using conventional radiographs-rays was 0.49% (standard conditions: 6 mAs, 40 kV, 1 m FFD), using printouts of digital images was 2.89% (4 mAs, 42 kV, 1 m FFD) and regarding the analysis process was 0.22%. BMD calculation is not affected by alterations in FFD (precision error 1.21%), mAs (0.83%) or film quality/brand (0.38%), but differs significantly depending on tube voltage (2.70%). The system was not able to analyse conventional images with tube voltages of 49/52 kV. DXR technology is stable with most of the tested parameters. Normative data should exclusively be used for calculations using similar tube voltage or correction factors. All other parameters had no significant influence on the BMD calculation. Reproducibility is high. For technical reasons it is not recommended to use the printouts of digital images for BMD determination. (orig.)

  1. SU-C-209-06: Improving X-Ray Imaging with Computer Vision and Augmented Reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, R.D.; Scherrer, B [Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Don, S [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using a computer vision algorithm and augmented reality interface to reduce repeat rates and improve consistency of image quality and patient exposure in general radiography. Methods: A prototype device, designed for use with commercially available hardware (Microsoft Kinect 2.0) capable of depth sensing and high resolution/frame rate video, was mounted to the x-ray tube housing as part of a Philips DigitalDiagnost digital radiography room. Depth data and video was streamed to a Windows 10 PC. Proprietary software created an augmented reality interface where overlays displayed selectable information projected over real-time video of the patient. The information displayed prior to and during x-ray acquisition included: recognition and position of ordered body part, position of image receptor, thickness of anatomy, location of AEC cells, collimated x-ray field, degree of patient motion and suggested x-ray technique. Pre-clinical data was collected in a volunteer study to validate patient thickness measurements and x-ray images were not acquired. Results: Proprietary software correctly identified ordered body part, measured patient motion, and calculated thickness of anatomy. Pre-clinical data demonstrated accuracy and precision of body part thickness measurement when compared with other methods (e.g. laser measurement tool). Thickness measurements provided the basis for developing a database of thickness-based technique charts that can be automatically displayed to the technologist. Conclusion: The utilization of computer vision and commercial hardware to create an augmented reality view of the patient and imaging equipment has the potential to drastically improve the quality and safety of x-ray imaging by reducing repeats and optimizing technique based on patient thickness. Society of Pediatric Radiology Pilot Grant; Washington University Bear Cub Fund.

  2. SU-C-209-06: Improving X-Ray Imaging with Computer Vision and Augmented Reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, R.D.; Scherrer, B; Don, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using a computer vision algorithm and augmented reality interface to reduce repeat rates and improve consistency of image quality and patient exposure in general radiography. Methods: A prototype device, designed for use with commercially available hardware (Microsoft Kinect 2.0) capable of depth sensing and high resolution/frame rate video, was mounted to the x-ray tube housing as part of a Philips DigitalDiagnost digital radiography room. Depth data and video was streamed to a Windows 10 PC. Proprietary software created an augmented reality interface where overlays displayed selectable information projected over real-time video of the patient. The information displayed prior to and during x-ray acquisition included: recognition and position of ordered body part, position of image receptor, thickness of anatomy, location of AEC cells, collimated x-ray field, degree of patient motion and suggested x-ray technique. Pre-clinical data was collected in a volunteer study to validate patient thickness measurements and x-ray images were not acquired. Results: Proprietary software correctly identified ordered body part, measured patient motion, and calculated thickness of anatomy. Pre-clinical data demonstrated accuracy and precision of body part thickness measurement when compared with other methods (e.g. laser measurement tool). Thickness measurements provided the basis for developing a database of thickness-based technique charts that can be automatically displayed to the technologist. Conclusion: The utilization of computer vision and commercial hardware to create an augmented reality view of the patient and imaging equipment has the potential to drastically improve the quality and safety of x-ray imaging by reducing repeats and optimizing technique based on patient thickness. Society of Pediatric Radiology Pilot Grant; Washington University Bear Cub Fund

  3. Multi-scale characteristics of coal structure by x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ting-ting; Feng, Zeng-chao; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    It is of great benefit to study the material and structural heterogeneity of coal for better understanding the coalbed methane (CBM) storage and enrichment. In this paper, multi-scale X-ray computed tomography (CT), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) at multi scales were conducted to thoroughly study the material distribution, heterogeneity, pore development, porosity and permeability of coal. It is suitable and reasonable to divide the testing samples into three structural categories by average density and heterogeneity degree, and the meso structure in the three categories accords with the morphology on SEM images. The pore size distribution and pore development of each subsample cannot be correspondingly related to their respective structure category or morphology due to different observation scales, while the macro pore size development, accumulated macro pore volume and macro pores porosity accord with the meso structure category and morphology information by CT and SEM at the same scale very well. Given the effect of macro pores on permeability and the contribution of micro pores to CBM storage capacity, reservoirs with developed micro pores and macro pores may be the most suitable coal reservoir for CBM exploitation.

  4. A computationally inexpensive model for estimating dimensional measurement uncertainty due to x-ray computed tomography instrument misalignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ametova, Evelina; Ferrucci, Massimiliano; Chilingaryan, Suren; Dewulf, Wim

    2018-06-01

    The recent emergence of advanced manufacturing techniques such as additive manufacturing and an increased demand on the integrity of components have motivated research on the application of x-ray computed tomography (CT) for dimensional quality control. While CT has shown significant empirical potential for this purpose, there is a need for metrological research to accelerate the acceptance of CT as a measuring instrument. The accuracy in CT-based measurements is vulnerable to the instrument geometrical configuration during data acquisition, namely the relative position and orientation of x-ray source, rotation stage, and detector. Consistency between the actual instrument geometry and the corresponding parameters used in the reconstruction algorithm is critical. Currently available procedures provide users with only estimates of geometrical parameters. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty in the measured geometrical parameters must be considered to provide a complete uncertainty analysis and to establish confidence intervals for CT dimensional measurements. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive model to approximate the influence of errors in CT geometrical parameters on dimensional measurement results. We use surface points extracted from a computer-aided design (CAD) model to model discrepancies in the radiographic image coordinates assigned to the projected edges between an aligned system and a system with misalignments. The efficacy of the proposed method was confirmed on simulated and experimental data in the presence of various geometrical uncertainty contributors.

  5. SEDRX: A computer program for the simulation Si(Li) and Ge(Hp) x-ray detectors efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, M.A.; Benouali, A.; Tchantchane, A.; Azbouche, A.; Tobbeche, S. Centre de Developpement des Techniques Nucleaires, Algiers; Labo. des Techniques Nucleaires)

    1992-12-01

    The difficulties encountered in measuring the x-ray detectors efficiency has motivated to develop a computer program to simulate this parameter. this program computes the efficiency of detectors as a function of energy. the computation of this parameter is based on the fitting coefficients of absorption in the case of photoelectric, coherent and incoherent factors. These coefficients are given by Mc Master library or may be determined by the interpolation based on cubic splines

  6. On the problem of possibilities of X-ray computer tomography in the diagnosis of endophitic tumors of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, A.N.; Akberov, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The possibilities of X-ray computer tomography in the diagnosis of endophitic tumors of the stomach including tumors of small size are considered using the examinations of 100 patients with stomach diseases. The computer-tomographic semiotics of small endophitic tumors of the stomach is presented, the place of computer tomography in the diagnosis of tumors of the stomach as well as its potential possibilities in revealing small tumors of the stomach with principally endophitic spreading. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  7. Enhanced renal image contrast by ethanol fixation in phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Ryota; Kunii, Takuya; Yoneyama, Akio; Ooizumi, Takahito; Maruyama, Hiroko; Lwin, Thet Thet; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru

    2014-07-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a crystal X-ray interferometer can depict the fine structures of biological objects without the use of a contrast agent. To obtain higher image contrast, fixation techniques have been examined with 100% ethanol and the commonly used 10% formalin, since ethanol causes increased density differences against background due to its physical properties and greater dehydration of soft tissue. Histological comparison was also performed. A phase-contrast X-ray system was used, fitted with a two-crystal X-ray interferometer at 35 keV X-ray energy. Fine structures, including cortex, tubules in the medulla, and the vessels of ethanol-fixed kidney could be visualized more clearly than that of formalin-fixed tissues. In the optical microscopic images, shrinkage of soft tissue and decreased luminal space were observed in ethanol-fixed kidney; and this change was significantly shown in the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. The ethanol fixation technique enhances image contrast by approximately 2.7-3.2 times in the cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla; the effect of shrinkage and the physical effect of ethanol cause an increment of approximately 78% and 22%, respectively. Thus, the ethanol-fixation technique enables the image contrast to be enhanced in phase-contrast X-ray imaging.

  8. Low-dose computed tomography to detect body-packing in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H., E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Niehues, S.M.; Schnapauff, D.; Grieser, C.; Rothe, J.H. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Waldmueller, D. [Bildungs- und Wissenschaftszentrum der Bundesfinanzverwaltung, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S.S. [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B.; Denecke, T. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To assess the possible extent of dose reduction for low-dose computed tomography (CT) in the detection of body-packing (ingested drug packets) as an alternative to plain radiographs in an animal model. Materials and methods: Twelve packets containing cocaine (purity >80%) were introduced into the intestine of an experimental animal (crossbred pig), which was then repeatedly examined by abdominal CT with stepwise dose reduction (tube voltage, 80 kV; tube current, 10-350 mA). Three blinded readers independently evaluated the CT datasets starting with the lowest tube current and noted the numbers of packets detected at the different tube currents used. In addition, 1 experienced reader determined the number of packets detectable on plain abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. Results: The threshold for correct identification of all 12 drug packets was 100 mA for reader 1 and 125 mA for readers 2 and 3. Above these thresholds all 3 readers consistently identified all 12 packets. The effective dose of a low-dose CT scan with 125 mA (including scout view) was 1.0 mSv, which was below that of 2 conventional abdominal radiographs (1.2 mSv). The reader interpreting the conventional radiographs identified a total of 9 drug packets and detected 8 packets by abdominal ultrasound. Conclusions: Extensive dose reduction makes low-dose CT a valuable alternative imaging modality for the examination of suspected body-packers and might replace conventional abdominal radiographs as the first-line imaging modality.

  9. First multimodal embolization particles visible on x-ray/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Soenke H; Budjan, Johannes; Aviv, Hagit; Haneder, Stefan; Kraenzlin, Bettina; Michaely, Henrik; Margel, Shlomo; Diehl, Steffen; Semmler, Wolfhard; Gretz, Norbert; Schönberg, Stefan O; Sadick, Maliha

    2011-03-01

    Embolization therapy is gaining importance in the treatment of malignant lesions, and even more in benign lesions. Current embolization materials are not visible in imaging modalities. However, it is assumed that directly visible embolization material may provide several advantages over current embolization agents, ranging from particle shunt and reflux prevention to improved therapy control and follow-up assessment. X-ray- as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible embolization materials have been demonstrated in experiments. In this study, we present an embolization material with the property of being visible in more than one imaging modality, namely MRI and x-ray/computed tomography (CT). Characterization and testing of the substance in animal models was performed. To reduce the chance of adverse reactions and to facilitate clinical approval, materials have been applied that are similar to those that are approved and being used on a routine basis in diagnostic imaging. Therefore, x-ray-visible Iodine was combined with MRI-visible Iron (Fe3O4) in a macroparticle (diameter, 40-200 μm). Its core, consisting of a copolymerized monomer MAOETIB (2-methacryloyloxyethyl [2,3,5-triiodobenzoate]), was coated with ultra-small paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (150 nm). After in vitro testing, including signal to noise measurements in CT and MRI (n = 5), its ability to embolize tissue was tested in an established tumor embolization model in rabbits (n = 6). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) (Integris, Philips), CT (Definition, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany), and MRI (3 Tesla Magnetom Tim Trio MRI, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany) were performed before, during, and after embolization. Imaging signal changes that could be attributed to embolization particles were assessed by visual inspection and rated on an ordinal scale by 3 radiologists, from 1 to 3. Histologic analysis of organs was performed. Particles provided a

  10. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography by using analytical DBP-type algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates a common metal artifacts problem in X-ray computed tomography (CT). The artifacts in reconstructed image may render image non-diagnostic because of inaccuracy beam hardening correction from high attenuation objects, satisfactory image could not be reconstructed from projections with missing or distorted data. In traditionally analytical metal artifact reduction (MAR) method, firstly subtract the metallic object part of projection data from the original obtained projection, secondly complete the subtracted part in original projection by using various interpolating method, thirdly reconstruction from the interpolated projection by filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. The interpolation error occurred during the second step can make unrealistic assumptions about the missing data, leading to DC shift artifact in the reconstructed images. We proposed a differentiated back-projection (DBP) type MAR method by instead of FBP algorithm with DBP algorithm in third step. In FBP algorithm the interpolated projection will be filtered on each projection view angle before back-projection, as a result the interpolation error is propagated to whole projection. However, the property of DBP algorithm provide a chance to do filter after the back-projection in a Hilbert filter direction, as a result the interpolation error affection would be reduce and there is expectation on improving quality of reconstructed images. In other word, if we choose the DBP algorithm instead of the FBP algorithm, less contaminated projection data with interpolation error would be used in reconstruction. A simulation study was performed to evaluate the proposed method using a given phantom.

