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Sample records for low-dose radiation-induced protective

  1. Protective Effects of Prunus armeniaca L (Apricot on Low Dose Radiation-Induced Kidney Damage in Rats

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    Meltem KURUS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This experimental study was designed to evaluate radiation-induced kidney damage and the protective effect of apricot against it using histological parameters. MATERIAL and METHODS: Rats were divided into 6 groups each containing 10 Sprague Dawley rats as follows: Regc: Rats on a regular diet (control diet for 28 weeks; control group. Regx: Rats on a regular diet for 28 weeks, XRE on last day of eighth week. Aprc: Rats on an apricot diet for 28 weeks; control for no XRE. Aprx: Rats on an apricot diet for 28 weeks, XRE on last day of eighth week. Reg+Aprc: Rats on a regular diet for 8 weeks, followed by an apricot diet for the following 20 weeks; control. Reg + Aprx: Rats on a regular diet for 8 weeks, XRE on last day of eighth week, followed by an apricot diet for 20 weeks. RESULTS: The kidneys of the control groups showed normal kidney histology, whereas Regx group showed major histopathological changes, such as glomerular collapse, hemorrhage, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates. The Aprx and Reg+Aprx groups showed smaller amounts of degeneration. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we suggest that agents with antioxidant properties such as apricot may have a positive effect in the treatment of renal diseases.

  2. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit+ stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit+ stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit+ stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms

  3. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

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    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  4. Radiation-induced stress effects following low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    environmental radiation protection of human and non-human species alike and suggest a highly conserved mechanism of stress response. Simple extrapolations from high to low dose exposure may need to be re evaluated. This presentation will discuss our knowledge about these low dose radiobiological effects in both human and non-human biota.

  5. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

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    Jiaming Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR. All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM observation, forced swim test (FST, the open field test (OFT, the chromosome aberration (CA, the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR.

  6. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

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    Lei, Xiao; Zhao, Hainan; Liu, Pengfei; Xu, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chuai, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR). All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM) observation, forced swim test (FST), the open field test (OFT), the chromosome aberration (CA), the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA), the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR. PMID:27774116

  7. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

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    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  8. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  9. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

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    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  10. Simulated Microgravity and Low-Dose/Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Induces Oxidative Damage in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Nishiyama, Nina C; Pecaut, Michael J; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Gifford, Peter; Haynes, Kristine E; Becronis, Caroline; Gridley, Daila S

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity and radiation are stressors unique to the spaceflight environment that can have an impact on the central nervous system (CNS). These stressors could potentially lead to significant health risks to astronauts, both acutely during the course of a mission or chronically, leading to long-term, post-mission decrements in quality of life. The CNS is sensitive to oxidative injury due to high concentrations of oxidizable, unsaturated lipids and low levels of antioxidant defenses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative damage in the brain cortex and hippocampus in a ground-based model for spaceflight, which includes prolonged unloading and low-dose radiation. Whole-body low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) gamma radiation using (57)Co plates (0.04 Gy at 0.01 cGy/h) was delivered to 6 months old, mature, female C57BL/6 mice (n = 4-6/group) to simulate the radiation component. Anti-orthostatic tail suspension was used to model the unloading, fluid shift and physiological stress aspects of the microgravity component. Mice were hindlimb suspended and/or irradiated for 21 days. Brains were isolated 7 days or 9 months after irradiation and hindlimb unloading (HLU) for characterization of oxidative stress markers and microvessel changes. The level of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation, was significantly elevated in the cortex and hippocampus after LDR + HLU compared to controls (P environment-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27243749

  11. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

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    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  12. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  13. Mechanistic Basis for Nonlinear Dose-Response Relationships for Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Stochastic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Walker, Vernon

    2003-01-01

    The linear nonthreshold (LNT) model plays a central role in low-dose radiation risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation exposure is assumed to increase one’s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Here, we introduce a mechanism-based model for low-dose, radiation-induced, stochastic ...

  14. Gamma ray radiation induced visible light absorption in P-doped silica fibers at low dose levels

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Ping; Kulkarni, N S; Brown, K

    1999-01-01

    A CCD Fiber Optic Spectrometer has been used to monitor the gamma ray radiation induced loss in P-doped fibers at different dopant concentrations (1, 5 and 10 mol%) with a light source (an incandescent bulb with a temperature of 2800-3000 K). The range of dose rates is limited to that used in medical applications (cancer treatments), that is 0.1 to 1.0 Gray per minute (Gy/min). At low integral dose level (<2.0 Gy) four absorption peaks were observed (470, 502, 540 and 600 nm) within the visible region. It has been observed that the radiation induced loss at 470 and 600 nm depends strongly on dose rate. At dose rates of 0.2 and 0.5 Gy/min the induced loss shows nonlinear relation to the total dose. However, at high dose rate (1.0 Gy/min) and low dose rate (0.1 Gy/min) it seems to have a linear dependence with total dose. The conversion from NBOHCs to GeX centers was observed during gamma radiation at low dose rates (0.1-0.5 Gy/min). At the wavelength of 502 and 540 nm, the radiation induced losses show exce...

  15. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function

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    Gridley, Daila S.

    2008-10-31

    Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of “dirty bombs” by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset of lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes compared to

  16. Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCID mice spleen after low dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Kondo, N.; Inaba, H.; Uotani, K.; Kiyohara, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.

    To assess the radioadaptive response of the whole body system in mice, we examined the temporal effect of low dose priming as an indicator of challenging irradiation-induced apoptosis through a p53 tumor suppressor protein- mediated signal transduction pathway. The p53 protein also plays an important role both in cell cycle control and DNA repair through cellular signal transduction. Using severe combined immunodeficiency mice defective in DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, we examined the role of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity in radioadaptation induced by low dose irradiation. Specific pathogen free 5-week-old female severe combined immunodeficiency mice and the parental mice (CB-17 Icr +/ + were irradiated with X-ray at 3.0 C3y at 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks after the conditioning irradiation at 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 or 0.60 Gy. The mice spleens were fixed for immunohistochemistry 12 h after the challenging irradiation. The p53-dependent apoptosis related Bax proteins on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method The apoptosis incidence in the sections was measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The frequency of Bax- and apoptosis-positive cells increased up to 12 h after the challenging irradiation in the spleen of both mice. However, these cells were not observed after a low dose irradiation at 0.15-0.60 Gy When pre-irradiation at 0.45 Gy 2 weeks before the challenging irradiation at 3.0 Gy was performed, Bax accumulation and apoptosis induced by challenging irradiation were depressed in the spleens of CB-17 Icr +/ + mice, but not in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These data suggest that DNA-dependent protein kinase might play a major role in radioadaptation induced by pre-irradiation with a low dose in mice spleen. We expect that the present findings will provide useful information in the health care of space crews.

  17. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  18. Radiation-induced bystander effects and adaptive responses--the Yin and Yang of low dose radiobiology?

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    Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca; Seymour, Colin [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca

    2004-12-02

    Our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low doses of high or low LET ionizing radiation is reviewed. The question of what actually constitutes a protective effect is discussed in the context of adaptive (often referred to as hormetic or protective) responses. Finally the review considers critically, how bystander effects may be related to observed adaptive responses or other seemingly protective effects of low doses exposures. Bystander effects induce responses at the tissue level, which are similar to generalized stress responses. Most of the work involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature measures a death response. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation (so-called 'background damage'), it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells carrying potentially problematic lesions, prior to exposure to radiation. This mechanism could lead to the production of 'U-shaped' or hormetic dose-response curves. The level of adverse, adaptive or apparently beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the original cell population, the level of organization at which damage or harm are scored and the precise definition of 'harm'. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving low doses of radiation and other environmental stressors.

  19. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

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    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  20. Low-dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measures by Acridine Orange Stained Micronucleus Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6 hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange due stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: an adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed (1-4). However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose (3). This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. (Author)

  1. Commentary: ethical issues of current health-protection policies on low-dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Doss, Mohan; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Janiak, Marek K; Miller, Mark L; Sanders, Charles L; Scott, Bobby R; Ulsh, Brant; Vaiserman, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-model predictions at low doses are "speculative, unproven, undetectable and 'phantom'." Moreover, numerous experimental, ecological, and epidemiological studies show that low doses of sparsely-ionizing or sparsely-ionizing plus highly-ionizing radiation may be beneficial to human health (hormesis/adaptive response). The present LNT-model-based regulations impose excessive costs on the society. For example, the median-cost medical program is 5000 times more cost-efficient in saving lives than controlling radiation emissions. There are also lives lost: e.g., following Fukushima accident, more than 1000 disaster-related yet non-radiogenic premature deaths were officially registered among the population evacuated due to radiation concerns. Additional negative impacts of LNT-model-inspired radiophobia include: refusal of some patients to undergo potentially life-saving medical imaging; discouragement of the study of low-dose radiation therapies; motivation for radiological terrorism and promotion of nuclear proliferation. PMID:24910586

  2. Mortality risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer at high doses and dose-rates, and extrapolation to the low dose domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liniecki, J

    1989-01-01

    Risk coefficients for life-long excessive mortality due to radiation-induced cancers are presented, as derived in 1988 by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), principally on the basis of follow-up from A-bomb survivors in Japan, over the period from 1950 through 1985. The data are based on the new, revised dosimetry (DS 86) in the two cities, and reflect the effects of high and intermediate doses of basically low LET radiation delivered instantaneously. The author presents arguments relevant to the extrapolation of the risk to the low dose (dose rate) domain, as outlined by UNSCEAR in its 1986, and the NCRP (USA) in its 1980, (no 64), reports. The arguments are based on models and dose-response relationships for radiation action, derived from data on cellular radiobiology, animal experiments on radiation-induced cancers and life shortening, as well as the available limited human epidemiological evidence. The available information points to the lower effectiveness of sparsely ionizing radiation at low doses and low dose-rates, as compared with that observed for high, acutely delivered doses. The possible range of the reduction values (DREF) is presented. For high LET radiations, the evidence is less extensive and sometimes contradictory; however, it does not point to a reduction of the effectiveness at low doses/dose-rates, relative to the high dose domain. Practical consequences of these facts are considered. PMID:2489419

  3. Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measured by Acridine Orange Stained Micronuleus Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange dye stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: An adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed [1- 4]. However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose [3]. This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. Materials and Methods: Specific pathogen free 5-week-old C3H/He mice, purchased from Shizuoka Laboratory Center (Japan), were kept in clean and conventional environment. When 6 weeks old, the animal were whole body irradiated using irradiator of IBL-437 (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min). After various time intervals, the two groups were administrated to adaptation dose and challenge dose of 0.01Gy and 2Gy, respectively. For experiments, sham-irradiated, only adaptive and challenge dose irradiated groups were run concurrently. Smears were stained and scored using Acridine orange dye method [2]. Statistically significant differences in MN-PCE frequency were determined by comparing tie individual values at each group with the respective control values (challenge dose irradiated group) by using the paired ttest. Results and Discussions: Induced MN by the challenge dose (2Gy) after the pretreatment with 0.01Gy is low to the one induced by the challenge dose alone. In the present study, this estimation for the

  4. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  5. Cancer risk from low dose radiation depends directly on the organ mass in a general model of radiation-induced cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z W

    2014-04-01

    Current methods of evaluating radiation-induced cancer risk depend on the organ dose but not explicitly on extensive quantities such as the organ mass. However, at the same organ dose, one may expect the larger number of cells in a larger organ to lead to a higher cancer risk. Here the author introduces organ- and radiation type-specific cell cancer risk coefficients and obtains analytical relations between cancer risk and the radiation environment, which contains the dependence of cancer risk on organ masses. The excess cancer risk induced by low dose radiation for an organ is shown to be directly proportional to the organ mass. Therefore the total excess risk for all solid cancers depends directly on organ masses and consequently on body weight or size. This method is also being compared with three existing methods of evaluating the radiation-induced cancer risk, and special cases where this formulation matches each method are demonstrated. The results suggest that the direct dependence of cancer risk on organ masses needs to be checked against existing epidemiological data and, if verified, should be included in the methodology for the evaluation of radiation-induced cancer risk, in particular the individual risk. This dependence is also expected to affect the cancer risk transport from one population group to another that is different in organ mass, body weight or height. PMID:24562066

  6. Cloning of low dose radiation induced gene RIG1 by RACE based on non-cloned cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To obtain full-length cDNA of radiation induced new gene RIG1 based on its EST fragment. Methods: Based on non-cloned cDNA library, enhanced nested RACE PCR and biotin-avidin labelled probe for magnetic bead purification was used to obtain full-length cDNA of RIG1. Results: About 1 kb of 3' end of RIG1 gene was successfully cloned by this set of methods and cloning of RIG1 5' end is proceeding well. Conclusion: The result is consistent with the design of experiment. This set of protocol is useful for cloning of full-length gene based on EST fragment

  7. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  8. Radiation-induced reactions of the lungs: Hormesis, guideline on radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain almost all full papers presented at the 34th annual meeting of the Vereinigung Deutscher Strahlenschutzaerzte e.V., held in Dresden from May 3-5, 1993. There were three main topics selected for this meeting: radiation-induced reactions in the lungs, radiation hormesis, and the German regulatory guide for Radiation Protection in Medicine, as amended in mid-1993. The papers discuss the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lesions in the lungs, results of animal experiments applying partial and whole-lung irradiation, clinical experience and diagnostics, lung function impairment, and X-ray signs of the thorax after radiation exposure of the respiratory organ. The two papers discussing the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, radiation hormesis and adaptive response in biological systems have been presented by experts in this matter which give a picture of the current scientific knowledge and of the items of controversy. (orig./MG)

  9. Health Risks From Low Doses and Low Dose-Rates of Ionizing Radiation. Session 5: Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Donald A

    2016-03-01

    The system of radiological protection is a prospective approach to protection of individuals in all exposure situations. It must be applied equitably across all age groups and all populations. This is a very different circumstance from dose assessment for a particular individual where the unique characteristics of the individual and the exposure can be taken into account. Notwithstanding the ongoing discussions on the possible shape of the dose response at low doses and dose rates, the prospective system of protection has therefore historically used a linear assumption as a pragmatic, prudent and protective approach. These radiation protection criteria are not intended to be a demarcation between "safe" and "unsafe" and are the product of a risk-informed judgement that includes inputs from science, ethics, and experience. There are significant implications for different dose response relationships. A linear model allows for equal treatment of an exposure, irrespective of the previously accumulated exposure. In contrast, other models would predict different implications. Great care is therefore needed in separating the thinking around risk assessment from risk management, and prospective protection for all age groups and genders from retrospective assessment for a particular individual. In the United States, the prospective regulatory structure functions effectively because of assumptions that facilitate independent treatment of different types of exposures, and which provide pragmatic and prudent protection. While the a linear assumption may, in fact, not be consistent with the biological reality, the implications of a different regulatory model must be considered carefully. PMID:26808877

  10. Radiation-induced developmental anomalies in mammalian embryos by low doses and interaction with drugs, stress and genetic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of low doses of radiation with different LET (140kV X-rays, negative pions and 15MeV electrons), as well as the interaction with drugs, genetic and stress factors, has been studied in rat and mouse embryos. Pregnant mice of two different strains (F/A and NMRI) and rats (Sprague-Dawley) were irradiated at day 8 or 9 of gestation. Four to five days after irradiation (with and without additional treatment) the foetuses were observed macro- and microscopically for developmental anomalies such as post-implantation loss, growth retardation, eye defects, exencephaly, cleft palate, and limb defects. In both mice strains it was found that a radiation dose as low as 1rad results in a significant increase in the rates of abnormal foetuses. Irradiation with peak pions (high LET) was more effective than 140kV X-rays or 15MeV electrons (RBE 1.4). Application of iodoacetamide and tetracyclines (Reverin, Ledermycin) before irradiation with X-rays led to a significant sensitization of radiation effects. The most impressive synergistic effect was shown with lucanthone (Miracil D) where the radiation damage after 50rads was multiplied almost fourfold. With smaller radiation doses the injection of lucanthone led to various degrees of sensitization depending on both the mouse strain (genetic factors) and dosage used. Besides chemical substances, a short time restraint of pregnant females represents a stress situation which was teratogenic in mice, and may enhance radiation and chemically induced developmental anomalies. Combinations of modifying factors with different radiation might deserve further attention. (author)

  11. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events.

  12. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events. PMID:23946774

  13. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  14. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  15. Radiation induced cancer risk, detriment and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recommendations on radiation protection limits for workers and for the public depend mainly on the total health detriment estimated to be the result of low dose ionizing radiation exposure. This detriment includes the probability of a fatal cancer, an allowance for the morbidity due to non-fatal cancer and the probability of severe hereditary effects in succeeding generations. In a population of all ages, special effects on the fetus particularly the risk of mental retardation at defined gestational ages, should also be included. Among these components of detriment after low doses, the risk of fatal cancer is the largest and most important. The estimates of fatal cancer risk used by ICRP in the 1990 recommendations were derived almost exclusively from the study of the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs of 1945. How good are these estimates? Uncertainties associated with them, apart from those due to limitations in epidemiological observation and dosimetry, are principally those due to projection forward in time and extrapolation from high dose and dose rate to low dose and dose rate, each of which could after the estimate by a factor of 2 or so. Recent estimates of risk of cancer derived directly from low dose studies are specific only within very broad ranges of risk. Nevertheless, such studies are important as confirmation or otherwise of the estimates derived from the atomic bomb survivors. Recent U.S. British and Russian studies are examined in this light. (author)

  16. Inducible HSP70 Protects Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Lee, Su-Jae; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Ho [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Irradiation (IR) delivered to the head and neck is a common treatment for malignancies. Salivary glands in the irradiation field are severely damaged, and consequently this resulted in marked salivary hypofunction. While the exact mechanism of salivary gland damage remains enigmatic, fluid secreting acinar cells are lost, and saliva output is dramatically reduced. Previously we have reported that inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i) induced radioresistance in vitro. Moreover, HSP70i localized to salivary glands by gene transfer has great potential for the treatment of salivary gland. Herein, we investigated whether HSP70 can use as radio protective molecules for radiation-induced salivary gland damage in vivo.

  17. Application of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiation oncology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid assay of the ability of lymphocytes to respond to radiation-induced damage is presented. Age and genetic dependence of radiation response have been quantified. The assay is sensitive to low doses of radiation. Its ability to assess the cytotoxic response of blood capillaries to radiation has been evaluated. (author)

  18. HSP25 Protects Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae June; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kwon, Hee Choong; Lee, Su Jae; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Yun Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Irradiation (IR) is a central treatment modality administered for head and neck malignancies. A significant consequence of this IR treatment is irreversible damage to salivary gland in the IR field. While the exact mechanism of salivary gland damage remains enigmatic, fluid secreting acinar cells are lost, and saliva output is dramatically reduced. Previously we have reported that heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) induced radioresistance in vitro. HSP25 interferes negatively with apoptosis through several pathways which involve its direct interaction with cytochrome c, protein kinase c delta or Akt. And localized gene transfer to salivary glands has great potential for the treatment of salivary gland. Herein, we investigated whether HSP25 can use as radio protective molecules for radiation-induced salivary gland damage in vivo.

  19. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  20. Protection of radiation-induced DNA damage in albino rats by Zingiber Montanum extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tropical ginger, Zingiber montanum (J. König) A. Dietr, has potentials in scavenging free radicals and affording protection from radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The present investigation aims at determining antioxidant and radioprotective properties of the rhizome extract. Sulphur free radical, DPPH and superoxide scavenging assays were carried out for assessing antioxidant activities. Radiation-induced (500 cGy) DNA damage in pBR322 in vitro could be significantly reduced upto 71% (P < 0.05) by treatment with 60% ethanol extract (20 μg). Acute toxicity of the 60% ethanol extract was determined and suitable injectable dose was selected for intra-peritoneal administration in albino rats (Rattus norvegicus). The LD50 of extract calculated for 72 hrs was found to be 2.9 g/kg, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of rhizome extract was 1.3 g/kg. Rhizome extract (0.5 g/kg) in 60% ethanol was intra-peritoneally injected to albino rats and exposed to 100, 300 and 500 cGy. Radioprotective effect of the extract was determined by alkaline single cell comet assay. Significant reduction (P < 0.05) of comet DNA (68%) and length (61%)in rat bone marrow cells was observed at a radiation dose of 500 cGy. The results demonstrate that tropical ginger possess free radical scavenging properties and can protect bone marrow cells from radiation-induced DNA damages. The results on radiation induced DNA damage using plasmid pBR322 DNA obviously justify that the extract at a low dose can protect DNA from undergoing strand breakage due to gamma radiation exposure. Versatility of Zingiber montanum in different chemical assays in terms of its radical scavenging potential shows that this non-conventional food plant as a lot of potential in maintaining human health through dietary supplementation as nutraceutical. This candidate plant also can possibly be a promising candidate in clinical radiotherapy perhaps as a substitute of or the well-know radioprotector amifostine. (author)

  1. Commentary: Ethical Issues of Current Health-Protection Policies on Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Doss, Mohan; Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Janiak, Marek K.; Miller, Mark L.; Sanders, Charles L.; Scott, Bobby R.; Ulsh, Brant; Vaiserman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-m...

  2. Evaluation of the detriment associated with exposure at low doses and low dose rates in the radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Questions about quantifying the radiological risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation have been debated repeatedly for a variety of exposure situations, including, among others, medical irradiation, discharges from nuclear facilities, transportation of radioactive waste, and potential nuclear accidents. This paper aims to shed light on the link between exposure and risk, focusing on the items that constitute the detriment associated with this exposure. The management of the risk associated with it relies on a cautious hypothesis of a linear no-threshold relation between exposure and risk of death or detriment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published General Recommendations in 1966 that recognised this relation, but did not publish a quantification of the risk until 1977. The Commission introduced the concept of effective dose as a risk indicator that makes it possible to determine dose limits according to the risk associated with them. In 1990, the Commission proposed a revision of the quantification and construction of detriment. New limits, based on risk quantification and, for the first time, risk tolerability, were proposed. The optimisation of radiation protection - keeping radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable in light of the economic and social context - became the key principle of the radiation protection system. The use of detriment makes it possible to use economic tools to guide the decision process for this optimisation - by assessing the monetary value of human life. This concept, widely used in health economics during the 1980's, has been criticised by many and must be used cautiously. ICRP published the latest quantifications of detriment in 2007. Detriment is thus an indicator that assesses the risk of death associated with exposure to ionising radiation for an average individual. Its construction relies on simplifying assumptions that are needed to implement a robust and effective radiation

  3. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  4. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive.

  5. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5–30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5–30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of...

  6. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells we...

  7. Low dose radiation induced adaptive response upon salt stress and vacuum stress: a possible mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve, the relationship of irradiation-vacuum stress, and irradiation-salt stress, was investigated with rice seeds irradiated to 60-560 Gy by 60Co γ-rays. The dose-response curve was simulated based on seedling height data, which showed obedient to linear-quadratic model. During germination,the irradiated rice seeds were stressed by 10-3 Pa vacuum, or by NaCl in different concentrations. After that, the dose-response curve manifested a saddle-like shape. The results indicate that while low dose irradiation could retard seedling growth synergistically with vacuum stress and salt stress, it could also induce adaptive response upon vacuum stress and salt stress. Low dose irradiation induced adaptive response upon environmental adverse factors could contribute to the mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve. (authors)

  8. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces direct activation of natural killer cells and provides a novel approach for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guozi; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Guanjun; Jin, Haofan; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Dehai; Niu, Chao; Han, Wei; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that limited availability and cytotoxicity have restricted the development of natural killer (NK) cells in adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI). While it has been reported that low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) could enhance the immune response in animal studies, the influence of LDIR at the cellular level has been less well defined. In this study, the authors aim to investigate the direct effects of LDIR on NK cells and the potential mechanism, and explore the application of activation and expansion of NK cells by LDIR in ACI. The authors found that expansion and cytotoxicity of NK cells were markedly augmented by LDIR. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in the supernatants of cultured NK cells were significantly increased after LDIR. Additionally, the effect of the P38 inhibitor (SB203580) significantly decreased the expanded NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine levels, and expression levels of FasL and perforin. These findings indicate that LDIR induces a direct expansion and activation of NK cells through possibly the P38-MAPK pathway, which provides a potential mechanism for stimulation of NK cells by LDIR and a novel but simplified approach for ACI.

  9. Ultra Low Dose Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Protects Mouse Liver from Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Hochhauser

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is the main cause of both primary graft dysfunction and primary non-function of liver allografts. Cannabinoids has been reported to attenuate myocardial, cerebral and hepatic I/R oxidative injury. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, a cannabinoid agonist, is the active components of marijuana. In this study we examined the role of ultralow dose THC (0.002mg/kg in the protection of livers from I/R injury. This extremely low dose of THC was previously found by us to protect the mice brain and heart from a variety of insults. Methods: C57Bl Mice were studied in in vivo model of hepatic segmental (70% ischemia for 60min followed by reperfusion for 6 hours. Results: THC administration 2h prior to the induction of hepatic I/R was associated with significant attenuated elevations of: serum liver transaminases ALT and AST, the hepatic oxidative stress (activation of the intracellular signaling CREB pathway, the acute proinflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-10 and c-FOS hepatic mRNA levels, and ERK signaling pathway activation. This was followed by cell death (the cleavage of the pro-apoptotic caspase 3, DNA fragmentation and TUNEL after 6 hours of reperfusion. Significantly less hepatic injury was detected in the THC treated I/R mice and fewer apoptotic hepatocytes cells were identified by morphological criteria compared with untreated mice. Conclusion: A single ultralow dose THC can reduce the apoptotic, oxidative and inflammatory injury induced by hepatic I/R injury. THC may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in hepatic I/R injury during liver transplantation, liver resection and trauma.

  10. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  11. Protective Effect of Curcumin on γ - radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the radioprotective effect of curcumin on γ radiation induced genetic toxicity. The DNA damage was analyzed by the frequencies of chromosome aberrations assay. Human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with 5.0 γg/ml of curcumin for 30 min at 37 degree C then exposed to 1, 2 and 4 Gy gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes which were pre-treated with curcumin exhibited a significant decrease in the frequency of chromosome aberration at 1 and 2 Gy radiation-induced chromosome damage as compared with the irradiated cells which did not receive the curcumin pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin gives protection to lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced chromosome aberration at certain doses. (author)

  12. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  13. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  14. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  15. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  16. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions.

  17. Protective effect of flax seed oil against radiation induced hematological alterations in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human beings are exposed to ionizing and non ionizing radiation from natural as well as manmade sources. Ionizing radiations are one of the predominant exogenous factors that have deleterious consequences to human life. Exposure to ionizing radiations damages the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal or central nervous systems, depending on radiation dose. Hence, there is an urgent need to prevent such deleterious effects caused due to ionizing radiations. Chemical protection involves the use of synthetic and natural products against planned radiation exposure. Medicinal plants are rich in antioxidants and their chemical constituents may be the potential source for radioprotective agents. Linum usitatissimum plant (family: Linaceae), source of flaxseed oil (FSO), is well known for its anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, cardioprotector, antiulcer properties owing to the presence of various phytochemicals. The present study has been focused to find out the preventive action of flaxseed oil against radiation induced hematological and biochemical lesions in mammals. For this purpose, FSO (50μL/animal/day) was orally administered to Swiss albino mice for five days, prior to 6 Gy gamma radiation exposure. The animals were sacrificed on 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th and 30th day after irradiation. Radiation treated control group exhibited significant reduction in erythrocytes count, hemoglobin content, hematocrit value and total WBC count in peripheral blood. In contrast, pretreatment with FSO significantly increased all these blood constituents. Further, the antioxidant parameters such as reduced glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase showed a significant elevation in FSO pretreated group which were reduced in irradiated control group. Similarly, radiation induced increase lipid peroxidation in blood was significantly inhibited after FSO treatment. The present results indicate that the flaxseed oil has the ability to debilitate the radiation induced adverse alterations in the

  18. Protective effect of zingerone, a dietary compound against radiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotective potential of phenolic alkanone, Zingerone (ZO) was investigated using human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as Chinese hamster fibroblast (V79) cells growing in vitro and in vivo by using Swiss albino mice exposed to gamma radiation. In the in vivo studies, mice were administered with ZO (10-100 mg/kg b.wt), once daily for five consecutive days. One hour after the last administration of ZO on the fifth day, animals were whole body exposed to 10 Gy gamma radiations. The radioprotective potential was assessed using animal survival, haemopoietic stem cell survival (CFU) assay, mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, histological observations of intestinal and bone marrow damage. Effect of ZO pretreatment on radiation-induced changes in glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and lipid peroxidation (LPx) levels was also analyzed. ZO treatment resulted increase in the LD50/30 by 1.8 Gy (dose reduction factor = 1.2). The number of spleen colonies after whole body irradiation of mice (4.5 or 7.5 Gy) was increased when ZO was administered 1 h prior to irradiation. The histological observations indicated a decline in the villus height and crypt number with an increase in goblet and dead cell population in the irradiated group, which was normalized by pretreatment with ZO. A significant (p < 0.001) reduction in micronucleated polychromatic, normochromatic erythrocytes, increased PCE/NCE ratio, increase in the GSH, GST, SOD, CAT and decreased LPx levels were observed in ZO by pretreated group when compared to the irradiated animals. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate the potential of ZO in mitigating radiation-induced cytotoxic, genotoxicity, apoptosis in cell culture and animal mortality, cytogenetic damage, intestinal and bone marrow protection in vivo. Radioprotective potential of ZO may be attributed to the inhibition radiation-induced decline in the endogenous antioxidant levels

  19. Mitochondrial protection by low doses of insulin-like growth factor- Ⅰ in experimental cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel Pérez; María García-Fernández; Matías Díaz-Sánchez; Juan E Puche; Gloria Delgado; Marian Conchillo; Jordi Muntané; Inma Castilla-Cortázar

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To characterize the mitochondrial dysfunction in experimental cirrhosis and to study whether insulin-like growth factor- I (IGF-I) therapy (4 wk) is able to in-duce beneficial effects on damaged mitochondria leading to cellular protection.METHODS:Wistar rats were divided into three groups:Control group,untreated cirrhotic rats and cirrhotic rats treated with IGF-I treatment (2 μg/100 g bw/d).Mitochondrial function was analyzed by flow cytometry in isolated hepatic mitochondria,caspase 3 activation was assessed by Western blot and apoptosis by TUNEL in the three experimental groups.RESULTS:Untreated cirrhotic rats showed a mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by a significant reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (in status 4 and 3);an increase of intramitochondrial reactive oxigen species (ROS) generation and a significant reduction of ATPase activity.IGF-Ⅰ therapy normalized mitochondrial function by increasing the membrane potential and ATPase activity and reducing the intramitochondrial free radical production.Activity of the electron transport complexes Ⅰ and Ⅲ was increased in both cirrhotic groups.In addition,untreated cirrhotic rats showed an increase of caspase 3 activation and apoptosis.IGF- Ⅰ therapy reduced the expression of the active peptide of caspase 3 and resulted in reduced apoptosis.CONCLUSION:These results show that IGF- Ⅰ exerts a mitochondrial protection in experimental cirrhosis leading to reduced apoptosis and increased ATP production.

  20. Punica granatum peel extract protects against ionizing radiation-induced enteritis and leukocyte apoptosis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a well-recognized sequel of therapeutic irradiation. Therefore we examined the radioprotective properties of Punica granatum peel extract (PPE) on the oxidative damage in the ileum. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body X-ray irradiation of 800 cGy. Irradiated rats were pretreated orally with saline or PPE (50 mg/kg/day) for 10 days before irradiation and the following 10 days, while control rats received saline or PPE but no irradiation. Then plasma and ileum samples were obtained. Irradiation caused a decrease in glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, which was accompanied by increases in malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity, collagen content of the tissue with a concomitant increase 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (an index of oxidative DNA damage). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and lactate dehydrogenase were elevated in irradiated groups as compared to control. PPE treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. Furthermore, flow cytometric measurements revealed that leukocyte apoptosis and cell death were increased in irradiated animals, while PPE reversed these effects. PPE supplementation reduced oxidative damage in the ileal tissues, probably by a mechanism that is associated with the decreased production of reactive oxygen metabolites and enhancement of antioxidant mechanisms. Adjuvant therapy of PPE may have a potential to support a successful radiotherapy by protecting against radiation-induced enteritis. (author)

  1. The Protective Effect of Amifostine on Radiation-Induced Proctitis: Systemic Versus Topical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Uzal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of intrarectal administration of amifostine in radiation-induced proctitis compared to intraperitoneal administration.Materials and Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control (CONT, irradiation alone (RT, intraperitoneal amifostine plus irradiation (IPAMI, and intrarectal amifostine plus irradiation (IRAMI. The rats in the RT, IPAMI and IRAMI groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 17.5 Gy to the pelvis. Amifostine was administered by the intraperitoneal (200 mg/kg or intrarectal (2000 mg/kg route before irradiation. Histopathologic analysis of the rectum was performed 14 days after irradiation. Results: Significant radiation damage appeared in all histopathologic parameters and was reduced by amifostine. Pretreatment with IPAMI significantly reduced the inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria (p=0.021, cryptitis (p=0.002 and crypt abscess (p=0.015. However, the protective effect of IRAMI was significant for all parameters with equal or higher significance than IPAMI, including the eosinophil leucocytes count (p=0.02, and distortion of the crypts (p=0.008, and was also significant for regenerative/reparative atypia (p=0.013. Conclusion: Intrarectal high dose topical administration of amifostine is more effective in the prevention of radiation-induced proctitis compared to its intraperitoneal systemic administration.

  2. Protection by polaprezinc against radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polaprezinc, an anti-ulcer drug, is a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine. Polaprezinc has been shown to prevent gastric mucosal injury. The anti ulcer effects of polaprezinc have been ascribed to its antioxidative property. The effect of polaprezinc on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis was studied in the jejunal epithelial crypt cells of rats. Seven-to eight week-old Wistar rats, which were treated with 100 mg/kg of polaprezinc orally 1 h before irradiation or 2% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium in controls, were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at 2 Gy. The number of apoptotic cells per jejunum crypt was counted in haematoxylin and eosin stained sections at 0-6 h after irradiation. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) positive cells and immunopositive cells for active caspase-3 per crypt were also counted. Accumulation of p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 and Bax expression in the jejunum after irradiation were examined by Western blot analyses. Polaprezinc treatment given prior to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in numbers of apoptotic cells, TUNEL positive cells and active caspase-3 immunopositive cells in jejunal crypt cells. Polaprezinc treatment resulted in decreases of p53 accumulation, p21WAF1/CIP1 and Bax expression after irradiation. Polaprezinc has a protective effect against ionizing radiation induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. (author)

  3. Protection by polaprezinc against radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Uemura, Takashi; Niino, Daisuke; Sekine, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    Polaprezinc, an anti-ulcer drug, is a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine. Polaprezinc has been shown to prevent gastric mucosal injury. The anti ulcer effects of polaprezinc have been ascribed to its antioxidative property. The effect of polaprezinc on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis was studied in the jejunal epithelial crypt cells of rats. Seven-to eight week-old Wistar rats, which were treated with 100 mg/kg of polaprezinc orally 1h before irradiation or 2% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium in controls, were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at 2 Gy. The number of apoptotic cells per jejunum crypt was counted in haematoxylin and eosin stained sections at 0-6 h after irradiation. TUNEL positive cells and immunopositive cells for active caspase-3 per crypt were also counted. Accumulation of p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression in the jejunum after irradiation were examined by Western blot analyses. Polaprezinc treatment given prior to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in numbers of apoptotic cells, TUNEL positive cells and active caspase-3 immunopositive cells in jejunal crypt cells. Polaprezinc treatment resulted in decreases of p53 accumulation, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression after irradiation. Polaprezinc has a protective effect against ionizing radiation induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. PMID:18413982

  4. Protective role of garlic against gamma radiation induced histological and histochemical changes in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work was planned to evaluate the radioprotective effect of garlic (Allium sativum) against the hazardous action of gamma radiation on liver of rat one and ten days post-exposure. Garlic was orally administered (100 mg/ kg body wt) to rats daily for two weeks before exposure to single dose whole body gamma-irradiation (5Gy). The results showed that exposure of rats to gamma- irradiation caused massive portal infiltration with inflammatory cells, dilatation of blood sinusoids, an increase in the number of Kupffer cells, vacuolation of some hepatocytes as well as pyknosis and karyolysis of hepatic nuclei in the liver tissue. Histochemical examination of liver one day post- irradiation illustrated weak to moderate glycogen particles. While, on ten days post-irradiation, a strong activity for glycogen was detected. The disturbance in carbohydrate metabolism is closely related to the radiation induced histological damage in the liver tissue. Administration of garlic for 2 weeks pre-irradiation reduced the radiation induced histopathological changes and showed marked protection against the tissue damaging effect of radiation. It could be concluded that treatment of rats with garlic before exposure to gamma-irradiation offered a noticeable radioprotective effect of the studied organ

  5. Protective effect of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in low-dose streptozotocin & high-fat diet-induced type-2 diabetes in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Uma Bhandari; Vinay Kumar; Parveen Kumar; Tripathi, C.D.; Geetika Khanna

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the pathologic phenomena associated with diabetes and related conditions including obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the protective effects of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis was evaluated in experimental diabetes induced by low dose of streptozoticin (STZ) combined with high fat diet (HFD) in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were injected with low-dose STZ (45 mg/kg, i.v., ...

  6. Protective effect of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in low-dose streptozotocin & high-fat diet-induced type-2 diabetes in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Uma; Kumar, Vinay; Kumar, Parveen; Tripathi, C.D.; KHANNA, Geetika

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the pathologic phenomena associated with diabetes and related conditions including obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the protective effects of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis was evaluated in experimental diabetes induced by low dose of streptozoticin (STZ) combined with high fat diet (HFD) in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were injected with low-dose STZ (45 mg/kg, i.v., singl...

