WorldWideScience

Sample records for low-dose alcohol effects

  1. Effects of low doses of alcohol on declarative memory in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Arturo Bríñez-Horta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of low doses of alcohol on two elements of explicit or declarative memory, in 16 participants, 8 women and 8 men, with The Weschler Memory Scale III Text Test. A factorial 2 * 4 counterbalanced with repeated measures design was used. There were no statistically significant differences by gender, but there were differences among doses, specially 0.150 g / Kg., which reduced episodic and semantic retrieval, between 43.9 and 62.9 % of effect strength, in intermediate term memory. These results provided evidence that alcohol in low doses has a more pronounced effect in semantic, rather than episodic memory, in the middle term

  2. Study of morbidity in persons subjected to combined effect of low dose irradiation and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.; Zakharov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Materials related to study of morbidity in persons from one of the controled areas subjected to combined effect of low dose ionizing radiation and alcohol are presented. The group under control included persons living in the same area but not misusing alcohol. The morbidity analysis for the period of two years before the accident showed that the number of morbidity cases and days characterized by incapacity for work among 100 working persons was 1.2 and 1.35 times higher as compared to persons not misusing alcohol. Two years after the accident these values constitute 1.6 and 1.75 correspondingly. It is established on the basis of the dispensary examnations, that taking into account other equal conditions the number of morbidity cases related to cardiovasular deseases among the persons misusing alcohol increased (11 % against 6.8 % bycontrol). The number of other chronic morbidity cases does not differ from control values. 7 refs.; 2 tabs

  3. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  4. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  5. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  6. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  7. Effects of Consuming a Low Dose of Alcohol with Mixers Containing Carbohydrate or Artificial Sweetener on Simulated Driving Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Brickley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Australian National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC devised gender-based drinking recommendations to ensure blood or equivalized breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC remain <0.050%. However, these may be inappropriate for individuals consuming alcohol without carbohydrate (CHO, which results in higher BrACs. This study investigated the effects of ingesting alcohol with and without CHO on BrACs and simulated driving performance. Thirty-two participants (16 males; age: 23 ± 6 years completed two randomized single-blinded trials. Participants performed a baseline drive (Drive 1, then an experimental drive (Drive 2, following alcohol consumption (males: 20 g; females: 10 g. Alcoholic beverages contained either 25 g sucrose or aspartame (AS. Driving performance was assessed using lateral control (standard deviation of lane position [SDLP] and number of lane departures and risk-taking (number of overtaking maneuvers and maximum overtaking speed. BrAC and subjective ratings (e.g., intoxication were also assessed. BrAC was significantly lower as Drive 2 commenced with CHO compared to AS (0.022 ± 0.008% vs. 0.030 ± 0.011%. Two males provided BrACs >0.050% with AS. Neither beverage influenced changes to simulated driving performance. Ingesting alcohol in quantities advised by the NDARC results in no detectable simulated driving impairment. However, the likelihood of exceeding the legal drink-driving BrAC is increased when alcohol is consumed with artificially-sweetened mixers.

  8. Differential residual effects of zaleplon and zopiclone on actual driving: a comparison with a low dose of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, Annemiek; Riedel, Wim J; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Darwish, Mona; Paty, Isabelle; Patat, Alain

    2002-03-15

    To compare residual effects of zaleplon 10 mg, zopiclone 7.5 mg, and placebo, and a social dose of alcohol on car driving, memory, and psychomotor performance. Two-part placebo controlled, crossover study. Part 1 was single blind, Part 2 double blind. University research institute. Thirty healthy volunteers (15 men and 15 women, mean age 32 +/- 7 years) In Part 1 alcohol and alcohol-placebo drinks were administered around noon. In Part 2 single oral doses of zaleplon 10 mg, zopiclone 7.5 mg and placebo were administered at bedtime. A highway driving test, laboratory tests of word learning, critical tracking and divided attention, and subjective assessments of sleep, mood, and effects of treatments on driving. Driving started 40 minutes after a second alcohol dose in Part 1, and 10 hours after drug intake in Part 2. The results demonstrated that alcohol, at average plasma concentrations of approximately 0.030 g/dl, significantly impaired performance in all tests. Zaleplon's residual effects did not differ significantly from those of placebo in any test. In contrast, zopiclone had significant residual effects on driving, divided attention, and memory. The magnitude of impairment in the driving test observed the morning after zopiclone 7.5 mg was twice that observed with alcohol. Zaleplon 10 mg has no residual effects on driving when taken at bedtime, 10 hours before driving. In contrast, zopiclone 7.5 mg can cause marked residual impairment. Patients should be advised to avoid driving the morning after zopiclone administration.

  9. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  10. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  11. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  12. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  13. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  14. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  15. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  16. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  18. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  19. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  20. Modifying effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalendo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that irradiation of Hela cells with stimulating doses of 0,1 Gy changes the cells' response to the subsequent radiation effect of greater value: instead of DNA synthesis inhibition stimulation takes place. Modifying effect of preliminary irradiation with 0,1 Gy manifests it self only in case if there is a certain time interval not less than 3 minutes and not more than 10 minutes (3-5 minutes is optimal interval). Data on modifying effect with 0,1 Gy at subcellular and cellular-population levels are presented. 21 refs.; 6 figs

  1. Low doses of alcohol substantially decrease glucose metabolism in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Franceschi, Dinko; Fowler, Joanna S; Thanos, Panayotis Peter K; Maynard, Laurence; Gatley, S John; Wong, Christopher; Veech, Richard L; Kunos, George; Kai Li, Ting

    2006-01-01

    Moderate doses of alcohol decrease glucose metabolism in the human brain, which has been interpreted to reflect alcohol-induced decreases in brain activity. Here, we measure the effects of two relatively low doses of alcohol (0.25 g/kg and 0.5 g/kg, or 5 to 10 mM in total body H2O) on glucose metabolism in the human brain. Twenty healthy control subjects were tested using positron emission tomography (PET) and FDG after placebo and after acute oral administration of either 0.25 g/kg, or 0.5 g/kg of alcohol, administered over 40 min. Both doses of alcohol significantly decreased whole-brain glucose metabolism (10% and 23% respectively). The responses differed between doses; whereas the 0.25 g/kg dose predominantly reduced metabolism in cortical regions, the 0.5 g/kg dose reduced metabolism in cortical as well as subcortical regions (i.e. cerebellum, mesencephalon, basal ganglia and thalamus). These doses of alcohol did not significantly change the scores in cognitive performance, which contrasts with our previous results showing that a 13% reduction in brain metabolism by lorazepam was associated with significant impairment in performance on the same battery of cognitive tests. This seemingly paradoxical finding raises the possibility that the large brain metabolic decrements during alcohol intoxication could reflect a shift in the substrate for energy utilization, particularly in light of new evidence that blood-borne acetate, which is markedly increased during intoxication, is a substrate for energy production by the brain.

  2. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  3. Effect of Low Dose Lead (Pb) Administration on Tail Immersion Test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Effect of Low Dose Lead (Pb) Administration on Tail ... Acute and sub-acute effects of lead are caused by relatively large ... As such, the brain is the organ most studied in lead toxicity. ..... inflammatory Properties of Hydro-alcohol Extract of.

  4. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  6. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  7. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  8. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  9. Low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure modulates weight gain and eliminates fractalkine expression in e14.5 mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordyn Karliner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD is caused by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and often leads to long-lasting developmental symptoms, including increased microglial migration and increased release of the chemokine, fractalkine, both of which play a role in embryonic brain development. However, the effects of low-dose alcohol exposure on microglia and fractalkine embryonically are not well documented. This study addresses this gap by using the voluntary drinking paradigm, Drinking in the Dark (DiD, to expose mice to acute doses of alcohol from embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5 to E14.5. Maternal mice and embryo analyses revealed increased embryo weights and a trend of increased gestational weight gain in alcohol-exposed mice compared to water-exposed mice. After quantifying soluble fractalkine concentrations through Western Blots, results indicated decreased fractalkine in alcohol-exposed mice compared to water-exposed. Overall, our data suggest that exposure to low doses of alcohol inhibits fractalkine release, which may affect microglial function.

  10. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  11. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  12. Low-dose effects hypothesis and observations on NPP personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, R.; Acheva, A.; Boteva, R.; Chobanova, N.; Djounova, J.; Gyuleva, I.; Ivanova, K.; Kurchatova, G.; Milchev, A.; Negoicheva, K.; Nikolov, V.; Panova, D.; Pejankov, I.; Rupova, I.; Stankova, K.; Zacharieva, E. [Radiobiology Department, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    In the modern world the use of various sources of ionizing radiation is nearly ubiquitous. They have numerous applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture, etc. Radiation doses to workers nevertheless are commensurable to the natural background exposure. Published data on the health effects of occupational radiation exposure are often contradictory. Addressing the issue of „negative” (bystander effects, genomic instability) and „positive” (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses is important and has a significant social and economic impact. In this paper we summarize the results of our extensive monitoring of nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. We believe it is a cohort suitable for analysis of health effects at low doses, because of their good medical and dosimetric control. Our results rather support the idea of absence of adverse health effects in NPP workers. (author)

  13. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  14. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  15. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  16. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  17. adverse effects of low dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.T.; Khan, D.A.; Khan, F.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the frequency of adverse effects attributed to Methotrexate (MTX) toxicity and serum minimum toxic concentration with low dose MTX in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from March 2010 to March 2011. Methodology: One hundred and forty adult patients of RA receiving low dose MTX (10 mg/week) for at least 3 months, ere included by consecutive sampling. Blood samples were collected 2 hours after the oral dose of MTX. Serum alanine transaminase and creatinine were analyzed on Hitachi and blood counts on Sysmex analyzer. Serum MTX concentration was measured on TDX analyzer. Results: Out of one hundred and forty patients; 68 males (49%) and 72 females (51%), 38 developed MTX toxicity (27%), comprising of hepatotoxicity in 12 (8.6%), nephrotoxicity in 3 (2.1%), anaemia in 8 (5.7%), leucopenia in 2 (1.4%), thrombocytopenia in 3 (2.1%), pancytopenia in 2 (1.4%), gastrointestinal adverse effects in 5 (3.6%) and mucocutaneous problems in 3 (2.1%). Receiver operating characteristic curve revealed serum minimum toxic concentration of MTX at cutoff value of 0.71 mu mol/l with a sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76%. Conclusion: Adverse effects of low dose MTX were found in 27% of RA patients, mainly comprising of hepatotoxicity and haematological problems. MTX toxicity can be detected by therapeutic drug monitoring of serum concentration of 0.71 mu mol/l with sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76% in the patients on low dose MTX maintenance therapy. (author)

  18. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  19. Low dose effects detected by micronucleus assay in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Bojtor, I.; Kubasova, T.; Horvath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low doses of X-rays between 0.01 and 1 Gy were studied on whole blood samples of various individuals using the cytokinesis-blocked lymphocyte micronucleus assay as an endpoint. The adaptive response could be induced in G 0 cells by 0.01 Gy followed by 1 Gy challenging dose within a time period of 8 hours, in vitro. The probability distribution of micronucleus increments in those samples which had received very low doses in the range 0.01-0.05 Gy proved to be of asymmetrical type (i.e. lognormal) -very likely to the same shape which has been verified for unirradiated (control) population - while the variable turned to be normally distributed at or above 1 Gy. Profound changes have been experienced in the main characteristics of the linear dose - response relationship and in regression parameters, as well, when successively lessened dose ranges were studied toward 0.01 Gy. In the range below ∼ 0.2 Gy the response were found to be unrelated to the absorbed dose. These findings suggest that in (very) low dose range a higher attention should be needed to biological parameters like repair, protective mechanisms and antioxidant capacities, rather than to the absorbed radiation energy only. (author)

  20. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  1. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  2. Anti-tumor effect of low dose radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengping; Lu Jiaben; Zhu Bingchai

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the effects of the total body irradiation of low dose radiation (LDR) and/or the local irradiation of large dose on average tumor weights and tumor inhibitory rates in 170 mice inoculated S 180 sarcoma cell, and the influence of LDR on average longevity in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Results show (1) LDR in the range of 75∼250 mGy can inhibit tumor growth to some extent; (2) fractionated irradiation of 75 mGy and local irradiation of 10 Gy may produce a synergism in tumor growth inhibition; and (3)LDR may enhance average longevity in ascitic tumor-bearing mice

  3. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  4. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  5. The effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbaek, Mette; Hjerrild, Mette; Hallas, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    with three classes of antihypertensive drugs. The effect on blood pressure was estimated by office measurements together with serum potassium and adverse effects. The data were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 544 patients were identified; 200 were excluded because of secondary hypertension, other......Our objective was to estimate the effect of addition of low-dose spironolactone to previous antihypertensive therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. Patients had 25 to 50 mg of spironolactone once daily added to the treatment of hypertension that was uncontrolled despite previous treatment...... indications for spironolactone than hypertension, previous antihypertensive therapy with less than three drugs unless demonstrated intolerance to a third drug, insufficient compliance, and lack of follow-up data. Thus, 344 cases were included in the analysis. The population was 62.1 ± 12.8 years old, 45...

  6. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  7. The effects of chronic low dose irradiation on drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.; Taskaev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of the chronic gamma-irradiation in the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability and on the life-span in the laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes in mobile genetic elements and defects in the DNA repair processes. It is shown that the radiation-induced alteration of the traits under study depends from genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains we have observed an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate and life-span. Also it was established that irradiation leads to the frequencies of the GD-sterility and mutability of the snw and h(w+) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. The obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation. (author)

  8. Genetic effects of low-dose irradiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnulin, V.G.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    Influence of chronic γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability in the laboratory strains of Drosophila Melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes by families of mobile genetic elements and of systems of hybrid disgenesis and also violations in reparation processes control mechanisms. It was shown that the rates of induction of recessive lethal mutations depended on genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate were observed. Also in was established that irradiation leads to the increase in frequencies of the gonads sterility and mutability of the sn w and h(w + ) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. Obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation [ru

  9. Low dose prenatal alcohol exposure does not impair spatial learning and memory in two tests in adult and aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlie L Cullen

    Full Text Available Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can have detrimental impacts on the developing hippocampus, which can lead to deficits in learning and memory function. Although high levels of alcohol exposure can lead to severe deficits, there is a lack of research examining the effects of low levels of exposure. This study used a rat model to determine if prenatal exposure to chronic low dose ethanol would result in deficits in learning and memory performance and if this was associated with morphological changes within the hippocampus. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6% (vol/vol ethanol (EtOH or an isocaloric control diet throughout gestation. Male and Female offspring underwent behavioural testing at 8 (Adult or 15 months (Aged of age. Brains from these animals were collected for stereological analysis of pyramidal neuron number and dendritic morphology within the CA1 and CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. Prenatal ethanol exposed animals did not differ in spatial learning or memory performance in the Morris water maze or Y maze tasks compared to Control offspring. There was no effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on pyramidal cell number or density within the dorsal hippocampus. Overall, this study indicates that chronic low dose prenatal ethanol exposure in this model does not have long term detrimental effects on pyramidal cells within the dorsal hippocampus or impair spatial learning and memory performance.

  10. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  11. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  12. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alatas, Zubaidah

    2003-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  13. Implications of effects ''adaptive response'', ''low-dose hypersensitivity'' und ''bystander effect'' for cancer risk at low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P

    2006-01-01

    A model for carcinogenesis (the TSCE model) was applied in order to examine the effects of ''Low-dose hypersensitivity (LDH)'' and the ''Bystander effect (BE)'' on the derivation of radiation related cancer mortality risks. LDH has been discovered to occur in the inactivation of cells after acute exposure to low LET radiation. A corresponding version of the TSCE model was applied to the mortality data on the Abomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The BE has been mainly observed in cells after exposure to high LET radiation. A Version of the TSCE model which included the BE was applied to the data on lung cancer mortality from the workers at the Mayak nuclear facilities who were exposed to Plutonium. In general an equally good description of the A-bomb survivor mortality data (for all solid, stomach and lung tumours) was found for the TSCE model and the (conventional) empirical models but fewer parameters were necessary for the TSCE model. The TSCE model which included the effects of radiation induced cell killing resulted in non-linear dose response curves with excess relative risks after exposure at young ages that were generally lower than in the models without cell killing. The main results from TSCE models which included cell killing described by either conventional survival curves or LDH were very similar. A sub multiplicative effect from the interaction of smoking and exposure to plutonium was found to result from the analysis of the Mayak lung cancer mortality data. All models examined resulted in the predominant number of Mayak lung cancer deaths being ascribed to smoking. The interaction between smoking and plutonium exposures was found to be the second largest effect. The TSCE model resulted in lower estimates for the lung cancer excess relative risk per unit plutonium dose than the empirical risk model, but this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The excess relative risk dose responses were linear in the empirical model and

  14. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  15. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  16. Effect of low doses gamma irradiation of cotton seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Khalifa, Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Field experiments and then large scale application of irradiated cotton seeds (C.V. Aleppo-40) were carried out during three seasons (1986, 1987 and 1988) for field experiment at ACSAD Station in Dier-Ezzor and 1988, 1989 and 1990 for large scale application at Euphrate's Basin, Al-Ghab and Salamia, farmers farms. The above areas were selected as they represent major cotton production areas in Syria. The aims of the experiments were to study the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy on cotton yield and to look for the optimum dose of gamma irradiation to obtain best results. The results show that, there were positive effect (P<0.95) for doses 5-30 Gy in increasing cotton yield. The highest increase was at dose of 10 Gy. which as 19.5% higher than control. For the large scale application using 10 Gy the increase in cotton yield varied from 10-39% compared to control. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs

  17. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  18. A new study on the effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.; Jammet, H.

    1986-01-01

    A study conducted by prof. Rose has investigated mortality among 39540 employees of the UKAEA, from 1946 to 1978. The three main points are: 1. General mortality and mortality from malignant diseases are lower than in the population of England and Wales (74 and 79 per cent respectively), thus showing no major difference between workers monitored for exposure to radiation and other workers. 2. For monitored workers, the only death cause for which there is a statistically significant correlation with radiation exposure is prostate cancer; there are many cases especially in workers with doses exceeding 0.05 Sv (5 rem) and monitored for tritium. Such a correlation has never been found in any other epidemiologic survey of workers exposed to low-level doses, Hanford (USA) workers especially; conversely, mortality from either multiple myeloma or pancreas cancer is not found here. These facts plead for a cautious interpretation of the results as a whole. 3. A linear representation of the variations of leukemia and cancer mortality vs exposure results in lines, the slopes of which are 3 times higher than those of the lines adopted by ICRP; however, the 95% confidence intervals (-2.7 + 12.4 and -22 + 52.5) are such that the results are compatible with a null effect (slope 0) and even with a benefic effect (negative slope). They are therefore compatible with ICRP estimations. A recent attempt to evaluate the two main investigations on low-dose occupational exposures (UKAEA and Hanford) suggests a dose-response relationship very near that of ICRP [fr

  19. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  20. Effect of low-dose irradiation on pregnant mouse haemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, S.R.; McCarthy, E.G.; MacVittie, T.J.; Baum, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of low-dose gamma radiation to haemopoietic progenitor cell compartments of the marrow and spleen of virgin female mice and pregnant mice were studied. Microplasma clot cultures were used to assess burst-forming uniterythroid (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) activity, and double-layer agar cultures were established to evaluate granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) and macrophage colony-forming cell (M-CFC). The apparent shift in maternal erythropoiesis from the bone marrow to the enlarged spleen was reflected by an increase in CFU-E and BFU-E per spleen and a concomitant decrease in CFU-E and BFU-E per femur. Whereas maternal GM-CFC values per femur increased 36%, maternal GM-CFC per spleen increased by 172% compared to virgin values. Total-body irradiation to the day-10.5 pregnant mouse caused a further suppression of day-14.5 medullary erythropoiesis (i.e. decreased CFU-E values) compared to the virgin female mouse. An ability of the maternal spleen to support further compensatory erythropoiesis following increasing doses of radiation was demonstrated. Four days after 1.0 Gy exposure, maternal values for GM-CFC per femur or spleen decreased to nonirradiated virgin mice values. M-CFC per maternal femur decreased to nonirradiated virgin mice values. M-CFC per maternal femur decreased following 1.5 Gy, but M-CFC per spleen appeared to be unaffected with doses from 0.5 to 2.0 Gy. (author)

  1. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  2. ALDH2 and ADH1B interactions in retrospective reports of low-dose reactions and initial sensitivity to alcohol in Asian American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E; Pandika, Danielle; Shea, Shoshana H; Eng, Mimy Y; Liang, Tiebing; Wall, Tamara L

    2011-07-01

    A mechanistic model has been proposed for how alcohol-metabolizing gene variants protect individuals from the development of alcohol use disorders, with heightened sensitivity to alcohol being an early step (endophenotype) in this model. This study was designed to determine whether possession of 2 alcohol-metabolizing genes variations, the aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 allele and the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 allele, was associated with self-reported sensitivity to alcohol at low doses and at initial use. Asian-American college students (N=784) of Chinese and Korean descent were genotyped at the ALDH2 and ADH1B loci and assessed for lifetime alcohol symptoms following 1 or 2 drinks and level of response to alcohol during the first 5 lifetime drinking episodes. Participants who had an ALDH2*2 allele were more likely to report experiencing all 6 low-dose symptoms and having heightened initial response to alcohol. An interaction was found between ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2, with ADH1B*2 being associated with heightened self-reported sensitivity to alcohol only in individuals who also possessed 1 ALDH2*2 allele. These findings suggest the effects of ADH1B*2 may be felt more strongly in Asians who already have some heightened sensitivity to alcohol from possessing 1 ALDH2*2 allele, but who are not too sensitized to alcohol from possessing 2 ALDH2*2 alleles. These results offer additional insight into the discrepant findings that have been reported in the literature for the role of ADH1B*2 in response to alcohol and the development of alcohol-related problems. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  3. The assessment of the carcinogenic effects of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Latarjet, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is concluded that the exclusion of patients for the purposes of risk estimation, the choice of a particular relative risk projection model and of a dose reduction factor equal to 2 are all decisions which result in an overestimation of the actual risk. These choices can be understood when the aim is radiation protection and when it is safer to overestimate the risk; however, they are open to criticism if the aim is a realistic assessment of the risk. For low doses, below 50 mSv/year, and when all causes of uncertainty are added, the actual risk might be markedly lower than the risk estimated with the ICRP (1991) carcinogenic risk coefficient and the DRF estimated by ICRP. Future studies should aim at providing direct and more precise assessments of risk coefficients in the low dose region. (Author)

  4. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    1999-01-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  5. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  6. Biological effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.

    1998-01-01

    A study was performed with the aim to examine whether the progeny of cells that had been repeatedly irradiated with low doses of gamma rays will change their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Four mammalian cell lines were used in the experiment. It was found that the progeny of cells irradiated in this way do not change their sensitivity to gamma rays but would change their sensitivity to various cytostatics drugs. (A.K.)

  7. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  8. The Potential Neurotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure in a Guinea Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1 THE POTENTIAL NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF LOW-DOSE SARIN EXPOSURE IN A GUINEA PIG MODEL Melinda R. Roberson, PhD, Michelle B. Schmidt...Proving Ground, MD 21010 USA ABSTRACT This study is assessing the effects in guinea pigs of repeated low-dose exposure to the nerve...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Potential Neurotoxic Effects Of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure In A Guinea Pig Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  9. From Chernobyl to Fukushima: the effect of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.

    2011-01-01

    This Power Point presentation describes the Fukushima's reactors, recalls some data about the earthquake and tsunami, and indicates their consequences for the operation of the power station (notably the loss of cooling means). It identifies some design errors for the Chernobyl's and Fukushima's power stations, outlines differences between these two cases. It gives assessment of doses receives by external irradiation around Fukushima, of the dose rate evolution, of the sea contamination. It gives some data about the Chernobyl accident (radioactivity evolution). After some data about health consequences of Chernobyl, health risks and more particularly biological risks associated to low doses are described. Protection measures are evoked, as well as psycho-social impacts

  10. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-M.; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD 5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD 5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD 5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD 5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD 5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD 5 doses of sarin failed to

  11. The biological effects of low doses of radiation: medical, biological and ecological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gun-Aajav, T.; Ajnai, L.; Manlaijav, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The results of recent studies show that low doses of radiation make many different structural and functional changes in a cell and these changes are preserved for a long time. This phenomenon is called as effects of low doses of radiation in biophysics, radiation biology and radiation medicine. The structural and functional changes depend on doses and this dependence has non-linear and bimodal behaviour. More detail, the radiation effect goes up and reaches its maximum (Low doses maximum) in low doses region, then it goes down and takes its stationary means (there is a negative effect in a few cases). With increases in doses and with further increases it goes up. It is established that low dose's maximum depends on physiological state of a biological object, radiation quality and dose rate. During the experiments another special date was established. This specialty is that many different physical and chemical factors are mutually connected and have synergetic behaviour. At present, researches are concentrating their attention on the following three directions: 1. Direct and indirect interaction of radiation's low doses: 2. Interpretation of its molecular mechanism, regulation of the positive effects and elaboration of ways o removing negative effects: 3. Application of the objective research results into practice. In conclusion the authors mention the current concepts on interpretation of low doses effect mechanism, forward their own views and emphasize the importance of considering low doses effects in researches of environmental radiation pollution, radiation medicine and radiation protection. (author)

  12. The genetic effects induced by an irradiation in low doses at Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Taskaev, A.I.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    The review generalizes the results obtained in researches of genetic radiation effects for Drosophila melanogaster from contamination regions near the Chernobylsk NPP. The results of laboratory investigations of low dose irradiation effects on genotype variability and lifetime of Drosophila are presented too. It supposed that the main effect of low dose irradiation is caused by the induced genetic instability against the background of which the realization of different-directed radiobiological reactions is possible [ru

  13. Morphine sparing effect of low dose ketamine during patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2003-09-12

    Sep 12, 2003 ... KEY WORDS: Ketamine, morphine sparing effect, patient controlled intravenous analgesia. ... Measurements: Morphine consumption, visual analogue pain score (VAPS), pulse ..... Brain Research, 1990; 518: 218-222. 7.

  14. Effects of low dose radiation on repair processes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Altmann, H.; Kovac, R.; Topaloglou, A.; Egg, D.; Guenther, R.

    1978-10-01

    DNA excision repair was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low dose radiation of 222 Rn. Autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3 H-thymidine incorporation by repair replication into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions obtained by BND cellulose chromatography seem to indicate a stimulatory effect of repeated low dose radiation on repair enzymes. (author)

  15. The effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan; Du Zeji; Tian Hailin; Zhao Yujie; Zou Huawei; Zhou Jianhua; Kong Xiangrong; Zhang Jianhua; Shen Wei

    2001-01-01

    LDR could stimulate lymphocyte transformation for adults, children and infants. The effect of LDR on lymphocytes in malnourished children was lower, but higher on lymphocytes in cord blood. The effect of LDR on CD 4 + cells in adult persons was higher than that on CD + cells. NK cells were radioresistant. The stimulative effect of LDR on NK activity in tumor patients was lower than that in normal individuals. For the mice with tumors, LDR could increase the ratio of L 3 T 4 cells in blood, spleen and the number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumors. Extracellular fluid of the lymphocytes operated by LDR could also stimulate the lymphocyte transformation. The preliminary LDR could decrease the injuries to macromolecules, membrane antigens and chromosomes in lymphocytes which were induced by high dose radiation. The LDR- induced protein might be found from mouse spleen cells, and this protein could increase immune function in human and animals

  16. Effects of low doses of radiation on crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Claims for radiation-induced growth stimulations in plants have been made, starting almost from the time of the discovery of X-rays. However, there is general disagreement on this question, since the numerous studies designed to prove or disprove the existence of the phenomenon have produced inconclusively and erratic results. It is obvious that small, but significant, growth increases may be produced at times by ionizing radiations in certain crop plants, but such increases have not always been reproducible from one experiment to another, and marked inconsistencies often occur with regard to the optimal exposures to produce such effects. The purpose of the FAO/IAEA Panel meeting held in Rome on 1 June, 1964, was to review and evaluate the experimental results in this area and applications for increasing crop yields. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Studies of health effects of low dose radiation and its application to medicare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Ishida, Kenji; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Koana, Takao; Magae, Junji; Watanabe, Masami; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    2008-01-01

    The articles contain following 7 topics of low dose radiation effects. Studies of Health Effects of Low dose Radiation and Its Application to Medicare'', describes the indication of Rn therapy and investigations of its usefulness mechanism mainly in Misasa Spa, Okayama Pref. ''Challenges for the Paradigm Shift (CRIEPI Studies)'', introduces studies against the paradigm that radiation dose is linearly and proportionally hazardous. ''Studies of High Background Radiation Area (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes global HBRA studies on chromosome affection and effect of smoking in HBRA. ''Is the Radiation Effect on Man Proportional to Dose? (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes studies of immature sperm irradiated at low dose against Linear-Non-threshold Theory (LNT) hypothesis. ''Induction of Radiation Resistance by Low Dose Radiation and Assessment of Its Effect in Models of Human Diseases (CRIEPI Studies)'', explains the adoptive response in radiation effect, suppression of carcinogenesis and immune regulation by previous low dose radiation in the mouse, and improvement of diabetes in the db/db mouse. ''Modulation of Biological Effects of Low Dose Radiation: Adoptive Response, Bystander Effect, Genetic Instability and Radiation Hormesis'', summarizes findings of each item. ''Cancer Treatment with Low dose Radiation to the Whole Body'', describes basic studies in the mouse tumor in relation to suppression of carcinogenesis and metastasis, immune activation and treatment, and successful clinical studies in patients with ovary, colon cancers and malignant lymphoma where survival has been significantly improved: a base of recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) clinical trials. The mechanism is essentially based on immune activation of patients to cure the disease. (R.T.)

  18. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  19. Long term effects of low doses of ionising radiation: facts and fallacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    Health effects of low doses of ionising radiation have been a public concern. The public perception of these low effects is that it causes cancer and genetic effects. Enormous amount of work regarding this cancer has been done all over the world, on occupational workers exposed to low doses of ionising radiation. These studies do not show any adverse effect on them. Epidemiological studies done on members of public staying near nuclear facilities also have shown that there is no health risk involved in staying near these facilities. Genetic effects have also shown negative results. These two aspects of health effects of low dose of radiation are discussed in detail. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  20. On the common mechanism for initiation of different effects of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Main regularities of different endpoints of ionizing radiation low dose effects (adaptive response, stimulation of proliferation, special radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells, and others) have been examined. It has been shown that these endpoints have a commonness for the dose interval, the shape of the dose-response curve, the reverse effect of dose rate, non-specificity toward initiating agents, and others. An explanation is suggested for the common mechanism of the initiation of all the studied low dose effects, basing on the theory of the non-specific reaction of cell to external influences. It is concluded that initiation of the low dose effects is conditioned by radiation induced damage of functions of plasmic and internal membranes

  1. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  2. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kyung Mi

    2012-01-01

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ( 137 Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  3. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ({sup 137}Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  4. Effects of low dose radiation on antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Gao Gang; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Liu Xiaoqiu; Wang Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To search for effects of low dose radiation on the activities of antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were all determined by chemical colorimetry. Results: Low dose radiation increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) in serum of tumor-bearing mice more markedly than those in the unirradiated controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GST, CAT in serum of tumor-bearing mice (d 5 , d 3 ) irradiated with 5cGy 6h before 2.0 Gy radiation are obviously higher than those of the group (c 3 , c 5 ) given with radiotherapy only. Conclusion: The increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in serum of tumor-bearing mice triggered by low dose radiation could partly contribute to the protective mechanism. (authors)

  5. Effects of low dose gamma- and UV-radiation on sea urchin eggs and spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czihak, G.K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper outlines the results of a study of the effects of low dose gamma-and UV-irradiation on sea urchin eggs and spermatozoa with particular reference to the effects on the stages of the mitotic cycle and individual susceptibility. (UK)

  6. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  7. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference. Refs, figs, tabs.

  8. Effects of low-dose recombinant human erythropoietin treatment on cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Søren Lundgaard; Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo

    2017-01-01

    , NUFI or self-reported results between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In this small study, we found no significant effect of low-dose or micro-dose rhEpo on visual attention, cognitive performance in complex cognitive tasks or self-experienced cognitive performance compared with placebo. FUNDING: The Aase......INTRODUCTION: High-dose recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) has been shown to improve cognitive performance in both healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from diseases affecting the brain. The aim of this study was to examine whether administration of low-dose and even micro-dose rh...

  9. Effects of low-dose recombinant human erythropoietin treatment on cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Søren Lundgaard; Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo

    2017-01-01

    -reported results between the groups. Conclusions: In this small study, we found no significant effect of low-dose or micro-dose rhEpo on visual attention, cognitive performance in complex cognitive tasks or self-experienced cognitive performance compared with placebo. Funding: The Aase and Ejnar Danielsen......Introduction: High-dose recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) has been shown to improve cognitive performance in both healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from diseases affecting the brain. The aim of this study was to examine whether administration of low-dose and even micro-dose rh...

  10. Effect of low dose Lead (Pb) administration on tail immersion test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of low dose Lead (Pb) administration on tail immersion test and ... subtle decline in cognitive function, and adverse reproductive outcome at low blood Pb level. ... Twenty adult Wistar rats of both sexes (weight 150g to 200g) were used.

  11. The effects of low-dose radiotherapy on fresh osteochondral allografts: An experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Gönç

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In osteochondral massive allograft transplantations, the immune reaction of the host could be precluded with radiotherapy, and the side-effects can be prevented by low-dose fractionated regimen. The total dose of fractionated radiotherapy for an immune suppression should be adjusted not to damage the cartilage tissue, but to avoid articular degeneration in the long term.

  12. Synergistic cancer growth-inhibitory effect of emodin and low-dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-cancer activity of emodin and its combination with low-dose cisplatin against human gastric cancer (SNU-5), including their effects on cell cycle phase distribution, apoptosis and cancer cell morphology. Methods: The anti-cancer activity of emodin, cisplatin and their combination against ...

  13. Effects of a preovulatory single low dose of mifepristone on ovarian function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stege, Jolande G.; Pahl-van Beest, Elske H.; Beerthuizen, Rob J. C. M.; van Lunsen, Rik H. W.; Scholten, Piet C.; Bogchelman, Dick H.

    Objectives To investigate the effect of a single low dose of mifepristone on ovarian function, when administered in the preovulatory period. Methods Healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were studied during two consecutive menstrual cycles. Either mifepristone or placebo was given in a

  14. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  15. The biological effect of 125I seed continuous low dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Hong-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of 125I seed continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on colonic cell line CL187 in vitro. Methods The CL187 cell line was exposed to radiation of 60Coγ ray at high dose rate of 2 Gy/min and 125I seed at low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Radiation responses to different doses and dose rates were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Under 125I seed low dose rate irradiation, a total of 12 culture dishes were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group, and 2, 5, and 10 Gy irradiation groups. At 48 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by Annexin and Propidium iodide (PI staining. Cell cycle arrests were detected by PI staining. In order to investigate the influence of low dose rate irradiation on the MAPK signal transduction, the expression changes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Raf under continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDR and/or EGFR monoclonal antibodies were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Results The relative biological effect (RBE for 125I seeds compared with 60Co γ ray was 1.41. Apoptosis rates of CL187 cancer cells were 13.74% ± 1.63%, 32.58% ± 3.61%, and 46.27% ± 3.82% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 1.67% ± 0.19%. G2/M cell cycle arrests of CL187 cancer cells were 42.59% ± 3.21%, 59.84% ± 4.96%, and 34.61% ± 2.79% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 26.44% ± 2.53%. P 2/M cell cycle arrest. After low dose rate irradiation, EGFR and Raf expression increased, but when EGFR was blocked by a monoclonal antibody, EGFR and Raf expression did not change. Conclusion 125I seeds resulted in more effective inhibition than 60Co γ ray high dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells. Apoptosis following G2/M cell cycle arrest was the main mechanism of cell-killing effects under low dose rate irradiation. CLDR could

  16. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Felix K; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Kirschke, Jan S; Noël, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  17. Stimulatory effect of low dose radionuclide on DNA synthesis and UDS in splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Yang Zhanshan

    1999-12-01

    To study the stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in splenic lymphocytes induced by low dose enriched uranium 235 U. By using 3 H-TdR incorporation assay technique, the DNA replicative synthesis in PHA and LPS stimulated splenic lymphocytes was observed. By using DNA synthesis inhibitor such as hydroxyurea, the UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in splenic lymphocytes occurred. When the injected low dose of enriched uranium 235 u was 0.1 μg/kg body weight, the transformation capacity was elevated for splenic T lymphocytes, simultaneously the stimulative index increased. The UDS of splenic lymphocytes induced by ultra-violate revealed a statistically significant increase by low dose of enriched uranium 235 U at the range of 0.1-20 μg/kg body weight. A stimulatory action of low dose enriched uranium 235 U on DNA replicative synthesis as well as on UV-induced UDS in splenic lymphocytes was detected

  18. Effects of emitter junction and passive base region on low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershenkov, V.S.; Cherepko, S.V.; Maslov, V.B.; Belyakov, V.V.; Sogoyan, A.V.; Ulimov, N.; Emelianov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Low dose rate effect in bipolar devices consists in the increase of peripheral surface recombination current with dose rate decrease. This is due to the more rapid positive oxide charge and interface trap density build-up as the dose rate becomes lower. High dose rate elevated temperature irradiation is proposed for simulation if the low dose rate effect. In the present we tried to separate the effect of radiation-induced charge in the thick passivation oxide over the emitter junction and passive base regions of npn bipolar transistor. Its goal is to improve bipolar device design for use in space environments and nuclear installations. Three experiments were made during this work. 1. Experiment on radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) effect under elevated temperature was performed to show transistor degradation dependence on emitter-base bias. 2. High dose rate elevated and room temperature irradiation of bipolar transistors were performed to separate effects of emitter-junction and passive base regions. 3. Pre- and post- irradiation hydrogen ambient storage was used to investigate its effect on radiation-induced charge build-up over the passive base region. All experiments were performed with npn and pnp transistors. (authors)

  19. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  20. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  1. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  2. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  3. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  4. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  5. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  6. Effects of Low Dose DD Radiation on Callus Growth of Lithospermum erythrorhizon S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, H.Y.; Kim, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of low dose DD-radiation on the callus growth of Lithospermum erythrorhizon S. cultured on different medium and lighting condition was investigated. The 8 Gy irradiation stimulated callus growth on LS medium supplemented with BA 2 mg/L and NAA 2mg/L, however, the growth of callus was more effective on LS medium supplemented with BA 1 mg/L and NAA 1 mg/L under 16 hrs day light

  7. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Rozhko, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1 – absence of effects (stress recognition), 2 – activation (adaptive response), and 3 – inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. - Highlights: • Luminous bacteria demonstrate nonlinear dose-effect relation in radioactive solutions. • Response to low-dose radiation includes 3 stages: threshold, activation, inhibition. • ROS are responsible for low-dose effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides. • Luminous marine bacteria are a convenient tool to study radiation hormesis

  8. Stimulation effect of early growth in crops by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Song, H.S.; Kim, J.K.; Lee, Y.K.; Lee, Y.B.

    1998-01-01

    Germination rate and early growth in crop such as rice,soybean,and perilla were observed after irradiation of γ-ray (Co-60) in order to determine the effects of low does radiation. The low dose radiation was able to improve the early growth in crops and their agricultural characters. Germination rate of 2Gy-irradiatied rice seeds was high and also were seeding height and fresh weight of the 0.5 Gy-irradiated. Germination rate and early growth of soybean were high in 4Gy-irradiated group. Perilla gew of so promisingly after after low dose irradiation, however there slightly increasing effects on germination rate, seeding height and fresh weight at 2Gt-, 1Gy-, and 1Gy irradiated group, respectively. (author)

  9. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been devised to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats, and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines have been reviewed, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to human is discussed

  10. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have devised a method to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, researchers have reviewed some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to humans is discussed

  11. Biological effect of low-dose application beta-radiation on the gingival mucosa of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ippolitov, Yu.A.; Kovtun, N.N.; Timofeev, L.V.

    1999-01-01

    Biological effect of low-dose application beta-radiation on the gingival mucosa of dogs is studied. Obtained data illustrate the interactions between tissues in local exposure of live tissue to beta-radiation and determine the threshold total dose as 400 sGy. Higher doses lead to secondary changes in the gingival mucosa after which the tissue barrier does not recover [ru

  12. A prospective cohort study on sustained effects of low-dose ecstasy use on the brain in new ecstasy users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Jager, Gerry; Vlieger, Erik-Jan P.; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D.; Lavini, Cristina; Bisschops, Ivo; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Booij, Jan; den Heeten, Gerard J.; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-01-01

    It is debated whether ecstasy use has neurotoxic effects on the human brain and what the effects are of a low dose of ecstasy use. We prospectively studied sustained effects (>2 weeks abstinence) of a low dose of ecstasy on the brain in ecstasy-naive volunteers using a combination of advanced MR

  13. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, we are conducting two experiments. Experiment 1 - Late effects of chronic low dose-rate g-rays irradiation on SPF mice, using life-span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation with g-rays for 400 days was performed using 137 Cs γ-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8,000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. As of 2002 March 31, 3,999 of the total 4,000 mice have died. Preliminary analyses of data show that 20 mGy/day suggested a shortened life span in both sexes. Partial results show that the most common lethal neoplasms in the pooled data of non-irradiated control and irradiated male mice, in order of frequency, were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, and endocrine system were common. Experiment 2 - Effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate g-ray irradiated SPF mice: pilot study, was started in 1999 and is currently in progress. (author)

  14. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  15. Effects of monophasic low-dose oral contraceptives on fibrin formation and resolution in young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K R; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Skouby, S O

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine key variables in the regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during intake of low-dose oral contraceptives containing newly developed progestogens. STUDY DESIGN: Thirty-four healthy young women were allocated to 12 consecutive cycles of treat......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine key variables in the regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during intake of low-dose oral contraceptives containing newly developed progestogens. STUDY DESIGN: Thirty-four healthy young women were allocated to 12 consecutive cycles...... and concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor. Thrombin-antithrombin III complexes and fibrin degradation products were unchanged, signifying no effect of hormonal intake on the degree of activation of the coagulation system or the efficacy of fibrinolysis. CONCLUSION: The overall dynamic balance between...