  11. About a method for compressing x-ray computed microtomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Lucia; Kourousias, George; Billè, Fulvio; De Carlo, Francesco; Fidler, Aleš

    2018-04-01

    The management of scientific data is of high importance especially for experimental techniques that produce big data volumes. Such a technique is x-ray computed tomography (CT) and its community has introduced advanced data formats which allow for better management of experimental data. Rather than the organization of the data and the associated meta-data, the main topic on this work is data compression and its applicability to experimental data collected from a synchrotron-based CT beamline at the Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste facility (Italy) and studies images acquired from various types of samples. This study covers parallel beam geometry, but it could be easily extended to a cone-beam one. The reconstruction workflow used is the one currently in operation at the beamline. Contrary to standard image compression studies, this manuscript proposes a systematic framework and workflow for the critical examination of different compression techniques and does so by applying it to experimental data. Beyond the methodology framework, this study presents and examines the use of JPEG-XR in combination with HDF5 and TIFF formats providing insights and strategies on data compression and image quality issues that can be used and implemented at other synchrotron facilities and laboratory systems. In conclusion, projection data compression using JPEG-XR appears as a promising, efficient method to reduce data file size and thus to facilitate data handling and image reconstruction.

  12. Noise propagation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2014-01-01

    Three phase-retrieval algorithms, based on the transport-of-intensity equation and on the contrast transfer function for propagation-based imaging, and on the linearized geometrical optics approximation for analyser-based imaging, are investigated. The algorithms are compared in terms of their effect on propagation of noise from projection images to the corresponding phase-retrieved images and further to the computed tomography (CT) images/slices of a monomorphous object reconstructed using filtered backprojection algorithm. The comparison is carried out in terms of an integral noise characteristic, the variance, as well as in terms of a simple figure-of-merit, i.e. signal-to-noise ratio per unit dose. A gain factor is introduced that quantitatively characterizes the effect of phase retrieval on the variance of noise in the reconstructed projection images and in the axial slices of the object. Simple analytical expressions are derived for the gain factor and the signal-to-noise ratio, which indicate that the application of phase-retrieval algorithms can increase these parameters by up to two orders of magnitude compared to raw projection images and conventional CT, thus allowing significant improvement in the image quality and/or reduction of the x-ray dose delivered to the patient. (paper)

  13. X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Wang Jue; Chen Weimin

    2009-01-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials. (authors)

  14. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values......The influence of clay content in soil-pore structure development and the relative importance of macroporosity in governing convective fluid flow are two key challenges toward better understanding and quantifying soil ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil-water...... retention and air permeability) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning were combined and used from two scales on intact soil columns (100 and 580 cm3). The columns were sampled along a natural clay gradient at six locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 and L6 with 0.11, 0.16, 0.21, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.46 kg kg−1...

  15. Monitoring of stainless-steel slag carbonation using X-ray computed microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Marijn A; Nielsen, Peter; De Kock, Tim; Boone, Matthieu N; Quaghebeur, Mieke; Cnudde, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Steel production is one of the largest contributors to industrial CO2 emissions. This industry also generates large amounts of solid byproducts, such as slag and sludge. In this study, fine grained stainless-steel slag (SSS) is valorized to produce compacts with high compressive strength without the use of a hydraulic binder. This carbonation process is investigated on a pore-scale level to identify how the mineral phases in the SSS react with CO2, where carbonates are formed, and what the impact of these changes is on the pore network of the carbonated SSS compact. In addition to conventional research techniques, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) is applied to visualize and quantify the changes in situ during the carbonation process. The results show that carbonates mainly precipitate at grain contacts and in capillary pores and this precipitation has little effect on the connectivity of the pore space. This paper also demonstrates the use of a custom-designed polymer reaction cell that allows in situ HRXCT analysis of the carbonation process. This shows the distribution and influence of water and CO2 in the pore network on the carbonate precipitation and, thus, the influence on the compressive strength development of the waste material.

  16. Heterogeneous vesiculation of 2011 El Hierro xeno-pumice revealed by X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.; Mancini, L.; Polacci, M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Soler, V.; Arzilli, F.; Brun, F.

    2016-12-01

    During the first week of the 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption, abundant light-coloured pumiceous, high-silica volcanic bombs coated in dark basanite were found floating on the sea. The composition of the light-coloured frothy material (`xeno-pumice') is akin to that of sedimentary rocks from the region, but the textures resemble felsic magmatic pumice, leaving their exact mode of formation unclear. To help decipher their origin, we investigated representative El Hierro xeno-pumice samples using X-ray computed microtomography for their internal vesicle shapes, volumes, and bulk porosity, as well as for the spatial arrangement and size distributions of vesicles in three dimensions (3D). We find a wide range of vesicle morphologies, which are especially variable around small fragments of rock contained in the xeno-pumice samples. Notably, these rock fragments are almost exclusively of sedimentary origin, and we therefore interpret them as relicts an the original sedimentary ocean crust protolith(s). The irregular vesiculation textures observed probably resulted from pulsatory release of volatiles from multiple sources during xeno-pumice formation, most likely by successive release of pore water and mineral water during incremental heating and decompression of the sedimentary protoliths.

  17. Multifunctional BSA-Au nanostars for photoacoustic imaging and X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Lihui; Liu, Lin; Qin, Yeshan; Liu, Hongguang; Yang, Haishan

    2016-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bovine serum albumin-capped Au nanostars (BSA-AuNSs) for dual-modal computed tomography (CT)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging application. The BSA-AuNSs have an average size of 85nm, and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak at approximately 770nm. They have excellent biocompatibility, good X-ray attenuation, and great PA contrast enhancement properties. When injected intravenously, liver signal markedly increases in both CT and PA modalities. The in vivo biodistribution studies and pathology results showed that the BSA-AuNSs were mainly excreted through the liver and intestines with no obvious biotoxicity. These results indicate that BSA-AuNSs have high potential to be used as dual-modal CT/PA imaging contrast agents or further used to develop targeted probes. This preliminary study suggests that PA tomography may be used to non-invasively trace the kinetics and biodistribution of the nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. X-rays computed tomographic scans of lower limb and trunk muscles in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi; Nishio, Hisahide

    1992-10-01

    X-rays computed tomographic (CT) scans of muscles of the lower limbs and the trunk in 14 patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH) were studied. The CT scans showed that the affected muscles were decreased in density and size. The laterality of muscular involvement was sometimes observed. The muscular lesions in the lower limbs showed proximal distribution. In the thigh, the hamstrings were affected first, the adductor muscles second, and then the muscular involvement progressed to the quadriceps femoris muscle. In the lower leg, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were relatively spared as compared with the tibialis anterior muscle. In the lumbar girdle, the abdominal muscles were involved first, the gluteal muscles second, the back muscles third, and the psoas major muscle were relatively spared. The muscular weakness of this distribution exacerbated lumbar lordosis. The neck muscles were less affected than those of the lumbar girdle. The CT scans in FSH demonstrated the characteristic pattern of muscular involvement, which differed from the inherited muscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and others. (author).

  19. X-rays computed tomographic scans of lower limb and trunk muscles in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Keiichi; Nishio, Hisahide.

    1992-01-01

    X-rays computed tomographic (CT) scans of muscles of the lower limbs and the trunk in 14 patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH) were studied. The CT scans showed that the affected muscles were decreased in density and size. The laterality of muscular involvement was sometimes observed. The muscular lesions in the lower limbs showed proximal distribution. In the thigh, the hamstrings were affected first, the adductor muscles second, and then the muscular involvement progressed to the quadriceps femoris muscle. In the lower leg, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were relatively spared as compared with the tibialis anterior muscle. In the lumbar girdle, the abdominal muscles were involved first, the gluteal muscles second, the back muscles third, and the psoas major muscle were relatively spared. The muscular weakness of this distribution exacerbated lumbar lordosis. The neck muscles were less affected than those of the lumbar girdle. The CT scans in FSH demonstrated the characteristic pattern of muscular involvement, which differed from the inherited muscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and others. (author)

  20. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-03-03

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma. Future improvement in radionuclide imaging by means of emission composition potential. The compound plating approacl threshold for all the investigated transistors and fast neutron spectra lies within the raal. The value of the potential slightly changes with the coordinate change in this region, i.e. the charge on a collecting electrode is not practically guided up to a certain moment of time during the movement of nonequilibrium carriers.

  1. Multi-mounted X-ray cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Wang, Jingzheng; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng

    2018-04-01

    As a powerful nondestructive inspection technique, X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) has been widely applied to clinical diagnosis, industrial production and cutting-edge research. Imaging efficiency is currently one of the major obstacles for the applications of X-CT. In this paper, a multi-mounted three dimensional cone-beam X-CT (MM-CBCT) method is reported. It consists of a novel multi-mounted cone-beam scanning geometry and the corresponding three dimensional statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The scanning geometry is the most iconic design and significantly different from the current CBCT systems. Permitting the cone-beam scanning of multiple objects simultaneously, the proposed approach has the potential to achieve an imaging efficiency orders of magnitude greater than the conventional methods. Although multiple objects can be also bundled together and scanned simultaneously by the conventional CBCT methods, it will lead to the increased penetration thickness and signal crosstalk. In contrast, MM-CBCT avoids substantially these problems. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed MM-CBCT prototype system. This technique will provide a possible solution for the CT inspection in a large scale.

  2. Evaluation of Collateral Source Characteristics With 3-Dimensional Analysis Using Micro-X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Yuichiro; Hokimoto, Seiji; Tabata, Noriaki; Nakagawa, Osamu; Oshima, Asahi; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Otani, Jun; Ishii, Masanobu; Uchikawa, Michie; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Kaikita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hisao; Nishiyama, Koichi; Tsujita, Kenichi

    2018-03-23

    Collateral arteries provide an alternative blood supply and protect tissues from ischemic damage in patients with peripheral artery disease. However, the mechanism of collateral artery development is difficult to validate. Collateral arteries were visualized using micro-x-ray computed tomography. Developmental characteristics were assessed using confocal microscopy. We conducted a single-center, retrospective, observational study and assessed the dilatation of collateral arteries on ischemic sides. We quantified the vascular volume in both ischemic and nonischemic legs. A prominent increase in vascular volume was observed in the ischemic leg using a murine hind-limb ischemia model. We also performed qualitative assessment and confirmed that the inferior gluteal artery functioned as a major collateral source. Serial analysis of murine hind-limb vessel development revealed that the inferior gluteal artery was a remnant of the ischial artery, which emerged as a representative vessel on the dorsal side during hind-limb organogenesis. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients who were admitted for the diagnosis or treatment of peripheral artery disease. The diameter of the inferior gluteal artery on the ischemic side showed significant dilatation compared with that on the nonischemic side. Our findings indicate that an embryonic remnant artery can become a collateral source under ischemic conditions. Flow enhancement in the inferior gluteal artery might become a novel therapeutic approach for patients with peripheral artery disease. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  3. A minute fossil phoretic mite recovered by phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A.; Wirth, Stefan; Penney, David; McNeil, Andrew; Bradley, Robert S.; Withers, Philip J.; Preziosi, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) reveals the phoretic deutonymph of a fossil astigmatid mite (Acariformes: Astigmata) attached to a spider's carapace (Araneae: Dysderidae) in Eocene (44–49 Myr ago) Baltic amber. Details of appendages and a sucker plate were resolved, and the resulting three-dimensional model demonstrates the potential of tomography to recover morphological characters of systematic significance from even the tiniest amber inclusions without the need for a synchrotron. Astigmatids have an extremely sparse palaeontological record. We confirm one of the few convincing fossils, potentially the oldest record of Histiostomatidae. At 176 µm long, we believe this to be the smallest arthropod in amber to be CT-scanned as a complete body fossil, extending the boundaries for what can be recovered using this technique. We also demonstrate a minimum age for the evolution of phoretic behaviour among their deutonymphs, an ecological trait used by extant species to disperse into favourable environments. The occurrence of the fossil on a spider is noteworthy, as modern histiostomatids tend to favour other arthropods as carriers. PMID:22072283

  4. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation by stepped vitrification and monitored by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Ariadna; Clavero, Macarena; Gallardo, Miguel; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Amorim, Christiani A; Parrado-Gallego, Ángel; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; Paulini, Fernanda; Morris, John; Risco, Ramón

    2018-04-01

    Ovarian tissue cryopreservation is, in most cases, the only fertility preservation option available for female patients soon to undergo gonadotoxic treatment. To date, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue has been carried out by both traditional slow freezing method and vitrification, but even with the best techniques, there is still a considerable loss of follicle viability. In this report, we investigated a stepped cryopreservation procedure which combines features of slow cooling and vitrification (hereafter called stepped vitrification). Bovine ovarian tissue was used as a tissue model. Stepwise increments of the Me 2 SO concentration coupled with stepwise drops-in temperature in a device specifically designed for this purpose and X-ray computed tomography were combined to investigate loading times at each step, by monitoring the attenuation of the radiation proportional to Me 2 SO permeation. Viability analysis was performed in warmed tissues by immunohistochemistry. Although further viability tests should be conducted after transplantation, preliminary results are very promising. Four protocols were explored. Two of them showed a poor permeation of the vitrification solution (P1 and P2). The other two (P3 and P4), with higher permeation, were studied in deeper detail. Out of these two protocols, P4, with a longer permeation time at -40 °C, showed the same histological integrity after warming as fresh controls. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  6. Data fusion in X-ray computed tomography using a superiorization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrapp, Michael J; Herman, Gabor T

    2014-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an important and widespread inspection technique in industrial non-destructive testing. However, large-sized and heavily absorbing objects cause artifacts due to either the lack of penetration of the specimen in specific directions or by having data from only a limited angular range of views. In such cases, valuable information about the specimen is not revealed by the CT measurements alone. Further imaging modalities, such as optical scanning and ultrasonic testing, are able to provide data (such as an edge map) that are complementary to the CT acquisition. In this paper, a superiorization approach (a newly developed method for constrained optimization) is used to incorporate the complementary data into the CT reconstruction; this allows precise localization of edges that are not resolvable from the CT data by itself. Superiorization, as presented in this paper, exploits the fact that the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), often used for CT reconstruction, is resilient to perturbations; i.e., it can be modified to produce an output that is as consistent with the CT measurements as the output of unmodified SART, but is more consistent with the complementary data. The application of this superiorized SART method to measured data of a turbine blade demonstrates a clear improvement in the quality of the reconstructed image.