  7. Grape Seed Oil Extract Protects Against Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in Rats Eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was carried out to investigate the beneficial effects of grape seed oil on radiation-induced oxidative stress in the irradiated rat eyes. The rats were divided into three groups; control group that received distilled water, irradiated group (R) that exposed to gamma radiation as a single dose of 6.4 Gy and irradiated + grape seed oil group (R+GSO) that administered grape seed oil for seven consecutive days then exposed to the same single gamma radiation dose followed by grape seed oil for seven additional days. Histopathological results revealed protective effect of grape seed oil on the eye tissues of rat. The results lead to the conclusion that administration of GSO prior to radiation exposure may be a promising attempt in attenuating the extent of oxidative damage accompanying radiotherapy

  8. REDD1 protects osteoblast cells from gamma radiation-induced premature senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Hong Li

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is commonly used for cancer treatment. However, it often results in side effects due to radiation damage in normal tissue, such as bone marrow (BM failure. Adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC reside in BM next to the endosteal bone surface, which is lined primarily by hematopoietic niche osteoblastic cells. Osteoblasts are relatively more radiation-resistant than HSPCs, but the mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the stress response gene REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 was highly expressed in human osteoblast cell line (hFOB cells after γ irradiation. Knockdown of REDD1 with siRNA resulted in a decrease in hFOB cell numbers, whereas transfection of PCMV6-AC-GFP-REDD1 plasmid DNA into hFOB cells inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p21 expression and protected these cells from radiation-induced premature senescence (PS. The PS in irradiated hFOB cells were characterized by significant inhibition of clonogenicity, activation of senescence biomarker SA-β-gal, and the senescence-associated cytokine secretory phenotype (SASP after 4 or 8 Gy irradiation. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the stress response proteins p53 and nuclear factor κ B (NFkB interacted with REDD1 in hFOB cells. Knockdown of NFkB or p53 gene dramatically suppressed REDD1 protein expression in these cells, indicating that REDD1 was regulated by both factors. Our data demonstrated that REDD1 is a protective factor in radiation-induced osteoblast cell premature senescence.

  9. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy.

  10. Protective Role of Clove Against Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antioxidants in food play an important role in preventing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Clove is widely used in Egypt as a spice which is a potent scavenger of a variety of free radicals. Clove (Syzygium aromaticum, Eugenia aromaticum or Eugenia caryophyllata) is the aromatic dried flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of cloves against oxidative stress and tissue injury, in animals, induced by gamma irradiation. Rats were subjected to two doses of gamma radiation (2 and 4 Gy). Four weeks before irradiation animals received cloves in basal diets. In liver and serum of irradiated animals, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) showed a significant increase associated to a marked decrease in glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT). The level of total lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) showed significant increase in the serum of irradiated rats. On the other hand, the level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), total protein, albumin and total globulins showed significant decrease. Rats fed on a basal diet containing cloves during a period of 4 weeks before irradiation showed significant improvement in the oxidant/antioxidant status denoted by a significant reduction in TBARS level associated with significant increase in GSH and CAT. Moreover, the radiation-induced changes in lipids, proteins and enzyme activities were significantly ameliorated. It could be concluded that cloves possibly protect against radiation-induced oxidative stress and tissue damage

  11. Protective Effects of 5-Androstendiol (5-AED) on Radiation-induced Intestinal Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Lee, Seung Sook; Jang, Won Suk; Lee, Sun Joo; Park, Sun Hoo; Kim, MinSook; Cho, Soo Youn [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang Jong; Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National University College of Veterinary Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We examined the radioprotective effects of 5-androstendiol (5-AED), a natural hormone produced in the reticularis of the adrenal cortex, as a result of intestinal damage in gamma-irradiated C3H/HeN mice. Thirty mice (C3H/HeN) were divided into three groups; 1) non-irradiated control group, 2) irradiated group, and 3) 5-AED-treated group prior to irradiation. Next, 5-AED (50 mg/kg per body weight) was subcutaneously injected 24 hours before irradiation. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 10 Gy for the histological examination of jejunal crypt survival and the determination of the villus morphology including crypt depth, crypt size, number of villi, villus height, and length of basal lamina, as well as 5 Gy for the detection of apoptosis. The 5-AED pre-treated group significantly increased the survival of the jejunal crypt, compared to irradiation controls (p<0.05 vs. irradiation controls at 3.5 days after 10 Gy). The evaluation of morphological changes revealed that the administration of 5-AED reduced the radiation-induced intestinal damages such as villus shortening and increased length of the basal lamina of enterocytes (p<0.05 vs irradiation controls on 3.5 day after 10 Gy, respectively). The administration of 5-AED decreased the radiation-induced apoptosis in the intestinal crypt, with no significant difference between the vehicle and 5-AED at 12 hours after 5 Gy. The results of this study suggest that the administration of 5-AED has a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation. In turn, these results suggest that 5-AED could be a useful candidate for radioprotection against intestinal mucosal injury following irradiation.

  12. Possible Protective Role of Carnosine against gamma-Radiation-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative Stress with subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been postulated as one of the mechanisms of cardiac toxicity. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) a biological antioxidant, is a relatively non-toxic dipeptide which possesses many functions (antiglycator, scavenger of ions of zinc and copper, toxic aldehydes and protein carbonyls) that are likely to suppress oxidative stress. The aim of the present work is to investigate the possible protective effects of carnosine on gamma-radiation-induced cardiac damage in mice. Carnosine was supplemented daily to mice (50 mg/ Kg body wt), by gavage, 10 days before whole body gamma-irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy (applied as a shot dose). The results obtained showed that whole body gamma-irradiation of mice produced biochemical alteration in levels of serum glucose and lipid profile fractions. Furthermore, some markers of cardiac injury enzymes as serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatin phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities showed significant increases associated with alteration in the antioxidant status of cardiac tissues. Significant increases of lipid peroxidation end product malonaldehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl levels, xanthine oxidase (XO) activity along with reduction in the activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes; glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed. Carnosine-treatment prior irradiation has attenuated the cardiotoxic effects of radiation obvious by reduction in the levels of MDA and protein carbonyl and XO activity, rescued the depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and diminished the increases of cardiac injury markers. It could be postulated that carnosine as a multi-functional dietary supplement could exert a modulator role in the radiation-induced cardiac damage and serum biochemical changes through its antioxidant properties

  13. The Protective Role of Septilin Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Testicular Toxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaima Soliman Eissa* and Nehal Aly Moustafa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: This study deals with evaluation of the histological and some histochemical alterations in rat testes induced by whole body gamma irradiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect of septilin (a herbal preparation against these effects. Results : The obtained results indicated that doses of (3 Gy and 6 Gy gamma radiation have testicular toxic effects in rats. The histological lesions observed in the testes varied between vacuolation, swelling, pyknosis and even necrosis in some spermatogenic cells as well as significant depletion in the number of spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes, secondary spermatocytes and spermatids. The histochemical observations revealed diminution in the polysaccharides content and increase in the collagen fibres in the testis of irradiated animals. These effects were mostly perceptive with the high dose of the radiation than with the lower one. Treatment with septilin (a herbal preparation for one week followed by gamma radiation proved that septilin has a protective effect against gamma radiation-induced toxic effects in the testes of rats; where most of the histological and histochemical changes observed due to irradiation were minimized to a large extent; however there was no complete protection. Conclusion: Thus, this study concluded that gamma-irradiation exerts toxic effects in the testes of rats and pre-treatment with septilin inhibits these toxic effects, which in turn advocate using such herbal extract as a radioprotector.

  14. Lack of protection following passive transfer of polyclonal highly functional low-dose non-neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Dugast

    Full Text Available Recent immune correlates analysis from the RV144 vaccine trial has renewed interest in the role of non-neutralizing antibodies in mediating protection from infection. While neutralizing antibodies have proven difficult to induce through vaccination, extra-neutralizing antibodies, such as those that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC, are associated with long-term control of infection. However, while several non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been tested for their protective efficacy in vivo, no studies to date have tested the protective activity of naturally produced polyclonal antibodies from individuals harboring potent ADCC activity. Because ADCC-inducing antibodies are highly enriched in elite controllers (EC, we passively transferred highly functional non-neutralizing polyclonal antibodies, purified from an EC, to assess the potential impact of polyclonal non-neutralizing antibodies on a stringent SHIV-SF162P3 challenge in rhesus monkeys. Passive transfer of a low-dose of ADCC inducing antibodies did not protect from infection following SHIV-SF162P3 challenge. Passively administered antibody titers and gp120-specific, but not gp41-specific, ADCC and antibody induced phagocytosis (ADCP were detected in the majority of the monkeys, but did not correlate with post infection viral control. Thus these data raise the possibility that gp120-specific ADCC activity alone may not be sufficient to control viremia post infection but that other specificities or Fc-effector profiles, alone or in combination, may have an impact on viral control and should be tested in future passive transfer experiments.

  15. Protective effect of Nardostachys jatamansi on radiation induced anxiety and oxidative stress in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardostachys jatamansi (family Valerianaceae), an indigenous medicinal plant induces in organism a state of resistance against stress. It helps to promote physical and mental health augment resistance of the body against disease and has shown potent antioxidant activity. To study the anxiolytic and protective effect of 100 mg of ethanolic extract of Nardostachys jatamansi was studied on the mice exposed to 6 Gy Electron beam radiation (EBR). The animals were treated with 100 mg of Nardostachys jatamansi extract (NJE) for 15 days before radiation exposure. The anxiety status of animals observed once for every 3 days during experiment period. The level of lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) was estimated 15 days after irradiation. The irradiation of animals resulted in an elevation in anxiety, lipid peroxidation and reduction in GSH. Treatment of mice with NJE before irradiation caused a significant depletion in anxiety, lipid peroxidation followed by significant elevation in GSH. Our results indicate that the protective activity of NJE on radiation induced anxiety and oxidative stress may be due to free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant level in mice. (author)

  16. The Protective Role of Ginkgo Biloba against Radiation Induced Injury on Rat Gastro-intestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761) is an antioxidant substance exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters of gastrointestinal injury induced by exposing rats to acute doses of γ-rays and the potential value of EGb 761 in preventing changes in these parameters. Male albino rats were treated orally with the extract in a dose of 100 mg/ kg for 7 successive days before whole body exposure to acute radiation levels of 2 and 6 Gray (Gy). Control groups were run concurrently. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Various inflammatory mediators and biochemical parameters were determined in the stomach and intestine. Both tissues were also examined histopathologically. Exposure to radiation led to dose dependent changes in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers (elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and nitrite associated with a glutathione (GSH) decrease as well as in the level of inflammatory parameters (elevation of Tumour necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) associated with depletion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pre-treatment with EGb 761 protected against the changes in both oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against the radiation induced gastrointestinal damage, possibly through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

  17. Biology responses to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biology responses to low dose radiation is the most important problem of medical radiation and radiation protection. The especial mechanism of low dose or low dose rate induced cell responses, has been found independent with linear no-threshold model. This article emphasize to introduce low dose or low dose rate induced biology responses of adaptive response, by-effect, super-sensitivity and genomic instability. (authors)

  18. Oral nicotinamide protects against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemides, Eleni; Sivapirabu, Geetha; Halliday, Gary M; Park, Joohong; Damian, Diona L

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous immunity, which is a key defence against the development of skin cancers, is suppressed by even small doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Preventing this UV-induced immunosuppression may therefore reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) has immune-protective and cancer-preventive effects against UV radiation in mice, and we have shown previously that topical nicotinamide is immune protective in humans. Using the Mantoux model of skin immunity in healthy volunteers, we compared oral nicotinamide to placebo (both administered for 1 week) in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design against the effects of solar-simulated ultraviolet (ssUV) radiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin purified protein derivative. Discrete areas of the back were irradiated with low doses of ssUV daily for three consecutive days. Immunosuppression, calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema of irradiated sites compared with unirradiated control sites, was determined in volunteers taking oral nicotinamide and placebo. Significant immunosuppression occurred in an UV dose-dependent manner in the presence of placebo. Oral nicotinamide, at doses of either 1500 or 500 mg daily, was well tolerated and significantly reduced UV immunosuppression with no immune effects in unirradiated skin. Oral nicotinamide is safe and inexpensive and looks promising as a chemopreventive supplement for reducing the immunosuppressive effects of sunlight.

  19. Grapevine fruit extract protects against radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lymphocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) causes oxidative stress through overwhelming generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the living cells leading the oxidative damage further to biomolecules. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) posses several bioactive phytochemicals and is the richest source of antioxidants. In this study, we investigated V. vinifera for its phytochemical content, enzymes profile and, ROS-and oxidant-scavenging activities. We have also studied the fruit extract of four different grapevine viz., Thompson seedless, Flame seedless, Kishmish chorni and Red globe for their radioprotective actions in human lymphocytes. The activities of ascorbic acid oxidase and catalase significantly (P < 0.01) differed among extracts within the same cultivar, while that of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase did not differ significantly. The superoxide radical-scavenging activity was higher in the seed as compared to the skin or pulp of the same cultivar. Pretreatment with grape extracts attenuated the oxidative stress induced by 4 Gy γ-radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro. Further, γ-radiation-induced increase in caspase 3/7 activity was significantly attenuated by grape extracts. These results suggest that grape extract serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants against the IR-induced oxidative stress and also inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, the protective action of grape depends on the source of extract (seed, skin or pulp) and type of the cultivars. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced late brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate whether radiation-induced late injury of the brain can be ameliorated by traditional Chinese Medicine through blocking the primary events. Methods: This trial included five animal groups: sham irradiation, irradiation only, and three treatment groups. The whole brain of BALB/C mouse was irradiated with 22 Gy by using a 6 MV linear accelerator. Step down method was used to evaluate the study and memory abilities. Mouse weight was also recorded every week before and after irradiation. On D90, all mice alive were euthanized and Glee's silver dye method and Bielschousky silver dye method were used to detect the senile plaque and the neurofibrillary tangle. One-Way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences among the groups in the various aspects of study and memory abilities as well as quality of life. Kaplan-Meier was used to evaluate the survival. Log-rank was used to detect the differences among the survival groups. Results: 1. There was no significant difference in survival among the treatment groups, even though Salvia Miltiorrhiza (SM) was able to improve the quality of life. As to the cognition function, it was shown that whole brain radiation would make a severe cognition damage with the learning and memorizing ability of the irradiated mice being worse than those of the sham irradiation group. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Salvia Miltiorrhiza possesses the role of a protective agent against cognition function damage induced by irradiation. 2. Glee's silver dye and Bielschousky silver dye show much more senile plaque and the neurofibrillary tangle in brain tissue of R group and R + 654-2 group than those in the R + SM group. Conclusions: Salvia Miltiorrhiza is able to protect the mouse from cognition function damage induced by irradiation and improve the quality of life by ameliorating the primary events, though it does not improve the survival

  1. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life; Radioprotection et environnement les faibles doses dans la vie quotidienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  2. Protective effects of parathyroid hormone on radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the protective effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in mice. Methods: A total of sixty male C57 mice were irradiated by 60Co γ-rays to induce hematopoietic injuries, and then the mice were randomly divided into PTH and control group.The PTH-treated group was treated with PTH (80 μg· kg-1 · d-1) intraperitoneally everyday. The control group was given equivalent volume saline. Peripheral blood cell number, bone marrow mononuclear cell number,granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) and CD34 positive cells in bone marrow were detected. Results: With the whole post-irradiation period, the WBC and bone marrow mononuclear cell numbers in PTH-treated mice were significantly higher than those in saline-treated mice (t=6.32, 9.19, 11.18, 7.44 and 4.42, P<0.05). The RBC numbers in PTH-treated mice were significantly higher than those in control mice at 10 d, 15 d and 20 d post-irradiation (t =6.48, 3.66 and 4.98, P<0.05). The PLT numbers in PTH-treated mice were significantly higher than those in control group at 5 and 30 d post-irradiation (t=2.57 and 3.10, P<0.05). PTH increased CD34 positive cell and CFU-GM numbers in bone marrow after irradiation (t=16.12, 7.82 and 20.00, P<0.05). Conclusions: PTH could improve the hematopoietic recovery after irradiation. (authors)

  3. The Protective Effects of CD39 Overexpression in Multiple Low-Dose Streptozotocin–Induced Diabetes in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Joanne S. J.; McRae, Jennifer L.; Thomas, Helen E.; Fynch, Stacey; Elkerbout, Lorraine; Hill, Prue; Murray-Segal, Lisa; Robson, Simon C.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; d’Apice, Anthony J. F.; Cowan, Peter J.; Dwyer, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Islet allograft survival limits the long-term success of islet transplantation as a potential curative therapy for type 1 diabetes. A number of factors compromise islet survival, including recurrent diabetes. We investigated whether CD39, an ectonucleotidase that promotes the generation of extracellular adenosine, would mitigate diabetes in the T cell–mediated multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLDS) model. Mice null for CD39 (CD39KO), wild-type mice (WT), and mice overexpressing CD39 (CD39TG)...

  4. Esomeprazole for prevention and resolution of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients treated with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid for cardiovascular protection: the OBERON trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiman, James M; Herlitz, Johan; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander J; Lanas, Angel; Agewall, Stefan; Nauclér, Emma C; Svedberg, Lars-Erik; Nagy, Péter

    2013-03-01

    Although low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is recommended for prevention of cardiovascular events in at-risk patients, its long-term use can be associated with the risk of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms that may impact treatment compliance. This prespecified secondary analysis of the OBERON study (NCT00441727) determined the efficacy of esomeprazole for prevention/resolution of low-dose ASA-associated upper GI symptoms. A post hoc analysis of predictors of symptom prevention/resolution was also conducted. Helicobacter pylori-negative patients taking low-dose ASA (75-325 mg) for cardiovascular protection who had ≥1 upper GI risk factor were eligible. The patients were randomized to once-daily esomeprazole 40 mg, 20 mg, or placebo, for 26 weeks; 2303 patients (mean age 67.6 years; 36% aged >70 years) were evaluable for upper GI symptoms. The proportion of patients with dyspeptic or reflux symptoms (self-reported Reflux Disease Questionnaire) was significantly lower (P 70 years (P symptoms at baseline (P prevention/resolution of upper GI symptoms. Together, these analyses demonstrate that esomeprazole is effective in preventing and resolving patient-reported upper GI symptoms in low-dose ASA users at increased GI risk.

  5. Adenosine kinase inhibition protects against cranial radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting, however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK. Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks (novel place recognition, novel object recognition, and contextual fear conditioning 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the fear conditioning task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection also against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS

  6. A novel topical protectant for the prevention of β-radiation induced moist desquamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Effective therapies for the prevention of radiation-induced skin burns that could be readily deployed under a nuclear accident or nuclear terrorism scenario are urgently needed. In this report we describe the efficacy of a novel radioprotectant (DMZ911) in a model of b-radiation induced moist desquamation (MD) in pig skin. DMZ911 is a nitroxide-based topical cream that effectively delivers the nitroxide into viable skin cells. Stable nitroxide compounds have been shown to be effective against both X-ray and ?-ray-induced damage in vivo and in vitro. A pig skin model of β-radiation-induced MD was employed in this study. Exposure to 30 Gy was used to induce skin lesions involving >80% moist desquamation in prescribed test sites on flank skin of female Large White pigs. DMZ911 or placebo was applied to various test sites 2 hours prior to radiation exposure. Lesions were scored based on the area of the test site containing 50% MD (severe) as determined by clinical assessment using blinded observers. Treatment with DMZ911 resulted in a 31% net reduction in MD when compared to placebo treated sites following an 8-week study period. This reduction was observed whether all sites or only those with severe MD were considered. Skin damage (as indicated by MD) from radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 31% (p = 0.05) following pretreatment with the novel topical radioprotectant DMZ911. This observation suggests that skin lesion development from radiation-induced oxidative damage cascades may be successfully inhibited by treatment with DMZ911. This topical therapeutic agent represents a novel treatment for nuclear radiation induced skin injury. DMZ911 may have unique applications in radiation oncology, cosmetic and therapeutic UV, laser, glycolic and dermabrasion procedures

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium prevents radiation-induced liver injury by inhibiting inflammation and protecting sinusoidal endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current management of radiation-induced liver injury is limited. Sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) apoptosis and inflammation are considered to be initiating events in hepatic damage. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions during hepatic irradiation, acting via paracrine mechanisms. This study aims to examine whether MSC-derived bioactive components are protective against radiation-induced liver injury in rats. MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) was generated from rat bone marrow–derived MSCs. The effect of MSC-CM on the viability of irradiated SECs was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Activation of the Akt and ERK pathways was analyzed by western blot. MSC-CM was also delivered to Sprague–Dawley rats immediately before receiving liver irradiation, followed by testing for pathological features, changes in serum hyaluronic acid, ALT, and inflammatory cytokine levels, and liver cell apoptosis. MSC-CM enhanced the viability of irradiated SECs in vitro and induced Akt and ERK phosphorylation in these cells. Infusion of MSC-CM immediately before liver irradiation provided a significant anti-apoptotic effect on SECs and improved the histopathological features of injury in the irradiated liver. MSC-CM also reduced the secretion and expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. MSC-derived bioactive components could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating radiation-induced liver injury. (author)

  8. The Protective Effects of 5-Methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic Acid on Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are prospective radioprotectors because of their ability to scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. The hematopoietic system is widely studied in radiation research because of its high radiosensitivity. In the present study, we describe the beneficial effects of 5-methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic acid (MLA, which was synthesized from melatonin and α-lipoic acid, against radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. MLA administration significantly enhanced the survival rate of mice after 7.2 Gy total body irradiation. The results showed that MLA not only markedly increased the numbers and clonogenic potential of hematopoietic cells but also decreased DNA damage, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, MLA decreased the levels of ROS in hematopoietic cells by inhibiting NOX4 expression. These data demonstrate that MLA prevents radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the number and function of and by inhibiting DNA damage and ROS production in hematopoietic cells. These data suggest MLA is beneficial for the protection of radiation injuries.

  9. The Protective Effect of Amifostine on Radiation-Induced Proctitis: Systemic Versus Topical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Cem Uzal; Atakan Sezer; Ufuk Usta; Necdet Süt; Alaattin Özen; Mehmet Ali Yağcı

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of intrarectal administration of amifostine in radiation-induced proctitis compared to intraperitoneal administration.Materials and Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control (CONT), irradiation alone (RT), intraperitoneal amifostine plus irradiation (IPAMI), and intrarectal amifostine plus irradiation (IRAMI). The rats in the RT, IPAMI and IRAMI groups were irradiated ind...

  10. The Protective Effect of Amifostine on Radiation-Induced Proctitis: Systemic Versus Topical Application

    OpenAIRE

    UZAL, Cem; ALAS, Ruşen Coşar; USTA, UFUK; Süt, Necdet; ÖZEN, Alaattin; Yağcı, Mehmet Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of intrarectal administration of amifostine in radiation-induced proctitis compared to intraperitoneal administration. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control (CONT), irradiation alone (RT), intraperitoneal amifostine plus irradiation (IPAMI), and intrarectal amifostine plus irradiation (IRAMI). The rats in the RT, IPAMI and IRAMI groups were irr...

  11. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Caloglu; Vuslat Yurut Caloglu; Tulin Yalta; Omer Yalcin; Cem Uzal

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC) to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6), Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8), Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8), and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8). The rats in all groups were irradiated individually...

  12. Protective Effects and Its Relative Mechanisms of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation on pancreatic cells of Male Diabetic Rat’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa F. Waer, **Seham A. Helmy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Back ground & Aim of the work: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic metabolic disorder brings great danger to human health. Low-dose-rate radiation modulates various biological responses including carcinogenesis, immunological responses and diabetes. This study examined the effect of low doses of irradiation on the pathological and ultrastructural progression of type I diabetes in rats inducted by Streptozotocin.Material and Methods: The present study was done on 80 healthy adult albino male rats 9 weeks age, in the weight range from (150–200 gm. Rats were grouped to 4 groups they were cared according to the Guiding Principle in the Care and Use of Animals. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of freshly prepared Streptozotocin (STZ- 45 mg/kg b.w.. Whole body gamma irradiation was performed using Caesium -137. Animals were exposed to fractionated dose levels of 0.5 Gy/week of γ-radiation for 3 and 6 weeks. The body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels were measured after 3 and 6 weeks. Small blocks of pancreatic tissues of different groups were removed and prepared for pathological and ultrastructure examination. Results: An elevated level of glucose and decreased level of insulin in blood were first detected at 3 and 6 weeks of age in the STZ treated rats. There was significant and remarkable tendency of gaining normal levels of both blood glucose and blood insulin by irradiation exposure especially after 6 weeks of irradiation. Both suppression of cell death and cellular injury induced by STZ were also observed by EM examination in 3 week and 6 weeks. Conclusion: The present results indicated that treatment with 0.5 Gy γ rays suppresses progression of type I diabetes in STZ rats

  13. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  14. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  15. Protective effects of alpha lipoic acid on radiation-induced salivary gland injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kim, Kyung Mi; Jung, Myeong Hee; Jung, Jung Hwa; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a treatment for patients with head and neck (HN) cancer. However, radiation exposure to the HN often induces salivary gland (SG) dysfunction. We investigated the effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced SG injury in rats. Results ALA preserved acinoductal integrity and acinar cell secretary function following irradiation. These results are related to the mechanisms by which ALA inhibits oxidative stress by inhibiting gp91 mRNA and 8-OHdG expression and apoptosis of acinar cells and ductal cells by inactivating MAPKs in the early period and expression of inflammation-related factors including NF-κB, IκB-α, and TGF-β1 and fibrosis in late irradiated SG. ALA effects began in the acute phase and persisted for at least 56 days after irradiation. Materials and Methods Rats were assigned to followings: control, ALA only (100 mg/kg, i.p.), irradiated, and ALA administered 24 h and 30 min prior to irradiation. The neck area including the SG was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose, 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Rats were killed at 4, 7, 28, and 56 days after radiation. Conclusions Our results show that ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced SG injury in patients with HN cancer. PMID:27072584

  16. Protective effects of catecholomic acid derivatives on radiation-induced damage of rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of catecholomic acid derivatives 9501, 9502 and 7601 (CBMIDA) against radiation-induced injury of rat liver mitochondria in vitro. Methods: The injury of rat liver mitochondria was induced by γ-irradiation in vitro. The contents of MDA were assayed by spectrophotometry of TBA. The absorption value at 520 nm was measured to detect swelling of mitochondria. The electron microscopic samples of mitochondria were prepared. Results: All 9501 (5 x 10-6 mol/L), 9502(10-5 mol/L), and 7601 (10-5 mol/L) significantly inhibited radiation-induced increase of MDA information.The swelling of mitochondria induced by irradiation was also prevented by 9501, 7601. The electron micrographs also showed that 9501 markedly reduced the pathological damage of mitochondria induced by γ-irradiation. The mechanisms of anti-oxidative action of catecholomic acid derivatives was discussed. Conclusion: Injurious effect of radiation on rat liver mitochondria can be prevented by catecholomic acid derivatives 9501, 9502 and 7601 (CBMIDA)

  17. New risk estimates at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The age of molecular radiation epidemiology may be at hand. The techniques are available to establish with the degree of precision required to determine whether agent-specific mutations can be identified consistently. A concerted effort to examine radiation-induced changes in as many relevant genes as possible appears to be justified. Cancers in those exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation should be chosen for the investigation. Parallel studies of radiation-induced cancers in experimental animals would not only complement the human studies, but perhaps reveal approaches to extrapolation of risk estimates across species. A caveat should be added to this optimistic view of what molecular studies might contribute to the knotty problem of risk estimates at low doses. The suggestions are made by one with no expertise in the field of molecular biology

  18. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  19. Low-dose levodopa protects nerve cells from oxidative stress and up-regulates expression of pCREB and CD39.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ying Zhong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the influence of low-dose levodopa (L-DOPA on neuronal cell death under oxidative stress. METHODS: PC12 cells were treated with L-DOPA at different concentrations. We detected the L-DOPA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Meanwhile, MTT and LDH assay were performed to determine the proliferation and growth of PC12 cells with or without ROS scavenger. In addition, after pretreatment with L-DOPA at different concentrations alone or in combination with CD39 inhibitor, PC12 cells were incubated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and the cell viability was evaluated by MTT and LDH assay. In addition, the expression of pCREB and CD39 was detected by immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay in both cells and rat's brain after L-DOPA treatment. RESULTS: After treatment with L-DOPA for 3 days, the cell proliferation and growth were promoted when the L-DOPA concentration was 30 µM. Low dose L-DOPA could protect the PC12 cells from H2O2 induced oxidative stress, which was compromised by CD39 inhibitor. In addition, the expression of CD39 and pCREB increased in both PC12 cells and rats' brain after L-DOPA treatment. CONCLUSIONS: L-DOPA at different concentrations has distinct influence on proliferation and growth of PC12 cells, and low dose (<30 µM L-DOPA protects PC12 cells against oxidative stress which might be related to the up-regulation of CD39 and pCREB expression.

  20. Comparison of the protective action of glutathione and cysteamine on radiation-induced mitotic delay in cultured S-5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, S; Kobayashi, M; Hashimoto, H; Nakanishi, T

    1979-06-01

    The protective effect of glutathione (GSH) and cysteamine (MEA) on radiation-induced mitotic delay in cultured mammalian L-5 cells was studied. Cells treated with 20 mM of GSH during irradiation with 2 Gy (200 rad) showed faster recovery of the mitotic index than control cells irradiated without chemical treatment; however, GSH had no effect on mitotic delay time. Inhibition of mitosis was observed with 80, 100, and 120 mM of GSH. Cells treated with 5 mM of MEA during irradiation also showed faster recovery of the mitotic index than the controls, but in addition the delay time was shortened. Progression of G2-phase cells treated with 5-fluorouracil to mitosis after irradiation was protected by MEA but not by GSH. Progression of S-phase cells labeled with 3H-thymidine to mitosis was accelerated by both agents during irradiation.

  1. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  2. [Current epidemiological evidence regarding the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Implications for radiation protection, public health and forensic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Lamberto; Romano, Ferdinando; Schioppa, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Cristian; Lodi, Vittorio; Pirone, Giovanni Maria

    2004-01-01

    The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation have been widely studied, but remain uncertain. Up-to-date knowledge about epidemiologic evidence for potential human health effects of low dose ionizing radiation is important for revising national radiation protection legislation. This review, conducted by a multidisciplinary research team of the Italian Institute of Social Medicine, evaluates epidemiologic studies published since July 2003. After careful selection, a total of 302 studies were reviewed. Greater emphasis was given to papers that analyzed data using standardized incidence and mortality ratios and to studies regarding occupational exposures in all workers, healthcare workers and aircrew members. Nevertheless, studies regarding A-bomb survivors of Hiroshima/Nagasaki, Chernobyl cleanup workers, patients exposed for medical reasons, and workers in nuclear plants were also included. Given the limitations of epidemiological studies and excluding the cosmic rays context, which requires further research, the authors conclude that harmful effects from exposures to ionizing radiation at doses lower than 100 mSv cannot be ruled out. Nevertheless, if any harmful health effects do exist, they are certainly very small. The implications for radiation protection, public health and forensic medicine are discussed. PMID:15213763

  3. Protective effect of low dose of melatonin against cholestatic oxidative stress after common bile duct ligation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukaddes Esrefoglu; Mehmet Gül; Memet Hanifi Emre; Alaattin Polat; Mukadder Ayse Selimoglu

    2005-01-01

    contributes to oxidative damage. Melatonin,even at low dose, is an efficient agent in reducing negative parameters of cholestasis.

  4. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J Sullivan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAd encoding the Ebola glycoprotein (GP and nucleoprotein (NP has been previously shown to confer specific protective immunity in nonhuman primates. GP can exert cytopathic effects on transfected cells in vitro, and multiple GP forms have been identified in nature, raising the question of which would be optimal for a human vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To address this question, we have explored the efficacy of mutant GPs from multiple Ebola virus strains with reduced in vitro cytopathicity and analyzed their protective effects in the primate challenge model, with or without NP. Deletion of the GP transmembrane domain eliminated in vitro cytopathicity but reduced its protective efficacy by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, a point mutation was identified that abolished this cytopathicity but retained immunogenicity and conferred immune protection in the absence of NP. The minimal effective rAd dose was established at 10(10 particles, two logs lower than that used previously. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of specific GPs alone vectored by rAd are sufficient to confer protection against lethal challenge in a relevant nonhuman primate model. Elimination of NP from the vaccine and dose reductions to 10(10 rAd particles do not diminish protection and simplify the vaccine, providing the basis for selection of a human vaccine candidate.

  5. Protective effects of Punica Granatum (L) and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations produce deleterious effects in the living organisms and the rapid technological advancement has increased human exposure to ionizing radiations enormously. Radiotherapy, which is a chief modality to treat cancer, faces a major drawback because it produces severe side effects developed due to damage to normal tissue by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies have indicated that some commonly used medicinal plants may be good sources of potent but non-toxic radioprotectors. The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., an ancient, mystical, and highly distinctive fruit, is the predominant member of the Punicaceae family. It is used in several systems of medicine for a variety of ailments. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of ethanolic extracts of pomegranate whole fruit (EPWF) and seeds (EPS) and Synthetic Ellagic acid (EA) against Electron beam radiation(EBR) induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice. The extracts and synthetic compound were assessed for its radical scavenging property by DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. The animals were exposed to sub-lethal dose (6 Gy) of Electron Beam Radiation and then treated with 200 mg/kg body wt. of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid for 15 consecutive days. The biochemical estimations were carried out in the liver homogenate of the sacrificed animals. Radiation induced depletion in the level of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were prevented significantly by EPWF, EPS and EA administration. Also there was significant reduction in the levels of membrane lipid peroxidation in the treated groups compared to irradiated control. The findings of our study indicate the protective efficacy of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical changes in mice may be due to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant levels. (author)

  6. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D; Child, Robert; Crane, Deborah D; Celli, Jean; Bosio, Catharine M

    2012-01-01

    Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  7. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  8. The protective effect of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor on radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation-induced lung toxicity is a significant dose-limiting side effect of radiotherapy for thoracic tumors. Recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) has been shown to be a mitogen for type II pneumocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether rHuKGF prevents or ameliorates the severity of late lung damage from fractionated irradiation in a rat model. Methods and materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a dose of 40 Gy/5 fractions/5 days. rHuKGF at dose of 5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg was given via a single intravenous injection 10 min after the last fraction of irradiation. Animals were followed for 6 months after irradiation. Results: The breathing rate increased beginning at 6 weeks and reached a peak at 14 weeks after irradiation. The average breathing frequencies in the irradiated groups with rHuKGF (5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg) treatment were significantly lower than that in the group receiving radiation without rHuKGF (116.5 ± 1.0 and 115.2 ± 0.8 vs 123.5 ± 1.2 breaths/min, p < 0.01). The severity of lung fibrosis and the level of immunoreactivity of integrin αvβ6, TGFβ1, type II TGFβ receptor, Smad3, and phosphorylated Smad2/3 were significantly decreased only in the group receiving irradiation plus high-dose rHuKGF treatment compared with irradiation plus vehicle group, suggesting a dose response for the effect of rHuKGF. Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate that rHuKGF treatment immediately after irradiation protects against late radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity. These results suggest that restoration of the integrity of the pulmonary epithelium via rHuKGF stimulation may downregulate the TGF-β-mediated fibrosis pathway. These data also support the use of rHuKGF in a clinical trial designed to prevent radiation-induced lung injury

  9. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  10. Protective Role of L- Carnitine and Zinc against γ-Radiation induced Cardiac and testicular Disorders in Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-Carnitine is a dipeptide amino acid necessary for fat metabolism, it provides energy by transporting long-chain fatty acids to mitochondria to act as a fuel and it is considered a powerful antioxidant. In addition, zinc is an essential mineral which helps to increase the secretion of male sex hormones and raises the sperm count, so its combination with L-carnitine is useful for the fertility process. The present study aims to evaluate the potency of L-carnitine and zinc as radio- protective and curative agent pre and after exposure to γ-radiation through biochemical, histological, morphological abnormalities of sperms and DNA damage in the sperms induced by γ-irradiation by comet assay. Animals received L-carnitine (LC) and zinc (Zn) orally at the dose 9.45 mg/100 gm body wt./day for successive 20 days and then exposed to whole body gamma radiation at the dose 4 Gy (1 Gy for 4 days, day after day) on the 7th day from treatment with antioxidant. Histological examinations of heart and testis tissues showed that administration of LC and Zn have attenuated radiation induced damage and improved tissues architecture. Moreover, the observed amelioration in the tissues was accompanied by a remarkable decrease of their lipid peroxide levels (malondialdehyde (MDA)), together with an increase in glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Hormonal determinations of serum testosterone (T), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) which carried out for fertility assessment showed that whole body γ-irradiation of rats induced significant decrease in serum testosterone while FSH and LH were significantly increased as compared with control group. On the other hand, irradiation caused significant elevation in the total number of abnormal head, and / or tail of sperms in comparison to the control rats. The comet assay showed that exposure to γ-radiation induced DNA damage of sperms (tail moment values).