  16. Effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on storage properties in light salted Pseudosciaena crocea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoyan; Yang Xianshi; Li Xueying; Guo Quanyou

    2012-01-01

    To explore the preservation effect of γ irradiation on light salted Pseudosciaena crocea, the influence of 1 kGy low-dose γ irradiation on sensory quality, microbiological and chemical quality including TVC, TVB-N and TBARS contents of light salted P. crocea stored at 25 ℃ was discussed. The results showed that the number of total viable counts significantly decreased after irradiation, during the whole storage, the bacteria numbers of light salted P. crocea treated with irradiation were still less than the control. The concentrations of TVB-N was significantly reduced after irradiation, whereas lipid oxidation was less accelerated. The shelf life could be remarkably prolonged after low-dose γ irradiation. While the shelf life of control group were 9 and 11 days, the shelf life of irradiated light salted P. crocea were extended to 16 and 20 days, respectively. The results can provide technical references for commercial application of seafood irradiation. (authors)

  17. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  18. Health effects of low-dose radiation: Molecular, cellular, and biosystem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollycove, M.; Paperiello, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Since the fifties, the prime concern of radiation protection has been protecting DNA from damage. UNSCEAR initiated a focus on biosystem response to damage with its 1994 report, ''Adaptive Responses to Radiation of Cells and Organisms''. The DNA damage-control biosystem is physiologically operative on both metabolic and radiation induced damage, both effected predominantly by free radicals. These adaptive responses are suppressed by high-dose and stimulated by low dose radiation. Increased biosystem efficiently reduces the number of mutations that accumulate during a lifetime and decrease DNA damage-control with resultant aging and malignancy. Several statistically significant epidemiologic studies have shown risk decrements of cancer mortality and mortality from all causes in populations exposed to low-dose radiation. Further biologic and epidemiologic research is needed to establish a valid threshold below which risk decrements occur. (author)

  19. Evaluation of a combination of low-dose ketamine and low-dose midazolam in terminal dyspnea-attenuation of "double-effect"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kanti Dam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Of all symptoms in palliative medicine those concerning respiration are most excruciating and difficult to treat. Reticence about the use of morphine for palliation of dyspnea is common, especially in nonmalignant diseases, as there is a fear of causing respiratory depression, particularly where Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD exists. This factor is also compounded by the lack of availability of morphine in parts of developing countries. Ketamine has excellent anesthetic and analgesic effects in addition to being easily available. It produces bronchodilatation and does not produce respiratory or cardiovascular depression. The author seeks to evaluate the role of low-dose (0.2 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (0.02 mg/kg in the attenuation of terminal dyspnea. Methods: Sixteen patients with terminal dyspnea, admitted to the Critical Care Unit (CCU with cancer and other noncancer diagnoses were recruited. The subjective component of dyspnea was assessed using the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS, which has values from 0 - 10, 10 being maximum dyspnea. Each patient received a low-dose of ketamine and midazolam for relief of dyspnea. All the patients received low-flow (2 L/min. oxygen therapy via nasal cannula. Immediately after admission, all the patients were reassured and nursed in a decubitus position of their choice. The GRS was recorded at the point of admission, 10 minutes after starting oxygen therapy, and ten minutes after administration of low-dose ketamine and midazolam. Hemodynamic parameters were also recorded at these three points. Result: All the patients who enrolled in our study had significant dyspnea at admission, as was evident from the GRS scores of 8.250 (SD 0.91, respiratory rate of 28.56 (SD 5.0, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP of 102.7 (SD 14.63, pulse rate of 115.62 (SD 23.3, and SpO2 of 92.43 (SD 2.38. All the patients benefited from the combination of ketamine and midazolam, as evidenced by the statistically

  20. Effects of low-doses of Bacillus spp. from permafrost on differentiation of bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyonova, L F; Novikova, M A; Kostolomova, E G

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a new microorganism species (Bacillus spp., strain M3) isolated from permafrost specimens from Central Yakutia (Mamontova Mountain) on the bone marrow hemopoiesis were studied on laboratory mice. Analysis of the count and immunophenotype of bone marrow cells indicated that even in low doses (1000-5000 microbial cells) these microorganisms modulated hemopoiesis and lymphopoiesis activity. The percentage of early hemopoietic precursors (CD117(+)CD34(-)) increased, intensity of lymphocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation (CD25(+)CD44(-)) decreased, and the percentage of lymphocytes released from the bone marrow (CD25(+)CD44(+)) increased on day 21 after injection of the bacteria. These changes in activity of hemopoiesis were associated with changes in the level of regulatory T lymphocytes (reduced expression of TCRαβ) and were most likely compensatory. The possibility of modulating hemopoiesis activity in the bone marrow by low doses of one microorganism strain isolated from the permafrost could be useful for evaluating the effects of other low dose bacteria on the bone marrow hemopoiesis.

  1. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre; Dean, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial "pause" in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature.

  2. Effect of low dose radiation on somatic intrachromosomal recombination in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, A.M.; Cormack, J.; Morley, A.A.; Sykes, P.J.; Bhat, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: High doses of ionising radiation are mutagenic in a wide range of mutation assays. The majority of radiation exposure studies in in vivo mouse mutation assays have been performed at high doses, eg greater than 1 Gy. However, these doses are not relevant to the low doses of ionising radiation that the majority of the population might likely come into contact with. Radiation protection levels tend to be based on a simple linear no-threshold model which suggests that any radiation above zero is potentially harmful. The pKZ1 recombination mutagenesis mouse model has proven to be a sensitive assay for the detection of mutations caused by low doses of chemical agents. In pKZ1 mice, somatic intrachromosomal recombination (SICR) inversion events can be detected in cells using histochemistry for the E. coli LacZ transgene. We exposed pKZ1 mice to a single radiation dose ranging from 0.001 to 2 Gy. A significant increase in SICR was observed in spleen at the two highest doses of 0.1 and 2 Gy and a significant reduction in SICR below the endogenous frequency was observed at the two lowest doses of 0.01 and 0.001 Gy. After exposing a pKZ1 cell line to the same dose range, a similar J curve response was observed with significant increases in SICR observed at the 3 highest doses and a significant decrease below the endogenous frequency at the lowest dose (0.001 Gy). The next experiments will be to determine the dose where the SICR frequency returns to the endogenous level. The important question posed by these results is 'Is a reduction below the endogenous SICR level caused by low doses of ionising radiation anti-mutagenic?' Studies now need to be performed to investigate the effect of low doses of radiation on other mutation end-points, and the mechanism for the reduction in SICR

  3. Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle aged people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiSilvestro Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin extracts of turmeric are proposed to produce health benefits. To date, human intervention studies have focused mainly on people with existing health problems given high doses of poorly absorbed curcumin. The purpose of the current study was to check whether in healthy people, a low dose of a lipidated curcumin extract could alter wellness-related measures. Methods The present study was conducted in healthy middle aged people (40–60 years old with a low dose of curcumin (80 mg/day in a lipidated form expected to have good absorption. Subjects were given either curcumin (N = 19 or placebo (N = 19 for 4 wk. Blood and saliva samples were taken before and after the 4 weeks and analyzed for a variety of blood and saliva measures relevant to health promotion. Results Curcumin, but not placebo, produced the following statistically significant changes: lowering of plasma triglyceride values, lowering of salivary amylase levels, raising of salivary radical scavenging capacities, raising of plasma catalase activities, lowering of plasma beta amyloid protein concentrations, lowering of plasma sICAM readings, increased plasma myeloperoxidase without increased c-reactive protein levels, increased plasma nitric oxide, and decreased plasma alanine amino transferase activities. Conclusion Collectively, these results demonstrate that a low dose of a curcumin-lipid preparation can produce a variety of potentially health promoting effects in healthy middle aged people.

  4. Effect and adaptive response of lymphocytes DNA induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin

    1994-09-01

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) was conducted and was proved to be an optimal method for studying DNA strand breaks induced by low dose irradiation. The linear dose response curve was obtained. The minimum detected dose was 0.3 Gy. There was no effect of low dose γ-rays (0.5∼8.0 cGy) on DNA strand breaks of quiescent and mitogen-induced lymphocytes. The 0.5∼4.0 cGy γ-rats could induce adaptive response of lymphocytes' DNA strand breaks, especially, at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 cGy. The challenge doses of 5∼20 Gy could make the adaptive response appearance, and the 15 Gy was the best one. The 3-AB could powerfully inhibit the adaptive response. The repair of DNA strand breaks (37 degree C, 15∼60 min) caused by 15 Gy γ-rays could be promoted by the low dose γ-ray irradiation (2.0 cGy), but no difference was found at 37 degree C, 120 min

  5. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    We obtained the following results with regards to the effects of low dose ionizing radiation (5, 10, 15 and 20 cGy) on neuronal migration of developing rat cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration delay was found by autoradiography after intraperitoneal labeling with 3 H-thymidine to pregnant Wistar rats embryonic 16, and low dose radiation an hour or 48 hours after labeling. In 15-20 cGy, N-CAM (neural cell adhesion molecules) staining patterns changed with immunohistochemical method, whereas those of L1 and cytoskeleton neurofilament (160 KD), tauprotein, MAP2 (microtubule associated protein 2) did not. After 24-48 hours of radiation, N-CAM were not detected on the matrix cell layer. After 72-96 hours of radiation, N-CAM staining recovered to a normal pattern. In conclusion, low dose radiation of 15-20 cGy gave rise to neuronal migration delay and it was suggested that N-CAM may be related to neuronal migration as one of the mechanisms involved. (author)

  6. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  7. The effect of low-dose X-irradiation on immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keiichiro

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis of radiation hormesis has been proposed. To elucidate the hormetic effect on the immune system, we studied the mitogen-induced proliferation of splenocytes of F344/NSlc rat and BALB/c mouse after low-dose X-irradiation. Con A, PHA or LPS-induced proliferation of rat splenocytes prepared at 4 hr after irradiation was augmented with 5 cGy. This augmentation was observed within a few hours after irradiation, being a temporary effect. In case of mice, the proliferation of splenocytes induced by Con A, PHA or LPS was augmented by irradiation with 2.5 cGy. Thus, some phenomena of hormetic effect on the immune system were observed. However, the mechanism of augmentation of immune splenocytes is uncertainty. Therefore, we examined changes in production of LTB 4 and IL-1 being inflammatory mediators. After 5 cGy irradiation the production of LTB 4 of rat splenocyte showed a significant increase. Furthermore, 2.5 cGy irradiation also enhanced, the biological activity of intracellular IL-1 of LPS-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Additionally, to elucidate the stimulative effect on the antitumor immunity by low-dose X-irradiation, we studied the changes in the incidence of thymic lymphoma using AKR mice and of spontaneous metastasis to lung using tumor bearing mice. The incidence of thymic lymphoma was significantly decreased and the life span was significantly prolonged by periodical low-dose X-irradiation in terms of breeding of AKR mice. By an irradiation with 15 cGy, numbers of lung colony in the tumor bearing mice were decreased by 57% relative to the sham-irradiated controls. Then, IL-6 and TNF-α production of tumor bearing mice splenocytes were enhanced. These findings suggest that the low-dose X-irradiation might have caused a light inflammation and might have induced an augmentation of immune splenocytes. Furthermore, these results indicate that an augmentation of the antitumor immunity was induced by low-dose X-irradiation. (author). 127 refs

  8. The effect of low-dose X-irradiation on immune system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Keiichiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1996-06-01

    The hypothesis of radiation hormesis has been proposed. To elucidate the hormetic effect on the immune system, we studied the mitogen-induced proliferation of splenocytes of F344/NSlc rat and BALB/c mouse after low-dose X-irradiation. Con A, PHA or LPS-induced proliferation of rat splenocytes prepared at 4 hr after irradiation was augmented with 5 cGy. This augmentation was observed within a few hours after irradiation, being a temporary effect. In case of mice, the proliferation of splenocytes induced by Con A, PHA or LPS was augmented by irradiation with 2.5 cGy. Thus, some phenomena of hormetic effect on the immune system were observed. However, the mechanism of augmentation of immune splenocytes is uncertainty. Therefore, we examined changes in production of LTB{sub 4} and IL-1 being inflammatory mediators. After 5 cGy irradiation the production of LTB{sub 4} of rat splenocyte showed a significant increase. Furthermore, 2.5 cGy irradiation also enhanced, the biological activity of intracellular IL-1 of LPS-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Additionally, to elucidate the stimulative effect on the antitumor immunity by low-dose X-irradiation, we studied the changes in the incidence of thymic lymphoma using AKR mice and of spontaneous metastasis to lung using tumor bearing mice. The incidence of thymic lymphoma was significantly decreased and the life span was significantly prolonged by periodical low-dose X-irradiation in terms of breeding of AKR mice. By an irradiation with 15 cGy, numbers of lung colony in the tumor bearing mice were decreased by 57% relative to the sham-irradiated controls. Then, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} production of tumor bearing mice splenocytes were enhanced. These findings suggest that the low-dose X-irradiation might have caused a light inflammation and might have induced an augmentation of immune splenocytes. Furthermore, these results indicate that an augmentation of the antitumor immunity was induced by low-dose X-irradiation. 127 refs.

  9. The effects of chronic, low doses of Ra-226 on cultured fish and human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaopei; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel, E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the chronic low-dose radiation effects caused by α-particle radiation from {sup 226}Ra over multiple cell generations in CHSE/F fish cells and HaCaT human cells. Methods: CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells were cultured in medium containing {sup 226}Ra to deliver the chronic low-dose α-particle radiation. Clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival fractions of cells with or without being exposed to radiation from {sup 226}Ra. Results: The chronic low-dose radiation from {sup 226}Ra does have effects on the clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells. When CHSE/F cells were cultured in {sup 226}Ra-medium over 9 passages for about 134 days, the clonogenic surviving fractions for cells irradiated at dose rates ranging from 0.00066 to 0.66 mGy/d were significantly lower than that of cells sham irradiated. For HaCaT cells grown in medium containing the same range of {sup 226}Ra activity, the clonogenic surviving fraction decreased at first and reached the lowest value at about 42 days (8 passages). After that, the clonogenic survival began to increase, and was significantly higher than that of control cells by the end of the experimental period. Conclusion: The chronic, low-dose high LET radiation from {sup 226}Ra can influence the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. CHSE/F cells were sensitized by the radiation, and HaCaT cells were initially sensitized but later appeared to be adapted. The results could have implications for determining risk from chronic versus acute exposures to radium. - Highlights: • Cells were exposed to chronic low-dose α-radiation from {sup 226}Ra in medium with {sup 226}Ra. • The clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells decreased when exposed to {sup 226}Ra for 134 days. • The clonogenic survival of HaCaT cells decreased at first and then increased. • The doubling time of both cells were not affected by this kind of radiation.

  10. The special cell effects and somatic consequences of exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regina Fedortseva; Sergei Aleksanin; Eugene Zheleznyakov; Irina Bychkovskaya

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: The experimental data presented in the report put some clarity into the ongoing polemics about possibility of induction of harmful non-carcinogenic effects in human body as a result of exposure to low doses of radiation. The denial of this possibility is based on the fact that traditionally studied genotoxic effects cannot be the cause of this pathology: the incidence of these effects in exposure to low doses of radiation is fairly low; the effects are not overt in critical slowly regenerating tissues, since they can only be morphologically manifested in actively growing cell populations. Methods: Endothelium of myocardial and alveolar capillaries were studied ultra-structurally in 236 rats irradiated by a wide range of X-ray doses (0,25;0,5;2,25;4,5;9;30;48;100) and 28 intact control animals. Studies were conducted during 12-18 months. The material consisted of 2-3 portions from various parts of myocardium and lung. From each portion, sections were prepared, in which all capillary sections were analyzed and ultra-structure of all lining capillary endotheliocytes (their number most often was more than 100) was studied. In each animal the percentage of non-viable endotheliocytes with signs of generalized organoid destruction, damage of plasmalemma and nuclear structures was accounted. Results: Irradiation of rat to low and higher doses caused significant (up to 7 times) increase number of endothelial cells with various ultra-structural damages (from relatively light ones to in the cell death). Even the lowest dose - 0,25 Gy produce an increasing degeneration, intracellular lysis and defects of mitochondria. We found unusual features of postradiational endothelium changes: dose independence, necessity of revealing the long-term, non-mutational cellular effects, massive involvement of cells, early development of the maximum effect already after the low dose irradiation. These special somatic effects, unlike genotoxic

  11. Effect of low dose irradiation of pork loins on the microflora, sensory characteristics and fat stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, M.L.; Kraft, A.A.; Olson, D.G.; Walker, H.W.; Rust, R.E.; James, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of low dose (100 krad) irradiation on microflora, sensory characteristics, and development of oxidative rancidity of vacuum packaged pork loins was investigated after irradiation and during low temperature (4 0 C) storage up to 21 days. Irradiation reduced numbers of mesophiles, psychrotrophs, anaerobic bacteria (P<0.01), and staphylococci (P<0.05), with the effect on mesophiles and psychrotrophic spoilage organisms the greatest. Effect of irradiation on sensory characteristics of pork loin was minimal with no detectable differences between irradiated and nonirradiated pork after 14 days of storage. Irradiation of pork did not affect cooking loss or thiobarbituric acid values

  12. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted of lectu...

  13. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Karen Mandrup; Boberg, Julie; Isling, Louise Krag

    2016-01-01

    was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose–response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg...... intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may...

  14. The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation - A question of ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Three ethical questions are asked and answered about the current state of affairs concerning how those in power manipulate public understanding of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The questions are as follows: (1) Is it ethical to frighten people when you do not know that there is anything to be frightened of? (2) Is it ethical to be so conservative that resources are spent to solve a problem that may not exist? (3) Is it ethical not to tell the whole truth about the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation?

  15. The fitting parameters extraction of conversion model of the low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakerenkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) in bipolar devices consists of in base current degradation of NPN and PNP transistors increase as the dose rate is decreased. As a result of almost 20-year studying, the some physical models of effect are developed, being described in detail. Accelerated test methods, based on these models use in standards. The conversion model of the effect, that allows to describe the inverse S-shaped excess base current dependence versus dose rate, was proposed. This paper presents the problem of conversion model fitting parameters extraction.

  16. Investigations on the effects of low dose irradiation on different bulbous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.; Fendrik, I.

    1983-01-01

    Dormant bulbs, and bulbs with the first emergent leaf, of species of tulip, crocus, iris, scilla, eranthus, galanthus and muscari, were irradiated with low doses of X-rays. Four parameters were investigated when the plants flowered:-plant height, flower number, fresh weight and dry weight. The effects of irradiation of dormant bulbs and one-leaf plants on these four parameters were tabulated for the different species. Results agree with previous experiments and indicate greater radiation effects on plant compared to bulb irradiation. (U.K.)

  17. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  18. The effect of low-dose total body irradiation on tumor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Miyamoto, Miyako; Watabe, Nobuyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is considered to bring about an immunosuppressive effect on an organism, on the basis of data obtained from sublethal doses of TBI. However, there are no data on how low-dose TBI affects an organism. Over the last five years, we have been studying the effects of low-dose TBI on normal or tumor-bearing mice and the immunological background of these effects. In experimental studies, an increase in the TD50 value (the number of cells required for a tumor incidence of 50 %) in mice exposed to 10 rad was recognized and showed a remarkable increase at 6 hours to 15 hours after irradiation. TBI of 10 rad also showed an enhancement effect on tumor cell killing when given 12 hours before local tumor irradiation. In order to clarify the mechanism of this kind of effect, some immunological studies were performed using several immunological procedures, and the results suggested that 10 rad of TBI caused increasing tumor immunity in irradiated mice. Clinical trials in some patients with advanced tumors are now being undertaken on the basis of these experimental data, and the effect of TBI on tumor control appears promising, although it is too early to draw conclusions. (author)

  19. A study on the effect of low doses gamma radiation on mushroom spawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajlouni, Said

    1993-03-01

    Mushroom spawn (Hybrid-521) was irradiated at room temperature using low doses of gamma radiation (50-600 rad). The spawn was then planted at two stages; first, after 24 hours of irradiation, and second after storage for three weeks at refrigeration temperature. Results of this study showed that the applied doses of gamma radiation did not have any stimulatory effect on mushroom growth or productivity. It was also noticed that mushroom production rate decreased when irradiated spawn was stored for three weeks prior to planting, as compared with spawn planted 24 hours after irradiation. (author). 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Effect of low dose tritium on mouse lymphocyte DNA estimated by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Yusuke; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maruyama, Satoko; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ichimasa, Michiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with low dose effect of HTO on mouse lymphocytes DNA (in vitro irradiation) estimated by the comet assay using ICR male mouse of 20 to 23 weeks old. Lymphocytes were isolated by centrifugation of whole blood sample on Ficoll-Paque solution and embedded in agarose gel just after mixed with HTO. After lymphocytes were exposed to 17-50 mGy of HTO, the agarose gel slides were washed to remove HTO and cell lysis treatment on the slides was conducted before electrophoresis. The individual comets on stained slides after electrophoresis were analyzed using imaging software. No significant DNA damages were observed. (author)

  1. Developmental neurotoxic effects of a low dose of TCE on a 3-D neurosphere system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdraboh, M E; Abdeen, S H; Salama, M; El-Husseiny, M; El-Sherbini, Y M; Eldeen, N M

    2018-02-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the industrial toxic byproducts that now persist in the air, soil, and water. Several studies have already illustrated the toxic effect of high doses of TCE on the biological functions of several organs. This study aims to highlight the toxic impact of a low dose of TCE (1 μmol/L) on the development of rat neural stem cells (NSCs). The subventricular zones (SVZ) of rat pup's brains were collected and minced, and the harvested cells were cultured in the presence of neural growth factors B27/N2 to develop neurospheres. The cells were then exposed to a dose of 1 μmol/L TCE for 1 or 2 weeks. The outcomes indicated a remarkable inhibitory effect of TCE on the differentiation capacity of NSCs, which was confirmed by down-regulation of the astrocyte marker GFAP The inhibitory effect of TCE on the proliferation of NSCs was identified by the reductions in neurosphere diameter, Ki67 expression, and cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase. Immunolabelling with annexin V indicated the proapoptotic effect of TCE exposure. PCR results revealed a TCE-mediated suppression of the expression of the antioxidant enzyme SOD1. This paper illustrates, for the first time, a detailed examination of the toxic effects of an environmentally low dose of TCE on NCSs at the transcriptional, translational, and functional levels.

  2. Immunomodulatory Properties and Molecular Effects in Inflammatory Diseases of Low-Dose X-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rödel, Franz; Frey, Benjamin; Manda, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Guido; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Keilholz, Ludwig; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Gaipl, Udo S.; Rödel, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are the result of complex and pathologically unbalanced multicellular interactions. For decades, low-dose X-irradiation therapy (LD-RT) has been clinically documented to exert an anti-inflammatory effect on benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders. By contrast, experimental studies to confirm the effectiveness and to reveal underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still at their early stages. During the last decade, however, the modulation of a multitude of immunological processes by LD-RT has been explored in vitro and in vivo. These include leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion, adhesion molecule and cytokine/chemokine expression, apoptosis induction, and mononuclear/polymorphonuclear cell metabolism and activity. Interestingly, these mechanisms display comparable dose dependences and dose-effect relationships with a maximum effect in the range between 0.3 and 0.7 Gy, already empirically identified to be most effective in the clinical routine. This review summarizes data and models exploring the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LD-RT that may serve as a prerequisite for further systematic analyses to optimize low-dose irradiation procedures in future clinical practice.

  3. Immunomodulatory Properties and Molecular Effects in Inflammatory Diseases of Low-Dose X-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frey, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Manda, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Guido [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Rostock (Germany); Hehlgans, Stephanie [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Keilholz, Ludwig [Department of Radiotherapy, Clinical Center Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum, Hamburg (Germany); Gaipl, Udo S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Rödel, Claus, E-mail: franz.roedel@kgu.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-09-25

    Inflammatory diseases are the result of complex and pathologically unbalanced multicellular interactions. For decades, low-dose X-irradiation therapy (LD-RT) has been clinically documented to exert an anti-inflammatory effect on benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders. By contrast, experimental studies to confirm the effectiveness and to reveal underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still at their early stages. During the last decade, however, the modulation of a multitude of immunological processes by LD-RT has been explored in vitro and in vivo. These include leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesion, adhesion molecule and cytokine/chemokine expression, apoptosis induction, and mononuclear/polymorphonuclear cell metabolism and activity. Interestingly, these mechanisms display comparable dose dependences and dose-effect relationships with a maximum effect in the range between 0.3 and 0.7 Gy, already empirically identified to be most effective in the clinical routine. This review summarizes data and models exploring the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LD-RT that may serve as a prerequisite for further systematic analyses to optimize low-dose irradiation procedures in future clinical practice.

  4. Ranitidine Can Potentiate The Prokinetic Effect Of Itopride At Low Doses- An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Aroosa Ishtiaq; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Khan, Asma; Khan, Qamar-Uz-Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Gastroparesis and GERD occur concomitantly in 40 percent of the cases. Prokinetic drugs and acid blockers are employed as the main treatment modality. Ranitidine is an acid blocker with additional prokinetic activity and Itopride is a known prokinetic drug. This study was designed to observe the synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride on isolated duodenum of rabbits. Ranitidine (10-5-10-3) and itopride (10-6-10-5) were added in increasing concentrations to isolated duodenum of rabbits and contractions were recorded on PowerLab Data acquisition unit AHK/214. Cumulative dose response curves were constructed. The potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride was seen by using a fixed dose of ranitidine and cumulatively enhancing doses of itopride on iWorx. Ranitidine and itopride produced a dose dependent reversible contraction of the isolated tissue of rabbits with ranitidine showing a max response of 0.124mV and itopride showing a maximum response of 0.131mV. Ranitidine was able to potentiate the prokinetic effect of itopride at low doses but at high dose the effect began to wane off. Ranitidine and itopride produce a statistically significant synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect at low doses in vitro.

  5. A review of the bystander effect and its implications for low-dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Michael, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Current models for the interaction between ionising radiation and living cells or tissues are based on direct genetic damage produced by energy deposition in cellular DNA. An important observation which has questioned this basic assumption is radiation-induced bystander response, in which cells which have not been directly targeted respond if their neighbours have been exposed. This response predominates at low doses of relevance to radiation risk analysis (<0.2 Gy) and therefore needs to be fully characterised. The development of microbeams, which allow individual cells within populations to be targeted with precise doses of radiation, has provided a useful tool for quantifying this response. The authors' studies have targeted individual human and mouse cells with counted protons and helium ions and monitored neighbouring cells for the production of bystander responses. Bystander responses have been measured after exposures as low as a single proton or helium ion delivered to an individual cell. An important aspect is that these responses saturate with increasing dose to the single target cell, thus the relative roles of direct and indirect (non-targeted) responses change with dose. Studies with multicellular, tissue-based models are providing evidence that bystander responses may have a complex phenotype involving multiple pathways and the overall response may be a balance between multiple signalling processes and responses to radiation exposure. Current models for radiation risk assume a linear non-threshold response and have generally been extrapolated from high-dose exposures. The involvement of competing processes at low doses may have important consequences for understanding the effects of low-dose exposure. (author)

  6. Extrapolation of experimental data on late effects of low-dose radionuclides in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalistratova, V.S.; Nisimov, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    The situation of living of population on radionuclide contamination areas was simulated in the experimental study using white strainless rats of different ages. The significance of age for late stochastic effects of internal radionuclide contamination with low doses of 131 I, 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 106 Ru was studied. Some common regularities and differences in late effects formation depending on age were found. Results of the study showed that the number of tumors developed increased in groups of animals exposed at the youngest age. The younger animal at the moment of internal radionuclide contamination, the higher percentage of malignant tumors appeared. It was especially so for tumors of endocrine glands (pituitary, suprarenal,- and thyroid). Differences in late effects formation related to different type of radionuclide distribution within the body were estimated. On the base of extrapolation the conclusion was made that human organism being exposed at early postnatal or pubertal period could be the most radiosensitive (1.5-2.0 or sometimes even 3-5 times higher than adults). Data confirmed the opinion that children are the most critical part of population even in case of low dose radiation exposure. (author)

  7. Effect of low dose radiation on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei protein synthesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Qingyong; Chen Shali; Liu Shuzheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To the effect of low dose radiation on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei protein synthesis in mice. Methods: The expression of proteins was analyzed by gel filtration with Sephadex G-100 and HPLC based on separation of proteins on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei after whole-body irradiation with 75 mGy X-rays and sham-irradiation, and their biological activity was examined by mouse splenocyte proliferation and chromosome aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results: HPLC analysis showed that there was a marked increase in expression of 61.4 kD protein in the extract of thymocyte cytosol and 30.4 kD protein in the extract of thymocyte nuclei in comparison with the corresponding fractions from the sham-irradiated control mice. These protein fractions from the thymocyte cytosol and nuclei of the irradiated mice showed both stimulating effect on normal T cell proliferation and protective effect on chromosome damage induced by high dose radiation. Conclusion: These findings might have implications in study of mechanism of immunoenhancement and cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation

  8. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  9. Effect of low dose X-ray irradiation on apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) with different doses of X-rays on the apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of male Kunming mouse testes. The time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in the different stages of spermatogenic cell cycles of mouse testis after LDR with different doses of X-rays were studied with light microscope using the methods of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and HE staining. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR had a remarkable regularity in cell types. When the dose was 0.025 Gy, spermatogonium apoptosis was taken as main. With the dose increase of irradiation (0.025-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic rate of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after irradiation with low dose. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR has a regular change, which provides a further experimental evidence for the mechanism study of hormesis by LDR

  10. Low dose radiation induced protein and its effect on expression of CD25 molecule in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find the substantial basis for effects of low dose radiation, on development, extraction, and the biogical activity of the low-dose radiation-induced proteins, and the effects of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Methods: 1. Healthy Kumning male mice exposed to radiation of 226 Ra γ-rays at 5, 10 and 15 cGy respectively. The mice were killed 2 hours after exposure, the spleen cells were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultra-centrifugalized at low temperature (4 degree C). The LDR-induced proteins were obtained in the supernatant solution. Then the changes of CD25 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique, which was used to reflect the effect of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Results: LDR induced proteins were obtained from spleen cells in mice exposed to 5-15 cGy whole body radiation. Conclusion: The expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes was increased significantly after use of LDR induced proteins. LDR induced proteins can enhance expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes slightly

  11. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  12. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation—Implications for low dose risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, Munira; Salomaa, Sisko; Wright, Eric

    2013-01-01

    and adaptive responses are powered by fundamental, but not clearly understood systems that maintain tissue homeostasis. Despite excellent research in this field by various groups, there are still gaps in our understanding of the likely mechanisms associated with non-DNA targeted effects, particularly......Non-DNA targeted effects of ionising radiation, which include genomic instability, and a variety of bystander effects including abscopal effects and bystander mediated adaptive response, have raised concerns about the magnitude of low-dose radiation risk. Genomic instability, bystander effects....... Furthermore, it is still not known what the initial target and early interactions in cells are that give rise to non-targeted responses in neighbouring or descendant cells. This paper provides a commentary on the current state of the field as a result of the non-targeted effects of ionising radiation (NOTE...

  13. Effects of low dose irradiation on NK activity of normal individuals and patients with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hailin; Su Liaoyuan

    1994-10-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on NK activity of lymphocytes and on K 562 cells were studied. The NK activity was determined by means of 3 H-TdR release assay. While 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to reflect functional changes of K 562 cells after low dose irradiation. 21 patients with cancer and 10 normal individuals were detected. The results indicated that the NK activity of lymphocytes in normal individuals increased significantly after 10 and 50 cGy γ-ray irradiation, while in patients with cancer the NK activity of lymphocytes increased only at the dose of 50 cGy irradiation. The increase of NK activity in normal individuals was higher than that in patients with cancer after same doses of irradiation. When K 562 cells were irradiated by 10 cGy γ-rays, the 3 H-TdR incorporation value increased. After exposed to over 50 cGy the stimulating effect disappeared

  14. Stimulatory effect of low dose radiation on the immune function in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Li Xiujuan; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The author aims at investigating the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with low dose radiation on immune function in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: C57BL/6J mine implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells in the right thighs were used as an experimental animal model. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays was given at the 10 th day after implantation and immunological parameters were detected 18 hours after irradiation. The immunological parameters included the spontaneous incorporation of 3 H-TdR into thymocytes, the number of splenocytes, the reaction of splenocytes to ConA and LPS, the splenic production of IL-2, the cytotoxic activities of natural killer (NK) and lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK) as well as specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Results: The immunological parameters of irradiated tumor-bearing mice were significantly increased compared with those of sham-irradiated tumor-bearing mice (P<0.05∼0.01). Conclusion: Low dose radiation could significantly increase the immune function of tumor-bearing mice, and this stimulatory effect may be of some potential significance in tumor therapy

  15. Multilevel mechanisms of stimulatory effect of low dose radiation on immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu-Zeng Liu

    1992-01-01

    Attention is paid to the effects of low level ionizing radiation on humans. The conference is devoted to low dose radiation and defense mechanisms of the body. Due to the importance of the immune system in body resistance, special attention has been given to host defense mechanisms following exposure to different doses of ionizing radiation. The immune system has long been known to be highly sensitive to moderate to high doses of ionizing radiation with immuno-depression as one of the most important causes of death in acute radiation syndrome. However, the dose-effect relationship of immune functions has been found to be quite different in the low dose range, especially with doses within 0.1 Gy. With doses above 0.5 Gy most immunologic parameters show a dose dependent depression. With doses between 0.1-0.5 Gy there may be no definite changes in immune functions. Doses within 0.1 Gy, given in single or chronic exposures, have been found to stimulate many immune responses. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Effect of Low Dose Gamma Radiation on Some Biochemical Indicators in the Blood Plasma of Chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraljevic, P.; Simpraga, M.; Vilic, M.; Miljanic, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: An attempt was made to determine the effect of irradiation of eggs by low dose ionising radiation before incubation on concentration of total protein, glucose and cholesterol in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The eggs of heavy breeding chickens were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation ( 60 Co) before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was the control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for the both groups. After hatching, blood samples were taken from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of all three parameters was determined spectrophotometrically using Boehringer Mannheim GmbH optimized kits. The concentration of total protein was significantly decreased in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs on days 3, 7 and 30 and increased only on day 5. The concentration of glucose in the blood plasma was increased in the same chickens on days 1 and 30. The concentration of the cholesterol was decreased in the same chickens on day 7, and increased on day 10. Obtained results indicate that low-dose of gamma radiation has effects on some metabolic processes in the chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation. (author)

  17. Toxic effects of low doses of Bisphenol-A on human placental cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benachour, Nora; Aris, Aziz

    2009-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to a great number of xenobiotics and their metabolites present as pollutants. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is extensively used in a broad range of products including baby bottles, food-storage containers, medical equipment, and consumer electronics. Thus, BPA is the most common monomer for polycarbonates intended for food contact. Levels of this industrial product are found in maternal blood, amniotic fluid, follicular fluid, placental tissue, umbilical cord blood, and maternal urine. In this study, we investigated toxic effects of BPA concentrations close to levels found in serum of pregnant women on human cytotrophoblasts (CTB). These cells were isolated from fresh placentas and exposed to BPA for 24 h. Our results showed that very low doses of BPA induce apoptosis (2 to 3 times) as assessed using M30 antibody immunofluorescent detection, and necrosis (1.3 to 1.7 times) as assessed through the cytosolic Adenylate Kinase (AK) activity after cell membrane damage. We also showed that BPA increased significantly the tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene expression and protein excretion as measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA luminescent test, respectively. Moreover, we observed that induction of AK activation and TNF-α gene expression require lower levels of BPA than apoptosis or TNF-α protein excretion. Our findings suggest that exposure of placental cells to low doses of BPA may cause detrimental effects, leading in vivo to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity and pregnancy loss.

  18. Problems associated with the effects of low doses of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the English version of the report number 34 of the Academie des Sciences, published in October 1995, and entitled 'Problemes lies aux effets des faibles doses des radiations ionisantes'. This report had been endorsed by CODER (Comite des Etudes et Rapports) on February 7, 1995. In dealing with problems associated with ionising radiation, a wide range of important aspects must be taken into account and many different international bodies are concerned with them. It was therefore though useful to make the report available in English. Several additions have been made to the original edition: it has been complemented with three appendices on the cellular, molecular and genetic effects of exposure to low doses of ionising radiations ; it was though useful to give, in addition to the references of the chapters and appendices, a summary of the main relevant work published by French research teams over the past few years; an addendum quotes some of the important contributions made over the past year; a symposium devoted to the effects of low doses of ionising radiations, and to repair enzyme systems will be organized by the Academy at the end of 1997. This will provide the opportunity to re-explore the situation in the light of the data accumulated at that time. This field is evolving rapidly and a periodic evaluation of the new data is mandatory. (authors)

  19. Scientific conception on mechanisms of calcium homeostasis disorders under low dose effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abylaev, Zh.A.; Dospolova, Zh.G.

    1997-01-01

    Scientific conception of probable consequences of calcium homeostasis disorders in personals, exposed to low dose effect of ionizing radiation has been developed. Principle positions of the conception is that pathologic processes development have different ways of conducting. During predominance of low doses of external gamma-radiation there is leading pathologic mechanism (mechanism 1) of disorder neuroendocrine regulation of both the calcium and the phosphor. In this case sicks have disorders of both the vegetative tonus and the endocrine status. Under internal irradiation (mechanism 2) there is disfunction of organs and systems (bore changes and disorders of hormone status). These changes are considered as consequence of negative action on organism of incorporated long-living radionuclides. Radio-toxic factors action (mechanism 3) provokes the excess of hormones, which acting on bone tissue and could be cause of steroid osteoporosis. Influence of chronic stress factor (mechanism 4) enlarges and burden action on organism of low radiation doses. It is emphasized, that decisive role in development of pathologic processes has mechanism of disturbance of neuroendocrine regulation of calcium exchange

  20. Combination effect of low dose fentanyl and propofol on emergence agitation in children following sevoflurane anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhamees, Hassan S; Mercan, Arzu; ElHalafawy, Yasser M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the combination effect of low dose fentanyl and subhypnotic dose of propofol on emergence agitation in children receiving sevoflurane for adenotonsillectomy procedure.After ethical approval, a prospective, randomized, clinical study was performed in Saad Specialist Hospital, Al-Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2007-2008. One hundred and twenty children in physical status of I according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, aged 2-6 years, scheduled for adentonsillectomy under general anesthesia were allocated into 3 groups randomly. Anesthesia was induced and maintained by sevoflurane in all groups. Children received 0.1 ml.kg-1 normal saline at the end of surgery in group C (n=40), 1.5 mcg.kg-1 fentanyl during induction, and 0.1 ml.kg-1 normal saline at the end of surgery in group F (n=40), and 1.5 mcg.kg-1 fentanyl during induction and 1 mg.kg-1 propofol at the end of surgery in group FP (n=40). Postoperative agitation was recorded, if any, for the first postoperative hour.Three groups were comparable with regard to demographic data. Twenty-one patients (53%) in the control group, 14 patients (35%) in group F and 7 (18%) patients in group FP experienced postoperative agitation.The combination of low dose fentanyl before surgery and propofol at the end of surgery decreases the incidence and level of emergence agitation in children after adenotonsillectomy procedure under sevoflurane anesthesia. (author)

  1. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  2. The assessment of effects of low doses of ionizing radiations: contributions of epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, P.; Hubert, Ph.; Bard, D.

    1998-01-01

    After a brief recall of the history of the application of epidemiological studies to the field of ionizing radiations (actually to study the consequences of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing), and after having outlined that most of these epidemiological studies addressed carcinogenic effects of radiations on populations exposed to doses greater than 0,2 Gy, this article more particularly addresses epidemiological studies for low doses (lower than 0,5-1 Gy). The authors present objectives and methods (monitoring, etiological research, risk quantification), and discuss the limitations of epidemiology and its strengths. In the next part, they comment and discuss the main data sources used for the epidemiological assessment of low doses. These sources respectively deal with Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study, its results in terms of solid cancers and leukaemia, its limitations), with occupational exposures (radiologists, workers in nuclear installations, crews of intercontinental flights, Chernobyl liquidators, uranium minors exposed to radon), with environmental exposures (domestic exposures to radon, exposure to natural radiation, to nuclear test fallouts, and to Chernobyl accident fallouts, exposure about nuclear installations), and with other types of exposure

  3. Lifetime exposure to low doses of lead in rats: effect on selected parameters of carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Jaroslava; Lukačínová, Agnesa; Lovásová, Eva; Cimboláková, Iveta; Rácz, Oliver; Ništiar, František

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of exposure to low doses of lead dissolved in drinking water (average daily dose of 2.2 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) on selected carbohydrate metabolism parameters in 20 wistar rats. Animals were divided into two groups - control (C) (group drinking clear water) and experimental group (Pb; group exposed to low doses of lead acetate in a concentration of 100 μmol l(-1) of drinking water). In this study, we studied the biochemical parameters (glucose, haemoglobin (Hb), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and amylase (AMS)) in rat blood. Glucose and Hb concentration and AMS activity decreased, LDH activity increased but HbA1c concentration levels did not change in rats exposed to lead. Our results well documented that lifetime exposure to lead affected carbohydrate metabolism of rats. Some parameters like concentration of Hb as well as activities of AMS and LDH are useful markers of intoxication of rats with lead. For the evaluation of results (e.g. AMS), not only the data at the end of the experiment should be taken into account but also the entire duration of trials (i.e. more time steps) that makes results more objective should be considered. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Low dose X –ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focea, R; Nadejde, C; Creanga, D; Luchian, T

    2012-01-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  5. Systemic effects of low-dose dopamine during administration of cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James; Benani, Dina J; Newman, Matthew; Burton, Bradley; Crow, Jessica; Levis, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Low-dose dopamine has been utilized to improve renal blood flow, urine output, and reduce drug-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in renal function, cardiovascular adverse events, and neurologic toxicity in patients receiving cytarabine with or without low-dose dopamine. Methods A retrospective, single-center, cohort study of patients receiving cytarabine at 667 mg/m 2 /dose or greater, with or without dopamine at ≤5 mcg/kg/min. Cohorts were based upon initiation or absence of low-dose dopamine; cytarabine only, cytarabine + pre- and day of low-dose dopamine, and cytarabine + post-low-dose dopamine. Renal outcomes (urine output, serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance) were compared with baseline and between cohorts. Safety endpoints (arrhythmias, tachycardia, and neurotoxicity) were compared between cohorts based on low-dose dopamine exposure. Results There was no difference in urine output from baseline in all cohorts. Comparing cytarabine only and pre- and day of low-dose dopamine cohorts, there was no difference in urine output. In those receiving low-dose dopamine, there was no difference in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance from baseline. No arrhythmias were documented during the study period, and there was no difference in the incidence of tachycardia between groups (P = 0.66). Neurotoxicity was reported in three patients who were on low-dose dopamine. Conclusion Though variation existed in individual patients administered low-dose dopamine, the use of low-dose dopamine did not significantly impact renal function in this small sample at a single institution. In addition, low-dose dopamine did not negatively impact cardiovascular function.

  6. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perfluorononanoic acid in combination with 14 chemicals exerts low-dose mixture effects in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Pedersen, Mikael; Skov, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Humans are simultaneously exposed to several chemicals that act jointly to induce mixture effects. At doses close to or higher than no-observed adverse effect levels, chemicals usually act additively in experimental studies. However, we are lacking knowledge on the importance of exposure to complex...... real-world mixtures at more relevant human exposure levels. We hypothesised that adverse mixture effects occur at doses approaching high-end human exposure levels. A mixture (Mix) of 14 chemicals at a combined dose of 2.5 mg/kg bw/day was tested in combination with perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA...... pituitary-adrenal axis. In conclusion, our data suggest that mixtures of environmental chemicals at doses approaching high-end human exposure levels can cause a hormonal imbalance and disturb steroid hormones and their regulation. These effects may be non-monotonic and were observed at low doses. Whether...