  7. A minute fossil phoretic mite recovered by phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A; Wirth, Stefan; Penney, David; McNeil, Andrew; Bradley, Robert S; Withers, Philip J; Preziosi, Richard F

    2012-06-23

    High-resolution phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) reveals the phoretic deutonymph of a fossil astigmatid mite (Acariformes: Astigmata) attached to a spider's carapace (Araneae: Dysderidae) in Eocene (44-49 Myr ago) Baltic amber. Details of appendages and a sucker plate were resolved, and the resulting three-dimensional model demonstrates the potential of tomography to recover morphological characters of systematic significance from even the tiniest amber inclusions without the need for a synchrotron. Astigmatids have an extremely sparse palaeontological record. We confirm one of the few convincing fossils, potentially the oldest record of Histiostomatidae. At 176 µm long, we believe this to be the smallest arthropod in amber to be CT-scanned as a complete body fossil, extending the boundaries for what can be recovered using this technique. We also demonstrate a minimum age for the evolution of phoretic behaviour among their deutonymphs, an ecological trait used by extant species to disperse into favourable environments. The occurrence of the fossil on a spider is noteworthy, as modern histiostomatids tend to favour other arthropods as carriers.

  8. Three Dimensional Digital Sieving of Asphalt Mixture Based on X-ray Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chichun Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform three-dimensional digital sieving based on X-ray computed tomography images, the definition of digital sieve size (DSS was proposed, which was defined as the minimum length of the minimum bounding squares of all possible orthographic projections of an aggregate. The corresponding program was developed to reconstruct aggregate structure and to obtain DSS. Laboratory experiments consisting of epoxy-filled aggregate specimens were conducted to investigate the difference between mechanical sieve analysis and the digital sieving technique. It was suggested that concave surface of aggregate was the possible reason for the disparity between DSS and mechanical sieve size. A comparison between DSS and equivalent diameter was also performed. Moreover, the digital sieving technique was adopted to evaluate the gradation of stone mastic asphalt mixtures. The results showed that the closest proximity of the laboratory gradation curve was achieved by calibrated DSS, among gradation curves based on calibrated DSS, un-calibrated DSS and equivalent diameter.

  9. Measurement of brain atrophy of aging using x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Shumpei; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1984-01-01

    We measured brain volume of 1,045 subjects with no brain damage using x-ray computed tomography and investigated brain atrophy of aging. Severity of brain atrophy was estimated by brain atrophy index (BAI): BAI (%)=100 (%)x(cerebrospinal fluid space volume/cranial cavity volume). Atrophy of the brain began with statistical significance in the forties in both sexes. In males 40-49 years of age the mean BAI was 1.0% greater (p<0.001) and the S.D. of BAI was 1.1% greater (p<0.001) than those in their thirties. In females of 40-49 years the mean BAI was 0.5% greater (p<0.001) than that in their thirties, but there was no statistical significance between the two S.D.'s of both decades. The BAI increased exponentially with the increasing age from thirties in both sexes. Correlation coefficients were 0.702 (p< 0.001, n=471) in males and 0.721 (p<0.001, n=480) in females. From the regression coefficients it was calculated that the BAI was doubled in 19.4 years in males and 17.4 years in females after thirties. (author)

  10. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  11. Small-angle x-ray scattering in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Durga; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Drabold, David A.; Elliott, Stephen R.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) in amorphous silicon (a -Si) with particular emphasis on the morphology and microstructure of voids. The relationship between the scattering intensity in SAXS and the three-dimensional structure of nanoscale inhomogeneities or voids is addressed by generating large high-quality a -Si networks with 0.1%-0.3% volume concentration of voids, as observed in experiments using SAXS and positron annihilation spectroscopy. A systematic study of the variation of the scattering intensity in the small-angle scattering region with the size, shape, number density, and the spatial distribution of the voids in the networks is presented. Our results suggest that the scattering intensity in the small-angle region is particularly sensitive to the size and the total volume fraction of the voids, but the effect of the geometry or shape of the voids is less pronounced in the intensity profiles. A comparison of the average size of the voids obtained from the simulated values of the intensity, using the Guinier approximation and Kratky plots, with that of the same from the spatial distribution of the atoms in the vicinity of void surfaces is presented.

  12. A method for describing the doses delivered by transmission x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, T.B.; Gagne, R.M.; Johnson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for describing the absorbed dose delivered by x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is proposed which provides a means to characterize the dose resulting from CT procedures consisting of a series of adjacent scans. The dose descriptor chosen is the average dose at several locations in the imaged volume of the central scan of the series. It is shown that this average dose, as defined, for locations in the central scan of the series can be obtained from the integral of the dose profile perpendicular to the scan plane at these same locations for a single scan. This method for estimating the average dose from a CT procedure has been evaluated as a function of the number of scans in the multiple scan procedure and location in the dosimetry phantom using single scan dose profiles obtained from five different types of CT systems. For the higher dose regions in the phantoms, the multiple scan dose descriptor derived from the single scan dose profiles overestimates the multiple scan average dose by no more than 10%, provided the procedure consists of at least eight scans

  13. Computation of the Transmitted and Polarized Scattered Fluxes by the Exoplanet HD 189733b in X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Frédéric [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences, Boční II 1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Grosso, Nicolas, E-mail: frederic.marin@astro.unistra.fr [Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2017-02-01

    Thousands of exoplanets have been detected, but only one exoplanetary transit was potentially observed in X-rays from HD 189733A. What makes the detection of exoplanets so difficult in this band? To answer this question, we run Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations to estimate the amount of X-ray flux reprocessed by HD 189733b. Despite its extended evaporating atmosphere, we find that the X-ray absorption radius of HD 189733b at 0.7 keV, which is the mean energy of the photons detected in the 0.25–2 keV energy band by XMM-Newton , is ∼1.01 times the planetary radius for an atmosphere of atomic hydrogen and helium (including ions), and produces a maximum depth of ∼2.1% at ∼±46 minutes from the center of the planetary transit on the geometrically thick and optically thin corona. We compute numerically in the 0.25–2 keV energy band that this maximum depth is only of ∼1.6% at ∼±47 minutes from the transit center, and not very sensitive to the metal abundance, assuming that adding metals in the atmosphere would not dramatically change the density–temperature profile. Regarding a direct detection of HD 189733b in X-rays, we find that the amount of flux reprocessed by the exoplanetary atmosphere varies with the orbital phase, spanning between three and five orders of magnitude fainter than the flux of the primary star. Additionally, the degree of linear polarization emerging from HD 189733b is <0.003%, with maximums detected near planetary greatest elongations. This implies that both the modulation of the X-ray flux with the orbital phase and the scatter-induced continuum polarization cannot be observed with current X-ray facilities.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy for X-ray chest in interstitial lung disease as confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, F.; Raza, S.; Shafique, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of x-ray chest in interstitial lung disease as confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest. Study Design: A cross-sectional validational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Oct 2013 to Apr 2014. Material and Method: A total of 137 patients with clinical suspicion of interstitial lung disease (ILD) aged 20-50 years of both genders were included in the study. Patients with h/o previous histopathological diagnosis, already taking treatment and pregnant females were excluded. All the patients had chest x-ray and then HRCT. The x-ray and HRCT findings were recorded as presence or absence of the ILD. Results: Mean age was 40.21 ± 4.29 years. Out of 137 patients, 79 (57.66 percent) were males and 58 (42.34 percent) were females with male to female ratio of 1.36:1. Chest x-ray detected ILD in 80 (58.39 percent) patients, out of which, 72 (true positive) had ILD and 8 (false positive) had no ILD on HRCT. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of chest x-ray in diagnosing ILD was 80.0 percent, 82.98 percent, 90.0 percent, 68.42 percent and 81.02 percent respectively. Conclusion: This study concluded that chest x-ray is simple, non-invasive, economical and readily available alternative to HRCT with an acceptable diagnostic accuracy of 81 percent in the diagnosis of ILD. (author)

  15. Energy-angle correlation correction algorithm for monochromatic computed tomography based on Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhijun; Du, Yingchao; Huang, Wenhui; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-12-01

    The necessity for compact and relatively low cost x-ray sources with monochromaticity, continuous tunability of x-ray energy, high spatial coherence, straightforward polarization control, and high brightness has led to the rapid development of Thomson scattering x-ray sources. To meet the requirement of in-situ monochromatic computed tomography (CT) for large-scale and/or high-attenuation materials based on this type of x-ray source, there is an increasing demand for effective algorithms to correct the energy-angle correlation. In this paper, we take advantage of the parametrization of the x-ray attenuation coefficient to resolve this problem. The linear attenuation coefficient of a material can be decomposed into a linear combination of the energy-dependent photoelectric and Compton cross-sections in the keV energy regime without K-edge discontinuities, and the line integrals of the decomposition coefficients of the above two parts can be determined by performing two spectrally different measurements. After that, the line integral of the linear attenuation coefficient of an imaging object at a certain interested energy can be derived through the above parametrization formula, and monochromatic CT can be reconstructed at this energy using traditional reconstruction methods, e.g., filtered back projection or algebraic reconstruction technique. Not only can monochromatic CT be realized, but also the distributions of the effective atomic number and electron density of the imaging object can be retrieved at the expense of dual-energy CT scan. Simulation results validate our proposal and will be shown in this paper. Our results will further expand the scope of application for Thomson scattering x-ray sources.

  16. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  17. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  18. An accurate method for computer-generating tungsten anode x-ray spectra from 30 to 140 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A

    1997-11-01

    A tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) was used to compute x-ray spectra at 1 keV intervals over the range from 30 kV to 140 kV. The TASMIP is not semi-empirical and uses no physical assumptions regarding x-ray production, but rather interpolates measured constant potential x-ray spectra published by Fewell et al. [Handbook of Computed Tomography X-ray Spectra (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1981)]. X-ray output measurements (mR/mAs measured at 1 m) were made on a calibrated constant potential generator in our laboratory from 50 kV to 124 kV, and with 0-5 mm added aluminum filtration. The Fewell spectra were slightly modified (numerically hardened) and normalized based on the attenuation and output characteristics of a constant potential generator and metal-insert x-ray tube in our laboratory. Then, using the modified Fewell spectra of different kVs, the photon fluence phi at each 1 keV energy bin (E) over energies from 10 keV to 140 keV was characterized using polynomial functions of the form phi (E) = a0[E] + a1[E] kV + a2[E] kV2 + ... + a(n)[E] kVn. A total of 131 polynomial functions were used to calculate accurate x-ray spectra, each function requiring between two and four terms. The resulting TASMIP algorithm produced x-ray spectra that match both the quality and quantity characteristics of the x-ray system in our laboratory. For photon fluences above 10% of the peak fluence in the spectrum, the average percent difference (and standard deviation) between the modified Fewell spectra and the TASMIP photon fluence was -1.43% (3.8%) for the 50 kV spectrum, -0.89% (1.37%) for the 70 kV spectrum, and for the 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 and 140 kV spectra, the mean differences between spectra were all less than 0.20% and the standard deviations were less than approximately 1.1%. The model was also extended to include the effects of generator-induced kV ripple. Finally, the x-ray photon fluence in the units of

  19. Low-dose computed tomography for the detection of cocaine body packs. Clinical evaluation and legal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pache, G.; Bulla, S.; Baumann, T.; Langer, M.; Blanke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the juridical basis for CT examinations of cocaine body packers and to evaluate the clinical implementation of a tube current reduction-based low-dose CT protocol. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed to discuss the legal basis regarding the problem, the procedures, the potential harm and the proportionality. Retrospective evaluation of 8 patients who had undergone a low-dose CT scan (body mass index 2 30 mAs; > 25 kg/m 2 60 mAs) during the time period from February until October 2009 in order to exclude or to assess remaining cocaine body packs was approved by the institutional review board. The detectability and condition of the body packs were analyzed. Effective doses were calculated. Results: German jurisdiction does not distinguish between plain film X-ray and CT examinations. Both plain film X-ray and CT examination require a judicial warrant. However, examination results might still remain valid if a warrant was not requested. In 8 examinations (30 mAs n = 3, 60 mAs n = 5, mean BMI 25.9 ± 3.2.) a total of 34 body packs were correctly identified. The mean density of the body packs was 74.4 ± 31.9 HU (range 17 - 154 HU) with a cocaine content between 22.5 % and 72.8 %. The mean estimated radiation dose was 2.23 ± 0.72 mSv. Conclusion: Although medical legal aspects do not specify the diagnostic procedure to be performed, the high diagnostic accuracy and applied radiation dose reduction could establish low-dose CT as the method of choice for detecting cocaine body packs, thereby potentially avoiding future legal problems. (orig.)