  11. The Possible Protective Role of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. Against Radiation-Induced Certain Biochemical Changes in Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the modulating efficacy of prolonged oral administration of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. essential oil (FEO) against gamma irradiation-induced biochemical changes in male rats. Essential oil of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. was orally administrated at dose level of 250 mg/kg body wt/day for 21 days before irradiation and 7 days post exposure (6.5 Gy single dose). Rats exposed to ionizing radiation exhibited a potential elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, bilirubin, urea and creatinine levels, lipid abnormalities, and an increase in tissue lipid peroxidation (LPO) and metallothioneins (MTs). On the other hand, noticeable drop in liver and kidney glutathione content and serum total protein, albumin and testosterone levels were recorded. Tissue organs displayed some changes in trace element concentrations, which may be due to the radiation ability to induce oxidative stress. The data obtained from rats treated with fennel oil before and after whole body gamma irradiation revealed significant modulation in the biochemical tested parameters and profound improvement in the activity of antioxidant status, glutathione and metallothioneins. The treatment of irradiated rats with fennel oil also appeared to be effective in minimizing the radiation-induced increase in lipid peroxidation as well as changes in essential trace elements in some tissue organs. In addition to its containing many chemical antioxidant constituents such as polyphenols, fennel was found to contain detectable concentrations of essential trace elements (Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mg, Mn and Ca) which may be involved in multiple biological processes as constituents of enzymes system including superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn, Mn, SODs), oxide reductase, glutathione (GSP, GSH, GST), metallothionein MTs, etc. Overall, it could be concluded that Foeniculum vulgare Mill. essential oil exerts beneficial protective role against radiation-induced

  12. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  13. Pretreatment by low-dose fibrates protects against acute free fatty acid-induced renal tubule toxicity by counteracting PPARα deterioration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a preventive strategy against tubular damage associated with proteinuria is of great importance. Recently, free fatty acid (FFA) toxicities accompanying proteinuria were found to be a main cause of tubular damage, which was aggravated by insufficiency of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), suggesting the benefit of PPARα activation. However, an earlier study using a murine acute tubular injury model, FFA-overload nephropathy, demonstrated that high-dose treatment of PPARα agonist (0.5% clofibrate diet) aggravated the tubular damage as a consequence of excess serum accumulation of clofibrate metabolites due to decreased kidney elimination. To induce the renoprotective effects of PPARα agonists without drug accumulation, we tried a pretreatment study using low-dose clofibrate (0.1% clofibrate diet) using the same murine model. Low-dose clofibrate pretreatment prevented acute tubular injuries without accumulation of its metabolites. The tubular protective effects appeared to be associated with the counteraction of PPARα deterioration, resulting in the decrease of FFAs influx to the kidney, maintenance of fatty acid oxidation, diminution of intracellular accumulation of undigested FFAs, and attenuation of disease developmental factors including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and NFκB activation. These effects are common to other fibrates and dependent on PPARα function. Interestingly, however, clofibrate pretreatment also exerted PPARα-independent tubular toxicities in PPARα-null mice with FFA-overload nephropathy. The favorable properties of fibrates are evident when PPARα-dependent tubular protective effects outweigh their PPARα-independent tubular toxicities. This delicate balance seems to be easily affected by the drug dose. It will be important to establish the appropriate dosage of fibrates for treatment against kidney disease and to develop a novel PPARα activator that has a steady serum concentration regardless of

  14. Studies of ionising radiation induced bystander effects in 3D artificial tissue system and applications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. The bystander effect cannot be comprehensively explained on the basis of a single cell reaction. It is well known that an organism is composed of different cell types that interact as functional units in a way to maintain normal tissue function. Therefore the radiation response is not simply the sum of cellular responses as assumed in classical radiobiology, predominantly from studies using cell cultures. Experimental models, which maintain tissue-like intercellular cell signalling and 3D structure, are essential for proper understanding of the bystander effect. Our work relates to experimentation with novel 3D artificial human tissue systems available from MatTek Corporation (Boston, USA). Air-liquid interface culture technique is used to grow artificial tissues, which allow to model conditions present in vivo. The Gray Cancer Institute (Northwood, UK) charged particle microbeam was used to irradiate tissue samples in a known pattern with a known number of 3He2+ particles or protons. After irradiation, the tissues models were incubated for 3 days, fixed in 10 % NBF, paraffin embedded and then sliced into 5 μm histological sections located at varying distances from the plane of the irradiated cells. We studied in situ apoptosis and markers of differentiation. Significantly elevated bystander induced apoptosis was observed with 3'-OH DNA end-labelling based technique in 3D artificial tissue systems. Our results also suggested an importance of proliferation and differentiation status for bystander

  15. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  16. Protective role of grape seed extract against radiation induced oxidative stress in rats: Role of endogenous antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of grape seed extract against γ-irradiation induced oxidative stress in hepatic tissue. Animals were divided into four groups; Control group, Grape seed extract (GSE) group: animals were administered GSE for 14 consecutive days (100 mg/kg). Irradiated (IRR) group: rats were received dist. water for 7 days and then rats were irradiated with a single dose of 6 Gy and dist. water was maintained for 7 additional days. GSE-IRR group: rats were treated with GSE for 7 consecutive days, one hour later after the last dose of GSE, rats were irradiated with a single dose of 6 Gy and GSE was maintained for 7 additional days. Administration of GSE for 14 consecutive days resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), in hepatic tissues which were reduced by radiation treatment. Also, GSE resulted in a significant decrease in total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hepatic tissues and a significant decrease in Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and Gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities and NO(x) level compared to irradiated group. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicate that GSE could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rat and thereby protect the animals from radiation-induced hepatotoxicity

  17. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  18. Nanoencapsulation of rice bran oil increases its protective effects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; da Silva, Cássia Regina; de Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Cabreira, Thaíssa Nunes; de Bona da Silva, Cristiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2015-06-01

    Excessive UV-B radiation by sunlight produces inflammatory and oxidative damage of skin, which can lead to sunburn, photoaging, and cancer. This study evaluated whether nanoencapsulation improves the protective effects of rice bran oil against UVB radiation-induced skin damage in mice. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing rice bran oil were prepared, and had mean size around 200 nm, negative zeta potential (∼-9 mV), and low polydispersity index (rice bran oil was prepared. This formulation was able to prevent ear edema induced by UVB irradiation by 60 ± 9%, when compared with a hydrogel containing LNC prepared with a mixture of medium chain triglycerides instead of rice bran oil. Protein carbonylation levels (biomarker of oxidative stress) and NF-κB nuclear translocation (biomarker of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenesis response) were reduced (81% and 87%, respectively) in animals treated with the hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil. These in vivo results demonstrate the beneficial effects of nanoencapsulation to improve the protective properties of rice bran oil on skin damage caused by UVB exposure. PMID:25818120

  19. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeke Rockx-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  20. Protective effect of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in low-dose streptozotocin & high-fat diet-induced type-2 diabetes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the pathologic phenomena associated with diabetes and related conditions including obesity, insulin resistance and hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the protective effects of pioglitazone on cardiomyocyte apoptosis was evaluated in experimental diabetes induced by low dose of streptozoticin (STZ combined with high fat diet (HFD in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats (150-200 g were injected with low-dose STZ (45 mg/kg, i.v., single dose and orally fed with a HFD (20 g/day/rat for a period of 28 days and simultaneously treated with pioglitazone (20 mg/kg/p.o. for a period of 21 days (from 8 th day to 28 th day. On 29 th day blood was collected, serum separated and used for biochemical parameters. Heart tissue was used for cardiomyocyte apoptosis measurement and also for histopathological examination. Results: Pioglitazone treatment resulted in a decrease in cardiomyocyte apoptosis as revealed by a decrease in cardiac caspase-3, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels and DNA fragmentation, and an increase in Na+K+ATPase levels in diabetic rats. Cardiac histology of diabetic control rats showed dense focal fatty infiltration in the myocardial cells whereas normal architecture with regular morphology and well preserved cytoplasm was observed with pioglitazone treatment. Pioglitazone treatment significantly reduced the heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, body mass index (BMI and levels of serum glucose, leptin, insulin, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol (TC and triglycerides (TGs, apoliproprotein-B glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels and atherogenic index, and increased the levels of serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and cardiac antioxidant enzymes. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study results suggest that pioglitazone possesses cardiac anti-apoptotic potential in diabetic rat model and can be further explored for its use for treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Protective Effect of Anthocyanins from Lingonberry on Radiation-induced Damages

    OpenAIRE

    Shuang-Qi Tian; Zhen-Yu Wang; Li-Li Zuo; Zi-Luan Fan

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively e...

  2. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  3. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  4. Radiation-induced inhibition of splenocyte locomotion and its protection by C. parvum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isac, M.; Schechter, M.; Likhite, V.; Rotman, M.; Sall, S.; Moroson, H.

    1978-05-01

    Normal C57/BL mice were stimulated by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of Corynebacterium parvum (CP) prior to sublethal whole-body or local (leg) irradiation. At different times after irradiation, spleens were removed and the direct leukocyte migration assay carried out in comparison with unirradiated controls. CP causes enlarged spleens with white pulp depleted of germinal centers, and red pulp increased due to nucleated cell proliferation. X irradiation causes depletion both in white and red pulp, and a reduction in splenocyte locomotion ability. Reduction in splenocyte locomotion due to whole-body irradiation was significantly less in CP-treated than in control mice. A factor of 1.5 to 3.3 for protection of migration by CP was obtained, depending upon timing between CP stimulation, whole-body irradiation, and migration assay. The largest protection factor 1 day postirradiation was observed when migration was 7 to 14 days post-CP treatment. It is postulated that nonspecific immune adjuvant stimulation of the reticuloendothelial system by CP induces greater repopulation of the radiation-depleted spleen by leukocytes having migration capability. These findings may have relevance to the clinical use of local radiation therapy combined with CP stimulation of host immune response.

  5. CpG-Oligodeoxynucleotide Treatment Protects against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Intestine Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available the bone marrow and the intestine are the major sites of ionizing radiation (IR-induced injury. Our previous study demonstrated that CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN treatment mitigated IR-induced bone marrow injury, but its effect on the intestine is not known. In this study, we sought to determine if CpG-ODN have protective effect on IR-induced intestine injury, and if so, to determine the mechanism of its effect.Mice were treated with CpG-ODN after IR. The body weight and survival were daily monitored for 30 days consecutively after exposure. The number of surviving intestinal crypt was assessed by the microcolony survival assay. The number and the distribution of proliferating cell in crypt were evaluated by TUNEL assay and BrdU assay. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 in crypt were analyzed by Immunohistochemistry assay. The findings showed that the treatment for irradiated mice with CpG-ODN diminished body weight loss, improved 30 days survival, enhanced intestinal crypts survival and maintained proliferating cell population and regeneration in crypt. The reason might involve that CpG-ODN up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 protein and down-regulated the expression of Bax protein and caspase-3 protein.CpG-ODN was effective in protection of IR-induced intestine injury by enhancing intestinal crypts survival and maintaining proliferating cell population and regeneration in crypt. The mechanism might be that CpG-ODN inhibits proliferating cell apoptosis through regulating the expression of apoptosis-related protein, such as Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3.

  6. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  7. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with γ-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage

  8. Protective effects of extracts of Vernonia amygdalina, Hibiscus sabdariffa and vitamin C against radiation-induced liver damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    catalase were obtained in animals treated with VIT C and extracts at 5 weeks. Taken together, the results suggest that the extracts of VA and HS, and VIT C could increase the antioxidant defense systems and may probably protect animals from radiation-induced liver damage. (author)

  9. Protective Effect of Anthocyanins from Lingonberry on Radiation-induced Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-Qi Tian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively eliminate free radicals, but studies on the immunoregulatory and anti-radiation effects of anthocyanins from lingonberry (ALB are less reported. In this experiment, mice were given orally once daily for 14 consecutive days before exposure to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation and were sacrificed on the 7th day post-irradiation. The results showed that the selected dose of extract did not lead to acute toxicity in mice; while groups given anthocyanins orally were significantly better than radiation control group according to blood analysis; pretreatment of anthocyanins significantly (p < 0.05 enhanced the thymus and spleen indices and spleen cell survival compared to the irradiation control group. Pretreatment with anthocyanins before irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of micronuclei (MN in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs. These findings indicate that anthocyanins have immunostimulatory potential against immunosuppression induced by the radiation.

  10. Protective role of green tea administration against radiation-induced biological changes in pregnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green tea (Gt) derived from the leaves of camelia sinensis contains polyphenolic compounds also known as eipcatechins, which are anioxidant in nature. This study aims to evaluate the radioprotective, anioxidative potential of two concentrations of Gt extract in pregnant rats. Animals exposed to fractionated 3 Gy gamma radiation of 1 Gy installments at the 7th, 11th and 15th days of gestation were examined on the 20th day. Total protenis, uric acid, urea and creatinine, as well as ransmiase were measured. Irradiation of rats caused significant drop in serum total protein, which was significantly elevated specially with Gt 3%. Elevation in serum uric acid was dropped secially with Gt while, elevation in urea after irradiation dropped by Gt% only. Both concentrations of Gt did not signficantly change creatinine elevation exerted by irradiation. Results revealed sigbificat protection by both Gt concentrations against the elevation in serum glucose level. While was dropped approaching control by irradiation, which ASt dropped by irradiation was normalized attaining almost control level with Gt3%. While, AST dropped by irradiation was normalized attaining almost control level with Gt 3%. Histological damage to liver cells by irradiation was ameliorated by administration og Gt in both concentrations. This was indicated by restoration of the cellular integrity besides by nucleated cells and slight regenerative signs in the nuclei

  11. Ambient ultraviolet radiation induces protective responses in soybean but does not attenuate indirect defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Thorsten R. [Department of Botany II, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences, University of Wuerzburg, Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3, 97082 Wuerzburg (Germany); Rostas, Michael [Department of Botany II, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences, University of Wuerzburg, Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3, 97082 Wuerzburg (Germany)], E-mail: rostas@botanik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2008-09-15

    We investigated the effects of ambient ultraviolet (UV) radiation on (i) the performance and chemistry of soybean plants, (ii) the performance of Spodoptera frugiperda and (iii) the foraging behavior of the herbivore's natural enemy Cotesia marginiventris which exploits herbivore-induced plant volatiles (VOC) for host location. The accumulation of protective phenolics was faster in plants receiving ambient UV than in controls exposed to sun light lacking UV. Accordingly, isorhamnetin- and quercetin-based flavonoids were increased in UV exposed plants. No UV effects were found on the performance and feeding behavior of S. frugiperda. Herbivore-damaged plants emitted the same VOC when grown under ambient or attenuated UV for 5, 10 or 30 days. Consequently, C. marginiventris was attracted but did not discriminate between exposed and unexposed soybeans. In summary, ambient UV radiation affected soybean morphology and physiology but did not destabilize interactions between trophic levels. - Ambient ultraviolet radiation does not alter induced VOC emission in soybean and thus host location of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris remains effective.

  12. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  13. Low Dose Effects: Testing the Assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work is to investigate the biological responses of cells and animals to low doses and low dose rates of low linear energy transfer radiation and to compare the results to the predictions of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis. These experiments indicate that at low dose, none of the assumptions of the LNT hypothesis were supported by the data, either in cells or in animals. If these results from human and rodent cells, and from other animals, are applicable to humans, the data further indicate that the use of the LNT hypothesis for radiation protection purposes is not conservative but may actually increase the overall risk of cancer

  14. Delta-tocotrienol suppresses radiation-induced microRNA-30 and protects mice and human CD34+ cells from radiation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Hong Li

    Full Text Available We reported that microRNA-30c (miR-30c plays a key role in radiation-induced human cell damage through an apoptotic pathway. Herein we further evaluated radiation-induced miR-30 expression and mechanisms of delta-tocotrienol (DT3, a radiation countermeasure candidate, for regulating miR-30 in a mouse model and human hematopoietic CD34+ cells. CD2F1 mice were exposed to 0 (control or 7-12.5 Gy total-body gamma-radiation, and CD34+ cells were irradiated with 0, 2 or 4 Gy of radiation. Single doses of DT3 (75 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection for mice or 2 μM for CD34+ cell culture were administrated 24 h before irradiation and animal survival was monitored for 30 days. Mouse bone marrow (BM, jejunum, kidney, liver and serum as well as CD34+ cells were collected at 1, 4, 8, 24, 48 or 72 h after irradiation to determine apoptotic markers, pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6, miR-30, and stress response protein expression. Our results showed that radiation-induced IL-1β release and cell damage are pathological states that lead to an early expression and secretion of miR-30b and miR-30c in mouse tissues and serum and in human CD34+ cells. DT3 suppressed IL-1β and miR-30 expression, protected against radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse and human cells, and increased survival of irradiated mice. Furthermore, an anti-IL-1β antibody downregulated radiation-induced NFκBp65 phosphorylation, inhibited miR-30 expression and protected CD34+ cells from radiation exposure. Knockdown of NFκBp65 by small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly suppressed radiation-induced miR-30 expression in CD34+ cells. Our data suggest that DT3 protects human and mouse cells from radiation damage may through suppression of IL-1β-induced NFκB/miR-30 signaling.

  15. Radiation-induced acute brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine-salvia miltiorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    expression of ICAM-1 on the brain vascular endothelial cell can act as indexes of acute brain injury induced by radiation. Traditional Chinese medicine Salvia Miltiorrhiza has a protective effect on radiation-induced acute brain injury

  16. Second International MELODI Workshop on Low Dose Risk Research - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) mission is to impulse low dose risk research in Europe through a strategic research agenda (SRA) and road-map of priorities. The last presentation is dedicated to the SRA and its preference research programs. The other presentations deal principally with the low-dose exposure in medical uses of ionizing radiations, radiosensitivity, radiation-induced cataracts, or epidemiology and radiobiology of cardiovascular disease. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  17. Protective effect of inhalation of hydrogen gas on radiation-induced dermatitis and skin injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sadahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Tachibana, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The effect of inhalation of hydrogen-containing gas (1.3% hydrogen + 20.8% oxygen + 77.9% nitrogen) (HCG) on radiation-induced dermatitis and on the healing of healing-impaired skin wounds in rats was examined using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. An X-ray dose of 20 Gy was irradiated onto the lower part of the back through two holes in a lead shield. Irradiation was performed before or after inhalation of HCG for 2 h. Inhalation of HCG significantly reduced the severity of radiodermatitis and accelerated healing-impaired wound repair. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and 8-hydroxy-2(')-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) showed that the proportion of apoptotic keratinocytes and the level of staining in the X-irradiated skin of rats that pre-inhaled HCG were significantly lower than that of rats which did not pre-inhale HCG. Cutaneous full-thickness wounds were then created in the X-irradiated area to examine the time-course of wound healing. X-irradiation significantly increased the time required for wound healing, but the inhalation of HCG prior to the irradiation significantly decreased the delay in wound healing compared with the control and post-inhalation of HCG groups. Therefore, radiation-induced skin injury can potentially be alleviated by the pre-inhalation of HCG.

  18. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 ± 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 ± 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  19. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  20. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  1. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Jing Piao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC, a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1, which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1 and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  2. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Bakkal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg. Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  3. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage

  4. Protective role of Tinospora cordifolia extract against radiation-induced qualitative, quantitative and biochemical alterations in testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In today's changing global scenario, ionizing radiation is considered as most potent cause of oxidative stress mediated by free radical flux which induces severe damage at various hierarchical levels in the organization in the living organisms. Testis is a highly prolific tissue with fast cellular renewal and poor antioxidant defense; therefore it becomes an easy target for the radiation-induced free radicals that have long been suggested as major cause of male infertility. Chemical radioprotection is an important strategy to countermeasure the deleterious effects of radiation. Several Indian medicinal plants are rich source of antioxidants and these have been used for the treatment of ailments. Tinospora cordifolia, commonly known as amrita, is one of the plants that have several pharmacological and therapeutic properties. Therefore, the present study was performed to evaluate the deleterious effects of semi lethal dose of gamma radiation on testicular tissue and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia root extract (TCE). For this purpose, healthy Swiss albino male mice were selected from an inbred colony and divided into four groups. Group I (normal) was administered double distilled water (DDW) volume equal to TCE (75 mg/kg.b.wt/animal) by oral gavage. Group II was orally supplemented TCE as 75 mg/kg. b.wt once daily for 5 consecutive days. Group III (irradiated control) received DDW orally equivalent to TCE for 5 days then exposed to 5 Gy gamma radiation. Group IV (experimental) was administered TCE as in Group II and exposed to radiation (as in Group III). Irradiation resulted into significant decrease in the frequency of different spermatogenic cell counts along with severe histo-pathological lesions up to 7th day of irradiation in testes of irradiated control animals, thereafter, recovery followed towards the normal architecture. TCE pretreatment effectively prevented radiation induced such alterations in cellular counts and testicular injuries by

  5. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  6. Protective effect of peach kernel extracts on radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood lymphocytes in the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the comet assay, has been applied to the detection of DNA damage from a number of chemical and biological factors in vivo and in vitro. The comet assay is a novel method to assess DNA single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites in individual cells. We evaluated the effect of peach kernel extracts on radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood lymphocytes using the comet assay. The lymphocytes, with or without pretreatment of the extracts, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy of 60Co gamma ray. Significantly increased tail moment, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in the comet assay, showed an excellent dose-response relationship. The treatment of the peach kernel extracts prominently reduced the DNA damage in irradiated groups compared to that in non-treated control groups. The result indicated that the extracts showed radioprotective effect on lymphocyte DNA when assessed by the comet assay

  7. Study on the protective effect of MgSO4 on the radiation-induced neural stem cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the neuroprotective effect of magnesium sulfate on radiation induced neural stem cell injury. Methods: Brain tissue was obtained from new-born sprague-dawley rats within 24 hours, and the cerebral hemisphere was dissociated to culture the neural stem cells. After being identified by immunofluorescence method, the neural stem cells were randomly divided into 3 groups as blank control group, experimental control group and experimental group. The neural stem cells of experimental control group and experimental group were irradiated with 2 or 4 Gy of gamma rays. The proliferation and the cell cycle of neural stem cells were detected at different time-points ranging from 24 h,48 h, 72 h after irradiation with CCK-8 and FCM. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the proliferation rate of experimental control group was significantly reduced (t=5.33-8.44, P<0.05 ), and the G1 phase arrest of experimental control group was significantly enhanced (t=30.60-71.22, P<0.05).Compared with the experimental control group, the proliferation of experimental group significantly increased excluding that of 24 h (t=2.45-4.71, P<0.05), the apoptosis rate of experimental group significantly decreased (t=6.73-41.12, P<0.05), which was closer to the blank control group.Conclusion: Magnesium sulfate can alleviate the injury of proliferation and decrease the cell apoptosis in the early stage after irradiation. (authors)

  8. Protective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in cultured human lymphocytes and isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce oxidative stress through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in an imbalance of the pro-oxidant and antioxidant status in the cells, which is suggested to culminate in cell death. The present work was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes and rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of rats by collagenase perfusion. The cellular changes were estimated using lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduced glutathione (GSH). The DNA damage was analyzed by comet assay, cytokinesis blocked micro nucleus assay, dicentric aberrations and translocation frequency. Cell cycle distribution and measurement of the percentage of apoptotic cells were performed by flow cytometry analysis. To investigate whether the dietary agents like curcumin and its analog have a role on cell cycle regulation, we analyzed the changes in cell cycle profiles by using fluorescence activated cell sorter. The increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase dose (1, 2 and 4 Gy) of γ-radiation in cultured lymphocytes and hepatocytes. TBARS were increased significantly, whereas the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in γ-irradiated hepatocytes and lymphocytes. On pretreatment with curcumin and its analog (1, 5 and 10 μg/ml) showed a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes were increased significantly along with the levels of GSH. The maximum protection of hepatocytes and lymphocytes was observed at 10 μg/ml curcumin and 5 μg/ml curcumin analog pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin and its analog helps in protecting the normal hepatocytes and lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced cellular

  9. ß-cell specific overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 does not protect against multiple low dose streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetes in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börjesson, A; Rønn, S G; Karlsen, A E;

    2011-01-01

    effects of STZ. Exposure of wt islets to IL-1ß or IL-1ß+IFN-¿ seemed to lead to a failing IL-1Ra response from SOCS-3 transgenic islets. It could be that an increased expression of a possible protective molecule against ß-cell destruction may lead to a dampered response of another putative protective...... molecule. This may have counteracted a protective effect against MLDSTZ in SOCS-3 transgenic mice....

  10. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, R D; Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubM...

  11. Long-term administration of a small molecular weight catalytic metalloporphyrin antioxidant, AEOL 10150, protects lungs from radiation-induced injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether administration of a catalytic antioxidant, Mn(III) tetrakis(N,N'-diethylimidazolium-2-yl) porphyrin, AEOL 10150, with superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic properties, reduces the severity of radiation-induced injury to the lung from single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy. Methods and Materials: Rats were randomly divided into four different dose groups (0, 1, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150), receiving either short-term (1 week) or long-term (10 weeks) drug administration via osmotic pumps. Rats received single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy to the right hemithorax. Breathing rates, body weights, blood samples, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess lung damage. Results: There was no significant difference in any of the study endpoints between the irradiated controls and the three groups receiving RT and short-term administration of AEOL 10150. For the long-term administration, functional determinants of lung damage 20 weeks postradiation were significantly worse for RT + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and RT + 1 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150 as compared with the irradiated groups treated with higher doses of AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day). Lung histology at 20 weeks revealed a significant decrease in structural damage and collagen deposition in rats receiving 10 or 30 mg/kg/day after radiation in comparison to the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant reduction in macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, and hypoxia in rats receiving AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day) after lung irradiation compared with the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Conclusions: The chronic administration of a novel catalytic antioxidant, AEOL 10150, demonstrates a significant protective effect from radiation-induced lung injury. AEOL 10150 has its primary impact on the cascade of events after irradiation, and adding the drug before irradiation and its short-term administration have no significant

  12. LOW DOSE PIRFENIDONE SUPPRESSES TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA-1 AND TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE-1,AND PROTECTS RATS FROM LUNG FIBROSIS INDUCED BY BLEOMYCIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-lun Tian; Wei Yao; Zi-jian Guo; Li Gu; Yuan-jue Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the optimal dosage of pirfenidone for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in Wistar rats, and the alteration of expressions of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in lung tissue.Methods Male Wistar rats were endotracheally instilled with bleomycin or normal saline. Pirfenidone (25-800 mg·kg-1·d-1), dexamethasone (3 mg/kg), or 1% carboxymethylcellulose sodium were given daily by feed 2 days before instillation of bleomycin. Groups T7 and T14 were fed pirfenidone 50 mg·kg -1·d-1 at 7 days or 14 days after bleomycin instillation. Lungs were harvested at 28 days after bleomycin instillation. Patholological changes in lung tissues were evaluated with HE staining. Lung collagen was stained by sirius red and measured by content of hydroxyproline. Expression of proteins of TGF-β, TIMP-1, and MMP-13 were detected by Western blotting.Results At doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg·kg-1·d-1, pirfenidone had significant anti-fibrofic effects for bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis, and these effects were most significantly attenuated at the dosage of 50mg·kg-1 1d-1 (HE: P<0.01, P<0.01, and P =0.064; sirius red: P<0.05, P<0.01, and P<0. 05; hydroxyproline: P=0.595, P<0.01, and P=0.976). Pirfenidone at a dosage of 50 mg·kg -1·d-1 inhibited protein expression of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1 in lung tissue in the early phase (0.79 and 0.75 times of control group), but had no effect on expression of MMP-13.Conclusion Low dose pirfenidone, especially at dosage of 50 mg·kg-1·d-1, has significant anti-fibrotic effects on bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Pirfenidone partially inhibits the enhancement of the expression of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1 in lung tissue.

  13. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  14. Radiological protection effect on vanillin derivative VND3207 radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the protection of vanillin derivative VND3207 on the cytogenetic damage of mouse bone marrow cell induced by ionizing radiation. Methods: BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups: normal control group, 2 Gy dose irradiation group, and three groups of 2 Gy irradiation with VND3207 protection at doses of 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. VND3207 was given by intragastric administration once a day for five days. Two hours after the last drug administration, the mice were irradiated with 2 Gy γ-rays. The changes of polychromatophilic erythroblasts micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberration (CA) and mitosis index (MI) of mouse bone marrow cells were observed at 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Results: Under the protection of VND3207 at the dosages 10, 50, 100 μmg/kg, the yields of poly-chromatophilic erythroblasts MN and CA of bone marrow cells were significantly decreased (t=2.36-4.26, P<0.05), and the marrow cells MI remained much higher level compared with the irradiated mice without drug protection (t=2.58, 2.01, P<0.05). The radiological protection effect was drug dose-dependent, and the administration of VND3207 at the dosage of 100 mg/kg resulted in reduction by 50 % and 65% in the yields of MN and CA, respectively. Conclusions: VND3207 had a good protection effect of on γ-ray induced cytogentic damage of mouse bone marrow cells. (authors)

  15. A garlic extract protects from ultraviolet B (280-320 nm) radiation-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyophilized aged garlic extract has been incorporated at concentrations of 0.1%, 1% and 4% by weight into semi purified powdered diets and fed to hairless mice. Under moderate UVB exposure conditions resulting in 58% suppression of the systemic contact hypersensitivity response in control-fed mice, a dose-responsive protection was observed in the garlic-fed mice; contact hypersensitivity in the UVB-exposed mice fed 4% garlic extract was suppressed by only 19%. If the UVB exposure was replaced by topical application of one of a series of lotions containing increasing concentrations of cis-urocanic acid, a dose-responsive suppression of contact hypersensitivity was demonstrated in control-fed mice (urocanic acid at 25, 50, 100 and 200 micrograms per mouse resulting in 22-46% suppression). Mice fed a diet containing 1% aged garlic extract were partially protected from cis-urocanic acid-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity, with greater protection from the lower concentrations of urocanic acid. Mice fed a diet containing 4% aged garlic extract were protected from all concentrations of urocanic acid. The results indicate that aged garlic extract contains ingredient(s) that protect from UVB-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity and suggest that the mechanism of protection is by antagonism of the cis-urocanic acid mediation of this form of immunosuppression

  16. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  17. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  18. Moderate acute intake of de-alcoholised red wine, but not alcohol, is protective against radiation-induced DNA damage ex vivo-Results of a comparative in vivo intervention study in younger men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remains unclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress in a crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21-26 years. The participants adhered to a low plant phenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300 mL of complete red wine, dealcoholised red wine or ethanol on separate occasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiation-induced genome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentration was measured. Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1 and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wine protected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated with the concentration of total plasma catechin (R = -0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction of red wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin

  19. Low-dose energetic protons induce adaptive and bystander effects that protect human cells against DNA damage caused by a subsequent exposure to energetic iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During interplanetary missions, astronauts are exposed to mixed types of ionizing radiation. The low 'flux' of the high atomic number and high energy (HZE) radiations relative to the higher 'flux' of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons makes it highly probable that for any given cell in the body, proton events will precede any HZE event. Whereas progress has been made in our understanding of the biological effects of low-LET protons and high-LET HZE particles, the interplay between the biochemical processes modulated by these radiations is unclear. Here we show that exposure of normal human fibroblasts to a low mean absorbed dose of 20 cGy of 0.05 or 1-GeV protons (LET ∼ 1.25 or 0.2 keV/μm, respectively) protects the irradiated cells (P < 0.0001) against chromosomal damage induced by a subsequent exposure to a mean absorbed dose of 50 cGy from 1 GeV/u iron ions (LET ∼ 151 keV/μm). Surprisingly, unirradiated (i.e. bystander) cells with which the proton-irradiated cells were co-cultured were also significantly protected from the DNA-damaging effects of the challenge dose. The mitigating effect persisted for at least 24 h. These results highlight the interactions of biological effects due to direct cellular traversal by radiation with those due to bystander effects in cell populations exposed to mixed radiation fields. They show that protective adaptive responses can spread from cells targeted by low-LET space radiation to bystander cells in their vicinity. The findings are relevant to understanding the health hazards of space travel. (author)

  20. Protection from radiation-induced damage of spermatogenesis in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) by follicle-stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In adult rhesus monkeys a two- to threefold increase in the number of spermatogonia was found at Day 75 after 1 Gy of X-irradiation when the animals were pretreated with two intramuscular injections of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) each day. Also the percentage of cross-sections of seminiferous tubules showing spermatogonia (repopulation index) was much higher when FSH was given before irradiation. At 75 days postirradiation the repopulation index was 39 +/- 10% after irradiation alone and 81 +/- 11% when FSH pretreatment was applied. The pretreatment with two injections of FSH each day during 16 days caused an increase in the number of proliferating A spermatogonia. In view of earlier results in the mouse, where proliferating spermatogonial stem cells appeared more radioresistant than quiescent ones, it is suggested that the protective effects of FSH treatment are caused by the increase in the proliferative activity of the A spermatogonia and consequently of the spermatogonial stem cells. The results indicate that in the rhesus monkey the maximal protective effect of FSH is reached after a period of treatment between 7 and 16 days

  1. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation. PMID:20041793

  2. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  3. Black Hoof Medicinal Mushroom Phellinus linteus (Agaricomycetes) Extracts Protect Against Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Abnormality in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jen-Yin; Chen, Chin-Chu; Su, Chih-Chung; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Phellinus linteus extracts (PLEs) against radiation damage in mice. First, BALB/c mice were irradiated once with γ-rays at 4, 5, 6, or 8 Gy and allowed to recover for 20 days. Results reveal that 8-Gy radiation caused death in 100% of mice on day 13, and 6-Gy radiation caused death in 86.7% of mice (13/15) at the end of the experiment, whereas 4- and 5-Gy radiation did not result in any death. We then used 5-Gy γ-ray radiation to examine the protective effects of PLEs. Mice were orally administered a PLE (500, 1000, and 1500 mg/kg) daily for 2 weeks before radiation and for 6 weeks after radiation. γ-Ray radiation significantly decreased body weight starting from week 2 after radiation. Supplementation with a median and high dose of PLE significantly restored body weights starting at weeks 5 and 3, respectively. The radiation-protective agent WR2721 (200 mg/kg intraperitoneally) restored body weights starting at week 4. White blood cells, platelets, red blood cells, and hemoglobin were significantly decreased by radiation, and PLEs (primarily at high doses) and WR2721 significantly prevented hematologic abnormality. These results suggest that PLE has potential as a radioprotective agent. PMID:27649604

  4. Protective Role of Hsp27 Protein Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and Radiosensitization Effects of Hsp27 Gene Silencing in Different Human Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ability of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) to protect cells from stressful stimuli and its increased levels in tumors resistant to anticancer therapeutics suggest that it may represent a target for sensitization to radiotherapy. In this study, we investigate the protective role of Hsp27 against radiation-induced apoptosis and the effect of its attenuation in highly expressing radioresistant cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: We examined clonogenic death and the kinetics of apoptotic events in different tumor cell lines overexpressing or underexpressing Hsp27 protein irradiated with photons. The radiosensitive Jurkat cell line, which does not express Hsp27 constitutively or in response to γ-rays, was stably transfected with Hsp27 complementary DNA. Attenuation of Hsp27 expression was accomplished by antisense or RNAi (interfering RNA) strategies in SQ20B head-and-neck squamous carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer, and U87 glioblastoma radioresistant cells. Results: We measured concentration-dependent protection against the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Jurkat-Hsp27 cells, which led to a 50% decrease in apoptotic cells at 48 hours in the highest expressing cells. Underlying mechanisms leading to radiation resistance involved a significant increase in glutathione levels associated with detoxification of reactive oxygen species, a delay in mitochondrial collapse, and caspase activation. Conversely, attenuation of Hsp27 in SQ20B cells, characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, sensitizes cells to irradiation. This was emphasized by increased apoptosis, decreased glutathione basal level, and clonogenic cell death. Sensitization to irradiation was confirmed in PC3 and U87 radioresistant cells. Conclusion: Hsp27 gene therapy offers a potential adjuvant to radiation-based therapy of resistant tumors

  5. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and lymphotoxin-β) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and lymphotoxin-β) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation induces biological alterations in human skin in vitro: Relevance of a well-balanced UVA/UVB protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous damages such as sunburn, pigmentation, and photoaging are known to be induced by acute as well as repetitive sun exposure. Not only for basic research, but also for the design of the most efficient photoprotection, it is crucial to understand and identify the early biological events occurring after ultraviolet (UV exposure. Reconstructed human skin models provide excellent and reliable in vitro tools to study the UV-induced alterations of the different skin cell types, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using different in vitro human skin models, the effects of UV light (UVB and UVA were investigated. UVB-induced damages are essentially epidermal, with the typical sunburn cells and DNA lesions, whereas UVA radiation-induced damages are mostly located within the dermal compartment. Pigmentation can also be obtained after solar simulated radiation exposure of pigmented reconstructed skin model. Those models are also highly adequate to assess the potential of sunscreens to protect the skin from UV-associated damage, sunburn reaction, photoaging, and pigmentation. The results showed that an effective photoprotection is provided by broad-spectrum sunscreens with a potent absorption in both UVB and UVA ranges.

  7. 1,2,3,4,6-penta-ο-galloyl-β-D-glucose protects splenocytes against radiation-induced apoptosis in murine splenocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antioxidant property and hematopoietic repair capacity are important characteristics of radioprotective agents. Some studies have demonstrated that 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG), a molecule isolated from the waterlily, has antioxidant, hematopoietic repair, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we try to determine whether PGG extracted from a lily, Nymphaea tetragona var. angusta, has radioprotective effects on splenocytes in vitro against 60Co γ-ray irradiation with absorption doses of 2 Gy and 4 Gy. Results show that PGG treatment dramatically enhances the proliferation of splenocytes compared with irradiated but untreated controls. In addition, PGG treatment before irradiation protects the splenocytes from lethal effects of irradiation and decreases DNA damages as identified by the alkaline comet assay. PGG-treated cells also show less radiation-induced apoptosis. These cells have lower concentrations of the pro-apoptotic protein p53 and more of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. The results presented in this study suggest that PGG has a cytoprotective effect on immune cells exposed to normally damaging amount of radiation. Thus, PGG could be an effective, non-toxic radioprotective agent. (author)

  8. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  9. Protective Effect of Topically Applied Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri Against Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Chronic Skin Damage in Guinea Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟明亮; 曹鹏利; 于国英; 朱莉; 王跃军; 王春波

    2003-01-01

    Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri (PCF) , a topical polypeptide isolated from Chlamys farreri, was used in this experiment aimed to investigate the photoprotective effect of PCF against chronic skin damage induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. The chronic ultraviolet-irradiated guinea pig model was established, and visible changes in the skin including wrinkling, sagging and erythema were observed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) in the dorsal skin were determined using biochemical methods. The results showed:(1)PCF (5 % and 20%) could greatly protect the dorsal skin of guinea pig against wrinkling, sagging and erythema induced by UV radiation in a concentration-dependent manner.(2)PCF could reduce MDA formation in the dorsal skin caused by UV irradiation, while increasing the activities of SOD and GSH-px.(3)The differences among the PCF groups and UV model group were significant (P<0.05, P<0.01). These results indicated that topical application of PCF provided broad solar UV spectrum photoprotection; and that the antioxidant property of PCF might play a role in photoprotection.