  8. Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

    2010-01-01

    Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses <100 mSv in a single exposure appear to be too small to allow epidermiological detection of statistically significant excess cancers in the presence of naturally occurring cancers; that low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

  9. The effects of low dose radiation (LDR) on mice of immune function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Deng Daping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To find out the Effects of Low Dose Radiation(LDR) on mice of immune function. Methods: Through flow cytometry to observe and analyse the effects of the leukomonocyte. Through immunohistochemistry to study IL-2, TNF-α. Results: At dose of 100mGy the stimulative effect on CD 4 + cells, CD 8 + cells and NK activity was higher than that at other doses. At dose of 500mGy leukomonocyte activity was lower. At dose of 100mGy, the colorations about IL-2, TNF-α deepen. Conclusion: LDR could stimulate immune function, especially at dose of 100mGy. while at dose of 500mGy, radiation could restrain the leukomonocyte activity. (authors)

  10. Radioprotective effect of low doses of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline alone or associated with phosphorothioates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, J.D.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.; Laduranty, J.; Miginiac, L.; Lion, C.; Sentenac-Roumanou, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the mouse, the intraperitoneal injection of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline has a radioprotective effect even at low doses. Its association with S-[2-(3-aminopropyl)aminoethyl] phosphorothioate (WR 2721) or S-[3-(3-methylaminopropyl)-aminopropyl]phosphorothioate (WR 151327) at low doses led to an enhancement of their respective radioprotective activities without any apparent side effects. These results strengthen the interest of this non-sulphur compound as a radioprotector

  11. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA{sup R}) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA{sup R}, followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA{sup R} disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA{sup R}) through the culture medium.

  12. An extracellular DNA mediated bystander effect produced from low dose irradiated endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Malinovskaya, Elena M.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2011-01-01

    The human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture was exposed to X-ray radiation in a low dose of 10 cGy. The fragments of extracellular genomic DNA (ecDNA R ) were isolated from the culture medium after the short-term incubation. A culture medium of unirradiated endothelial cells was then supplemented with ecDNA R , followed by analysing the cells along the series of parameters (bystander effect). The exposed cells and bystander endotheliocytes showed similar response to low doses: approximation of the 1q12 loci of chromosome 1 and their transposition into the cellular nucleus, change in shape of the endotheliocytic nucleus, activation of the nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), actin polymerization, and an elevated level of DNA double-stranded breaks. Following blockade of TLR9 receptors with oligonucleotide-inhibitor or chloroquine in the bystander cells these effects - except of activation of NORs - on exposure to ecDNA R disappeared, with no bystander response thus observed. The presence of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the bystander effect being studied suggests a possibility for radiation-modified ecDNA fragments (i.e., stress signaling factors) to be released into the culture medium, whereas inhibition of TLR9 suggests the binding these ligands to the recipient cells. A similar DNA-signaling pathway in the bystander effect we previously described for human lymphocytes. Integrity of data makes it possible to suppose that a similar signaling mechanism which we demonstrated for lymphocytes (humoral system) might also be mediated in a monolayer culture of cells (cellular tissue) after the development of the bystander effect in them and transfer of stress signaling factors (ecDNA R ) through the culture medium.

  13. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear accidents of tremendous magnitude, such as those of Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011), mean that individuals living in the contaminated areas are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the dose-response relationship for effects of low doses of radiation is not still established. The present study was aimed at investigating in mice the early effects of low-dose internal radiation exposure on the kidney. Adult male (C57BL/6J) mice were divided into three groups. Two groups received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of cesium ( 137 Cs) with activities of 4000 and 8000Bq/kg bw. A third group (control group) received a single s.c. injection of 0.9% saline. To evaluate acute and subacute effects, mice (one-half of each group) were euthanized at 72h and 10 days post-exposure to 137 Cs, respectively. Urine samples were collected for biochemical analysis, including the measurement of F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) levels. Moreover, the concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured in renal tissue. Urinary excretion of total protein significantly increased at 72h in mice exposed to Cs4000. Uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased significantly at both times post-exposure in animals exposed to Cs8000. After 72h and 10d of exposure to Cs4000, a significant increase in the γ-glutamil transferase (GGT) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities was observed. In turn, F2-IsoP levels increased -mainly in the Cs4000 group- at 72h post-exposure. Following irradiation ( 137 Cs), the highest level of KIM-1 was corresponded to the Cs4000 group at 72h. Likewise, the main DNA damage was detected in mice exposed to Cs4000, mainly at 10d after irradiation. The alterations observed in several biomarkers suggest an immediate renal damage following exposure to low doses of IR (given as 137 Cs). Further investigations are required to clarify the

  14. Beneficial effects of low dose Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, A S; Omotoso, Gabriel O; Enaibe, B U; Akinola, O B; Tagoe, C N B

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed at determining the effects of administration of mature green fruits of Musa paradisiaca on the semen quality of adult male Wistar rats. THE ANIMALS USED FOR THE STUDY WERE GROUPED INTO THREE: the control group, given 2 ml of double distilled water, a low dose group given 500 mg/kg/day and a high dose group given 1000 mg/kg/day of the plantain fruits, which was made into flour, and dissolved in 2 ml of double distilled water for easy oral administration. Significant increment in the semen parameters was noticed in animals that received a lower dose of the plantain flour, but those animals who received the high dose had marked and very significant reduction in sperm cell concentration and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa. Musa paradisiaca should be consumed in moderate quantities in order to derive its beneficial effects of enhancing male reproductive functions.

  15. Effect of ultra-low dose whole-body-irradiation on severe patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimori, Shigeru; Koriyama, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    An ultra-low dose whole body irradiation therapy was given to 5 patients with intractable bulbar syndrome, in a dose of 10 rad/fraction, 2 times a week for 5 weeks, with a total of 100 rad; and effects of this therapy on their clinical symptoms and immunological ability were discussed. In 3 of them, bulbar syndrome was improved, and the other one, the first irradiation was effective. The peripheral leukocyte count and lymphocyte count became lowest immediately after completion of the irradiation, and returned to the normal level within 1 to 2 months. The function of T-cells, especially suppressive T-cells, was recovered; and decrease in B-cells, resulted in a decrease in the AChR antibody titer. (Ueda, J.)

  16. Effect of ultra-low dose whole-body-irradiation on patients with severe myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimori, Shigeru; Koriyama, Kenji (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    An ultra-low dose whole body irradiation therapy was given to 5 patients with intractable bulbar syndrome, in a dose of 10 rad/fraction, 2 times a week for 5 weeks, with a total of 100 rad; and effects of this therapy on their clinical symptoms and immunological ability were discussed. In 3 of them, bulbar syndrome was improved, and the other one, the first irradiation was effective. The peripheral leukocyte count and lymphocyte count became lowest immediately after completion of the irradiation, and returned to the normal level within 1 to 2 months. The function of T-cells, especially suppressive T-cells, was recovered; and decrease in B-cells, resulted in a decrease in the AChR antibody titer.

  17. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng [Nambu Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Bae [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10{sup 6}, 13.901 x 10{sup 6}, 14.153 x 10{sup 6}, 13.831 x 10{sup 6}, 14.137 x 10{sup 6}, 14.677 x 10{sup 6} respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body.

  18. The effects of rat's sperm bioassay for low dose X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gye Hwan; Min, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Bock; Lee, Sam Yul; Lee, Jun Haeng; Park, Jong Bae

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the enhancement effects of low dose radiation on biological activation, this study applied low dose X-ray to the whole body of male rats to find out whether hormesis is induced in male germ cells. Total 36 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats as experimental animal were subdivided into 6 groups(in 6 rats per group) such as control, 10 mGy, 20 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy and 200 mGy radiation group. All the groups showed slightly increasing number of sperms per 0.1 g semen (14.216 x 10 6 , 13.901 x 10 6 , 14.153 x 10 6 , 13.831 x 10 6 , 14.137 x 10 6 , 14.677 x 10 6 respectively), and the motility of sperms amounted to 50.9%, 49.5%, 55.1%, 54.3%, 48.0% and 52.2% respectively. Particularly, compared to the control, the other 5 groups showed higher male hormone level, and the microscopic observations of testicle tissues showed no vacuolization in seminiferous tubules and testis cells. In the results of this experiment, no harmful effect was observed on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for which the dose of radiation was controlled as regulated legally by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Health and Welfare. However, as these results were obtained from a limited number of animals, we cannot maintain that the same effect will be observed in the human body. Therefore, there should be further research on the effect on other animals and ultimately on the human body

  19. Modeling low-dose-rate effects in irradiated bipolar-base oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, R.J.; Cirba, C.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Michez, A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Witczak, S.C.

    1997-02-01

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in BJTs. Simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for the low-dose-rate enhancement

  20. Effects of low doses of gamma rays on yield, yield components, and other characters of two maize varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, Z. B.; Jabbo, N. F.; Khalaf, M. Z.; Majid, A. H.; Ali, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The study was conducted during the fall of 1991 and 1992 at Al-Latyfia Experimental Station to determine the effect of low doses of gamma rays on yield, yield components, and other characters of two maize varieties. Five doses were used in addition to control. A factorial experiment with randomized complete block design in three replications was used in the study. Results revealed that there was significant difference between varieties in plant and ear height in 1992. However, differences between varieties were also significantly affected by most yield component characters. Low doses significantly affected plant height, weight of 500 kernels in 1991, and kernel row number in 1992. Grain yield was affected significantly in 1991 and 1992 by low doses. Results showed that 2.0 krad was the most useful low dose to increase grain yield, whereas there was no significant effect between varieties in grain yield. 7 refs., 6 tabs

  1. Effect of low-dose gamma-radiation upon hatchability and weight of chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljanic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Although any dose of ionizing radiation has generally been recognized to be detrimental to living being, low dose ionizing radiation seems to invoke primary stimulative effects. Stimulatory effects of low dose ionizing radiation include many aspects such as growth, fecundity and longevity stimulation, accelerated development, enhance biological responses for immune systems, enzymatic repair, physiological functions, and the removal of cellular damage, including prevention and removal of cancers and other diseases. Low dose ionizing radiation might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation and on the seventh day of incubation on hatchability of eggs and body weight of chickens. This study includes three independent experiments. In the first experiment, six-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Avian-line 34, were irradiated by a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60 Co) before incubation. In the second experiments also involving six-hundred-line 34 eggs were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation on the seventh day of incubation. In the third experiment three-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Ross 308 were irradiated by dose 0.30 Gy gamma irradiation before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. Hatchability was calculated in terms of all eggs divided with fertile eggs which hatched. The individual weights of the chickens were determined on the first and on the forty second day. Growth data were analyzed statistically by t-test. Irradiation of chicken eggs and embryos at rates o f 0.15 Gy increases

  2. Effects of low dose radiation on regulatory function between lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hailin; Su Liaoyuan; Du Zeji; Zou Huawei; Wang Aiqing

    1997-01-01

    Four kinds of McAbs (anti CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 and CD 57 ) were used to separate CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 (B) and CD 57 (NK) lymphocyte subsets from human peripheral blood by 'Panning-direct' method. First the natural killing activity of each subsets and the regulatory functions between CD 57 and other subsets were studied. Then the effects of low dose radiation on the function of CD 57 cells and the regulatory functions between CD 57 and other subsets were studied. The results showed that the NK activity was found in all of the four subsets, with CD 57 cell having the strongest activity. When CD 4 and CD 57 cells were co-cultured, the total NK activity was higher than that of the sum of these two single subsets, i.e. there was synergistic effect between CD 4 and CD 57 cells. When CD 8 or CD 19 cells were co-cultured separately with CD 57 cells, no synergistic effect was found. Irradiation by gamma rays at doses of 50 cGy and 80 cGy was able to stimulate the function of CD 57 cells. After Cd 4 or CD 57 cells were irradiated, the total NK activity of their co-culture increased significantly. This phenomenon was not found in other subsets. This suggested that low dose radiation can enhance the synergistic action between CD 4 and CD 57 cells. So at least four subsets (CD 4 , CD 8 , CD 19 , CD 57 ) contribute to the total NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (15 refs., 4 tabs.)

  3. The effect of low dose radiation on the neuronal cell proliferation in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Doo Soon; Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon; Kim, Sang Ki; Lee, Taeck Hyun; Kim, Chang Ju

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on neuronal cell proliferation in diabetic rats. A group of rats (first group) were divided into three subgroups (nondiabetic control, nondiabetic 0.1 Gy and nondiabetic 10 Gy groups) to determine the effect of radiation on normal hippocampal neuronal cell proliferation. A further group of rats (second group) were divided into six subgroups (nondiabetic control, diabetic control, diabetic 0.01 Gy, diabetic 0.1 Gy, diabetic 1 Gy and diabetic 10 Gy groups) to determine the effect of radiation on hippocampal neuronal cell proliferation under diabetic conditions. Using immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), the number of neuronal cells in the dentate gyrus of all the groups was counted. The number of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate Gyrus of the nondiabetic control, nondiabetic 0.1 Gy and nondiabetic 10 Gy subgroups of the first group were 45.96 ± 3.42, 59.34 ± 5.20 and 19.26 ± 2.98/mm 2 , respectively. The number of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the diabetic control, diabetic 0.01 Gy, diabetic 0.1 Gy, diabetic 1 Gy and diabetic 10 Gy subgroups of the second group were 55.44 ± 8.57, 33.33 ±6.46, 67.75 ± 10.54, 66.63 ± 10.05, 23.59 ± 6.37 and 14.34± 7.22/mm 2 , respectively. Low dose radiation enhances cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of STZ-induced diabetic rats

  4. Clinical effects of chronic low doses irradiation (11 years after Chernobyl accident)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanenko, A.Y.; Bebeshko, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    Estimation of clinical effects of influence low doses of irradiation as the result of the Chernobyl accident on the human organism is presented in this report. The results of the investigations are concerning to changings in different organs and systems of inhabitants of the contamination territories and among clean-up workers. Increasing of morbidity of digestive and nervous systems is notified. Increase of thyroid cancer, chronic thyroidities and hypothyreouses is resisted in clean-up workers in dynamic observation. Highly morbidity of bronchopulmonal system and blood circulation system is revealed. High level of compensative and adaptive reactions of immune and hemopoietic systems is notified. Excesses of leukemias and lymphomas in inhabitants of the contamination territories is not demonstrated but tendency for increasing quantity cases of oncohematological diseases (leukemias, lymphomas, MDS) among clean-up workers IV-VII 1986 are absent. A dynamic of health state of children injured as a result of Chernobyl accident is characterized with continues negative tendencies. (author)

  5. Cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy: what research is needed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wondergem, Jan [International Atomic Energy Agency, Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, Division of Human Health, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Vienna (Austria); Boerma, Marjan [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kodama, Kazunori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Stewart, Fiona A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Biological Stress Response (H3), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Trott, Klaus R.

    2013-11-15

    The authors of this report met at the Head Quarter of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria, on 2-4 July 2012, for intensive discussions of an abundance of original publications on new epidemiological studies on cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy and radiobiological experiments as well as several comprehensive reviews that were published since the previous meeting by experts sponsored by the IAEA in June 2006. The data necessitated a re-evaluation of the situation with special emphasis on the consequences current experimental and clinical data may have for clinical oncology/radiotherapy and radiobiological research. The authors jointly arrived at the conclusions and recommendations presented here. (orig.)

  6. Effects of low doses of gamma radiation on DNA synthesis in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.

    1983-01-01

    Rats of one or ten days of age were irradiated with low doses of gamma radiation, and synthesis of DNA was examined by the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine in the cerebellum and the rest of the brain in vivo. DNA synthesis was depressed in both parts of the brain but the effects were larger in cerebellum. A minimum was found about 10 hours after irradiation in the older rats and later (18 h) in the younger ones. The dose response in 10 day-old rats, was biphasic and showed that cerebellum was more affected. Autoradiographs showed that fewer cells entered the cycle and those synthesizing showed a depressed rate of synthesis. These findings are discussed in relation to induction of cell death. (Auth.)

  7. Effect of kasoline on male rats reproductive system in control and after irradiation in low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, E.F.; Vereshchako, G.G.; Khodosovskaya, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    It was studied morphofunctional status of reproductive system and several haematological parameters of male rats after administration of kasoline without any another treatment or before following irradiation in low dose (1 Gy). Kasoline is biological active substance obtained from castoreum. In intact animals this medical drug heightened relative weight of testis, epidydimisis, prostate gland and seminal vesicles; number of mature sex cells, extracted from epidydimisis and DNA contents in testiculare tissue. Kasoline possesses specific radioprotective properties that resulted in restoration of leukocytes number in blood, in grown number of spermatozoids, extracted from epidydimisis, and considerable increase of DNA value in the testis tissue. Obtained effects were more prominent at 30 and 90 days after irradiation. (authors)

  8. Cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy: what research is needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, Jan; Boerma, Marjan; Kodama, Kazunori; Stewart, Fiona A.; Trott, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this report met at the Head Quarter of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria, on 2-4 July 2012, for intensive discussions of an abundance of original publications on new epidemiological studies on cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy and radiobiological experiments as well as several comprehensive reviews that were published since the previous meeting by experts sponsored by the IAEA in June 2006. The data necessitated a re-evaluation of the situation with special emphasis on the consequences current experimental and clinical data may have for clinical oncology/radiotherapy and radiobiological research. The authors jointly arrived at the conclusions and recommendations presented here. (orig.)

  9. Basic study on low dose radiation effect: SOD activity of immune organs and hemogram in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kaneko, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeo; Nakano, Kazushiro; Edamatsu, Rei; Mori, Akitane.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of low dose radiation on SOD activities of immune organs such as thymus, spleen, bone marrow in rats and hematological findings changes. Animals were exposed to radiation in a wholebody fashion, 4 hours before sacrifice. SOD activities in thymus and bone marrow cells from the rats X-ray irradiated at doses of 0.25∼0.50 Gy/10 min were enhanced in comparison with those of non-irradiated rats. The enhancement was also observed in spleen cells obtained from group of rats irradiated at 0.05 Gy/10 min. Radiation exposure with over 0.50 Gy/10 min gave rats inhibitory responses in those immune organs. The changes in homogram were not observed with γ-ray exposure of less than 0.10 Gy/10 min. (author)

  10. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in bone marrow was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases of the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. However, there were no remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells. (author)

  11. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of CFU-S colonies on day 12, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  12. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  13. Effects of sparse sampling schemes on image quality in low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Sajid; Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong; Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Various scanning methods and image reconstruction algorithms are actively investigated for low-dose computed tomography (CT) that can potentially reduce a health-risk related to radiation dose. Particularly, compressive-sensing (CS) based algorithms have been successfully developed for reconstructing images from sparsely sampled data. Although these algorithms have shown promises in low-dose CT, it has not been studied how sparse sampling schemes affect image quality in CS-based image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present several sparse-sampling schemes for low-dose CT, quantitatively analyze their data property, and compare effects of the sampling schemes on the image quality.Methods: Data properties of several sampling schemes are analyzed with respect to the CS-based image reconstruction using two measures: sampling density and data incoherence. The authors present five different sparse sampling schemes, and simulated those schemes to achieve a targeted dose reduction. Dose reduction factors of about 75% and 87.5%, compared to a conventional scan, were tested. A fully sampled circular cone-beam CT data set was used as a reference, and sparse sampling has been realized numerically based on the CBCT data.Results: It is found that both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality in the CS-based reconstruction. Among the sampling schemes the authors investigated, the sparse-view, many-view undersampling (MVUS)-fine, and MVUS-moving cases have shown promising results. These sampling schemes produced images with similar image quality compared to the reference image and their structure similarity index values were higher than 0.92 in the mouse head scan with 75% dose reduction.Conclusions: The authors found that in CS-based image reconstructions both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality, and suggest that a sampling scheme should be devised and optimized by use of these indicators. With this strategic

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of 125I seeds for low-dose-rate irradiation of PANC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jidong; Wang Junjie; Zhuang Hongqing; Liao Anyan; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relative biological effectiveness(RBE) of National Model 6711 125 I seeds and the response patterns of PANC-1 exposed to 125 I seeds irradiation. Methods: PANC-1 cells in exponential growth were irradiated at initial dose rate of 2.59 cGy/h in vitro and exposed to 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. Meanwhile, the other part of cells were exposed to the same doses by 60 Co at dose rate of 2.21 Gy/min. After irradiation, the cells were stained by trypan blue to measure the cellular mortality rate and to compare the changes along with plating times of 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after 4 Gy. The colonies were counted to obtain the plating efficiencies by colony-forming assay and the cell surviving faction was calculated to plot cell survival curves, and RBE of 125 I seeds relative to 60 Co was determined. Results: The cell death rate for continuous low- dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds was greater than 60 Co at the same doses above or equal to 4 Gy. After 4 Gy irradiation, the cellular mortality rates were increased with times. The difference was significant between 125 I seeds and 60 Co. The survival fractions of 125 I were lower than those of 60 Co, and the RBE of 125 I relative to 60 Co was determined to be 1.45. Conclusion: The cell-killing effects for continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by 125 I seeds are greater than acute high-dose-rate of 60 Co. (authors)

  15. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-01-01

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A vy ) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure ( vy locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined

  16. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  17. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  18. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in μSv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  19. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  20. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on life span prolongation of human premature-aging syndrome model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2006-01-01

    We previously showed that Type II diabetes model mice prolonged of their life span by life long low dose rate irradiation. We also found that antioxidant function in variety tissues of some strain of mice were enhancement after low dose/low dose rate irradiation. The prolongation of life span might depend on certain damaged level of reactive oxygen species. We thought the effect of the prolongation was due to the enhancement of the antioxidant activities after irradiation. We investigated whether the enhancement of antioxidant activities after low dose rate irradiation had an effect on life span prolongation. Four-week-old female human premature-aging syndrome model mice, kl/kl (klotho) mice, which the life span of this model mouse is about 65 days, were irradiated with gamma rays at 0.35, 0.70 or 1.2 mGy/hr. The 0.70 mGy/hr-irradiated group remarkably effected on the prolongation of their life span. Some mice of the group were extremely survived for about and more 100 days. Antioxidant activities in the irradiated groups were enhancement by low dose rate irradiation, however the dependence of the dose rates were not clearly difference. These results suggest that the antioxidant activities in this model mouse were enhanced by the low dose rate irradiation, and may make it possible to prolong the life span of this mouse. (author)

  1. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  2. Proceedings of the 8. LOWRAD: International conference on the effects of low doses and very low doses of ionizing radiation on human health and biotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental papers are presented in these proceedings covering the following subjects: radiation protection, dosimetry, radiation dosimetry, cells, technetium, plutonium, uranium, thorium, low dose irradiation, radiation doses, cesium, radiation chemistry, nuclear medicine, safety and occupational exposure, neoplasm, cytology and radioisotopes

  3. A systematic review of Bisphenol A "low dose" studies in the context of human exposure: a case for establishing standards for reporting "low-dose" effects of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Hanson-Drury, Sesha

    2013-12-01

    Human exposure to the chemical Bisphenol A is almost ubiquitous in surveyed industrialized societies. Structural features similar to estrogen confer the ability of Bisphenol A (BPA) to bind estrogen receptors, giving BPA membership in the group of environmental pollutants called endocrine disruptors. References by scientists, the media, political entities, and non-governmental organizations to many toxicity studies as "low dose" has led to the belief that exposure levels in these studies are similar to humans, implying that BPA is toxic to humans at current exposures. Through systematic, objective comparison of our current, and a previous compilation of the "low-dose" literature to multiple estimates of human external and internal exposure levels, we found that the "low-dose" moniker describes exposures covering 8-12 orders of magnitude, the majority (91-99% of exposures) being greater than the upper bound of human exposure in the general infant, child and adult U.S. Population. "low dose" is therefore a descriptor without specific meaning regarding human exposure. Where human exposure data are available, for BPA and other environmental chemicals, reference to toxicity study exposures by direct comparison to human exposure would be more informative, more objective, and less susceptible to misunderstanding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced low dose rate radiation effect test on typical bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Minbo; Chen Wei; Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Huang Shaoyan; Sheng Jiangkun; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun

    2014-01-01

    Two types of bipolar transistors and nine types bipolar integrated circuit were selected in the irradiation experiment at different "6"0Co γ dose rate. The base current of bipolar transistor and input bias current of amplifier and comparator was measured, low dose enhance factor of test device was obtained. The results show that bipolar device have enhanced low dose rate sensitivity, enhancement factor of bipolar integrated circuit was bigger than that of transistor, and enhanced low dose rate sensitivity greatly varied with different structure and process of bipolar device. (authors)

  5. Synergistic Effects of Ad-Libitum Low-Dose Fructose Drinking and Low-Dose Streptozotocin Treatment in Wistar Rats: A Mild Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asie Sadeghi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To develop a convenient animal model of T2D by pretreatment with low-dose 10% w/v fructose (FRC solution followed by the injection of low doses of streptozotocin (STZ in Wistar rats. For this 8-week experimental study; rats were first fed a standard chow ad-libitum diet and either tap water (n=40 or 10% w/v FRC solution (n=40 for 4 weeks. Next, rats in each category were randomly allocated to 4 subgroups (n=10 each of low-dose STZ (25,35, and 45 mg/kg. The final mean fasting blood sugar (FBG of FRC+STZ45 (197±55.87 mg/dl were significantly higher than that of the STZ45 (P=0.015 and FRC (P=0.019 groups. FRC+STZ45 showed the highest insulin resistance demonstrated by insulin tolerance test [area under the curve (AUC of insulin tolerance test; P<0.05]. AUC was not significantly different between the STZ45 and non-STZ groups and between FRC and non-FRC fed groups. Furthermore, FBG levels did not differ between FRC and non-FRC groups. Body weight measurement showed that the FRC+STZ45 group had the lowest body weight compared to all other groups. Our data provide the evidence that FRC and STZ45 synergistically could induce hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in Wistar rats. Here we presented a feasible model for initial forms of T2D by employing pretreatment with low-dose FRC solution and treatment with low-dose STZ.

  6. Low dose radiation effects: an integrative european approach (Risc-Rad Project) coordinated by the Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, L.

    2006-01-01

    RISC-RAD (Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by ionizing Radiations) is an Integrated Project funded by the European Commission under 6. Framework Programme / EURATOM. RISC-RAD started on 1. January 2004 for a duration of four years. Coordinated by Cea (Dr Laure Sabatier), it involves 11 European countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) and 29 research institutions. Objectives: Exposures to low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are very frequent in normal living environment, at work places, in industry and in medicine. Effects of these exposures on human health cannot be reliably assessed by epidemiological methods, nor is thoroughly understood by biologists. RISC-RAD project proposes to help bridging the gap of scientific knowledge about these effects. To achieve this goal, a necessary key step is to understand the basic mechanisms by which radiation induces cancer. Studying this multistage process in an integrated way, the project offers a new biological approach characterised by and clear-cut and objective-driven scientific policy: the project is focused on the effects of low doses (less than 100 mSv) and protracted doses of radiation. It aims at identifying new parameters that take into account the differences in radiation responses between individuals. A group of modelers works closely with the experimental teams in order to better quantify the risks associated with low and protracted doses. Research work is divided into five work packages interacting closely with each other. WP1 is dedicated to DNA damage. Ionizing Radiation (IR) produce a broad spectrum of base modifications and DNA strand breaks of different kinds, among which double-strand breaks and 'clustered damage' which is thought to be a major feature in biological effectiveness of IR. The aim of Work Package 1 is to improve understanding of the initial DNA damage induced by

  7. Anti-tumor effect of total body irradiation of low doses on WHT/Ht mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Miyako; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1987-01-01

    The effect of low dose (0.05 - 1.0 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) on non-tumor bearing and tumor bearing mice were investigated. Mice received TBI of 0.1 Gy during 6 - 12 hours before tumor cell inoculation demonstrated to need larger number of tumor cells (approximately 2.5 times) for 50 per cent tumor incidence, compared to recipient mice not to receive TBI. On the other hand, in tumor bearing mice given 0.1 Gy of TBI only tumor cell killing effect was not detected, however enhancement of tumor cell killing effect and prolonged growth delay were observed when tumor bearing mice were treated with 0.1 Gy of TBI in combined with local irradiation on tumors, especially cell killing effect was remarkable in dose range over 6 Gy of local exposure. The mechanism of the effect of 0.1 Gy TBI is considered to be host mediated reactions from the other our experimental results. (author)

  8. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  9. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  10. The Protective Effects of Oral Low-dose Quercetin on Diabetic Nephropathy in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabele Beserra Santos Gomes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major causes of end-stage renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg demonstrated renoprotective, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in the C57BL/6J model of diabetic nephropathy, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE-/-. Methods: DN was induced by streptozotocin (100 mg/kg/day, for 3 days in adult apoE-/-mice. Six weeks later, the mice were divided into the following groups: diabetic apoE-/- mice treated with quercetin (DQ, 10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, diabetic ApoE-/- mice treated with vehicle (DV and non-treated non-diabetic (ND mice.Results: Quercetin treatment caused a reduction in polyuria (~30%, glycemia (~25%, abolished the hypertriglyceridemia and had significant effects on renal function, including decreased proteinuria (~15% and creatininemia (~30%, which were accompanied by beneficial effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight.Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical and morphological modifications. Thus, this translational study highlights the importance of quercetin as a potential nutraceutical for the management of DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia.

  11. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on early sexual development in male and female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Boberg, Julie

    2014-01-01

    the influence of BPA on early sexual development in male and female rats at dose levels covering both regulatory no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) (5 and 50 mg/kg bw per day) as well as doses in the microgram per kilogram dose range (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg bw per day). Time-mated Wistar rats (n=22) were...... in both sexes indicates effects on prenatal sexual development and provides new evidence of low-dose adverse effects of BPA in rats in the microgram per kilogram dose range. The NOAEL in this study is clearly below 5 mg/kg for BPA, which is used as the basis for establishment of the current tolerable......Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely detected in human urine and blood. BPA has been reported to impair many endpoints for reproductive and neurological development; however, it is controversial whether BPA has effects in the microgram per kilogram dose range. The aim of the current study was to examine...

  12. Evaluating low dose ionizing radiation effects on gene expression in human skin biopsy cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Z.; Schwietert, C.; Stern, R.L.; Lehnert, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    Significant biological effects can occur in animals, animal cells, immortalized human cell lines, and primary human cells after exposure to doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in the <1-10 cGy region. However it is unclear how these observations mimic or even pertain to the actual in vivo condition in humans, though such knowledge is required for reducing the uncertainty of assessing human risks due to low dose IR (LDIR) exposures. Further, low dose effects have increasing clinical relevance in the radiotherapeutic management of cancer as the volume of tissue receiving only LDIR increases as more targeted radiotherapy (i.e. IMRT) becomes more widely used. Thus, human translational data must be obtained with which to correlate in vitro experimental findings and evaluate their 'real-life' applicability. To evaluate LDIR effects in human tissue we have obtained freshly explanted full thickness human skin samples obtained from aesthetic surgery, and subjected them to ex vivo irradiation as a translational research model system of a complex human tissue. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposures were delivered at 1, 10, or 100 cGy. The temporal response to IR was assessed by harvesting RNA at multiple time points out to 24 hours post IR. Gene expression changes were assessed by real time PCR. We have shown that RNA can be reliably extracted with fidelity from 3 mm diameter punch biopsies of human tissue and provide good quality sample for the real time PCR evaluation. Genes of interest include those reported to have altered expression following LDIR from in vitro cell culture models. These include genes associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and various cytokines. These feasibility studies in human skin irradiated ex vivo, have demonstrated that gene expression can be measured accurately from very small human tissue samples, thus setting the stage for biopsy acquisition of tissue irradiated in vivo from patients-volunteers. The clinical study has begun and the data from

  13. Maternal and neonatal effects of adding morphine to low-dose bupivacaine for epidural labor analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostbil, A; Celik, M; Alici, H A; Erdem, A F; Aksoy, M; Ahiskalioglu, A

    2014-01-01

    Labor is one of the most painful experiences a woman may face during her lifetime. One of the most effective methods used for eliminating this pain is epidural analgesia. The aim of this study to determine the impact of adding morphine to low-dose bupivacaine epidural anesthesia on labor and neonatal outcomes, and maternal side effects. This is a prospective randomized double-blind study comparing two regimens of anesthetic agents used for epidural anesthesia in labor. A total of 120 pregnant women were randomized into two groups with 60 subjects in each study arm. A catheter was inserted, and 0.1% bupivacaine + 2 μg/mL fentanyl in 15 mL saline were given to Group bupivacaine-fentanyl (Group BF), while 0.0625% bupivacaine + 2 μg/ml fentanyl + 2 mg morphine in 15 mL saline were given to Group bupivacaine-fentanyl-morphine (Group BFM) with no test dosing from the needle. No morphine was added to the subsequent epidural injections in Group BFM. The total dose of bupivacaine was significantly lower in Group BFM relative to Group BF (P = 0.0001). The visual analogu scalescores at 15, 30, and 45 min were significantly lower in Group BF compared to thosein Group BFM (P = 0.0001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.006, respectively). The second stage of labor was significantly shorter in Group BFM relative to Group BF (P = 0.027 and P = 0.003, respectively). The satisfaction with analgesia following the first dose was higher in the nonmorphine group (P = 0.0001). However, maternal postpartum satisfaction was similar in both groups. Either nausea or vomiting was recorded in eight patients in Group BFM. We believe that epidural analgesia comprised of a low-dose local anaesthetic and 2 mg morphine provides a painless labor that significantly reducesthe use of local anesthetic without changing the efficiency of the analgesic, ensuring the mother's satisfaction without leading to an adverse effect on the mother or foetus, while mildly (but significantly) shortening the second stage of

  14. Elevated sodium chloride concentrations enhance the bystander effects induced by low dose alpha-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Zhu Lingyan; Jiang Erkang; Wang Jun; Chen Shaopeng; Bao Linzhi; Zhao Ye; Xu An; Yu Zengliang; Wu Lijun

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high NaCl can be genotoxic, either alone or combined with irradiation. However, little is known about the relationship between environmental NaCl at elevated conditions and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). RIBE, which has been considered as non-targeted bystander responses, has been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. In the present study, RIBE under the elevated NaCl culture condition was assessed in AG 1522 cells by both the induction of γ-H2AX, a reliable marker of DNA double-strand break (DSB) for the early process ( G -methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, the induced fraction of foci-positive cells was effectively inhibited both in 0.2 cGy α-particle irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions under either normal or elevated NaCl conditions. These results suggested that the cultures with elevated NaCl medium magnified the damage effects induced by the low dose α-particle irradiation and nitric oxide generated by irradiation was also very important in this process

  15. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-10-11

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (<10 cGy) during early gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the increased use of CT scans in disease diagnosis, increased number of people predicted to live and work in space, and the present concern about radiological terrorism. We showed for the first time that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the A{sup vy} locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in

  16. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  17. Immunologic mechanism of the suppressive effect of low dose radiation on thymic lymphoma induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiujuan; Yang Ying; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    To study immunologic mechanism of the suppressive effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on thymic lymphoma (TL) induced by high dose radiation (HDR). The authors adopted the model that C57BL/6J mice were administered whole body irradiation with 1.75 Gy X-rays one time every week for 4 weeks to induce TL. It was examined that splenic NK cytotoxic activity, IL-2 and γ-IFN secretion activity, peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and its TNF-α secretion activity in mice with different dose 1 month after irradiation. The results showed that all the immunologic functions mentioned above in mice given 75 mGy 12 h before 1.75 Gy every time were higher than that in mice given only 1.75 Gy, and approached to the sham-irradiation mice. It suggested that the suppressive effect of LDR on TL induced by HDR may be related to the adaptive response induced by LDR and decreasing immunological functions damage caused by HDR

  18. Effects of low dose radiation pretreatment on radiation injuried brain's free radicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fuqi; Wang Cheng; Xie Hong; Tian Ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation pretreatment on radiation in- juried brain's free radicle to provide some useful data of brain radiation injury protection. Methods: One hundred mGy was selected as the pretreatment does, 25 Gy was selected as the challenge does. Experiment rats were divided into three groups randomly, group one as simple group:the group irradiated without exposing to pre-irradiation; group two as 6 h-group: the group irradiated with LDR pretreatment 6 h before exposing to 25 Gy irradiation; group three as 24 h-group:the group irradiated with LDR pretreatment 24 h before 25 Gy irradiation. The observation was done 6 hour's after irradiation, the effect of LDR pretreatment on increasing activity of the superoxide dismutase(SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde(MDA) after the brain tissue homogenate were detected. Results: Com- pared with the simple group, the group with LDR pretreatment showed increasing of SOD and decreasing of MDA at the 6th hour after 25Gy irradiation. In addition, there was no difference between the 6 h-group and the 24 h-group. Conclusion: LDR pretreatment can increase SOD and decrease MDA in some period. It could infer that the suitable LDR pretreatment could play a protective role in the brain radiation injury. (authors)

  19. [Conscious sedation and amnesic effect of intravenous low-dose midazolam prior to spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi; Ohashi, Naotsugu; Kurita, Satoshi; Nakatani, Keiji; Nagata, Noboru; Toyoda, Yoshiroh

    2008-06-01

    The pain associated with spinal puncture is severe, and the memory of this uncomfortable procedure often deters patients from undergoing the procedure again. Therefore, it is important to make the patient as comfortable as possible when this procedure is performed. We administrated a low-dose (1-2.5 mg) of midazolam intravenously several minutes before conducting a spinal-tap in 200 patients undergoing elective surgery of the lower limb. The dose of midazolam used was based on the patient's age and weight, and we investigated remaining of a memory concerning the spinal-tap procedure and side effects of midazolam at the end of surgery. Memory of the spinal-tap procedure remained in 14.0%, 1.9%, and 32.7% of the patients who had received benzodiazepine preoperatively and in 25.0%, 40.0%, and 60.9% of the patients who hadn't received benzodiazepine preoperatively in the age group or =70 years, respectively. No patient experienced severe respiratory depression, but an excessive sedation or restlessness was experienced in 1.6%, 4.8%, and 5.2% of the patients. In the patients aged memory concerning the spinal-tap procedure; however, it is important to note that the number of side effects associated with this procedure increases in patients aged > or =60 years.

  20. Effect of low doses gamma irradiation on seed, bulblets and bulbs of onion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, Mohammad

    1991-10-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of certain crops. To the best of our knowledge the feasibility of this treatment has not yet been tested on onion in Syria. The effect of low doses gamma irradiation on onion seeds, bulblets and bulbs of two local varieties, red and white, was studied during three consecutive seasons (1986 - 1988). Air dried seeds were irradiated by gamma rays from 137 Cs source. Five, 10, 15, 20 and 30 GY, were applied at dose rate of 9.8 Gy/min. The irradiation of onion bulblets and bulbs were carried out with gamma-rays from 60 Co source at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. using 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Gy. Within 7 - 10 days after irradiation, both controlled and irradiated seeds, bulblets and bulbs were sown in the field in complete randomized block design with 4 replicates. Irradiation of seeds with doses of 5, 10 and 15 Gy led to highly significant increases in bulblets yield in the three seasons. The increases ranged from 14.5 to 22.1 for red variety and from 16.2 to 22.3 for white variety. The irradiation of bulblets with 1 and 2 Gy increase significantly the yield of bulbs by 21.6 - 26.0% for red variety and 21.6 - 24.4% for white variety. A considerable increase in seed yield was obtained after irradiation of bulbs with 1 and 2 Gy doses. The average increment was about 21.0% for both varieties. Large scale application were performed in 1989 and 1990 using doses of 10 Gy for seeds and 1 Gy for bulblets and bulbs. A considerable increase in the yield was obtained. The average percentage increment was 16.9% and 23.3% for seeds, 18.6 and 20.9% for bulblets, 24.8 and 27.3% for bulbs, for red and white varieties respectively. Therefore, presowing irradiation of seeds, bulblets and bulbs of onion with low doses of gamma-rays (5 - 15 Gy for seeds and 1 - 2 Gy for bulblets and bulbs) can be of practical application resulting in improvement of yield of

  1. Effect of low doses of irradiation on the carotenoids in head to eat carrots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, K.S.C.; Lima, A.L.S.; Freitas, L.C.; Della-Modesta, R.C.; Godoy, R.L.O.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims was to evaluate the effect of low doses of g radiation on the total carotenoids, α and β-carotene content in minimally processed carrots, during the shelflife. Carrots are the mains vegetable source of carotenoids provitamin A (α and β-carotene). According to the Family Budget Survey (FBS) carried out in the Brazilian Southeast, within the roots and tubers group, carrots are widely consumed. The carotenoid stability varies largely during the stages of processing and storage, depending upon structure, temperature, oxygen availability, light exposure, humidity content, water activity and acid, metal anti-oxidant and pro-oxidant presence. The minimally processed carrots in this experiment were manually peeled, rinsed, cutted into diskis, packaged under 5% O 2 / 10% CO 2 and 21% O 2 (sintetic air), g ionizing radiation treatments was carried out with a 137 Cs source, of 0,25, 0,50, 0,75 and 1,0kGy doses, and shelf-stored at 5°C for 24 days. Total carotenoids quantification was by 449nm spectrophotometer. Determination of a and β-carotenes was made by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The different treatments and control group were, too, evaluated by analysing of colour and volatiles, by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy with solid phase microextration (CG-MS/SPME), for study the significant carotenoids losses during the process [pt

  2. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Cranial Base: Is Low-Dose Radiotherapy Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease of unknown etiology with different clinical features. A standardised treatment has not been established so far. Case Report. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient who initially presented with hypesthesia of the fifth cranial nerve and pain of the left ear. Diagnosis showed a tumour localised in the cranial base with a maximum diameter of 4.1 cm. The diagnosis of LCH was confirmed histologically by biopsy. Diagnostic workup verified the cranial lesion as the sole manifestation of LCH. A total dose of 9 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy was delivered. The symptoms dissolved completely within 6 months after radiation; repeated CT and MRI scans revealed a reduction in size of the lesion and a remineralisation of the bone. After a followup of 13 years the patient remains free of symptoms without relapse or any side effects from therapy. Discussion. Due to the indolent course of the disease with a high rate of spontaneous remissions the choice of treatment strongly depends on the individual clinical situation. In the presented case low-dose radiotherapy was sufficient to obtain long-term local control in a region with critical structures and tissues.