  20. A reference sample for investigating the stability of the imaging system of x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Brown, Stephen; Flay, Nadia; McCarthy, Michael; McBride, John

    2016-01-01

    The use of x-ray computed tomography for dimensional measurements associated with engineering applications has flourished in recent years. However, error sources associated with the technology are not well understood. In this paper, a novel two-sphere reference sample has been developed and used to investigate the stability of the imaging system that consists of an x-ray tube and a detector. In contrast with other research work reported, this work considered relative positional variation along the x -, y - and z -axes. This sample is a significant improvement over the one sphere sample proposed previously, which can only be used to observe the stability of the imaging system along x - and y -axes. Temperature variations of different parts of the system have been monitored and the relationship between temperature variations and x-ray image stability has been studied. Other effects that may also influence the stability of the imaging system have been discussed. The proposed reference sample and testing method are transferable to other types of x-ray computed tomography systems, for example, systems with transmission targets and systems with sub-micrometre focal spots. (paper)

  1. Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process for Large X-Ray Mirror Mandrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-energy grazing incidence shell optics for hard-x-ray telescopes. The resolution of a mirror shells depends on the quality of cylindrical mandrel from which they are being replicated. Mid-spatial-frequency axial figure error is a dominant contributor in the error budget of the mandrel. This paper presents our efforts to develop a deterministic cylindrical polishing process in order to keep the mid-spatial-frequency axial figure errors to a minimum. Simulation software is developed to model the residual surface figure errors of a mandrel due to the polishing process parameters and the tools used, as well as to compute the optical performance of the optics. The study carried out using the developed software was focused on establishing a relationship between the polishing process parameters and the mid-spatial-frequency error generation. The process parameters modeled are the speeds of the lap and the mandrel, the tool s influence function, the contour path (dwell) of the tools, their shape and the distribution of the tools on the polishing lap. Using the inputs from the mathematical model, a mandrel having conical approximated Wolter-1 geometry, has been polished on a newly developed computer-controlled cylindrical polishing machine. The preliminary results of a series of polishing experiments demonstrate a qualitative agreement with the developed model. We report our first experimental results and discuss plans for further improvements in the polishing process. The ability to simulate the polishing process is critical to optimize the polishing process, improve the mandrel quality and significantly reduce the cost of mandrel production

  2. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Machida, Toyohei; Oishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kamachi, Chikahumi; Okabe, Tsutomu; Akazawa, Kouhei; Takasaka, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author).

  3. Characterization of feed channel spacer performance using geometries obtained by X-ray computed tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Haaksman, Viktor A.

    2016-09-09

    Spiral-wound membrane modules used in water treatment for water reuse and desalination make use of spacer meshes for keeping the membrane leaves apart and for enhancing the mass transfer. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has gained importance in the design of new spacers with optimized hydrodynamic characteristics, but this requires a precise description of the spacer geometry. This study developed a method to obtain accurate three-dimensional (3-D) geometry representations for any given spacer design from X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The method revealed that the filaments of industrial spacers have a highly variable cross-section size and shape, which impact the flow characteristics in the feed channel. The pressure drop and friction factors were calculated from numerical simulations on five commercially available feed spacers used in practice. Model solutions compared well to experimental data measured using a flow cell for average velocities up to 0.2 m/s, as used in industrial reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membrane operations. A newly-proposed spacer geometry with alternating strand thickness was tested, which was found to yield a lower pressure drop while being highly efficient in converting the pumping power into membrane shear. Numerical model solutions using CFD with geometries from CT scans were closer to measurements than those obtained using the traditional circular cross-section strand simplification, indicating that CT scans are very well suitable to approximate real feed spacer geometries. By providing detailed insight on the spacer filament shape, CT scans allow better quantification of local distribution of velocity and shear, possibly leading to more accurate estimations of fouling and concentration polarization. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Description of EMX computer code. System for measuring soft X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, D.A.; Smeulders, P.; Launois, D.

    1978-07-01

    After briefly describing the system for measuring soft X rays implanted in TFR 600, the objectives and principles of the E.M.X calculation programme are presented. This model is divided into two distinct parts. The ultimate aim of EMX 1, the first part, is to build the soft X ray photo of a plasma with varied characteristics, seen through a certain collimation system (in this case a slit). That of EMX 2, the second part, is to filter the previously built soft X ray photo, by means of the system of absorbents belonging to the measuring system and to calculate the currents generated by each detector aimed at a plasma chord. The first calculation results are commented and discussed [fr

  5. A computer simulation platform for the estimation of measurement uncertainties in dimensional X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiller, Jochen; Reindl, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    into account the main error sources for the measurement. This method has the potential to deal with all kinds of systematic and random errors that influence a dimensional CT measurement. A case study demonstrates the practical application of the VCT simulator using numerically generated CT data and statistical......The knowledge of measurement uncertainty is of great importance in conformance testing in production. The tolerance limit for production must be reduced by the amounts of measurement uncertainty to ensure that the parts are in fact within the tolerance. Over the last 5 years, industrial X......-ray computed tomography (CT) has become an important technology for dimensional quality control. In this paper a computer simulation platform is presented which is able to investigate error sources in dimensional CT measurements. The typical workflow in industrial CT metrology is described and methods...

  6. Computer analysis of the X-ray images of renal concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, N.; Zozikov, B.; Yanakiev, I.; Varlev, H.; Dimitrov, I.; Baltadjiev, D.; Dimitrova, St.; Shimanov, V.; Sultanov, A.; Pazderov, R.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation aimed to assessing the possibilities of computerized analysis of renal concretions is described. The results of comparative study of digitized X-ray images of concretions and data retrieved from radio-spectral microprobe analysis are presented. The obtained data confirm the author's hypothesis set forth, claiming that it is possible to define the composition and structure of renal concretions using specially developed software (Videoexpert 2.0). Excellent results are obtained even from native X-rays where the concernment is still within the patient's body. Roentgen computerized analysis is recommended in making decision on therapeutic approach towards calculi in urological and radiographic practice. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. Snow particles extracted from X-ray computed microtomography imagery and their single-scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Aoki, Teruo; Masuda, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Sizes and shapes of snow particles were determined from X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) images, and their single-scattering properties were calculated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths using a Geometrical Optics Method (GOM). We analyzed seven snow samples including fresh and aged artificial snow and natural snow obtained from field samples. Individual snow particles were numerically extracted, and the shape of each snow particle was defined by applying a rendering method. The size distribution and specific surface area distribution were estimated from the geometrical properties of the snow particles, and an effective particle radius was derived for each snow sample. The GOM calculations at wavelengths of 0.532 and 1.242 μm revealed that the realistic snow particles had similar scattering phase functions as those of previously modeled irregular shaped particles. Furthermore, distinct dendritic particles had a characteristic scattering phase function and asymmetry factor. The single-scattering properties of particles of effective radius reff were compared with the size-averaged single-scattering properties. We found that the particles of reff could be used as representative particles for calculating the average single-scattering properties of the snow. Furthermore, the single-scattering properties of the micro-CT particles were compared to those of particle shape models using our current snow retrieval algorithm. For the single-scattering phase function, the results of the micro-CT particles were consistent with those of a conceptual two-shape model. However, the particle size dependence differed for the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor.

  8. Body composition of adult brachium by X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji

    1988-01-01

    Sexual and age-related differences of body composition was analyzed in brachium by X-ray computed tomography. Subjects included 104 normal healthy adults (49 males and 55 females). The ages of the subjects ranged between 20 and 69. CT images were taken at the proximal third point, center and distal third point of the upper arm. The cross sectional areas of subcutaneous fat, muscular layer, intermuscular connective tissue and bone were measured in each image. For the muscular layer, each muscle was specified and measured. Results were related to sexual and age differences. 1) In males the muscular layer was the largest, followed in order by the subcutaneous fat and bone at all levels. In females, the subcutaneous fat was the largest, and the muscular layer was second. 2) Subcutaneous fat in the males increased in the 50s and 60s. The muscular layer of the males tended to decrease with age. On the contrary, subcutaneous fat in females increased with age. 3) At the proximal level in males, the brachial triceps reduced with age and the deltoid muscles reduced more. The female triceps and deltoid muscles showed slight age related changes in size. 4) At the other two levels, though the male triceps decreased remarkably with age, the female triceps did not. These muscles were similar in both sexes in the 60s. 5) The sexual difference in the size of each muscle diminished with the difference in motor activity of both sexes. Intermuscular variation was reduced to difference in the fiber type composition of each muscle. (author)

  9. Comparison of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and conventional X-ray of the equine digit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiter, M.

    1996-10-01

    An anatomical study of the equine digit with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was performed. In addition, the observed pathologic findings were compared with their diagnosticity in associated radiographs. Twenty isolated forelimbs were radiographed and compared with the according CT-images. From 19 isolated forelimbs and one hindlimb MR-images were taken using spinecho and overview gradient-echo sequences. The appearance of bone and soft tissue is described in various sectional positions. CT images allow excellent evaluation of bone tissue in cases in which the X-ray examination suffers from the superimposition of adjacent structures. Thus, in several cases of navicular disease additional findings were made using CT. An insertional desmopathy of the interosseus, a cartilagineous fetlock chip, a separation of the hoof wall and osteophytes of the distal phalanx were found with CT but not in the associated radiographs. MRI allows the specific diagnosis of joint-, ligament- and tendon diseases also in the hoof region. The possibility to evaluate the navicular region, the distal interphalangeal joint and the hoof matrix is of great diagnostic value. In one case of navicular d sease a defect of the flexor cortex with pannus formation could be diagnosed. In a case with chronical laminitis the separation of the epidermal lamellae and the growth of the scar horn were depicted. A tendinitis of the interosseus, fibrocartilage in the insertion of the deep digital flexor tendon, the interosseus and in the distal sesamoid ligaments are well documented. It is concluded that in some equine patients CT and MRI are indicated due to the substantial diagnostic information. (author)

  10. Refinement of clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans containing metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, Graham

    2017-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) data contains artefacts from many sources, with sufficient prominence to affect diagnostic utility when metal is present in the scans. These artefacts can be reduced, usually by the removal and in-filling of any sinogram data which has been affected by metal, and several such techniques have been proposed. Most of them are prone to introducing new artefacts into the CT data or may take a long time to correct the data. It is the purpose of this paper to introduce a new technique which is fast, yet can effectively remove most artefacts without introducing significant new ones. The new metal artefact reduction technique (RMAR) consists of an iterative refinement of the CT data by alternately forward- and back-projecting the part of the reconstruction near to metal. The forward-projection is corrected by making use of a prior derived from the reconstructed data which is independently estimated for each projection angle, and smoothed using a newly developed Bitonic filter. The new technique is compared with previously published (LI, NMAR, MDT) and commercial (O-MAR, IMAR) alternatives, quantitatively on phantom data, and qualitatively on a selection of clinical scans, mostly of the hip. The phantom data is from two recently published studies, enabling direct comparison with previous results. The results show an increased reduction of artefacts on the four phantom data sets tested. On two of the phantom data sets, RMAR is significantly better (pCT data, RMAR can correct each image in 3-8s, which is more than one hundred times faster than MDT. The new technique is demonstrated to have performance at least as good as MDT, with both out-performing other approaches. However, it is much faster then the latter technique, and shows better preservation of data very close to metal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pulmonary tumor measurements from x-ray computed tomography in one, two, and three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemaire, Lauren; Owrangi, Amir M; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Wilson, Laura; O'Riordan, Elaine; Keller, Harry; Driscoll, Brandon; Bauman, Glenn; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and reproducibility of three-dimensional (3D) measurements of lung phantoms and patient tumors from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and compared these to one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) measurements. CT images of three spherical and three irregularly shaped tumor phantoms were evaluated by three observers who performed five repeated measurements. Additionally, three observers manually segmented 29 patient lung tumors five times each. Follow-up imaging was performed for 23 tumors and response criteria were compared. For a single subject, imaging was performed on nine occasions over 2 years to evaluate multidimensional tumor response. To evaluate measurement accuracy, we compared imaging measurements to ground truth using analysis of variance. For estimates of precision, intraobserver and interobserver coefficients of variation and intraclass correlations (ICC) were used. Linear regression and Pearson correlations were used to evaluate agreement and tumor response was descriptively compared. For spherical shaped phantoms, all measurements were highly accurate, but for irregularly shaped phantoms, only 3D measurements were in high agreement with ground truth measurements. All phantom and patient measurements showed high intra- and interobserver reproducibility (ICC >0.900). Over a 2-year period for a single patient, there was disagreement between tumor response classifications based on 3D measurements and those generated using 1D and 2D measurements. Tumor volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate for irregular, spherical phantoms and patient tumors with nonuniform dimensions. Response classifications obtained from multidimensional measurements suggest that 3D measurements provide higher sensitivity to tumor response. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic evaluation of ischemic heart disease by X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Takasu, Junichiro; Sakakibara, Makoto; Imai, Hitoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Morooka, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki

    1987-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and evaluating ischemic heart disease, conventional and enhanced CT were performed for 180 patients (150 with transmural infarction, 12 with subendocardial infarction, and 18 with angina pectoris). MRI examinations were performed for 38 patients (31 with transmural infarction, three with subendocardial infarction, and four with angina pectoris). With enhanced CT, two findings in the myocardium were direct evidence of myocardial infarction: 1) filling defects on the early scans, and 2) late enhancement of the myocardium on the delayed scans. The former were observed mainly at the sites of recent anterior myocardial infarction and the latter were seen in about half of the patients with recent and remote anterior myocardial infarctions. However, these findings were inadequately imaged in patients with inferoposterior infarction and subendocardial infarction. Among 137 patients with transmural infarction, enhanced CT revealed left ventricular aneurysms in 51 (37 %) and ventricular thrombi in 26 (19 %). ECG-gated MRI apparatus having a superconducting magnetic operating at 0.25 Tesla was used, and data for this study were collected using the single-slice spin echo technique. In eight of nine patients with acute myocardial infarction, gated MRI demonstrated the infarcted myocardium as regions of high signal intensity relative to that of the adjacent normal myocardium. Such a difference in MRI signal intensity was scarcely recognized in the chronic stage of myocardial infarction, but the indirect findings of infarction, such as regional wall thinning, wall motion disturbances, left ventricular aneurysms, and ventricular thrombi were easily detected using MRI. No characteristic finding was obtained by CT or MRI in patients with angina pectoris. (author)

  13. Body composition of adult brachium by X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Ryoji

    1988-10-01

    Sexual and age-related differences of body composition was analyzed in brachium by X-ray computed tomography. Subjects included 104 normal healthy adults (49 males and 55 females). The ages of the subjects ranged between 20 and 69. CT images were taken at the proximal third point, center and distal third point of the upper arm. The cross sectional areas of subcutaneous fat, muscular layer, intermuscular connective tissue and bone were measured in each image. For the muscular layer, each muscle was specified and measured. Results were related to sexual and age differences. (1) In males the muscular layer was the largest, followed in order by the subcutaneous fat and bone at all levels. In females, the subcutaneous fat was the largest, and the muscular layer was second. (2) Subcutaneous fat in the males increased in the 50s and 60s. The muscular layer of the males tended to decrease with age. On the contrary, subcutaneous fat in females increased with age. (3) At the proximal level in males, the brachial triceps reduced with age and the deltoid muscles reduced more. The female triceps and deltoid muscles showed slight age related changes in size. (4) At the other two levels, though the male triceps decreased remarkably with age, the female triceps did not. These muscles were similar in both sexes in the 60s. (5) The sexual difference in the size of each muscle diminished with the difference in motor activity of both sexes. Intermuscular variation was reduced to difference in the fiber type composition of each muscle. (author).

  14. Image-based metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography utilizing local anatomical similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Yang, Xiaofeng; Rosenfield, Jonathan; Elder, Eric; Dhabaan, Anees

    2017-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used in radiation therapy treatment planning in recent years. However, metal implants such as dental fillings and hip prostheses can cause severe bright and dark streaking artifacts in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. In this work, a metal artifact reduction method is proposed based on the intrinsic anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Neighboring CT slices from the same patient exhibit similar anatomical features. Exploiting this anatomical similarity, a gamma map is calculated as a weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error for each pixel in an artifact-corrupted CT image relative to a neighboring, artifactfree image. The minimum value in the gamma map for each pixel is used to identify an appropriate pixel from the artifact-free CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. With the proposed method, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 360 HU and 460 HU to 24 HU and 34 HU on head and pelvis CT images, respectively. Dose calculation accuracy also improved, as the dose difference was reduced from greater than 20% to less than 4%. Using 3%/3mm criteria, the gamma analysis failure rate was reduced from 23.25% to 0.02%. An image-based metal artifact reduction method is proposed that replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring CT slices free of metal artifacts. This method is shown to be capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, thereby improving HU and dose calculation accuracy.

  15. MCNP6 simulation of radiographs generated from megaelectron volt X-rays for characterizing a computed tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A.; Tringe, Joseph W.

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate conventional munition, we simulated an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system for generating radiographs from nominal x-ray energies of 6 or 9 megaelectron volts (MeV). CT simulations, informed by measured data, allow for optimization of both system design and acquisition techniques necessary to enhance image quality. MCNP6 radiographic simulation tools were used to model ideal detector responses (DR) that assume either (1) a detector response proportional to photon flux (N) or (2) a detector response proportional to energy flux (E). As scatter may become significant with MeV x-ray systems, simulations were performed with and without the inclusion of object scatter. Simulations were compared against measurements of a cylindrical munition component principally composed of HMX, tungsten and aluminum encased in carbon fiber. Simulations and measurements used a 6 MeV peak energy x-ray spectrum filtered with 3.175 mm of tantalum. A detector response proportional to energy which includes object scatter agrees to within 0.6 % of the measured line integral of the linear attenuation coefficient. Exclusion of scatter increases the difference between measurement and simulation to 5 %. A detector response proportional to photon flux agrees to within 20 % when object scatter is included in the simulation and 27 % when object scatter is excluded.

  16. X-ray film digitization using a personal computer and hand-held scanner: a simple technique for storing images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Nunez, C. F.; Lloret-Alcaniz, A.

    1998-01-01

    To develop a simple, low-cost technique for the digitization of X-ray films for personal use. A 66-MHz 486 PC with 8 MB of RAM, a Logitech ScanMan 256 hand-held scanner and a standard negatoscope with the power source converted to direct current. Although the system was originally designed for the digitization of mammographies, it has also been used with computed tomography, magnetic resonance, digital angiography and ultrasonographic images, as well as plain X-rays. After a minimal training period, the system digitized X-ray films easily and rapidly. Although the scanning values vary depending on the type of image to be digitized, an input spatial resolution of 200 dpi and a contrast resolution of 256 levels of gray are generally adequate. Of the storage formats tested, JPEG presented the best quality/image size ratio. A simple, low-cost technique has been developed for the digitization of X-ray films. This technique enables the storage of images in a digital format, thus facilitating their presentation and transmission. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Development of a computer model using the EGS4 simulation code to calculate scattered X-rays through some materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghorabie, F.H.H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a computer model based on the use of the well-known Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 was developed to simulate the scattering of polyenergetic X-ray beams through some materials. These materials are: lucite, polyethylene, polypropylene and aluminium. In particular, the ratio of the scattered to total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) has been calculated for X-ray beams in the energy region 30-120 keV. In addition scatter fractions have been determined experimentally using a polyenergetic superficial X-ray unit. Comparison of the measured and the calculated results has been performed. The Monte Carlo calculations have also been carried out for water, bakelite and bone to examine the dependence of scatter fraction on the density of the scatterer. Good agreement (estimated statistical error < 5%) was obtained between the measured and the calculated values of the scatter fractions for materials with Z < 20 that were studied in this paper. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Gerritsen

    Full Text Available We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4% had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197. Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  19. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, P A; Minnema, M C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  20. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  1. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [UCLA Health System, Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  2. Design and implemention of a multi-functional x-ray computed tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xi, Xiaoqi; Han, Yu; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Xiang; Deng, Lin; Chen, Siyu; Jin, Zhao; Li, Zengguang

    2015-10-01

    A powerful volume X-ray tomography system has been designed and constructed to provide an universal tool for the three-dimensional nondestructive testing and investigation of industrial components, automotive, electronics, aerospace components, new materials, etc. The combined system is equipped with two commercial X-ray sources, sharing one flat panel detector of 400mm×400mm. The standard focus 450kV high-energy x-ray source is optimized for complex and high density components such as castings, engine blocks and turbine blades. And the microfocus 225kV x-ray source is to meet the demands of micro-resolution characterization applications. Thus the system's penetration capability allows to scan large objects up to 200mm thick dense materials, and the resolution capability can meet the demands of 20μm microstructure inspection. A high precision 6-axis manipulator system is fitted, capable of offset scanning mode in large field of view requirements. All the components are housed in a room with barium sulphate cement. On the other hand, the presented system expands the scope of applications such as dual energy research and testing. In this paper, the design and implemention of the flexible system is described, as well as the preliminary tomographic imaging results of an automobile engine block.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and DFT computations of nanosized phosphazenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shariatinia, Z.; Moghadam, E.J.; Maghsoudi, N.; Mousavi, H.S.M.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 641, č. 5 (2015), s. 967-978 ISSN 0044-2313 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phosphazene * ultrasonic * nanoparticle * x-ray crystallography * DFT calculation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.261, year: 2015

  4. China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. Methods The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG, was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Results Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. Conclusion A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China

  5. [China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Fan, Yaguang; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Youlin; Wang, Guiqi; Huang, Yunchao; Wang, Xinyun; Wu, Ning; Zhang, Guozheng; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Bu, Hong; Li, Yin; Wei, Sen; Chen, Liang'an; Hu, Chengping; Shi, Yuankai; Sun, Yan

    2018-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG) established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG), was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China. Additional research , including LDCT combined with biomarkers, is

  6. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, Anne; Duvauchelle, Philippe; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Ponard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage

  7. Automated X-ray and Optical Analysis of the Virtual Observatory and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.; Krughoff, S.; Connolly, A.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a system to combine the Web Enabled Source Identification with X-Matching (WESIX) web service, which emphasizes source detection on optical images,with the XAssist program that automates the analysis of X-ray data. XAssist is continuously processing archival X-ray data in several pipelines. We have established a workflow in which FITS images and/or (in the case of X ray data) an X-ray field can be input to WESIX. Intelligent services return available data (if requested fields have been processed) or submit job requests to a queue to be performed asynchronously. These services will be available via web services (for non-interactive use by Virtual Observatory portals and applications) and through web applications (written in the Django web application framework). We are adding web services for specific XAssist functionality such as determining .the exposure and limiting flux for a given position on the sky and extracting spectra and images for a given region. We are improving the queuing system in XAssist to allow for "watch lists" to be specified by users, and when X-ray fields in a user's watch list become publicly available they will be automatically added to the queue. XAssist is being expanded to be used as a survey planning 1001 when coupled with simulation software, including functionality for NuStar, eRosita, IXO, and the Wide Field Xray Telescope (WFXT), as part of an end to end simulation/analysis system. We are also investigating the possibility of a dedicated iPhone/iPad app for querying pipeline data, requesting processing, and administrative job control.

  8. Selection of stationary phase particle geometry using X-ray computed tomography and computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Irma; Minceva, Mirjana; Arlt, Wolfgang

    2012-02-17

    The X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to determine local parameters related to the column packing homogeneity and hydrodynamics in columns packed with spherically and irregularly shaped particles of same size. The results showed that the variation of porosity and axial dispersion coefficient along the column axis is insignificant, compared to their radial distribution. The methodology of using the data attained by CT measurements to perform a CFD simulation of a batch separation of model binary mixtures, with different concentration and separation factors is demonstrated. The results of the CFD simulation study show that columns packed with spherically shaped particles provide higher yield in comparison to columns packed with irregularly shaped particles only below a certain value of the separation factor. The presented methodology can be used for selecting a suited packing material for a particular separation task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fibre failure assessment in carbon fibre reinforced polymers under fatigue loading by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Garcea, Serafina; Sinclair, Ian; Spearing, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In situ fatigue experiments using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SRCT) are used to assess the underpinning micromechanisms of fibre failure in double notch carbon/epoxy coupons. Observations showed fibre breaks along the 0º ply splits, associated with the presence and failure of bridging fibres, as well as fibres failed in the bulk composite within the 0º plies. A tendency for cluster formation, with multiple adjacent breaks in the bulk composite was observed when higher peak loads we...

  10. Automated aortic calcium scoring on low-dose chest computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isgum, Ivana; Rutten, Annemarieke; Prokop, Mathias; Staring, Marius; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Viergever, Max A.; Ginneken, Bram van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans provide information about cardiovascular risk status. These scans are non-ECG synchronized, thus precise quantification of coronary calcifications is difficult. Aortic calcium scoring is less sensitive to cardiac motion, so it is an alternative to coronary calcium scoring as an indicator of cardiovascular risk. The authors developed and evaluated a computer-aided system for automatic detection and quantification of aortic calcifications in low-dose noncontrast-enhanced chest CT. Methods: The system was trained and tested on scans from participants of a lung cancer screening trial. A total of 433 low-dose, non-ECG-synchronized, noncontrast-enhanced 16 detector row examinations of the chest was randomly divided into 340 training and 93 test data sets. A first observer manually identified aortic calcifications on training and test scans. A second observer did the same on the test scans only. First, a multiatlas-based segmentation method was developed to delineate the aorta. Segmented volume was thresholded and potential calcifications (candidate objects) were extracted by three-dimensional connected component labeling. Due to image resolution and noise, in rare cases extracted candidate objects were connected to the spine. They were separated into a part outside and parts inside the aorta, and only the latter was further analyzed. All candidate objects were represented by 63 features describing their size, position, and texture. Subsequently, a two-stage classification with a selection of features and k-nearest neighbor classifiers was performed. Based on the detected aortic calcifications, total calcium volume score was determined for each subject. Results: The computer system correctly detected, on the average, 945 mm 3 out of 965 mm 3 (97.9%) calcified plaque volume in the aorta with an average of 64 mm 3 of false positive volume per scan. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was ρ=0.960 between the system and the

  11. Computer x-ray powder diffraction patterns and densities for corundum, aluminium, zirconium, delta-UZr2 and the zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.