  10. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  11. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:25187044

  12. Protective effect of propolis on radiation-induced chromosomal damage on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years, particular interest has been given to investigations concerning natural, effective and nontoxic compounds with radioprotective capacity in concert with increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them, propolis, a resinous mixture of substances collected by honey bees (Apis mellifera) has been considered promising since it presents several advantageous characteristics, i.e., antiinflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial and free radical scavenging action. It is, therefore, a direct antioxidant that protects cells and organisms from the adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These relevant biological activities are mainly mediated by the flavonoids, present at relatively high concentrations in the propolis. Considering that the chemical composition and, consequently, the biological activity of propolis is variable according to the environmental plant ecology, the present study was conducted in order to evaluate the radioprotective capacity of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, against genotoxic damages induced by 60Co γ-radiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). for this purpose, micronucleus induction was analyzed concerning irreparable damage, specifically related to DNA double-strand breaks, that are potentially carcinogenic. CHO-K1 cells were submitted to different concentrations of propolis (3 - 33 μg/ml), 1 h before irradiation, with 1 Gy of γ radiation (0.722 Gy/min). The data obtained showed a decreasing tendency in the quantity of radioinduced damage on cells previously treated with propolis. The radioprotective effect was more prominent at higher propolis concentration. The treatment with propolis alone did not induce genotoxic effects on CHO-K1 cells. Beside that, the treatment with propolis, associated or not with radiation, did not influence the kinetics of cellular proliferation. (author)

  13. Characteristics of repair following very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems being with the physical processes of energy deposition and develop through many stages of chemical reaction and biological response. The modeling effort attempts to organize the available data and theories of all of these stages into self-consistent models that can be compared and tested. In some cases, important differences among models result in only small differences in cell survival within the ranges of dose and dose rate that are normally investigated. To overcome this limitation, new ways of irradiating cells at extremes of dose rate, or ways of evaluating the effects of very small doses, are developed. Mathematical modeling and cellular studies complement each other. It has recently been found that some mechanisms are not adequate to account for the interaction of dose and repair time as they affect the reproductive survival of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Repair of radiation-induced cellular damage plays a central role in the survival of cells exposed to doses of 1 Gy or more. This repair is responsible for the dose rate, split-dose and delayed plating effect and can be evaluated. Because split-dose and dose-rate experiments involve repair during irradiation and delayed plating experiments involve repair after irradiation is completed, it was originally thought that different repair processes were involved. It is now clear that this is not necessarily the case. Appropriately designed models can account for observed effects at conventional doses (1 Gy or more) whether they assume all damage is lethal unless repaired or some damage is innocuous unless it interacts with additional damage. The fact that the survival following a plating delay is always less than the survival following immediate plating at low doses indicates that the damage produced is probably not potentially lethal

  14. Two pediatric cases of high dose radiation-induced meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Miho [National Yokosuka Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Nagashima, Goro; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Aoyagi, Masaru; Takasato, Yoshio

    2001-10-01

    There have been many reports of low dose radiation-induced meningiomas, and the number of reports of high dose radiation-induced meningiomas has been increasing recently. In this report, we present two cases of pediatric radiation-induced meningiomas, one 14 years after 36 Gy of radiation therapy for medulloblastoma and the other 8 years after 20 Gy of local radiation therapy for germinoma. Both patients underwent surgical removal of the meningiomas. The case of medulloblastoma was later revealed to be basal cell phacomatosis syndrome. Basal cell phacomatosis syndrome is a disease that occurs as a result of abnormality of chromosome 9. We speculate that the occurrence of radiation-induced meningioma may have been related to the basic genetic vulnerability of the patients. (author)

  15. MELODI - Multidisciplinary European Low dose Initiative - First Draft of Strategic Research Agenda (SRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SRA Working Group of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) was tasked to develop a long-term strategic research agenda (SRA) to guide the coherent integration of national low dose research programmes. Priorities that need to be addressed concern fundamental mechanistic research ranging from radiation track structure and the deposition of energy in biologically important molecules; the resultant homeostatic perturbations and the steps in the cellular and tissue metabolic pathways that eventually lead to disease pathologies. In fact, the main priorities are here the step-wise elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced (oxidative) stress responses and their impact on radiation-induced cancers and non cancer diseases. To achieve this a holistic approach is proposed staring with radiation-specific effects, radiation-induced molecular, biological and pathological effects involving a systems biology approach as well as molecular epidemiology and mathematical modelling in order to come up with more solid low dose health risk assessments. The pathologies considered are outlined in the report where the need is stressed for the MELODI platform to involve a constellation of classical and emerging technologies in a highly multidisciplinary approach. Elucidating the shapes of low-dose response relationships and resolving the question of thresholds is paramount to resolving questions of risk for both populations and individuals. Much is known about radiation-induced cancer in humans and animal models but this needs to be pursued particularly at low doses. More recently, the scientific community has realised that low radiation-induced health effects range well beyond cancer. The priority non-cancer areas that need to be brought into focus are cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic. (A.C.)

  16. MELODI - Multidisciplinary European Low dose Initiative - First Draft of Strategic Research Agenda (SRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [IRSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Lloyd, D. [Health Protection Agency, Chilton (United Kingdom); O' Neill, P. [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-11

    The SRA Working Group of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) was tasked to develop a long-term strategic research agenda (SRA) to guide the coherent integration of national low dose research programmes. Priorities that need to be addressed concern fundamental mechanistic research ranging from radiation track structure and the deposition of energy in biologically important molecules; the resultant homeostatic perturbations and the steps in the cellular and tissue metabolic pathways that eventually lead to disease pathologies. In fact, the main priorities are here the step-wise elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced (oxidative) stress responses and their impact on radiation-induced cancers and non cancer diseases. To achieve this a holistic approach is proposed staring with radiation-specific effects, radiation-induced molecular, biological and pathological effects involving a systems biology approach as well as molecular epidemiology and mathematical modelling in order to come up with more solid low dose health risk assessments. The pathologies considered are outlined in the report where the need is stressed for the MELODI platform to involve a constellation of classical and emerging technologies in a highly multidisciplinary approach. Elucidating the shapes of low-dose response relationships and resolving the question of thresholds is paramount to resolving questions of risk for both populations and individuals. Much is known about radiation-induced cancer in humans and animal models but this needs to be pursued particularly at low doses. More recently, the scientific community has realised that low radiation-induced health effects range well beyond cancer. The priority non-cancer areas that need to be brought into focus are cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic. (A.C.)

  17. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  18. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  19. Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses DE-FG02-05 ER 63947 Final Technical Report 15 May 2005; 14 May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouffler, Simon

    2010-07-28

    This report provides a complete summary of the work undertaken and results obtained under US Department of Energy grant DF-FG02-05 ER 63947, Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses. There is ample epidemiological evidence indicating that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic in the higher dose range. This evidence, however, weakens and carries increasing uncertainties at doses below 100-200 mSv. At these low dose levels the form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancer cannot be determined reliably or directly from studies of human populations. Therefore animal, cellular and other experimental systems must be employed to provide supporting evidence on which to base judgements of risk at low doses. Currently in radiological protection a linear non-threshold (LNT) extrapolation of risk estimates derived from human epidemiological studies is used to estimate risks in the dose range of interest for protection purposes. Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation (eg UNSCEAR 2006; IARC 2000). Good animal models of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are available including strains such as CBA, RFM and SJL (eg Major and Mole 1978; Ullrich et al 1976; Resnitzky et al 1985). Early mechanistic studies using cytogenetic methods in these mouse models established that the majority of radiation-induced AMLs carried substantial interstitial deletions in one copy of chromosome (chr) 2 (eg Hayata et al 1983; Trakhtenbrot et al 1988; Breckon et al 1991; Rithidech et al 1993; Bouffler et al 1996). Chr2 aberrations are known to occur in bone marrow cells as early as 24 hours after in vivo irradiation (Bouffler et al 1997). Subsequent molecular mapping studies defined a distinct region of chr2 that is commonly lost in AMLs (Clark et al 1996; Silver et al 1999). Further, more detailed, analysis identified point mutations at a specific region of the Sfpi1/PU.1 haemopoietic transcription factor gene

  20. Low dose effects. Adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate if there are disturbancies in adaptive response when lymphocytes of people living on the polluted with radionuclides area after Chernobyl disaster and liquidators suffered from accident have been investigated. The level of lymphocytes with micronuclei have been scored in Moscow donors and people living in Bryansk region with the degree of contamination 15 - 40 Ci/km. The doses that liquidators have been obtained were not higher then 25 cGy. The mean spontaneous level of MN in control people and people from Chernobyl zones does't differ significantly but the individual variability in the mean value between two populations does not differ significantly too. And in this case it seems that persons of exposed areas. Then another important fact in lymphocytes of people living on polluted areas the chronic low dose irradiation does not induce the adaptive response. In Moscow people in most cases (≅ 59 %) the adaptive response is observed and in some cases the demonstration of adaptive response is not significant (≅1%). In Chernobyl population exposed to chronic low level, low dose rate irradiation there are fewer people here with distinct adaptive response (≅38%). And there appear beings with increased radiosensitivity after conditioned dose. Such population with enhanced radiosensitivity have not observed in Moscow. In liquidators the same types of effects have been registered. These results have been obtained on adults. Adaptive response in children 8 - 14 old population living in Moscow and in Chernobyl zone have been investigated too. In this case the spontaneous level of MN is higher in children living in polluted areas, after the 1.0 Gy irradiation the individual variability is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct is very large. Only 5 % of children have distinct adaptive response, the enhancement of radiosensitivity after conditioned dose is observed. (authors)

  1. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  3. Radiation Induced Fermion Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, S.; M. W. Evans; Recami, E.

    1998-01-01

    The Dirac equation is solved for two novel terms which describe the interaction energy between the half integral spin of a fermion and the classical, circularly polarized, electromagnetic field. A simple experiment is suggested to test the new terms and the existence of radiation induced fermion resonance.

  4. Low-dose radiation induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates PERK-CHOP signaling pathway in mouse testicular cells%低剂量电离辐射诱导小鼠睾丸细胞内质网应激及PERK-CHOP信号通路的激活

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方芳; 龚平生; 宋祥福; 龚守良; 王志成

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨低剂量电离辐射与小鼠睾丸细胞内质网应激的发生以及PERK-CHOP通路激活的相关性. 方法:健康雄性昆明小鼠随机分成时程-效应(75 mGy照射后0、3、6、12和24h)和剂量-效应(0、50、75、100和200 mGy照射后12 h)组,每组动物10只.采用H2O2和MDA试剂盒比色法检测其含量;利用实时定量逆转录PCR( quantitative RT-PCR)检测GRP78、PERK和CHOP mRNA;Western印迹和图像分析技术检测GRP78、PERK、磷酸化PERK( phosphorylated PERK,pho-PERK)和CHOP蛋白表达. 结果:小鼠经75 mGy全身照射后,睾丸组织中H2O2含量随时间延长而增加,MDA含量在3和6h稍有降低,而后随时间延长而增加,二者在12和24h较0h时显著增加(P< 0.05,P<0.01);除了GRP78 mRNA(3和24 h)和蛋白表达(6 h)分别在照射后有降低趋势外,GRP78( 12 h)、PERK(3、6、12和24 h)和CHOP( 12和24h)的mRNA表达较0h显著增加(P<0.05,P<0.01),GRP78(12和24 h)、pho-PERK(3、12和24h)和CHOP(3、6、12和24 h)的蛋白表达也都较0h显著增加(P<0.05,P<0.01),PERK蛋白表达则无明显变化规律.小鼠经50 ~ 200 mGy全身照射后12 h,睾丸组织中H2O2含量在50 ~ 100 mGy照射后随剂量增加而增加,200 mGy照射后则稍有降低,MDA含量随剂量增加而增加,而且H2O2含量(75和100 mGy)和MDA含量(75、100和200 mGy)显著高于0 mGy组(P<0.05,P<0.01);除了GRP78mRNA表达在50和200 mGy照射后有降低趋势外,GRP78(75和100 mGy)、PERK(75、100和200 mGy)和CHOP(50、75、100和200 mGy)的mRNA表达都显著高于0 mGy组(P<0.05,P<0.01),GRP78(100和200 mGy)、pho-PERK(50、100和200 mGy)和CHOP(50、75、100和200 mGy)的蛋白表达也都显著高于0mGy组(P<0.05,P<0.01),而PERK蛋白表达则无明显变化规律. 结论:低剂量电离辐射能够诱导小鼠睾丸细胞发生内质网应激,并且激活PERK-CHOP信号通路.%Objective: To explore the correlation of low-dose radiation with endoplasmic reticulum stress

  5. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  6. Prophylactic role of melatonin against radiation induced damage in mouse cerebellum with special reference to Purkinje cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Kumari, Seema; Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Bhatia, A L [Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Melatonin, a hormone with a proven antioxidative efficacy, crosses all morphophysiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and distributes throughout the cell. The present study is an attempt to investigate the prophylactic influence of a chronic low level of melatonin against an acute radiation induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum of Swiss albino mice, with special reference to Purkinje cells. After 15 days of treatment the mice were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 30 days. Biochemical parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels as the endpoints. The quantitative study included alterations in number and volume of Purkinje cells. Swiss albino mice were orally administered a very low dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/mouse/day) for 15 consecutive days before single exposure to 4 Gy gamma radiation. Melatonin checked the augmented levels of LPO, by approximately 55%, by day 30 day post-exposure. Radiation induced depleted levels of GSH could be raised by 68.9% by day 30 post-exposure. Radiation exposure resulted in a reduction of the volume of Purkinje cells and their total number. The administration of melatonin significantly protected against the radiation induced decreases in Purkinje cell volume and number. Results indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin resulting in its prophylactic property against radiation induced biochemical and cellular alterations in the cerebellum. The findings support the idea that melatonin may be used as an anti-irradiation drug due to its potent free radical scavenging and antioxidative efficacy.

  7. Radiation-Induced Cancer. Proceedings of a Symposium on Radiation-Induced Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The link between radiation and cancer was recognized soon after the discovery of X-rays and natural radioactivity. In the early years after the discovery of ionizing radiations some of the pioneering workers suffered severely from the damaging effects of radiation exposure. These incidents,- generally due to ignorance of the biological consequences of radiation exposure, were instrumental in starting investigations on the subject. Gradually precise information became available on the nature of radiation-induced damage and on the repair phenomena. This information has been advanced by recent progress in molecular biology, cellular biology, cytogenetics, biochemistry, virology, immunology and related disciplines. Contributions of these disciplines to radiation biology and cancer research has resulted in the use of radiation to solve various problems of human health including cancer. At the same time, with knowledge of the effects of radiations on cells and on various organisms including man, it has become possible to state the level of radiation dose that is not an apparent health hazard (i. e. the maximum permissible dose). This work has been vitally important in programs dealing with the occupational safety of personnel working with radiations. Although the present safety standards and devices are generally recognized as adequate, they must be re-evaluated from time to time in the light of the latest findings in radiobiology and other related disciplines. The Symposium on Radiation-Induced Cancer, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in collaboration with the World Health Organization, permitted discussion and evaluation of the present understanding of the nature of late biological effects of radiations including cancer, and development of protective as well as curative measures against cancer. Much attention was given to the comparative analysis of the effects of radiation, particularly at low dose levels, on man and experimental mammals. Emphasis

  8. Low dose of oleanolic acid protects against lithocholic acid-induced cholestasis in mice: potential involvement of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2-mediated upregulation of multidrug resistance-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Fan, Xiaomei; Xu, Chenshu; Deng, Rongrong; Zhou, Xunian; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Min

    2014-05-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a natural triterpenoid and has been demonstrated to protect against varieties of hepatotoxicants. Recently, however, OA at high doses was reported to produce apparent cholestasis in mice. In this study, we characterized the protective effect of OA at low doses against lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced cholestasis in mice and explored further mechanisms. OA cotreatment (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved mouse survival rate, attenuated liver necrosis, and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase; more importantly, serum total bile acids and bilirubin, as well as hepatic total bile acids were also remarkably reduced. Gene and protein expression analysis showed that hepatic expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), Mrp3, and Mrp4 was significantly increased by OA cotreatment, whereas other bile acid metabolism- and transport-related genes, including Na+/taurocholate cotransporter, organic anion transporter 1b2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance protein 3, Cyp3a11, Cyp2b10, Sulfotransferase 2a1 (Sult2a1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1a1 (Ugt1a1), were only slightly changed. OA also caused increased nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2) mRNA expression and nuclear protein accumulation, whereas nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor were not significantly influenced by OA. Luciferase (Luc) assays performed in HepG2 cells illustrated that OA was a strong Nrf2 agonist with moderate PXR and weak FXR agonism. Finally, in mouse primary cultured hepatocytes, OA dose- and time-dependently induced expression of Mrp2, Mrp3, and Mrp4; however, this upregulation was abrogated when Nrf2 was silenced. In conclusion, OA produces a protective effect against LCA-induced hepatotoxicity and cholestasis, possibly due to Nrf2-mediated upregulation of Mrp2, Mrp3, and Mrp4. PMID:24510383

  9. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  10. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    P S Satheesh Kumar; Anita Balan; Arun Sankar; Tinky Bose

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concer...

  11. Plants ecotoxicology. A case of low doses and multi pollutant exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' Kin, S.; Kim, J.; Evseeva, T.; Oudalova, A.; Dikarev, V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In this report, results of long-term laboratory, 'green-house' and field experiments carried out on different species of wild and agricultural plants (spring barley, Scots pine, spider wort, bulb onion and others) to study toxic and genotoxic effects of low doses and concentrations of such common pollutants as acute and chronic {gamma}-radiation, heavy natural radionuclides, compounds of heavy and alkaline earth metals, pesticides are presented for the first time. Special attention is paid to eco-toxic effects of chronic low dose exposures, the dose-rate effect, synergistic and antagonistic effects of different factors' combined exposures and biological effects of incorporated radionuclides. The results of long-term field experiments in the 30-km Chernobyl NPP zone, in the vicinity of the facility for the processing and storage of radioactive wastes (Leningrad region), in the vicinity of the radium production industry storage cell (Komi Republic), at the site of an underground nuclear explosion (Perm region) are discussed. These findings suggest that the further evolution of investigations in this field would issue in the development of a theoretical bases and practical procedures for environmental protection against radioactivity, taking into account the new experimentally confirmed facts about the presence of such essentially important singularities of the biological effect of low ionizing radiation doses as the nonlinearity of a dose-effect relationship, radiation-induced genomic instability, phenomenon of radio-adaptation, increased probability of synergetic and antagonistic effects of the combined action of different nature factors. A development of a new concept of radiation protection for a human and biota should be based on the clear understanding of these effects and their contribution to the response of biological objects. (author)

  12. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  13. Comparison of the protective roles of L-carnitine and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage by histopathological and biochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Vuslat Yurut-Caloglu; Murat Caloglu; Sevgi Eskiocak; Ebru Tastekin; Alaattin Ozen; Nukhet Kurkcu; Fulya Oz-Puyan; Zafer Kocak; Cem Uzal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the radioprotective efficacies of L-carnitine (LC) and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage. Materials and Methods: Forty-five, 3-month-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Control (CONT, n = 7); irradiation alone RT: radiation therapy (RT, n = 8); amifostine plus irradiation (AMI + RT, n = 8); LC plus irradiation (LC + RT, n = 8); LC and sham irradiation (LC, n = 7); and amifostine and sham irradia...

  14. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages-oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks-on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster).We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, double strand breaks (DSB) are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responsesfor cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation. (author)

  15. Some remarks on the significance of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria of the present system of individual dose limitation are considered as well as the evolution of the limiting values. The assumption of the linearity of the dose-effect relationship without any threshold is probably the best approach to adopt for recommendations in radiation protection and for accounting the doses acquired by exposure to ionizing radiation. On the other hand the present evaluation of the natural background could imply a different dose-effect relationship in the low doses region and perhaps the existence of a threshold. Therefore the extrapolations which are usually made after exposures of different groups of people to low doses cannot be considered as scientifically sound. (author)

  16. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair. PMID:20008078

  17. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation

  18. DNA damage-related gene expression as biomarkers to assess low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. According to the UNSCEAR, the natural rays from the Sun and the Earth transmit about 2,4 mSv to each individual every year. Human activities expose us to an additional radiation dose (1,2 mSv/year), especially the techniques used in non-invasive medical imaging (radiography, CT scanners). Ionizing radiation can induce a large spectrum of DNA lesions, but under optimal DNA repair conditions, the principal residual lesions of importance are misrepaired doublestrand breaks. Predictive markers of intrinsic radio sensitivity in healthy individuals are needed in monitoring their occupational or environmental radiation exposure and may predict a patient's response to radiotherapy. Radiation protection requires a thorough understanding of low dose ionizing radiation. Currently extrapolation from high doses is necessary to estimate the effects of low doses. Furthermore, it is critically important to have an appreciation of the variation in individual responses to radiation among the human population. Present estimates of the risks from radiation exposure are based largely on the 'average' individual in an exposed population. However, clinical observations of adverse reactions to radiotherapy indicate large variations in individual radio sensitivity. Quantification of risk requires the identification of new parameters taking into account these differences in radiation responses. Therefore, a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms by which radiation induces cancer is essential. It is necessary to understand the various steps involved in the multistage process of radiation-induced tumor genesis and to answer the following specific question: Is there a link between radio sensitivity of individuals (short term) and susceptibility to cancer (late after exposure)? Appearance of mutations consist one of more prominent consequence of the radiation action. The aim of our study consisted in the restriction fragment's length polymorphism (RFLP

  19. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  20. Molecular targets for radioprotection by low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive response is a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose of a stressor after a smaller inducing dose had been applied a few hrs earlier. Radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells did not show such an adaptive response, i.e. a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose (2 Gy) of a radiation after a priming dose (1 cGy) had been applied 4 or 7 hrs earlier, but its thermoresistant clone (TR) did. Since inducible HSP70 and HSP25 expressions were different between these two cell lines, the role of inducible HSP70 and HSP25 in adaptive response was examined. When inducible hsp70 or hsp25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, radioresistance in clonogenic survival and reduction of apoptosis was detected. The adaptive response was also acquired in these two cell lines, and inducible hsp70 transfectant showed more pronounced adaptive response than hsp25 transfectant. From these results, inducible HSP70 and HSP25 are at least partly responsible for the induction of adaptive response in these cells. Moreover, when inducible HSP70 or HSP25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, coregulation of each gene was detected and heat shock factor (HSF) was found to be responsible for these phenomena. In continuation of our earlier study on the involvement of heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and HSP70 in the induction of adaptive response, we have now examined the involvement of these proteins in the induction of the adaptive response, using an animal model system. C57BL6 mice were irradiated with 5 cGy of gamma radiation 3 times for a week (total of 15cGy) and a high challenge dose (6Gy) was given on the day following the last low dose irradiation. Survival rate of the low dose pre-irradiated mice was increased to 30%. Moreover, high dose-mediated induction of apoptosis was also reduced by low dose pre-irradiation. To elucidate any link existing between HSP and induction of the adaptive response, reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was performed

  1. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  2. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention

  3. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants

  4. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  5. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Mi Joo

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells, mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13, and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Comparison of the protective roles of L-carnitine and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage by histopathological and biochemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuslat Yurut-Caloglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the radioprotective efficacies of L-carnitine (LC and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage. Materials and Methods: Forty-five, 3-month-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Control (CONT, n = 7; irradiation alone RT: radiation therapy (RT, n = 8; amifostine plus irradiation (AMI + RT, n = 8; LC plus irradiation (LC + RT, n = 8; LC and sham irradiation (LC, n = 7; and amifostine and sham irradiation (AMI, n = 7. The rats in the AMI + RT, LC + RT and RT groups were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy to the whole abdomen. LC (300 mg/kg and amifostine (200 mg/kg was given intraperitoneally 30 min before irradiation. Five days after irradiation, both antral follicles and corpus luteum in the right ovaries were counted, and tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP were measured. Results: Irradiation significantly decreased antral follicles and corpus luteum (P: 0.005 and P 0.05. The level of MDA and AOPP significantly increased after irradiation (P = 0.001 and P 0.005. The levels of both MDA and AOPP were also similar when LC + RT is compared with AMI + RT group (P > 0.005. Conclusions: L-carnitine and amifostine have a noteworthy and similar radioprotective effect against radiation-induced acute ovarian toxicity.

  7. [Risk of deterministic effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation: retrospective study among health workers in view of a new publication of International Commission on Radiological Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrone, Mario; Di Lascio, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    The new recommended equivalent (publication n. 118 of International Commission on Radiological Protection) dose limit for occupational exposure of the lens of the eye is based on prevention of radiogenic cataracts, with the underlying assumption of a nominal threshold which has been adjusted from 2,5 Gy to 0.5 Gy for acute or protracted exposure. The study aim was to determine the prevalence of ocular lens opacity among healthcare workers (radiologic technologists, physicians, physician assistants) with respect to occupational exposures to ionizing radiations. Therefore, we conducted another retrospective study to explore the relationship between occupational exposure to radiation and opacity lens increase. Healthcare data (current occupational dosimetry, occupational history) are used to investigate risk of increase of opacity lens of eye. The sample of this study consisted of 148 health-workers (64 M and 84 W) aged from 28 to 66 years coming from different hospitals of the ASL of Potenza (clinic, hospital and institute with scientific feature). On the basis of the evaluation of the dosimetric history of the workers (global and effective dose) we agreed to ascribe the group of exposed subjects in cat A (equivalent dose > 2 mSV) and the group of non exposed subjects in cat B (workers with annual absorbed level of dose near 0 mSv). The analisys was conducted using SPSS 15.0 (Statistical Package for Social Science). A trend of increased ocular lens opacity was found with increasing number for workers in highest category of exposure (cat. A, Yates' chi-squared test = 13,7 p = 0,0002); variable significantly related to opacity lens results job: nurse (Χ(2)Y = 14,3 p = 0,0002) physician (Χ(2)Y = 2.2 p = 0,1360) and radiologic technologists (Χ(2)Y = 0,1 p = 0,6691). In conclusion our provides evidence that exposure to relatively low doses of ionizing radiation may be harmful to the lens of the eye and may increase a long-term risk of cataract formation; similary

  8. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  9. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  10. LOW DOSE MAGNESIUM SULPHATE REGIME FOR ECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangal V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pre- eclampsia is one of the commonest medical complications seen during pregnancy. It contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Dr.J.A.Pritchard in 1955, introduced magnesium sulphate for control of convulsions in eclampsia and is used worldwide. Considering the low body mass index of indian women, a low dose magnesium sulphate regime has been introduced by some authors. Present study was carried out at tertiary care centre in rural area. Fifty cases of eclampsia were randomly selected to find out the efficacy of low dose magnesium sulphate regime to control eclamptic convulsions. Maternal and perinatal outcome and magnesium toxicity were analyzed. It was observed that 86% cases responded to initial intravenous dose of 4 grams of 20% magnesium sulphate . Eight percent cases, who got recurrence of convulsion, were controlled by additional 2 grams of 20% magnesium sulphate. Six percent cases required shifting to standard Pritchard regime, as they did not respond to low dose magnesium sulphate regime. The average total dose of magnesium sulphate required for control of convulsions was 20 grams ie. 54.4% less than that of standard Pritchard regime. The maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in the present study werecomparable to those of standard Pritchard regime. The study did not find a single case of magnesium related toxicity with low dose magnesium sulphate regime. Low dose magnesium sulphate regime was found to be safe and effective in eclampsia.

  11. Low dose rapamycin exacerbates autoimmune experimental uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapamycin, a potent immune modulator, is used to treat transplant rejection and some autoimmune diseases. Uveitis is a potentially severe inflammatory eye disease, and 2 clinical trials of treating uveitis with rapamycin are under way. Unexpectedly, recent research has demonstrated that low dose rapamycin enhances the memory T cell population and function. However, it is unclear how low dose rapamycin influences the immune response in the setting of uveitis. DESIGN AND METHODS: B10.RIII mice were immunized to induce experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Ocular inflammation of control and rapamycin-treated mice was compared based on histological change. ELISPOT and T cell proliferation assays were performed to assess splenocyte response to ocular antigen. In addition, we examined the effect of rapamycin on activation-induced cell death (AICD using the MitoCapture assay and Annexin V staining. RESULTS: Administration of low dose rapamycin exacerbated EAU, whereas treating mice with high dose rapamycin attenuated ocular inflammation. The progression of EAU by low dose rapamycin coincided with the increased frequency of antigen-reactive lymphocytes. Lastly, fewer rapamycin-treated T cells underwent AICD, which might contribute to exaggerated ocular inflammation and the uveitogenic immune response. CONCLUSION: These data reveal a paradoxical role for rapamycin in uveitis in a dose-dependent manner. This study has a potentially important clinical implication as rapamycin might cause unwanted consequences dependent on dosing and pharmacokinetics. Thus, more research is needed to further define the mechanism by which low dose rapamycin augments the immune response.

  12. LOW DOSE RISK, DECISIONS, and RISK COMMUNICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low-dose exposures. Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low-dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  13. Health benefits from low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body exposures of mice and humans show no harm from low doses of ionizing radiation. Forty reports show statistically significant, p < 0.01, beneficial effects when cancer and total mortality rates were examined in mice. In vitro experiments indicate that radiogenic metabolism, adaptive repair mechanisms, such as DNA repair enzymes, and the essential nature of ionizing radiation are responsible for part of this activity. However, overwhelming evidence shows that low-dose irradiation increases immune competence. Such data negate the linear concept, which has no reliable whole-animal data to support it in the low-dose range. Cell culture data are not pertinent; such cells do not have a complete immune system

  14. Personal dosimetry statistics and specifics of low dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose statistics of a personal dosimetry service, considering 35,000+ readings, display a sharp peak at low dose (below 0.5 mSv) with skewness to higher values. A measure of the dispersion is that approximately 65% of the doses fall below the average plus 2 standard deviations, an observation which may prove helpful to radiation protection agencies. Categorizing the doses by the concomitant use of a finger ring dosimeter, that skewness is larger in the whole body, and ring dosimeters. The use of Harshaw 5500 readers at high gain leads to frequent values of the glow curve that are judged to be spurious, i.e. values not belonging to the roughly normal noise over the curve. A statistical criterion is shown for identifying those anomalous values, and replacing them with the local behavior, as fit by a cubic polynomial. As a result, the doses above 0.05 mSv which are affected by more than 2% comprise over 10% of the data base. The low dose peak of the statistics, above, has focused our attention on the evaluation of LiF(Mg,Ti) dosimeters exposed at low dose, and read with Harshaw 5500 readers. The standard linear procedure, via an overall reader calibration factor, is observed to fail at low dose, in detailed calibrations from 0.02 mSv to 1 Sv. A significant improvement is achieved by a piecewise polynomials calibration curve. A cubic, at low dose is matched, at ∼10 mSv, in value and first derivative, to a linear dependence at higher doses. This improvement is particularly noticeable below 2 mSv, where over 60% of the evaluated dosimeters are found. (author)

  15. Tardive dyskinesia with low dose amisulpride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharoor, Hema; Padmavati, R

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to use amisulpride in the treatment of dysthymia and also as an adjunct treatment in patients with major depression. At low doses (50 mg), amisulpride preferentially blocks presynaptic auto receptors, enhances dopamine release, and therefore acts as a dopaminergic compound able to resolve the dopaminergic hypo activity that characterizes depression. Based on experimental data, amisulpride is the drug of choice for dopaminergic transmission disorders, both in depression and in schizophrenia. This case highlights the development of dyskinesia in a depressed patient treated with low dose amisulpride and fluvoxamine.

  16. Radiation induced diarrhoea - literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced diarrhoea is an acute side effect of radiotherapy treatment to the pelvic area, experienced by nearly all patients. This paper will explore the patho-physiological rationale of diarrhoea, the causes of radiation-induced diarrhoea, the factors that influence the severity and occurrence, and the treatment of diarrhoea in relation to the radiotherapy setting, by analysing the current literature and will conclude by outlining future directions in this field. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  17. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  18. Effects of emitter junction and passive base region on low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dose rate effect in bipolar devices consists in the increase of peripheral surface recombination current with dose rate decrease. This is due to the more rapid positive oxide charge and interface trap density build-up as the dose rate becomes lower. High dose rate elevated temperature irradiation is proposed for simulation if the low dose rate effect. In the present we tried to separate the effect of radiation-induced charge in the thick passivation oxide over the emitter junction and passive base regions of npn bipolar transistor. Its goal is to improve bipolar device design for use in space environments and nuclear installations. Three experiments were made during this work. 1. Experiment on radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) effect under elevated temperature was performed to show transistor degradation dependence on emitter-base bias. 2. High dose rate elevated and room temperature irradiation of bipolar transistors were performed to separate effects of emitter-junction and passive base regions. 3. Pre- and post- irradiation hydrogen ambient storage was used to investigate its effect on radiation-induced charge build-up over the passive base region. All experiments were performed with npn and pnp transistors. (authors)

  19. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Erkang; WU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    A bstract In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy a-particle irradiated and non-irradiated by- stander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensi- tive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline- 1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose a-particle radiation-induced damage in ir- radiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  20. Apoptosis and survival parameters during protection from radiation-induced thymocyte death by a candidate radioprotector, GC-2112, from Allium sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical studies on nuclear fallout effects show that whole-body exposure to relatively low doses of ionizing radiation (2-10 Gy) induces the hematopoietic syndrome (HS) characterized by severe anemia and immunodeficiency and death within 10-30 days. The thymocyte model applies in many cell death researches and is found to undergo a morphologically and molecularly distinct p53-based apoptosis with DNA-damaging insults, such as radiation exposure. We have shown that exogenously applied radioprotector from allium sativum (garlic), GC-2112, improves total cellular survival for various observation periods concomitantly shifting the LD50/24 from 7 Gy (control) to 21 Gy (GC-2112). This increased survival characteristic of the radioprotected macrophage-free thymocytes, however, fails to correlate with the prevention of apoptosis-associated DNA scissions. Mechanisms to the observed radiomodification may possibly involve cysteine compounds found rich in garlic. These preliminary findings show promise in the applications of selected herbal drugs as dietary prophylaxis against clinical morbidities arising from either medical, occupational or environmental exposures to ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. The OER at low-dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing interest in the treatment of human cancers with multifraction beam therapy at low dose-rates, on the assumption that the OER at low dose-rates is smaller than that at high dose-rates. A comparison has therefore been made of various published values of OER as a function of γ dose-rate for Vicia faba, HeLa cells, P388 cells, hamster cells and chromosome aberrations. The mean value of the OER at low dose-rate was about 20% lower than the mean OER obtained at high dose-rate, although two OER values at low dose-rates were significantly lower than the other reported values. There are technical difficulties associated with maintaining the test systems under hypoxic conditions for long periods of time and the observed decrease in cloning efficiency of hypoxic control cells indicates that cells can be damaged by this treatment alone. It is therefore possible that the high dose-rate OER values would have been reduced if the cells irradiated at high dose-rates under oxic and anoxic conditions had had a pre-treatment period of storage under anoxic conditions. (U.K.)

  2. Stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first section of the bibliography lists materials on the stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation, with particular reference to stimulation of germination and yield. The second section contains a small number of selected references on seed irradiation facilities. (author)

  3. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-05-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on hlumg cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from {sup 60}Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows

  4. The OER at low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author comments on a letter (Kal, H.B., and Barendsen, G.W., 1976, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 49, 1049) reviewing published values of the OER for low dose-rate γ-rays. Artefacts of the system may have been responsible for one very low OER value taken from work carried out in the early 1960s, but later work in which these problems were eliminated still yielded OER values significantly lower than for acute X- or γ-ray exposures. Consideration is given to significance of this reduction in OER for γ-rays at the low dose-rates characteristic of interstitial implants. The performance of these interstitial implants may be comparable with the most sophisticated and expensive pion or heavy ion treatments. (U.K.)

  5. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  6. 螺旋CT低剂量扫描对早产儿颅脑病变的诊断与防护价值%Diagnostic, preventive and protective value of helical CT scanning of low dose for premature infants with encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱大玲

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨螺旋CT扫描技术在早产儿颅脑病变诊断中的应用与防护价值.方法:对40例高度怀疑颅内病变的早产儿分别行常规剂量(120 Kv,150mAs)及低剂量(120 Kv,50mAs)CT扫描,观察比较其对病变的定量、定性诊断的差异及其辐射剂量的差异.结果:与常规剂量CT扫描相比,低剂量CT扫描对病变的定量与定性诊断无明显差异,而辐射剂量大幅度下降.结论:低剂量CT扫描技术适用于早产儿颅脑病变的检查,有利于患儿颅脑部的辐射防护.%Objective: To explore the application, preventive and protective value of helical CT scanning technique for premature infants with encephalopathy. Methods: 40 premature infants suspected of intracranial lesions received conventional dose CT scanning (120Kv, 150mAs) and low dose CT scanning (120Kv, 50mAs) , the differences of quantitative diagnosis, qualitative diagnosis for lesions and radiation dose were observed and compared. Results: There was no significant difference in quantitative diagnosis and qualitative diagnosis for lesions between conventional dose CT scanning and low dose CT scanning, but the radiation dose of low dose CT scanning decreased significantly. Conclusion; Low dose CT scanning technique is suitable for examination of premature infants with encephalopathy, which is helpful to radioprotection of premature infants.

  7. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested

  8. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  9. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  10. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  11. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acheva, A; Georgieva, R; Rupova, I; Boteva, R [Laboratory Molecular Radiobiology and Epidemiology, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, 132 Kliment Ohridski blvd, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Lyng, F [Radiation and Environmental Science Center, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin st, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: anjin_a@mail.bg

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  12. From Chernobyl to Fukushima: the effect of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Power Point presentation describes the Fukushima's reactors, recalls some data about the earthquake and tsunami, and indicates their consequences for the operation of the power station (notably the loss of cooling means). It identifies some design errors for the Chernobyl's and Fukushima's power stations, outlines differences between these two cases. It gives assessment of doses receives by external irradiation around Fukushima, of the dose rate evolution, of the sea contamination. It gives some data about the Chernobyl accident (radioactivity evolution). After some data about health consequences of Chernobyl, health risks and more particularly biological risks associated to low doses are described. Protection measures are evoked, as well as psycho-social impacts

  13. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, Stefan; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko;

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula......Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days...... with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer´s model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control...... that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer´s pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease....

  14. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses. PMID:27218294

  15. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  16. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage.