  3. The regulatory effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Ikaros-autotaxin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hana; Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Ikaros, a transcription factor containing zinc-finger motif, has known as a critical regulator of hematopoiesis in immune system. Ikaros protein modulates the transcription of target genes via binding to the regulatory elements of the genes promoters. However the regulatory function of Ikaros in other organelle except nuclear remains to be determined. This study explored radiation-induced modulatory function of Ikaros in cytoplasm. The results showed that Ikaros protein lost its DNA binding ability after LDIR (low-dose ionizing radiation) exposure. Cell fractionation and Western blot analysis showed that Ikaros protein was translocated into cytoplasm from nuclear by LDIR. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. We identified Autotaxin as a novel protein which potentially interacts with Ikaros through in vitro protein-binding screening. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that Ikaros and Autotaxin are able to bind each other. Autotaxin is a crucial enzyme generating lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a phospholipid mediator, which has potential regulatory effects on immune cell growth and motility. Our results indicate that LDIR potentially regulates immune system via protein-protein interaction of Ikaros and Autotaxin.

  4. Effect of low dose gamma-radiation upon Newcastle disease virus antibody level in chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Gottstein, Z.; Ciglar Grozdanic, I.; Matanovic, K.; Miljanic, S.; Mazija, H.; Kraljevic, P.

    2009-01-01

    The specific antibody response against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs exposed to low dose gamma-radiation was studied. Materials and methods: Two groups of eggs of commercial meat chicken lines were irradiated with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation, respectively. The same number of eggs unexposed to gamma-radiation served as controls. After hatching the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation was not vaccinated while the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation was vaccinated on the 14 day. Specific serum anti-Newcastle disease virus antibodies were quantified by the hemagglutination inhibition assay with 4 HA units of Newcastle disease virus La Sota strain. Result: Specific antibody titres against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation and vaccinated on the 14 th day significantly increased on the 28 th day. Specific antibody titre against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation and non-vaccinated was significantly higher on the 1 st and 14 th day. Conclusion: Acute irradiation of heavy breeding chicken eggs with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation could have a stimulative effect on humoral immunity in chickens.

  5. The effect of single low-dose dexamethasone on vomiting during awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Morioka, Nobutada; Maruyama, Takashi; Komayama, Noriaki; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kawamata, Takakazu; Ozaki, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative vomiting leads to serious respiratory complications that could influence the surgical decision-making process for awake craniotomy. However, the use of antiemetics is still limited in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactically administered single low-dose dexamethasone on the incidence of vomiting during awake craniotomy. The frequency of hyperglycemia was also examined. We conducted a retrospective case review of awake craniotomy for glioma resection between 2012 and 2015. Of the 124 patients, 91 were included in the analysis. Dexamethasone was not used in 43 patients and the 48 remaining patients received an intravenous bolus of 4.95 mg dexamethasone at anesthetic induction. Because of stable operating conditions, no one required conscious sedation throughout functional mapping and tumor resection. Although dexamethasone pretreatment reduced the incidence of intraoperative vomiting (P = 0.027), the number of patients who complained of nausea was comparable (P = 0.969). No adverse events related to vomiting occurred intraoperatively. Baseline blood glucose concentration did not differ between each group (P = 0.143), but the samples withdrawn before emergence (P = 0.018), during the awake period (P awake craniotomy cases. However, as even a small dose of dexamethasone increases the risk for hyperglycemia, antiemetic prophylaxis with dexamethasone should be administered after careful consideration. Monitoring of perioperative blood glucose concentration is also necessary.

  6. The effect of low-dose neutron irradiation on extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tiehe; Lu Yongjie; Chai Mingsheng; Peng Wulin; Yang Yifang; Pan Yan; Chen Jinguo

    2003-01-01

    Projective: To study the effect of neutron irradiation on extracellular matrix. Methods: 120 male wistar rats were divided into four groups at random, and then exposed to neutron of 252 Cf-source at the doses of 0, 0.29, 0.62 and 1.20 Gy, respectively. After the exposure of 3 days, 1 month and 2 months, the rats were sacrificed and lung tissue specimens stored at -30 degree C. Hyaluronan, laminin, type III procollagen and type IV collagen in the lung tissue were detected by the method of radioimmunoassay. Results: The differences of the levels of hyaluronan in lung tissue among the groups were unsignificant. The levels of laminin in 0.29, 0.62 and 1.20 Gy groups after the 3-day exposure were remarkably different to those of the control group, and unable to recover completely even 2 months after the exposure. The levels of type IV collagen in higher three irradiated groups were all higher, but not significantly. The levels of type III procollagen in the early stage after exposure were higher, and later they lowered. Conclusion: The levels of some components of extracellular matrix in the lung tissue of rat can be changed by low-dose of neutron irradiation, but their variational modes and degrees depend on the dose of neutron irradiation and the length of period after exposure

  7. Evaluation the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia complicates up to 3% of pregnancies in developing countries. Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in pathogenesis of preeclampsia. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of low-dose aspirin on endothelial dysfunction in preeclamptic patients. Materials and Methods: in this triple-blind randomized clinical trial, enrolled patients were divided randomly into two groups. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA 80 mg or placebo will be taken daily by oral administration from the initiation of diagnosis until 2 months after delivery. Every patient's flow-mediated dilation (FMD were evaluated at the beginning of study and 2 months after delivery with the same experienced operator at a same period of the time (3–5 pm by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic. T-test or Mann–Whitney test was used in the comparison of means between the intervention and placebo groups. To compare FMD in each group, before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Results: Mean value of FMD in intervention (9.61 ± 5.58 and control group (9.40 ± 4.33 have no significant differences before drug consumption (P = 0.089. FMD in intervention group significantly increased after ASA consumption ([9.61 ± 5.58 vs. 13.65 ± 7.91] [P = 0.044]. Conclusion: Increase mean of FMD in intervention group shows that this supplement can improve endothelial function.

  8. Effect of continuous low-dose γ-irradiation on rat Sertoli cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamtchouing, P.; Papadopoulos, V.; Drosdowsky, M.A.; Carreau, S.; Pinon-Lataillade, G.; Maas, J.; Guillaumin, J.M.; Bardos, P.; Perreau, C.; Hochereau de Reviers, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous low-dose γ-irradiation of mature rats induced a progressive degeneration of the germ cells. Blood FSH increased by 127, 176 and 214%, respectively, after 55, 70 and 85 days of treatment when compared to FSH levels in control rats (8.50 ± 0.60 ng/ml); conversely, serum LH and testosterone levels were unchanged. The Sertoli cell function was affected by the treatment from 70 days on, as attested by androgen binding protein (ABP) and transferrin secretions which diminished 35-40%. Serum ABP levels were not altered, whatever the duration of irradiation, even though epididymal ABP contents (as well as concentrations) diminished 34-60% when compared to those of the controls. Moreover, in purified Leydig cells, LH-stimulated intracellular cAMP levels, which were decreased by seminiferous tubule medium (STM) from control rats, were enhanced in presence of STM from treated animals. Testosterone output was stimulated 9-fold in presence of oLH and further increased (46-76%) from stages XIV-V by STM prepared from control and irradiated rats, respectively. After 85 days the STM effects on both cAMP and testosterone syntheses were zero. These results demonstrate a probable alteration of Sertoli cell function after irradiation, but also a role of the germ cells in the regulation of the synthesis of ABP, transferrin and Sertoli cell paracrine factors

  9. Effect of low dose irradiation on expression of membrane molecules of T lymphocytes in cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Yang Guang; Jia Tingzhen

    2001-01-01

    The membrane molecules expression of T lymphocytes of cord blood after low dose irradiation (LDI) was investigated. Freshly isolated lymphocytes from cord blood were irradiated with 62 mGy γ-ray. At different time (4 h, 12 h, 24 h) after irradiation the changes of TCR + , CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells were examined by flow cytometry with direct immunofluorescence, respectively. The experimental results showed that the proportion of CD3 + , TCR + /CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + cells increased significantly after LDI, with the most obvious enhancement noted in the 24 h experimental group. The ratio of CD4 to CD8 showed no significant changes. It is suggested that expedition of the maturation, activation and signal transduction of T lymphocytes from cord blood can be induced by irradiation of 62 mGy γ-ray. So the reconstruction of immune functions after cord blood transplantation can be accelerated, enhancing the graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and preventing the tumor from relapsing

  10. Utilization of the higher plants in a study on hereditary effect of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Jun

    1976-01-01

    Some problems in a study of hereditary effect of low-dose irradiation, which used the higher plants (tradescantia, peas, etc.) as materials, were mentioned. Conditions to be used as materials were mentioned as follows: 1) the materials must have high radio-sensitivity, 2) the natural mutation of the materials must be low, 3) hereditary uniformity and stability of genes in the materials were important, and 4) in case of considering the materials as environmental radiation monitors, the observation period must be long and the duration from exposure to detection of mutation must be short. Tradescantia has most of these conditions, but the greatest fault is that the object of its observation is mutation of somatic cells, and hereditary study is impossible. Therefore, it is necessary to find out other materials in order to solve the problem whether there is a difference in relative frequency of chromosomal abnormalities, which occurrs in germinal cells and is transmitted to posterity, between low and high doses or not. (Serizawa, K.)

  11. Protective effect of low dose caffeine on psychological stress and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Özgür Kasımay; Ellek, Nurfitnat; Salehin, Nabila; Hamamcı, Rabia; Keleş, Hülya; Kayalı, Damla Gökçeoğlu; Akakın, Dilek; Yüksel, Meral; Özbeyli, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine is an adrenergic antagonist that enhances neuronal activity. Psychological stress depresses cognitive function. To investigate the effects of acute and chronic low dose caffeine on anxiety-like behavior and cognitive functions of acute or chronic psychological stressed rats. Acute or chronic caffeine (3mg/kg) was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats (200-250g, n=42) before acute (cat odor) and chronic variable psychological stress (restraint overcrowding stress, elevated plus maze, cat odor, forced swimming) induction. Anxiety and cognitive functions were evaluated by hole-board and object recognition tests. The brain glutathione and malondialdehyde assays, myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), luminol and lucigenin activity and histological examination were done. ANOVA and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. The depressed cognitive function with chronic stress exposure and the increased anxiety-like behavior with both stress inductions were improved via both caffeine applications (pcaffeine pretreatments in chronic stressed rats, and chronic caffeine in acute stressed ones reduced the elevated myeloperoxidase activities (pcaffeine (pcaffeine (pcaffeine decreased SOD activity (pcaffeine. The increased anxiety-like behavior and depleted cognitive functions under stress conditions were improved with both acute and predominantly chronic caffeine pretreatments by decreasing oxidative damage parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive

  13. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive.

  14. Is there a way to resolve the controversy on low dose effects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The controversy which is addressed in this paper is whether there are risks or benefits to health from exposure to low levels of ionising radiation or, indeed, whether there are any significant health effects at all. The background to this controversy was outlined in 1998 in the report of a Task Group on Low Dose Effects, convened by the International Nuclear Societies Council (INSC). For the purpose of the INSC report, low levels of radiation were defined as acute doses less than 10 mSv and chronic dose rates less than 20 mSv per year. The INSC Task Group itself concluded that, either there is no risk, or there may be health benefits from such exposures. The scientific aspects of the matter were reviewed by the author in 2001 at the IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe, in Dubrovnik, and are summarised in the next section of this paper. In Dubrovnik, the author concluded that there is at least as much evidence of beneficial health effects as harmful effects from low level radiation. Controversy on the biological effects of low level radiation continues to be polarised to an extent which should be considered unacceptable in a rational community, and it is aggravated by the multiplicity of different viewpoints from which to consider the information available on this subject. These viewpoints include not only the scientific and regulatory positions, but also public and political perceptions, and the news media; and they lead to a wide variety of views, each of which is considered to be legitimate by most of those who adopt it

  15. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  16. Effects of low dose gamma-ray radiation on the seed germination and physiological activity of vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Lee, Y. G. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, K. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    To determine the effect of low dose gamma-ray radiation on the germination rate and physiology of germinative seeds of Chinese cabbage(Brassica campestris L. cv. Hanyoreum) and radish(Raphanus sativus L. cv. Chungsukoungzoung). The germination rate of irradiation group was higher than that of the control. Especially it was highest at the early stage of induction. The germination rate of Chinese cabbage increased at 4 Gy-, 10 Gy- and 50 Gy irradiation group and that of radish increased at 2 Gy-, 6 Gy- and 10 Gy irradiation group. The seedling height of Chinese cabbage and radish increased positively in low dose irradiation group. The seedling height of Chinese cabbage was noticeably higher at 4 Gy and 10 Gy irradiation group and that of radish at 6 Gy irradiation group. The protein contents of seeds irradiated with low dose gamma-ray radiation was increased compared to that of the control especially at the early stage of induction. The enzyme activity of seeds irradiated with low dose of gamma-ray radiation was increased at 4 Gy and 10 Gy irradiation group. These results suggest that the germination and physiological activity of old seeds could be stimulated promisingly by the low dose gamma-ray radiation.

  17. Clinical characteristic of epidemic hepatitis in case of the effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kov, O.P.; Shubik, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    Clinical course of infections hepatitics B, developed on the background of pulmonary tuberculosis in people, who were subjected to chronic low dose ionizing radiation, indicated more frequent cases of severe and medium-severe forms of morbidity as compared to non-irradiated patients and those with no comitant pulmonary tuberculosis. However the reconvalescence terms, hepatitis size normalization, urine colour in different group patients did not differ essentially. The data obtained testify to the absence of significant peculiarities in the course of infections hepatitis B, combined with pulmonar tuberculosis under conditions of chronic low dose ionizing radiation. 3 refs.; 3 tabs

  18. Mechanism of suppressive effect of low dose radiation on cancer cell dissemination in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Haiqing; Li Xiuyi; Chen Yubing; Zhang Yingchun; Liu Shuzheng

    1997-01-01

    Influence of low dose radiation on immunity in C57 BL/6 mice injected with cancer cells was studied. In mice given 75 mGy WBI 24 h before injection of Lewis lung carcinoma cells or B 16 melanoma cells, the percentage of S-phase thymocytes and CD 3+ thymocytes, the splenic NK cell activity, IL-2 secretion and γIFN secretion were found to be potentiated 2∼8 day after irradiation in comparison with the sham-irradiation mice. The results suggest that low dose radiation might suppress cancer cell dissemination via the enhancement of immune reactivity

  19. Studies on the stimulating effect of low dose irradiation on lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan

    1994-01-01

    In the study, three kinds of monoclonal antibody were used to separate subsets of lymphocyte, and then the functional changes of the separated subsets after low dose irradiation (LDI) were studied. McAb CD4, CD8 and B were used to obtain CD 4 + , CD8 + and B cells respectively with 'Panning' method, the cells were irradiated with X-ray machine (200 kV, 10 mA) for 0, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 Gy. 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to reflect functional changes of subsets after LDI. The results indicated that (1) three kinds of subsets could be stimulated by LDI (within 0.2 Gy). The peak effect for CD 4 + and B cells was induced by 0.1 Gy irradiation for CD8 + cell, the peak effect dose was 0.05 Gy; (2) between 0.02 Gy and 0.2 Gy, for same dose, the stimulating effect of CD4 + was higher than that of CD8 + . This result has an important significance in demonstrating the immune mechanism of radiation hormesis. The past viewpoint suggested that immune hormesis was caused by the damage of radiosensitive T cell (Ts) after LDI. Recently, some authors proved that no change of the ratio of Ts to T H existed after LDI. In the study presented, It is found that the values of 3 H-TdR incorporation in CD4 + was bigger than that in CD8 + after LDI. Obvious stimulating effect could still be observed after 0.2 Gy irradiation, it indicated that subsets separated by McAb could have a wide stimulating dose range for LDI

  20. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  1. Radiation induced bystander effects: mechanisms and implication for low dose radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.L.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Zhou, H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction of cells in a population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each, we found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. Although the bystander observations have been well established, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. There are indications that multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon and different cell types respond differently to the bystander signaling. In confluent monolayers, there is evident that gap junctional communication is crucial in mediating the bystander effect whereas reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species have been implicated as the mediating molecules in sub-confluent cultures. Although p53 is not necessary for the expression of bystander effect, there is evident that repair deficient cells may express a higher bystander response. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signaling genes have been shown to be differentially expressed among bystander cells. The functional roles of these genes in the bystander effect will be discussed. The bystander observations imply that the relevant target for various radiobiological endpoints is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimate for low dose radiation exposure. (Work supported by NIH grants CA 49062 and CA-RR11623)

  2. Evaluation of therapeutic effect of low dose naltrexone in experimentally-induced Crohn's disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Dina Ibrahim; Osman, Afaf Sayed; Tolba, Hedayat Mahmoud; Khattab, Aida; Abdel-Salam, Lubna O; Kamel, Mahmoud M

    2016-10-01

    Crohn's disease is a relapsing inflammatory condition afflicting the digestive tract. Drugs used for treatment of Crohn's disease may be associated with serious side effects. Endogenous opioid peptides modulate inflammatory cytokine production. Opioid antagonists have been shown to play a role in healing and repair of tissues. This work was designed to detect the possible beneficial effects of opioid antagonist naltrexone in indomethacin-induced Crohn's disease in rats. Enteritis was induced in male albino rats by two subcutaneous injection of indomethacin in a dose of 7.5mg/kg 24h apart started on day one. Salfasalazine, naltrexone and their combination were administered orally from day one of induction of enteritis to day 10. Disease activity index, serum levels of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α, macroscopic and microscopic pathological scores and in vitro motility studies were evaluated. Induction of enteritis resulted in significant increase of disease activity index, significant elevation of serum levels of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α, significant deterioration of pathological scores and significant increase in the mean contractility response of the isolated ileal segments compared with normal untreated rats. Treatment with sulfasalazine, low dose of natrexone or their combination resulted in significant improvement of all measured parameters compared with enteritis group. The current finding could provide new interesting opportunity for developing new therapeutic approaches for treatment of Crohn's disease. Use of naltrexone, especially in small dose, has little side effects making it of interest for treatment of Crohn's disease. Also, it provides the possibility of reduced doses of other drugs if it is used as combined therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-dose memantine attenuated morphine addictive behavior through its anti-inflammation and neurotrophic effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wu, Hsiang-En; Tseng, Leon F; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-06-01

    Opioid abuse and dependency are international problems. Studies have shown that neuronal inflammation and degeneration might be related to the development of opioid addiction. Thus, using neuroprotective agents might be beneficial for treating opioid addiction. Memantine, an Alzheimer's disease medication, has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated whether a low dose of memantine prevents opioid-induced drug-seeking behavior in rats and analyzed its mechanism. A conditioned-place-preference test was used to investigate the morphine-induced drug-seeking behaviors in rats. We found that a low-dose (0.2-1 mg/kg) of subcutaneous memantine significantly attenuated the chronic morphine-induced place-preference in rats. To clarify the effects of chronic morphine and low-dose memantine, serum and brain levels of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. After 6 days of morphine treatment, cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6) levels had significantly increased in serum; IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels had significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, both addiction-related brain areas; and BDNF levels had significantly decreased, both in serum and in addiction-related brain areas. Pretreatment with low-dose memantine significantly attenuated chronic morphine-induced increases in serum and brain cytokines. Low-dose memantine also significantly potentiated serum and brain BDNF levels. We hypothesize that neuronal inflammation and BDNF downregulation are related to the progression of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that the mechanism low-dose memantine uses to attenuate morphine-induced addiction behavior is its anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects.

  4. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on induction of myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the induction of myeloid leukemia and other kinds of neoplasias in C3H male mice irradiated at several dose rate levels. We compared the incidence of neoplasias among these groups, obtained dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF) for myeloid leukemia. C3H/He male mice were exposed to whole body gamma-ray irradiation at 8 weeks of age. All mice were maintained for their entire life span and teh pathologically examined after their death. Radiation at a high dose-rate of 882 mGy/min (group H), a medium dose-rate of 95.6 mGy/min (group M), and low dose-rates of 0.298 mGy/min (group L-A), 0.067 mGy/min (group L-B) or 0.016 mGy/min (group L-C) were delivered from 137 Cs sources. The mice in group L were irradiated continuously for 22 hours daily up to total doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 Gy over a period of 3 days to 200 days. As for the induction of neoplasias, myeloid leukemia developed significantly more frequently in irradiated groups than in unirradiated groups. The time distribution of mice dying from myeloid leukemia did not show a difference between groups H and L. The incidence of myeloid leukemia showed a greater increase in the high dose-rate groups than in the low and medium dose-rate groups in the dose range over 2 Gy, it also showed significant increases in the groups irradiated with 1 Gy of various dose rate, but the difference between these groups was not clear. These dose effect curves had their highest values on each curve at about 3 Gy. We obtained DDREF values of 2-3 by linear fittings for their dose response curves of dose ranges in which leukemia incidences were increasing. (author)

  5. The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Mak, Tytus D.; Chen, Congju; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Brenner, David J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics has been shown to have utility in assessing responses to exposure by ionizing radiation (IR) in easily accessible biofluids such as urine. Most studies to date from our laboratory and others have employed γ-irradiation at relatively high dose rates (HDR), but many environmental exposure scenarios will probably be at relatively low dose rates (LDR). There are well-documented differences in the biologic responses to LDR compared to HDR, so an important question is to assess LDR effects at the metabolomics level. Our study took advantage of a modern mass spectrometry approach in exploring the effects of dose rate on the urinary excretion levels of metabolites 2 days after IR in mice. A wide variety of statistical tools were employed to further focus on metabolites, which showed responses to LDR IR exposure (0.00309 Gy/min) distinguishable from those of HDR. From a total of 709 detected spectral features, more than 100 were determined to be statistically significant when comparing urine from mice irradiated with 1.1 or 4.45 Gy to that of sham-irradiated mice 2 days post-exposure. The results of this study show that LDR and HDR exposures perturb many of the same pathways such as TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, which also have been implicated in our previous IR studies. However, it is important to note that dose rate did affect the levels of particular metabolites. Differences in urinary excretion levels of such metabolites could potentially be used to assess an individual's exposure in a radiobiological event and thus would have utility for both triage and injury assessment. (orig.)

  6. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation on alfalfa (Lucerne) yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Odat, M; Khalifa, Kh [Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic). Dept. of Radiation Agriculture

    1994-11-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported frequently as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of field and horticulture crops. Lucerne seeds of previous season (local variety) were irradiated by gamma rays Cs sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 source using doses of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 Gy at dose rate of 9.2 Gy/min. Then were planted after 7 days from irradiation with unirradiated control in complete randomized block design and 5 replicates for three seasons (1986, 1987, 1988), the field experiment was carried out at ACSAD research station in Der-Ezzor. Also pot experiments were carried out to study the effect of low doses gamma irradiation on seed germination and growth of shoot and root systems of seedlings. The following observation were made on plants grown in the field:- fresh weight and dry weight of shoot system, - seed yield at the end of the experiment. The results show that there is a positive effect of seed irradiation on percentage of germination and root systems of seedling compared with the control. the highest increase in dry weight of shoot and root systems was at doses of 10 and 15 Gy. specially when sowing was 10 days after irradiation. Gamma irradiation doses of 10 and 15 Gy led to significant increases in fresh and dry weight at shoot system in the three seasons. The increases were 17.5% and 14.6% for the doses of 10 and 15 Gy respectively. A considerable increase in seed yield obtained at doses from 10 to 40 Gy, and the seed yield varied from 13.3% to 17.9% Compared with the control. (author). 20 refs., 18 tabs.

  7. Effect of Low Dose Radiation Upon Antioxidant Parameters in Skeletal Muscle of Chick Embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Pirsljin, J.; Beer Ljubic, B.; Miljanic, S.; Kraljevic, P.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper an attempt was made to determine the effect of irradiation of eggs with low dose ionizing radiation upon lipid peroxide (TBARS) level, glutathione (GSH) level, activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in skeletal muscle of chick embryo and newly hatched chicks. The eggs of a heavy breeding chickens were irradiated with a dose of 0.3 Gy gamma radiation (60Co source) on the 19th day of incubation. Along with the irradiated chick embryos, there was a control group of non-irradiated chick embryos. The antioxidant parameters were measured in breast muscle (m. pectoralis superficialis) and thigh muscle (m. biceps femoris) of chick embryos on 1, 3, 6, 24 and 72 h after egg irradiation. All parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Lipid peroxidation, GSH level and CAT activity decreased in the breast and thigh muscle of chick embryos on the first hour after irradiation, while the activity of GSH-Px increased in the thigh muscle on the 1st hour after irradiation. CAT activity decreased in the breast muscle of chick embryos on the hour 24 after irradiation. The GSH level increased in the breast and thigh muscle of chick embryos on the hour 72 after irradiation while the activity of GSH-Px increased in the breast muscle. At the same time CAT activity decreased in breast muscle while lipid peroxidation decreased in thigh muscle. The obtained results showed that acute irradiation of chicken eggs on the 19th day of incubation with the dose of 0.3 Gy gamma radiation could be an oxidative stress in both types of muscles immediately after irradiation. However, at the one-day old chicks (72 hours after irradiation) this dose could have a stimulating effect upon GSH level in both breast and thigh muscle.(author)

  8. The effect of Low-dose Gamma Radiation on the Bio-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose gamma radiation has been applied to intravenous fluids to enhance the sterility assurance levels. This study was undertaken to determine the stability of gamma irradiated 2.5 % dextrose, 2.5 % dextrose in saline, Ringers lactate and Gastrointestinal replacement fluid at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 kGy.

  9. Effects of low dose radiation on kidney function and morphology of diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Li Xiaokun; Gong Shouliang; Meng Tao; Li Cai; Cai Lu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on the kidney function and morphology in C57BL/6J mice with diabetic nephropathy (DN) induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and illuminate the protective function of LDR on kidney damage caused by diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: The healthy and right age C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups including control, DM, LDR and DM/LDR. The mice in DM and DM/LDR groups were injected intraperitoneally with STZ to set up DM models. The mice in DM/LDR and LDR groups were irradiated with 25 mGy X-rays every other day for 4 weeks. The changes of blood glucose level, urine index level and the morphology of glomerular were detected at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after radiation. Results: The blood glucose levels of mice in DM and DM/LDR groups after STZ-induced DM model preparation were higher than those in LDR and control groups (P<0.05). After treated with LDR for 2 weeks, the blood glucose level in DM/LDR group was supressed and significantly lower than that in DM group (P<0.05). Moreover the the change had been kept to 16 weeks. In addition, compared with DM group, the level of urine micro albumin(MALB) in DM/LDR group was decreased and the urine creatinine (Cre) level was increased. Compared with DM group, the morphological results showed that the glomerular mesangial expansion and mesangial cell proliferation were significantly supressed in DM/LDR group (P<0.05). Conclusion: LDR can promote the decease of blood glucose level efficiently, relief the change of kidney function, supress and delay the pathological changes of DN. (authors)

  10. Effects of continuous low-dose prenatal irradiation on neuronal migration in mouse cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous exposure to γ-rays during corticogenesis on the migration of neuronal cells in developing cerebral cortex. Pregnant mice were injected with 0.5 mg of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on day 14 of gestation to label cells in the S phase. The mice were then exposed to 137 Cs γ-rays (dose rates of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.94 Gy/day) continuously for 3 days. Brains from 17-day-old embryos and from offspring at 3 and 8 weeks after birth were processed immunohistochemically to track the movements of BrdU-labeled cells. Comparative analyses of the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex revealed that the migration of neurons was delayed during the embryonic period in mice irradiated at 0.94 Gy/day, in 3-week-old mice, there was a significant difference in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex between the mice irradiated prenatally and control, and in 8-week-old mice, there were no differences in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells between control and animals irradiated with 0.1 and 0.3 Gy/day. In contrast, in the animals irradiated with 0.94 Gy/day, the significant difference in the distribution pattern of the labeled cells relative to control was maintained. These results suggest that the migration of neuronal cells in mouse cerebral cortex is disturbed by continuous prenatal irradiation at low-dose and some modificational process occurred during the postnatal period. (author)

  11. Neurogenic Effects of Low-Dose Whole-Body HZE (Fe) Ion and Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tara B; Hurley, Sean D; Wu, Michael D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the dose-toxicity profile of radiation is critical when evaluating potential health risks associated with natural and man-made sources in our environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose whole-body high-energy charged (HZE) iron (Fe) ions and low-energy gamma exposure on proliferation and differentiation of adult-born neurons within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cells deemed to play a critical role in memory regulation. To determine the dose-response characteristics of the brain to whole-body Fe-ion vs. gamma-radiation exposure, C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 1 GeV/n Fe ions or a static 137 Cs source (0.662 MeV) at doses ranging from 0 to 300 cGy. The neurogenesis was analyzed at 48 h and one month postirradiation. These experiments revealed that whole-body exposure to either Fe ions or gamma radiation leads to: 1. An acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, detected at doses as low as 30 and 100 cGy for Fe ions and gamma radiation, respectively; and 2. A reduction in newly differentiated neurons (DCX immunoreactivity) at one month postirradiation, with significant decreases detected at doses as low as 100 cGy for both Fe ions and gamma rays. The data presented here contribute to our understanding of brain responses to whole-body Fe ions and gamma rays and may help inform health-risk evaluations related to systemic exposure during a medical or radiologic/nuclear event or as a result of prolonged space travel.

  12. Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin on Chronic Acid Reflux Esophagitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Yano, Fumiaki; Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2018-01-01

    Clinical role of low-dose aspirin (LDA) in pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease is by far controversial. This can be attributed to the paucity of basic research detailing the mechanism of LDA-induced esophageal mucosal injury (EI) on underlying chronic acid reflux esophagitis (RE). The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of LDA on chronic RE in rats. Esophagitis was induced in 8-week-old male Wistar rats by ligating the border between forestomach and glandular portion with a 2-0 silk tie and covering the duodenum with a small piece of 18-Fr Nélaton catheter. Seventy-eight chronic RE rat models were divided into five treatment groups, consisting of orally administered vehicle (controls), and aspirin doses of 2, 5, 50 or 100 mg/kg once daily for 28 days. EI was assessed by gross area of macroscopic mucosal injury, severity grade of esophagitis and microscopic depth of infiltration by inflammatory cells. Area of esophagitis in animals with aspirin dose of 100 mg/kg/day showed a 36.5% increase compared with controls, although it failed to achieve statistical significance (p = 0.812). Additionally, the rate of severe EI was increased in animals with aspirin dose of 100 mg/kg/day as compared with controls (p aspirin (100 mg/kg/day) contributed in exacerbating preexisting EI. LDA (2 and 5 mg/kg/day), on the other hand, did not affect chronic RE in this model. LDA seems to be safe for use in patients with chronic RE.

  13. Effects of low doses of gamma irradiation on pine nuts (Araucaria angustifolia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modolo, Debora M.; Silva, Lucia A.C.S.; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: dmmodolo@cena.usp.br, E-mail: lcasilva@cena.usp.br, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Ambiente, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C.; Arthur, Paula B.; Arthur, Valter [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Araucaria angustifolia, is known as the Pinheiro-do-Parana, Brazilian pine, Pine, Pine Tree Monkey, emerges as the main representative of the Rain Forest, also known as Araucaria Forest, part of the Atlantic Forest biome (Decree Law 750/1993). A major problem in implementing this plan is to stand the loss of germination of seeds. The storage conditions of the seeds of species, some time have been the subject of studies by various researchers. Several studies have shown that ionizing radiation can increase the germination rate, to break dormancy and plant production, thus appearing as an alternative method to increase the production of economically important crops. Despite the Hormesis Theory have been confirmed in experiments and observations made over the years, relatively few researchers who are dedicated to the study of this phenomenon. Due to losses of germination of pine nut, the aim of this work was to study the effect of low doses of gamma radiation on pine nut. The seeds were bought locally in the city of Piracicaba and irradiated with 0 (control), 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 10, 12, 5, 15.0 and 17.5 Gy. Subsequently the seeds were planted in a plastic cup containing vermiculite as substrate. Evaluations of the germinated seeds number and measure the size of the plants every 10 days. The results indicated that the dose of 0.25 Gy there was a greater number of plants germinated and irradiation stimulated the growth of these plants. Already a lethal dose of the seeds was 15 Gy. (author)

  14. Effects of Low-Dose Amoxicillin on Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Kevin D; Callahan, Mary T; Shimkevitch, Anton V; Farmer, Jackson T; Endres, Jennifer L; Marchand, Mélodie; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies showed that sub-MIC levels of β-lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Here, we investigated this process by measuring the effects of sub-MIC amoxicillin on biofilm formation by the epidemic community-associated MRSA strain USA300. We found that sub-MIC amoxicillin increased the ability of USA300 cells to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under both static and flow conditions. We also found that USA300 biofilms cultured in sub-MIC amoxicillin were thicker, contained more pillar and channel structures, and were less porous than biofilms cultured without antibiotic. Biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin correlated with the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA). However, eDNA released by amoxicillin-induced cell lysis alone was evidently not sufficient to stimulate biofilm. Sub-MIC levels of two other cell wall-active agents with different mechanisms of action-d-cycloserine and fosfomycin-also stimulated eDNA-dependent biofilm, suggesting that biofilm formation may be a mechanistic adaptation to cell wall stress. Screening a USA300 mariner transposon library for mutants deficient in biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin identified numerous known mediators of S. aureus β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation, as well as novel genes not previously associated with these phenotypes. Our results link cell wall stress and biofilm formation in MRSA and suggest that eDNA-dependent biofilm formation by strain USA300 in low-dose amoxicillin is an inducible phenotype that can be used to identify novel genes impacting MRSA β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Effects of low doses of gamma irradiation on pine nuts (Araucaria angustifolia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modolo, Debora M.; Silva, Lucia A.C.S.; Arthur, Valter; Harder, Marcia N.C.; Arthur, Paula B.; Arthur, Valter

    2011-01-01

    The Araucaria angustifolia, is known as the Pinheiro-do-Parana, Brazilian pine, Pine, Pine Tree Monkey, emerges as the main representative of the Rain Forest, also known as Araucaria Forest, part of the Atlantic Forest biome (Decree Law 750/1993). A major problem in implementing this plan is to stand the loss of germination of seeds. The storage conditions of the seeds of species, some time have been the subject of studies by various researchers. Several studies have shown that ionizing radiation can increase the germination rate, to break dormancy and plant production, thus appearing as an alternative method to increase the production of economically important crops. Despite the Hormesis Theory have been confirmed in experiments and observations made over the years, relatively few researchers who are dedicated to the study of this phenomenon. Due to losses of germination of pine nut, the aim of this work was to study the effect of low doses of gamma radiation on pine nut. The seeds were bought locally in the city of Piracicaba and irradiated with 0 (control), 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 10, 12, 5, 15.0 and 17.5 Gy. Subsequently the seeds were planted in a plastic cup containing vermiculite as substrate. Evaluations of the germinated seeds number and measure the size of the plants every 10 days. The results indicated that the dose of 0.25 Gy there was a greater number of plants germinated and irradiation stimulated the growth of these plants. Already a lethal dose of the seeds was 15 Gy. (author)

  16. Effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on the dormancy breaking and physiological activity of 'Dejima' seed potato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Baek, M. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To observe the stimulating effects of low dose {gamma}-radiation on the dormancy breaking and physiological activity, potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Dejima) were irradiated at the dose of 0.5 {approx} 30 Gy. Low dose {gamma}-radiation had promoting effects on the srouting rate the optimum dose of 1 Gy and 2 Gy and on the sprout length at the optimum dose of 2 Gy and 4 Gy. In case of number of sprouts, there were increased in all of the low dose irradiation groups and period storages, which showed very significant promoting effects at 4,8,16 Gy of 15 DAP. The field growth of 45 DAP were increased at all of the low dose irradiation group, which particularly were very significant promoting effect at 4 Gy irradiation group. Irradiation didn't have significant effects on the antioxidant enzyme activity of potato plantlet, but the peroxidase activity of 45 DAP plantlet increased at 4 Gy irradiation group.

  17. Some changes of cholesterol, glucose and total proteins in serum of chicken after effect of low dose of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Novakova, J.; Benova, K.; Falis, M.; Sezstakova, E.; Toropila, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of investigate was the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on the organism of chicken. We investigated changes of concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in time gap 1, 3, 14 and 25 days after expose with a single whole-body gamma irradiation of 3 Gy. (authors)

  18. Effect of low-dose prednisone (with calcium and calcitriol supplementation) on calcium and bone metabolism in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W. F.; van Veen, G. J.; Gerrits, M. I.; Jacobs, J. W.; Houben, H. H.; van Rijn, H. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    The administration of moderate to high doses of corticosteroids is associated with bone loss. This probably results from the uncoupling of bone formation (decreased) and bone resorption (unchanged or increased). We examined the effect of low-dose (10 mg/day) prednisone (LDP) and the possible

  19. A low-dose mindfulness intervention and recovery from work: effects on psychological detachment, sleep quality, and sleep duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüslheger, U.R.; Feinholdt, A.; Nübold, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although playing a crucial role for the prevention of long-term health impairment, interventions aiming at the improvement of employees' recovery processes are still scarce. In this study, we therefore investigated the effectiveness of a low-dose mindfulness intervention for recovery from work. In

  20. Adverse effects on sexual development in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a mixture of low doses of five environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole and procymidone, would cause adverse developmental toxicity effects in rats. In rat dams, a significant increase...... and cumulative intake, because of the potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on development and reproduction in humans....

  1. Cytogenetical effects of low doses: results obtained by N.N.Luchik and present-day problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of present status of the problem of quantitative assessment of cytogenetic effects low is presented. The importance of works of N.V. Luchik is demonstrated for the development of this field of radiobiology. The results of the author's own experimental and theoretical research on the regularities of induction of cytogenetical damage by low doses of ionising radiation are presented

  2. Immunomodulatory Effects of Macrolide Antibiotics - Part 2 : Advantages and Disadvantages of Long-Term, Low-Dose Macrolide Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, J.; de Graaff, C. S.; van der Werf, T. S.; Boersma, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    The available evidence for long-term, low-dose treatment with 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, COPD, chronic sinusitis, and asthma is reviewed with special attention to possible adverse effects and the emergence of resistance during long-term macrolide

  3. Stimulation growth effect of Eriocheir sinensis treated with low-dose neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Keyong; Liu Chunquan; Xu Lixin; Peng Zhangji

    2006-01-01

    This paper was dealt with the relationship between biochemical indexes and different growth stages of Eriocheir sinensis megalopa treated with Low-dose Neutron at 55.24 to 73.66 mGy. It showed that some biochemical component indexes were increased, such as-SH group in protain (between 23.40% to 69.59%), albumen (between 4.99% to 22.6%) and Hyp compared with CK. However, free radical level (between 7.67% to 32.68%) and AKP were decreased. The carapace color was turned into darker than that of CK; Antibacterial immunity of younger crab during the growing stage was increased, the body size of treated Eriocheir sinensis megalopa became uniform and early sexual maturity was inhibited in a certain degree with a low dose neutron treatment. (authors)

  4. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal migration on developing rat cerebral cortex, we need a tissue culture system in which neuronal migration can be observed. We prepared a tissue culture system of embryonic rat cerebral cortex starting on embryonic day 16 and cultivating it for 48 hours. The autoradiographic study in this system revealed not only the migration of 3 H-thymidine labeled neurons but also neuronal migration delays from low doses of ionizing radiation of more than 10 cGy. In addition, on immunohistochemical study, cell-cell adhesion molecule N-CAM staining was remarkably decreased in the matrix cell layer. In the tissue culture system where monoclonal anti-N-CAM antibodies were added, neuronal migration delay comparable to that of 20 cGy radiation was found. In conclusion, it was speculated that neuronal migration delay might be caused by disturbed N-CAM synthesis in matrix cells after low dose ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Effect of Hashimoto thyroiditis on low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungju; Choi, June Young; Moon, Jae Hoon; Park, Hyo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-04-01

    Radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is an integral part of the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) treatment. Although a minimum dose is usually recommended, there is controversy as to whether the low-dose (1100 MBq) radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is adequate for selected patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 691 patients. Patients with no remnant thyroid on the follow-up whole body scan and low stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) level (Hashimoto thyroiditis based on histopathology diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.23; p Hashimoto thyroiditis and elevated sTg are negative predictive factors for successful low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. An appropriate risk-adjusted approach may improve the efficacy of radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E730-E735, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Elevated sodium chloride concentrations enhance the bystander effects induced by low dose alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei; Zhu Lingyan; Jiang Erkang; Wang Jun; Chen Shaopeng; Bao Linzhi; Zhao Ye; Xu An; Yu Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that high NaCl can be genotoxic, either alone or combined with irradiation. However, little is known about the relationship between environmental NaCl at elevated conditions and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). RIBE, which has been considered as non-targeted bystander responses, has been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. In the present study, RIBE under the elevated NaCl culture condition was assessed in AG 1522 cells by both the induction of {gamma}-H2AX, a reliable marker of DNA double-strand break (DSB) for the early process (<1 h post irradiation), and the generation of micronuclei (MN), a sensitive marker for relative long process of RIBE. Our results showed that in the absence of irradiation, NaCl at elevated concentration such as 8.0, 9.0 and 10.0 g/L did not significantly increase the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci-positive cells and the number of foci per positive cell comparing with that NaCl at a normal concentration (6.8 g/L). However, with 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiation, the induced fraction of {gamma}-H2AX foci-positive cells and the number of induced {gamma}-H2AX foci per positive cell were significantly increased in both irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions. Similarly, the induction of MN by 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiation also increased with the elevated NaCl concentrations. With N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, the induced fraction of foci-positive cells was effectively inhibited both in 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions under either normal or elevated NaCl conditions. These results suggested that the cultures with elevated NaCl medium magnified the damage effects induced by the low dose {alpha}-particle irradiation and nitric oxide generated by irradiation was also very important in this process.

  7. Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE Fe Ions for Induction ofMicro-Nuclei at Low Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groesser, Torsten; Chun, Eugene; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2007-01-16

    Dose-response curves for induction of micro-nuclei (MN) was measured in Chinese hamster V79 and xrs6 (Ku80-) cells and in human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells in the dose range of 0.05-1 Gy. The Chinese Hamster cells were exposed to 1 GeV/u Fe ions, 600 MeV/u Fe ions, and 300 MeV/u Fe ions (LETs of 151, 176 and 235 keV/{micro}m respectively) as well as with 320 kVp X-rays as reference. Second-order polynomials were fitted to the induction curves and the initial slopes (the alpha values) were used to calculate RBE. For the repair proficient V79 cells the RBE at these low doses increased with LET. The values obtained were 3.1 (LET=151 keV/{micro}m), 4.3 (LET = 176 keV/{micro}m) and 5.7 (LET = 235 keV/{micro}m), while the RBE was close to 1 for the repair deficient xrs6 cells regardless of LET. For the MCF10A cells the RBE was determined for 1 GeV/u Fe ions and found to be 5.4, slightly higher than for V79 cells. To test the effect of shielding, the 1 GeV/u Fe ion beam was intercepted by various thickness of high-density polyethylene plastic absorbers, which resulted in energy loss and fragmentation. It was found that the MN yield for V79 cells placed behind the absorbers decreased in proportion to the decrease in dose both before and after the Fe ion Bragg peak (excluding the area around the Fe-ion Bragg peak itself), indicating that RBE did not change significantly due to shielding. At the Bragg peak the effectiveness for MN formation per unit dose was decreased, indicating an 'overkill' effect by low-energy very high-LET Fe ions.