    1976-11-01

    The computer-calculated X-ray powder diffraction patterns and theoretical densities of α-Al 2 O 3 ; Al; α-Zr; β-Zr; delta-UZr 2 ; γ, delta - and epsilon-zirconium hydrides are presented. Brief comments are given on some of the published X-ray powder diffraction data on these phases. (author)

  12. Possible Radiation-Induced Damage to the Molecular Structure of Wooden Artifacts Due to Micro-Computed Tomography, Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Kozachuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to ascertain whether radiation produced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, micro-computed tomography (μCT and/or portable handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF equipment might damage wood artifacts during analysis. Changes at the molecular level were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. No significant changes in FTIR spectra were observed as a result of μCT or handheld XRF analysis. No substantial changes in the collected FTIR spectra were observed when XPS analytical times on the order of minutes were used. However, XPS analysis collected over tens of hours did produce significant changes in the FTIR spectra.

  13. Technical Note: SPEKTR 3.0—A computational tool for x-ray spectrum modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnoose, J.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A computational toolkit (SPEKTR 3.0) has been developed to calculate x-ray spectra based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) algorithm, updating previous work based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) spectral model. The toolkit includes a MATLAB (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) function library and improved user interface (UI) along with an optimization algorithm to match calculated beam quality with measurements. Methods: The SPEKTR code generates x-ray spectra (photons/mm{sup 2}/mAs at 100 cm from the source) using TASMICS as default (with TASMIP as an option) in 1 keV energy bins over beam energies 20–150 kV, extensible to 640 kV using the TASMICS spectra. An optimization tool was implemented to compute the added filtration (Al and W) that provides a best match between calculated and measured x-ray tube output (mGy/mAs or mR/mAs) for individual x-ray tubes that may differ from that assumed in TASMICS or TASMIP and to account for factors such as anode angle. Results: The median percent difference in photon counts for a TASMICS and TASMIP spectrum was 4.15% for tube potentials in the range 30–140 kV with the largest percentage difference arising in the low and high energy bins due to measurement errors in the empirically based TASMIP model and inaccurate polynomial fitting. The optimization tool reported a close agreement between measured and calculated spectra with a Pearson coefficient of 0.98. Conclusions: The computational toolkit, SPEKTR, has been updated to version 3.0, validated against measurements and existing models, and made available as open source code. Video tutorials for the SPEKTR function library, UI, and optimization tool are available.

  14. Technical Note: spektr 3.0—A computational tool for x-ray spectrum modeling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnoose, J.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A computational toolkit (spektr 3.0) has been developed to calculate x-ray spectra based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) algorithm, updating previous work based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) spectral model. The toolkit includes a matlab (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) function library and improved user interface (UI) along with an optimization algorithm to match calculated beam quality with measurements. Methods: The spektr code generates x-ray spectra (photons/mm2/mAs at 100 cm from the source) using TASMICS as default (with TASMIP as an option) in 1 keV energy bins over beam energies 20–150 kV, extensible to 640 kV using the TASMICS spectra. An optimization tool was implemented to compute the added filtration (Al and W) that provides a best match between calculated and measured x-ray tube output (mGy/mAs or mR/mAs) for individual x-ray tubes that may differ from that assumed in TASMICS or TASMIP and to account for factors such as anode angle. Results: The median percent difference in photon counts for a TASMICS and TASMIP spectrum was 4.15% for tube potentials in the range 30–140 kV with the largest percentage difference arising in the low and high energy bins due to measurement errors in the empirically based TASMIP model and inaccurate polynomial fitting. The optimization tool reported a close agreement between measured and calculated spectra with a Pearson coefficient of 0.98. Conclusions: The computational toolkit, spektr, has been updated to version 3.0, validated against measurements and existing models, and made available as open source code. Video tutorials for the spektr function library, UI, and optimization tool are available. PMID:27487888

  15. Iterative metal artifact reduction for x-ray computed tomography using unmatched projector/backprojector pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Li, Lei; Cai, Ailong; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) is a major problem and a challenging issue in x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. Iterative reconstruction from sinograms unaffected by metals shows promising potential in detail recovery. This reconstruction has been the subject of much research in recent years. However, conventional iterative reconstruction methods easily introduce new artifacts around metal implants because of incomplete data reconstruction and inconsistencies in practical data acquisition. Hence, this work aims at developing a method to suppress newly introduced artifacts and improve the image quality around metal implants for the iterative MAR scheme. Methods: The proposed method consists of two steps based on the general iterative MAR framework. An uncorrected image is initially reconstructed, and the corresponding metal trace is obtained. The iterative reconstruction method is then used to reconstruct images from the unaffected sinogram. In the reconstruction step of this work, an iterative strategy utilizing unmatched projector/backprojector pairs is used. A ramp filter is introduced into the back-projection procedure to restrain the inconsistency components in low frequencies and generate more reliable images of the regions around metals. Furthermore, a constrained total variation (TV) minimization model is also incorporated to enhance efficiency. The proposed strategy is implemented based on an iterative FBP and an alternating direction minimization (ADM) scheme, respectively. The developed algorithms are referred to as “iFBP-TV” and “TV-FADM,” respectively. Two projection-completion-based MAR methods and three iterative MAR methods are performed simultaneously for comparison. Results: The proposed method performs reasonably on both simulation and real CT-scanned datasets. This approach could reduce streak metal artifacts effectively and avoid the mentioned effects in the vicinity of the metals. The improvements are evaluated by

  16. Rapid phenotyping of crop root systems in undisturbed field soils using X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Johannes; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Colombi, Tino; Walter, Achim

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a powerful tool for root phenotyping. Compared to rather classical, destructive methods, CT encompasses various advantages. In pot experiments the growth and development of the same individual root can be followed over time and in addition the unaltered configuration of the 3D root system architecture (RSA) interacting with a real field soil matrix can be studied. Yet, the throughput, which is essential for a more widespread application of CT for basic research or breeding programs, suffers from the bottleneck of rapid and standardized segmentation methods to extract root structures. Using available methods, root segmentation is done to a large extent manually, as it requires a lot of interactive parameter optimization and interpretation and therefore needs a lot of time. Based on commercially available software, this paper presents a protocol that is faster, more standardized and more versatile compared to existing segmentation methods, particularly if used to analyse field samples collected in situ. To the knowledge of the authors this is the first study approaching to develop a comprehensive segmentation method suitable for comparatively large columns sampled in situ which contain complex, not necessarily connected root systems from multiple plants grown in undisturbed field soil. Root systems from several crops were sampled in situ and CT-volumes determined with the presented method were compared to root dry matter of washed root samples. A highly significant (P < 0.01) and strong correlation (R(2) = 0.84) was found, demonstrating the value of the presented method in the context of field research. Subsequent to segmentation, a method for the measurement of root thickness distribution has been used. Root thickness is a central RSA trait for various physiological research questions such as root growth in compacted soil or under oxygen deficient soil conditions, but hardly assessable in high throughput until today, due

  17. X-Ray Computed Tomography: The First Step in Mars Sample Return Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzenbach, L. C.; Fries, M. D.; Grady, M. M.; Greenwood, R. C.; McCubbin, F. M.; Zeigler, R. A.; Smith, C. L.; Steele, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars 2020 rover mission will collect and cache samples from the martian surface for possible retrieval and subsequent return to Earth. If the samples are returned, that mission would likely present an opportunity to analyze returned Mars samples within a geologic context on Mars. In addition, it may provide definitive information about the existence of past or present life on Mars. Mars sample return presents unique challenges for the collection, containment, transport, curation and processing of samples [1] Foremost in the processing of returned samples are the closely paired considerations of life detection and Planetary Protection. In order to achieve Mars Sample Return (MSR) science goals, reliable analyses will depend on overcoming some challenging signal/noise-related issues where sparse martian organic compounds must be reliably analyzed against the contamination background. While reliable analyses will depend on initial clean acquisition and robust documentation of all aspects of developing and managing the cache [2], there needs to be a reliable sample handling and analysis procedure that accounts for a variety of materials which may or may not contain evidence of past or present martian life. A recent report [3] suggests that a defined set of measurements should be made to effectively inform both science and Planetary Protection, when applied in the context of the two competing null hypotheses: 1) that there is no detectable life in the samples; or 2) that there is martian life in the samples. The defined measurements would include a phased approach that would be accepted by the community to preserve the bulk of the material, but provide unambiguous science data that can be used and interpreted by various disciplines. Fore-most is the concern that the initial steps would ensure the pristine nature of the samples. Preliminary, non-invasive techniques such as computed X-ray tomography (XCT) have been suggested as the first method to interrogate and

  18. Non-destructive X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) Analysis of Sediment Variance in Marine Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Dipre, G.; Sawyer, D.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Benthic activity within marine sediments can alter the physical properties of the sediment as well as indicate nutrient flux and ocean temperatures. We examine burrowing features in sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean collected during the 2005 Healy-Oden TransArctic Expedition (HOTRAX) and from the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 308. While traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, we assess burrowing using an X-ray computed tomography (XCT) scanner. XCT noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions and produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis. XCT units are recorded as Hounsfield Units (HU), where -999 is air, 0 is water, and 4000-5000 would be a higher density mineral, such as pyrite. We rely on the fundamental assumption that sediments are deposited horizontally, and we analyze the variance over each flat-lying slice. The variance describes the spread of pixel values over a slice. When sediments are reworked, drawing higher and lower density matrix into a layer, the variance increases. Examples of this can be seen in two slices in core 19H-3A from Site U1324 of IODP Expedition 308. The first slice, located 165.6 meters below sea floor consists of relatively undisturbed sediment. Because of this, the majority of the sediment values fall between 1406 and 1497 HU, thus giving the slice a comparatively small variance of 819.7. The second slice, located 166.1 meters below sea floor, features a lower density sediment matrix disturbed by burrow tubes and the inclusion of a high density mineral. As a result, the Hounsfield Units have a larger variance of 1,197.5, which is a result of sediment matrix values that range from 1220 to 1260 HU, the high-density mineral value of 1920 HU and the burrow tubes that range from 1300 to 1410 HU. Analyzing this variance allows us to observe changes in the sediment matrix and more specifically capture

  19. X-ray computed tomography reconstruction on non-standard trajectories for robotized inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banjak, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of computed tomography (CT) is large and rapidly increasing with typical areas of use in the aerospace, automotive and transport industry. To support this growth of CT in the industrial field, the identified requirements concern firstly software development to improve the reconstruction algorithms and secondly the automation of the inspection process. Indeed, the use of robots gives more flexibility in the acquisition trajectory and allows the control of large and complex objects, which cannot be inspected using classical CT systems. In this context of new CT trend, a robotic platform has been installed at CEA LIST to better understand and solve specific challenges linked to the robotization of the CT process. The considered system integrates two robots that move the X-ray generator and detector. This thesis aims at achieving this new development. In particular, the objective is to develop and implement analytical and iterative reconstruction algorithms adapted to such robotized trajectories. The main focus of this thesis is concerned with helical-like scanning trajectories. We consider two main problems that could occur during acquisition process: truncated and limited-angle data. We present in this work experimental results for reconstruction on such non-standard trajectories. CIVA software is used to simulate these complex inspections and our developed algorithms are integrated as reconstruction tools. This thesis contains three parts. In the first part, we introduce the basic principles of CT and we present an overview of existing analytical and iterative algorithms for non-standard trajectories. In the second part, we modify the approximate helical FDK algorithm to deal with transversely truncated data and we propose a modified FDK algorithm adapted to reverse helical trajectory with the scan range less than 360 degrees. For iterative reconstruction, we propose two algebraic methods named SART-FISTA-TV and DART

  20. Enabling three-dimensional densitometric measurements using laboratory source X-ray micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, M. J.; Fowler, R.; Courtois, L.; Nonni, S.; Zuddas, F.; Atwood, R. C.; Davis, G. R.; Lee, P. D.

    2018-01-01

    We present new software allowing significantly improved quantitative mapping of the three-dimensional density distribution of objects using laboratory source polychromatic X-rays via a beam characterisation approach (c.f. filtering or comparison to phantoms). One key advantage is that a precise representation of the specimen material is not required. The method exploits well-established, widely available, non-destructive and increasingly accessible laboratory-source X-ray tomography. Beam characterisation is performed in two stages: (1) projection data are collected through a range of known materials utilising a novel hardware design integrated into the rotation stage; and (2) a Python code optimises a spectral response model of the system. We provide hardware designs for use with a rotation stage able to be tilted, yet the concept is easily adaptable to virtually any laboratory system and sample, and implicitly corrects the image artefact known as beam hardening.

  1. Comparison of computational to human observer detection for evaluation of CT low dose iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Brendan; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers were created and compared to human observers for the detection of low contrast targets in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with an advanced, knowledge-based, iterative image reconstruction method for low x-ray dose imaging. A 5-channel Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling Observer (CHO) was used with internal noise added to the decision variable (DV) and/or channel outputs (CO). Models were defined by parameters: (k1) DV-noise with standard deviation (std) proportional to DV std; (k2) DV-noise with constant std; (k3) CO-noise with constant std across channels; and (k4) CO-noise in each channel with std proportional to CO variance. Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer studies were performed on sub-images extracted from phantom images with and without a "pin" target. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood comparison to human probability correct (PC) data. PC in human and all model observers increased with dose, contrast, and size, and was much higher for advanced iterative reconstruction (IMR) as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Detection in IMR was better than FPB at 1/3 dose, suggesting significant dose savings. Model(k1,k2,k3,k4) gave the best overall fit to humans across independent variables (dose, size, contrast, and reconstruction) at fixed display window. However Model(k1) performed better when considering model complexity using the Akaike information criterion. Model(k1) fit the extraordinary detectability difference between IMR and FBP, despite the different noise quality. It is anticipated that the model observer will predict results from iterative reconstruction methods having similar noise characteristics, enabling rapid comparison of methods.