  17. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage. PMID:27656146

  18. [Low dose naltrexone for treatment of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesner, Karin Bruun; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte

    2015-10-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the use of low dose naltrexone (LDN) for off-label treatment of pain in diseases as fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis and morbus Crohn. The evidence is poor, with only few randomized double-blind placebo-controlled studies. The studies currently available are reviewed in this paper. LDN could be a potentially useful drug in the future for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, but more studies are needed to verify that it is superior to placebo, and currently it cannot be recommended as first-line therapy. PMID:26509454

  19. The principal phenolic and alcoholic components of wine protect human lymphocytes against hydrogen peroxide- and ionising radiation-induced DNA damage in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested the hypothesis that the alcoholic and phenolic components of wine are protective against the DNA damaging and cytotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation in vitro. The components of wine tested were ethanol, glycerol, a mixture of the phenolic compounds catechin and caffeic acid, and tartaric acid, all at concentrations that were 2.5% or 10.0% of the concentration in a typical Australian white wine Riesling. These components were tested individually or combined as a mixture and compared to a white wine stripped of polyphenols as well as a Hanks balanced salt solution control which was the diluent for the wine components. The effect of the components was tested in lymphocytes, using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, after 30 minutes incubation in plasma or whole blood for the hydrogen peroxide or gamma-radiation challenge respectively. The results obtained showed that ethanol, glycerol, the catechin-caffeic acid mixture, the mixture of all components, and the stripped white wine significantly reduced the DNA damaging effects of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation (ANOVA P = 0.043 - 0.001). The strongest protective effect against DNA damage by gamma irradiation was observed for the catechin-caffeic acid mixture and mixture of all components (30% and 32% reduction respectively). These two treatments as well as ethanol produced the strongest protective effects against DNA damage by hydrogen peroxide (24%, 25% and 18% respectively) . The protection provided by the mixture did not account for the expected additive protective effects of the individual components suggesting that the components may be exerting their effects through similar mechanisms which are saturated at the concentrations tested. Ethanol was the only component that significantly increased base-line DNA damage rate, however, this effect was negated in the mixture. In conclusion our results suggest that the main phenolic and alcoholic components of wine can reduce

  20. [Complications of low-dose amiodarone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, D; Gilad, R; Katz, E

    1991-11-15

    Complications of low-dose amiodarone in 83 patients, in whom the drug was effective and who were followed for 1-13 years, are presented. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 11 (in 8 by the finding of elevated TSH). In 2 of the 3 in whom clinical signs of hypothyroidism were evident, amiodarone was continued, but thyroxine was also given. In 5 others thyrotoxicosis ensued. Propylthiouracil (PTU) was given and amiodarone was discontinued. PTU was then stopped within 4-8 months, without recurrence of the hyperthyroidism. In 1 patient pneumonitis resolved spontaneously a few weeks after stopping amiodarone. Because of gastrointestinal distress amiodarone was stopped in 1 patient. In none were liver enzymes elevated, nor was the nervous system affected clinically. Photosensitivity in 6 patients and skin discoloration in 2 did not necessitate discontinuation of the drug. Blurred vision was reported by 4, but its connection with amiodarone was not proven. There was sinus bradycardia in 2. There was no arrhythmic effect of amiodarone seen on ECG nor on Holter monitoring, nor was there any mortality. We conclude that amiodarone in low doses causes many complications, most of them mild and transient. However, in only a few cases is discontinuation of the drug indicated. PMID:1752553

  1. Low dose spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhin R.E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the nature of unilateral spinal anesthesia using various modes of administration of low doses of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Materials and Methods. Prospectively, the randomized study included 56 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. In the control group bupivacaine of 5mg was administered simultaneously, in the main group — fractionally by 2.5 mg. The development of thermal and pain blocks from different sides was investigated. The data were statistically processed. Results. In the control group, the positioning of the patient usually began after the entire dose of anesthetic had been administered. In the case of temperature paresthesia in the area of the sacral segments of the full anesthesia throughout underlying limb was not always achieved. In 6 cases of block was not sufficient. In the main group patient positioning was performed after the administration of 2.5 mg of anesthetic and evaluate temperature paresthesia and in 2 cases the total dose was increased to 7.5 mg. The successful development of sensory block at fractional administration was significantly higher than in the single-step introduction. Conclusion. Temperature paresthesia occurs within the first minute and is an early predictor of developing spinal anesthesia. The area of arising paresthesia shows preferential distribution of the anesthetic. In the application of low dose local anesthetic the desired upper level of anesthesia via the patient positioning and dose adjustment may be achieved.

  2. Low-Dose Aspirin Treatment Alleviates Gamma Irradiation Impaired Fertility in Female Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), the extensively prescribed analgesic, can improve female fertility by suppressing the prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis and modulating the uterine circulation. Aspirin has also been found to exhibit a protective ability on the radiation induced oxidative stress. Thus the present work aims to investigate the effect of oral low-dose Aspirin treatment on the radiation induced female reproductive disturbance. Adult female rats were used in the current experiment. All rat group treatments started at the onset of the proestrus phase and terminated at the diestrus encompassing 2 complete estrus cycles. Subsequently, the rats were divided into 4 equal groups: Group 1-Control: female rats receiving distilled water via an oral gavage; Group 2- Irradiation: female rats subjected to 6 Gy gamma rays at the proestrus cycle and receiving distilled water; Group 3-Aspirin: rats orally administered a daily dose of 7mg/kg body weight aspirin dissolved in distilled water via an oral gavage and Group 4- Irradiation + Aspirin: female rats irradiated as group 2 and receiving aspirin treatment. A number of rats from each experimental group were allowed to mate following every treatment to serve as Control mated (Subgroup 1), Irradiated mated (Subgroup 2), Aspirin administered mated (Subgroup 3) and Irradiated + Aspirin treated mated (Subgroup 4). At the assigned day of the second estrus cycle completion, blood was collected from Groups 1-4 for subsequent hormonal assay, lipid peroxides and glutathione (GSH) estimation whereas Subgroups 1-4 were carefully monitored for reproduction and infertility rates. Results have shown that the 6 Gy γ- irradiation of the rats at the proestrus cycle (Group 2) caused a decrease in follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and estradiol (E2) levels associated with a drastic increase in the progesterone levels in addition to the significant

  3. In vitro studies to evaluate the protective effects of Cassia fistula on electron beam radiation induced damages in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is increasingly used for medical and occupational purposes and is an established weapon in the diagnosis and the therapy of cancer. Cassia fistula, a member of the Leguminosae family, it is used as a traditional medicine specially to treat the skin diseases. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the changes induced by different doses of Electron Beam radiation on Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF) and protective effects of Cassia fistula on the same. Aqueous, methanolic and ethonolic extracts of Cassia fistula were prepared. In vitro biochemical assays like DPPH radical scavenging assay, Ferric Anion Reducing Potential using TPTZ, Nitric Oxide scavenging assay. Total antioxidant determination assay, Super Anion Radical Scavenging assays were carried out to study the antioxidant properties. HDF cells were standardized and treated with the Cassia fistula MTT assay was performed. Cells were irradiated and MTT, Micronucleus (MN) assays were performed then compared with control and non-irradiated cells. Cells were treated with Cassia fistula and irradiated; MTT and MN were performed. On comparison with the standard Ascorbic acid, ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula was showing 90% activity. The ethanolic extract of Cassia fistula is having high EC50 value. On comparison to the standard the alcoholic extracts of Cassia fistula has shown a higher FRAP value. Aqueous extract of Cassia fistula has minimum Nitric oxide scavenging property compared to alcoholic extracts. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts of Cassia fistula has shown 38-40% of Superoxide Radical Scavenging property in 500 μg/mL concentration. Also ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Cassia fistula has remarkable antioxidant property. Hence these concentrations were selected for further studies. Human Dermal Fibroblast cells were treated with the 500 μg/ mL of alcoholic Cassia fistula extracts which showed a protection against irradiated groups. (author)

  4. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  6. In vitro studies to evaluate the antioxidant property of salidroside and rosavin and protective effects of electron beam radiation induced damages in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosavin and Salidroside are active component of Rhodiola rosea, it is a phenylpropanoid derivative of plant. Rhodiola rosea, also known as 'golden root' or 'roseroot' belongs to the plant family Crassulaceae. Rhodiola grows primarily in dry sandy ground at high altitudes in the arctic areas of Europe and Asia. Plant is rich with phenolic compounds, known to have a strong antioxidant property. Studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea has a capacity to decrease toxicity of Adriamycin (anti-cancer drugs), while it enhances their anti-carcinogenic effects. Enhanced antioxidant activity of Rhodiola rosea play role in the prevention of both chronic disease and aging. Present study is aimed to determine the antioxidant property of Rosavin and Salidroside and dose determination on human dermal fibroblast against dermal fibroblast. Rosavin and Salidroside were dissolved in 10% DMSO. Invitro biochemical assays like DPPH radical scavenging assay, Ferric Anion Reducing Potential using TPTZ, Nitric Oxide scavenging assay, Total antioxidant determination assay, Super Anion Radical Scavenging assays were carried out to know property of the extract. Extracts were then treated on monolayer dermal fibroblast cells survival assay was performed. Salidroside has shown 80% total antioxidant property compare to Rosavin with respect Ascorbic acid as a standard. 100'R concentration of Salidroside and Rosavin has quite equal potential to scavenging DPPH similar like Ascorbic acid. Ferric Anion Reducing Potential using TPTZ, Nitric Oxide scavenging assays have also shown both Salidroside and Rosavin has a good antioxidant property. Invitro studies on dermal fibroblast have shown remarkable protective effect on normal and irradiated groups. (author)

  7. How to understand low dose risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that those who were exposed to ionizing radiation have increased risks of developing malignancies. The magnitude of the risk varies depending on not only the dose but also age at the time of exposure, gender, background incidence rate etc. In the case of atomic bomb survivors, the relative risk of cancer is linearly related to the dose, and the sex averaged relative risk (exposure age is 30, risk calculation is when they reached age 70) is 1.5 at 1 Gy. Because the increased risks below 100 to 200 mGy are too small and not statistically significant, there are arguments in interpreting the risks at the low dose range. (author)

  8. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  9. MVA-based H5N1 vaccine affords cross-clade protection in mice against influenza A/H5N1 viruses at low doses and after single immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost H C M Kreijtz

    Full Text Available Human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype, frequently reported since 2003, result in high morbidity and mortality. It is feared that these viruses become pandemic, therefore the development of safe and effective vaccines is desirable. MVA-based H5N1 vaccines already proved to be effective when two immunizations with high doses were used. Dose-sparing strategies would increase the number of people that can be vaccinated when the amount of vaccine preparations that can be produced is limited. Furthermore, protective immunity is induced ideally after a single immunization. Therefore the minimal requirements for induction of protective immunity with a MVA-based H5N1 vaccine were assessed in mice. To this end, mice were vaccinated once or twice with descending doses of a recombinant MVA expressing the HA gene of influenza virus A/Vietnam/1194/04. The protective efficacy was determined after challenge infection with the homologous clade 1 virus and a heterologous virus derived from clade 2.1, A/Indonesia/5/05 by assessing weight loss, virus replication and histopathological changes. It was concluded that MVA-based vaccines allowed significant dose-sparing and afford cross-clade protection, also after a single immunization, which are favorable properties for an H5N1 vaccine candidate.

  10. Proceedings of the 8. LOWRAD: International conference on the effects of low doses and very low doses of ionizing radiation on human health and biotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental papers are presented in these proceedings covering the following subjects: radiation protection, dosimetry, radiation dosimetry, cells, technetium, plutonium, uranium, thorium, low dose irradiation, radiation doses, cesium, radiation chemistry, nuclear medicine, safety and occupational exposure, neoplasm, cytology and radioisotopes

  11. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  12. 'Low-dose' corticosteroid prophylaxis against fat embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, J; Lewis, M; Zaltzman, M; Feldman, C; Orford, A; Zwi, S

    1987-10-01

    The effect of 'low-dose' corticosteroids (9 mg/kg methylprednisolone), given after skeletal trauma, on the incidence of the fat embolism syndrome and isolated arterial hypoxemia was studied in 42 controls and 40 steroid-treated subjects. Fat embolism occurred in ten controls (23.8%) and one steroid-treated subject (2.5%) (p = 0.01). A further 44 subjects developed isolated hypoxemia. This was severe (PaO2 less than 50 mm Hg) in seven of 32 controls (21.9%) and one of 39 steroid-treated subjects (2.6%) (p = 0.01). The overall incidence of hypoxemia was 67.1%, affecting 33 controls (78.6%) and 22 steroid-treated patients (55%) (p less than 0.05). The degree of hypoxemia was severe (PaO2 less than 50 mm Hg) in 12 controls (28.6%) and two (5%) of the steroid-treated subjects (p = 0.005). No control subject died or required mechanical ventilation. One steroid-treated subject without fat embolism died of a fulminant infection. Although methylprednisolone in a relatively low dose provides protection against fat embolism and pulmonary dysfunction after skeletal trauma, the safety of this therapy requires further evaluation. PMID:3312625

  13. Homeostatic balance as an indicator of prolonged technogenic exposure in low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Indication of changes induced by ionizing radiation starting up a wide range of pathologic reactions in the disease developments still poses a significant problem in radiation medicine. It mainly concerns exposure to low dose-rate ionizing radiation, since its effects are still open to question, and today any researcher acknowledges that radiation induced pathological changes can accumulate at both subclinical and prenosological stages and develop not only in exposed persons, but also in their offspring. The subject of this study was workers of reactor and radiochemical productions of Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) exposed to external and combined (external and internal) radiation respectively. Two comparative groups were formed: reactor and radiochemical production workers. In the reactor production group of workers the cumulative dose of external γ-radiation was up to 300 mSv, in the radiochemical production group - up to 150 mSv. Age ranged from 40 to 50 years. The two groups were compared between each other. Above all, there were formed 'insider control' groups (workers of the same productions with zero doses) to assess the impact of radiation factor on central homeostatic mechanisms. These groups were created using pair technique in order to level somatic disorders influence on the parameters under study. Numbers of full and biochemical blood examinations, energy metabolism between cells, hormones of homeostasis by the adaptive hormone level - insulin and cortisol, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection systems, immune and vegetative systems were all analyzed. Analyses of the systems performed, it was found out that in persons having been exposed to long term occupational radiation there were significant changes indicating lipid peroxidation system activation, antioxidant protection system depression, as well as lowered energy metabolism. The higher external γ-doses the bigger these changes are. Results from the two groups of

  14. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at %235U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.)

  15. Contraception. Low-dose pill launched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    At a vibrant ceremony in Kampala, Uganda, the Minister of Women in Development, Youth and Culture launched the new low-dose oral contraceptive Pilplan which provides women more options for birth spacing. Diplomats, physicians, government officials, and business leaders attended the ceremony at the Sheraton Hotel Kampala. A dance group did an interpretation of "Women in Uganda: Gaining Momentum." The Minister considered the introduction of this new pill as a turning point for reproductive rights. A baseline survey among Ugandan women has shown that although almost all women were familiar with the pill, only 36% have ever used it and only 15% were currently using it. 80% thought that pill use was preferable to having an unplanned pregnancy. These findings convinced the Minister that ignorance and misconception keep women from using the pill. The government, health providers, and others need to educate women about Pilplan and how to use it correctly. A bilateral agreement between the Ministry of Health and USAID set in motion a social marketing project which has now launched two contraceptive methods: Pilplan in 1993 and the Protector condom in 1990. USAID vowed to continue to support Pilplan, particularly if men could also help in supporting birth spacing. A Uganda-based pharmaceutical firm will distribute Pilplan in Uganda through pharmacies, clinics, and health facilities. Pilplan targets all middle- to low-income women. PMID:12319754

  16. 染料木黄酮对X射线辐射所致HUVEC损伤的防护作用%Protective effect of genistein on high dose X-radiation-induced oxidative stress damage in HUVECs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申玉莉; 葛玲; 张继青; 陈丹; 王琪; 刘宏; 宋梦娇

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究染料木黄酮对大剂量X射线辐射诱导的人脐静脉血管内皮细胞(HUVEC)氧化性损伤的防护作用.方法 染料木黄酮浓度为0、5、20、50 μmol/L分别于辐照前2h预作用于HUVEC,以3.6Gy、6.0 Gy X射线照射后于24、48 h检测细胞内SOD、GSH-Px和ROS的水平变化.结果 与正常对照组比较,辐照模型组HUVEC细胞内SOD、GSH-Px的含量明显降低(P<0.01),ROS含量显著增加(P<0.01),且随着辐照剂量的增加变化越明显;与辐照模型组相比,染料木黄酮给药组能明显改善辐射诱导的氧化应激引起的损伤,显著降低ROS含量,增加SOD活性(P<0.01),在一定浓度范围内,防护作用随着染料木黄酮浓度的增加而增强,且染料木黄酮对3.6 Gy辐照剂量下的防护效果优于6.0 Gy辐照剂量.与辐照模型组相比,染料木黄酮各组细胞内GSH-Px水平无显著变化(P>0.05).结论 染料木黄酮有一定的抗辐射作用,在一定浓度范围内其防护效果呈现浓度依赖性.%Objective To study the protective role of genistein on high dose X-radiation-induced oxidative stress damage in HUVECs. Methods Before exposing to 3. 6 Gy or 6. 0 Gy X-ray, HUVECs incubated with different concentrations of genistein for 2 h. After 24 h and 48 h incubation, the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) ,glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected. Results Compared with the control group, the levels of ROS were apparently increased (P 0. 05). The protection of genistein against 3. 6 Gy X-ray irradiation was superior to that of 6. 0 Gy X-ray irradiation. Conclusion Genistein can ameliorate X-radiation-induced oxidative damage in HUVECs at a dosage dependent manner.

  17. Assessment of the expected harm from prenatal irradiation with low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of the coefficients, suggested by ICRP (Publication 45) for assessment of the risk from prenatal irradiation with low doses and low dose rates is discussed. This includes: development of lethal and curable cancer, severe genetic defects, death before implantation and retarded mental development. Summarizing the individual assessment, the total harm from prenatal irradiation with 1 mvSv have been estimated at 4,9.104 lost years. The expected harm from the additional irradiation of the Bulgarian population during the first year after the Chernobyl accident is evaluated on that basis, taking into account the number of expected pregnancies among Bulgarian women in reproductive age and the individual effective equivalent doses. 15 refs

  18. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-11-09

    that could be mitigated by over expression of the H2O2 metabolizing enzyme, catalase, and/or the mitochondrial form of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Furthermore, using radiation-induced genomically unstable cells, it was shown that steady-state levels of H2O2 were significantly elevated for many cell generations following exposure, catalase suppressed the radiation-induced mutator phenotype when added long after radiation exposure, unstable clones showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction some of which was characterized by improper assembly of SDH subunits (particularly subunit B), and chemical inhibitors of SDH activity could decrease steady-state levels of H2O2 as well as mutation frequency. These results support the hypotheses that 1) SDH mutations could contribute to transformation by inducing genomic instability and a mutator phenotype via increasing steady-state levels of ROS; 2) metabolic sources of O2•- and H2O2 play a significant role in low dose radiation induced injury and genomic instability; and 3) increased mutation rates in irradiated mammal cells can be suppressed by scavengers of H2O2 (particularly catalase) long after radiation exposure. Overall the results obtained during this period of support provide clear evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal oxidative metabolism in mitochondria that result in increases in steady-sate levels of H2O2 and other ROS are capable of significantly contributing to radiation-induced mutator phenotypes in mammalian cells.

  19. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  20. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors)

  1. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  2. Theoretical epidemiology applied to health physics: estimation of the risk of radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indirect estimation of low-dose radiation hazards is possible using the multihit model of carcinogenesis. This model is based on cancer incidence data collected over many decades on tens of millions of people. Available data on human radiation effects can be introduced into the modeling process without the requirement that these data precisely define the model to be used. This reduction in the information demanded from the limited data on human radiation effects allows a more rational approach to estimation of low-dose radiation hazards and helps to focus attention on research directed towards understanding the process of carcinogenesis, rather than on repeating human or animal experiments that cannot provide sufficient data to resolve the low-dose estimation problem. Assessment of the risk of radiation-induced breast cancer provides an excellent example of the utility of multihit modeling procedures

  3. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  4. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  5. Radiation-induced meningioma: a distinct molecular genetic pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Y; Chernova, O; Juen, S S; Somerville, R P; Israel, Z; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2000-07-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas arise after low-dose irradiation treatment of certain medical conditions and are recognized as clinically separate from sporadic meningioma. These tumors are often aggressive or malignant, they are likely to be multiple, and they have a high recurrence rate following treatment compared with sporadic meningiomas. To understand the molecular mechanism by which radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) arise, we compared genetic changes in 7 RIM and 8 sporadic meningioma (SM) samples. The presence of mutations in the 17 exons of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, which has been shown to be inactivated in sporadic meningiomas, was analyzed in RIM and SM using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. In contrast to SM, which showed NF2 mutations in 50% of specimens, no mutations were found in RIM. In addition, Western blot analysis of schwannomin/merlin protein, the NF2 gene product, demonstrated protein levels comparable to normal brain in 4/4 RIM tumor samples analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genomic regions, which were reported for SM, was also analyzed in all cases of RIM using 22 polymorphic DNA markers. Allele losses were found on chromosomes 1p (4/7), 9p (2/7), 19q (2/7), 22q (2/7), and 18q (1/7). From these observations we conclude that unlike sporadic meningiomas, NF2 gene inactivation and chromosome 22q deletions are far less frequent in RIM, and their role in meningioma development following low dose irradiation is less significant. Other chromosomal lesions, especially loss of 1p, possibly induced by irradiation, may be more important in the development of these tumors. PMID:10901233

  6. [Radiation-induced cancers: state of the art in 1997].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J M

    1997-01-01

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing with radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patients given well-known doses in well-defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of "clusters" of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low doses delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these "high" doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tabacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both in medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonably expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation-induced

  7. 大鼠急性放射性肝损伤及其保护的实验研究%Study on Mechanisms of Radiation-induced Hepatic Injury and Its Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏红强; 邓琳; 金冶宁

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨活性氧自由基(ROS)、一氧化氮(NO)和TGF-β1在大鼠急性放射性肝损伤中的机制及细胞保护剂安福定对大鼠急性放射性肝损伤的保护作用.方法:健康雄性SD大鼠48只,随机分成正常对照组(C组)、安福定组(A组)、单纯照射组(X组)3组各16例.正常对照组不予照射.其余两组给予一次性全肝照射,照射剂量20Gy.安福定组于照射前30 min腹腔内注射安福定200mg/kg;单纯照射组则照射前腹腔注射等容量的生理盐水.结果:照射后第4、8、14天的血ALT、AST、肝组织光镜未出现明显变化.电镜下明显的超微结构改变.单纯放射组大鼠血浆ROS活性明显高于正常对照组(P<0.05).安福定组血浆MDA含量显著低于正常对照组,而SOD活性则高于正常对照组.单纯放射组大鼠血浆NO含量明显高于正常对照组和安福定组(P<0.05).照射后第14天单纯放射组大鼠血浆TGF-131含量明显高于正常对照组和安福定组(P<0.05).结论:ROS、NO和TGF-β1都参与了急性放射性肝损伤.NO和TGF-β1则分别作为炎症介质和炎性细胞因子在损伤的进程中起关键作用.安福定对放射性肝损伤有保护作用.测定血MDA含量及SOD活性、NO和TGF-β1比血ALT、AST更早提示放射性肝损伤.%Objective : To observe the effects of oxygen free radical( ROS )、nitric oxide( NO )and TGF-β1 on the acute radiation-induced hepatic injury of rats. The protective effect of amifostine against radiation was also discussed. Methods: Forty-eight SDrats were divided into normal group, radiated group, and amifostine-pretreated group. The models were made hy a single radiation of 20Gy on whole liver except the normal group. Amifostine was given intraperitoneally ( 200mg/kg ) 30 minutes before irradiation to amifostine group. The levels of plasma ROS、NO、 TGF-β1 in rats were measured on the 4th,8th and 14th day after radiation. Animals were euthanized 14 days after irradiation, and

  8. The redox homeostasis system in radiation-induced genome instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The participation of the redox homeostasis system in the formation of the radiation-induced genome instability and new data of literature, that give a direct evidence the presence of this instability in vivo, is considered. The O2- radical, H2O2 and NO radical role as signal molecules, that trigger the cascade of active responses to change of redox status of the cells, are discussed. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) reorganize the membrane physico-chemical system of cell metabolism regulation. The data about changes in ROS generation system, including NO, that lead to genome instability after ionizing irradiation even in low doses, are analyzed. It is noted, that the radiation-induced genome instability and ROS production increase may be observed both in direct irradiated cells and their progeny and in the cells, that are not find oneself in ionization tracks, and their progeny. There evidences that the genome instability of irradiated cell progeny is maintained by the increases ROS production

  9. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  10. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Pijnappel, Ruud M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jansen, Liesbeth [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosterwijk, Jan C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Clinical Genetics, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the question of how low-dose radiation exposure affects breast cancer risk among high-risk women. A systematic search was conducted for articles addressing breast cancer, mammography screening, radiation and high-risk women. Effects of low-dose radiation on breast cancer risk were presented in terms of pooled odds ratios (OR). Of 127 articles found, 7 were selected for the meta-analysis. Pooled OR revealed an increased risk of breast cancer among high-risk women due to low-dose radiation exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9- 1.8). Exposure before age 20 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1) or a mean of {>=}5 exposures (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0) was significantly associated with a higher radiation-induced breast cancer risk. Low-dose radiation increases breast cancer risk among high-risk women. When using low-dose radiation among high-risk women, a careful approach is needed, by means of reducing repeated exposure, avoidance of exposure at a younger age and using non-ionising screening techniques. (orig.)

  11. Assessment research of the protective effect of Amifostine on radiation-induced lung injury of rats%阿米福汀对大鼠肺放射性肺损伤保护作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅欣; 章倩; 刘迎玫; 陈佳艺; 章真; 郭小毛

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose:Radiation-induced lung injury is a common complication in thoracic tumor after radiation therapy. How to protect the lung tissues from radiation injury is very important during radiotherapy. As a kind of radiation-protective agents, this study aimed to assess the protective effects of amifostine on acute lung tissues’ radiation-induced injury in the rats by radiated with chest wall tangent technology. Methods:Thirty-five female Fish-344 rats were randomized into 2 arms of 2 different fraction schedule:Conventional fraction, 20 rats were irradiated in 50 Gy per 25 fractions in 25 days. They were further randomized into 2 subgroups:10 with amifostine and 10 rats radiation alone without drug. Single fraction, 15 rats irradiated with 20 Gy in one fraction to the right lung. Three subgroups were randomized as:5 rats in irradiation plus amifostine;5 rats irradiation alone and 5 in control subgroup. Amifostine (140 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally 30 minutes before irradiation. Breathing rate, weight variation and plasmas of transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) 1 levels were recorded after irradiation. The lung tissue of irradiated side and the same side of control group were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson’s and Weigen’s staining and TGF-β1 immunohistochemistry staining. Results:In both arms, breathing rate increased in rats got irradiated, however, the coming time of fastest breathing rate delayed in rats with amifostine. There is no difference among all subgroups of TGF-β1 level in the plasma. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson’s and Weigen’s staining revealed alveolar wall became thicker and the pulmonary tissue fibrosis in irradiation alone group. However, in the radiation with amifostine group, no matter what schedule of fractionation, much more of the lung architecture was preserved and fibrosis was lessened. Immunohistochemistry staining was expressed positive to strongly positive in irradiation

  12. New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Yanagida

    2016-04-01

    With food allergies, removing the need to eliminate a food that could be consumed in low doses could significantly improve quality of life. This review discusses the importance of an OFC and OIT that use low doses of causative foods as the target volumes. Utilizing an OFC or OIT with a low dose as the target volume could be a novel approach for accelerating the tolerance to causative foods.

  13. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P Delia; G Sansotta; V Donate; P Frosina; G Messina; C De Renzis; G Famularo

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of a high-potency probiotic preparation on prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea in cancer patients.METHODS: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Four hundred and ninety patients who underwent adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy after surgery for sigmoid, rectal, or cervical cancer were assigned to either the high-potency probiotic preparation VSL#3 (one sachet t.i.d.,) or placebo starting from the first day of radiation therapy. Efficacy endpoints were incidence and severity of radiation-induced diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, and the time from the start of the study to the use of loperamide as rescue medication.RESULTS: More placebo patients had radiation-induced diarrhea than VSL#3 patients (124 of 239 patients, 51.8%, and 77 of 243 patients, 31.6%; P < 0.001) and more patients given placebo suffered grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared with VSL#3 recipients (55.4% and 1.4%, P < 0.001). Daily bowel movements were 14.7 ± 6 and 5.1 ± 3 among placebo and VSL#3 recipients (P < 0.05), and the mean time to the use of loperamide was 86 ± 6 h for placebo patients and 122 ± 8 h for VSL#3 patients (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: Probiotic lactic acid-producing bacteria are an easy, safe, and feasible approach to protect cancer patients against the risk of radiation-induced diarrhea.

  14. Theory and data for estimating the risk at low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological protection bases the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) model for estimating the risk at low doses and dose rates. Incorporation of risk concept into radiological protection brought the LNT model that implies that there is no wholly ''safe'' dose of radiation. Epidemiological studies have provided statistically reasonable basis for the LNT model for radiological protection. In estimating the cancer risk at low dose and dose rate using the atomic bomb survivor data, the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) is estimated. Theoretical and methodological issues on the DDREF emerged from the biological points of view. The International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) indicated that uncertainty analysis of the risk suggests that the LNT model is more reasonable than the threshold model with uncertain threshold doses. The latest epidemiological studies at low dose rates support LNT models. The gap between biology and epidemiology is increasing although some issues already exist in risk estimation at low doses. To get more scientifically reliable risk estimate, the dialogue between biology and epidemiology is needed to construct the framework of risk estimation such as biologically-based carcinogenesis models. (author)

  15. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  16. Validation of a Low Dose Simulation Technique for Computed Tomography Images

    OpenAIRE

    Muenzel, Daniela; Koehler, Thomas; Brown, Kevin; Žabić, Stanislav; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Waldt, Simone; Bendik, Edgar; Zahel, Tina; Schneider, Armin; Dobritz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Peter B Noël

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT) images from an original higher dose scan. Materials and Methods Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV) of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection). Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10–80 mAs) were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were comp...

  17. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  18. How relevant to radiation protection is the adaptive response mechanism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence that the phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) which results from a low dose exposure could modify the risk of a subsequent radiation exposure, and conceivably could even provide a net benefit rather than the putative radiation detriment at low doses. The AR has been widely observed in human and other mammalian cells exposed to low doses and low-dose rates. The phenomenon has been demonstrated at the level of one track per cell, the lowest insult a cell can receive. The AR to radiation has been shown to: (i) protect against the DNA damaging effects of radiation and many chemical carcinogens; (ii) increase the probability that improperly repaired cells will die by apoptosis, thereby reducing risk to the whole organism; (iii) suppress both spontaneous- and radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro; and (iv) reduce life-shortening in mice that develop myeloid leukemia as a result of a radiation exposure. It remains unclear, however, if the AR will be relevant to either risk assessment or radiation protection. There is currently no evidence of AR's influence on the incidence of radiogenic cancer in vivo although recent data indicate that adapting doses could lead to reduced risk in animal or human populations. Currently the existing dose control and dose management programs attempt to limit or eliminate even very low exposures, without evidence that such an approach has economic and societal benefits. Indeed, if adaptation from exposure to low doses provides the same responses in vivo as have been shown in vitro, then the current approach to protection against low doses may be counterproductive However, the demonstrated principles of the adaptive response to radiation in vitro will not likely influence the long held current formulation of radiation protection practices until the biological action of accumulated low doses of radiation in vivo and its impact on the modulation of radiation carcinogenesis are better understood. (author)

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna M. Hengel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess responses to low-dose ionizing radiation (LD-IR exposures potentially encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents or terrorist acts, a quantitative proteomic approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in a reconstituted human skin tissue model treated with 0.1 Gy of ionizing radiation. To improve the dynamic range of the assay, subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and to provide insight into radiation-induced alterations in protein localization. Relative peptide quantification across cellular fractions, control and irradiated samples was performing using 8-plex iTRAQ labeling followed by online two-dimensional nano-scale liquid chromatography and high resolution MS/MS analysis. A total of 107 proteins were detected with statistically significant radiation-induced change in abundance (>1.5 fold and/or subcellular localization compared to controls. The top biological pathways identified using bioinformatics include organ development, anatomical structure formation and the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. From the proteomic data, a change in proteolytic processing and subcellular localization of the skin barrier protein, filaggrin, was identified, and the results were confirmed by western blotting. This data indicate post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization and proteolytic processing playing an important role in regulating radiation response in human tissues.

  20. Measurement of 60CO gamma radiation induced attenuation in multimode step-index POF at 530 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Milan S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As optical fibres are used ever more extensively in space applications, nuclear industry, medicine and high-energy physics experiments, it has become essential to investigate the influence of ionizing radiation on their characteristics. In this work, the radiation-induced attenuation at 530 nm is investigated experimentally in step-index multimode polymethyl-methacrylate plastic optical fibres exposed to low dose-rate gamma radiation. Cumulative doses ranged from 50 Gy to 500 Gy. The radiation induced attenuation has been empirically found to obey the power law RIA= aDb, where D is the total radiation dose and a and b are the constants determined by fitting.

  1. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D.; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  2. 6. LOWRAD International Conference on Low dose radiation effects on human health and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the behalf of the Organising Committee, the International Journal of Low Radiation, the Hungarian Biophysical Society and the 'Frederic Joliot-Curie' National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene has been held the 6th International Conference on Low Dose Radiation Effects on Human Health and Environment (LOWRAD2007). LOWRAD2007 in Budapest, Hungary through October 18-20, 2007. The main topics was low radiation effect in the area of the radiology and nuclear medicine, radiation protection, dosimetry, environmental issues and waste management etc. One of the major goals of LOWRAD2007 is to encourage international cooperation and communication in all fields of low dose radiation science. This meeting provided a forum for the exchange of scientific ideas for all scientists of various countries. All aspects of low dose radiation research has been included in the scientific program. The program contained educational lectures to facilitate contacts between young and established scientists. (S.I.)

  3. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  4. Injury to the blood-testis barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionising radiation induces male infertility, accompanied by increasing permeability of the blood-testis barrier. However, the effect on male fertility by low-dose-rate chronic radiation has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of low-dose-rate chronic radiation on male mice were investigated by measuring the levels of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and occludin-1), Niemann-Pick disease type 2 protein (NPC-2) and anti-sperm antibody (AsAb) in serum. BALB/c mice were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (3.49 mGy h-1) for total exposures of 0.02 (6 h), 0.17 (2 d) and 1.7 Gy (21 d). Based on histological examination, the diameter and epithelial depth of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice. Compared with those of the non-irradiated group, 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice showed significantly decreased ZO-1, occludin-1 and NPC-2 protein levels, accompanied with increased serum AsAb levels. These results suggest potential blood-testis barrier injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to low-dose-rate chronic radiation. (authors)

  5. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  6. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  7. PREOPERATIVE THERAPY OF LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN IN INTERNAL MAMMARY ARTERY BYPASS OPERATIONS WITH AND WITHOUT LOW-DOSE APROTININ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHONBERGER, JPAM; BREDEE, JJ; VANOEVEREN, W; VANZUNDERT, AAJ; VERKROOST, M; TERWOORST, J; BAVINCK, JH; BERREKLOUW, E; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1993-01-01

    The effect of preoperative low-dose aspirin (1 mg/kg of body weight) and intraoperative low-dose aprotinin (2 million kallikrein inactivator units) treatment on perioperative blood loss and blood requirements in patients who undergo internal mammary artery bypass operations is unknown. Therefore, we

  8. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Foster, P. [Masson Hanger Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference.

  9. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  10. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Y. Chuang

    2006-08-31

    It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose γ-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

  11. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Munjal M; Patel, Neal H; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Giedzinski, Erich; Tseng, Bertrand P; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy), few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy), where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues) may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT) animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  12. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    Full Text Available The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy, few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy, where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  13. Protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low dose energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade Q.; Gridley, Daila S.; Rodhe, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-12-01

    Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposures of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to 224 proteins (or their phosphorylated forms) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured until fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high-dose rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 or 6 h after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loading onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. The results showed that low dose protons altered the expression of more than 10% of the proteins listed in the microarray analysis in various protein functional groups. Cell cycle (24%) related proteins were induced by protons and most of them were regulators of G1/S-transition phase. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles, cell cycle related proteins, cytoskeleton and signal transduction protein groups showed significantly more changes induced by protons compared with other protein functional groups.

  14. Low-dose CT denoising with convolutional neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Weihua; Liao, Peixi; Li, Ke; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the potential radiation risk, low-dose CT has attracted much attention. However, simply lowering the radiation dose will lead to significant deterioration of the image quality. In this paper, we propose a noise reduction method for low-dose CT via deep neural network without accessing original projection data. A deep convolutional neural network is trained to transform low-dose CT images towards normal-dose CT images, patch by patch. Visual and quantitative evaluation demonstrates a competing performance of the proposed method.

  15. Low-Dose CT via Deep Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Weihua; Liao, Peixi; Li, Ke; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the potential radiation risk, low-dose CT has attracted more and more attention. However, simply lowering the radiation dose will significantly degrade the imaging quality. In this paper, we propose a noise reduction method for low-dose CT via deep learning without accessing the original projection data. An architecture of deep convolutional neural network was considered to map the low-dose CT images into its corresponding normal-dose CT images patch by patch. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate a state-the-art performance of the proposed method.

  16. Even low doses of radiation lead to DNA damage accumulation in lung tissue according to the genetically-defined DNA repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies increases the exposure of healthy lung tissue to low-dose radiation. The biological impact of repetitive low-dose radiation on the radiosensitive lung is unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, using mouse strains with different genetic DNA repair capacities, we monitored the extent of DNA damage in lung parenchyma after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose 100-mGy radiation. Results: Using 53BP1 as a marker for double-strand breaks, we observed DNA damage accumulation during fractionated low-dose radiation with increasing cumulative doses. The amount of radiation-induced 53BP1 varied significantly between bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, suggesting that different cell populations in the lung parenchyma had varying vulnerabilities to ionizing radiation. The genetic background of DNA repair determined the extent of cumulative low-dose radiation damage. Moreover, increased DNA damage during fractionated low-dose radiation affected replication, and apoptosis in the lung parenchyma, which may influence overall lung function. Conclusion: Collectively, our results suggest that low, yet damaging, doses of radiation increase the risk of toxicity to normal lung tissue and the probability of developing secondary malignancies

  17. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia during low-dose amiodarone therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jessurun, GAJ; Hoogenberg, K; Crijns, HJGM

    1997-01-01

    Two cases of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity during a relatively short period of low-dose amiodarone treatment are reported. The toxicity risk of amiodarone is determined by cumulative factors in individual patients.

  18. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  19. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  20. Radiation-induced cancers in the rat, an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation carcinogenesis at low doses raises a major radiological protection problem; we have attempted to deal with it through animal investigations involving over 3,000 rats. For various radiation types, dose-effect relationships as well as possible synergies with endogenous or exogenous chemical factors were studied. The chief problem being the possibility of extrapolation to man, a comparison was made between man and rat with the only human data available from radon inhalation in uranium miners

  1. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be indicate that they are low. As a result, the risks are impossible to detect in population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relationship between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contrasts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any numbers of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study

  2. Discriminating Gene Expression Signature of Radiation-Induced Thyroid Tumors after Either External Exposure or Internal Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Chevillard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation.

  3. Discriminating gene expression signature of radiation-induced thyroid tumors after either external exposure or internal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Schlumberger, Martin; Hofman, Paul; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-12-21

    Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation.