  8. Radiation effect and response of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yujie; Su Liaoyuan; Zou Huawei; Kong Xiangrong

    1999-01-01

    The ability of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes were measured by using 3 H-TdR incorporation method. This method was used to observe the damage of lymphocytes irradiated by several challenge doses (0.5-0.8 Gy) and adaptive response induced by previous low dose irradiation. The results show that DNA synthesis was inhibited by challenge dose of radiation and was adapted by previous 0.048 Gy irradiation

  9. The biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on adaptive possibilities of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulbuc, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of adaptive possibilities and cancer risk in animals exposed at low doses of ionizing radiation was the object of the present work. The action of immunostimulating treatment on these processes was studied as well. In previously irradiated animals the diminution of adaptive possibilities and of the antitumoral resistance of the organism was observed. The stimulating action of Bufostimulin on these processes in irradiated animals was less pronounced than in unirradiated ones. (author)

  10. Effects of low doses of A-bomb radiation on human lifespan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Y.; Mine, M.

    1997-01-01

    Among about 100,000 A-bomb survivors registered at Nagasaki University School of Medicine, male subjects exposed to 31 - 40 cGy showed significantly lower mortality from non-cancerous diseases than age-matched unexposed males. And the death rate for exposed male and female was smaller than that for unexposed. It was presented that the low doses of A-bomb radiation increased lifespan of A-bomb survivors. (author)

  11. Effects of low dose radiation on differentiation, activation and apoptosis of thymocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xu; Zhang Yingchun; Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the possible mechanism of immunoenhancement after low dose radiation (LDR), the differentiation, activation and apoptosis of thymocytes following low dose irradiation were studied. Method: Kunming mice were whole-body irradiated (WBI) with low dose X-rays. The expressions of CD4, CD8, TCR, CD3, IL-2R, (Ca 2+ ) i , Bcl-2 Bax and apoptosis of thymocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: It was found that the ratio of T H /T S showed no significant changes after LDR. Thymocyte apoptosis was not increased after LDR. The increase of Bcl-2/Bax ratio after LDR might be one of its mechanisms. LDR could expedites the process of differentiation of, and facilitate the signal transduction in, thymocytes. Conclusion: The results indicate that the mechanism of immunoenhancement might be related to the expedition of the maturation, differentiation and activation of thymocytes, thus up-regulating the capability of supplying more mature T lymphocytes to the periphery by the thymus after LDR

  12. Radiation-induced attenuation in polarization maintaining fibers: low dose rate response, stress, and materials effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, M.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Hickey, S.J.; Brambani, L.A.; Onstott, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The loss induced in polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers by low dose rate <0.01 Gy/h, where 1 Gy = 100 rads(Si) radiation exposure has been found to vary from <0.4 to ∼6 dB/km-10 Gy, depending on the wavelength of measurement and the fiber. Correlations have been established between low dose rate response and the ''permanent'' induced loss determined by fitting the recovery of the induced loss following high dose rate exposure to nth-order kinetics. Using this technique, both 0.85- and 1.3-μm PM fibers have been found which show virtually no permanent incremental loss and would therefore appear to be resistant to low dose rate radiation environments. The asymmetric stress inherent in PM fibers has been shown to reduce the permanent induced loss, while the recovery of the radiation-induced attenuation was found to be enhanced in fibers with Ge-F-doped silica clads

  13. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  14. Effect of low-dose valsartan on proteinuria in normotensive immunoglobulin A nephropathy with minimal proteinuria: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Il; Na, Ha-Young; Moon, Ju-Young; Han, Sang-Woong; Yang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Choi, Hoon-Young; Lim, So-Dug; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Yong-Kyu; Shin, Sug-Kyun

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is a generally progressive disease, even in patients with favorable prognostic features. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antiproteinuric effect and tolerability of low-dose valsartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker) therapy in normotensive IgAN patients with minimal proteinuria of less than 0.5 to 1.0 g/day. Normotensive IgAN patients, who had persistent proteinuria with a spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio of 0.3 to 1.0 mg/mg creatinine, were recruited from five hospitals and randomly assigned to either 40 mg of valsartan as the low-dose group or 80 mg of valsartan as the regular-dose group. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after valsartan therapy. Forty-three patients (low-dose group, n = 23; regular-dose group, n = 20) were enrolled in the study. Proteinuria decreased significantly not only in the regular-dose group but also in the low-dose group. The change in urine protein-to-creatinine ratio at week 24 was -41.3% ± 26.1% (p valsartan can significantly reduce proteinuria without causing any intolerability in normotensive IgAN patients with minimal proteinuria.

  15. Inhibitory effects of prior low-dose X-ray irradiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in acatalasemic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Wang, Da-Hong; Mori, Shuji; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kira, Shohei; Nomura, Takaharu

    2004-01-01

    The catalase activities in blood and organs of the acatalasemic (C3H/AnLCs b Cs b ) mouse of C3H strain are lower than those of the normal (C3H/AnLCs a Cs a ) mouse. We examined the effects of prior low-dose (0.5 Gy) X-ray irradiation, which reduced the oxidative damage under carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in the acatalasemic or normal mice. The acatalasemic mice showed a significantly lower catalase activity and a significantly higher glutathione peroxidase activity compared with those in the normal mice. Moreover, low-dose irradiation increased the catalase activity in the acatalasemic mouse liver to a level similar to that of the normal mouse liver. Pathological examinations and analyses of blood glutamic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyruvic transaminase activity and lipid peroxide levels showed that carbon tetrachloride induced hepatopathy was inhibited by low-dose irradiation. These findings may indicate that the free radical reaction induced by the lack of catalase and the administration of carbon tetrachloride is more properly neutralized by high glutathione peroxidase activity and low-dose irradiation in the acatalasemic mouse liver. (author)

  16. The effect of pycnogenol on patients with dysmenorrhea using low-dose oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Jr H

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr, Clarice Haddad, Julio Casoy Centro de Pesquisa e Assistência em Reprodução Humana (CEPARH, Salvador, Bahia, BrazilObjective: Menstrual symptoms such as dysmenorrhea usually occur during the hormone-free interval in oral contraceptive users. Progestin withdrawal activates NF-κB transcription factor, which upregulates both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Cox-2 expression in the endometrium. The use of natural NF-κB inhibitors such as pycnogenol may block this response, improving dysmenorrhea.Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients with severe dysmenorrhea were allocated to one of two treatment groups. In Group A (n=13, women were treated with an oral contraceptive containing 15 µg of ethinyl estradiol and 60 mg of gestodene (Adoless® in a 24/4 regimen for three consecutive cycles. Women in Group B (n=11 used the same contraceptive regimen together with 100 mg of pycnogenol (Flebon® continuously for 3 months. Pain scores were graded using a visual analog scale (VAS before and during the hormone-free interval at the end of the third treatment cycle.Results: Before treatment, VAS pain scores for dysmenorrhea were 8 and 9 in Groups A and B, respectively. However, by the end of the third treatment cycle, pain scores had decreased significantly (P<0.05 both in groups A and B. The final pain scores were 6 in Group A and 2 in Group B, a difference that was statistically significant (P<0.0001. In Group B, 27% of the patients became pain-free, while in Group A, none of the women reported complete disappearance of this symptom. The number of bleeding days was also lower in Group B.Discussion: Pycnogenol effectively decreased pain scores and the number of bleeding days when administered concomitantly with a low-dose 24/4 oral contraceptive containing gestodene.Keywords: gestodene, hormone-free interval, pain

  17. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  18. Biological effects of low-dose radiation on human population living in high-background radiation areas of Kerala coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    High-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) of Kerala coast is densely populated and known for its wide variation in background radiation dose levels due to uneven distribution of monazite in the beach sand. The background radiation dose varies from 1 to 45 mGv/y. The areas with >1.5mGy/y is considered as HLNRA. Human population inhabiting in this area are exposed to low-dose chronic radiation since generations. Hence, this population provides an ideal situation to study dose response and adaptive response, if any, due to natural chronic low-dose exposure. It has been investigated extensively to study the biological and health effects of long-term low-dose/low-dose radiation exposure. So far over 150, 000 newborns monitored from hospital-based study did not reveal any significant difference in the incidence of any of the malformations and stillbirth between HLNRA and adjacent control areas. A case-control study on cleft lip/palate and mental retardation did not show any association with background radiation dose. Cytogenetic investigation of over 27,000 newborns did not show any significant increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations and karyotype anomalies. DNA damage endpoints, such as micronuclei, telomere length and DNA strand breaks, did not reveal any significant difference between control and exposed population. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed efficient repair of DNA strand breaks in HLNRA individuals. Molecular studies using high throughput microarray analysis indicated a large number of genes involved in various molecular and cellular pathways. Indications of in vivo radioadaptive response due to natural chronic low-dose exposure in this population have important implications to human health. (author)

  19. A survey of the effects of low-dose Dapsone plus Folic Acid in cystic acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohani M

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Forty-six cases of patients suffering from acne cystica (conglobata were treated by low-dose dapsone plus folic acid (1 mg/day. This study has been performed on patients that had no response to other treatments. Several essential and careful tests and examinations were performed on patients before and during treatment. Ten patients of 46 above-mentioned cases were excluded from treatment protocol, because of the reasons that have been mentioned in this article. In 33 cases of 36 patients that recieved the treatment, the cystic lesions were disappeared without any exception and had satisfactory response to treatment.

  20. Suppressing effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on incidence of type I diabetes of NOD mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Sakai, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we examined the effects of 0.5 Gy of ionizing radiation, given acutely or chronically, on the incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice was examined. NOD mice are characterized by a progressive loss of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas by autoimmune mechanisms. The results suggest that the suppressive effects on the onset of he diabetes by the low dose irradiation are explain by the induction of the antioxidative activity

  1. James V. Neel and Yuri E. Dubrova: Cold War debates and the genetic effects of low-dose radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna M; Stawkowski, Magdalena E

    2015-01-01

    This article traces disagreements about the genetic effects of low-dose radiation exposure as waged by James Neel (1915-2000), a central figure in radiation studies of Japanese populations after World War II, and Yuri Dubrova (1955-), who analyzed the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. In a 1996 article in Nature, Dubrova reported a statistically significant increase in the minisatellite (junk) DNA mutation rate in the children of parents who received a high dose of radiation from the Chernobyl accident, contradicting studies that found no significant inherited genetic effects among offspring of Japanese A-bomb survivors. Neel's subsequent defense of his large-scale longitudinal studies of the genetic effects of ionizing radiation consolidated current scientific understandings of low-dose ionizing radiation. The article seeks to explain how the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data remain hegemonic in radiation studies, contextualizing the debate with attention to the perceived inferiority of Soviet genetic science during the Cold War.

  2. Combination With Low-dose Dextromethorphan Improves the Effect of Amlodipine Monotherapy in Clinical Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei-Hsian; Chen, Pei; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Hung, Yi-Jen; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Wu, Chau-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-01-01

    at baseline. Accordingly, the combination with low dose of DXM was feasible to improve BP control in patients who failed to achieve the BP goal by standard AM monotherapy. The benefit effects might be significant especially in patients with impaired endothelial function. PMID:27015224

  3. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  4. Unexpected Effects of Low Doses of a Neonicotinoid Insecticide on Behavioral Responses to Sex Pheromone in a Pest Insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabhi, Kaouther K.; Esancy, Kali; Voisin, Anouk; Crespin, Lucille; Le Corre, Julie; Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Anton, Sylvia; Gadenne, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In moths, which include many agricultural pest species, males are attracted by female-emitted sex pheromones. Although integrated pest management strategies are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on widespread use of neurotoxic chemicals, including neonicotinoid insecticides. Residual accumulation of low concentrations of these insecticides in the environment is known to be harmful to beneficial insects such as honey bees. This environmental stress probably acts as an “info-disruptor” by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decreases chances of reproduction in target insects that largely rely on olfactory communication. However, low doses of pollutants could on the contrary induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway, thus enhancing reproduction. Here we tested the effects of acute oral treatments with different low doses of the neonicotinoid clothianidin on the behavioral responses to sex pheromone in the moth Agrotis ipsilon using wind tunnel experiments. We show that low doses of clothianidin induce a biphasic effect on pheromone-guided behavior. Surprisingly, we found a hormetic-like effect, improving orientation behavior at the LD20 dose corresponding to 10 ng clothianidin. On the contrary, a negative effect, disturbing orientation behavior, was elicited by a treatment with a dose below the LD0 dose corresponding to 0.25 ng clothianidin. No clothianidin effect was observed on behavioral responses to plant odor. Our results indicate that risk assessment has to include unexpected effects of residues on the life history traits of pest insects, which could then lead to their adaptation to environmental stress. PMID:25517118

  5. Unexpected effects of low doses of a neonicotinoid insecticide on behavioral responses to sex pheromone in a pest insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaouther K Rabhi

    Full Text Available In moths, which include many agricultural pest species, males are attracted by female-emitted sex pheromones. Although integrated pest management strategies are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on widespread use of neurotoxic chemicals, including neonicotinoid insecticides. Residual accumulation of low concentrations of these insecticides in the environment is known to be harmful to beneficial insects such as honey bees. This environmental stress probably acts as an "info-disruptor" by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decreases chances of reproduction in target insects that largely rely on olfactory communication. However, low doses of pollutants could on the contrary induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway, thus enhancing reproduction. Here we tested the effects of acute oral treatments with different low doses of the neonicotinoid clothianidin on the behavioral responses to sex pheromone in the moth Agrotis ipsilon using wind tunnel experiments. We show that low doses of clothianidin induce a biphasic effect on pheromone-guided behavior. Surprisingly, we found a hormetic-like effect, improving orientation behavior at the LD20 dose corresponding to 10 ng clothianidin. On the contrary, a negative effect, disturbing orientation behavior, was elicited by a treatment with a dose below the LD0 dose corresponding to 0.25 ng clothianidin. No clothianidin effect was observed on behavioral responses to plant odor. Our results indicate that risk assessment has to include unexpected effects of residues on the life history traits of pest insects, which could then lead to their adaptation to environmental stress.

  6. Effect of low dose rate irradiation on doped silica core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.; Askins, C.G.; Gingerich, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The optical attenuation induced in multimode doped silica core optical fiber waveguides by a year's exposure to low dose rate (1 rad/day) ionizing radiation was studied, allowing a characterization of fibers deployed in these environments and a determination of the permanent induced loss in the waveguides. Variations in the induced attenuation at 0.85 μm have been observed with changes in the dose rate between 1 rad/day and 9000 rads/min. These dose rate dependences have been found to derive directly from the recovery that occurs during the exposure; the recovery data predict little or no dose rate dependence of the damage at 1.3 μm. The low dose rate exposure has been found to induce significant permanent attenuation in the 0.7-1.7-μm spectral region in all fibers containing P in the core, whether doped uniformly across the diameter or constrained to a narrow spike on the centerline. Whereas permanent loss was induced at 0.85 μm in a P-free binary Ge-doped silica core fiber by the year's exposure, virtually no damage was observed at 1.3 μm

  7. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  8. Acute non-stochastic effect of very low dose whole-body exposure, a thymidine equivalent serum factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Porschen, W.; Booz, J.

    1982-01-01

    Whole-body irradiation of mice causes the dose-dependent appearance of a humoral factor in blood serum which inhibits incorporation of 125-IUdR into tissue culture cells. This factor appears even at doses below 0.01 Gy gamma irradiation and thus is probably not related to cell death. Data are presented relating this humoral factor to thymidine. Since at low doses the target size for this effect was calculated to be the entire cell, a cellular effect is postulated linking the site of few primary absorption events, anywhere in the cell, with the cellular membrane, thus causing changes in membrane charge, structure and/or fluidity. This may lead to blocking thymidine acceptance by the cell, and thus would cause a pile-up of thymidine in the reutilization pathway in peripheral blood and would give rise to the observed effect. The effect appears as a temporary disturbance of the physiological equilibrium and should not be related at present to any cellular damage. The acute low-dose effect described has implications for the measurement of low-dose exposure by biological dosimeters and on basic research on membrane function. (author)

  9. [Effect of low dose aspirin on osseointegration around titanium implants in osteoporotic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q; Li, F L

    2018-02-09

    than those in OP group [(77.20±7.14)%, (55.10±2.26) and (41.77±3.13) μm]( P 0.05). Conclusions: The low dose aspirin could promote IBCR, CBLW and TW of osteoporotic rats implants.

  10. Study of the effects of low-dose radiation and rhEGF on growth of cultured human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jicheng; Zhao Xiaoyu; Sheng Weihua; Tang Zhongyi

    1998-01-01

    In authors' study, the method of taking skin sample, mincing and trypsinizing the sample are presented. The cells were inoculated on adherent membrane or, for sublethally injured 3T3 cells, in culture dish fed with Eargles' medium supplemented with fetal calf serum and various growth-stimulating factors. The cultures were incubated at 37 degree C in an atmosphere containing 5% CO 2 . The medium was changed every three days. The cultured cells became confluent in about two weeks. At the same time, low-dose-radiation and rhEGF were used to influence the growth of the epithelial cells and to test the effects of dosage and concentration. The results showed that low-dose-radiation in the conditions like authors' study could enhance the growth of human epithelial cells just like rhEGF, and it has synergetic effects with rhEGF. The mechanism is discussed

  11. Risk assessment from heterogeneous energy deposition in tissue, the problem of effects from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation from external or internal sources cause heterogeneous distribution of energy deposition events in the exposed biological system. With the cell being the individual element of the tissue system, the fraction of cells hit, the dose received by the hit, and the biological response of the cell to the dose received eventually determine the effect in tissue. The hit cell may experience detriment, such as change in its DNA leading to a malignant transformation, or it may derive benefit in terms of an adaptive response such as a temporary improvement of DNA repair or temporary prevention of effects from intracellular radicals through enhanced radical detoxification. These responses are protective also to toxic substances that are generated during normal metabolism. Within a multicellular system the probability of detriment must be weighed against the probability of benefit through adaptive responses with protection against various toxic agents including those produced by normal metabolism. Because irradiation can principally induce both, detriment and adaptive responses, one type of affected cells may not be simply summed up at the expense of cells with other types of effects, in assessing risk to tissue. An inventory of various types of effects in the blood-forming system of mammals, even with large ranges of uncertainty, uncovers the possibility of benefit to the system from exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation. This experimental approach may complement epidemiological data on individuals exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation and may lead to a more rational appraisal of risk

  12. Effect of low dose of Vitex agnus castus on volume and surface area of oocyte in mice

    OpenAIRE

    HAMIDIAN, Gholamreza; YAHYAVI, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus L. (VAC) is a deciduous shrub that is native to Mediterranean, Europe and Central Asia. VAC extract has been used traditionally in the treatment of menstrual disorders (amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), corpus luteum insufficiency, uterine bleeding, fibroid cysts, infertility, acne, menopause, disrupted lactation and hyperprolactinaemia. This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of low dose of VAC essential oil on volume and surface area of oocyte...

  13. Neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of ionizing radiation: Role of adaptive response and bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, M.; Lao, X.-Y.; Kapadia, R.; Elmore, E.; Redpath, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction by low doses of ionizing radiation is of critical importance to the assessment of cancer risk at such doses. Epidemiologic analyses are limited by sensitivity to doses typically greater than 50-100 mGy for low LET radiation. Laboratory studies allow for the examination of lower doses using cancer-relevant endpoints. One such endpoint is neoplastic transformation in vitro. It is known that this endpoint is responsive to both adaptive response and bystander effects. The relative balance of these processes is likely to play an important role in determining the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses. A factor that may influence this balance is cell density at time of irradiation. The findings reported in this paper indicate that the transformation suppressive effect of low doses previously seen following irradiation of sub-confluent cultures, and attributed to an adaptive response, is reduced for irradiated confluent cultures. However, even under these conditions designed to optimize the role of bystander effects the data do not fit a linear no-threshold model and are still consistent with the notion of a threshold dose for neoplastic transformation in vitro by low LET radiation

  14. Effect of continuous exposure to very low dose rates of gamma rays on life span and neoplasia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, I.B. III; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Oghiso, Yoichi; Sato, Fumiaki; Matsushita, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Late effects of continuous exposure to ionizing radiation are potential hazards to workers in radiation facilities as well as to the general public. In the recent years, low-dose-rate and low-dose effects have become a serious concern. Using a total of 4,000 mice, we studied the late biological effects of chronic exposure to low-dose-rate radiation on life span and neoplasia. Two thousand male and 2000 female 8-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) B6C3F1 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups, one non-irradiated (control) and three irradiated. The irradiated groups were exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at dose-rates of 21, 1.1 and 0.05 mGy day -1 for approximately 400 days with total doses equivalent to 8000, 400 and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept under SPF conditions until natural death and pathological examination was performed to determine the cause of death. Statistical analyses showed that the life spans of mice of both sexes irradiated with 21 mGy day -1 (P -1 (P 86.7% of all deaths. Compared to the non-irradiated controls, incidences of lethal neoplasms were significantly increased for myeloid leukaemia and hemangiosarcoma in males, soft tissue neoplasms and malignant granulosa cell tumors in females exposed to 21 mGy day -1 . The number of multiple primary neoplasms per mouse was significantly increased in mice irradiated at 21 mGy day -1 . Our results suggest that life shortening in mice continuously exposed to low dose-rate gamma rays is due to early death from a variety of neoplasms and not from increased incidence of specific lethal neoplasms. (author)

  15. Effect of low dose of vinclozolin on reproductive tract development and sperm parameters in CD1 outbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzeinova, Fatima; Novakova, Vendula; Buckiova, Daniela; Kubatova, Alena; Peknicova, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a low dose of vinclozolin within the development of the reproductive tract during gestation (VIN-GD 15-22) and puberty (VIN-PND 23-44) in CD1 mice was tested. We found a decrease in the anogenital distance, prostate weight and pathology of testes in both experimental groups. Sperm counts decreased to 46% (VIN-GD) and to 81% (VIN-PND), and also the acrosomal state (evaluated by antiacrosomal antibody) decreased in both groups to 89% in comparison to the control group (100%). Sperm head abnormalities increased by approximately 18% and 13%, respectively. In this connection, the expression of some genes was changed (arosome-related gene (Acr), apoptosis related genes (p53, p21)). In conclusion, a low dose of vinclozolin affected the reproductive tract, sperm parameters and expression of selected genes in both experimental groups.

  16. The teratogenic effects of low dose 60Co γ-rays on the early pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chunlin

    1991-01-01

    The pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to 0.5 Gy and 1.0 Gy 60 Co γ-rays at the 9th day after conception. The results: 60 Co γ-rays at dose of 1.0 Gy could induced many defects: excenphaly, hydrocephalus, gastroschisis, cleft palate and cleft lip, anophthalmia, microphthalmia, shorten tail and absent tail in surviving fetuses. The growth retardation was found from the parameters of fetal weight, height, head circle and development of skeleton. In the group of radiation dose 0.5 Gy, only hydrocephalus, absent tail and growth retardation of skeleton appeared. The results suggest that low-dose exposure in the early pregnant rats can induce fetal defects and growth retardation. The probable mechanism of teratogen and growth retardation was discussed. The cAMP levels of brain and liver of rat fetuses were reported

  17. Effects of low dose radiation on differential expression of serum protein in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; He Ying; Shen Xianrong

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to find out the key proteins related with low dose radiation (Ld) by parametric technology, which provided the theory foundation for LDR protection Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed on serum protein Differential expression proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and database analysis Compared with the control group, 7 altered proteins was definite in terms of apolipoprotein C-Ⅲ, beta-globin parotid secretory protein alpha-2-macroglobulin precursor, mouse transthyretin, C1qc protein and clusterin. Some proteins related with LDR are found. It may provide some new explanations for the mechanism of LDR. (authors)

  18. Low doses of prophylactic cranial irradiation effective in limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, James H.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Blitzer, Peter H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Floody, Patrick A.; Harwin, William N.; Teufel, Thomas E.; Raymond, Michael G.; Reeves, James A.; Hart, Lowell L.; McCleod, Michael J.; Pizarro, Alejandro; Gabarda, Antonio L.; Rana, Van G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for the prevention of brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer remains controversial, both in terms of efficacy and the optimal dose-fractionation scheme. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of PCI at low doses. Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were referred to our institution for treatment of limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung between June 1986 and December 1992. Follow-up ranged from 1.1 to 89.8 months, with a mean of 19 months. Eighty-five patients received PCI. Results: Patients receiving PCI exhibited brain failure in 15%, while 38% of untreated patients developed metastases. This degree of prophylaxis was achieved with a median total dose of 25.20 Gy and a median fraction size of 1.80 Gy. At these doses, acute and late complications were minimal. Patients receiving PCI had significantly better 1-year and 2-year overall survivals (68% and 46% vs. 33% and 13%). However, patients with a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy and better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) were overrepresented in the PCI group. In an attempt to compare similar patients in both groups (PCI vs. no PCI), only patients with KPS ≥ 80, CR or near-CR to chemotherapy, and treatment with attempt to cure, were compared. In this good prognostic group, survival was still better in the PCI group (p = 0.0018). Conclusion: In this patient population, relatively low doses of PCI have accomplished a significant reduction in the incidence of brain metastasis with little toxicity. Whether such treatment truly improves survival awaits the results of additional prospective randomized trials

  19. Histological analysis of low dose NMU effects in the rat mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenschein Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to assess the histological changes in mammary glands of the female Wistar-Furth rat as a result of low dose exposure to N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU. Methods Groups of 30–40 virgin female rats of between 49–58 days old received a single injection of 10, 20, 30 or 50 mg NMU/kg body weight (BW. A group of 10 control rats received 0.9% NaCl solution only. The formation of palpable mammary gland tumors was assessed weekly and, upon sacrifice at 12, 22 and 25–30 weeks after treatment, we performed a comprehensive histological analysis of all mammary gland lesions and tumors. Results Alongside the predicted increase in tumor number and decrease in tumor latency with increasing NMU dose, we observed a number of microscopic lesions and other epithelial abnormalities in the mammary glands for all NMU doses. Two types of non-neoplastic histological changes were observed in rats exposed to 10 or 20 mg NMU/kg BW: namely, (i an increase in the number of acinar structures often accompanied by secretion into the lumen which is normally associated with pregnancy and lactation, and (ii an increase in the number of epithelial cells sloughed into the lumen of the epithelial ducts. Conclusion This study establishes a baseline for low-dose exposure and defines the histological features in the mammary gland resulting from NMU exposure. Furthermore, this system provides an ideal platform for evaluating the relative susceptibility of animals protected from, or predisposed to, developing cancer through environmental influences.

  20. Effects of low-dose IV ketamine on peripheral and central pain from major limb injuries sustained in combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomano, Rosemary C; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Kwon, Kyung H; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Rupprecht, Christine; Goldberg, Cynthia; Gallagher, Rollin M

    2013-07-01

    Examine response patterns to low-dose intravenous (IV) ketamine continuous infusions on multiple pain outcomes, and demonstrate effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of ketamine administration on general wards. Retrospective case series of consecutive patients given low-dose IV ketamine continuous infusions. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC. Nineteen eligible inpatients with neuropathic pain from major limb injuries sustained in combat with inadequate pain control from multimodal analgesia. A 3-day IV infusion of ketamine at doses ≤ 120 μg/kg/h. Daily present (PPI), average (API), and worst (WPI) pain intensity (0-10), global pain relief (GPR) (1 "no relief" to 5 "complete relief"), daily assessments of adverse events, and daily opioid requirements measured during therapy. A significant reduction in PPI (P pain (PLP) (N = 10; P = 0.0436) were observed. Mean percent increase in overall GPR was better for those reporting GPR scores ≤ 3 (N = 13) in the first 24 hours of therapy (P = 0.0153). While not significant, mean opioid requirement (IV morphine equivalents) decreased from 129.9 mgs ± 137.3 on day 1 to 112.14 ± 86.3 24 hours after therapy. Low-dose ketamine infusions for complex combat injury pain were safe and effective, and demonstrated response patterns over time and by baseline pain score stratification and presence or absence of PLP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Possible radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, María Virginia; Seoane, Analia I

    2016-08-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA damage through production of single and double-strand breaks and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Folic acid (FA) prevents radiation-induced DNA damage by modification of DNA synthesis and/or repair and as a radical scavenger. We hypothesized that in vitro supplementation with FA will decrease the sensitivity of cells to genetic damage induced by low dose of ionizing radiation. Annexin V, comet and micronucleus assays were performed in cultured CHO cells. After 7 days of pre-treatment with 0, 100, 200 or 300 nM FA, cultures were exposed to radiation (100 mSv). Two un-irradiated controls were executed (0 and 100 nM FA). Data were statistically analyzed with X2-test and linear regression analysis (P 0.05). We observed a significantly decreased frequency of apoptotic cells with the increasing FA concentration (P <0.05). The same trend was observed when analyzing DNA damage and chromosomal instability (P <0.05 for 300 nM). Only micronuclei frequencies showed significant differences for linear regression analysis (R2=94.04; P <0.01). Our results have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro; folate status should be taken into account when studying the effect of low dose radiation in environmental or occupational exposure.

  2. Effective Treatment of Intestinal Behçet's Disease with Long-Term, Low-Dose Clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiya Hakozaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old man was referred for body weight loss and lower right abdominal pain. Total colonoscopy revealed discrete and round ulceration at the ileocecal valve, and he was diagnosed with intestinal Behçet's disease (BD. By treatment with glucocorticoid, colchicine and salazosulfapyridine, the symptoms and ulceration were improved, but cessation of glucocorticoid resulted in relapse of ulceration at the terminal ileum. Long-term, low-dose treatment with clarithromycin (CAM was implemented for chronic respiratory infections. Furthermore, we expected that this CAM treatment would also be effective in BD. During this long-term, low-dose treatment with CAM, discrete ulceration at the terminal ileum was never revealed by follow-up total colonoscopy once or twice per year for 7 years. No reports have described the effectiveness of this treatment in patients with intestinal BD; however, we confirm that long-term treatment with low-dose CAM might have clinical benefits for patients with intestinal BD.

  3. The basic approaches to evaluation of effects of the long-therm radiation exposure in a range of 'low' doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takhauov, R.M.; Karpov, A.B.; Litvyakov, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    The previously performed research allowed forming the main concepts about deterministic effects of radiation impact and defining the main postulates of radiation medicine with respect to average and high levels of exposure. At the same time the research performed to evaluate stochastic effects caused by 'low' doses of ionizing radiation influence failed to find a single-valued answer relating both to dose impact inducing the effect development and to the spectrum of recorded pathologic processes or diseases. In this connection on our opinion the most prospective decision of present problem are studies in follow directions: 1. The evaluation of radiation productions personal and residents of nearby territories mortality and morbidity structure and dynamics. 2. The estimation of risk main diseases development with long-term radiation exposure and analysis of radiation factor role in its pathogenesis. 3. The study of genetic disturbances of persons and their descendants exposed long-term ionizing radiation in 'low' doses. 4. The study of individual radio sensitivity genetic markers. 5. The evaluation of structural and functional homeostasis disturbances inducing the radiation exposure in 'low' doses. The object of study is the Close administrative territorial formation Seversk population and mainly Siberian Group Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) personal - the largest complex productions of atomic industry in the world. The Regional Medico-Dosimetric Register (RMDR), creating since 2001 is the basis for epidemiological studies. The register database contain the information concerning to about 66 000 SGCE workers (it is a whole number of workers in all years of SGCE existence from 1950 to now day). The 35 000 from 66 000 workers are the workers of so-called main productions. About 96% workers exposed external radiation has cumulative dose less 500 mSv. On the base of laboratory of genomic medicine it was created and constantly enriched the bank DNA and biological material

  4. Effect of Low Dose gamma-ray Irradiation on the Germination and Growth in Red Pepper (Capcicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Eun-Kyung; Kim Jae-Sung

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of low dose gamma-ray irradiation in red pepper. The germination percentage, plant, the number of flower, chlorophyll contents, leaf length and width were observed from plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various low dose of gamma-ray. The germination percentage of irradiation group treatmented gamma-ray was much higher than that of the control. Specially the germination percentage after sowing red pepper seeds on paper towel was higher than 1,000 and 2,000 rad irradiation group. The height of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with gamma-ray was increased in 100, 200 and 400 rad irradiation group compared to that of the control. The height of plant from 2,400 rad irradiation group, however, was shorter than that of the control. Nutrient contents of leaves of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various dose of gamma-ray were significantly increased in 800 and 1,200 rad irradiation group. Electric conductivity (EC) of the water used for seed germination was lower irradiation group than control group. Therefore, there was the possibility to increase the germination and plant growth with gamma-ray of adequate low dose

  5. Conditioned instrumental behaviour in the rat: Effects of prenatal irradiation with various low dose-rate doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, H.

    1986-01-01

    4 groups of rats of the Wistar-strain were subjected to γ-irradiation on the 16th day of gestation. 5 rats received 0,6 Gy low dose rate irradiation, 5 animals received 0,9 Gy low dose and 6 high dose irradiation, 3 females were shamirradiated. The male offspring of these 3 irradiation groups and 1 control group were tested for locomotor coordination on parallel bars and in a water maze. The female offspring were used in an operant conditioning test. The locomotor test showed slight impairment of locomotor coordination in those animals irradiated with 0,9 Gy high dose rate. Swimming ability was significantly impaired by irradiation with 0,9 Gy high dose rate. Performance in the operant conditioning task was improved by irradiation with 0,9 Gy both low and high dose rate. The 0,9 Gy high dose rate group learned faster than all the other groups. For the dose of 0,9 Gy a significant dose rate effect could be observed. For the dose of 0,6 Gy a similar tendency was observed, differences between 0,6 Gy high and low dose rate and controls not being significant. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Effects of low-dose irradiation of X-rays on IUdR incorporation into mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misonoh, J.; Ishii, K.; Yoshida, M.; Okumura, Y.; Kodama, S.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that biological responses get smaller when a radiation dose gets lower, and it makes it difficult to detect them with significant differences from background levels. Therefore we know little about biological effects arisen from very low-dose radiation in mammals and mammalian cells. Feinendegen et al. detected a significant reduction of 125 I-UdR uptake in bone marrow cells at doses below 0.01 Gy. Using this extremely sensitive biological response, they also indicated that cells of mice irradiated twice with an interval of 4 hours did not show any reaction after the second irradiation. This meant that cells became radio-resistant after whole-body irradiation with low-doses. This phenomenon, an acquired radio-resistance after low-dose irradiation, is explained as an adaptive response to radiation , which is recently well documented in cytogenic studies. In order to confirm that whether it is common in the cell renewal systems, IUdR incorporation into mouse spleen and the other tissues were studied after whole-body irradiation. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Effects of low dose gamma irradiation on the germination and physiological activity of old red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Back, Myung Hwa; Lee, Hae Youn; Lee, Young Keun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To observe the stimulating effects of low dose gamma radiation on the germination and physiological activity of germinating seeds of old red pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv, Jokwang and cv. Hongkwang), seeds were irradiated at the dose of 2{approx}50 Gy. The germination rate of irradiation group was higher than that of the control. Especially it was highest at the early stage of induction. The germination rate at 7 days after sowing in Jokwang and Hongkwang cultivar was high as 74% and 11% at 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group, respectively. The seedling height of Jokwang cultivar was noticeably high at 4 Gy irradiation group and that of Hongkwang cultivar at 8 Gy Irradiation group. The protein contents of seedlings from seeds irradiated with low dose gamma radiation of Jokwang cultivar increased at the late stage of induction and that of Hongkwang cultivar at the early stage of induction. Catalase and peroxidase activities of seedlings from seeds irradiated with low dose gamma radiation of Jokwang cultivar increased at 4 Gy irradiation group and that of Hongkwang cultivar at 8 Gy irradiation group.

  8. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P.; Melbye, O.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Melbye, O.J. [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, R.M.; Bubrick, M.P.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques

  11. Effect of low dose radiation on POMC transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To disclose the changes in mRNA transcription level of POMC in the hypothalamus and immune organs after low dose radiation. Method: In situ hybridization was used to examine the changes of POMC mRNA transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs following whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays. Results: There was a basal expression of POMC mRNA in both the hypothalamus and immune organs. POMC mRNA-positive neutron were located in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays could significantly down-regulate the POMC transcription level that was remarkable within 1h and remained low in the observation period of 12h. POMC transcription level in mouse immune organs increased with time within 8h after irradiation and then began to decrease but still remained at a higher than normal level. The changes of POMC transcription level were more marked in the spleen than in other immune organs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the immediate decrease of POMC transcription level in the hypothalamus might be the direct cause of the down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis after WBI with 75 mGy X-rays, accompanied with an increase in POMC transcription in immune organs

  12. Low-dose exposure to Veratrum album in children causes mild effects--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Halbsguth, Ulrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; König, Naoko; Mégevand, Chloé; Zihlmann, Karin; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    White or false hellebore (Veratrum album) has a toxicological relevance because of the potential for misidentification of this plant as yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea). We report a retrospective case series of 11 children (8-12 years) with accidental intake of V. album at a youth camp where they had collected herbs for preparing fresh herb tea. Two children (18%) remained asymptomatic. Nine (82%) developed mild gastrointestinal symptoms, six (55%) presented neurological symptoms, and three (27%) showed bradycardia. All children recovered completely within 10 h of ingestion. The plant was identified at the emergency department; however, detection of veratridine and cevadine by means of high-performance liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry from the blood of the child with the most severe symptoms was negative (limit 0.01 ng/mL). Veratrum species contain more than 200 different alkaloids, which are the principal toxins and are responsible for most clinical symptoms. There are likely multiple mechanisms of toxicity and some of them are only partially understood. The opening of voltage-gated sodium channels is probably one of the most relevant pathophysiological mechanisms. Veratrum album intoxication in children demonstrated the same clinical course as observed in adults. Accidental ingestion of a low dose of the plant had a favorable outcome with supportive care.

  13. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, R.M.; Bubrick, M.P.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques.

  14. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, R M; Bubrick, M P; Feeney, D A; Johnston, G R; Rolfsmeyer, E S; Strom, R L; Hitchcock, C R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques.

  15. Comparing the effects of low-dose contraceptive pills to control dysfunctional uterine bleeding by oral and vaginal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Ferdous; Abbassi, Fariba

    2013-09-01

    Background and Objective : Contraceptive pills are generally taken orally and can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting and hypertension. The vaginal use of these pills can reduce such complications. Our objective was to compare the efficacy and side effects of low dose contraceptive pills by oral and vaginal route in the management of dysfunctional uterine bleeding-(DUB) Methods: This comparative observational study was conducted at Beheshti and Alzahra (SA) teaching hospitals, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2010-2011. One hundred women who presented with DUB were randomly assigned into two groups of equal number, receiving the low dose oral contraceptive pills by oral or vaginal route for three month. The amount and duration of bleeding were compared at the beginning and at the end of the study and side effects by these two methods compared. The results of this study showed that both oral and vaginal routes effectively reduced the duration and amount of bleeding due to DUB after three courses of treatment. This effect was better in the vaginal method compared with oral administration (P = 0.03). Regarding the side effects, nausea and vomiting were significantly higher in the oral group than in the vaginal group (P = 0.03). Vulvovaginitis infection was more frequent in the vaginal group than in the oral group (P = 0.03). Low dose contraceptive pills are effective in reducing the amount, time, and duration of bleeding in patients with DUB. In addition, reduction of gastrointestinal side effects by vaginal route helps to use these pills by the patient with proper training of physicians, midwives and patients.

  16. Effects of 14-day oral low dose selenium nanoparticles and selenite in rat—as determined by metabolite pattern determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Löschner, Katrin; Skov, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element with a small difference between physiological and toxic doses. To provide more effective and safe Se dosing regimens, as compared to dosing with ionic selenium, nanoparticle formulations have been developed. However, due to the nano-formulation, unexpected...... toxic effects may occur. We used metabolite pattern determination in urine to investigate biological and/or toxic effects in rats administered nanoparticles and for comparison included ionic selenium at an equimolar dose in the form of sodium selenite. Low doses of 10 and 100 fold the recommended human...

  17. Effect of low doses of gamma irradiation and N-fertilizer on N-sources in chickpea, using 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurd Ali, F.; Al-Shamma, M.; Al-Ayyobi, Z.

    1998-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation on the performance of winter chickpea in the presence of different levels of ammonium sulfate. The results showed an apparent effect of radiation and N-fertilizer on nodulation and N sub 2 -fixation. High levels of N-NH sup + sup 4 decreased N sub 2 - fixation but not nodule formation. However, the Presowing irradiation of chickpea with 10 Gy reduced the negative effect on N - fertilizer on N sub 2 - fixation (Author)

  18. Low-dose radiation effects on the evolution of chronic dystrophical processes in cornea and clouding of crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdaj, Yu.V.; Gajdaj, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-dose radiation effects on the course of chronic dystrophical processes in cornea and the dynamics of crystalline lens clouding of involution age genesis are investigated in the patients participated in Chernobyl accident response. Examples of the concrete pathological cases are considered. It was stated that the above dose effects led to exacerbation of the chronic slack dystrophical processes in cornea and intensification of the development of cornea primary dystrophy. In a number of cases the intensification of development of crystalline lens clouding takes place resulted in the cataract for 2-3 years

  19. The effect of low dose gamma irradiation on maize production (1985-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Khalifa, K.

    1990-06-01

    Presowing seed irradiation has been reported as a useful application of radiation in agriculture to stimulate growth and increase the yield of certain field crops. To the best of our knowledge the feasibility of this treatment has not yet been tested on maize in Syria. Our experiments were carried out in controlled, in field conditions, and in a large scale application. Samples of air dried seeds of maize (Var. Gota-82 and LG-11) of previous season were irradiated by gamma-rays from a 137 Cs sourse using doses of 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy. at dose rate of 9.8 - 9.2 Gy/min. Then were planted after 2 days from irradiation with unirradiated control, in complete randomized block design and replicated 4 times for four seasons (1985-1988). The date revealed that gamma irradiation, at interval doses of 5 - 10 Gy led to, first: Acceleration of seed germination, faster development, intensive development of root system, increase plant hieght (12 - 19%) and significant increase in ear size and number, and second: Increase both green mass (15 - 35%) and seed yield (10 - 31%), and percentage of seed protein (2 - 17%). Large scale applications were performed in 1987 and 1988 using a transportable irradiation unit POC-1 137 Cs and dose of 7.5 Gy. A significant yield increase was obtained from all fields. The average percentage increment varied from 13 - 30% which is approximately 382-765 Kg/h. Therefore, presowing seed irradiation with low doses gamma irradiation ranging from 5 to 10 Gy, was found to be feasible for application in qualitative and quantitative improvement of maize yield. (author). 38 refs., 12 figs., 44 tabs

  20. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  1. Cumulative inhibitory effect of low-dose aspirin on vascular prostacyclin and platelet thromboxane production in patients with atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weksler, B B; Tack-Goldman, K; Subramanian, V A; Gay, W A

    1985-02-01

    The relationship between the antithrombotic and antiplatelet effects of aspirin is complex, since aspirin influences other systems that protect against thrombosis as well as inhibiting platelet function. We investigated possible cumulative effects of low-dose aspirin on vascular production of prostacyclin in patients with documented atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Candidates for coronary artery vein graft bypass ingested 20 mg of aspirin daily during the week before surgery, and platelet aggregation, platelet formation of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), aortic and saphenous vein production of prostacyclin (PGI2), and hemostatic status were measured at the time of the bypass surgery. Low-dose aspirin markedly inhibited platelet aggregation responses and reduced TXA2 generation by greater than 90%, effects similar to those observed with much higher doses of aspirin. Both aortic and saphenous vein production of PGI2 were inhibited by 50% compared with PGI2 produced by vascular tissues of control subjects who received no aspirin preoperatively (51 +/- 10 pg 6-keto-PGF1 alpha/mg aortic wet weight [mean +/- SEM] in aspirin-treated subjects vs 130 +/- 16 pg/mg in control subjects, and 71 +/- 8 pg/mg saphenous vein wet weight vs 131 +/- 17 pg/mg). Blood loss at surgery was not significantly increased by preoperative low-dose aspirin as measured by chest tube drainage (754 +/- 229 ml in aspirin-treated subjects vs 645 +/- 271 ml in control subjects), hematocrit nadir (31.2 +/- 1.9% vs 31.8 +/- 1.7%), or transfusions (2.2 +/- 1.3 units of red blood cells vs 2.2 +/- 1.7 units).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of Low Dose Gamma Radiation Upon the Concentration of Calcium and Inorganic Phosphorus in the Blood Plasma of Chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraljevic, P.; Vilic, M.; Miljanic, S.; Simpraga, M.