  2. How little data is enough? Phase-diagram analysis of sparsity-regularized X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Sidky, E. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce phase-diagram analysis, a standard tool in compressed sensing (CS), to the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community as a systematic method for determining how few projections suffice for accurate sparsity-regularized reconstruction. In CS, a phase diagram is a convenient way to study...... and express certain theoretical relations between sparsity and sufficient sampling. We adapt phase-diagram analysis for empirical use in X-ray CT for which the same theoretical results do not hold. We demonstrate in three case studies the potential of phase-diagram analysis for providing quantitative answers...... measurements does not lead to improved performance compared with standard structured sampling patterns. Finally, we show preliminary results of how well phase-diagram analysis can predict the sufficient number of projections for accurately reconstructing a large-scale image of a given sparsity by means...

  3. Influence of imaging factors on image quality in bovine computed radiography (CR) using portable X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Sumiya, T.; Lee, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of X-ray tube-cassette distance and image scanning time on image quality to establish the benefit of Computed Radiography (CR) in bovine clinical practice. The tube-cassette distance had no effect on the visual evaluation score (graininess and sharpness). The image scanning time correlated with graininess but not sharpness. From these results, it was concluded that accidental variations in the tube-cassette distance and variations in image scanning time of several hours will not be major problems in clinical practice. CR is considered a useful X-ray system in bovine clinical imaging in which the maintenance of reproducible tube-cassette distance is difficult and variations in image scanning time is assumed

  4. A simulation-based study on the influence of beam hardening in X-ray computed tomography for dimensional metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Joseph J; Malcolm, Andrew A; McBride, John W

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a radiographic scanning technique for visualising cross-sectional images of an object non-destructively. From these cross-sectional images it is possible to evaluate internal dimensional features of a workpiece which may otherwise be inaccessible to tactile and optical instruments. Beam hardening is a physical process that degrades the quality of CT images and has previously been suggested to influence dimensional measurements. Using a validated simulation tool, the influence of spectrum pre-filtration and beam hardening correction are evaluated for internal and external dimensional measurements. Beam hardening is shown to influence internal and external dimensions in opposition, and to have a greater influence on outer dimensions compared to inner dimensions. The results suggest the combination of spectrum pre-filtration and a local gradient-based surface determination method are able to greatly reduce the influence of beam hardening in X-ray CT for dimensional metrology.

  5. Performance dependence of hybrid x-ray computed tomography/fluorescence molecular tomography on the optical forward problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Damon; Schulz, Ralf; Brooks, Dana; Miller, Eric; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Hybrid imaging systems combining x-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence tomography can improve fluorescence imaging performance by incorporating anatomical x-ray CT information into the optical inversion problem. While the use of image priors has been investigated in the past, little is known about the optimal use of forward photon propagation models in hybrid optical systems. In this paper, we explore the impact on reconstruction accuracy of the use of propagation models of varying complexity, specifically in the context of these hybrid imaging systems where significant structural information is known a priori. Our results demonstrate that the use of generically known parameters provides near optimal performance, even when parameter mismatch remains.

  6. Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiller, Jochen; Maisl, Michael; Reindl, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents physical and metrological characterization measurements conducted for an industrial x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) system. As is well known in CT metrology, many factors, e.g., in the scanning and reconstruction process, the image processing, and the 3D data evaluation...... components of a CT scanner, i.e. the x-ray tube and the flat-panel detector, are characterized. The contrast and noise transfer property of the scanner is obtained using image-processing methods based on linear systems theory. A long-term temperature measurement in the scanner cabinet has been carried out....... The dimensional measurement property has been quantified by using a calibrated ball-bar and uncertainty budgeting. Information about the performance of a CT scanner system in terms of contrast and noise transmission and sources of geometrical errors will help plan CT scans more efficiently. In particular...

  7. Combining X-ray computed tomography and visible near-infrared spectroscopy for prediction of soil structural properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria

    2018-01-01

    agricultural fields within Denmark with a wide range of textural properties and organic C (OC) contents were studied. Macroporosity (>1.2 mm in diameter) and CTmatrix (the density of the field-moist soil matrix devoid of large macropores and stones) were determined from X-ray CT scans of undisturbed soil cores...... (19 by 20 cm). Both macroporosity and CTmatix are soil structural properties that affect the degree of preferential transport. Bulk soils from the 127 sampling locations were scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer (400–2500 nm). Macroporosity and CTmatrix were statistically predicted with partial least......Soil structure is a key soil property affecting a soil’s flow and transport behavior. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used to quantify soil structure. However, the availability, cost, time, and skills required for processing are still limiting the number of soils studied. Visible...

  8. Pressurized subsampling system for pressured gas-hydrate-bearing sediment: Microscale imaging using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yusuke; Konno, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    A pressurized subsampling system was developed for pressured gas hydrate (GH)-bearing sediments, which have been stored under pressure. The system subsamples small amounts of GH sediments from cores (approximately 50 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height) without pressure release to atmospheric conditions. The maximum size of the subsamples is 12.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. Moreover, our system transfers the subsample into a pressure vessel, and seals the pressure vessel by screwing in a plug under hydraulic pressure conditions. In this study, we demonstrated pressurized subsampling from artificial xenon-hydrate sediments and nondestructive microscale imaging of the subsample, using a microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. In addition, we estimated porosity and hydrate saturation from two-dimensional X-ray CT images of the subsamples

  9. Multifractal Analysis of Seismically Induced Soft-Sediment Deformation Structures Imaged by X-Ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Komatsubara, Junko

    Unconsolidated soft sediments deform and mix complexly by seismically induced fluidization. Such geological soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDSs) recorded in boring cores were imaged by X-ray computed tomography (CT), which enables visualization of the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of iron-bearing mineral grains as strong X-ray absorbers in the deformed strata. Multifractal analysis was applied to the two-dimensional (2D) CT images with various degrees of deformation and mixing. The results show that the distribution of the iron-bearing mineral grains is multifractal for less deformed/mixed strata and almost monofractal for fully mixed (i.e. almost homogenized) strata. Computer simulations of deformation of real and synthetic digital images were performed using the egg-beater flow model. The simulations successfully reproduced the transformation from the multifractal spectra into almost monofractal spectra (i.e. almost convergence on a single point) with an increase in deformation/mixing intensity. The present study demonstrates that multifractal analysis coupled with X-ray CT and the mixing flow model is useful to quantify the complexity of seismically induced SSDSs, standing as a novel method for the evaluation of cores for seismic risk assessment.

  10. Optimizing contrast agents with respect to reducing beam hardening in nonmedical X-ray computed tomography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is commonly used as a contrast agent in nonmedical science and engineering, for example, to visualize Darcy flow in porous geological media using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Undesirable beam hardening artifacts occur when a polychromatic X-ray source is used, which makes the quantitative analysis of CT images difficult. To optimize the chemistry of a contrast agent in terms of the beam hardening reduction, we performed computer simulations and generated synthetic CT images of a homogeneous cylindrical sand-pack (diameter, 28 or 56 mm; porosity, 39 vol.% saturated with aqueous suspensions of heavy elements assuming the use of a polychromatic medical CT scanner. The degree of cupping derived from the beam hardening was assessed using the reconstructed CT images to find the chemistry of the suspension that induced the least cupping. The results showed that (i) the degree of cupping depended on the position of the K absorption edge of the heavy element relative to peak of the polychromatic incident X-ray spectrum, (ii) (53)I was not an ideal contrast agent because it causes marked cupping, and (iii) a single element much heavier than (53)I ((64)Gd to (79)Au) reduced the cupping artifact significantly, and a four-heavy-element mixture of elements from (64)Gd to (79)Au reduced the artifact most significantly.

  11. Segmentation-free statistical image reconstruction for polyenergetic x-ray computed tomography with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbakri, Idris A; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a statistical image reconstruction method for x-ray CT that is based on a physical model that accounts for the polyenergetic x-ray source spectrum and the measurement nonlinearities caused by energy-dependent attenuation. Unlike our earlier work, the proposed algorithm does not require pre-segmentation of the object into the various tissue classes (e.g., bone and soft tissue) and allows mixed pixels. The attenuation coefficient of each voxel is modelled as the product of its unknown density and a weighted sum of energy-dependent mass attenuation coefficients. We formulate a penalized-likelihood function for this polyenergetic model and develop an iterative algorithm for estimating the unknown density of each voxel. Applying this method to simulated x-ray CT measurements of objects containing both bone and soft tissue yields images with significantly reduced beam hardening artefacts relative to conventional beam hardening correction methods. We also apply the method to real data acquired from a phantom containing various concentrations of potassium phosphate solution. The algorithm reconstructs an image with accurate density values for the different concentrations, demonstrating its potential for quantitative CT applications

  12. Segmentation-free statistical image reconstruction for polyenergetic x-ray computed tomography with experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris A, Elbakri; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2003-08-07

    This paper describes a statistical image reconstruction method for x-ray CT that is based on a physical model that accounts for the polyenergetic x-ray source spectrum and the measurement nonlinearities caused by energy-dependent attenuation. Unlike our earlier work, the proposed algorithm does not require pre-segmentation of the object into the various tissue classes (e.g., bone and soft tissue) and allows mixed pixels. The attenuation coefficient of each voxel is modelled as the product of its unknown density and a weighted sum of energy-dependent mass attenuation coefficients. We formulate a penalized-likelihood function for this polyenergetic model and develop an iterative algorithm for estimating the unknown density of each voxel. Applying this method to simulated x-ray CT measurements of objects containing both bone and soft tissue yields images with significantly reduced beam hardening artefacts relative to conventional beam hardening correction methods. We also apply the method to real data acquired from a phantom containing various concentrations of potassium phosphate solution. The algorithm reconstructs an image with accurate density values for the different concentrations, demonstrating its potential for quantitative CT applications.

  13. Quantifying the distribution of paste-void spacing of hardened cement paste using X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Sup, E-mail: taesup@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Yeom, E-mail: kimky@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, 411-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Jinhyun, E-mail: jinhyun@stanford.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kang, Dong Hun, E-mail: timeriver@naver.com [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The distribution of paste-void spacing in cement-based materials is an important feature related to the freeze-thaw durability of these materials, but its reliable estimation remains an unresolved problem. Herein, we evaluate the capability of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for reliable quantification of the distribution of paste-void spacing. Using X-ray CT images of three mortar specimens having different air-entrainment characteristics, we calculate the distributions of paste-void spacing of the specimens by applying previously suggested methods for deriving the exact spacing of air-void systems. This methodology is assessed by comparing the 95th percentile of the cumulative distribution function of the paste-void spacing with spacing factors computed by applying the linear-traverse method to 3D air-void system and reconstructing equivalent air-void distribution in 3D. Results show that the distributions of equivalent void diameter and paste-void spacing follow lognormal and normal distributions, respectively, and the ratios between the 95th percentile paste-void spacing value and the spacing factors reside within the ranges reported by previous numerical studies. This experimental finding indicates that the distribution of paste-void spacing quantified using X-ray CT has the potential to be the basis for a statistical assessment of the freeze-thaw durability of cement-based materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paste-void spacing in 3D can be quantified by X-ray CT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of the paste-void spacing follows normal distribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spacing factor and 95th percentile of CDF of paste-void spacing are correlated.

  14. ERX: a software for editing files containing X-ray spectra to be used in exposure computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Manuela O.M.; Vieira, Jose W.; Silva, Alysson G.; Leal Neto, Viriato; Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure Computational Models (ECMs) are utilities that simulate situations in which occurs irradiation in a given environment. An ECM is composed primarily by an anthropomorphic model (phantom), and a Monte Carlo code (MC). This paper presents a tutorial of the software Espectro de Raios-X (ERX). This software performs reading and numerical and graphical analysis of text files containing diagnostic X-ray spectra for use in algorithms of radioactive sources in the ECMs of a Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica. The ERX allows the user to select one among several X-ray spectrums in the energy range Diagnostic radiology X-Ray most commonly used in radiology clinics. In the current version of the ERX there are two types of input files: the contained in mspectra.dat file and the resulting of MC simulations in Geant4. The software allows the construction of charts of the Probability Density Function (PDF) and Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) of a selected spectrum as well as the table with the values of these functions and the spectrum. In addition, the ERX allows the user to make comparative analysis between the PDF graphics of the two catalogs of spectra available, besides being can perform dosimetric evaluations with the selected spectrum. A software of this kind is an important computational tool for researchers in numerical dosimetry because of the diversity of Diagnostic radiology X-Ray machines, which implies in a mass of input data highly diverse. And because of this, the ERX provides independence to the group related to the data origin that is contained in the catalogs created, not being necessary to resort to others. (author)

  15. A limited, low-dose computed tomography protocol to examine the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, L.; Silberberg, P.J.; Rainbow, A.; Butler, R.