  4. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  5. Ventilation with low-dose carbon monoxide protects non-heart-beating donor rat lungs against worm ischemic injury%低浓度一氧化碳通气减轻无心跳供体肺的热缺血损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈乾坤; 姜格宁; 谢博雄; 丁嘉安; 陈晓峰

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the preservative effect of ventilation with low-dose carbon monoxide during warmischemia in non-heart-beating donor rat lungs. Methods Twelve animals were divided into a CO group (n = 6) , which received ven-tilation with low-dose carbon monoxide during a 4-hour warm ischemic period, and a control group (n = 6), which received no ventila-tion. PaO2, myeloperoxidase(MPO)activity, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophil count and the wet-to-dry (W/D) lung weightratio were recorded in each group. Results At the time point of 1 hour, 2 hours and 4 hours reperfusion, PaO2 in control group weresignificantly lower than CO group [(270±70) mm Hg vs. (400±80) mm Hg, (210±50) mm Hg vs. (320±60) mm Hg, (160±40) mm Hg vs. (250±55) mm Hg, P <0.05]. After 4 hours reperfusion, the W/D lung weight ratio in control group was signifi-cantly higher than CO group ( 7.3±0.5 vs. 5.4±0.8, P = 0.06 ). MPO activity in control group were significantly higher than inCO group (0.46±0.05 vs.0.27±0.06, P=0.015). BAL neutrophil count in control group was much higher than in CO group[(132±37)×105 vs. (97±28)×105, P < 0.05 ]. Expression of IL-1β mRNA in CO group was significantly lower than in controlgroup (0.435±0.221 vs. 0.592±0.121, P <0.05). Expression of caspase 3 mRNA in CO group were obviously lower than incontrol group (0.412±0.132 vs. 0.613±0.104, P<0.05). Conclusion Ventilation with low-dose monoxise can protectnon-heart-beating donor rat lungs againt warm ischemic injury by inhibiting the expression of proimflammatory factor IL-1β and apopto-sis-associated gene caspase 3. Ventilation with low-dose carbon monoxide presents a new strategy for the protection of lung graft in non-heart-beating donors.%目的 探讨低浓度一氧化碳通气对无心跳供体(NHBD)移植肺组织的热缺血损伤保护机制.方法 对供体大鼠NHBD给予低浓度CO机械通气,利用大鼠左肺移植动物模型进行研究;再灌注后测定动脉

  6. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be transmitted to children conceived after exposure. Studies of these risks in exposed population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relations hi between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contracts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any number of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to

  7. Low dose radiation effects: an integrative european approach (Risc-Rad Project) coordinated by the Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISC-RAD (Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by ionizing Radiations) is an Integrated Project funded by the European Commission under 6. Framework Programme / EURATOM. RISC-RAD started on 1. January 2004 for a duration of four years. Coordinated by Cea (Dr Laure Sabatier), it involves 11 European countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) and 29 research institutions. Objectives: Exposures to low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are very frequent in normal living environment, at work places, in industry and in medicine. Effects of these exposures on human health cannot be reliably assessed by epidemiological methods, nor is thoroughly understood by biologists. RISC-RAD project proposes to help bridging the gap of scientific knowledge about these effects. To achieve this goal, a necessary key step is to understand the basic mechanisms by which radiation induces cancer. Studying this multistage process in an integrated way, the project offers a new biological approach characterised by and clear-cut and objective-driven scientific policy: the project is focused on the effects of low doses (less than 100 mSv) and protracted doses of radiation. It aims at identifying new parameters that take into account the differences in radiation responses between individuals. A group of modelers works closely with the experimental teams in order to better quantify the risks associated with low and protracted doses. Research work is divided into five work packages interacting closely with each other. WP1 is dedicated to DNA damage. Ionizing Radiation (IR) produce a broad spectrum of base modifications and DNA strand breaks of different kinds, among which double-strand breaks and 'clustered damage' which is thought to be a major feature in biological effectiveness of IR. The aim of Work Package 1 is to improve understanding of the initial DNA damage induced by

  8. Low-Dose Interleukin-2 Therapy: A Driver of an Imbalance between Immune Tolerance and Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Kosmaczewska

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in autoimmune responses was established as a cytokine possessing strong pro-inflammatory activity. Studies of the past few years have changed our knowledge on IL-2 in autoimmune chronic inflammation, suggesting its protective role, when administered at low-doses. The disrupted balance between regulatory and effector T cells (Tregs and Teffs, respectively) is a characteristic of autoimmune diseases, and is dependent on homeostatic cytokines, inc...

  9. Low-Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low dose exposures. This involves the study of existing knowledge and the evaluation of science information presented within a variety of formats, as educational information, news media stories, and alternative communication methods (personal contact, small group interaction, email and internet, etc.). Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low- dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  10. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure. PMID:27425828

  11. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked – the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that “stress” can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called “non-targeted” mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the “health” of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed

  12. Validation of a low dose simulation technique for computed tomography images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT images from an original higher dose scan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection. Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10-80 mAs were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. RESULTS: Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was -1.2% (range -9% to 3.2% and -0.2% (range -8.2% to 3.2%, respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9-10.2 HU (noise and 1.9-13.4 HU (CT values, without significant differences (p>0.05. Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. CONCLUSION: Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques.

  13. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eCharlebois

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277. Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta 1-4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  14. Radiation-induced-radioresistance: mechanisms and modification radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The term radiation-induced-radioresistance (RIR) has been chosen to explain a particular class of resistance against lethal doses of radiation, which is transient and is induced by pre-exposure to low doses of radiation. This is a genetically governed phenomenon and is different from adaptation which in one of its several senses, refers to evolutionary transformation into new behavioural patterns. RIR is understood to be an evolutionarily conserved fundamental cellular defense mechanism. Small doses of radiation acting as stress stimuli evoke a concerted action of molecular pathways which help the organism to cope-up with the genotoxic effects of lethal doses of radiation given subsequently. Such molecular pathways are a complex interplay of genetic and biochemical entities and are increasingly becoming the focus of research world over. Most of our information on this subject has been gathered from prokaryotes, simpler eukaryotes, human cells and the epidemiological studies. A number of genes such as GADD 45, CDKN1A, PBP74, DIR1, DDR have been reported by to participate in RIR. However, till date, the mechanism of RIR remain poorly understood. In this deliberation some of our findings on mechanisms of RIR will be presented. Further, modification of RIR by a metabolic modifier, presently under clinical investigations for tumor radiotherapy, will also be presented

  15. Processability improvement of polyolefins through radiation-induced branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Song; Phillips, Ed; Parks, Lewis

    2010-03-01

    Radiation-induced long-chain branching for the purpose of improving melt strength and hence the processability of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) is reviewed. Long-chain branching without significant gel content can be created by low dose irradiation of PP or PE under different atmospheres, with or without multifunctional branching promoters. The creation of long-chain branching generally leads to improvement of melt strength, which in turn may be translated into processability improvement for specific applications in which melt strength plays an important role. In this paper, the changes of the melt flow rate and the melt strength of the irradiated polymer and the relationship between long-chain branching and melt strength are reviewed. The effects of the atmosphere and the branching promoter on long-chain branching vs. degradation are discussed. The benefits of improved melt strength on the processability, e.g., sag resistance and strain hardening, are illustrated. The implications on practical polymer processing applications such as foams and films are also discussed.

  16. Hazard of the radiation induced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of thyroid cancer in Belarus before Chernobyl accident was low and made in different age and sex groups 0,03-2,5 (male) and 0,1-3,9 (female) per 100000 correspondingly. Different risk factors, which can influence the thyroid cancer development, are being taken into account. They are the factors of environment (strong external irradiation, long-time irradiation for medical purposes or in result of disaster), endo gen factors (hormonal, reproductive, genetic predisposition), some medicinal preparations and other. The protective effect of vegetable and fish consumption was found out. Among the factors of thyroid cancer development one of the most important is radiation. There is a point of view, which assumes that one of the reasons of thyroid cancer cases increase among the population of developed countries is increase of radiation induced thyroid cancer. The results of first research testify the influence of radiation factor on thyroid cancer development. During the period 1920 -1960 in the USA X-ray therapy was applied for the treatment of different good-quality diseases. Thyroid got in the zone of irradiation during the complex treatment with using of radiation. The results of the research of 1970 revealed that 70% of children with thyroid cancer were exposed to radiation in children's age. The subsequent researches of by-effects from the side of a thyroid at beam therapy of various diseases alongside with the results of the estimation of consequences of inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki irradiation owing to nuclear bombardment have shown the influence of irradiation of a thyroid on cancer development. High quantity of radio-epidemiological researches was directed to the studying of the consequences of thyroid external irradiation at young age. In all carried out researches the quantity of observed thyroid cancer cases among irradiated people has exceeded number of expected. The influence of thyroid internal irradiation by I-131 at young age was

  17. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  18. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, K. [Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Nomura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kojima, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    after radon inhalation. Vasodilation, alleviation of diabetic symptoms and morphine-like analgesic effects were observed, suggesting that these change constitute part of the mechanisms of the radon spring therapy on the above conditions. In conclusion, we clarified that adequate oxygen stress induced by low dose radiation activates chemical biological protective function, such as induction of the synthesis of SOD and GSHP{sub x}. It is possible that activation of these mechanisms alleviates in vivo oxidation injuries resulting in alleviation of pathologic condition, such as symptoms of diabetes mellitus. Namely, adequate activation of the functions of the living body by low dose radiation can contribute to suppressing aging and to preventing or reducing diseases which are thought to involve peroxidation and have been regarded as diseases for which radon spring water is an effective treatment. (author)

  19. Low dose computed tomography of the chest : Applications and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In areas with a high intrinsic contrast such as the chest, radiation dose can be reduced for specific indications. Low dose chest CT is feasible and cannot only be applied for lung cancer screening, but also in daily routine and for early detection of lung destruction. We showed in a small sample of

  20. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  1. Low-dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, S. Ravih; Cader, Rizna Abdul; Mohd, Rozita; Yen, Kong Wei; Ghafor, Halim Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: Low dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity Symptoms: Epigastric pain Medication: Withdrawal of cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology • Hepatology • Gastroenterology • Toxicology Objective: Unexpected drug reaction Background: Cyclophosphamide is commonly used to treat cancers, systemic vasculitides, and kidney diseases (e.g., lupus nephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Acute adverse effects include bone marrow ...

  2. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  3. p53-dependent apoptosis suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About half of human conceptions are estimated not to be implanted in the uterus, resulting in unrecognizable spontaneous abortions. Experimental studies with mice have established that irradiation during the preimplantation period of the embryo induces a high incidence of prenatal deaths but virtually no malformations. This suggests that some mechanism is screening out the damaged fetuses. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of tissue repair of radiation-induced teratogenic injury, we compared the incidences of radiation-induced malformations and abortions in p53 null (p53-/-) and wild-type (p53+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy on day 9.5 of gestation, p53-/- mice showed a 70% incidence of anomalies and a 7% incidence of deaths, whereas p53+/+ mice had a 20% incidence of anomalies and a 60% incidence of deaths. Similar results were obtained after irradiation on day 3.5 of gestation. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and to embryonic or fetal lethality supports the notion that the p53 gene protects embryos and fetuses against the teratogenic effects of radiation by eliminating cells that have been badly damaged. In fact, after X-irradiation, the frequency of dying cells by apoptosis was greatly increased in tissues of the p53+/+ fetuses but not at all in those of the p53-/- fetuses. Mammals are protected from radiation-induced injury by two mechanisms, p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair in addition to well known DNA repair. Therefore, there are threshold doses below which there is no induction of teratogenic and carcinogenic effects after exposure to low-level radiation. (author)

  4. Comparison of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetics on low dose aspirin and not on low dose aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the frequency of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetes patients who are taking low dose aspirin with those patients who are not taking low dose aspirin. Study design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi for a period of two years (June 2006-May 2008). Patients and Methods: Sixty diabetic patients were selected who were taking low dose aspirin comparing group A and sixty diabetic patients who were not taking aspirin were placed in group B. These patients were selected from the OPD through non probability convenience sampling. All these patients were being followed up in medical outpatient quite regularly on fort-nightly basis. Data had been collected through a carefully designed questionnaire. Results: In group A, 90% of the patients had uric acid less than 445 micro mol/l and 10% of the patients had uric acid more than 445micro mol/l. Whereas in group B 100% of the patients had uric acid less than 445umol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Aspirin in low doses cause hyperuricemia and regular monitoring of uric acid is mandatory to prevent its adverse effects. (author)

  5. The effect of degree of deacetylation on the radiation induced degradation of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced degradation of chitosan having different degree of deacetylation (DD) ratios was investigated. Chitosan samples were irradiated with gamma rays in air at ambient temperature in the solid state at a low dose rate. Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography. Changes in their viscosity values as a function of dose, were also determined. Chains scission yields, G(S), and degradation rates were calculated. It was observed that the DD ratio was an important factor controlling the G(S) and degradation rate of chitosan. The change in the scission yield was attributed to the change in the crytallinity of the chitosan chains that was a result of a change in DD. - Highlights: • Radiation-induced degradation of chitosan described. • The influences of the DD on the radiation-induced degradation of chitosan were examined. • G(S) and degradation rate of chitosan were calculated by using molecular weights data obtained from size exclusion chromatography

  6. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  7. The 20th L H Gray Conference - Radiation Cancer Analysis and Low Dose Risk Assessment: New Developments and Perspectives (Ede, the Netherlands, February 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few international venues where scientists in vastly different fields working on a common problem, or on a number of closely related problems, can get together in an intimate setting to present the results of their research and to discuss their approaches and views in a collegial atmosphere, and without the trappings of a huge convention with its conflicting parallel sessions and distracting events. Over the years, the L H Gray Conferences have provided an ideal setting for such intimate gatherings. This year the 20th L H Gray Conference, held in Ede, the Netherlands, was no exception. Convened for the first time outside the United Kingdom and hosted by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). Paramount in all the participants' minds was the emerging information from molecular radiation biology on the recently recognised 'new' processes such as genomic instability, bystander effects, hypersensitivity, and the adaptive response. A novel aspect this year was the introduction of the opportunity, both at the beginning and at the end of the meeting, to participate in a 'vote' on controversial subjects by answering electronically such questions as: 'does radiation hormesis occur at low doses?' and 'should an age-dependence of radiological risk be incorporated into recommendations for radiation protectionThere appears to be no evidence for radiation-induced genomic instability, at least in this tumour. If this model holds for other tumour types, it would suggest that there is no 'radiation fingerprint' and that no special mechanism lies behind radiation-induced cancer. The major social event of the meeting was an afternoon devoted to a delightful excursion to the renowned Kroeller-Mueller Museum in the nearby national park (De Hoge Veluwe). Our Dutch hosts were even able to order up some sunshine for the day. After an afternoon of strolling through the museum and surrounding park, we were bussed to a hotel on the precipitous

  8. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially.

  9. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially. PMID:12881977

  10. Low-dose protocol for head CT in evaluation of hydrocephalus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suspicion of ventriculo–peritoneal shunt failure is classified as the most common indication for CT in children with hydrocephalus. The main target of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a low-dose protocol and to compare a total DLP received by patients in compared protocols. Our retrospective analysis included 256 examinations performed in patients aged from 1 month to 18 years, with body mass ranging from 3 to 100 kg. The examinations were conducted in the years 2009–2011. A total number of 128 examinations were performed on the basis of the low-dose protocol and 128 according to a standard protocol using the Siemens SOMATOM Definition AS 128-slice scanner. The analysis showed a full value of the diagnostic low-dose protocol with a simultaneous decrease of the total dose of DLP to the average of 40%. Application protocol with lower mAs in assessing the causes of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt failure in children with hydrocephalus is coherent with the valid principles of radiation protection in pediatrics and reduces the total DLP while maintaining a very good diagnostic value

  11. Treatment of refractory catatonic schizophrenia with low dose aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This case is of 54-year-old female with catatonic schizophrenia, characterized by treatment resistance to the pharmacotherapy with olanzapine, risperidone, flunitrazepam, and ECT. Olanzapine and risperidone and flunitrazepam did not improve her catatonic and psychotic symptoms, and induced the extrapyramidal symptoms. The effects of ECT did not continue even for a month. However, the treatment with low-dose aripiprazole dramatically improved the patient’s psychotic symptoms and extrapyramidal symptoms. The mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose aripiprazole in this case remain unclear, but unlike other antipsychotics, aripiprazole is a dopamine D2 partial agonist. In this regard, our results suggest that aripiprazole has numerous advantages, especially in cases of stuporous catatonia and a defective general status.

  12. The European initiative on low-dose risk research: from the HLEG to MELODI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of low-dose risk research for radiation protection is now widely recognised. The European Commission (EC) and five European Union (EU) Member States involved in the Euratom Programme set up in 2008 a 'High Level and Expert Group on European Low Dose Risk Research' (HLEG) aimed at identifying research needs and proposing a better integration of European efforts in the field. The HLEG revised the research challenges and proposed a European research strategy based on a 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI). In April 2009, five national organisations, with the support of the EC, created the initial core of MELODI (http://www.melodi-online.eu) with a view to integrate the EU institutions with significant programmes in the field, while being open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders, and to develop an agreed strategic research agenda (SRA) and roadmap. Since then, open workshops have been organised yearly, exploring ideas for SRA implementation. As of October 2014, 31 institutions have been included as members of MELODI. HLEG recommendations and MELODI SRA have become important reference points in the radiation protection part of the Euratom Research Programme. MELODI has established close interactions through Memorandum of Understanding with other European platforms involved in radiation protection (Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS) and, together with EURADOS, with the relevant medical European Associations. The role of Joint Programming in priority setting, foreseen in the forthcoming EU Horizon 2020, calls for keeping MELODI an open, inclusive and transparent initiative, able to avoid redundancies and possible conflicts of interest, while promoting common initiatives in radiation protection research. An important issue is the establishment of a proper methodology for managing these initiatives, and this includes the set-up of an independent MELODI Scientific Committee recently extended to Alliance, NERIS

  13. Low Dose Intermittent Isotretinoin Therapy in Moderate Acne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Belçın İzol; Emel Bülbül Başkan; Zübeyde Başar; Şükran Tunalı; Hayriye Sarıcaoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficiency and side effects of intermittent low dose isotretinoin therapy in moderate acne. Materials and Methods: Patients followed up at our acne outpatient clinic between September 2007 and April 2009 were evaluated. Those treated with 20 mg/day isotretinoin three times a week were included in the study. Relevant data were recorded from patient files. We recorded the age and weight of the cases, duration of acne, previous treatments, ac...

  14. Role of animal studies in low-dose extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current data indicate that in the case of low-LET radiation linear, extrapolation from data obtained at high doses appears to overestimate the risk at low doses to a varying degree. In the case of high-LET radiation, extrapolation from data obtained at doses as low as 40 rad (0.4 Gy) is inappropriate and likely to result in an underestimate of the risk

  15. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  16. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Mammals 1

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko; Kishikawa, Masao

    1991-01-01

    Radiation has been applied widely to clinics, researches and industries nowadays. Irradiation by atomic bomb produced many victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Radiation effects on animals and human belings have been reported extensively, especially at a dose range of high amount of radiation. As radiation effects at low dose have not been well studied, it is believed that even a small amount of radiation produces hazardous effects. However, it might not be true. Beneficial effects of a low dos...

  17. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-07-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  18. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Burke, Paula; Besplug, Jill; Slovack, Mark; Filkowski, Jody; Pogribny, Igor

    2004-04-14

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16{sup INKa} and DNA repair gene O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16{sup INKa} and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure.

  19. Radiatively induced Quark and Lepton Mass Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra $U(1)$ gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including $\\mu-e$ conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the $(g-2)_\\mu$ in our model.

  20. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  1. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  2. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  3. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, K; Boberg, J; Isling, L K; Christiansen, S; Hass, U

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because of small number of animals or few doses investigated these data have not been used by EFSA as point of departure for the newly assessed tolerable daily intake (TDI). We performed a study with perinatal exposure to BPA (0, 0.025, 0.25, 5, and 50 mg/kg bw/day) in rats (n = 22 mated/group). One of the aims was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose-response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg/kg BPA, indicating an increased mammary development at this low dose only. Increased prevalence of intraductal hyperplasia was observed in BPA females exposed to 0.25 mg/kg at PD 400, but not at PD 100, and not at higher or lower doses. The present findings support data from the published literature showing that perinatal exposure to BPA can induce increased mammary growth and proliferative lesions in rodents. Our results indicate that low-dose exposure to BPA can affect mammary gland development in male and female rats, although higher doses show a different pattern of effects. The observed intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may not be sufficiently protected. PMID:27088260

  4. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  5. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouter van Es, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Engelen, A.M. [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Witkamp, T.D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Ramos, L.M.P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Feldberg, M.A.M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-05-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging appearance of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. Design. MR imaging was performed in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy and in one with surgically proven radiation fibrosis of the brachial plexus. Patients. Three patients who had had radiation therapy to the axilla and supraclavicular region (two with breast carcinoma and one with Hodgkin`s lymphoma) presented with symptoms in the arm and hand. To exclude metastases or tumor recurrence MR imaging was performed. Results and conclusion. In one patient, fibrosis showing low signal intensity was found, while in two patients high signal intensity fibrosis surrounding the brachial plexus was found on the T2-weighted images. In one case gadolinium enhancement of the fibrosis was seen 21 years after radiation therapy. It is concluded that radiation-induced brachial plexopathy can have different MR imaging appearances. We found that radiation fibrosis can have both low or high signal intensities on T2-weighted images, and that fibrosis can enhance even 21 years after radiation therapy. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  6. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  7. A case of radiation-induced glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of malignant cerebellar glioma developing 25 years after radiotherapy for pineal tumor is described. The patient is a 40-year-old male, who was admitted to our department with complaints of dizziness and gait disturbance. neurological examinations revealed symptoms involving the left cerebellar hemisphere and cerebellar vermis. CT scan and MRI demonstrated a circularly enhanced tumor which was located in the left cerebellar hemisphere extending to the vermis. The tumor was diagnosed as malignant glioma. In view of the former radiotherapy, this glioma was suspected to have been induced by radiation. The situation conformed to Walker's criteria for radiation-induced tumor. With the patient under general anesthesia, the tumor was subtotally removed by means of suboccipitel craniectomy. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as astrocytoma, grade 3. Most radiation-induced gliomas are malignant. There seems to be no significant correlation between the radiation dose; the latent period widely varies, ranging from several years to more than 20 years. Even if the radiation dose is small, there still exists the risk that radiation might induce a tumor. It was concluded that the possibility of radiation-induced tumor should be kept in mind whenever radiation therapy is carried out for brain tumors. (author)

  8. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  9. Micronuclei: sensitivity for the detection of radiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro cytokinesis-block (CB) micronucleus (MN) assay for human peripheral blood has been used extensively for the assessment of chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation and chemicals and considered a suitable biological dosimeter for estimating in vivo whole body exposures, particularly in the case of large scale radiation accidents. One of the major drawbacks of the MN assay is its reduced sensitivity for the detection of damage induced by low doses of low LET radiation, due to the high variability among the spontaneous MN frequencies. It is suggested that age, smoking habit and sex are the main confounding factors that contribute to the observed variability. Previous work in our laboratory, shows a significant positive correlation of the spontaneous and radiation induced MN frequencies with age and smoking habit, the latter being the strongest confounder. These findings led to in vitro studies of the dose-response relationships for smoking and non smoking donors evaluated separately, using 60Co γ rays. The objectives of the present work are: 1-To increase the amount of data of the dose-response relationships, using γ rays from a 60Co source, for smoking and non smoking donors, in order to find, if applicable, a correction factor for the calibration curve that takes into account the smoking habit of the individual in the case of accidental overexposure dose assessment, particularly in the low dose range. 2-To establish general conclusions on the current state of the technique. The sample for smoking and non smoking calibration curves was enlarged in the range of 0Gy to 2Gy. The fitting of both curves, performed up to the 2Gy dose, resulted in a linear quadratic model. MN distribution among bi nucleated cells was found to be over dispersed with respect to Poisson distribution, the average ratio of variance to mean being 1.13 for non smokers and 1.17 for smokers. Each fitted calibration curve, for smoking and non smoking donors, fell within the 95

  10. Cohort studies on cancer mortality among nuclear workers exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To provide direct estimates of risk of cancer after protracted low doses of ionising radiation and to strengthen the scientific basis of radiation protection standards for low-dose ionising radiation exposure. Published papers referring to 20 low-dose ionising radiation-exposed cohorts among nuclear industry workers with Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMR) were recta-analyzed in fixed and random effect models. The significantly deficient Meta-SMRs for all deaths (0.73; 95% CI: 0.66-0.80), all cancers (0.83; 95% CI: 0.77- 0.91), lung cancer (0.93; 95% CI: 0.90-0.95), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.88; 95% CI: 0.78- 0.99), esophagus cancer (0.83; 95% CI:0.76-0.91), colorectal cancer (0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.94), stomach cancer (0.81; 95% CI: 0.76-0.86) were observed. The Meta-SMRs for leukemia, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin's disease were found to be no significant difference with normal populations. There was no excessive risk of cancers among nuclear workers exposed to low-doses and low-dose rates ionizing radiation. (authors)

  11. Changing of expression level of fas-antigen (CD95), cytokines synthesis and production after irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that bone marrow progenitor (CD34+), tymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are most radiosensitive than other cell types. Even low doses of radiation induce apoptosis. The investigators suggest that it is possible relationship between synthesis and production of cytokines and apoptotic process. With the purpose to determine correlation between expression of Fas-antigen and synthesis of cytokines after low doses irradiation the experiments by irradiation PBL of healthy persons in vitro were held. Cells were X-irradiated by 12,5, 25 and 50 cGy. In consequence of the experiments increasing of Fas-antigen was revealed. This increasing correlated with changing in synthesis and production of cytokines. Also the Chernobyl's accident liquidators (CAL) were investigated. After comparison data in the group CAL (I) with data in the control group (II) increasing of Fas-antigen expression was revealed. Also in I group was discovered increasing of the cell number sinthesied interleukine-4 (IL-4) and interleukine-6 (IL-6). Interleukine-lβ (IL-1 β) producing pell were decreased. These changes have been correlated with degree of immunodeficiency at CAL. These data allow to consider the apoptosis as cell mechanism included in pathogenesis of diseases, which can be showed later long time after irradiation. (author)

  12. Effect of low-dose gamma-radiation upon hatchability and weight of chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilic, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Simpraga, M. [Zagreb Univ., Veterinary faculty (Croatia); Miljanic, S. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Although any dose of ionizing radiation has generally been recognized to be detrimental to living being, low dose ionizing radiation seems to invoke primary stimulative effects. Stimulatory effects of low dose ionizing radiation include many aspects such as growth, fecundity and longevity stimulation, accelerated development, enhance biological responses for immune systems, enzymatic repair, physiological functions, and the removal of cellular damage, including prevention and removal of cancers and other diseases. Low dose ionizing radiation might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation and on the seventh day of incubation on hatchability of eggs and body weight of chickens. This study includes three independent experiments. In the first experiment, six-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Avian-line 34, were irradiated by a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60 Co) before incubation. In the second experiments also involving six-hundred-line 34 eggs were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation on the seventh day of incubation. In the third experiment three-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Ross 308 were irradiated by dose 0.30 Gy gamma irradiation before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. Hatchability was calculated in terms of all eggs divided with fertile eggs which hatched. The individual weights of the chickens were determined on the first and on the forty second day. Growth data were analyzed statistically by t-test. Irradiation of chicken eggs and embryos at rates o f 0.15 Gy increases

  13. Dietary nitrate and reductive polyphenols may potentiate the vascular benefit and alleviate the ulcerative risk of low-dose aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2013-02-01

    The recent revelation that daily low-dose aspirin not only lowers risk for vascular events, but also can notably decrease risk for a range of adenocarcinomas, decreasing total cancer mortality by about 20%, makes it highly desirable to implement this protective strategy on a population-wide basis. Nonetheless, the fact that low-dose aspirin approximately doubles risk for serious gastrointestinal bleeding may impede health authorities from recommending its use by people judged to be at low cardiovascular risk. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts gastroprotective effects by boosting blood flow and mucus production in the gastric mucosa - effects which demonstrably oppose the pro-ulcerative impact of aspirin and other NSAIDs. A nitrate-rich diet, as well as ingestion of reductive catechol-bearing polyphenols, can collaborate in promoting NO generation in gastric juice, and they are protective in rodent models of gastric ulceration. Moreover, a high-nitrate diet, as well as certain reductive polyphenols such as epicatechin and quercetin, can exert platelet-stabilizing effects complementary to those of aspirin, and act in other ways to preserve vascular health. Hence, diets rich in nitrate and reductive polyphenols have the potential to amplify the vascular-protective benefits of low-dose aspirin, while diminishing its pro-ulcerative risk. Low-dose aspirin may be more unequivocally recommendable within the context of such a dietary strategy.

  14. Comparison of protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low doses of gamma rays and energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade; Gridley, Diala; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposure of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to more than 200 proteins (or modified proteins) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured till fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of gamma rays at either low (1 cGy/hr) or high (0.2 Gy/min) dose-rate, or to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high dose-rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 and 6 hours after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loaded onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles in gamma-irradiated cells showed significantly higher inductions at the high dose-rate than at the low dose-rate. The protein profile in cells after the proton exposure showed a much earlier induction pattern in comparison to both the high and low dose-rate gamma exposures. The same expression patterns were also found in individual cell signaling cascades. At 6 hours post irradiation, high dose-rate gamma rays induced cellular protein level changes (ratio to control ˜2) mostly in apoptosis, cell cycle and cytoskeleton, while low dose-rate gamma rays induced similar changes with smaller fold-change values. In comparison, protons induced

  15. Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu extract prevents radiation-induced small intestinal injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice. Methods: Proliferation improvement of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) was tested by MTT assay in vitro. The preventive effect of the prescription was also tested in vivo. Mice were treated with Shenlingbaizhu by intragastric administration immediately after receiving local irradiation to the abdomen at a dose of 10 Gy (60Co γ-ray). The body mass, diarrhea and survival were recorded. The pathological changes in the jejunum of mice were stained by HE and observed. Results: Shenlingbaizhu Extract could significantly promote the proliferation of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Shenlingbaizhu Extract treatment reduced the diarrhea of irradiated mice, improved the intestinal structural recovery and increased the mice survival. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract shows significant protective effect on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, providing data for clinical treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. (authors)

  16. Selective brain responses to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray irradiation in males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure is known to have profound effects on the brain, leading to precursor cell dysfunction and debilitating cognitive declines [Nat. Med. 8 (2002) 955]. Although a plethora of data exist on the effects of high radiation doses, the effects of low-dose irradiation, such as ones received during repetitive diagnostic and therapeutic exposures, are still under-investigated [Am. J. Otolaryngol. 23 (2002) 215; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 889; Curr. Opin. Neurol. 16 (2003) 129]. Furthermore, most studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have been performed using a single acute dose, while clinically and environmentally relevant exposures occur predominantly under chronic/repetitive conditions. Here, we have used a mouse model to compare the effects of chronic/repetitive and acute low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure (0.5 Gy) to ionizing radiation on the brain in vivo. We examined the LDR effects on p42/44 MAPK (ERK1/ERK2), CaMKII, and AKT signaling-the interconnected pathways that have been previously shown to be crucial for neuronal survival upon irradiation. We report perturbations in ERK1/2, AKT, and CREB upon acute and chronic/repetitive low-dose exposure in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These studies were paralleled by the analysis of radiation effects on neurogenesis and cellular proliferation. Repetitive exposure had a much more pronounced effect on cellular signaling and neurogenesis than acute exposure. These results suggest that studies of single acute exposures might be limited in terms of their predictive value. We also present the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced signaling in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We show the role of estrogens in brain radiation responses and discuss the implications of the observed changes

  17. Evaluation of in vivo low-dose mouse irradiation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Kye, Y.-U.; Kim, J. K.; Son, T. G.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Nam, S.-H.; Kang, Y.-R.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop a facility that can irradiate subjects with a desired low dose, which can be used to assess the biological effects of low-dose radiation. We develop a single-occupancy mouse-cage and shelf system with adjustable geometric parameters, such as the distances and angles of the cages relative to the collimator. We assess the irradiation-level accuracy using two measurement methods. First, we calculate the angle and distance of each mouse cage relative to the irradiator. We employ a Monte Carlo n-particle simulation for all of the cages at a given distance from the radiation source to calculate the air kerma and the relative absorbed dose in the in-house designed shelving system; these are found to be approximately 0.108 and 0.109 Gy, respectively. Second, we measure the relative absorbed dose using glass dosimeters inserted directly into the heads and bodies of the mice. For a conventional irradiation system, the irradiation measurements show a maximum discrepancy of 42% between the absorbed and desired doses, whereas a discrepancy of only 6% from the desired dose is found for the designed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi-mouse cages are shown to yield to significantly greater differences in the mouse head and body relative absorbed doses, compared to the discrepancies found for single-occupancy cages in the conventional irradiation system. Our findings suggest that the in-house shelving system has greater reliability for the biological analysis of the effects of low-dose radiation.

  18. Extrapyramidal side effects with low doses of amisulpride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nikhiles; Singh, Om P; Sen, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    Amisulpride, the newly introduced antipsychotic in India, is claimed to be effective in both positive and negative symptom schizophrenia and related disorders, though it has little or no action on serotonergic receptors. Limbic selectivity and lower striatal dopaminergic receptor binding capacity causes very low incidence of EPS. But, in clinical practice, we are getting EPS with this drug even at lower doses. We have reported three cases of akathisia, acute dystonia, and drug-induced Parkinsonism with low doses of amisulpride. So, we should keep this side effect in mind when using amisulpride. In fact, more studies are required in our country to find out the incidence of EPS and other associated mechanism.

  19. The effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbaek, Mette; Hjerrild, Mette; Hallas, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to estimate the effect of addition of low-dose spironolactone to previous antihypertensive therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. Patients had 25 to 50 mg of spironolactone once daily added to the treatment of hypertension that was uncontrolled despite previous treatment...... with three classes of antihypertensive drugs. The effect on blood pressure was estimated by office measurements together with serum potassium and adverse effects. The data were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 544 patients were identified; 200 were excluded because of secondary hypertension, other......-dose spironolactone is highly effective when added to previous treatment of patients with resistant hypertension....

  20. Low-dose 64- MDCT urography in nonmalignant kidney diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Purpose: Our purpose is to present the initial experience for the diagnosis of non malignant kidney diseases and congenital variants in the anatomy of the urinary system using low-dose protocols of research. Material and methods: There are different protocols concerning the introduction of the contrast medium, and the number of phases used. All these protocols are aimed at receiving high quality images at low-dose radiation, based on the principles of ALARA. We have used two low-dose protocols of the study: standardized and newly introduced by us. The difference in parameters between the two protocols is shown on the table. Our new study protocol include no special preparation for the patients. We use three phases and late excretory phase made on 20-25 min., after the introduction of contrast medium, which occurs after a single - bolus technique. We make the reconstructions on Maximum intensity projection and on Volume rendering. Up to the present we compared patients with almost same body index and same clinical diagnosis: 6 cases of nephrolithiasis; 2 cases of bilateral nephrolithiasis;4 obstructive hydronephrosis;1 case of ureteral lithiasis; 1 case of a function of the left kidney; 3 cases of retroaortic left renal vein; 7 cases of stenosis of right renal artery caused by calcification plaque; 1 case of multiple abscesses in the left kidney; Image quality of the new low-dose protocol was compared with the standard one shows the same diagnostic results. An attempt to reduce the voltage of the tube to 80 kVp, we visualized the changes resulting in multiple abscesses in the left kidney, and the present of a calculi in the left pyelon. During the CT examination a ring artifact was appear and it will be discussed with our engineers. Results: What CTDIvol, DLP and Effective dose means? The CTDIvol is a standardized parameter to measure Scanner Radiation Output. DLP is the product of the length of the irradiated scan volume and the average CTDIvol over that

  1. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  2. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  3. Low doses controversy; La controverse des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 -le Vesinet (France); Carde, C. [EDF, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    In this article is studied the question of low dose irradiation. From this question, the risk assessment and how it is perceived in public opinion is studied. Then, it is more generally, the question of public opinion and the information made by the media which is discussed. Different events and how they were related in press are reviewed: leukemia around La Hague, human guinea-pigs for plutonium, Chernobyl consequences, survivors from Hiroshima, nuclear nomads ( for temporary workers and their bad medical surveillance ), radioactive effluents releases from La Hague, Valduc or Cattenom. (N.C.).

  4. Low dose aspirin therapy and renal function in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Rotimi Oluyombo,2 Paul Sunday Ogunro,3 Adetunji Oladeni Adeniji,4 Oluyomi Olusola Okunola,5 Olugbenga Edward Ayodele21Department of Medicine, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 3Department of Chemical Pathology, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 5Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, NigeriaPurpose: To determine whether low dose aspirin has any deleterious effects on renal function in elderly patients.Methods: We conducted a prospective pilot study of 30 Nigerians older than 60 years with various chronic ailments necessitating the use of low dose aspirin. Patients gave their consent, and institutional ethical clearance was obtained. Each patient's baseline samples at enrolment (before commencing aspirin use served as a control, and subsequent weekly samples were compared. The weekly mean of each parameter was calculated, and the differences of means from baseline were determined, and values were compared for statistical differences with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 16.Results: We found that a majority of patients (86.67% had basal renal functions at chronic kidney disease stages 1 and 2. When compared with the corresponding baseline parameters, the mean weekly serum and urinary electrolytes, urea, creatinine, and uric acid parameters did not change, and the P-value did not show any statistical significance. However, there was positive statistical significance for the creatinine clearance (P = 0.025. Also, unlike in previous studies, anemia and hypoalbuminemia did not affect the renal function parameters.Conclusion: This study did not show any deleterious effects with short-term, low dose (75 mg daily aspirin use on kidney functions in

  5. Radiation-induced sensitisation of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book contains the proceedings of a symposium on radiation-induced sensitization of stainless steels, which took place at Berkeley, United Kingdom, 1986. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the mechanism leading to inter-granular corrosion of 20%Cr/25% Ni/Nb stainless steel cladding of AGR fuel following irradiation. Nine papers are presented, of which three are theoretical, two papers are based upon corrosion studies of 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb steel, and the remaining are concerned with compositional redistribution and its measurement. (U.K.)