    2003-01-01

    In our previous paper it has been showed that the irradiation of chickens eggs before incubation by low dose gamma irradiation effects upon growth of the chickens hatched from irradiated eggs as well as upon activity of ALT and AST, and on the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol in the blood plasma of those chickens. Therefore in this paper an attempt was made to determine the effects of irradiation of eggs by low dose of ionizing radiation on the 19th day of incubation upon the concentration of calcium (Ca) and inorganic phosphorus (P) in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The eggs of heavy breeding chickens (Gent, line COBB 500) were irradiated by a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (6 0C o source) on the 19th day of incubation. Along with the chickens, which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. After hatching, blood samples were taken on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of Ca was determined calorimetrically using Randox optimized kits, while the concentration of P was determined by Herbos dijagnostika Sisak (Croatia) optimized kits. The concentration of Ca in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs was significantly increased on the first day, while it was decreased on the day 42. The concentration of P was decreased on the first day in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The fact that the concentration of both minerals in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs was significantly changed on the first day proves that the irradiation of eggs by low dose of ionizing radiation on the nineteenth day of incubation had an effect on metabolism of both minerals in those chickens. (author)

  3. Effect of low dose pre-irradiation on DNA damage and genetic material damage caused by high dosage of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Zhu Jingjuan; Shang Qingjun; Wang Zhuomin; Cui Fuxian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose γ-rays pre-irradiation on the induction of DNA damage and genetic material damage in peripheral lymphocytes by high dosage of cyclophosphamide (CTX). Methods: Male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, sham-irradiated group, low dose irradiated group(LDR group), cyclophosphamide chemotherapy group(CTX group) and low dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy group(LDR + CTX group). After being feeded for one week, all the mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, groups of LDR and LDR + CTX were administered with 75 mGy of whole-body irradiation, 30 h later groups CTX and LDR + CTX were injected intraperitoneally 3.0 mg cyclophosphamide. All the mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Genetic material damage was analyzed using micronucleus frequency(MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes(PCE) in bone marrow. Results: (1) Compared with control group and sham-irradiated group, the DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes in CTX group were increased significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: (1) High- dosage of CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes. 75 mGy y-irradiation before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. (2) CTX has potent mutagenic effect, giving remarkable rise to MNF of PCE. 75 mGy γ-ray pre-irradiation has not obvious protection against genetic toxicity of high-dose CTX chemotherapy. (authors)

  4. Cyanotoxins at low doses induce apoptosis and inflammatory effects in murine brain cells: Potential implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Takser

    Full Text Available Cyanotoxins have been shown to be highly toxic for mammalian cells, including brain cells. However, little is known about their effect on inflammatory pathways. This study investigated whether mammalian brain and immune cells can be a target of certain cyanotoxins, at doses approximating those in the guideline levels for drinking water, either alone or in mixtures. We examined the effects on cellular viability, apoptosis and inflammation signalling of several toxins on murine macrophage-like RAW264.7, microglial BV-2 and neuroblastoma N2a cell lines. We tested cylindrospermopsin (CYN, microcystin-LR (MC-LR, and anatoxin-a (ATX-a, individually as well as their mixture. In addition, we studied the neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA and its isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB, as well as the mixture of both. Cellular viability was determined by the MTT assay. Apoptosis induction was assessed by measuring the activation of caspases 3/7. Cell death and inflammation are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, our final step was to quantify the expression of a major proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α by ELISA. Our results show that CYN, MC-LR and ATX-a, but not BMAA and DAB, at low doses, especially when present in a mixture at threefold less concentrations than individual compounds are 3–15 times more potent at inducing apoptosis and inflammation. Our results suggest that common cyanotoxins at low doses have a potential to induce inflammation and apoptosis in immune and brain cells. Further research of the neuroinflammatory effects of these compounds in vivo is needed to improve safety limit levels for cyanotoxins in drinking water and food. Keywords: Cyanotoxins, Low doses, Apoptosis, Inflammation, Brain cells, Neurodegenerative diseases

  5. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low-dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    A method has been developed based on animal data which appears useful in predicting biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in humans. It is shown that measures of whole-body retention, plasma concentration, short-term toxicity and cancer incidence can be projected, at least in limited circumstances, for some elements and organic compounds. Some of the procedures used for extrapolation in other fields as well as those from radiobiology are reviewed, the similarity procedure developed discussed, and a review provided of some of the issues in low-dose-effect modelling and the extrapolation of those data to humans

  6. The effects of environmental factors and experimental method on the results of low dose rate microprocessor irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, A; Gerard, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IPSN, Centre d' Etudes de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Gauthier, G; Henry, J Y; Le Meur, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1992-02-01

    As part of the safety studies of nuclear facilities, a series of experiments have been in progress over a number of years to determine the principal parameters for which allowance needs to be made in the testing of microprocessors in low dose rate nuclear irradiation environments. This paper contains a brief description of the results already published, followed by a review of the latest results obtained, specifically as concerns the effects of temperature, the origin of the batch, the angle of incidence of the radiation and the test routine used. (author)

  7. Effects of Low Dose Chronic Radiation and Heavy Metals on Plants and Their Fungal and Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dmitriev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of low dose chronic radiation on plant disease resistance and fungal and virus infections have been studied. The results obtained in the 10-km Chernobyl zone demonstrated a decrease in plant disease resistance and appearance of a "new" population of stem rust agents of cereal with a high frequency of more virulent clones. Radionuclide contamination and heavy metals lead to wider virus spread and a higher diversity of virus species. The Chernobyl zone is a territory of enhanced risk and potential threats for the environment. A special type of monitoring of microevolution processes in plant pathogens should provide better understanding of how serious these potential threats are.

  8. Panel discussion on health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Scientific findings and non-threshold hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This is a record of a panel discussion in the IAEA Interregional Training Course. In current radiation work, protection measures are taken on the assumption that any amount of radiation, however small, entails a risk of deleterious effects. This so-called non-threshold assumption of radiation effects, on the one hand, creates public distrust of radiation use. However, because the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are difficult to verify, wide views ranging from the non-threshold hypothesis to one which sees small amounts of radiation as rather useful and necessary are presented. In this panel discussion, how the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation should be considered from the standpoint of radiation protection was discussed. Panelists included such eminent scientists as Dr. Sugahara and Dr. Okada, who are deeply interested in this field and are playing leading parts in radiobiology research in Japan, and Dr. Stather, deputy Director of NRPB, UK, who, in UNSCEAR and ICRP, is actively participating in the international review of radiation effects and the preparation of reports on radiation protection recommendations. They agreed with each other that although it is reasonable, under the current scientific understanding, to follow the recommendation of ICRP, research in this area should be strongly promoted hereafter, for basing radiation protection on firm scientific grounds. Many participants actively asked about and discussed problems in their own field. (author)

  9. Effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Xufang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats. Methods: 96 rats were randomly divided into the control group and the irradiation group with low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf, 0.35 mGy/h) irradiation 20.5 h every day. 8 rats of each group were killed at 14 d, 28 d, 42d, 56d, 70d after irradiation and 35d after the irradiation, and their peripheral hematological cells were tested respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, peripheral blood WBC was reduced significantly at the dose of 0.3Gy and 0.4Gy (P < 0.05), and was reduced remarkably at dose of 0.5Gy (P<0.01) and 35d after stopping irradiation(P<0.01). At dose of 0.2Gy, Peripheral blood RBC was abnormally higher comparing with the control group (P<0.01), accompanying with higher HCT and HGB, which suggests condensed blood. At the other point, RBC tend to become lower, but only at dose 0.5Gy, and the difference is significant comparing with control group(P <0.05). At dose of 0.3Gy, 0.4Gy and 0.5Gy, HCT were significantly lower comparing with control group. Comparing with control group, MCV was higher at 35d after stopping irradiation, and PLT was significantly lower in dose of 0.2Gy. Conclusion: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could significantly reduce peripheral blood WBC, with less effects on RBC and PLT. The reduced WBC could not recover at 35d after stopping irradiation. (authors)

  10. PROFOUND AND SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC EFFECTS OF CLINICALLY-RELEVANT LOW DOSE SCATTER IRRADIATION ON THE BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKovalchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Irradiated cells can signal damage and distress to both close and distant neighbors that have not been directly exposed to the radiation (naïve bystanders. While studies have shown that such bystander effects occur in the shielded brain of animals upon body irradiation, their mechanism remains unexplored. Observed effects may be caused by some blood-borne factors; however they may also be explained, at least in part, by very small direct doses received by the brain that result from scatter or leakage. In order to establish the roles of low doses of scatter irradiation in the brain response, we developed a new model for scatter irradiation analysis whereby one rat was irradiated directly at the liver and the second rat was placed adjacent to the first and received a scatter dose to its body and brain. This work focuses specifically on the response of the latter rat brain to the low scatter irradiation dose. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence that very low, clinically relevant doses of scatter irradiation alter gene expression, induce changes in dendritic morphology, and lead to behavioral deficits in exposed animals. The results showed that exposure to radiation doses as low as 0.115 cGy caused changes in gene expression and reduced spine density, dendritic complexity, and dendritic length in the prefrontal cortex tissues of females, but not males. In the hippocampus, radiation altered neuroanatomical organization in males, but not in females. Moreover, low dose radiation caused behavioral deficits in the exposed animals. This is the first study to show that low dose scatter irradiation influences the brain and behavior in a sex-specific way.

  11. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (p < 0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-α activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride is agonistic to ER-α in MCF-7 cell line at low doses. • Tributyltin chloride up regulated aromatase activity and estradiol production. • Tributyltin chloride also activates MAPK pathway inducing ERK activation

  12. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha, E-mail: paroyfbs@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (p < 0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-α activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride is agonistic to ER-α in MCF-7 cell line at low doses. • Tributyltin chloride up regulated aromatase activity and estradiol production. • Tributyltin chloride also activates MAPK pathway inducing ERK activation.

  13. Effects of low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the lymphocyte subpopulations of peripheral blood in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Yifang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of rats. Methods: Ninety-six rats were randomly divided into control group and irradiated group exposed to low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf,0.35 mGy/h) for 20.5 h every day. At days 14,28,42,56 and 70 d after irradiation and 35 d after stopping irradiation, After 8 rats of each group were killed, WBC and lymphocyte subpopulations of CD4 + CD3 + , CD8 + CD3 + and CD45RA + /CD161α + in peripheral blood were estimated respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, WBC was reduced significantly at dose of 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy (P + CD3 - was evidently higher compared with control group at doses of 0.1,0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation (P + CD3 - was obviously higher compared with control group at dose of 0.2 and 0.3 Gy (P + CD3 + at dose of 0.1 Gy (P + CD3 + at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 Gy (P + CD45RA - ) was increased significantly at doses of 0.2-0.3 Gy, and peripheral blood B cells(CD161α - CD45RA + ) was reduced remarkably at doses of 0.1-0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation compared with the control group. Conclusions: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could make TCR (T-cell-receptor) mutant, therefore, WBC, B cells in peripheral blood significantly reduced and NK cells increased. These changes may could not recover at 35 d after Stopping irradiation. (authors)

  14. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picano, Eugenio; Vano, Eliseo; Domenici, Luciano; Bottai, Matteo; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed

  15. Effect of low dose radiation on cytochrome c and caspase-3 protein expressions in spermatogenic cells of mouse testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhicheng; Zhao Hongguang; Piao Chunnan; Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lv Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expressions of cytochrome e (Cyt c) and caspase-3 proteins in spermatogenic cells of mouse testis. Methods: The relationships of dose- and time-effect of Cyt c and caspase-3 protein expressions with different dose of X-rays were observed in the spermatogenic cells of mouse testis with immunohistochemical technique (SABC). Results: After irradiation with 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1 and 0.2 Gy, Cyt c and caspase-3 proteins expressed differently in all kinds of spermatogenic cells, and principally in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, and less in spermatids and spermatozoa. And the expressions increased with the increasing of irradiation dose. The expressions of both proteins after irradiation with 0.075 Gy increased with the lapse of time and reached to the peak at 12 h, and then decreased. Conclusion: Dose-and time-effect exists on the low-dose irradiation induced expressions of Cyt e and caspase-3 proteins in spermatogenic cells of mouse testis. (authors)

  16. The observation of curative effects by therapy with low-dose 131I in younger with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Liqun; Li Lingling; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the the curative effects in younger with Graves disease therapied by 131 I. Methods: The dose of 131 I is administrated with 1480-2220kBq/g of thyroid tissue which was decided by many factors that include the paticnt's Age, volume of thyroid, course and if antihyroid drug is administrated. The curative effects was classfide into four groups: complete remission, excellence, parts of remission, no effect. Results: 47 were complete remission, 34 were excellence, 10 were the parts of remission and 0 was no effects. The total effective power was 100%. Conclusions: Therapy with low-dose of mi for younger with Graves' disease is an effect, simple and safe method. Repeating treatment with 131 I will improve the curative rate of Graves' disease in younger, and the incidence of hypothyroidism cannot be increased. (authors)

  17. Effect of postnatal low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals on the gut microbiome in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Raikhel, Vincent; Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto; Lambertini, Luca; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Bua, Luciano; Belpoggi, Fiorella; L Teitelbaum, Susan; Chen, Jia

    2016-06-14

    This proof-of-principle study examines whether postnatal, low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals modifies the composition of gut microbiome. Three chemicals that are widely used in personal care products-diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB), triclosan (TCS)-and their mixture (MIX) were administered at doses comparable to human exposure to Sprague-Dawley rats from birth through adulthood. Fecal samples were collected at two time points: postnatal day (PND) 62 (adolescence) and PND 181 (adulthood). The gut microbiome was profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity. Metagenomic profiling revealed that the low-dose chemical exposure resulted in significant changes in the overall bacterial composition, but in adolescent rats only. Specifically, the individual taxon relative abundance for Bacteroidetes (Prevotella) was increased while the relative abundance of Firmicutes (Bacilli) was reduced in all treated rats compared to controls. Increased abundance was observed for Elusimicrobia in DEP and MPB groups, Betaproteobacteria in MPB and MIX groups, and Deltaproteobacteria in TCS group. Surprisingly, these differences diminished by adulthood (PND 181) despite continuous exposure, suggesting that exposure to the environmental chemicals produced a more profound effect on the gut microbiome in adolescents. We also observed a small but consistent reduction in the bodyweight of exposed rats in adolescence, especially with DEP and MPB treatment (p gut microbiota in adolescent rats; whether these changes lead to downstream health effects requires further investigation.

  18. Effects of perinatal exposure to low doses of tributyltin chloride on pregnancy outcome and postnatal development in mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiliang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Fengmei; Li, Guozhen; Xin, Quanbin; Dai, Bingqin

    2012-10-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, is well known to induce imposex in female gastropods. In this study, we assessed the effects of low doses of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) on dams and their offspring. Pregnant mice were administered by gavage with 0, 1, 10, or 100 μg TBTCl/kg body weight/day from day 6 of pregnancy through the period of lactation. There were no TBT treatment-related deaths or clinical signs of toxicity for dams, and no treatment-related effects on body weight, litter sizes, gestational length of dams, and sex ratio, lactational body weight, postnatal survival, age at eruption of incisors, and eye opening of pups. However, at 100 μg/kg, TBTCl retarded the testes descent of male offspring. Behavioral tests showed a significant delay in cliff-drop aversion response in offspring of 10 and 100 μg/kg groups, but no significant difference in the righting reflex between control and TBT-exposed offspring was detectable. These results indicate that neurobehavioral toxicity seems to be one sensitive indicator to assess the risk of low doses of TBT. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of Fractionated Low Doses of Gamma Radiation on Some Haematological and Immunological Parameters in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahgat, M.M.; Abdel-Khalek, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed on 30 mature male albino rats to evaluate the direct effect of fractionated low doses (0.5 Gy twice weekly) gamma radiation and delayed effect (one month post-irradiation) on some haematological and immunological parameters. The rats were divided into three equal groups, Control and two whole body gamma-irradiated groups the irradiated groups were subjected to total doses of 4 and 8 Grays over a period of one and two months, respectively. The blood samples and peritoneal macrophages were taken twice from each irradiated rats at the end of their irradiation period and after one month post irradiation. Activated peritoneal macrophages in all groups showed significant decrease as compared to control group denoting that irradiation may cause receptor alteration and/or decrease in the phagocytic power of macrophages lasting for a longer time. Throughout the whole experiment there was wide variation in platelet count with no significant or minimal changes in other blood elements. Moreover, in the post irradiation group after two months irradiation, all the haematological parameters tested, except the Hct, were increased as compared to the control group. These results pointed to that the bone marrow and lymphoid organs of the animals can tolerate fractionated low dose irradiation through rapid recovery and/or compensatory stimulation. The presence of many target cells in the post irradiated group increases the red blood cell fragility

  20. The hemodynamic effects of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil in patients with low myocardial ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sanatkar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil on patients with low cardiac output who underwent lower limb surgery. Fifteen patients who had ejection fraction less than 40% (group 1 were compared with 65 cases with ejection fraction more than 40% (group 2 in our study. Our subjects underwent spinal block with 7.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% and 5 µg sufentanil. We recorded early events such as hypotension, bradycardia, vasopressor need and ST segment change in our cases. The average mean arterial pressure decreased 13% (110 mmHg to 95.7 mmHg in group 1 and 20% (160 mmHg to 128 mmHg in group 2 (P<0.001. Hypotension due to spinal anesthesia was observed in none of our subjects in both groups and none of our cases need to vasopressor support. All patients remained alert, and no ST segment changes were observed in two groups. In our study none of subjects complained of pain intraoperatively. The subjects were without complaints during the spinal anesthetic in both groups. Spinal block with low dose local anesthetic and sufentanil was a safe and effective method for lower limb surgery in patients with low ejection fraction.

  1. Effects of 14-day oral low dose selenium nanoparticles and selenite in rat—as determined by metabolite pattern determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hadrup

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential element with a small difference between physiological and toxic doses. To provide more effective and safe Se dosing regimens, as compared to dosing with ionic selenium, nanoparticle formulations have been developed. However, due to the nano-formulation, unexpected toxic effects may occur. We used metabolite pattern determination in urine to investigate biological and/or toxic effects in rats administered nanoparticles and for comparison included ionic selenium at an equimolar dose in the form of sodium selenite. Low doses of 10 and 100 fold the recommended human high level were employed to study the effects at borderline toxicity. Evaluations of all significantly changed putative metabolites, showed that Se nanoparticles and sodium selenite induced similar dose dependent changes of the metabolite pattern. Putative identified metabolites included increased decenedioic acid and hydroxydecanedioic acid for both Se formulations whereas dipeptides were only increased for selenite. These effects could reflect altered fatty acid and protein metabolism, respectively.

  2. Behavioral effects in mice of postnatal exposure to low-doses of 137-cesium and bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Luis; Bellés, Montserrat; LLovet, Maria Isabel; Domingo, Jose L; Linares, Victoria

    2016-01-18

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the most important plasticizer used in many household products such as polycarbonate plastics or epoxy resins. Public and scientific concerns exist regarding the possibility that the neonatal exposure to BPA may contribute to neurobehavioral disorders. On the other hand, there is little information on the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation during critical phases of postnatal brain development, as well as the combination of radiation and environmental chemicals. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to low doses of internal radiation ((137)Cs), and/or BPA on postnatal day 10 (PND10). At the age of two months, animals were submitted to several tests to assess anxiety, activity, learning, and memory. Results showed that exposure to (137)Cs, alone or in combination with BPA, increased the anxiety-like of the animals without changing the activity levels. Animals exposed to (137)Cs showed impaired learning, and spatial memory, an impairment that was not observed in the groups co-exposed to BPA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the reproductive performance and outcome of an exposed population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannino, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of ionizing radiation (cumulative dose less than 5.0 rads/yr) effects the reproductive history and/or outcome of a human population. Medically-related personnel who were exposed to low doses of radiation in the course of their employment were compared with medically-related personnel who were not routinely exposed to ionizing radiation. Each population consisted of 3000 persons from the states of Michigan and Ohio. Reproductive performance, history, and outcome of each sample population was compared statistically. Nineteen congenital defects and 47 postnatal defects were recorded for conceptions of the non-exposed population and 50 congenital defects and 83 postnatal defects were recorded for the exposed group. These groups were further broken down as to whether conception took place before, during, or after exposure and the results statistically analyzed. It was found that the exposure population had greater than expected numbers of postnatal defects and less than expected numbers of normal conceptions

  4. Effects of long-term low dose radiation. Epstein-Barr virus-specific antibodies in radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Etsuko; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Onomichi, Mitsukazu; Nakamura, Ikuo; Tanoue, Shozo; Tanaka, Ryuji; Kumagai, Takashi; Katsuki, Takato; Sawada, Shozo.

    1988-09-01

    To clarify the long-term effects of occupational exposure to low doses of radiation, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody titers in sera from 104 radiological technologists (R.T.) and 118 controls in Kumamoto prefecture were measured by the immunofluorescence method. Antibody titers to viral capsid antigen (VCA)-IgG increased with the years of experience as R.T., and the prevalence of abnormal antibody titers to both VCA-IgG and early antigen (EA)-IgG were significantly higher in R.T. with over 15 years of experience or 30 rads of cumulative radiation dose than in the controls. However, there was no correlation between exposure and the frequency of abnormal EBV-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA) antibody titers. The EBV-specific antibody titers of 24 Hiroshima atomic-bomb survivors were also measured. They were similar to those of the R.T. with over 30 years of experience. The EBV-specific antibody titers of R.T. suggest that there may be an impairment of immunologic competence after continuous long-term exposure to low doses of radiation. Also, the correlation of EBV-specific antibody titers and frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations in 53 R.T. was studied. Some correlations were found between the antibody titers to both of the VCA-IgG and EBNA and the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations.

  5. Behavioral effects in mice of postnatal exposure to low-doses of 137-cesium and bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia, Luis; Bellés, Montserrat; LLovet, Maria Isabel; Domingo, Jose L.; Linares, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the most important plasticizer used in many household products such as polycarbonate plastics or epoxy resins. Public and scientific concerns exist regarding the possibility that the neonatal exposure to BPA may contribute to neurobehavioral disorders. On the other hand, there is little information on the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation during critical phases of postnatal brain development, as well as the combination of radiation and environmental chemicals. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to low doses of internal radiation ( 137 Cs), and/or BPA on postnatal day 10 (PND10). At the age of two months, animals were submitted to several tests to assess anxiety, activity, learning, and memory. Results showed that exposure to 137 Cs, alone or in combination with BPA, increased the anxiety-like of the animals without changing the activity levels. Animals exposed to 137 Cs showed impaired learning, and spatial memory, an impairment that was not observed in the groups co-exposed to BPA.

  6. Low Dose of Clonazepam Is Effective in the Treatment of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihiro Kawajiri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Painless legs and moving toes syndrome (PoLMT is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes in the absence of pain. It is considered a variant of painful legs and moving toes syndrome, which is characterized by similar movements but is accompanied by pain. Although neuropathy, spinal cord compression, brain tumor, cerebral infarction, and Wilson's disease have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause, trigger, and mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, a standardized treatment for PoLMT is not established yet. Case Presentation: We describe a 64-year-old Japanese woman with no past medical history who presented with nonrhythmic repetitive involuntary toe movement of the left foot in the absence of pain. She was diagnosed with idiopathic PoLMT and treated with a low dose of clonazepam (0.5 mg/day. The involuntary movement disappeared completely several days after treatment. Conclusion: A low dose of clonazepam is effective in the treatment of PoLMT.

  7. Effect of low-dose irradiation on structural and mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncan, Tevfik; Demirağ, Burak; Ermutlu, Cenk; Yalçinkaya, Ulviye; Özkan, Lütfü

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low-dose irradiation on fibrous cartilage and to obtain a hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage (HCLF) with similar structural and mechanical properties to hyaline cartilage. An osteochondral defect was created in 40 knees of 20 rabbits. At the 7th postoperative day, a single knee of each rabbit was irradiated with a total dose of 5.0 Gy in 1.0 Gy fractions for 5 days (radiotherapy group), while the other knee was not irradiated (control group). Rabbits were then divided into four groups of 5 rabbits each. The first three groups were sacrificed at the 4th, 8th and the 12th postoperative weeks and cartilage defects were macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The remaining group of 5 rabbits was sacrificed at the 12th week and biomechanical compression tests were performed on the cartilage defects. There was no significant biomechanical difference between the radiotherapy and the control group (p=0.686). There was no significant macroscopic and microscopic difference between groups (p=0.300). Chondrocyte clustering was observed in the irradiated group. Low-dose irradiation does not affect the mechanical properties of HCLF in vivo. However, structural changes such as chondrocyte clustering were observed.

  8. Effect of low dose, short-term creatine supplementation on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Silva, Aquiles; Buzzachera, Cosme F; Piçarro, Ivan Da C; Januario, Renata S B; Ferreira, Luis H B; McAnulty, Steven R; Utter, Alan C; Souza-Junior, Tacito P

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of a low dose, short-term Creatine monohydrate (Cr) supplementation (0.03 g.kg.d -1 during 14 d) on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players. Using a two-group matched, double blind, placebo-controlled design, nineteen male soccer players (mean age = 17.0 ± 0.5 years) were randomly assigned to either Cr ( N  = 9) or placebo ( N  = 10) group. Before and after supplementation, participants performed a 30s Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) to assess peak power output (PPO), mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), and total work. There were significant increases in both PPO and MPO after the Cr supplementation period ( P  ≤ 0.05) but not the placebo period. There were also significant increases in total work, but not FI, after the Cr supplementation and placebo periods ( P  ≤ 0.05). Notably, there were differences in total work between the Cr and placebo groups after ( P  ≤ 0.05) but not before the 14 d supplementation period. There is substantial evidence to indicate that a low-dose, short-term oral Cr supplementation beneficially affected muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

  9. Low doses and non-targeted effects in environmental radiation protection; where are we now and where should we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Rusin, Andrej; Seymour, Colin

    2017-11-01

    The field of low dose radiobiology has advanced considerably in the last 30 years from small indications in the 1980's that all was not simple, to a paradigm shift which occurred during the 1990's, which severely dented the dose-driven models and DNA centric theories which had dominated until then. However while the science has evolved, the application of that science in environmental health protection has not. A reason for this appears to be the uncertainties regarding the shape of the low dose response curve, which lead regulators to adopt a precautionary approach to radiation protection. Radiation protection models assume a linear relationship between dose (i.e. energy deposition) and effect (in this case probability of an adverse DNA interaction leading to a mutation). This model does not consider non-targeted effects (NTE) such as bystander effects or delayed effects, which occur in progeny cells or offspring not directly receiving energy deposition from the dose. There is huge controversy concerning the role of NTE with some saying they reflect "biology" and that repair and homeostatic mechanisms sort out the apparent damage while others consider them to be a class of damage which increases the size of the target. One thing which has recently become apparent is that NTE may be very critical for modelling long-term effects at the level of the population rather than the individual. The issue is that NTE resulting from an acute high dose such as occurred after the A-bomb or Chernobyl occur in parallel with chronic effects induced by the continuing residual effects due to radiation dose decay. This means that if ambient radiation doses are measured for example 25 years after the Chernobyl accident, they only represent a portion of the dose effect because the contribution of NTE is not included. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Effect of low dose irradiation of 60Co γ-rays on seed germination, seedling growth and enzymes activity of Lactuca sativa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiuqing; Zhang Tie

    2012-01-01

    The seeds of Lactuca sativa were irradiated by different doses (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 Gy) of 60 Co γ-rays. The effects of low dose irradiation on seed germination, seedling growth and enzymes activity were investigated. The results indicated that low dose irradiation could promote germination rate, germinating viability, germination rate in the field, root length and height of seedling. The suitable dosage for low dose irradiation for Lactuca sativa was 30 Gy. POD activity after irradiation treatment in the range of 10 to 50 Gy and CAT activity after irradiation treatment in the range of 20 Gy to 40 Gy was lower than that of control. (authors)

  11. Study of dose effect relationship at low doses for non quantitative reactions of skin intestinal mucosa and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the biological reactions observed in animal experiments or in clinical studies are non quantitative and they only allow assessing an inequality between the effects produced by different irradiations. The method used in non quantitative studies is actually based on the relative contribution of irreparable events and reparable to the cell killing. It provides for the cell population involved in non quantitative biological effects some data which can be expressed in term of a cell survival curve. Such data can be useful in Radiation therapy particularly for maximizing the difference between biological effects by a proper choice of the fraction size. The initial part of the cell survival curve, within the range of doses actually used appears to be a straight exponential. This should allow the extrapolation to very low doses in the range of interest to Radiation Protection

  12. A cross section study on low-dose lonization radiation and health effects in different sex subgroups of occupational population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiayuan; Yang Fei; Huang Zhonghang; Lu Xiaoqing; Liu Hui; Jiang Di; Yang Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between long-time exposure to low-dose ionization radiation and health effects. Methods: 1052 occupational subjects exposed to ionization radiation in Chengdu city were recruited in monitoring cohort in 2007, including 785 men (74.62%) and 267 women (25.38%). Individual exposure dose were monitored by Thermoluminescent Measurement. Health effects include blood routine examination, Chromosomal aberration, eye lens test, etc. Variance Analysis (ANOVA), χ 2 Test and Univariate Procedure of General Liner Model (Covariance Analysis) were implemented to test the difference among subgroups with SPSS 13.0 software. Results: Annual average of exposure dose of male and female were (0.76 ± 0.65) mSv and (0.75 ± 0.64) mSv. There is no statistical significant between sex subgroups (F= (0.136, P = 0.712). In females subgroup, the frequencies and ratios with low WBC, Low platelet, high RBC and high HGB were 30 (11.2%), 45(16.9%), 4(1.5%) and 3(1.1%) respectively. And in male subgroup, frequencies and ratios of above index were 32 (4.1%), 147 (18.7%), 64 (8.2%) and 115 (14.6%) respectively. Except low platelet, the distribution differences of the rest three blood indexes between sex subgroups were statistically significant (χ 2 test, P<0.01). Either in male or in female subgroups, no statistically significant difference of all health indexes(RBC, WBC, Platelet, HGB, and Chromosomal aberration) was observed in different radiation dose teams. Conclusion: In this monitoring cohort, the health effects were related to hormesis and adaptive response as well as radiation damage accumulation effect of low-dose ionization radiation. Females were the sensitive group to suffer adverse effects, while blood indexes were the sensitive indexes for monitoring radiation exposure. (authors)

  13. Final report for project "Effects of Low-Dose Irradiation on NFkB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, Gayle E [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Grdina, David [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Li, Jian-Jian [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Low dose ionizing radiation effects are difficult to study in human population because of the numerous confounding factors such as genetic and lifestyle differences. Research in mammalian model systems and in vitro is generally used in order to overcome this difficulty. In this program project three projects have joined together to investigate effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. These are doses at and below 10 cGy of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation such as X-ray and gamma rays. This project was focused on cellular signaling associated with nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) and mitochondria - subcellular organelles critical for cell aging and aging-like changes induced by ionizing radiation. In addition to cells in culture this project utilized animal tissues accumulated in a radiation biology tissue archive housed at Northwestern University (http://janus.northwestern.edu/janus2/index.php). Major trust of Project 1 was to gather all of the DoE sponsored irradiated animal (mouse, rat and dog) data and tissues under one roof and investigate mitochondrial DNA changes and micro RNA changes in these samples. Through comparison of different samples we were trying to delineate mitochondrial DNA quantity alterations and micro RNA expression differences associated with different doses and dose rates of radiation. Historic animal irradiation experiments sponsored by DoE were done in several national laboratories and universities between 1950’s and 1990’s; while these experiments were closed data and tissues were released to Project 1. Project 2 used cells in culture to investigate effects that low doses or radiation have on NFκB and its target genes manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and genes involved in cell cycle: Cyclins (B1 and D1) and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Project 3 used cells in culture such as “normal” human cells (breast epithelial cell line MCF10A cells and skin keratinocyte cells HK18) and mouse embryo fibroblast (mef

  14. We can do better than effective dose for estimating or comparing low-dose radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose concept was designed to compare the generic risks of exposure to different radiation fields. More commonly these days, it is used to estimate or compare radiation-induced cancer risks. For various reasons, effective dose represents flawed science: for instance, the tissue-specific weighting factors used to calculate effective dose are a subjective mix of different endpoints; and the marked and differing age and gender dependencies for different health detriment endpoints are not taken into account. This paper suggests that effective dose could be replaced with a new quantity, ‘effective risk’, which, like effective dose, is a weighted sum of equivalent doses to different tissues. Unlike effective dose, where the tissue-dependent weighting factors are a set of generic, subjective committee-defined numbers, the weighting factors for effective risk are simply evaluated tissue-specific lifetime cancer risks per unit equivalent dose. Effective risk, which has the potential to be age and gender specific if desired, would perform the same comparative role as effective dose, be just as easy to estimate, be less prone to misuse, be more directly understandable, and would be based on solid science. An added major advantage is that it gives the users some feel for the actual numerical values of the radiation risks they are trying to control.

  15. Very Low-Dose Risperidone in First-Episode Psychosis: A Safe and Effective Way to Initiate Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. McGorry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients experiencing a first psychotic episode have high rates of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs when treated with the doses of neuroleptics used in multiepisode or chronic schizophrenia. There is some evidence that lower doses may be equally, if not more, effective but less toxic in this population. Here, we report the results of a biphasic open label trial designed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of low-dose (2–4 mg/day risperidone treatment in a group of 96 first-episode nonaffective psychosis patients. At the end of the trial, 62% of patients met the response criteria although approximately 80% had achieved a response at some time during the study. Reports of EPS remained low, and there were no dystonic reactions. We conclude that even at a dose of 2 mg/day, risperidone was highly effective in reducing acute symptomatology in a real world sample of young first-episode psychosis patients.

  16. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  17. Effect of low dose radiation on the odontogenesis of mice foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, M.; Al-Achkar, W.

    1998-09-01

    Mice foetuses were irradiated in utero by gamma rays (0,2, 4,6 Gy) at 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 days of gestation. Histological study was carried out on the first premandibular tooth after 2,4,6,8 days of irradiation, to investigate the effect of irradiation on different steps of tooth development. It appeared that the irradiation induced a delay in the tooth development depending on the time of irradiation and period of gestation. The 2 Gy irradiation effect was small. The 4 Gy dose induced a delay of the cytodifferentiation of the odontoblasts and the ameloblasts. These effects were associated with a morphological retardation in the coronal and the tooth root. More pronounced effects after 6 Gy irradiation for all aspects of the odontogenesis were observed. It caused a strong decrease in the tooth development of the anlages (irradiation of day 12 of the gestation), blocked the morphogenesis (irradiation of day 14), and delayed the cytodifferentiation of the odontoblasts and the amelobasts (irradiation of day 16). Whereas the irradiation at the day 18 had no effects on the functional differentiation of the odontoblasts, but a delay in the functional differentiation of the ameloblasts was observed. Our results show, in our experimental conditions, that irradiation effect the processes prior to the cytodifferentiation of the ameloblasts and the odontoblasts and there are no effects to be observed on the cyto and functional differentiation of these two blasts when their cells achieved its final differentiation. (author)

  18. Low-Dose Hydroxychloroquine is as Effective as Phlebotomy in Treatment of Patients with Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Ashwani K.; Kormos-Hallberg, Csilla; Lee, Chul; Sadagoparamanujam, V.-M.; Grady, James J.; Freeman, Daniel H.; Anderson, Karl E.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is an iron-related disorder caused by reduced activity of hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD); it can be treated by phlebotomy or low doses of hydroxychloroquine. We performed a prospective pilot study to compare the efficacy and safety of these therapies. Methods We analyzed data from 48 consecutive patients with well-documented PCT to characterize susceptibility factors; patients were treated with phlebotomy (450 mL, every 2 weeks until they had serum ferritin levels of 20 ng/mL) or low-dose hydroxychloroquine (100 mg orally, twice weekly, until at least 1 month after they had normal plasma levels of porphyrin). We compared the time required to achieve a normal plasma porphyrin concentration (remission, the primary outcome) for 17 patients treated with phlebotomy and 13 treated with hydroxychloroquine. Results The time to remission was a median 6.9 months for patients that received phlebotomy and 6.1 months for patients treated with hydroxychloroquine treatment (6.7 and 6.5 months for randomized patients), a difference that was not significant (Log Rank P=.06 and P=.95, respectively). The sample size was insufficient to confirm noninferiority of hydroxychloroquine treatment (hazard ratio [HR], 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95–5.06) for all patients. Patients that received hydroxychloroquine had substantially better compliance. There were no significant side effects of either treatment. Conclusions Hydroxychloroquine, 100 mg twice weekly, is as effective and safe as phlebotomy in patients with PCT, although noninferiority was not established. Given these results, higher-dose regimens of hydroxychloroquine, which have more side effects, do not seem justified. Compliance was better and projected costs were lower for hydroxychloroquine than phlebotomy treatment. Long-term studies are needed to compare durability of response. PMID:22985607

  19. Potential pre-cataractous markers induced by low-dose radiation effects in cultured human lens cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.; McNamara, M.; Bjornstad, K.; Chang, P.

    The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. Recent evidence indicates that exposure to relatively low doses of space radiation are associated with an increased incidence and early appearance of human cataracts (Cucinotta et al., Radiat. Res. 156:460-466, 2001). Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the early responses of various late-responding tissues into our understanding and estimation of radiation risk for space travel. In addition, these studies may contribute to the development of countermeasures for the early lenticular changes, in order to prevent the late sequelae. Radiation damage to the lens is not life threatening but, if severe, can affect vision unless surgically corrected with synthetic lens replacement. The lens, however, may be a sensitive detector of radiation effects for other cells of ectodermal origin in the body for which there are not currently clear endpoints of low-dose radiation effects. We have investigated the dose-dependent expression of several radiation-responsive endpoints using our in vitro model of differentiating human lens epithelial cells (Blakely et al., Investigative Ophthalmology &Visual Sciences, 41(12):3898-3907, 2000). We have investigated radiation effects on several gene families that include, or relate to, DNA damage, cytokines, cell-cycle regulators, cell adhesion molecules, cell cytoskeletal function and apoptotic cell death. In this paper we will summarize some of our dose-dependent data from several radiation types, and describe the model of molecular and cellular events that we believe may be associated with precataractous events in the human lens after radiation exposure. This work was supported by NASA Grant #T-965W.

  20. Effect of cyclic, low dose pyrimethamine treatment in patients with Late Onset Tay Sachs: an open label, extended pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, Etty; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Sagie, Liora; Urshanski, Nataly; Sagiv, Nadav; Peleg, Leah; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah; Navon, Ruth; Valevski, Avi; Stern, Naftali

    2015-04-17

    Late Onset Tay- Sachs disease (LOTS) is a rare neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease which results from mutations in the gene encoding the α subunit (HEXA) of β-hexosaminidase enzyme (HexA). At the present time, no effective treatment exists for LOTS and other neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nerve system (CNS). Pyrimethamine (PMT) was previously shown to act as a HexA chaperone in human fibroblasts in vitro carrying some (e.g., αG269S), but not all LOTS-related mutations. The present study assessed the effect of cyclic, low dose and long term pyrimethamine treatment on HexA in subjects with LOTS. In an open label trial in 4 LOTS patients, PMT was initiated at an average daily dose of ~2.7 mg and administered cyclically guided by blood lymphocyte HexA activity for a mean duration of 82.8 (±22.5; SD) weeks (~1.5 year). HexA activity rose in all subjects, with a mean peak increase of 2.24 folds (±0.52; SD) over baseline activity (range 1.87-3). The mean treatment time required to attain this peak was of 15.7 (±4.8; SD) weeks. Following increase in activity, HexA gradually declined with the continued use of PMT, which was then stopped, resulting in the return of HexA activity to baseline. A second cycle of PMT treatment was then initiated, resulting again in an increase in HexA activity. Three of the patients experienced a measurable neuropsychiatric deterioration whereas one subject remained entirely stable. Cyclic low dose of PMT can increase HexA activity in LOTS patients. However, the observed increase is repeatedly transient and not associated with discernible beneficial neurological or psychiatric effects.

  1. Cyanotoxins at low doses induce apoptosis and inflammatory effects in murine brain cells: Potential implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takser, Larissa; Benachour, Nora; Husk, Barry; Cabana, Hubert; Gris, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Cyanotoxins have been shown to be highly toxic for mammalian cells, including brain cells. However, little is known about their effect on inflammatory pathways. This study investigated whether mammalian brain and immune cells can be a target of certain cyanotoxins, at doses approximating those in the guideline levels for drinking water, either alone or in mixtures. We examined the effects on cellular viability, apoptosis and inflammation signalling of several toxins on murine macrophage-like RAW264.7, microglial BV-2 and neuroblastoma N2a cell lines. We tested cylindrospermopsin (CYN), microcystin-LR (MC-LR), and anatoxin-a (ATX-a), individually as well as their mixture. In addition, we studied the neurotoxins β- N -methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and its isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), as well as the mixture of both. Cellular viability was determined by the MTT assay. Apoptosis induction was assessed by measuring the activation of caspases 3/7. Cell death and inflammation are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, our final step was to quantify the expression of a major proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α by ELISA. Our results show that CYN, MC-LR and ATX-a, but not BMAA and DAB, at low doses, especially when present in a mixture at threefold less concentrations than individual compounds are 3-15 times more potent at inducing apoptosis and inflammation. Our results suggest that common cyanotoxins at low doses have a potential to induce inflammation and apoptosis in immune and brain cells. Further research of the neuroinflammatory effects of these compounds in vivo is needed to improve safety limit levels for cyanotoxins in drinking water and food.