    1993-01-01

    Limited, low-dose, three-scan computed tomography (CT) was shown to be as accurate as a complete CT series in examining the sacroiliac joints and is suggested as an effective alternative to plain radiography as the primary means to detect sacroiliitis. The advantages include the brevity of the examination, a 2-fold to 4-fold reduction in radiation exposure relative to conventional radiography and a 20-fold to 30-fold reduction relative to a full CT series. The technique was developed from studies of anatomic specimens in which the articular surfaces were covered with a film of barium to show clearly the synovial surfaces and allow the choice of the most appropriate levels of section. From the anteroposterior scout view the following levels were defined: at the first sacral foramen, between the first and second sacral foramina and at the third sacral foramen. In the superior section a quarter of the sacroiliac joint is synovial, whereas in the inferior section the entire joint is synovial. The three representative cuts and the anteroposterior scout view are displayed on a single 14 x 17 in. (36 x 43 cm) film. Comparative images at various current strengths showed that at lower currents than conventionally used no diagnostic information was lost, despite a slight increase in noise. The referring physicians at the authors' institution prefer this protocol to the imaging routine previously used. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  16. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  17. Standardization and Optimization of Computed Tomography Protocols to Achieve Low-Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D.; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Kofler, James M.; Krishnam, Mayil S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper we summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures comprising the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing-tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose. PMID:24589403

  18. Low-dose computed tomography volumetry for subtyping chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tomohito; Horie, Miho; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Daisuke; Shoushtarizadeh, Hassan; Binnie, Matthew; Azad, Sassan; Hwang, David M; Machuca, Tiago N; Waddell, Thomas K; Singer, Lianne G; Cypel, Marcelo; Liu, Mingyao; Paul, Narinder S; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2016-01-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation is challenged by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) and its distinct subtypes of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). However, the current diagnostic criteria for CLAD subtypes rely on total lung capacity (TLC), which is not always measured during routine post-transplant assessment. Our aim was to investigate the utility of low-dose 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) lung volumetry for differentiating RAS from BOS. This study was a retrospective evaluation of 63 patients who had developed CLAD after bilateral lung or heart‒lung transplantation between 2006 and 2011, including 44 BOS and 19 RAS cases. Median post-transplant follow-up was 65 months in BOS and 27 months in RAS. The median interval between baseline and the disease-onset time-point for CT volumetry was 11 months in both BOS and RAS. Chronologic changes and diagnostic accuracy of CT lung volume (measured as percent of baseline) were investigated. RAS showed a significant decrease in CT lung volume at disease onset compared with baseline (mean 3,916 ml vs 3,055 ml when excluding opacities, p volumetry is a useful tool to differentiate patients who develop RAS from those who develop BOS. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) in the perioperative workup of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Overgaard, Angelica; Maly, Pavel [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Ohlin, Acke [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Gunnarsson, Mikael [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Sundgren, Pia C. [University of Michigan Health Systems, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2009-03-15

    The study aims were to estimate the radiation dose in patients examined with low dose spine CT and to compare it with that received by patients undergoing standard CT for trauma of the same region, as well as to evaluate the impact of dose reduction on image quality. Radiation doses in 113 consecutive low dose spine CTs were compared with those in 127 CTs for trauma. The inter- and intraobserver agreement in measurements of pedicular width, and vertebral rotation, measurements of signal-to-noise ratio and assessment of hardware status were the indicators in the evaluation of image quality. The effective dose of the low dose spine CT (0.37 mSv) was 20 times lower than that of a standard CT for trauma (13.09 mSv). This dose reduction conveyed no impact on image quality. This low dose spine CT protocol allows detailed evaluation that is necessary for preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation. (orig.)

  20. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  1. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  2. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  3. Impact of polychromatic x-ray sources on helical, cone-beam computed tomography and dual-energy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Zou Yu; Pan Xiaochuan

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been much work devoted to developing accurate and efficient algorithms for image reconstruction in helical, cone-beam computed tomography (CT). Little attention, however, has been directed to the effect of physical factors on helical, cone-beam CT image reconstruction. This work investigates the effect of polychromatic x-rays on image reconstruction in helical, cone-beam computed tomography. A pre-reconstruction dual-energy technique is developed to reduce beam-hardening artefacts and enhance contrast in soft tissue

  4. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors behavior in X-ray computed tomography conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ricq, S; Garcin, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of CdTe and CdZnTe 2D array detectors for medical X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) is investigated. Different metallic electrodes have been deposited on High-Pressure Bridgman Method CdZnTe and on Traveling Heater Method CdTe:Cl. These detectors are exposed to X-rays in the CT irradiation conditions and are characterized experimentally in current mode. Detectors performances such as sensitivity and response speed are studied. They are correlated with charge trapping and de-trapping. The trapped carrier space charges may influence the injection from the electrodes. This enables one to get information on the nature of the predominant levels involved. The performances achieved are encouraging: dynamic ranges higher than 4 decades and current decreases of 3 decades in 4 ms after X-ray beam cut-off are obtained. Nevertheless, these detectors are still limited by high trap densities responsible for the memory effect that makes them unsuitable for XCT.

  5. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Connor A.; Foje, Nathan; van Avermaete, Tony; Miramontes, Bernadette; Chapaman, Sarah E.; Sasser, Todd A.; Kannan, Raghuraman; Gerstler, Steven; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site. PMID:23711461

  6. [Effective Techniques to Reduce Radiation Exposure to Medical Staff during Assist of X-ray Computed Tomography Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Ryuichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Miyachi, Yusuke; Tateishi, Satoshi; Uno, Yoshinori; Amakawa, Kazutoshi; Ohura, Hiroki; Orita, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Medical staffs like radiological technologists, doctors, and nurses are at an increased risk of exposure to radiation while assisting the patient in a position or monitor contrast medium injection during computed tomography (CT). However, methods to protect medical staff from radiation exposure and protocols for using radiological protection equipment have not been standardized and differ among hospitals. In this study, the distribution of scattered X-rays in a CT room was measured by placing electronic personal dosimeters in locations where medical staff stands beside the CT scanner gantry while assisting the patient and the exposure dose was measured. Moreover, we evaluated non-uniform exposure and revealed effective techniques to reduce the exposure dose to medical staff during CT. The dose of the scattered X-rays was the lowest at the gantry and at the examination table during both head and abdominal CT. The dose was the highest at the trunk of the upper body of the operator corresponding to a height of 130 cm during head CT and at the head corresponding to a height of 150 cm during abdominal CT. The maximum dose to the crystalline lens was approximately 600 μSv during head CT. We found that the use of volumetric CT scanning and X-ray protective goggles, and face direction toward the gantry reduced the exposure dose, particularly to the crystalline lens, for which lower equivalent dose during CT scan has been recently recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 118.

  7. How little data is enough? Phase-diagram analysis of sparsity-regularized X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, J S; Sidky, E Y

    2015-06-13

    We introduce phase-diagram analysis, a standard tool in compressed sensing (CS), to the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community as a systematic method for determining how few projections suffice for accurate sparsity-regularized reconstruction. In CS, a phase diagram is a convenient way to study and express certain theoretical relations between sparsity and sufficient sampling. We adapt phase-diagram analysis for empirical use in X-ray CT for which the same theoretical results do not hold. We demonstrate in three case studies the potential of phase-diagram analysis for providing quantitative answers to questions of undersampling. First, we demonstrate that there are cases where X-ray CT empirically performs comparably with a near-optimal CS strategy, namely taking measurements with Gaussian sensing matrices. Second, we show that, in contrast to what might have been anticipated, taking randomized CT measurements does not lead to improved performance compared with standard structured sampling patterns. Finally, we show preliminary results of how well phase-diagram analysis can predict the sufficient number of projections for accurately reconstructing a large-scale image of a given sparsity by means of total-variation regularization.

  8. Reservoir core porosity in the Resende formation using 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Milena F.S.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Rocha, Paula Lucia F. da

    2009-01-01

    The storage capacity and production of oil are influenced, among other things, by rocks and fluids characteristics. Porosity is one of the most important characteristics to be analyzed in oil industry, mainly in oil prospection because it represents the direct capacity of storage fluids in the rocks. By definition, porosity is the ratio of pore volume to the total bulk volume of the formation, expressed in percentage, being able to be absolute or effective. The aim of this study was to calculate porosity by 3D High-Resolution X-ray Computed Microtomography using core plugs from Resende Formation which were collected in Porto Real, Rio de Janeiro State. This formation is characterized by sandstones and fine conglomerates with associated fine siliciclastic sediments, and the paleoenviroment is interpreted as a braided fluvial system. For acquisitions data, it was used a 3D high resolution microtomography system which has a microfocus X-ray tube (spot size < 5μm) and a 12-bit cooled X-ray camera (CCD fiber-optically coupled to a scintillator) operated at 100 kV and 100 μA. Twenty-two samples taken at different depths from two boreholes were analyzed. A total of 961 slices were performed with a resolution of 14.9 μm. The results demonstrated that μ-CT is a reliable and effective technique. Through the images and data it was possible to quantify the porosity and to view the size and shape of porous. (author)

  9. Observation of glassy state relaxation during annealing of frozen sugar solutions by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Tamiya, Shinri; Do, Gabsoo; Kono, Shinji; Ochiai, Takaaki

    2018-06-01

    Glassy phase formation in a frozen product determines various properties of the freeze-dried products. When an aqueous solution is subjected to freezing, a glassy phase forms as a consequence of freeze-concentration. During post-freezing annealing, the relaxation of the glassy phase and the ripening of ice crystals (i.e. Ostwald ripening) spontaneously occur, where the kinetics are controlled by the annealing and glass transition temperatures. This study was motivated to observe the progress of glassy state relaxation separate from ice coarsening during annealing. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe a frozen and post-freezing annealed solutions by using monochromatized X-ray from the synchrotron radiation. CT images were successfully obtained, and the frozen matrix were analyzed based on the gray level values that were equivalent to the linear X-ray attenuation coefficients of the observed matters. The CT images obtained from rapidly frozen sucrose and dextrin solutions with different concentrations gave clear linear relationships between the linear X-ray attenuation coefficients values and the solute concentrations. It was confirmed that the glassy state relaxation progressed as increasing annealing time, and this trend was larger in the order of the glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze-concentrated phase. The sucrose-water system required nearly 20 h of annealing time at -5 °C for the completion of the glassy phase relaxation, whereas dextrin-water systems required much longer periods because of their higher glass transition temperatures. The trends of ice coarsening, however, did not perfectly correspond to the trends of the relaxation, suggesting that the glassy phase relaxation and Ostwald ripening would jointly control the ice crystal growth/ripening kinetics, and the dominant mechanism differed by the annealing stage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum many-body effects in x-ray spectra efficiently computed using a basic graph algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yufeng; Prendergast, David

    2018-05-01

    The growing interest in using x-ray spectroscopy for refined materials characterization calls for an accurate electronic-structure theory to interpret the x-ray near-edge fine structure. In this work, we propose an efficient and unified framework to describe all the many-electron processes in a Fermi liquid after a sudden perturbation (such as a core hole). This problem has been visited by the Mahan-Noziéres-De Dominicis (MND) theory, but it is intractable to implement various Feynman diagrams within first-principles calculations. Here, we adopt a nondiagrammatic approach and treat all the many-electron processes in the MND theory on an equal footing. Starting from a recently introduced determinant formalism [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 096402 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.096402], we exploit the linear dependence of determinants describing different final states involved in the spectral calculations. An elementary graph algorithm, breadth-first search, can be used to quickly identify the important determinants for shaping the spectrum, which avoids the need to evaluate a great number of vanishingly small terms. This search algorithm is performed over the tree-structure of the many-body expansion, which mimics a path-finding process. We demonstrate that the determinantal approach is computationally inexpensive even for obtaining x-ray spectra of extended systems. Using Kohn-Sham orbitals from two self-consistent fields (ground and core-excited state) as input for constructing the determinants, the calculated x-ray spectra for a number of transition metal oxides are in good agreement with experiments. Many-electron aspects beyond the Bethe-Salpeter equation, as captured by this approach, are also discussed, such as shakeup excitations and many-body wave function overlap considered in Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe.

  11. In situ flash x-ray high-speed computed tomography for the quantitative analysis of highly dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Stefan; Nau, Siegfried; Salk, Manfred; Thoma, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    The in situ investigation of dynamic events, ranging from car crash to ballistics, often is key to the understanding of dynamic material behavior. In many cases the important processes and interactions happen on the scale of milli- to microseconds at speeds of 1000 m s-1 or more. Often, 3D information is necessary to fully capture and analyze all relevant effects. High-speed 3D-visualization techniques are thus required for the in situ analysis. 3D-capable optical high-speed methods often are impaired by luminous effects and dust, while flash x-ray based methods usually deliver only 2D data. In this paper, a novel 3D-capable flash x-ray based method, in situ flash x-ray high-speed computed tomography is presented. The method is capable of producing 3D reconstructions of high-speed processes based on an undersampled dataset consisting of only a few (typically 3 to 6) x-ray projections. The major challenges are identified, discussed and the chosen solution outlined. The application is illustrated with an exemplary application of a 1000 m s-1 high-speed impact event on the scale of microseconds. A quantitative analysis of the in situ measurement of the material fragments with a 3D reconstruction with 1 mm voxel size is presented and the results are discussed. The results show that the HSCT method allows gaining valuable visual and quantitative mechanical information for the understanding and interpretation of high-speed events.

  12. Computed tomography of the chest with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination: prel