  6. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  7. Segmentation of individual ribs from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of individual ribs and other bone structures in chest CT images is important for anatomical analysis, as the segmented ribs may be used as a baseline reference for locating organs within a chest as well as for identification and measurement of any geometric abnormalities in the bone. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the individual ribs from low-dose chest CT scans. The proposed algorithm consists of four main stages. First, all the high-intensity bone structure present in the scan is segmented. Second, the centerline of the spinal canal is identified using a distance transform of the bone segmentation. Then, the seed region for every rib is detected based on the identified centerline, and each rib is grown from the seed region and separated from the corresponding vertebra. This algorithm was evaluated using 115 low-dose chest CT scans from public databases with various slice thicknesses. The algorithm parameters were determined using 5 scans, and remaining 110 scans were used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation algorithm. The outcome of the algorithm was inspected by an author for the correctness of the segmentation. The results indicate that over 98% of the individual ribs were correctly segmented with the proposed algorithm.

  8. Locoregional IL-2 low dose applications for gastrointestinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zachary Krastev; Willem Den Otter; V Koltchakov; R Tomova; S Deredjian; A Alexiev; D Popov; B Tomov; Jan-Willem Koten; John Jacobs

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of local interleukin 2 (IL-2)in patients with different forms of abdominal cancer. This required experimentation with the time interval between IL-2 applications and the methods of application.METHODS: Sixteen patients with stages Ⅲ and Ⅳ of gastrointestinal malignancies (primary or metastatic) who were admitted to our Department of Gastroenterology were treated with locoregionally applied IL-2 in low doses.RESULTS: No major problems applying locoregional IL-2 were encountered. In 6 out of 16 patients, a modest but clinically worthwhile improvement was obtained. Adverse effects were minimal, The therapeutic scheme was well tolerated, even in patients in a poor condition.CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of low dose locoregional IL-2 application in advanced abdominal cancer. Local IL-2 therapy gives only negligible adverse effects. The results suggest that it is important to apply intratumorally. Local IL-2 may be given adjunct to standard therapeutic regimes and does not imply complex surgical interventions. These initial results are encouraging.

  9. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following γ-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following γ-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not γ-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure

  10. Binding of radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an aqueous solution of double-stranded DNA of bacteriophage PM2 containing phenylalanine and saturated with N2O is irradiated with γ-rays, radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals are bound covalently. Under the conditions used about 25 phenylalanine molecules may be bound per lethal hit. Also for single-stranded PM2 DNA, most of the phenylalanine radicals bound are non-lethal. Evidence is presented that in double-stranded DNA an appreciable fraction of the single-strand breaks is induced by phenylalanine radicals. Radiation products of phenylalanine and the phenylalanine bound to the DNA decrease the sensitivity of the DNA to the induction of single-strand breaks. There are indications that the high efficiency of protection by radiation products of phenylalanine is due to their positive charge, which will result in a relatively high concentration of these compounds in the vicinity of the negatively charged DNA molecules

  11. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  12. Effects of low doses of radiation on crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claims for radiation-induced growth stimulations in plants have been made, starting almost from the time of the discovery of X-rays. However, there is general disagreement on this question, since the numerous studies designed to prove or disprove the existence of the phenomenon have produced inconclusively and erratic results. It is obvious that small, but significant, growth increases may be produced at times by ionizing radiations in certain crop plants, but such increases have not always been reproducible from one experiment to another, and marked inconsistencies often occur with regard to the optimal exposures to produce such effects. The purpose of the FAO/IAEA Panel meeting held in Rome on 1 June, 1964, was to review and evaluate the experimental results in this area and applications for increasing crop yields. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Protection against ultraviolet-B radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and edema responses in C3H/HeN mice by green tea polyphenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of skin to UV radiation can cause diverse biological effects, including induction of inflammation, alteration in cutaneous immune cells and impairment of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses. Our laboratory has demonstrated that oral feeding as well as topical application of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) affords protection against the carcinogenic effects of UVB (280-320 nm) radiation. In this study, we investigated whether GTP could protect against UVB-induced immunosuppression and cutaneous inflammatory responses in C3H mice. Immunosuppression was assessed by contact sensitization with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene applied to UVB-irradiated skin (local suppression) or to a distant site (systemic suppression), while double skin-fold swelling was used as the measure of UVB-induced inflammation. (author)

  14. Computed tomographic findings of radiation-induced acute adrenal injury with associated radiation nephropathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation nephropathy was first recognized in 1906. The kidney is a radiosensitive organ with a tolerance dose (5% complications in 5 years) of 20 Gray. The imaging findings of acute and chronic radiation induced renal injury are previously described. Radiation-induced adrenal injury, to our knowledge, has not been described in the literature. Unlike the kidneys and other upper abdominal organs, the adrenal glands are traditionally thought to be radio-resistant, protected from radiation-induced injury by proximity to adjacent organs and by the adrenal medulla which reportedly has increased radio-resistance. We present the computed tomographic imaging findings of a patient with acute radiation induced adrenal injury which resulted in adrenal insufficiency following radiotherapy of an adjacent thecal metastasis

  15. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    exposure. Our study finds a risk of leukemia associated with chronic external exposure and allows taking into account modifying factors of this relation. Additional follow-up allows to improve the precision of the estimated dose-response relationship. A combined analysis including the present cohort and other nuclear cohorts could quantify more precisely the risks associated with low doses at low dose rates, in order to validate current underlying hypotheses of the radiation protection system. (author)

  16. Role of Rosemary leaves extract against radiation-induced hematological and biochemical alterations in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Garima S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a study of the modulatory effect of Rosmarinus officinalis leaves extract on radiation-induced hematological and biochemical changes in Swiss albino mice. The dose reduction factor for the Rosemary extract against gamma rays was calculated 1.53 from LD50/30 values. The Rosemary extract was administered orally for 5 consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. The hematological and biochemical parameters were assessed from day 1 to 30 post-irradiation intervals. The total erythrocyte count, total leucocytes count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit values in the experimental group were found to be elevated as compared to the control group of mice. Furthermore, the Rosemary extract treatment enhanced reduced glutathione content in the liver and blood against radiation-induced depletion. Treatment with the plant extract brought a significant fall in the lipid peroxidation level, suggesting rosemary's role in protection against radiation-induced membrane and cellular damage. The results from the present study suggest a radio-protective effect of the Rosemary extract against radiation-induced hematological and biochemical alterations in mice.

  17. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  18. Pomalidomide Plus Low-Dose Dexamethasone Improves Survival for Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Pomalidomide plus Low-Dose Dexamethasone Improves Survival for Patients with Multiple Myeloma Summary ... the combination of pomalidomide (Pomalyst ® ) and low-dose dexamethasone may benefit some patients with multiple myeloma that ...

  19. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. PMID:27279742

  20. Restless Legs Syndrome After Single Low Dose Quetiapine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyata, Ahmet Z; Celebi, Fahri; Yargc, Lutfi I

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is an underdiagnosed sensori-motor disorder and psychotropic drugs are one of the main secondary causes of the illness. The most common psychotropic agents that cause restless legs syndrome are antidepressants; however, antipsychotics have also been reported to induce restless legs syndrome. The prevalence, vulnerability factors and the underlying mechanism of antipsychotic-induced restless legs syndrome are unclear. A possible explanation is that dopaminergic blockade is the main precipitator of the syndrome. Quetiapine-induced restless legs syndrome is another point of interest because of its low binding to D2 receptors. We herein report the case of a restless legs syndrome that emerged after a single low dose quetiapine administration.

  1. Transcriptome profiling of mice testes following low dose irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine C.; Tanaka, Masami; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner;

    2013-01-01

    cell types of the adult testis. We observed large expression changes in the somatic cell profile, which mainly could be attributed to changes in cellularity, but hyperplasia of Leydig cells may also play a role. We speculate that the possible hyperplasia may be caused by lower testosterone production......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is used routinely to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cells vary in radio-sensitivity and the aim of this study was to investigate cellular and molecular changes caused by low dose irradiation of mice testis and to identify transcripts from different cell types...... in the adult testis. METHODS: Transcriptome profiling was performed on total RNA from testes sampled at various time points (n = 17) after 1 Gy of irradiation. Transcripts displaying large overall expression changes during the time series, but small expression changes between neighbouring time points were...

  2. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  3. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley,Alexander,A; Turner, David,R

    2004-10-31

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  4. Porous hydroxyapatite tablets as carriers for low-dosed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosijns, A; Vervaet, C; Luyten, J; Mullens, S; Siepmann, F; Van Hoorebeke, L; Masschaele, B; Cnudde, V; Remon, J P

    2007-09-01

    The present study evaluated an innovative technique for the manufacturing of low-dosed tablets. Tablets containing hydroxyapatite and a pore forming agent (50% (w/w) Avicel PH 200/20, 37.5% and 50% corn starch/37.5% sorbitol) were manufactured by direct compression followed by sintering. The influence of pore forming agent (type and concentration), sinter temperature and sinter time on tablet properties was investigated. Sintering (1250 degrees C) revealed tablets with an acceptable friability (manufactured using a modified gelcasting technique yielding tablets with a median pore size of 60 and 80 microm. Release from these tablets was drastically increased indicating that the permeability of the tablets was influenced by the pore size, shape and connectivity of the porous network. Changing and controlling these parameters made it possible to obtain drug delivery systems providing different drug delivery behaviour.

  5. Low-Dose Naltrexone for Pruritus in Systemic Sclerosis

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    Tracy Frech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pruritus is a common symptom in systemic sclerosis (SSc, an autoimmune disease which causes fibrosis and vasculopathy in skin, lung, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Unfortunately, pruritus has limited treatment options in this disease. Pilot trials of low-dose naltrexone hydrochloride (LDN for pruritus, pain, and quality of life (QOL in other GIT diseases have been successful. In this case series we report three patients that had significant improvement in pruritus and total GIT symptoms as measured by the 10-point faces scale and the University of California Los Angeles Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium Gastrointestinal Tract 2.0 (UCLA SCTC GIT 2.0 questionnaire. This small case series suggests LDN may be an effective, highly tolerable, and inexpensive treatment for pruritus and GIT symptoms in SSc.

  6. Radiation-induced doping of conducting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conducting polymers have the potential form many applications in electronics. The various patterns of doped regions of conducting polymers should be generated for the applications. Doping of conducting polymers is achieved by contact of the polymer with dopant or electrochemically. By these methods, doping occurs in the entire area exposed to the dopant. It is necessary to combine these doping techniques with lithography for achieving the patterned doping. Radiation-induced doping effects of conducting polymers have been reported. The doping is performed by irradiation of polymers in an atmosphere of gases, which do not react without irradiation, such as CH3Br, SF6, and N2O. If only the irradiated area was doped, patterned doping could be achieved without using lithography technique. We have elucidated the mechanism of the radiation-induced doping. The electrical conductivity was increased by irradiation the gas near the polymer film without irradiating the film itself. This result indicates that dopants were generated upon irradiation in the gas phase and the dopants react with the polymer. Hence, the pattern of doping is blurred by this method. We then developed another method of radiation-induced doping. Solid dopant precursor was coated on the polymer, and irradiation was performed. Figure 1 shows the results for poly(3-octylhitophene)(P3OT) by this method. A film of poly(3-octylthiophene) was prepared by spin coating from a solution of tetrahydrofuran on a quartz plate. The thickness of the film was approximately 100 nm. The polymer film was dried overnight at 80 degree C in a vacuum, and Au electrodes were evaporated on the films for electrical conductivity measurements. Saturated solution of 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in 1-bromopropane was dropped on the film and dried at room temperature in a vacuum. The film was put in a vacuum chamber, which has a 0.2-mm-thick Be window. X rays entered through the Be window, and the films were irradiated

  7. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  8. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  9. Clinical application of low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effect of reducing the value of mA or kV on the image quality and the radiation dose of the patients undergoing low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics. Methods: Thirty patients were divided into three groups, each group has 10 patients. They were group 1 (80 kV and 200 mA), group 2 (120 kV and 80 mA), group 3 (120 kV and 200 mA) The volume CT dose index (CTDI) was recorded and the average dose-length produce (DLP) was calculated in three groups,respectively. Image quality of three groups were compared and scored by two radiologists, and the results were statistically analysed. Results: The CTDI and DLP of 80 kV group (group 2) were 8.7 mGy and (36.80 ± 3.60) mGy · cm, respectively, those of 80 mA group (group 3) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively, and those of conventional-dose group (group 1) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively. There was no significant difference among three groups in diagnostic image quality. Conclusions: Low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics, especially the low-kV scan, may decrease the radiation exposure and guarantee the image quality. (authors)

  10. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  11. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced in fibroblasts after exposure to low-dose neutron radiation but not after γ rays. Our past work had shown similar modulation of transcripts for α-tubulin, β- and γ-actins, ornithine decarboxylase and interleukin 1 after exposure to either neutrons or γ rays. However, differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes were observed, with both being induced after exposure to γ rays but not neutrons. Recently, we have identified two genes that are induced after exposure to neutrons but not γ rays: Rp-8 (a gene associated with apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Induction of Rp-8 mRNA was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.005 Gy/min) and high dose rate (0.12 Gy/min). No induction of other genes associated with apoptosis such as Rp-2, bcl-2 and Tcl-30 was observed. The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measurements of CAT activity and CAT transcripts after irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses (0.1-3 Gy). Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected after exposure to neutrons (0.48 Gy) administered at low (0.05 Gy/min) but not high (0.12 Gy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction, however, was inhibited by exposure to low-dose-rate neutron irradiation. These results are interesting in light of reports that Rp-8 is induced during apoptosis and that HIV causes apoptosis. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Varicose Vein Stripping Under Low-Dose Spinal Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Muhammedoğlu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Spinal anesthesia is frequently used for procedures involving the lower limbs. Compared with general anesthesia, low-dose spinal anesthesia is a cost-effective method and has advantages such as avoiding hypotension, longer duration of anesthesia and increased length of hospitalization. The aim of this trial was to compare two different low-dose bupivacaine drug regimens. Methods: Sixty unpremedicated patients were randomly allocated into two groups (n=30. There were no differences between the groups in age, weight, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, gender, and duration of surgery. We performed spinal anesthesia at the L3-4 interspace with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. We administered 6.5 mg (group 1 and 8 mg (group 2 0.5% heavy bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space. We positioned the patient laterally to the operation side for 15 minutes, then, turned to supine position. Motor and sensory block was assessed by the Bromage scale and pinprick test. Results: There were significant differences between the two groups in duration of motor block, but no significant differences in hemodynamic response to spinal anesthesia. None of the patients had intraoperative pain. Five patients in group 1 and 2 patients in group 2 had urinary retention. Conclusion: Our observations suggest that 6.5 mg heavy bupivacaine is efficient and suitable for unilateral varicose veins stripping operation. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 25-8

  13. Low dose mTHPC photodynamic therapy for cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Herbert; Kniebühler, Gesa; Pongratz, Thomas; Betz, Christian S.; Göke, Burkhard; Sroka, Ronald; Schirra, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Objective: Demonstration of whether a low dose of mTHPC (temoporfin , Foscan) is sufficient to induce an efficient clinical response in palliative PDT of non-resectable cholangiocarcinoma (CC), while showing a low side effect profile as compared to the standard Photofrin PDT. Materials and Methods: 13 patients (14 treatment sessions) with non-resectable CC were treated with stenting and PDT (3 mg Foscan per treatment, 0.032-0.063 mg/kg body weight, 652 nm, 50 J/cm). Fluorescence measurements were performed with a single bare fiber for 5/13 patients prior to PDT at the tumor site to determine the fluorescence contrast. For another 7/13 patients, long-term fluorescence-kinetics were measured on the oral mucosa to determine the time of maximal relative fluorescence intensity. Results: Foscan fluorescence could clearly be identified spectroscopically as early as 20 hours after administration. It was not significantly different between lesion and normal tissue within the bile duct. Fluorescence kinetics assessed at the oral mucosa were highest at 72-96 hours after administration. The DLI was therefore extended from 20 hours to approx. 70 hours for the last 5 patients treated. The treatment effect was promising with a median survival of 11 months for the higher grade tumors (Bismuth types III and IV). Local side effects occurred in one patient (pancreatitis), systemic side effects were much reduced compared to prior experience with Photofrin. Conclusion: Combined stenting and photodynamic therapy (PDT) performed with a low dose of Foscan results in comparable survival times relative to standard Photofrin PDT, while lowering the risk of side effects significantly.

  14. Low dose intratympanic gentamicin for control of intractable vertigo

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    H Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Intratympanic gentamicin therapy is an effective modality for control of vertigo in Meniere's disease (MD and when given in low concentration (<30 mg/mL, once weekly minimizes its side effects like chronic vestibular insufficiency or hearing loss. We studied the efficacy of low dose interval intratympanic gentamicin therapy in control of intractable vertigo in MD and the postprocedure hearing loss. As gentamicin is vestibular end-organ selective and not specific for treatment of MD alone we studied its efficacy in non-Meniere's peripheral vertigo (NMPV in patients with nonserviceable hearing in affected ear. Subjects and Methods: Our study included 13 patients with “Definite” MD and seven patients with NMPV. In MD group, one treatment series consisted of a maximum of 3 weekly intratympanic gentamicin injections of 0.3 mL (12 mg of gentamicin. In NMPV group, the schedule was similar but dosage per injection was 0.5 mL (20 mg. Another similar series of injections were repeated for recurrences. Results: Significant reduction was noted in number of vertigo spells in both groups after treatment (P < 0.001. All the patients experienced either complete or substantial control (Class A or B of their vertigo. The functional level scale had significantly improved posttreatment in both groups (P < 0.01. No significant worsening in hearing was noted in any of the patients in MD group. Interpretation and Conclusion: Low dose interval intratympanic gentamicin is a simple cost-effective office procedure for managing vertigo in patients with MD and in patients with NMPV and nonserviceable hearing.

  15. An insight in to effect of dose, dose rate and confounding factors on radiation induced DNA damage and repair using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce a variety of DNA lesions such as single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs), and oxidative damage to bases, interstrand cross-links and locally multiplies damaged sites (LMDs). However, the most dangerous DNA lesions which are responsible for the origin of lethal effects, mutagenesis, genomic instability and carcinogenesis are the DSBs and LMDs. Humans are at high risk of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation either through environmental or occupational exposures. It is known that following exposure to doses below 10 cGy mammalian cells adapt to subsequent higher doses of ionizing radiation exposures a phenomenon known as adaptive response. Neither the changes induced by low dose ionizing radiation nor the biochemical pathways that signal this low dose radiation effect are well studied. The genetic effect of ionizing radiation depends on the radiation dose as well as on the dose rate at which it is delivered. The radiation induced cellular effects such as chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, micronucleus formation, transformation, mutations and changes in gene expression can cause cancer, cell death or damage can transmitted to subsequent generations. Contradictory reports exist in literature about variation in genetic response as function of dose and dose rates. There are different methods available to detect the DNA damage such as Neutral and Alkaline elution assay, DNA unwinding assay, Comet assay, Halo assay, FISH-comet assay, gamma-H2AX. Comet assay is a valuable technique which allows detection of DNA damage and repair at single cell level and provides a unique opportunity to investigate intercellular differences in any eukaryotic cell population. Thus, there is need to evaluate the utility and accuracy of different techniques used for estimation of radiation induced DNA damage. Here, we report our observations on the effect of low-dose, low dose rates, low dose limit, type of radiation

  16. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  17. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Baker, Alysa Fairchild Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. Keywords: non–small cell lung cancer, acute, late, toxicity, stricture

  18. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis Exacerbated by Everolimus

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    Yuji Miura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Everolimus, a potent mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity against various types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC; however, little information is available on the efficacy and safety of the combination of everolimus and radiotherapy. We report a case of radiation-induced esophagitis that might have been exacerbated by the sequential administration of everolimus. Case Presentation: A 63-year-old Japanese man with RCC complained of back pain, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed vertebral metastases. He received radiotherapy (30 Gy/10 fractions to the T6-10 vertebrae. Everolimus was administered immediately after the completion of radiotherapy. One week later, he complained of dysphagia, nausea and vomiting. An endoscopic examination of the esophagus showed erosive esophagitis in the middle to lower portions of his thoracic esophagus, corresponding to the irradiation field. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware that everolimus might lead to the unexpected exacerbation of radiation toxicities.

  19. Radiation-induced grafting onto wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced grafting tests were done on single wool fibres. Different vinyl monomers were used for this purpose and they were grafted in twenty different solvents which were selected for their swelling effiency and solvent parameters. The tests were done once with and once without the addition of water. The presence of water causes the polymer uptake to increase considerably. Formic acid/methanol and methanol were found to be the most suitable solvent systems, as they have the highest hydrogen-bond interaction effiency. The moisture uptake of wool depends on the hydrophily and hydrophoby of the grafted polymers. The single-fibre tests serve as a basis for analogous grafting tests on wool fabrics. The permanent- press was improved by graftng with hydrophoric polymers and polymers with a high glass-transition temperature

  20. Gamma-radiation-induced grafting onto wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced grafting studies have been carried out on loose wool fibres. Different vinyl monomers were used and they were grafted in different solvents which were selected on the basis of their swelling efficiency and solubility parameters. The treatments were performed once with and once without the addition of water. The presence of water caused the polymer uptake to increase considerably. Formic acid/methanol and methanol accelerate the grafting process best, since they have the highest hydrogen-bond interaction efficiency. The moisture uptake of grafted wool decreases. X-ray and differential scanning calorimetry tests show unambiguously that grafting occurs in different morphological areas, depending on the type of polymer. The single fibre studies served as basis for analogous tests on wool fabrics (Part II). (author)

  1. Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5' to 3' direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation

  2. Early detection of lung cancer using low-dose CT: an update; Lungenkrebsfrueherkennung mit Low-dose-CT: ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignancy. Due to a lack of early symptoms patients usually undergo therapy at advanced tumor stages when prognosis is poor. Feasibility studies of low-dose spiral CT screening of heavy smokers have shown that many small, resectable lung cancers can be diagnosed at early stages using simple diagnostic algorithms based on size and attenuation of detected pulmonary nodules with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign lesions. Preliminary results of repeat screening confirms small size and favourable stage distribution of detected cancers, using even simpler diagnostic algorithms: additional diagnostic procedures are only required in new or growing nodules whereas follow-up with low-dose CT is sufficient in nodules that appear unchanged to exclude slow growth. However, mortality reduction by lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has yet to be demonstrated. Several randomised controlled trials are under way to assess possible mortality reduction by comparison of mortalities in a screening group and a control group. It is hoped that through international cooperation data from these trials can be pooled to allow for statistically significant conclusions as early as possible. (orig.) [German] Lungenkrebs ist die haeufigste zum Tode fuehrende maligne Erkrankung. Wegen des Fehlens von Fruehsymptomen kommen Patienten meist in fortgeschrittenen Tumorstadien zur Behandlung, wenn die Prognose sehr schlecht ist. Machbarkeitsstudien zum Einsatz der Niedrigdosis-Spiral-Computertomographie bei starken Rauchern haben gezeigt, dass sich bei Einsatz simpler, auf Groesse und Dichte gefundener Rundherde basierender diagnostischer Algorithmen eine grosse Zahl kleiner, resektabler Bronchialkarzinome in fruehen Stadien diagnostizieren liess, wobei der Anteil invasiver Massnahmen wegen benigner Laesionen gering war. Erste Ergebnisse von Wiederholungsuntersuchungen zeigen wiederum eine geringe Groesse und guenstige

  3. Paradoxical relationship between Mn superoxide dismutase deficiency and radiation-induced cognitive defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikki Corniola

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy of the CNS, even at low doses, can lead to deficits in neurocognitive functions. Reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is usually, but not always, associated with cognitive deficits resulting from radiation therapy. Generation of reactive oxygen species is considered the main cause of radiation-induced tissue injuries, and elevated levels of oxidative stress persist long after the initial cranial irradiation. Consequently, mutant mice with reduced levels of the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or Sod2, are expected to be more sensitive to radiation-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and the related functions. In this study, we showed that MnSOD deficiency led to reduced generation of immature neurons in Sod2-/+ mice even though progenitor cell proliferation was not affected. Compared to irradiated Sod2+/+ mice, which showed cognitive defects and reduced differentiation of newborn cells towards the neuronal lineage, irradiated Sod2-/+ mice showed normal hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions and normal differentiation pattern for newborn neurons and astroglia. However, we also observed a disproportional decrease in newborn neurons in irradiated Sod2-/+ following behavioral studies, suggesting that MnSOD deficiency may render newborn neurons more sensitive to stress from behavioral trainings following cranial irradiation. A positive correlation between normal cognitive functions and normal dendritic spine densities in dentate granule cells was observed. The data suggest that maintenance of synaptic connections, via maintenance of dendritic spines, may be important for normal cognitive functions following cranial irradiation.

  4. Radiation-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This short survey focuses on the main radiation-induced base lesions that have been identified within cellular DNA. For this purpose, sensitive assays that are aimed at measuring a few modifications per 107 normal bases were set-up. In that respect high performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (CLHP-MS/MS) was found to be able to single out the formation of 9 oxidized nucleosides and two modified nucleo-bases out of the 70 oxidative base lesions that have been identified in model systems. As a striking result, it was found that in the DNA of γ-irradiated human monocytes, the formamide-pyrimidine derivative of guanine is produced in a higher yield than the ubiquitous 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine damage, both arising from the same radical precursor. However, relatively high doses of ionizing radiation (> 20 Gy) have to be applied in order to detect an increase in the level of the damage. This is due to the low efficiency for both low and high LET radiations to generate oxidative damage to DNA on one hand and the occurrence of artifactual oxidation of the overwhelming normal bases during DNA extraction on the other hand. Interestingly, a modified comet assays that involves the combined use of the alkaline single gel electrophoretic technique and DNA repair N-glycosylases has allowed the detection of three main types of radiation-induced damage within the dose range 0.3 Gy -10 Gy. It appears that the total of frank DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites is similar to the sum of oxidized pyrimidine bases and modified purine bases that are recognized by the endonuclease Ill protein and the formamide-pyrimidine DNA N-glycosylase respectively. (author)

  5. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J; Brown, Celeste J; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV. PMID:27103314

  6. Preclinical assessment of HIV vaccines and microbicides by repeated low-dose virus challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland R Regoes

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trials in macaque models play an essential role in the evaluation of biomedical interventions that aim to prevent HIV infection, such as vaccines, microbicides, and systemic chemoprophylaxis. These trials are usually conducted with very high virus challenge doses that result in infection with certainty. However, these high challenge doses do not realistically reflect the low probability of HIV transmission in humans, and thus may rule out preventive interventions that could protect against "real life" exposures. The belief that experiments involving realistically low challenge doses require large numbers of animals has so far prevented the development of alternatives to using high challenge doses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using statistical power analysis, we investigate how many animals would be needed to conduct preclinical trials using low virus challenge doses. We show that experimental designs in which animals are repeatedly challenged with low doses do not require unfeasibly large numbers of animals to assess vaccine or microbicide success. CONCLUSION: Preclinical trials using repeated low-dose challenges represent a promising alternative approach to identify potential preventive interventions.

  7. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J; Brown, Celeste J; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV.

  8. Nuclear energy and health: and the benefits of low-dose radiation hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Pollycove, Myron

    2009-01-01

    Energy needs worldwide are expected to increase for the foreseeable future, but fuel supplies are limited. Nuclear reactors could supply much of the energy demand in a safe, sustainable manner were it not for fear of potential releases of radioactivity. Such releases would likely deliver a low dose or dose rate of radiation, within the range of naturally occurring radiation, to which life is already accustomed. The key areas of concern are discussed. Studies of actual health effects, especially thyroid cancers, following exposures are assessed. Radiation hormesis is explained, pointing out that beneficial effects are expected following a low dose or dose rate because protective responses against stresses are stimulated. The notions that no amount of radiation is small enough to be harmless and that a nuclear accident could kill hundreds of thousands are challenged in light of experience: more than a century with radiation and six decades with reactors. If nuclear energy is to play a significant role in meeting future needs, regulatory authorities must examine the scientific evidence and communicate the real health effects of nuclear radiation. Negative images and implications of health risks derived by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects of high doses must be dispelled.

  9. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  10. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  11. Simvastatin ameliorates low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic nephropathy in an experimental rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Siwei; Xu, Huali; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuchen; Sun, Fanfan; SUI, DAYUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to study the possible renal protective effect of simvastatin in the development and progression of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. A rat model of T2DN was induced by high-fat diet together with single low-dose of streptozotocin. The diabetic rats were either given treatment or vehicle control for 13 weeks to develop nephropathy. At the end of treatment, parameters of renal function were determined. Kidney samples were collected for histological studies and generated homoge...

  12. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on immune system in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Y.; Sakai, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Low-dose irradiation induces a number of biological functions in mice. Nomura et al. have demonstrated that the low-dose irradiation elevates the level of antioxidants and gives suppressive effects on some chemically induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related disease models. We paid attention to this stimulated immunological function by low dose irradiation and started the study that by low dose irradiation and started the study that by low-dose rate irradiation. The enhancement of immune response in mice under various conditions will be discussed.

  13. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong Street, Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Jung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong Street, Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong Street, Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.t [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong Street, Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10{sup 4} times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children

  14. Nuclear apoJ: A low dose radiation inducible regulator of cell death. Final report for period September 15, 1998 - September 14, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronow, Bruce J.

    2002-04-19

    This project was based on preliminary data that was published by Dr. Boothman (Yang et al. 2000) which indicated a strong induction of apoJ gene expression, increased secretion of the protein, and accumulation of an apparently somewhat different form of the apoJ protein in the nucleus of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells undergoing response to DNA damage. A clone expressing apoJ protein was isolated that was capable of interacting with Ku80, a component of the double strand break repair complex that is essential for the successful repair of rearranging immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes as evidenced by failure to produce mature B and T cells in the absence of Ku70. ApoJ clones isolated and characterized by Dr. Boothman bound strongly to a Ku-70 ''bait'' protein. Over-expression of these same clones in a cell line was capable of killing the cell. ApoJ is very strongly induced in many instances of programmed cell death and has been proposed repeatedly to play some sort of effector role in the process. Our principle hypothesis for this study was that the strong induction of the apoJ gene and the particular expression of a nuclear form of the protein was potentially a causal factor in the decision point made by the cell as it attempts to repair double-strand breakage based DNA damage. The hypothesis was that if sufficiently high damage occurred, it would be deleterious to maintain the cell's viability through continued DNA repair. One method to inhibit DNA repair might be by inhibiting proteins such as Ku-70 that are necessary for double-strand break repair. If apoJ does play a critical role in tipping the decision balance over to cell death, we reasoned that deficiency of apoJ would cause increased accumulation of cells with DNA damage and that this might decrease cell death in response to DNA damage and increase tumor occurrence rates. To test this hypothesis and its potential implications, we exposed wildtype and apoJ deficient animals that we constructed through gene targeting to increasing levels of ionizing radiation from a Cesium source. Data gathered under the support of this grant application initially indicated that apoJ deficient animals were more resistant to radiation, but as we accumulated more and more data points and covered a tighter exposure range, the genotype-based differences became insignificant. However, the possibility existed that because mortality based radiation-resistance could be attributable to mechanism for which nuclear apoJ was not rate determining, we maintained a very large of colony of apoJ knockout and wildtype animals in both the C57/B16 and Cv129 strain backgrounds that were exposed to sub-lethal levels of ionizing radiation to monitor for the occurrence of tumors. These animals were allowed to fully recover and age normally in either germ free or normal animal housing. Our results demonstrated no significant differences between wildtype and apoJ knockout animals over a period that extended up to 30 months for individual animals. We recorded similar weight gain, a relatively low mortality rate, and a similar mixture and rate of sarcoma and adenocarcinomas after surviving the initial ionizing radiation exposures. Thus we conclude that apoJ gene function, which was totally eliminated by our gene targeting, did not influence radiation sensitivity or serve as a tumor suppressor in response to DNA damage.

  15. Radiation-induced cancer in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Sekizuka, Eiichi [National Saitama Hospital, Wako (Japan); Yamashita, Hisao [Keio Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takami, Akira [Yamawaki Coll., Tokyo (Japan); Kubo, Atsushi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-12-01

    Results of two questionnaire surveys on radiation-induced malignant tumors conducted in 1977 and 1984 in Japan are briefly summarized. A total of 234 universities and general hospitals (139 in 1977, and 95 in 1984) responded and provided data from 1945 to 1977 and from 1978 to 1984. The number of patients with benign disease who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 150 in the first survey (1977) and 86 in the second survey (1984). The underlying benign diseases of these patients included tuberculous lymphadenitis, skin disease, hemangioma, and thyroid disease, and the most frequent radiation-induced malignant tumors in these patients were malignant tumors of the pharynx (80), cancer of the larynx (26), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (22), cancer of the esophagus (219), and skin cancer (21). In patients with head and neck diseases the highest correlation between underlying benign disease and radiation-induced malignant tumors was between cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis and tumors of the pharynx (67 patients), followed by cancer of the larynx (19), and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (11). There were also correlations between thyroid disease and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (8 patients), hemangioma and skin cancer (7), and skin disease and skin cancer (8). The ratio of the observed values to predicted values (O/E ratio) in these patients was highest for cancer of the pharynxy (118), followed by cancer of the parotid gland (42), skin cancer (31), cancer of the esophagus (22), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (21), and cancer of the larynx (16). The number of patients with malignant tumors who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 140 in 1977 and 108 in 1984, and the underlying malignant tumors in these patients included tumors of the uterus (106), breast (32), and head and neck (80). The most frequent secondary malignant tumors were soft tissue tumors, followed by leukemia

  16. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  17. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24772825

  18. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  19. Functional modulation on macrophage by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhe; Guo, Shengnan; Hu, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2016-10-01

    Previously it was confirmed that naltrexone, a non-peptide δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist is mainly used for alcoholic dependence and opioid addiction treatment. However, there is increasing data on immune regulation of low dose naltrexone (LDN). The aim of this work was to explore the effect of LDN on the phenotype and function of macrophage. The changes of macrophage after treatment with LDN were examined using flow cytometry (FCM); FITC-dextran phagocytosis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances function of macrophage as confirmed by up-regulating MHC II molecule and CD64 on macrophage while down-regulating CD206 expression. Furthermore the productions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, increased significantly. Macrophages in LDN treated group performed the enhanced phagocytosis. Therefore it is concluded that LDN could promote function of macrophage and this work has provided concrete data of impact on immune system by LDN. Especially the data would support interaction between CD4+T cell and macrophage in AIDS treatment with LDN in Africa (LDN has already been approved in Nigeria for the use in AIDS treatment). PMID:27561742

  20. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  1. Bayesian approach in MN low dose of radiation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Micronucleus assay in lymphocytes is a well established technique for the assessment of genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Due to the presence of a natural background of MN the net MN is obtained by subtracting this value to the gross value. When very low doses of radiation are given the induced MN is close even lower than the predetermined background value. Furthermore, the damage distribution induced by the radiation follows a Poisson probability distribution. These two facts pose a difficult task to obtain the net counting rate in the exposed situations. It is possible to overcome this problem using a bayesian approach, in which the selection of a priori distributions for the background and net counting rate plays an important role. In the present work we make a detailed analysed using bayesian theory to infer the net counting rate in two different situations: a) when the background is known for an individual sample, using exact value value for the background and Jeffreys prior for the net counting rate, and b) when the background is not known and we make use of a population background distribution as background prior function and constant prior for the net counting rate. (Author)

  2. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  3. Prevention of radiation-induced liver and kiney toxicity: a role for amifostine

    OpenAIRE

    KALDIR, Mine Uğuzalp; Çaloğlu, Vuslat Yürüt; ALAS, Ruşen Coşar; ÇERMİK, Tevfik Fikret; Altaner, Şemsi; ESKİOCAK, Sevgi; Saynak, Mert; TOKATLI, Füsun; KOÇAK, Zafer; UZAL, Cem

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the protective effect of amifostine against radiation induced liver and kidney injury of rats, using scintigraphic and histopathologic parameters. METHODS Female Wistar Albino rats were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control, radiotherapy alone (RT), and amifostine+RT (n=10). Single-dose of 600 cGy X-ray was performed with a single field compromised liver and right kidney. Amifostine was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 400 mg/kg, 30 minutes before irrad...

  4. Radiation induced mutations for breeding of sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several sorghum cultivars of Mali were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays and compared with the Caudatum types. Radio-sensitivity studies suggested that the local types were less sensitive to radiation than the introduced types. Whereas the local varieties survived dose of 300 Gy, in Caudatum types, seed germination and growth were significantly reduced at 200 Gy. Several agronomically important mutants were obtained among the progeny of the local types. Some of the mutants were shorter and had improved panicle characteristics. Radiation-induced variation was observed in several characters such as plant height, resistance to lodging, plant architecture, drought tolerance, panicle length and compactness, seed size and color, seed quality (viterous or floury) and protein content, glume color and structure, flowering data (early and late maturity), and tillering capacity. One mutant was drought tolerant. Promising mutants were selected and are presently under evaluation in the National List Trials to confirm their potential and future release. Selected variants have been also crossed with local types to obtain promising material. (author). 8 refs, 2 tabs

  5. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  6. Retroviruses in radiation-induced lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleotide sequence of RadLV/VL3(T+L+), the thymotropic and leukemogenic entity of the in-vitro propagated radiation leukemia virus complex (RadLV/VL3), is that of a recombinant retrovirus. The gag, pol and most of the env gene are very similar to the homologous regions of Akv MuLV. The 3' end of the env gene and the LTR appear to have derived from a xenotropic MuLV. However, the LTR has acquired a feature shared by other lymphomagenic MuLVs. This feature consists in sequence rearrangements resulting in the generation of presumed enhancer elements. RadLV/VL3(T+L+)-specific proviral sequences were found adjacent to the c-myc gene in several virus-induced thymic lymphomas of the rat, suggesting that the enhancer elements might play a role in lymphomagenesis. However, it was found that the presence of a provirus at a specific DNA site can lead to an in-vitro growth advantage and to clonal cell selection independently of a lymphomagenic process. The authors conclude from this observation that clonal appearance of an integrated provirus in cultured radiogenic lymphoma cells does not necessarily reflect a viral induction of radiation-induced leukemogenesis. (author)

  7. EFFICIENT ACTIVATION OF ANTITUMOR IMMUNITY BY IL-6 GENE-MODIFIED LEUKEMIA VACCINE IN COMBINATION WITH LOW DOSE CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE AND LOW DOSE IL-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Xuetao; Ge Lingfu; Ju Dianwen; Tao Qun; Yu Yizhi

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antitumor effect of the IL-6 gene-modified erythroleukemia cells combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) and low dose IL-2.Methods: Mice inoculated with FBL-3-IL-6 in combination with low dose IL-2 and low dose cyclophosphamide (Cy). Results: Mice received combined therapy of FBL-3-IL-6, IL-2 and Cy developed tumors most slowly and survived much longer when compared with mice in control groups, with 5 out of 8leukemia-bearing mice being tumor free 100 days after the combined treatment. To further explain the mechanism of the antitumor effects by the combined therapy. It was found that combined therapy with low dose Cy, low dose IL-2 and FBL-3-IL-6 achieved maximal cytotoxic effects of nature killer cells and specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, increased production IL-2, TNF and GM-CSF from spleen lymphocytes in tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the FBL3-IL-6 also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of the peritoneal macrophages. The results demonstrated that administration of low dose Cy and low dose IL-2 in combination with IL-6 genemodified leukemia vaccine could elicit potent antileukemia effects, and the mechanisms involved in the antitumor process may include the induction of specific and nonspecific antitumor immunity, reversal of T suppressor cells that mediated local immuno-suppression in tumor bearing mice. Conclusion: The combined therapy with cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccine, low dose of Cy and IL-2 might be a promising approach for the treatment of leukemia.