  2. The effect of lysate of spleen cells after low dose radiation (LDR) on NK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    To find effect of lysate of spleen cells after LDR on NK activity of CD 57 cells or non-CD 57 cells, lysate of spleen cells after LDR were extracted. McAb (anti CD 57 cells) was used to separate CD 57 cells from human peripheral blood by Panning direct method. The CD 57 cells and non-CD 57 cells were used as effective cells. K 562 cells labelled by 3 H-TdR were used as target cells. The ratio of effect cells to target cells was 10:1. NK activity of CD 57 cells or non-CD 5 -7 cells with the lysate of spleen cells after LDR was reflected by the efficiency of anti tumor cells. The 3 H-TdR incorporation in K 562 cells cultured with non-CD 57 cells was significantly lower than that with CD 57 cells. After use of the lysate of spleen cells after LDR, NK activities of CD 57 cells and non-CD 57 cells were 1.24 and 1.58 respectively. They were both increased obviously compared with control groups. The effect of anti K 562 cells of non-CD 57 cells is even greater than that of CD 57 cells. The lysate of spleen cells after LDR can enhance the effect of both non-CD 57 cells and CD 57 cells

  3. Modulation of low dose radiation effect on pentose phosphate pathway enzymes by B-multivitamin deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimatkina, T.I.; Lashak, L.K.; Moiseenok, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Blood, liver, thymus and spleen of albino rats injected subcutaneously with antivitamins (othythiamine and methotrexate) and subjected to prolonger γ-irradiation in the overall dose of 0.75 Gy were assayed for transketolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase after 12h, 1, 2, 5 and 40 days from the last radiation dose. High transketolase sensitivity was found both to radiation (activation) and the combined effects of vitamin deficiency and radiation (potentiation of antivitamin inhibitory action) in all the tissues studied. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was little changed under the given experimental manipulations, but the combined effect of the factors considerably inhibited the enzyme activities in the organs of the immune system. Consequently, in B-multivitamin deficiency the effect of low radiation doses was subjected to a considerable modulation resulting in profound inhibition of the oxidation and nonoxidative branches of the pentose phosphate pathway. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs

  4. Public education on the health effects of low dose radiation. Why the government underestimated the risks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakiyama, Hisako

    2012-01-01

    Here the education on the health effects of radiation, which has not been taken up in the report of the National Diet of Japan Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission (NAIIC), is mentioned: The atomic power policy for the education on the health effects of radiation, the correspondence of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology after the Fukushima accident, the side readers on the radiation, Is there the clear evidence on the correlation of dose rate under 100 mSv to diseases?, the ploblem of dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor, the fluctuation range of the death rate 0.5% from cancer, the influence and assistance of the electric enterprise union to ICRP members, etc. (M.H.)

  5. The effect of low doses of gamma rays on hatchability of broiler parent stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, Abdul-Hamid

    1990-01-01

    It is a summary of the report written about the three experiments which have been carried out to study the stimulatory effect of different doses of gamma irradiation on the hatchability of broiler parent stocks at 45 weeks of age. It has been shown that doses at 0.1 and 0.15 GY had a stimulatory effect on hatchability of highly-fertile broiler parent stock. Doses at 1.20, 1.60 and 2.10 GY had an inhibitory effect on hatchability of low-fertile broiler parent stock. No significant difference has been detected on the chicks weights hatched from eggs exposed to doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.20 GY of highly-fertile broiler parent stock. 4 tabs

  6. Effect of low dose x-irradiation on alloantigen sensitized and unsensitized lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohi, Kiyohiko; Yahata, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Yasuhiko; Asahara, Toshimasa; Ono, Eiji; Ezaki, Haruo

    1984-12-01

    The effect of local graft irradiation on immune response in allograft in which acute rejection occurs was studied using an in vitro model. Unidirectional mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was used as the in vitro model of acute rejection. 150 and 300 rad x-irradiation suppressed mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) but did not cell-mediated-lympholysis (CML) of unsensitized lymphocytes. X-irradiated alloantigen sensitized cells (ASC) generated in 6-day MLC suppressed MLR and CML of unsensitized lymphocytes. Suppressive effects of x-irradiated ASC were of the same degree by x-irradiation doses of 150-500 rad. Suppressive effect of x-irradiation was maintained for only a short period after x-irradiation. Potential function of suppressor precursor cells among unsensitized lymphocytes was abolished by x-irradiation of 300 rad. (author).

  7. Effect of anxiolytic aphobazole on hemopoietic system under exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and emotional stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.; Seredenin, S.B.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.; Lebedev, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of aphobazole in investigated on the course of adaptation reactions and state of compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system of rats-males under long-term emotional stress developed following the low-dose gamma-radiation. Gamma-quanta from 137 Cs source at 0.9 Gy dose (1.3 Gy/min dose rate) were used for single and uniform irradiation of animals. Two days later rats were exposed to long-term emotional stress. Aphobazole at the dose of 10.0 mg/kg was incorporated into rats once a day. It is shown that aphobazole permits to stop the violations in adaptation reactions and compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system under conditions of emotional stress development in the early period following the exposure to gamma radiation at 0.9 Gy dose [ru

  8. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  9. Effect of low dose irradiation on subsets of T-lymphocyte of peripheral blood, spleen and tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Huawei; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: In order to understand the mechanism of the stimulation effects of low dose radiation (LDR), the author observed the immune changes of T-lymphocyte subsets. Meteria and methods: Whole body of BALB/C bring-tumor mice were exposed to the doses of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cGy γ-rays. The changes of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, spleen and tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) were studied with flow cytometry (FCM). Results: the ratio of L 3 T 4 + /Lyt 2 + remarkable increased in the peripheral blood and spleen (p 3 T 4 + /Lyt 2 + further decreased in the TIL group of mice exposed 10 cGy (p 2 + molecules, were concentrated in the tumor tissues and they carried out the killing function to the tumor cells

  10. Effects of low-dose gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, N.; McFarlane, N.M.; Lemon, J.; Boreham, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Using a successful new automation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) scoring, the effects of low-dose (< 1.0 Gy) gamma and neutron radiation on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of reticulocytes (RET) in a mouse model were investigated. Gamma and neutron irradiation induced significant (p<0.001) increases in the levels of %MN-RET and decreases in the levels of %RET (p<0.001) as the dose level increased. Increasing dose levels showed that gamma radiation induced significantly (p<0.05) more %MN-RET and more %RET than neutron radiation. The results suggest that neutron irradiation may be more cytotoxic (less %RET) than gamma irradiation; however, gamma irradiation may be producing cells with more chromosomal aberrations (more %MN-RET) than neutron irradiation. (author)

  11. Health effects of low-dose radiation on atomic workers: a case study of employer-directed research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    The 15-year history of a study on the health effects of low-dose radiation on workers at the Hanford Atomic Plant in Washington State demonstrates different facets of political control by employers over investigations of employee working conditions. Evidence obtained through the Freedom of Information Act shows that the original study, under the guidance of Dr. Thomas Mancuso, an experienced and respected occupational health epidemiologist, was proof to employees that their exposure levels were safe. When it turned out that the study might show an increase in cancer rates among plant employees, its control was transferred to the employer. Lessons from these events are that it may be necessary for organized labor to negotiate the conduct of occupational health investigations as part of negotiated settlements

  12. Health effects of low dose ionising radiation - recent advances and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of this unusual interdisciplinary conference encompass the work of doctors, industrialists and civil servants. The discussion covers the investigation and quantification of dose response relationships for the various damaging effects of low level ionising radiation and a unified system for expressing biological damage, together with the results of epidemiological studies using models and data from the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA (including data base systems for assembling and validating data), the effects of background radiation (gamma ray and radon exposure), clustering studies, safety standards, radioactive waste discharge control and limitation through legislation and the monitoring of radioactivity in food. (author)

  13. Effect of x-ray low doses on tolerance to salinity in Latuca Sativa plantules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Fernandez, R.; Gonzalez Nunez, L.M.; Perez Talavera, S.

    1998-01-01

    The work presents the effect of different radiation doses (ranging from 50 to 200 Gy) applied on irradiated lettuce seeds in a ray source for surface therapy, with a working regime of 30 k and 10 m and a dose rate of 12,9 Gy/mins on the germination and growth of plantules in the presence or absence of salinity. The results indicated meaningful differences in the magnitude of the stimulation effect and the doses that caused it for normal conditions, as well as substantial increments in plantules tolerance from irradiated seeds

  14. Inherited effects from mouse immature oocytes following low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Khan, R.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M.

    1992-07-01

    Immature oocytes represent the genetic pool in female mice as well as in women and therefore are principal cells of concern for genetic studies. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic effects in female mice can be masked by the hypersensitive plasma membrane lethality target of immature oocytes. Studies have also shown that genetic effects can be detected when the plasma mambrane is sufficiently spared. Here, new data obtained using the mouse preimplantation embryo chimera assay are presented and discussed in light of previous findings for irradiated mouse oocytes

  15. Experimental investigation of combined blastomogenic effect of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poruba, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of high-and low cancer lines of mice in the contaminated area of Cherikov district in Gomel Region (dose rate 380-400 mR/h) for 120 days caused intensification of urethane-induced carcinogenesis in the lung of the high-cancer mouse line and did not exert a modifying effect on urethane pulmonary carcinogenesis in low-cancer animals. The findings indicate to genetic determination of body sensitivity to a complex blastomogenic effect of the factors studied (authors)

  16. Effect of low-dose heparin on urinary albumin excretion in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrup, B; Hansen, P M; Jensen, T

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of heparin on urinary albumin excretion in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. 39 patients with persistent urinary albumin excretion of 30-300 mg/24 h were randomly treated for 3 months with subcutaneous injections twice daily of isotonic saline, 5000 IU...

  17. Effect of low-dose heparin on urinary albumin excretion in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Hansen, P.M.; Jensen, T.; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A.; Feldt-Rasmussen, B.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.; Deckert, T.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of heparin on urinary albumin excretion in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. 39 patients with persistent urinary albumin excretion of 30-300 mg/24 h were randomly treated for 3 months with subcutaneous injections twice daily of isotonic saline, 5000 IU

  18. Low-dose caffeine discrimination and self-reported mood effects in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, K; Griffiths, R R

    1992-01-01

    A caffeine versus placebo discrimination procedure was used to determine the lowest caffeine dose that could produce discrimination and self-reported mood effects in normal volunteers. During daily sessions under double-blind conditions, caffeine-abstinent subjects orally ingested a capsule containing 178 mg caffeine or placebo. Before beginning discrimination training, the compounds were identified to subjects by letter codes. Fifteen, 30, and 45 min after capsule ingestion, subjects guessed the capsule's letter code. Correct guesses at 45 min earned money. After each session, subjects received a supplementary capsule containing caffeine or placebo to ensure that, within each phase of the study, subjects received the same daily dose of caffeine equal to the training dose. Five of the 15 subjects acquired the caffeine versus placebo discrimination within the first 20 sessions (greater than or equal to 75% correct); 6 other subjects acquired the discrimination with additional training. Nine subjects who acquired the discrimination were subsequently trained at progressively lower caffeine doses. In general, the lowest dose to produce discrimination (greater than or equal to 75% correct) was also the lowest dose to produce self-reported mood effects: 4 subjects showed discrimination and self-reported mood effects at 100 mg caffeine, 2 at 56 mg, 1 at 32 mg, and 1 at 18 mg. One of these subjects also showed self-reported mood effects at 10 mg. The present study documents discriminative stimulus and self-reported mood effects of caffeine at doses below those previously shown to affect any behavior in normal volunteers. PMID:1548451

  19. Cost-effectiveness of Low-dose Submicron Diclofenac Compared With Generic Diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladsi, Deirdre; Ronquest, Naoko; Odom, Dawn; Miles, LaStella; Saag, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    NSAIDs are commonly prescribed for the treatment of pain and inflammation. Despite the effectiveness of NSAIDs, concerns exist regarding their tolerability. Worldwide health authorities, including the European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and the US Food and Drug Administration, have advised that NSAIDs be prescribed at the lowest effective dosage and for the shortest duration. Effective lowering of NSAID dosage without compromising pain relief has been demonstrated in randomized, controlled trials of the recently approved NSAID lower-dose submicron diclofenac. Building on previously published work from an independently published systematic review and meta-analysis, a linear dose-toxicity relationship between diclofenac dose and serious gastrointestinal (GI) events was recently demonstrated, indicating that reductions in adverse events (AEs) may be seen even with modest dose reductions in many patients. The objective of the present study was to estimate the potential reduction in risk for NSAID dose-related AEs, corresponding savings in health care costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness of submicron diclofenac compared with generic diclofenac in the United States. Our decision-analytic cost-effectiveness model considered a subset of potential AEs that may be avoided by lowering NSAID dosage. To estimate the expected reductions in upper GI bleeding/perforation and major cardiovascular events with submicron diclofenac, our model used prediction equations estimated by meta-regressions using data from systematic literature reviews. Utilities, lifetime costs, and health outcomes associated with AEs were estimated using data from the literature. The face validity of the model structure and inputs was confirmed by clinical experts in the United States. Results were evaluated in 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The model predicted that submicron diclofenac versus generic diclofenac could reduce the occurrence of modeled GI events (by 18

  20. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2016-01-01

    /day. In the offspring, growth, sexual maturation, weights and histopathology of reproductive organs, oestrus cyclicity and sperm counts were assessed. Neurobehavioural development was investigated using a behavioural testing battery including tests for motor activity, sweet preference, anxiety and spatial learning....... Decreased sperm count was found at the lowest bisphenol A dose, that is 25 μg/kg/day, but not at the higher doses. Reproductive organ weight and histology were not affected and no behavioural effects were seen in male offspring. In the female offspring, exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A dose resulted...... not significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study using a robust experimental study design, has shown that developmental exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A can cause adverse effects on fertility (decreased sperm count), neurodevelopment (masculinization of spatial learning in females) and lead...

  1. Low dose effects - is the fear more dangerous than the radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaxos, M.

    1996-01-01

    The use of hypothesis which assumes a dose / harmful effect relationship without a limit allows the calculation of risks attributable to doses too small to produce detectable, harmful biological effects. The daughter product of this hypothesis is ALARA concept which requires that the dose received is kept as low as reasonably achievable. This concept of prudent avoidance is generally accepted by international radiation protection organisations and universally applied by radiation health professionals. The acceptance of a hypothesis which assumes that a single nuclear event can cause carcinogenesis, has generated levels of anxiety which may have resulted in significant detriment to those possibly exposed to ionising radiation. The anxiety generated may have caused more detriment and a higher death rate than the worst case ' theoretical' value calculated using the Linear or Quadratic Linear Hypothesis. Information selected from reports and comments in relevant publications indicating that this possibility has become a realty is presented. 24 refs

  2. Model predictions and analysis of enhanced biological effectiveness at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.; Sykes, C.E.; Younis, A.-R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A severe challenge to all models purporting to describe the biological effects of ionizing radiation has arisen with the discovery of two phenomena: the anomalous trend with dose rate of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells and the apparent excessive damaging power of electron-capture radionuclides when incorporated into cell nuclei. A new model is proposed which predicts and enables interpretation of these phenomena. Radiation effectiveness is found to be expressible absolutely in terms of the geometrical cross-sectional area of the radiosensitive sites. The duration of the irradiation, the mean free path for ionization, the influence of particles in the slowing-down spectrum perrtaining in the medium and two collective time factors determining the mean repair rate and the mean lifetime of unidentified reactive chemical species [pt

  3. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada); Conway, B. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Montaner, J.S.G. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); O`Shaughnessy, M.V. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Faculty of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); Greenstock, C.L. [AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch

    1996-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of {gamma}-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of {gamma}-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy {gamma}-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author).

  4. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation on barley tolerance grown under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Khalifa, Kh; Al-Ain, F.

    2003-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Al-Hijanah, an area located at about 35 km south east of Damascus. Seeds of two barley varieties [White Arabi (WA) and Pakistani 30163 (PK) were irradiated with 2 doses 0 and 15 Gy of gamma irradiation. Then, they were shown on salty soil (17.6-18,9 m mos/cm) and irrigated with salty water (5.12-5.75 m mos/cm). A dose of 15 Gy of gamma irradiation was shown to positively affect the percent germination of PK but had no similar effect on WA. The results were obtained at 3 different growth stages: first, the heading stage, 15 Gy dose increased shoots dry weight, Mg ++ , P content and percent of WA, whereas N percent of PK was decreased. When the seeds were irradiated by the same dose. K + content in WA was significantly higher than that in PK. Second, physiological maturity stage, the same dose (15 Gy) increased shoot dry, but affected negatively K + and Na + contents in PK variety. As for WA variety, Mg ++ and P contents were increased, whereas Na + and Cl - were slightly decreased. Third, harvest stage, gamma irradiation had a positive effect on total yield, grain yield, nitrogen yield and harvest index of PK variety. A positive effect was produced on straw yield, 1000-grain weight, and nitrogen yield of WA variety. (author)

  5. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Conway, B.; O'Shaughnessy, M.V.; Greenstock, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of γ-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of γ-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy γ-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author)

  6. A prospective randomized study of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuwan, Pawana; Tuntawiroon, Malulee; Sritongkul, Nopamol; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Komoltri, Chulalak; Thepamongkhol, Kullathorn; Khiewvan, Benjapa; Tuchinda, Pongpija; Sriussadaporn, Sutin

    2011-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. One hundred fifty patients with proven hyperthyroidism were randomly allocated into the high (74 patients) and low (76 patients) dose regimen of I-131 treatment. Four patients of the high dose group and one patient of the low dose group were excluded because of lost follow-up. A gland-specific dosage was calculated on the estimated weight of thyroid gland and 24-hour I-131 uptake. The high and low I-131 dose regimens were 150 microCi/gm and 100 microCi/gm, respectively. The first mean radioiodine activity administered to the high and low dose group was 10.2 and 8 mCi, respectively. Repeated treatment was given to 25 patients of the high dose group and 40 patients of the low dose group. Clinical outcome and calculated costs for outpatient attendances, and laboratory tests together with initial and subsequent treatments were evaluated for one year after I-131 treatment. Elimination of hyperthyroidism that resulted in either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was classified as therapeutic success. The cost effectiveness was also compared. At 6 months after treatment, 45 (64.3%) patients receiving high dose and 59 (78.7%) patients receiving low dose were hyperthyroidism. Clinical outcome at one year showed persistence of hyperthyroidism in 21 (30%) patients of the high dose regimen and 36 (48%) patients of the low dose regimen. At one year post treatment, it was demonstrated that the high dose regimen could eliminate hyperthyroidism in a significantly shorter time than the low dose regimen, i.e., 259.6 days and 305.5 days, respectively, p = 0.008). For the persistent hyperthyroid patients, the average total cost of treatment in the low dose group was significantly higher than that of the high dose group, i.e., 13,422.78 baht and 10,942.79 baht, respectively; p = 0.050). A high dose regimen of radioactive iodine treatment is more effective than

  7. Low dose irradiation effects on DIN 1.4948 mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der; Vries, M.I. de

    For the SNR 300 the licensing authorities require the determination of the lower boundaries of post-irradiation mechanical properties for DIN 1.4948 parent metal and welded joints. It has been established that with decreasing strain rate the post-irradiation tensile ductility decreases. A transition strain rate has been observed, above which there is no effect of irradiation on ductility. The transition strain rate increases with increasing temperature. Coarse grained heats show lower ultimate tensile strength above 800 K than fine grained heats. There is no significant effect of irradiation on load controlled high cycle fatigue with frequencies of 1 Hz or higher. In low cycle fatigue numbers of cycles to failure decrease with decreasing frequency. Increasing the test temperature reduces the number of cycles to failure even more. The frequency effect is more evident at 823 K. Parent metal has a better fatigue resistance than welded joints in unirradiated and irradiated condition. Creep strength is reduced by irradiation due to loss of ductility. It is shown that with increasing grain size the rupture strength decreases. The ductility of welded joints after irradiation is low, in some cases as low as 0.5% creep strain. After irradiation, tensile, creep and fatigue fracture surfaces show many more intergranular features than in the equivalent unirradiated condition. The promotion of intergranular fracture by irradiation and the consequent degradation of low strain rate mechanical properties is explained by the presence of helium on grain boundaries. Several measures to increase the helium content threshold can be taken, such as grain refinement, homogeneous boron distribution and promotion of helium bubble initiation. In cases where helium embrittlement is encountered, life reduction factors on unirradiated material properties must be applied

  8. Autoradiographic investigation of the effects of low-dose colchicine on dentinogenesis in rat incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Nogueira, T. de; Rossetini, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve wistar rats received 0.5 mg/kg colchicine (CLC) i.v. Three animals were sacrified 5 h, 24 h, 3 days and 7 days after the injection. Ninety minutes before sacrifice all animals received tritiated proline intraperitoneally. Autoradiograms of sections from the maxillary incisor were subjected to quantitative, and statistical analysis. These results revealed an increased secretory activity in the odontoblasts in the more incisal parts of the tooth, indicating a stimulatory effect of CLC on collagen production and secretion after 3 days. (author)

  9. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)

  10. Effects of low doses at the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, K.; Wawra, E.

    1978-07-01

    In connexion with the debate on nuclear energy again and again attempts are found to threaten the public with incorrect or dramatically exaggerated statements about the effect of low-level-radiation by nuclear technology. Thereby a wrong impression in parts of the population about the dangers of low-level-radiaton doses arose. This paper shall help to clarify some of the misunderstandings and describe the present state of knowledge in this field in a way also understandable by the interested layman. (author)

  11. Effect of low doses of X-rays on grain and straw yield of Setaria italica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fendrik, I.

    1976-01-01

    Dry or pre-soaked seeds were irradiated with 250-1,500 R/h of X-rays at a dose rate of 1,000 R/h and sown into pots. Till harvest normal cultural practices were employed. A stimulation of grain and straw yield was only obtained by irradiation of dry seeds. Irradiation of pre-soaked seeds was ineffective or somewhat harmful. The absence of any effects in post-soaked seeds indicated that early hydration of seeds after irradiation results in a stabilization of the damage. (MG) [de

  12. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A H [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1989-06-05

    Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)

  13. Subacute effects of low dose lead nitrate and mercury chloride exposure on kidney of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydın, Fatma Gökçe; Baş, Hatice; Kalender, Suna; Kalender, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Lead nitrate and mercury chloride are the most common heavy metal pollutants. In the present study, the effects of lead and mercury induced nephrotoxicity were studied in Wistar rats. Lead nitrate (LN, 45 mg/kg b.w/day) and mercury chloride (MC, 0.02 mg/kg b.w/day) and their combination were administered orally for 28 days. Four groups of rats were used in the study: control, LN, MC and LN plus MC groups. Serum biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and histopathological changes in kidney tissues were investigated in all treatment groups. LN and MC caused severe histopathological changes. It was shown that LN, MC and also co-treatment with LN and MC exposure induced significant increase in serum urea, uric acid and creatinine levels. There were also statistically significant changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, GPx and GST) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) in all groups except control group. In this study, we showed that MC caused more harmful effects than LN in rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Low-Dose Irradiation on Biochemical and Immunological Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.; Sayed, Z.S.; El-Gawish, M.A.; Mahdy, E.M.E.; Shosha, W.Gh.

    2008-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation (Malondialdehyde), Lactate dehydrogenase, Iron Concentration, IL-6 and IL-1β concentration were determined in Seventy-two male albino rats divided in two main groups. The first one was subdivided into 7 subgroups; control and 6 irradiated subgroups with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1 Gy single dose of gamma radiation. The other was subdivided into 4 irradiated subgroups with fractionated dose .-radiation of 0.3, 0.7 and 1 Gy with 0.1 Gy per day and the last subgroup 1 Gy with 0.2 Gy daily. All animals were sacrificed after three days of the last irradiation dose. The results revealed that all biochemical parameters were increased in rats exposed to fractionated more than single doses. In conclusion, the data of this study highlight on the beneficial and stimulatory effect of low ionizing radiation doses (≥ 1Gy) whether single or fractionated on some biochemical and immunological parameters. These findings may be fruitful for those who undergo radiotherapy as well as the dose-effect relationship

  15. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, U; Christiansen, S; Boberg, J; Rasmussen, M G; Mandrup, K; Axelstad, M

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A is widely used in food contact materials and other products and is detected in human urine and blood. Bisphenol A may affect reproductive and neurological development; however, opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on bisphenol A (EFSA J, 13, 2015 and 3978) concluded that none of the available studies were robust enough to provide a point of departure for setting a tolerable daily intake for bisphenol A. In the present study, pregnant Wistar rats (n = 17-21) were gavaged from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 with bisphenol A doses of 0, 25 μg, 250 μg, 5 mg or 50 mg/kg bw/day. In the offspring, growth, sexual maturation, weights and histopathology of reproductive organs, oestrus cyclicity and sperm counts were assessed. Neurobehavioural development was investigated using a behavioural testing battery including tests for motor activity, sweet preference, anxiety and spatial learning. Decreased sperm count was found at the lowest bisphenol A dose, that is 25 μg/kg/day, but not at the higher doses. Reproductive organ weight and histology were not affected and no behavioural effects were seen in male offspring. In the female offspring, exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A dose resulted in increased body weight late in life and altered spatial learning in a Morris water maze, indicating masculinization of the brain. Decreased intake of sweetened water was seen in females from the highest bisphenol A dose group, also a possible sign of masculinization. The other investigated endpoints were not significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study using a robust experimental study design, has shown that developmental exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A can cause adverse effects on fertility (decreased sperm count), neurodevelopment (masculinization of spatial learning in females) and lead to increased female body weight late in life. These results suggest that the new EFSA temporary tolerable daily intake of 4 μg/kg bw

  16. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them

  17. Urinary steroid hormone patterns: III. Effect of continuous daily administration of low dose megestrol acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, G L; Roy, S; Allag, I S; Ghosal, J

    1975-12-01

    The effect of megestrol acetate, administered in daily doses of .5 mg, on urinary steroid levels was studied before, during, and after therapy in 4 women volunteers. In each case, pregnanediol levels were reduced, though ovulatory biphasic patterns, as reflected in basal body temperature patterns, were apparent in the majority of the cycles, which suggests that corpus luteum function, but not ovulation, was impaired. 17-ketosteroid levels were significantly (p less than .001) increased either during or after treatment, while 17-hydroxycorticoid levels were reduced in 3 of the women. 2 subjects showed a marked reduction in levels of 17-ketogenic steroids and corticoid levels. Total estrogen levels seemed to correlate with the levels of corticoid excretion.

  18. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation on Bcl-2 transcription level of Peyer's patches in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Zheng Yongchen; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays on apoptosis in cells of mouse Peyer's patches and its molecular mechanism. Methods: RT-PCR was used to detect the changes of Bcl-2 transcription level. Agarose electrophoresis and flow cytometry were used to detect the changes of DNA and apoptotic bodies in Peyer's patches after WBI with different doses of X-rays. Results: The apoptotic was increased and Bcl-2 transcription level was decreased in Peyer's patches after 2 Gy X-rays. The apoptotic rate was decreased and Bcl-2 transcription level was increased in Peyer's patches after 75 mGy X-rays. Conclusion: Bcl-2 participates in the regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis in Peyer's patches

  19. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them.

  20. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: Conflict between assumptions and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Devasagayam, T.P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data on cancer incidence among the A-bomb survivors and more importantly experimental studies in cell and molecular radiobiology do not lend unequivocal support to the ''linear, no threshold'' (LNT) hypothesis; in fact, the discernible evidence that low and high doses of ionizing radiations induce qualitatively different/opposite effects cannot be summarily rejected. A time has come to examine the mechanistic aspects of ''radiation hormesis'' and ''radioadaptive response'' seriously rather than proclaiming one's profound disbelief about these phenomena. To put the discussion in a serious scientific mode, we briefly catalogue here reports in the literature on gene expression differentially influenced by low and high doses. These are not explicable in terms of the current radiation paradigm. (author)

  1. Effects of local low-dose rocuronium on the quality of peribulbar anesthesia for cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Abdellatif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Peribulbar anesthesia is associated with delayed and/or incomplete orbital akinesia compared with retrobulbar anesthesia. This study examined the effects of adding rocuronium 5 mg to two different concentrations of lidocaine-bupivacaine mixture on onset time of orbital and eyelid akinesia in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Methods: In a double-blind study, 90 patients were equally randomized to receive a mixture of 0.5 ml normal saline, 4 ml lidocaine 2%, and 4 ml bupivacaine 0.5% (group I, a mixture of rocuronium 0.5 ml (5 mg, 4 ml lidocaine 2%, and 4 ml bupivacaine 0.5% (group II, or a mixture of rocuronium 0.5 ml (5 mg, 4 ml lidocaine 1%, and 4 ml bupivacaine 0.25% (group III. Orbital akinesia was assessed on a 0-8 score (0 = no movement, 8 = normal at 2 min intervals for 10 min. Time to adequate anesthesia was also recorded. Results are presented as mean±SD. Results: Ocular movement score decreased during the assessment period in all groups. However, at 2 min after block administration, the score decreased to 4±2 (95% CI 3,5 in groups II and III compared with 5±2 (95% CI 4,6 in group I (P<0.01. Time to adequate condition to begin surgery was 9.8±2.9 vs. 6.9±4.1 vs. 7.9±3.9 min for groups I, II, and III, respectively (P=0.01. Conclusion: The addition of rocuronium 5 mg to a mixture of lidocaine 2% and bupivacaine 0.5% shortened the onset time of peribulbar anesthesia in patients undergoing cataract surgery without causing adverse effects.

  2. Beneficial effect of low dose Amlodipine vs Nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavane DS, Rajesh CS, Gurudatta Moharir, Bharatha Ambadasu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low dose amlodipine v/s nifedipine on serum cholesterol profile of rabbits receiving standard diet. Methods: Fourty Newzealand rabbits were selected for the study. Their cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning of the study. Rabbits were grouped into 4 groups receiving standard diet (control group, standard diet + vehicle propylene glycol, standard diet + nifedipine dissolved in propylene glycol and standard diet + amlodipine dissolved in propylene glycol. Along with standard diet they were treated with respective drugs for ten weeks. At the end of ten weeks serum cholesterol profile was estimated. Results: The cholesterol profile was estimated at the beginning and at the end of ten weeks. Total cholesterol in the amlodipine group decreased from 97±4.06 mg/dl to 90±4.2 mg/dl and HDL-Cholesterol increased from 32.01±4.40 mg/dl to 37±4.60 mg/dl after 10 week treatment but these changes were not significant. LDL cholesterol decreased significantly in rabbits with low dose of amlodipine from 55.42±3.32 mg/dl to 32.40±3.22 mg/dl and. In the nifedipine group there was a slight increase in total cholesterol from 102.49±5.16 mg/dl to 106±5.39 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol from 34.10±2.80 to 35.16±2.82 mg/dl and LDL cholesterol also increased from 56.20±2.20 mg/dl to 59.00±2.20 mg/dl after 10 week treatment. Conclusion: The study shows amlodipine produces favorable alterations in serum cholesterol profile

  3. Effect of Exposure to Pill Contraceptive Low-dose Levels of Homocysteine and Nitric Oxide in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is one of the public health priorities. Consumption of oral contraceptives increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and it still remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the effect of exposure on pill contraceptive low-dose  levels on homocysteine and nitric oxide. methods: In this cohort ( retrospective+ prospective study, 100 women with normal menstrual cycle aged betwen 20-35 years old refered to health care centers of Yazd, Iran in 2015.  This study was conducted through face to face interviews by the researcher who asked for demographic and anthropometric characteristics. Anthropometic indices  was measured and the levels of homosysteine and nitric oxide was determined. The data were analyzed using t-test, chi- square test and ANOVA by SPSS 21. Results: The mean and standard deviation of homocysteine levels in the exposed group acompared to non-exposed group were (3/848±2/357 μmol/L and (3/284±1/616 μmol/L as well as the mean and standard deviation of nitric oxide in the exposed group were (p-value=0/41 and (181/360±90/44μM and in the non-exposed group were (162/654±90/913 μM and (p-value=0/29 , respectively.According to these results, there was not found any statistical significant  difference among these results. Conclusion: Taking low dose oral contraceptives in healthy women did not change any differences in homocysteine and nitric oxide levels as a modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Effect of Low-dose Atracurium on Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion Conditions: A Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nasseri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The amount of sedation and muscle relaxation of the jaw may have an impact on complications caused by laryngeal mask airway (LMA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low-dose Atracurium on conditions of insertion, complications, and hemodynamic responses to LMA insertion following induction of anesthesia with propofol, in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Patients and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial study, 60 patients were randomly divided into two groups. Initially, the patients in the study group received 0.15 mg/kg intravenous injection of atracurium, and the patients in the control group received 2 ml of intravenous injection of normal saline, after which anesthesia in both groups were induced with midazolam, fentanyl, lidocaine, and propofol. The amount of jaw relaxation, ease of insertion, and the time needed for insertion, hemodynamic responses and complications of LMA insertion were evaluated. Results: Jaw relaxation and ease of LMA insertion in the study group was significantly better than that of the control group (P = 0.02. Average time needed for LMA placement in the study group (5/06 ± 0.52 second was significantly lower than the control group (5/76 ± 0.67 second (P = 0.001. Hemodynamic response to LMA insertion was similar in both groups. Sore throat at recovery and 24 h after surgery in the control group was significantly higher than that of the study group (3/30 vs. 10/30 (P = 0.01. Conclusions: Using low doses of atracurium decreases the time needed for LMA insertion and sore throat after the operation. Atracurium also increases jaw relaxation and facilitates the placement of LMA.

  5. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  6. Investigation of the Effects of Continuous Low-Dose Epidural Analgesia on the Autonomic Nervous System Using Hilbert Huang Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ren Chuang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of continuous low-dose epidural bupivacaine (0.05-0.1% infusion on the Doppler velocimetry for labor analgesia have been well documented. The aim of this study was to monitor the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS for women in labor based on Hilbert Huang transform (HHT, which performs signal processing for nonlinear systems, such as human cardiac systems. Thirteen pregnant women were included in the experimental group for labor analgesia. They received continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion. The normal-to-normal intervals (NN-interval were downloaded from an ECG holter. Another 20 pregnant women in non-anesthesia labor (average gestation age was 38.6 weeks were included in the comparison group. In this study, HHT was used to decompose components of ECG signals, which reflect three different frequency bands of a person's heart rate spectrum (viz. high frequency (HF, low frequency (LF and very low frequency (VLF. It was found that the change of energy in subjects without anesthesia was more active than that with continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion. The energy values of the experimental group (i.e., labor analgesia of HF and LF of ANS activities were significantly lower (P < 0.05 than the values of the comparison group (viz. labor without analgesia, but the trend of energy ratio of LF/HF was opposite. In conclusion, the sympathetic and parasympathetic components of ANS are all suppressed by continuous low-dose epidural bupivacaine 0.075% infusion, but parasympathetic power is suppressed more than sympathetic power.

  7. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Yanai, Takanori; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Science, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of prolonged low-dose irradiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors in tissues, gene expression was analyzed in the spleen as a hemopoietic tissue that is well known to be one of the most sensitive tissues to irradiation. SPF C3H/HeN female mice (Clea Japan Inc.) were irradiated under SPF conditions with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 2, 4, 6, and 8 Gy and a dose rate of 20 mGy/day. Non-irradiated mice of the same age were maintained as controls. At the end of the period of irradiation, both groups of mice were sacrificed and dissected to extract total RNA from their tissues. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the Northern hybridization were employed to detect gene expression. RT-PCT showed no marked changes in the gene expression of GM-CSF. IL-6 gene expression was shown to tend to be enhanced by prolonged low-dose irradiation. The results of Northern hybridization showed that IL-6 mRNA was expressed slightly in both groups, and it was too weak to compare the difference in mRNA expression level between the irradiated group and the controls. No mRNA expression of GM-CSF was detected by Northern hybridization. Based on these results, it was concluded that the gene expression levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF were inadequate to detect the chemiluminescence signals without amplification. It was therefore concluded that improvement of detection sensitivity and larger RNA samples would be necessary for further analysis of the gene expression of hemopoietic factors. (K.H.)

  8. Stimulation effects of low dose-rate irradiation on pancreatic antioxidant activity in type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of low dose-rate gamma irradiation on the type II diabetes mellitus were investigated in BKS.Cg-+Lepr db /+Lepr db /Jcl (DB mice). Ten-week-old female DB mice (5 mice in each group) were irradiated with gamma ray at 0.35, 0.70, or 1.2 mGy/hr. During the course of the 12 weeks the glucose level slightly increased with little difference between the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. The plasma insulin concentration decreased within the first 4 weeks in all groups. The level was kept low in the non-irradiated mice; while the insulin level in the irradiated groups showed a tendency to increase. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group the increase was statistically significant after 12 weeks of irradiation. Total activity of SOD, one of antioxidative enzymes, decreased both in non-irradiated and irradiated groups; however the decrease was less in the irradiated groups, especially 0.70 mGy/hr group. In the 0.70 mGy/hr group Mn-SOD activity, one of the components of total SOD activity, increased after 12-week irradiation. A pathological examination of the pancreas revealed that damage to β cells responsible for the secretion of insulin was much less in the 0.70 mGy/hr group compared to that in the non-irradiated group. These results indicated that the low dose-rate irradiation increase the antioxidative capacity in the pancreas to protect β cells from oxidative damage, and the to increase the insulin level. This mechanism would lead the mice to the recovery from the disease and the prolongation of the life span as is demonstrated in our previous report. (author)

  9. Effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on biological activity of NK cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liyun; Lin Meixiong; Luo Min; Ran Min; Liang Xuefei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro and in vivo effect of LDR on the proliferation and killing activity of mouse NK cells with exploitation of the related mechanism of signal transduction. The effect of infused NK cells on inhibiton of oncogenesis and tumor burden regression was also studied. Methods: Mononuclear cells extracted from mouse spleen were treated with immunomagnetic bead for the isolation of CD3 - /CD16 + , CD56 + cells. After verified with flowcytometry, these NK cells were cultured with mice splenic cells (irradiated with 20Gy 60 Co gamma ray) as feeder cells and rhIL-2 as induction factor for 3 rounds (5 days each round). Specimens of cultured NK cells were treated with different doses of radiation (25mGy, 75mGy, 200mGy, 500mGy), the proliferation index (PI) with tumoreidal activity on K562 cells (with 3 H-TdR) incorporation was examined at 4h, 24h, 48h, 72h after irradiation respectively. The role of P38MAPK signal pathway in the LDR effect was examined with adding either inhibitor (SB203580) or activator (P79350) of P38MAPK into the culture and measuring the PI, Killing activity (as expression of the related factors IFN-gamma, FasL, perforin) of NK cells thereafter. The in vivo test involved exposing mice to whole body 25mGy irradiation, harvesting splenic NK cells at 4h, 24h, 48h, 72h later respectively and performing the above-described in vitro procedures. Inhibition of oncogenesis was examined in vivo with infusion of cultured NK cells (LDR treated vs LDR non-treated) 10 days after infusion of K562 cells into mice and examination of hepatic/splenic CD 13+ , S-stage cells and peripheral blood tumor cells in the sacrificed animal another 10 days later. Also, K562 cells were innoculated subcutaneously into mice. After tumor nodule formation (2.0 x 2.0 mm), NK cells (LDR treated vs non-treated) were infused and regression of the tumor nodule with the weight of hepatic tumor mass was noticed in sacrificed animals on d 8 and the survival rate on d 40

  10. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  11. Effects of low doses gamma irradiation on yield and nitrogen utilization in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Sharanik, A.

    1997-12-01

    Twelve field experiments were conducted in two seasons (1992 and 1993) in three regions of Syria (Damascus, Al-Salamia and Al-Ghab). Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. var Diamont) were irradiated with gamma-radiation from a 60 Co source, using doses of 0,1,2,3,5 and 10 Gy, at dose rate of 0.15 Gy/min. The irradiated tubers were sown 5-6 days after irradiation, in a randomized complete block design with four replicates and two rates of nitrogen fertilizer (0 and 120 Kg/N/ha). Irradiation and N application significantly increased dry matter production by 24% (for optimal dose) and 38% respectively. The tuber yields were increased by 28.7% for N application and between 13.6 and 19.7 for optimal dose, as a mean for all experiments and regions. Presowing tubers irradiation with 3 Gy. dose also Increased N uptake at harvest by 21.6, 16.6 and 18% for Damascus, Al-Salamia and Al-Ghab respectively. irradiation had negligible effects on N concentration and both Scratch and Vitamin C contents in tubers. (author)

  12. Effects of Low-Dose Non-Caloric Sweetener Consumption on Gut Microbiota in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Uebanso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NASs provide sweet tastes to food without adding calories or glucose. NASs can be used as alternative sweeteners for controlling blood glucose levels and weight gain. Although the consumption of NASs has increased over the past decade in Japan and other countries, whether these sweeteners affect the composition of the gut microbiome is unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of sucralose or acesulfame-K ingestion (at most the maximum acceptable daily intake (ADI levels, 15 mg/kg body weight on the gut microbiome in mice. Consumption of sucralose, but not acesulfame-K, for 8 weeks reduced the relative amount of Clostridium cluster XIVa in feces. Meanwhile, sucralose and acesulfame-K did not increase food intake, body weight gain or liver weight, or fat in the epididymis or cecum. Only sucralose intake increased the concentration of hepatic cholesterol and cholic acid. Moreover, the relative concentration of butyrate and the ratio of secondary/primary bile acids in luminal metabolites increased with sucralose consumption in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that daily intake of maximum ADI levels of sucralose, but not acesulfame-K, affected the relative amount of the Clostridium cluster XIVa in fecal microbiome and cholesterol bile acid metabolism in mice.

  13. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.W.; Azure, M.T.; Narra, V.R.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit α particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224 Ra daughters 212 Pb and 212 Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of α and β particles in their decay to stable 208 Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212 Pb and its daughters. When 212 Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212 Bi, 212 Po and 208 Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D 37 ) was 0.143 ± 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D 37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210 Po, was used to obtain an RBE-LET relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBE α = 4.8 - 6.1 x 10 -2 LET + 1.0 x 10 -3 LET 2 . Similarly, the dependence of RBE on α-particle energy E α was given by RBE α = 22 E α -0.73 . These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of α-particle emitters. 46 refs., 6 figs

  14. Effect of low doses gamma-irradiation on yield and nitrogen utilization in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Sharanek, A.