  8. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  9. Physics and quality assurance of low dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to review the physical principles underlying design, clinical application and execution of interstitial and intracavitary implants in the classical low dose-rate (LDR) range. This year, the course will focus on quality assurance of sources, applicators and treatment planning software. In addition, development of procedures and QA checks designed optimize treatment delivery accuracy and patient safety during each individual procedure will be reviewed. The level of presentation will be designed to accommodate both physicists and physicians. Implementation of recently published AAPM Task Group reports (no. 40, 'Comprehensive Quality Assurance' and No. 43, 'Dosimetry of Interstitial Brachytherapy Sources') will be reviewed. Outline: (A) General Principles (1) QA endpoints: temporal accuracy, positional accuracy, dose delivery accuracy, and safety of the patient, personnel, and the institution (2) QA procedure development: forms, checklists, test development and design of treatment delivery procedures (B) QA of treatment delivery devices (1) Source acceptance testing and QA a) calibration and source strength specification standards b) leakage tests and source geometry verification (2) Applicator acceptance testing and QA (3) Remote afterloading devices (4) Treatment planning systems a) graphic input/output devices, implant geometry reconstruction, and graphical display b) dose calculation accuracy i) review of brachytherapy dose calculation algorithms ii) dosimetric benchmarks available: Task Group 43 report (C) Procedure-specific QA 1) Organization of treatment delivery team 2) Preplanning and preparation 3) Applicator insertion 4) Radiographic examination of the implant, prescription, and treatment calculation 5) Source insertion 6) Treatment planning and physicist review of treatment plans 7) QA during patient treatment and removal of sources and applicators

  10. Low dose Mifepristone (100 mg for medical termination of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Seth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abortion is the most common entity in the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology. Different methods and modes have been opted for until now to find an effective regimen with the least complications. We have tried the minimal dose (100 mg of Mifepristone (PO instead of the presently recommended 200 mg for medical abortion in early first trimester cases. Objectives: The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of low dose (100 mg Mifepristone for medical termination of early pregnancy with oral Misoprostol 800 μg, 24 hours later.Design: A prospective analytical study was conducted on a population of 82 early-pregnant patients who have requested medical abortions.Method: Pregnant women of less than 56 days gestation age from their last menstrual period, requesting medical abortion were selected over a period of 14 months from January 2007 to March 2008. They were given 100 mg Mifepristone orally on Day-1, followed by 800 μg Misoprostol orally 24 hours later on Day-2, keeping the patient in the ward for at least 6 hours. Abortion interval, success rate, post-abortion bleeding and side-effects were noted. Success was defined as complete uterine evacuation without the need for surgical intervention.Results: The total success rate of this minimal dose Mifepristone regimen was 96.25%. Pain and nausea were the predominant side-effects noted. In total 72 (90% women had completely aborted within 5 hours of taking Misoprostol. Three (3.75% women only required suction aspiration, hence termed as failed medical abortion. The abortion interval increased with the gestation age. All three failures were of the more-than-42-day gestational age group. The overall mean abortion interval was 4.68 ± 5.32 hours.Conclusion: Mifepristone 100 mg, followed 24 hours later by Misoprostol 800 μg orally, is a safe and effective regimen for medical abortion.

  11. Effect of low dose irradiation on Trichinella isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation should be an effective and safe method for reducing the risk of human trichinellosis. With the existence of different Trichinella phenotypes, however, parasite strains with different gene pools may exhibit different radiosensitivity. Studies were performed using the rat as a laboratory animal for testing Trichinella spiralis isolated from different hosts from one geographic region. The results showed no unique radioresistance of the strains. Although the effective dose of irradiation (i.e. the dose required for total blocking of development of muscle larvae) for most isolates was 0.6kGy, that dose did not affect the viability of Trichinella larvae of all strains. Two strains, tested at doses only up to 0.6 kGy, had their reproductive capacities reduced by more than 10,000-fold as a result of exposure to irradiation. On the other hand, strains of Trichinella isolated in a different region from different hosts and belonging to different taxa (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. nelsoni, putative European T. nelsoni = T3) were similarly more radiosensitive when tested in mice. A dose of 0.2 kGy prevented the production of larval progeny of all but one strain. The results of the experiments performed with the same T. spiralis strain on two different laboratory hosts (rat and mouse) showed unequivocally that the different results of the former experiments were attributable to the laboratory host used. The laboratory rat was found to be more sensitive in a bioassay for monitoring Trichinella larvae viability. It is concluded that low dose irradiation, 0.3-0.6 kGy, of hog carcasses can provide a substantial margin of safety for human consumption of pork heavily infected with Trichinella. However, irradiation procedures should be complemented by health education, improvement in sanitary measures on farms raising pigs and improvement in diagnosing infections in animals. Isolation of the domestic transmission cycle from the wildlife transmission cycle is also important

  12. How do we face low-dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-contamination caused by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident has spread to wide areas of the Prefecture and the present radiation level even in its capital Fukushima City is around 1 micro-Sv/h, 20 times as high as the past before the Accident. Japanese Government defines that the level <20 mSv/y is not hazardous to human health but residents always feel uneasiness. This paper describes about radiation problems present in administrative guidance from the scientific view. There are 3 different opinions about the health hazard of low dose exposure of <100 mSv/y: no influence, lower risk corresponding to lower dose (linear no threshold theory), and not always lower risk corresponding to lower dose. These are scientifically uncertain, and safety for radiation cannot be easily defined. Additional dose limit defined by Administration is 1 mSv/y for general public, to which compliance should be thought to be a prerequisite condition. The project of Fukushima Health Management Survey should be conducted in order to lessen the unnecessary exposure dose of residents as one of its aims. The most effective decontamination means are unknown at present, and therefore, whether the level of <1 mSv/y is attainable by decontamination of areas exceeding this is unknown. As seeable in easily declared safety of rice, people should not be overconfident in systems for monitoring urgently established after the accident. Three risk advisers invited by the Prefecture are saying that unnecessary exposure should be avoided, despite that they have the opinion of null risk at <100 mSv/y. The author comments that as the limited, insufficient information is said to lead the public to anxiety, confusion and finally panic, the Administration should not take a willful attitude tending to safety. (T.T.)

  13. Low dose CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Symons, Sean; Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhang, Liying; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); So, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) measurements at low doses (LD = 20 or 50 mAs) are similar to those obtained at regular doses (RD = 100 mAs), with and without the addition of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A single-center, prospective study was performed in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 37; 54 % male; age = 74 ± 15 years). Two CTP scans were performed on each subject: one at 100 mAs (RD) and one at either 50 or 20 mAs (LD). CTP parameters were compared between the RD and LD scans in regions of ischemia, infarction, and normal tissue. Differences were determined using a within-subjects ANOVA (p < 0.05) followed by a paired t test post hoc analysis (p < 0.01). At 50 mAs, there was no significant difference between cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), or time to maximum enhancement (Tmax) values for the RD and LD scans in the ischemic, infarcted, or normal contralateral regions (p < 0.05). At 20 mAs, there were significant differences between the RD and LD scans for all parameters in the ischemic and normal tissue regions (p > 0.05). CTP-derived CBF and CBV are not different at 50 mAs compared to 100 mAs, even without the addition of ASIR. Current CTP protocols can be modified to reduce the effective dose by 50 % without altering CTP measurements. (orig.)

  14. Lung cancer risk at low doses of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, W; Katz, R; Zhang, C X

    1986-10-01

    A survey of inhabitant exposures arising from the inhalation of 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, and lung cancer mortality has been carried out in two adjacent areas in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, designated as the "high background" and the "control" area. Annual exposure rates are 0.38 working level months (WLM) per year in the high background, and 0.16 WLM/yr in the control area. In 14 yr of continuous study, from 1970 to 1983, age-adjusted mortality rates were found to be 2.7 per 10(5) living persons of all ages in the high background area, and 2.9 per 10(5) living persons in the control area. From this data, we conclude that we are unable to determine excess lung cancers over the normal fluctuations below a cumulative exposure of 15 WLM. This conclusion is supported by lung cancer mortality data from Austrian and Finnish high-background areas. A theoretical analysis of epidemiological data on human lung cancer incidence from inhaled 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, which takes into account cell killing as competitive with malignant transformation, leads to the evaluation of a risk factor which is either a linear-exponential or a quadratic-exponential function of the alpha-particle dose. Animal lung cancer data and theoretical considerations can be supplied to support either hypothesis. Thus we conclude that at our current stage of knowledge both the linear-exponential and the quadratic-exponential extrapolation to low doses seem to be equally acceptable for Rn-induced lung cancer risk, possibly suggesting a linear-quadratic transformation function with an exponential cell-killing term, or the influence of risk-modifying factors such as repair or proliferation stimuli.

  15. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontes Belchor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99 mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish. The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  16. Small bowel injury in low-dose aspirin users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hiroki; Sakai, Eiji; Kato, Takayuki; Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is well known to be associated with an increased risk of serious upper gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulceration and bleeding. Until recently, attention was mainly focused on aspirin-induced damage of the stomach and duodenum. However, recently, there has been growing interest among gastroenterologists on the adverse effects of aspirin on the small bowel, especially as new endoscopic techniques, such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and balloon-assisted endoscopy, have become available for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Preliminary CE studies conducted in healthy subjects have shown that short-term administration of LDA can induce mild mucosal inflammation of the small bowel. Furthermore, chronic use of LDA results in a variety of lesions in the small bowel, including multiple petechiae, loss of villi, erosions, and round, irregular, or punched-out ulcers. Some patients develop circumferential ulcers with stricture. In addition, to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal lesions in LDA users, it is important for clinicians to confirm the differences in the gastrointestinal toxicity between different types of aspirin formulations in clinical use. Some studies suggest that enteric-coated aspirin may be more injurious to the small bowel mucosa than buffered aspirin. The ideal treatment for small bowel injury in patients taking LDA would be withdrawal of aspirin, however, LDA is used as an antiplatelet agent in the majority of patients, and its withdrawal could increase the risk of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel means for the treatment of aspirin-induced enteropathy are urgently needed. PMID:25501289

  17. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  18. Marked increase in the rate of ocular lens and forelimb regeneration in the newt. Cynops pyrrhogaster, following partial body exposure to low dose X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, T.; Kanao, T.; Miyachi, Y.

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, concern over the stimulating effects of low-dose X-rays has been growing. Therefore the effects of low-dose X-irradiation on lens and forelimb regeneration in the newt were examined. Newts were subjected to s harm or whole-body X-ray exposure at a dose of 0.05, 0.2 or 0.4Gy, delivered at a rate of 0.43Gy/min. The eyeballs were fixed in formalin solution, embedded in paraffin and assessed histologically. On day 14 after lens removal, unexposed animals showed the formation of a hollow epithelial vesicle of depigmented cells continuous with the laminae of the iris corresponding to the expected regeneration stage (Reyer's regeneration stage II). In contrast, lenses from newts exposed to a 0.2Gy dose X-ray showed some formation of the primary lens fiber nucleus corresponding to the fiber differentiation stage (Reyer's regeneration stage III-early). Thus, low-dose X-irradiation induced well regeneration compared to the unexposed groups. However, when newts were injected with N-nitro-L-arginine, nitric oxide inhibitor, no radiation-induced effect could be observed. Furthermore, an acceleration from Reyer's stage II to III-early was also found on day 14 following irradiation of only the upper belly, including the spleen. Interestingly, well regeneration could be observed on forelimb stage. On 6 weeks after amputation, unexposed animal was showed the assembly of the condrogenesis of the radius and ulna. In contrast, forelimb from newts exposed to a 0.2Gy spleen portion was showed the onset of digit formation. The effects of low-dose X-irradiation on regeneration may be mediated by changes in immune activity. (Author)

  19. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  20. A case of radiation induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Sato, Akira; Kato, Joji (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A case of carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa is presented. The case was suspected to have been induced by irradiation therapy for a carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. An external radiotherapy, 6-MeV Linac, had been done for the carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa in a 55-year-old female, with single lateral direction from the left to the right in 1977. In 1985, a papillary lesion on the right buccal mucosa was detected, and histological examination revealed a papilloma without atypism. In 1991, as an ulcer on the right upper buccal fold as well as three papillary lesions in the central portion of the right buccal mucosa were found, the patient was referred to our clinic. Microscopical findings were consistent with the early invasive carcinomas. A surgical excision of these whole lesions and skin graft were completed. The criteria of this case for the suspicion of radiation-induced carcinoma were as follows. There was a long latent period of 14 years. The previous dose of irradiation, 60 Gy, was sufficient. The right buccal mucosa was involved in the radiation field. A severe scar on the left cheek resulted from the previous irradiation. Anatomically, there is no evidence of the secondary carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa with the primary carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. No evidence for recurrence of the tumors on both sides of buccal mucosa has been detected so far. Further observations will be necessary to detect other tumors in the irradiated field later on. (author).

  1. Effects of low-dose ionising radiation on pituitary adenoma: is there a role for L-type calcium channel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia]. E-mail: santosr@cdtn.br

    2005-10-15

    Pituitary adenomas constitute about 6-18% of brain tumours in adults. Activation of voltage gated calcium currents can account for growth hormone over secretion in some GH-secreting pituitary adenomas that produce an acromegaly appearance and increase mortality. Ca{sup 2+} ions, as mediators of intracellular signalling, are crucial for the development of apoptosis. However, the role of [Ca{sup 2+}] in the development of apoptosis is ambiguous. In this study, the effects of low-dose ionising gamma radiation ({sup 60} Co) on rat pituitary adenoma cells survival and proliferation and the role of calcium channels on the apoptosis radio-induced were evaluated. Doses as low as 3 Gy were found to inhibit GH3 cell proliferation. Even though there was a significant number of live cells,168 hours following irradiation, they were not able to proliferate. The results indicate that the blockade of extracellular calcium influx through these channels does not interfere in the radiation-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. (author)

  2. On the risk to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging procedures - IOMP policy statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The science committee of International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) developed a policy statement on the predictions of radiation-induced cancers and cancer deaths in patients exposed to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging; this statement has been approved by the IOMP council. In order to attract the attention of medical physicists, an editorial (1) titled 'Risk of Medical Imaging' that includes the said statement has recently been published in Medical Physics journal of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). As stated, IOMP represents 80 national and 6 regional medical physics organizations and 18,000 medical physicists worldwide. The IOMP affiliated bodies/organizations in different countries (such as Association of Medical Physicists of India, AMPI) have been encouraged to reproduce the IOMP statement in their journals/newsletters for the benefit of larger community of medical physicists. The IOMP statement is reproduced below (readers may also go through the supportive literature listed in references). It is hoped that this policy statement will have some deterrent influence on the continued propagation of unproven risk related to medical imaging procedures conducted with small doses.

  3. Dual effect of low dose of irradiation on wheat x Leymus angustus: enhancement and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of low dose of γ-irradiation on wheat x Leymus angustus were studied. The results showed that appropriate low dose of irradiation can overcome the cross incompatibility and enhance seed setting, on the other hand, restrain the development of hybrid embryos and make rate of seed containing embryos decrease. When irradiation is used to enhance wide hybridization, the damage of low dose of γ-irradiation should be considered

  4. Critical appraisal of a fixed combination of esomeprazole and low dose aspirin in risk reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Vachhani, Ravi; Bouhaidar, Doumit; Zfass, Alvin; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Nawras, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Low dose aspirin (≤325 mg) is routinely used for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The use of low dose aspirin is associated with two- to four-fold greater risk of symptomatic or complicated peptic ulcers. Risk factors associated with low dose aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity includes prior history of ulcer or upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, concomitant use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid or warfarin, d...

  5. Low-dose CT scan screening for lung cancer: comparison of images and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT

    OpenAIRE

    ONO, KOJI; Hiraoka, Toru; Ono, Asami; Komatsu, Eiji; Shigenaga, Takehiko; Takaki, Hajime; Maeda, Toru; Ogusu, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Shintaro; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kai, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aim to compare image quality and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT for lung cancer screening. Methods In a single medical institution, 19 subjects who had been screened for lung cancer by low-dose CT before going through follow-up standard diagnostic CT were randomly selected. Both CT image sets for all subjects were independently evaluated by five specialized physicians. Results There were no significant differences between low-dos...

  6. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm3 was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable reduction

  7. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  8. Low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using advanced iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Fuqua, Christopher; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) can provide quantitative functional information for the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, x-ray dose in dynamic CTP is high, typically from 10mSv to >20mSv. We compared the dose reduction potential of advanced iterative reconstruction, Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio) to hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and filtered back projection (FBP). Dynamic CTP scans were obtained using a porcine model with balloon-induced ischemia in the left anterior descending coronary artery to prescribed fractional flow reserve values. High dose dynamic CTP scans were acquired at 100kVp/100mAs with effective dose of 23mSv. Low dose scans at 75mAs, 50mAs, and 25mAs were simulated by adding x-ray quantum noise and detector electronic noise to the projection space data. Images were reconstructed with FBP, iDose4, and IMR at each dose level. Image quality in static CTP images was assessed by SNR and CNR. Blood flow was obtained using a dynamic CTP analysis pipeline and blood flow image quality was assessed using flow-SNR and flow-CNR. IMR showed highest static image quality according to SNR and CNR. Blood flow in FBP was increasingly over-estimated at reduced dose. Flow was more consistent for iDose4 from 100mAs to 50mAs, but was over-estimated at 25mAs. IMR was most consistent from 100mAs to 25mAs. Static images and flow maps for 100mAs FBP, 50mAs iDose4, and 25mAs IMR showed comparable, clear ischemia, CNR, and flow-CNR values. These results suggest that IMR can enable dynamic CTP at significantly reduced dose, at 5.8mSv or 25% of the comparable 23mSv FBP protocol.

  9. 不同剂量模式照射对大鼠放射性肺损伤的影响%Impact of radiation-induced pulmonary injury in rats by different dose fractionation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文其; 袁堃; 康敏; 范小玲; 毛艳

    2012-01-01

    group. The TGF-β1 and TNF-ot of serum in the 1st,3rd,5th, 10th and 24th week after irradiation were measured by ELISA. The histological changes of their right lungs with HE staining from 1st week to 24 th week after irradiation were observed. Results High-dose fraction irradiation group,TGF-β1 in serum increased after being radiated,and it reached a peak in 10th week. TGF-β1 in serum remained at high level from 5th week to 24th week. After being radiated,TNF-α in serum increased rapidly from 1st week and reached the peak in 10th week, then declined rapidly. Low-dose fraction irradiation group,TGF-β1,TNF-α in serum increased after irradiation,but the changes were less than that of High-dose fraction irradiation group. The pathological changes in pulmonary tissue had experienced a process from acute radiation-induced pneumonitis to chronic pulmonary fibrosis, including acute inflamma-tion period,hyperplasia period, and fibrosis period. Whether the acute radiation-induced pneumonitis or the radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis,the Low-dose fraction irradiation group is lighter than the High-dose fraction irradiation group. Conclusion Received the same total doses of irradiation, Low-dose fraction irradiation group has less histological changes and the contents of TGF-β1 ,TNF-α in serum than High-dose fraction irradiation group, Low-dose fraction irradiation can protect late response tissue.

  10. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  11. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  12. Total Risk Management for Low Dose Radiation Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our civilization is witnessing about century of nuclear age mixed with enormous promises and cataclysmic threats. Nuclear energy seems to encapsulate both potential for pure good and evil or at least we humans are able to perceive that. These images are continuously with us and they are both helping and distracting from making best of nuclear potentials for civilization. Today with nuclear use significantly present and with huge potential to further improve our life with energy and medical use it is of enormous importance to try to have calmed, rational, and objective view on potential risks and certain benefits. Because all use of nuclear energy proved that their immediate risks are negligible (i.e., Three Mile Island and Fukushima) or much smaller than from the other alternatives (i.e., Chernobyl) it seems that the most important issue is the amount of risk from the long term effects to people from exposure to small doses of radiation. A similar issue is present in the increased use of modern computational tomography and other radiation sources use in medicine for examination and therapy. Finally, extreme natural exposures are third such potential risk sources. Definition of low doses varies depending on the way of delivery (i.e., single, multiple or continuous exposures), and for this paper usual dose of 100 mSv is selected as yearly upper amount. There are three very different scientifically supported views on the potential risks from the low doses exposure. The most conservative theory is that all radiation is harmful, and even small increments from background levels (i.e., 2-3 mSv) present additional risk. This view is called linear no threshold theory (LNT) and it is accepted as a regulatory conservative simple approach which guarantees safety. Risk is derived from the extrapolation of the measured effects of high levels of radiation. Opposite theory to LNT is hormesis which assumes that in fact small doses of radiation are helpful and they are improving our

  13. Histological analysis of low dose NMU effects in the rat mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenschein Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to assess the histological changes in mammary glands of the female Wistar-Furth rat as a result of low dose exposure to N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU. Methods Groups of 30–40 virgin female rats of between 49–58 days old received a single injection of 10, 20, 30 or 50 mg NMU/kg body weight (BW. A group of 10 control rats received 0.9% NaCl solution only. The formation of palpable mammary gland tumors was assessed weekly and, upon sacrifice at 12, 22 and 25–30 weeks after treatment, we performed a comprehensive histological analysis of all mammary gland lesions and tumors. Results Alongside the predicted increase in tumor number and decrease in tumor latency with increasing NMU dose, we observed a number of microscopic lesions and other epithelial abnormalities in the mammary glands for all NMU doses. Two types of non-neoplastic histological changes were observed in rats exposed to 10 or 20 mg NMU/kg BW: namely, (i an increase in the number of acinar structures often accompanied by secretion into the lumen which is normally associated with pregnancy and lactation, and (ii an increase in the number of epithelial cells sloughed into the lumen of the epithelial ducts. Conclusion This study establishes a baseline for low-dose exposure and defines the histological features in the mammary gland resulting from NMU exposure. Furthermore, this system provides an ideal platform for evaluating the relative susceptibility of animals protected from, or predisposed to, developing cancer through environmental influences.

  14. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  15. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic finding...

  16. Physical mechanisms of radiation induced creep in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of available experimental data has been conducted. It enables to correlate reliably the character of evolution of dislocation structure of irradiated materials with different stages of radiation induced creep. This provides reliable basis for the general conclusions concerning the character of some parametric dependences of deformation rate of these materials. Analysis of different modern theoretical models enables to evaluate regions of their applicability and their relative significance for radiation induced creep description. 20 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Low Doses of Gamma Rays Reduce the Sensitivity of Cervical Carcinoma Cells to Subsequent Treatment with Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges of modern genetics is to apply recent advances in mutation research to improve the accuracy of the estimates of the genetic risk for humans. Because of the important implications for radiation protection, biological effects of low-dose radiation have been a focus of research in recent years. Previously we have found that human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells irradiated repeatedly with low doses of gamma rays (HeLa1500 cells) became resistant to cisplatin. In this study we examine whether this effect was caused by inhibition of apoptosis. In HeLa and HeLa1500 cells we determined the induction of apoptosis following the treatment with cisplatin (i) by counting apoptotic cells with characteristic morphological changes, (ii) by analysing the expression of apoptotic genes involved in cytochrome c/Apaf-1/caspase-9 and in Fas/FasL pathways by Western blot method, and (iii) by estimating the activities of caspases by commercial caspase detection kits. Our results show that low doses of gamma rays induced alterations in human cervical carcinoma cells that were reflected in inhibition of p53-independent cisplatin-induced apoptosis due to reduced activity of caspase 3. (author)

  18. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD5 doses of sarin failed to

  19. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention

  20. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Kevin F., E-mail: KSeals@mednet.ucla.edu; Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cagnon, Christopher H., E-mail: CCagnon@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Hakim, Ramsey A., E-mail: RAlhakim@mednet.ucla.edu; Kee, Stephen T., E-mail: SKee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  1. Ionizing radiation induced cataract; Katarakt-Induktion durch ionisierende Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    2013-07-01

    Until recently it was believed that the cataract (opacity of the eye lens) is a deterministic effect with a dose threshold of several Gray in dependence on the exposure conditions. Studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, of American radiologic technologists, astronauts, and patients after having received several computer tomographies of the head region, however, have shown that this assumption is not correct. It had been overlooked in the past that with decreasing dose the latency period is increasing. Therefore, the originally available studies were terminated too early. The more recent studies show that, in the case of a threshold existing at all, it is definitely below 0.8 Gy independently of an acute or a chronic exposure. All studies, however, include 0 Gy in the confidence interval, so that the absence of a dose threshold cannot be excluded. The German Commission on Radiological Protection (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK) suggested therefore among others: targeted recording of the lens dose during activities which are known to be associated with possible significant lens exposure, examination of the lens should be included as appropriate in the medical monitoring of people occupationally exposed to radiation, if there is potentially high lens exposure, adoption of research strategies to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying radiation induced cataracts. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) actually assumes a threshold dose of 0.5 Gy and, based on this assumption, has recommended in 2011 to reduce the dose limit for the eye lens from 150 mSv in a year to 20 mSv in a year for people occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. (orig.)

  2. Panel discussion on health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Scientific findings and non-threshold hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a record of a panel discussion in the IAEA Interregional Training Course. In current radiation work, protection measures are taken on the assumption that any amount of radiation, however small, entails a risk of deleterious effects. This so-called non-threshold assumption of radiation effects, on the one hand, creates public distrust of radiation use. However, because the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are difficult to verify, wide views ranging from the non-threshold hypothesis to one which sees small amounts of radiation as rather useful and necessary are presented. In this panel discussion, how the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation should be considered from the standpoint of radiation protection was discussed. Panelists included such eminent scientists as Dr. Sugahara and Dr. Okada, who are deeply interested in this field and are playing leading parts in radiobiology research in Japan, and Dr. Stather, deputy Director of NRPB, UK, who, in UNSCEAR and ICRP, is actively participating in the international review of radiation effects and the preparation of reports on radiation protection recommendations. They agreed with each other that although it is reasonable, under the current scientific understanding, to follow the recommendation of ICRP, research in this area should be strongly promoted hereafter, for basing radiation protection on firm scientific grounds. Many participants actively asked about and discussed problems in their own field. (author)

  3. Simulating the Lunar Environment: Partial Weightbearing and High-LET Radiation-Induce Bone Loss and Increase Sclerostin-Positive Osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, B R; Lima, F; Swift, J M; Shirazi-Fard, Y; Greene, E S; Allen, M R; Fluckey, J; Hogan, H A; Braby, L; Wang, Suojin; Bloomfield, S A

    2016-09-01

    Exploration missions to the Moon or Mars will expose astronauts to galactic cosmic radiation and low gravitational fields. Exposure to reduced weightbearing and radiation independently result in bone loss. However, no data exist regarding the skeletal consequences of combining low-dose, high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and partial weightbearing. We hypothesized that simulated galactic cosmic radiation would exacerbate bone loss in animals held at one-sixth body weight (G/6) without radiation exposure. Female BALB/cByJ four-month-old mice were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups: 1 gravity (1G) control; 1G with radiation; G/6 control; and G/6 with radiation. Mice were exposed to either silicon-28 or X-ray radiation. (28)Si radiation (300 MeV/nucleon) was administered at acute doses of 0 (sham), 0.17 and 0.5 Gy, or in three fractionated doses of 0.17 Gy each over seven days. X radiation (250 kV) was administered at acute doses of 0 (sham), 0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy, or in three fractionated doses of 0.33 Gy each over 14 days. Bones were harvested 21 days after the first exposure. Acute 1 Gy X-ray irradiation during G/6, and acute or fractionated 0.5 Gy (28)Si irradiation during 1G resulted in significantly lower cancellous mass [percentage bone volume/total volume (%BV/TV), by microcomputed tomography]. In addition, G/6 significantly reduced %BV/TV compared to 1G controls. When acute X-ray irradiation was combined with G/6, distal femur %BV/TV was significantly lower compared to G/6 control. Fractionated X-ray irradiation during G/6 protected against radiation-induced losses in %BV/TV and trabecular number, while fractionated (28)Si irradiation during 1G exacerbated the effects compared to single-dose exposure. Impaired bone formation capacity, measured by percentage mineralizing surface, can partially explain the lower cortical bone thickness. Moreover, both partial weightbearing and (28)Si-ion exposure contribute to a higher proportion of

  4. Coronary artery calcification scoring in low-dose ungated CT screening for lung cancer: interscan agreement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.C.; Isgum, I.; Gondrie, M.J.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Ginneken, B. van; Prokop, M.; Graaf, Y. van der

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  5. Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring in Low-Dose Ungated CT Screening for Lung Cancer : Interscan Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Peter C. A.; Isgum, Ivana; Gondrie, Martijn J. A.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  6. Low doses of glyphosate change the response of soybean to later glyphosate exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stimulatory effect of low doses of toxic substances is known as hormesis. Many herbicides that cause severe injury to plants at recommended rates, promote growth or have other stimulatory effects at very low doses. The objective of this study was to evaluate glyphosate-induced hormesis in soyb...

  7. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  8. Modeling low-dose-rate effects in irradiated bipolar-base oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R.J.; Cirba, C.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Michez, A. [Univ. Montpellier 2 (France); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Witczak, S.C. [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in BJTs. Simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for the low-dose-rate enhancement.

  9. Radiation-induced gene expression in human subcutaneous fibroblasts is predictive of radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Alsner, Jan;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer patients show a large variation in normal tissue reactions after ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. One of the most common long-term adverse effects of ionizing radiotherapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), and several attempts have been made over the last...... with variable risk of RIF (grouped into five classes from low to high risk) were irradiated with two different schemes: 1x3.5Gy with RNA isolated 2 and 24h after irradiation, and a fractionated scheme with 3x3.5Gy in intervals of 24h with RNA isolated 2h after the last dose. RNA was also isolated from non...... and the four patients with the lowest risk of RIF after the fractionated scheme. The genes were associated with known functions in processes like apoptosis, extracellular matrix remodelling/cell adhesion, proliferation and ROS scavenging. A minimum set of 18 genes were identified that could differentiate high...

  10. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  11. Radiation-Induced Segregation and Phase Stability in Candidate Alloys for the Advanced Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Was; Brian D. Wirth

    2011-05-29

    Major accomplishments of this project were the following: 1) Radiation induced depletion of Cr occurs in alloy D9, in agreement with that observed in austenitic alloys. 2) In F-M alloys, Cr enriches at PAG grain boundaries at low dose (<7 dpa) and at intermediate temperature (400°C) and the magnitude of the enrichment decreases with temperature. 3) Cr enrichment decreases with dose, remaining enriched in alloy T91 up to 10 dpa, but changing to depletion above 3 dpa in HT9 and HCM12A. 4) Cr has a higher diffusivity than Fe by a vacancy mechanism and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is larger than Fe in the opposite direction to the vacancy flux. 5) Cr concentration at grain boundaries decreases as a result of vacancy transport during electron or proton irradiation, consistent with Inverse Kirkendall models. 6) Inclusion of other point defect sinks into the KLMC simulation of vacancy-mediated diffusion only influences the results in the low temperature, recombination dominated regime, but does not change the conclusion that Cr depletes as a result of vacancy transport to the sink. 7) Cr segregation behavior is independent of Frenkel pair versus cascade production, as simulated for electron versus proton irradiation conditions, for the temperatures investigated. 8) The amount of Cr depletion at a simulated planar boundary with vacancy-mediated diffusion reaches an apparent saturation value by about 1 dpa, with the precise saturation concentration dependent on the ratio of Cr to Fe diffusivity. 9) Cr diffuses faster than Fe by an interstitial transport mechanism, and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is much larger than Fe in the same direction as the interstitial flux. 10) Observed experimental and computational results show that the radiation induced segregation behavior of Cr is consistent with an Inverse Kirkendall mechanism.

  12. Methadone ameliorates multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of β cells by the immune system. Opioids have been shown to modulate a number of immune functions, including T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines. The immunosuppressive effect of long-term administration of opioids has been demonstrated both in animal models and humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of methadone, a μ-opioid receptor agonist, on type 1 diabetes. Administration of multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) (MLDS) (40mg/kg intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days) to mice resulted in autoimmune diabetes. Mice were treated with methadone (10mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for 24days. Blood glucose, insulin and pancreatic cytokine levels were measured. Chronic methadone treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia and incidence of diabetes, and restored pancreatic insulin secretion in the MLDS model. The protective effect of methadone can be overcome by pretreatment with naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Also, methadone treatment decreased the proinflammatory Th1 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ] and increased anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Histopathological observations indicated that STZ-mediated destruction of β cells was attenuated by methadone treatment. It seems that methadone as an opioid agonist may have a protective effect against destruction of β cells and insulitis in the MLDS model of type 1 diabetes

  13. PARTICLE, a Triplex-Forming Long ncRNA, Regulates Locus-Specific Methylation in Response to Low-Dose Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Bríd O’Leary

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to low-dose irradiation causes transiently elevated expression of the long ncRNA PARTICLE (gene PARTICLE, promoter of MAT2A-antisense radiation-induced circulating lncRNA. PARTICLE affords both a cytosolic scaffold for the tumor suppressor methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT2A and a nuclear genetic platform for transcriptional repression. In situ hybridization discloses that PARTICLE and MAT2A associate together following irradiation. Bromouridine tracing and presence in exosomes indicate intercellular transport, and this is supported by ex vivo data from radiotherapy-treated patients. Surface plasmon resonance indicates that PARTICLE forms a DNA-lncRNA triplex upstream of a MAT2A promoter CpG island. We show that PARTICLE represses MAT2A via methylation and demonstrate that the radiation-induced PARTICLE interacts with the transcription-repressive complex proteins G9a and SUZ12 (subunit of PRC2. The interplay of PARTICLE with MAT2A implicates this lncRNA in intercellular communication and as a recruitment platform for gene-silencing machineries through triplex formation in response to irradiation.

  14. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bo Qiao; Yan-Hui Zhao; Yan-Bin Zhao; Rui-Zhi Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, nograde 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P= 0.0001<0.01).CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT.

  15. Enhancing repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA as a radiotherapeutic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of mammalian organisms including man from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is of paramount importance and development of effective approaches to combat radiation damages using non-toxic radioprotectors is of considerable interest for defence, nuclear industries, radiation accidents, space travels, etc., besides the protection of normal tissues during radiotherapy of tumours. Many synthetic as well as natural compounds have been investigated in the recent past for their efficacy to protect the biological systems from radiation induced damages. They include sulfhydryl compounds, antioxidants, plant extracts, immune-modulators, and other agents. However, the inherent toxicity of many of the synthetic agents at the effective radio-protective concentration warranted further search for safer and more effective radio-protectors. In this context, therapeutic radioprotectors which are effective on post irradiation administration are of special relevance. One of the property that can be applied while screening for such radiation protective therapeutics is their ability to enhance repair of radiation-induced lesions in cellular DNA in terms of cellular repair index based on the parameters of the DNA following comet assay. Post irradiation administration of some natural and synthetic agents have shown their potential to enhance repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA in mice. These include phytoceuticals such as gallic acid, sesamol etc., extracts of medicinal plants such as Andrographis panniculata, and a few synthetic compounds such as tocopherol-mono-glucoside. The talk will give an overview of the work on DNA repair enhancement by a few natural and synthetic agents. (author)

  16. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  17. The effect of low doses on the metabolism of thymidine in bone marrow cells of NMRI mice; an in vivo - in vitro study using labeled nucleic acid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-dose whole-body exposure of mice to less than 0.01 Gy causes a temporary inhibition of incorporation of thymidine into DNA of bone-marrow cells in vitro. This inhibition has its maximum at 4 hours after irradiation. The low-dose effect is due to the temporary inhibition of cellular thymidine kinase. This decrease in thymidine kinase activity involves only 35% of the entire cellular enzyme activity and, analogous to the depression of thymidine incorporation into the cells, is only seen in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaHCO3. The inhibition of TdR-kinase at very low doses should not be viewed as an expression of cell damage but might be part of a cellular protection mechanism different from known repair systems. (orig.)

  18. Differences in the adaptive response to radiation damage in G0 human lymphocytes conditioned with hydrogen peroxide or low-dose X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out experiments to study the adaptive response in G0 human lymphocytes conditioned with either hydrogen peroxide or low-dose X-rays and challenged with 1.5 Gy of X-rays after stimulation. Peroxide conditioning treatment was given at different times before stimulation, while the low-dose irradiation was delivered at different dose rates just before stimulation of lymphocytes. A protective effect of pre-exposure to H2O2 against radiation damage detected as micronuclei in binucleated cells was evident, regardless of the time of conditioning treatment during G0. For low-dose-irradiated cells, on the other hand, the adaptation observed seemed to depend upon the dose rate, and never reached the extent observed in cells treated with peroxide

  19. Dose rate dependence of radiation-induced lattice defects and performance degradation in npn Si bipolar transistors by 2-MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayama, K. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2569-2 Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)], E-mail: hayama@ee.knct.ac.jp; Takakura, K.; Ohyama, H. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2569-2 Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Kuboyama, S. [JAXA, 2-1-1 Sengen, Ibaraki 305-8505 75 (Japan); Simoen, E.; Mercha, A.; Claeys, C. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    Total-dose response of npn Si transistors by 2-MeV electrons is presented for different dose rates. The base current increases after irradiation, whereas the collector current decreases. Therefore, the current gain ({beta}) decreases by irradiation. The degradation of electrical properties by 2-MeV electrons for low dose rate is higher than that for high dose rate. Similar dose rate dependence of the radiation-induced electron trap densities is observed by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements.

  20. Dose rate dependence of radiation-induced lattice defects and performance degradation in npn Si bipolar transistors by 2-MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, K.; Takakura, K.; Ohyama, H.; Kuboyama, S.; Simoen, E.; Mercha, A.; Claeys, C.

    2007-12-01

    Total-dose response of npn Si transistors by 2-Me