    1998-01-01

    Twelve field experiments were conducted in two seasons (1992 and 1993) in three regions of Syria (Damascus, Al-Salamia and Al-Ghab). Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. var Diamont) were irradiation with gamma-radiation from a 60 Co source, using doses of 0,1,2,3,5 and 10 Gy, at dose rate of 0.15 Gy/min. The irradiated tubers were sown 5-6 days after irradiation, in a randomized complete block design with four replicates and two rates of nitrogen fertilizer (0 and 120 Kg/N/ha). Irradiation and N application significantly increased dry matter production by 24% (for optimal dose) and 38% respectively. The tuber yields were increased by 28.7% for N application and between 13.6 and 19.7 for optimal dose, as a mean for all experiments and regions. Presowing tubers irradiation with 3 Gy. dose also Increased N uptake at harvest by 21.6, 16.6 and 18% for Damascus, Al-Salamia and Al-Ghab respectively. irradiation had negligible effects on N concentration and both Scratch and Vitamin C contents in tubers. (author)

  15. Review of proposed values for carcinogenic effects of low dose irradiation: calculations and sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.

    1983-01-01

    The assessment of radiological risk generally relies on no threshold linear relationship, computed by the ICRP and the National Academy of Science in a former report (BEIR II). The last report of the NAS, as well as the publication by Loewe and Mendelsohn of new dose estimates for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, enhanced the controversy on the shape of the curve of the dose effect relationship. The theoretical debate focuses on this shape (linear or quadratic, with or without threshold) which depends on the true impact of radiation in the carcinogenic process. This paper leaves aside the theoretical aspect of the problem. Instead, it describes the flow chart of the calculations which allow to find munerical values for the coefficients of the relationship, starting from the observations on irradiated human populations. In this process, besides the theoretical hypotheses, pragmatic choices, and even the necessary simplifications in the calculation, can result in substantial changes in the risk coefficients. This paper aims to present these factors of variability, as well as some sensitivity analyses. These analyses are performed within the framework of pragmatical problems like the assessment of radiological impact of nuclear facilities or the optimisation of radioprotection. In this respect, the shape of the curve appears not to have greater impact than other alternatives, such as the absolute v relative risk projection model, the choice of data source [fr

  16. Effects of cobalt-60 low doses radiation on beam, rice and radish seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, O.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on seeds of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) were studied. Bean and rice seeds were irradiated with 3.5 and 7.7 Gy (32 Gy/h). There was an apparent acceleration on rice seed germination with 3.5 Gy when they were stored for 6 days after irradiation, but the same dose caused a delay when the store time was 1 day. Bean seeds germination was not modified by 3.5 and 7.7 Gy, but the fresh and dry weight of young plants showed an increase, mainly due the major quantity of water in the embryonic axis. Bean seeds were irradiated with 0.5 and 2.0 Gy (30 Gy/h). Seeds germination showed a slight delay irradiating with 0.5 Gy, while height, fresh and dry weight and primary leaves area of the young plants as well as number of nodes, leaves, flowers, beans and seeds were not modified after irradiation with 0.5 and 2.0 Gy. Radish seeds irradiated with 10 and 30 Gy at dose rates of 4.5, 22.5 and 45.0 Gy/h showed a germination delay and fresh and dry weight values for young plants leaves lower than control. Roots of totally developed plants showed no modifications in weight, volume, mean diameter, lenght and in the amount of soluble reducing sugar. (author)

  17. Effect of Whole Body Low Dose Radiation (WB-LDR) on diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of type II diabetic mice to LDR has been shown to significantly up regulate pancreatic antioxidants along with reduction of glucose levels. Present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of WB-LDR on type II diabetic rats. Sprague-Dawley male rats (n=18) were pre-treated with Alloxan Monohydrate (150 mg/kg body weight, IP) to induce hyperglycemia. Elevated level of blood glucose was monitored for consecutive 10 days by Glucometer (Accu-Chek, Active) before irradiation. Two group of rats (n=12) were exposed to single dose of 0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation at the rate of 1.02 Gy/minute. Blood glucose level, feed, water intake and body weight was monitored for 10 days post irradiation. Results revealed weight loss, polydipsia, polyphagia and elevated blood glucose level up to 10th day in diabetic control, whereas; reverse trend was observed from 7th day post irradiation in two treated groups. However, no significant difference was found between two treated groups. The results indicate that treatment with WB-LDR reduces the blood-glucose level and so its complications in diabetic rats. (author)

  18. Effect of exposure to low-dose γ radiation during late organogenesis in the mouse fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, P.U.; Baskar, R.; Hande, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    The adominal region of pregnant Swiss mice was exposed to 0.05 to 0.50 of γ radiation on day 11.5 postcoitus. The animals were sacrificed on day 18 gestation and the fetuses were examined for mortality, growth retardation, changes in head size and brain weight, and incidence of microphthalmia. No marked increase in fetal mortality or growth retardation was observed below 0.25 Gy; the increase in these parameters was significant only at 0.50 Gy. A significant reduction in head size and brain weight and a significant increase in the incidence of microphthalmia were observed at doses above 0.15 Gy. Detectable levels of microcephaly and microphthalmia were evident even at 0.10 Gy. A linear dose response was seen for these effects in the dose range of 0.05 to 0.15 Gy. It is concluded that the late period of organogenesis in the mouse, especially between days 10 and 12 postcoitus, is a particularly sensitive phase in the development of the skull, brain and eye. 21 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  19. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  20. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation of Co-60 (radio-hormesis) in tomato seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, Toni Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Tomato seeds of the Gladiador hybrid were exposed to gamma radiation of Co-60 with the following doses: 0; 2,5; 5; 7,5; 10; 12,5; 15 e 20 Gy. Analysis were performed on germination, seedlings height to cotyledon, seedling total height, seedling fresh and dry weight, plant height, stalk diameter at the root beginning, fresh and dry weight of the 5 th leaf, number of green fruits with diameter higher than 3 cm, number of green, half ripen and ripen fruits, total number of fruits, Brix and pH of fruits, average fruit weight and fruit total production. A variety of stimulation effects were observed on the different plant developing stages. The greatest stimulus for production was observed in the 10 Gy dose. The highest seedling average height and plant average height were observed for the 7,5 Gy dose. The biggest number of green fruits with diameter higher than 3 cm occurred for the 12,5 and 15 Gy treatments. Irradiation also stimulated a higher total number of fruits in all doses, having advantage the 10 Gy dose which produced 88% more fruits than control as well as 86% more weight production. The fruits pH acidified significantly in a dose of 12,5 Gy and higher. Production increased in all treatments comparing to control and the highest stimulus for production observed was for the 10, 12,5 and 15 Gy. The use of low gamma radiation doses of Co-60 applied as pre-sowing treatment in the seeds, efficiently stimulated the development of plants and the tomato production. (author)

  1. Low doses of dextromethorphan have a beneficial effect in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Véronique; Pickering, Gisèle; Etienne, Monique; Dupuis, Amandine; Privat, Anne-Marie; Chalus, Maryse; Eschalier, Alain; Daulhac, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists may be given in persistent neuropathic pain, but adverse events especially with ketamine may limit their clinical use. Less central and cognitive adverse events are described with dextromethorphan and memantine. These molecules have been explored in many preclinical and clinical studies, but data are conflicting as regards neuropathic pain alleviation. Dextromethorphan and memantine have been administered to animals after spinal nerve ligation (SNL) to evaluate their antinociceptive/cognitive effects and associated molecular events, including the phosphorylation of several tyrosine (pTyr(1336), pTyr(1472)) residues in the NR2B NMDAR subunit. Spinal nerve ligation and sham animals received dextromethorphan (10 mg/kg, i.p.), memantine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline (1 mL/kg, i.p.). These drugs were administered once symptoms of allodynia and hyperalgesia had developed. Tests were carried out before and after surgery. Tactile allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and spatial memory were, respectively, evaluated by von Frey, Randall & Selitto and Y-maze tests and molecular events by Western blot analysis. Spinal nerve-ligated animals displayed nociception and impaired spatial memory. Dextromethorphan, but not memantine, reversed neuropathic pain (NP) symptoms, restored spatial memory integrity and decreased the expression of pTyr(1336)NR2B. Following postoperative administration of dextromethorphan, this study has demonstrated for the first time a concordance between behaviour, cognitive function and molecular events via pTyr(1336)NR2B for neuropathic pain alleviation. Confirmation of these findings in patients would constitute a major step forward in the treatment of neuropathic pain and in the improvement of cognitive function and quality of life. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  2. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster LR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lynn R Webster,1 Michael D Smith,1 Cemal Unal,2 Andrew Finn3 1PRA Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Biometrical Solutions LLC, Raleigh, NC, USA; 3BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine–naloxone (BN sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90–1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15 of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15 of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001, and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001. Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Keywords: opioid dependence, withdrawal symptoms, abuse-deterrent, buprenorphine

  3. Non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation act via TGF-beta to promote mammary carcinogenesis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a genome-wide approach to identifying genes persistently induced in the mouse mammary gland by acute whole body low dose ionizing radiation (10cGy) 1 and 4...

  4. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  5. A prospective cohort study on sustained effects of low-dose ecstasy use on the brain in new ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Win, Maartje M L; Reneman, Liesbeth; Jager, Gerry; Vlieger, Erik-Jan P; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; Lavini, Cristina; Bisschops, Ivo; Majoie, Charles B L M; Booij, Jan; den Heeten, Gerard J; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-02-01

    It is debated whether ecstasy use has neurotoxic effects on the human brain and what the effects are of a low dose of ecstasy use. We prospectively studied sustained effects (>2 weeks abstinence) of a low dose of ecstasy on the brain in ecstasy-naive volunteers using a combination of advanced MR techniques and self-report questionnaires on psychopathology as part of the NeXT (Netherlands XTC Toxicity) study. Outcomes of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and questionnaires on depression, impulsivity, and sensation seeking were compared in 30 subjects (12M, 21.8+/-3.1 years) in two sessions before and after first ecstasy use (1.8+/-1.3 tablets). Interval between baseline and follow-up was on average 8.1+/-6.5 months and time between last ecstasy use and follow-up was 7.7+/-4.4 weeks. Using 1H-MRS, no significant changes were observed in metabolite concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and creatine (Cr), nor in ratios of NAA, Cho, and mI relative to Cr. However, ecstasy use was followed by a sustained 0.9% increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontoparietal white matter, a 3.4% decrease in apparent diffusion (ADC) in the thalamus and a sustained decrease in relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) in the thalamus (-6.2%), dorsolateral frontal cortex (-4.0%), and superior parietal cortex (-3.0%) (all significant at pecstasy users, although effect sizes were limited and clinical relevance questionable. As no indications were found for structural neuronal damage with the currently used techniques, our data do not support the concern that incidental ecstasy use leads to extensive axonal damage. However, sustained decreases in rrCBV and ADC values may indicate that even low ecstasy doses can induce prolonged vasoconstriction in some brain areas, although it is not known whether this effect is permanent. Additional studies are needed to

  6. Immunomodulatory effects of macrolide antibiotics - part 2: advantages and disadvantages of long-term, low-dose macrolide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, J; de Graaff, C S; van der Werf, T S; Boersma, W G

    2011-01-01

    The available evidence for long-term, low-dose treatment with 14- and 15-membered ring macrolides in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, COPD, chronic sinusitis, and asthma is reviewed with special attention to possible adverse effects and the emergence of resistance during long-term macrolide treatment. Macrolide maintenance therapy has been proven to be of benefit in diffuse panbronchiolitis and CF, presumably due to an anti-inflammatory mechanism of action in addition to its direct antimicrobial effect. Solid evidence to justify this treatment regimen for non-CF bronchiectasis, asthma, or sinusitis is still lacking, although a beneficial effect of long-term macrolide therapy has been found in small clinical trials on these subjects. Data from randomized trials of long-term macrolide treatment in COPD are conflicting. A sufficiently long duration of treatment and the careful selection of patients appears to be crucial. Aside from its beneficial effects, possible side effects of macrolide treatment should be taken into account, the most important of these being gastrointestinal upset and cardiac arrhythmias. Development of macrolide resistance among respiratory pathogens is very common during long-term macrolide treatment. Whether this finding is clinically significant is a matter of debate. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Sex-specific effects of low-dose gestational estradiol-17β exposure on bone development in porcine offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flöter, Veronika L.; Galateanu, Gabriela; Fürst, Rainer W.; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Möstl, Erich; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sex-specific effects and non-monotonic dose responses were demonstrated after low-dose in utero E2 treatment in offspring. • Alterations in bone parameters were found in prepubertal male but not female offspring. • In postpubertal female offspring, cortical and total cross-sectional area were higher at the femoral midpoint. • In utero E2 treatment did neither significantly affect hormone concentrations nor puberty onset in offspring. • The results substantiate the high sensitivity of developing organisms to exogenous estrogens. - Abstract: Estrogens are important for the bone development and health. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals during the early development has been shown to affect the bone phenotype later in life. Several studies have been performed in rodents, while in larger animals that are important to bridge the gap to humans there is a paucity of data. To this end, the pig as large animal model was used in the present study to assess the influence of gestational estradiol-17β (E2) exposure on the bone development of the prepubertal and adult offspring. Two low doses (0.05 and 10 μg E2/kg body weight) referring to the ‘acceptable daily intake’ (ADI) and the ‘no observed effect level’ (NOEL) as stated for humans, and a high-dose (1000 μg E2/kg body weight), respectively, were fed to the sows every day from insemination until delivery. In the male prepubertal offspring, the ADI dose group had a lower strength strain index (p = 0.002) at the proximal tibia compared to controls, which was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Prepubertal females were not significantly affected. However, there was a higher cortical cross-sectional area (CSA) (p = 0.03) and total CSA (p = 0.02) at the femur midpoint in the adult female offspring of the NOEL dose group as measured by computed tomography. These effects were independent from plasma hormone concentrations (leptin, IGF1, estrogens), which remained

  8. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-01-01

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through the

  9. Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation induced by the synergistic effects of low dose irradiation and adoptive T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Noemi

    2016-12-19

    The detection of cancerous cells by the immune system elicits spontaneous antitumour immune responses. Still, during their progression, tumours acquire characteristics that enable them to escape immune surveillance. Cancer immunotherapy aims to reverse tumour immune evasion by activating and directing the immune system against transformed tumour cells. However, the tumours' intrinsic resistance mechanisms limit the success of many immunotherapeutic approaches. The functionally and morphologically abnormal tumour vasculature forms a physical barrier and prevents the entry of tumour-reactive immune effector cells, while the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment impairs their function. To block tumour immune evasion, therapeutic strategies are being developed that combine cancer immunotherapy with treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, that reprogram the tumour microenvironment to increase treatment efficacies and improve clinical outcome. In various preclinical models radiotherapy was shown to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Our group showed that in the RIP1-TAg5 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma, the transfer of in vitro-activated tumour-specific T cells induces T cell infiltration and promotes long-term survival only in combination with neoadjuvant local low dose irradiation (LDI). These treatment effects were mediated by iNOS+ macrophages. In this thesis, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the improved T cell infiltration and prolonged survival upon combination therapy with adoptive T cell transfer and local LDI. We demonstrate that combination therapy leads to a normalization of the aberrant tumour vasculature and endothelial activation, an increase in intratumoural macrophages, a reduction of intratumoural myeloid derived suppressor cells and, most importantly, to tumour regression. These findings suggest that this treatment inhibits tumour immune suppression but also facilitates immune effector cell infiltration through

  10. Antagonistic effects of gestational dietary exposure to low-dose vinclozolin and genistein on rat fetal germ cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehraiki, Abdelali; Messiaen, Sébastien; Berges, Raymond; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie-Chantal; Auger, Jacques; Habert, René; Levacher, Christine

    2011-05-01

    Continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (1 mg/kg/day genistein) and/or to an antiandrogenic food contaminant (1 mg/kg/day vinclozolin) has been recently reported to affect male reproductive tract and fertility [1] in adults. We investigated whether alterations of the testis are already present at the end of in utero exposure using the same rat model and doses following exposure from conception to delivery. After vinclozolin exposure, we observed in the neonate a slight but significant alteration of steroidogenesis and gametogenesis with a reduction of testosterone secretion and of the number of gonocytes. In contrast, genistein exposure had no effect. While the vinclozolin-genistein mixture acts in a synergistic manner to induce the most significant alterations in the adult, interestingly, genistein antagonized the deleterious effect of vinclozolin on germ cells in the neonate. This difference emphasizes the importance of studying the effects of endocrine disruptors during various developmental stages to understand their effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Time course of anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose radiotherapy: Correlation with TGF-β1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Gil, Felix; Gironella, Meritxell; Hernandez, Victor; Biete, Albert; Pique, Josep M.; Panes, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) has a potent anti-inflammatory effect, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β 1 is a potential mediator of this effect. The objectives of this study were to characterize the in vivo effects of LD-RT on leukocyte recruitment over time, and its relationship with TGF-β 1 production. Materials and methods: Mice were submitted to abdominal irradiation with a dose of 0.3 Gy, or to sham radiation and studied 5, 24, 48 or 72 h after irradiation. Four hours before the study a proinflammatory stimulus consisting of LPS or placebo was administered. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in intestinal venules were assessed using intravital microscopy. Circulating levels and intestinal tissue production of TGF-β 1 were determined. Results: Compared to non-irradiated LPS-challenged group, the number of adherent leukocytes was significantly reduced 5, 24 and 48 h, but not 72 h after irradiation in LPS-challenged mice. Rolling leukocytes were significantly decreased at all time points analyzed. Plasma TGF-β 1 levels were increased 5 and 24 h after irradiation. Increased intestinal production during this period was corroborated by in vitro culture experiments. Conclusions: LD-RT has a sustained inhibitory effect on leukocyte recruitment for 48 h, which is initially associated with an increase in TGF-β 1 intestinal production

  12. Effects of low dose {gamma} radiation on early growth and physiological activities of radish (raphanus sativus L.) and the reduction of ultraviolet-B stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Lee, H. Y.; Baek, M. H.; Yoo, J. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on early growth and photosynthesis in radish plant was studied. The seedling height of radish was stimulated in plants grown from seeds irradiated with the low dose of 10 Gy. The O{sub 2} evolution in the 10 Gy irradiation group was 1.2 times greater than in the control. The catalase and peroxidase activity of radish leaves grown from seeds irradiated with {gamma} radiation were increased at 10 Gy irradiation group as the superoxide dismutase activity of leaves was. To investigate the effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on response to UV-B stress, UV-B was given at the intensity of 1 W{center_dot} m{sup -2} to the detached leaves. Pmax was decreased with increasing illumination time by 76% in the control, while decreased by 75% in the 10 Gy irradiation group. The photochemical yield of PSII, estimated as Fv/Fm, was decreased with increasing illumination time by 75% after 4 hours while Fv/Fm in the 10 Gy irradiation group was decreased by 69% of inhibition, indicating that the low dose {gamma} radiation retarded the deteriorative effect of UV-B on PSII. The initial fluorescence (Fo) was slightly increased with increasing illumination time, while the maximal fluorescence (Fm) was decreased. These results showed the positive effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on the seedling growth and the reduction of the deteriorative effect of UV-B stress on photosynthesis in radish plant.

  13. Effect of different reconstruction algorithms on computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) performance in ultra-low dose CT colonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim7071@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Sang Gyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Cheong-il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We assessed the effect of reconstruction algorithms on CAD in ultra-low dose CTC. •30 patients underwent ultra-low dose CTC using 120 and 100 kVp with 10 mAs. •CT was reconstructed with FBP, ASiR and Veo and then, we applied a CAD system. •Per-polyp sensitivity of CAD in ULD CT can be improved with the IR algorithms. •Despite of an increase in the number of FPs with IR, it was still acceptable. -- Abstract: Purpose: To assess the effect of different reconstruction algorithms on computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) performance in ultra-low-dose CT colonography (ULD CTC). Materials and methods: IRB approval and informed consents were obtained. Thirty prospectively enrolled patients underwent non-contrast CTC at 120 kVp/10 mAs in supine and 100 kVp/10 mAs in prone positions, followed by same-day colonoscopy. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 80% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR80), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). A commercial CAD system was applied and per-polyp sensitivities and numbers of false-positives (FPs) were compared among algorithms. Results: Mean effective radiation dose of CTC was 1.02 mSv. Of 101 polyps detected and removed by colonoscopy, 61 polyps were detected on supine and on prone CTC datasets on consensus unblinded review, resulting in 122 visible polyps (32 polyps <6 mm, 52 6–9.9 mm, and 38 ≥ 10 mm). Per-polyp sensitivity of CAD for all polyps was highest with MBIR (56/122, 45.9%), followed by ASIR80 (54/122, 44.3%) and FBP (43/122, 35.2%), with significant differences between FBP and IR algorithms (P < 0.017). Per-polyp sensitivity for polyps ≥ 10 mm was also higher with MBIR (25/38, 65.8%) and ASIR80 (24/38, 63.2%) than with FBP (20/38, 58.8%), albeit without statistical significance (P > 0.017). Mean number of FPs was significantly different among algorithms (FBP, 1.4; ASIR, 2.1; MBIR, 2.4) (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Although the performance of stand-alone CAD

  14. Effect of different reconstruction algorithms on computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) performance in ultra-low dose CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Sun; Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Sang Gyun; Shin, Cheong-il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •We assessed the effect of reconstruction algorithms on CAD in ultra-low dose CTC. •30 patients underwent ultra-low dose CTC using 120 and 100 kVp with 10 mAs. •CT was reconstructed with FBP, ASiR and Veo and then, we applied a CAD system. •Per-polyp sensitivity of CAD in ULD CT can be improved with the IR algorithms. •Despite of an increase in the number of FPs with IR, it was still acceptable. -- Abstract: Purpose: To assess the effect of different reconstruction algorithms on computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) performance in ultra-low-dose CT colonography (ULD CTC). Materials and methods: IRB approval and informed consents were obtained. Thirty prospectively enrolled patients underwent non-contrast CTC at 120 kVp/10 mAs in supine and 100 kVp/10 mAs in prone positions, followed by same-day colonoscopy. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 80% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR80), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). A commercial CAD system was applied and per-polyp sensitivities and numbers of false-positives (FPs) were compared among algorithms. Results: Mean effective radiation dose of CTC was 1.02 mSv. Of 101 polyps detected and removed by colonoscopy, 61 polyps were detected on supine and on prone CTC datasets on consensus unblinded review, resulting in 122 visible polyps (32 polyps <6 mm, 52 6–9.9 mm, and 38 ≥ 10 mm). Per-polyp sensitivity of CAD for all polyps was highest with MBIR (56/122, 45.9%), followed by ASIR80 (54/122, 44.3%) and FBP (43/122, 35.2%), with significant differences between FBP and IR algorithms (P < 0.017). Per-polyp sensitivity for polyps ≥ 10 mm was also higher with MBIR (25/38, 65.8%) and ASIR80 (24/38, 63.2%) than with FBP (20/38, 58.8%), albeit without statistical significance (P > 0.017). Mean number of FPs was significantly different among algorithms (FBP, 1.4; ASIR, 2.1; MBIR, 2.4) (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Although the performance of stand-alone CAD

  15. Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells - Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Producing the Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, Neil J. [Centre for Research In Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Chronic low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to cells, such as those that occur in contaminated environments, are widely reported to produce a variety of effects, from adverse effects to no effects to positive effects. In addition, bystander effects have been reported in some studies. For only relatively few of these effects have mechanistic explanations been reported but in many of those for which they have, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or the anti-oxidants that help to control their effects, have often been suggested to have a role. In general, it is assumed that either radiolysis of water or stress due to IR cause an increase in ROS and/or anti-oxidant activity, and hence the observed effects. The role of ROS in producing the effects reported at chronic low doses of radiation has infrequently been tested at either a theoretical or experimental level. Here we use a dynamic model of anti-oxidant capacity in cells to test the theoretical underpinnings of the ROS hypothesis together with genomic and proteomic experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana to test the molecular effects of IR in cells. The published model we have constructed for testing the interaction of IR and anti-oxidant systems (Smith et al, 2012) first calculates the amount of ROS produced by IR. Overall, at the dose rates that occur in contaminated environments the amount of ROS produced by IR is extremely small, certainly much smaller than is routinely produced in a cell during many metabolic processes. ROS from respiration leak out of mitochondria at significant rates and in plant cells ROS also leak out of photo-synthesizing chloroplasts. Although there is a variety of anti-oxidants in many cells, the nexus of their capacity is glutathione (GSH) which ultimately derives its reducing power from NADPH. We thus modeled the anti-oxidative capacity of a cell from the activity GSH and used predicted concentrations of ROS from IR to calculate the oxidative stress that they would cause via the

  16. A comparison of larval density and low dose rate irradiation effects on amphibian body size at metamorphosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, K.; Scott, D.E.; Tsyusko, O.; Coughlin, D.P.; Hinton, T.G.

    2008-07-01

    Amphibian larvae undergo substantial morphological and physiological changes as they metamorphose into adults. This period of rapid change and enhanced cell division could increase their sensitivity to external stressors. In this study, we were interested in possible differences between natural and anthropogenic stressor effects during the period just prior to metamorphosis. We studied this by exposing late-stage Scaphiopus holbrookii tadpoles in different larval densities to four irradiation dose rates (0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1) from 137Cs. Life history traits important for population dynamics, such as body size at metamorphosis and development rate, were measured. Results suggest that the ecological factor larval density had a much more profound effect on juvenile body size at metamorphosis than low-dose rate radiation. The development rate measured as age at metamorphosis was not effected by the two stressors. Radiation had no impact on the endpoints we measured; giving credence to the IAEA guidance that a dose rate smaller than 10 mGy d-1 is protective of aquatic biota. (author)(tk)

  17. A comparison of larval density and low dose rate irradiation effects on amphibian body size at metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, K.; Scott, D.E.; Tsyusko, O.; Coughlin, D.P.; Hinton, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Amphibian larvae undergo substantial morphological and physiological changes as they metamorphose into adults. This period of rapid change and enhanced cell division could increase their sensitivity to external stressors. In this study, we were interested in possible differences between natural and anthropogenic stressor effects during the period just prior to metamorphosis. We studied this by exposing late-stage Scaphiopus holbrookii tadpoles in different larval densities to four irradiation dose rates (0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d -1 ) from 137 Cs. Life history traits important for population dynamics, such as body size at metamorphosis and development rate, were measured. Results suggest that the ecological factor larval density had a much more profound effect on juvenile body size at metamorphosis than low-dose rate radiation. The development rate measured as age at metamorphosis was not effected by the two stressors. Radiation had no impact on the endpoints we measured; giving credence to the IAEA guidance that a dose rate smaller than 10 mGy d -1 is protective of aquatic biota. (author)(tk)

  18. Feasibility and effectiveness of unintended pregnancy prevention with low-dose mifepristone combined with misoprostol before expected menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cui-Lan; Chen, Dun-Jin; Deng, Yi-Fan; Song, Li-Ping; Mo, Xue-Tang; Liu, Kai-Jie

    2015-12-01

    What is the efficacy of maintaining or restoring non-pregnant status with low-dose mifepristone combined with misoprostol administered before expected menstruation? Low-dose mifepristone and misoprostol administered at the time of expected menstruation was effective and safe in maintaining or restoring non-pregnant status, with no obvious menstrual disturbance. Menstrual regulation involves the medical or mechanical stimulation of uterine sloughing in women with up to 2-3 weeks of menstrual delay. Low-dose mifepristone plus misoprostol is efficacious for termination of ultra-early pregnancy (≤ 35 days of amenorrhoea) with no obvious menstrual disturbance. A total of 678 women fulfilled all criteria and were recruited. Seventeen women dropped out after deciding to remain pregnant and 11 others were lost to follow-up. Thus, data from 650 women who completed the procedure were included in analyses. Participants were enrolled at any time during their menstrual cycle and administered medication 1 day before expected menstruation. The end of the study was defined on a per-patient basis as the date of completion of the post-treatment menstrual cycle. The primary outcome was the efficacy of abortion induction (for pregnant women) or menstrual regulation (for non-pregnant women). Women with regular menstrual cycles (25-35 days) were voluntarily recruited for this study between February 2012 and December 2014. Serum β-hCG was measured before mifepristone intake. Mifepristone (50 mg) was administered orally 1 day before expected menstruation and 200 µg misoprostol was administered orally on the day of expected menstruation. Efficacy, disturbance in bleeding patterns in the treatment and post-treatment cycles, satisfaction with the treatment, and subsequent contraception preference were analysed. Retrospective analysis of serum β-hCG levels at admission indicated that 23.3% (158/678) of the women were pregnant. The success rate for pregnancy termination was 98.6% (136

  19. Low-dose carbon ion irradiation effects on DNA damage and oxidative stress in the mouse testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Long, Jing; Zhang, Luwei; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Weiping; Wu, Zhehua

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-dose carbon ion irradiation on reproductive system of mice, the testes of outbred Kunming strain mice were whole-body irradiated with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 Gy, respectively. We measured DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) and oxidative stress parameters including malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and testis weight and sperm count at 12 h, 21 d and 35 d after irradiation in mouse testis. At 12 h postirradiation, a significant increase in DNA DSB level but no pronounced alterations in MDA content or SOD activity were observed in 0.5 and 1 Gy groups compared with the control group. At 21 d postirradiation, there was a significant reduction in sperm count and distinct enhancements of DSB level and MDA content in 0.5 and 1 Gy groups in comparison with control. At 35 d postirradiation, the levels of DNA DSBs and MDA, and SOD activity returned to the baseline except for the MDA content in 1 Gy (P sperm count were still observed in 0.5 (P sperm count. Furthermore, these data suggest that the deleterious effects may be chronic or delayed in reproductive system after whole-body exposure to acute high-dose carbon ions.

  20. Assay of new systems in vivo mutagenesis for determining the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauluz, C.; Sierra, I.; Martin, L.; Real, A.; Vidania, R. de

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation reacts directly and indirectly with the genetic material in living cells and produces DNA damage. Processing of this damage by correcting enzymes may result in appearing of mutations which, in turn, may lead to carcinogenesis. We have focused on the determination of in vivo mutagenesis induced after exposure to X-rays, aiming at establishing methods to evaluate the effect of low doses of radiation. In vivo mutagenesis has been addressed in the Muta Mouse model that carries a lacZ marker gene and provides a relatively simple assay of appearance of mutations. Mutation frequencies were determined in the lacZ gene copies recovered from mice irradiated with 1Gy or 4Gy of X-rays, acute or fractionated. Liver, spleen and bone marrow DNA samples were isolated at different times after irradiation, ranging from 1 day to 2 months, and evolution of mutations was studied. Results showed different responses depending on the organ and especially on the time of analysis, suggesting that the mutagenic process in vivo is much more complex than previously deduced from in vitro experiments. Therefore, determination of the relationship between dose and mutagenic effect in vivo will require additional studies. (author)

  1. Quality changes of the Mediterranean horse mackerel (Trachurus mediterraneus) during chilled storage: The effect of low-dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarki, Raouf [Institut National des Sciences et Technologies de la Mer, La Goulette 2060 (Tunisia); Sadok, Saloua [Institut National des Sciences et Technologies de la Mer, La Goulette 2060 (Tunisia)], E-mail: salwa.sadok@instm.rnrt.tn; Barkallah, Insaf [Centre National des Sciences et Technologies Nucleaires, Sidi-Thabet 2020 (Tunisia)

    2009-04-15

    Pelagic fishes represent the main Mediterranean fisheries in terms of quantity. However, waste and spoilage of pelagic fish are substantial for a variety of reasons, such as their high perishability and the lack or inadequate supply of ice and freezing facilities. In this work, fresh Mediterranean horse mackerel (Trachurus mediterraneus) were irradiated at 1 and 2 kGy and stored in ice for 18 days. Quality changes during storage were followed by the determination of microbial counts, trimethylamine (TMA) and volatile basic nitrogen contents. Similarly, lipid composition and sensory analysis were carried out. Irradiation treatment was effective in reducing total bacterial counts throughout storage. Total basic volatile nitrogen content (TVB-N) and TMA levels increased in all lots with storage time, their concentrations being significantly reduced by irradiation, even when the lower level (1 kGy) was used. According to the quality index method, the control lot had a sensory shelf-life of 4 days, whereas those of the irradiated lots were extended by 5 days. Also, low-dose irradiation had no adverse effect on the nutritionally important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of Mediterranean horse mackerel. In the same way, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values increased with irradiation during the first day, but these values were lower at the end of storage, compared to the control. Results confirm the practical advantages of using {gamma} irradiation as an additional process to chilled storage to enhance the microbiological quality and to extend the shelf-life of small pelagic species.

  2. Contribution to the study of the effect of a low dose of gamma irradiation on seeds and tubers before planting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvy, A.

    1968-01-01

    From 1962 to 1965, 25 tests have been made with carrots (1 variety), radish (3 varieties), spinach (2 var.), tomatoes (2 var.), potatoes (2 var.), barley (2 var.), rice (3 var.) and corn (1 var.), with the object of studying the interest for agriculture of seed and tuber gamma irradiation at low dose before planting. These tests were made in the laboratory, in greenhouses and in the open field, all necessary care being taken for a valuable statistical analysis of- the results. Special attention was paid to the homogeneity of plant material by controlling more particularly moisture content of seeds and the storage conditions of tubers. The observations concerned germination, growth at early stages, development phases and yield of leaves, roots and fruit. Some stimulation cases are observed. For tomatoes, it is found that stimulation cases occur at extreme moisture content and not in the range of mean moisture content which corresponds to maximum radioresistance. The demonstration of these effects is related to varieties, complementary treatments, conditions of cultivation and observation criteria. In most cases, they are short-lived and suitable modifications of seed conditioning produce, upon controls, an effect equivalent to that of irradiation. In conclusion, it seems very unlikely - considering our cultivation methods - that seed and tuber irradiation before planting could be of interest for agriculture. (authors) [fr

  3. The effects of low dose X-irradiation on osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been indicated that moderate or high dose of X-irradiation could delay fracture union and cause osteoradionecrosis, in part, mediated by its effect on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. However, whether low dose irradiation (LDI has similar roles on osteoblasts is still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether and to what extent LDI could affect the proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts in vitro. Methods The MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to single dose of X-irradiation with 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 Gy respectively. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and mineralization was evaluated by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU assay, flow cytometry, ALP viability kit and von Kossa staining, respectively. Osteocalcin (OCN and core-binding factor α1 (Cbfα1 expressions were measured by real time-PCR and western blot, respectively. Results The proliferation of the cells exposed to 2.0 Gy was significantly lower than those exposed to ≤1.0 Gy (p  Conclusions LDI have different effects on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts from those of high dose of X-irradiation, which might suggest that LDI could lead to promotion of frature healing through enhancing the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts.

  4. Quality changes of the Mediterranean horse mackerel (Trachurus mediterraneus) during chilled storage: The effect of low-dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbarki, Raouf; Sadok, Saloua; Barkallah, Insaf

    2009-01-01

    Pelagic fishes represent the main Mediterranean fisheries in terms of quantity. However, waste and spoilage of pelagic fish are substantial for a variety of reasons, such as their high perishability and the lack or inadequate supply of ice and freezing facilities. In this work, fresh Mediterranean horse mackerel (Trachurus mediterraneus) were irradiated at 1 and 2 kGy and stored in ice for 18 days. Quality changes during storage were followed by the determination of microbial counts, trimethylamine (TMA) and volatile basic nitrogen contents. Similarly, lipid composition and sensory analysis were carried out. Irradiation treatment was effective in reducing total bacterial counts throughout storage. Total basic volatile nitrogen content (TVB-N) and TMA levels increased in all lots with storage time, their concentrations being significantly reduced by irradiation, even when the lower level (1 kGy) was used. According to the quality index method, the control lot had a sensory shelf-life of 4 days, whereas those of the irradiated lots were extended by 5 days. Also, low-dose irradiation had no adverse effect on the nutritionally important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of Mediterranean horse mackerel. In the same way, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values increased with irradiation during the first day, but these values were lower at the end of storage, compared to the control. Results confirm the practical advantages of using γ irradiation as an additional process to chilled storage to enhance the microbiological quality and to extend the shelf-life of small pelagic species

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy in an experimental model of systemic inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Gil, Felix B.A.; Gironella, Meritxell; Hernandez, Victor; Jorcano, Sandra; Biete, Albert; Pique, Josep M.; Panes, Julian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) on the inflammatory response and to characterize the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 Gy, or sham radiation before lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in intestinal venules were assessed using intravital microscopy. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was determined using radiolabeled antibodies 5 h after irradiation. Production of transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β 1 ) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its in vivo functional relevance by immunoneutralization. Results: Compared with vehicle treated animals, LPS induced a marked increase in leukocyte adhesion (0.13 ± 0.59 vs. 5.89 ± 1.03, p 1 were significantly increased in response to LD-RT in controls and LPS challenged animals. Neutralization of TGF-β 1 partially restored LPS-induced adhesion (4.83 ± 1.41, p 1 production and is not related to modulation of ICAM-1 expression

  6. Effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on enterotoxin-positive strains of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, H.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of low-dose gamma irradiation on selected enterotoxin producing strains of Clostridium perfringens Type A was studied. The radioresistance of three strains NCTC-8239, NCTC-10239 and NCTC-8798 in 0.1 percent peptone water, beef gravy and ground beef was determined for both vegetative cells and spores. D 10 values were approximately 30 Krad in 0.1 percent peptone water and 175 Krad in beef menstruums. D 10 values for spores were approximately 250 Krad in 0.1 percent peptone water and 335 Krad in beef. Low-level irradiation induced a 2 hr lag for cell recovery at 37 0 C following irradiation though this was strain dependent. Heat resistance of vegetative cells decreased following irradiation, although one strain was stimulated in growth response and unaltered in its heat resistance. Spore activation and germination were not affected by low-level irradiation. Spores were not significantly inactivated at this level. Irradiation had no effect on subsequent survival of vegetative cells stored at cold temperatures. Enterotoxin production by irradiated cultures was not affected by the irradiation treatment. A method for quantitating C. perfringens enterotoxin using crossed-immunoelectrophoresis was developed. It was found that this technique could detect at least .05 g of enterotoxin, could utilize crude enterotoxin preparations and was more sensitive than other methods based on biological activity

  7. Effect of prenatal exposure to low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weimin; Zhou Xiangyan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Effects of prenatal exposure to HTO (tritiated water) on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of rats were studied by determination of multiple parameters. Methods: Pregnant adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups, of which 3 groups were irradiated with beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by one single intraperitoneal injection on the 13th day of gestation. Offspring of these rats received cumulative doses of 0.000, 0.044, 0.088 and 0.264 Gy utero, respectively, and were observed for the appearance of three physiologic markers (eye opening, pinna detachment, incisor eruption), the age of acquisition of two reflexes (surface righting, negative geotaxis) and sensuous function (auditory startle), movement and coordination functions and activity (forelimb hanging, continuous corridor activity), and learning and memory (electric avoidance reflex in Y-maze, conditional reflex). Results: Results for most parameters in the 0.044 and 0.088 Gy groups were different significantly from those in the controls and for most parameters a dose-dependent effect was found. Conclusion: Offspring of rats having received prenatal low dose irradiation from HTO showed delayed growth and abnormal neurobehavior

  8. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2016-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (ND) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) have been much investigated for their toxicity at high doses, little is known about their biological activity at low concentrations. Here we report the biphasic dose response of ND and SiO2-NP in modulating normal human facial skin fibroblasts (FSF1) in culture. ND and SiO2-NP at low concentration (up to 0.5 μg/ml) had beneficial effects on FSF1 in terms of increasing their proliferation and metabolic activity. Exposure of FSF1 cells to low levels of NP enhanced their wound healing ability in vitro and slowed down aging during serial passaging as measured by maintenance of youthful morphology, reduction in the rate of loss of telomeres, and the over all proliferative characteristics. Furthermore, NP treatment induced the activation of Nrf2- and FOXO3A-mediated cellular stress responses, including an increased expression of heme oxygenease (HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of low dose of gamma radiation on the induction and signalling of complex damages of DNA in the mammals cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, D.

    2006-09-01

    The work presented in the frame of this thesis are in line with the studies on the radioinduced damages of DNA in order to better understand their genotoxic effects and the associated risks. The different radioinduced damages of DNA are given, the complex damages, double strand-break and multiple damages are particularly detailed as well as their methods of detection. Are presented the systems implemented in the cell in order to point the radioinduced damages and to implement the repair systems of these lesions. Then, are presented the knowledge on the effects of low doses and low dose rates. The whole of this work has for objective to highlight the mechanisms by which the reduction of dose rate allows an increase of cell survival. By a better knowledge of the system implemented in response to a low dose rate irradiation, it is possible to valid or not the linear without threshold model of low doses effects and consequently to better understand the eventual risks of cancer linked to exposures of low doses of ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  10. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, Hayley; Mothersill, Carmel; Lyng, Fiona M.; Howe, Orla

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  11. Quantitative and informatics tools for studying the effect of low dose radiation on tissue and cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvin, B.; Yang, Q.; Fontenay, G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The challenge of the post-genomic era is functional genomics, i.e., understanding how the genome is expressed to produce myriad cell phenotypes. To use genomic information to understand the biology of complex organisms, one must understand the dynamics of phenotype generation and maintenance. A phenotype is the result of selective expression of the genome. In order to define cell 'phenomes,' one would track the kinetics and quantities of multiple constituent proteins, their cellular context and morphological features in large populations. Our aim is to extend the development of the BioSig imaging bioinformatics system for understanding how ionizing radiation alters tissue homeostasis and responses in cell culture experiments. Given several thousand antibodies and reagents for differentiating cell-specific protein components, biological heterogeneity, and other variables that affect cellular responses, there is a clear requirements for managing images and information about these images. Our focus is on the development of (1) quantitative methods for protein expression either in tissue or cell culture studies, (2) a adequate data model that couples quantitative results with the experimental variables, and (3) browsing and visualization tools that enable exploration of large scale image data in feature space in the context of biological heterogeneity. The framework provides the basis for studying the effect of low-dose radiation on the cellular microenvironment, inter-cell communication, and the underlying mechanisms. In turn, this information can then be used to more accurately predict more complex multicellular biological responses following exposure to different types of inhibitors. The BioSig informatics approach to microscopy and quantitative image analysis has been used to build a more detailed picture of the signaling that occurs between cells, as a result of an exogenous stimulus such as radiation, or as a consequence of endogenous programs leading

  12. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  13. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  14. Bystander effects of exposure to low-dose-rate 125I seeds on human lung cancers cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Rongfei; Chen Honghong; Yu Lei; Zhao Meijia; Shao Chunlin; Cheng Wenying

    2007-01-01

    The bystander effects induced by continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seeds radiation on damage of human lung cancer cells were investigated. Human adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, which have different sensitivities to high-dose rate (HDR) external irradiation, were exposed directly to 125 I seeds in vitro and co-cultured with unirradiated cells for 24 h. Using cytokinesis-blocking micronucleus method and γ H2AX fluorescence immunoassay, bystander effects induced by 2Gy and 4Gy 125 I seed irradiation on micronucleus formation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of human lung cancer cells were detected and evaluated. The results showed that irradiation with 125 I seeds can induce medium-mediated bystander effects in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, exhibiting that both micronuclei formation and γ H2AX focus formation in bystander cells were increased significantly compared with non-irradiated cells. The extent of DNA damage induced by bystander effects was correlated with accumulated radiation dose and radiosensitive of tumor cells. NCI-H446 cells that were sensitive to HDR γ irradiation were more sensitive to continuous LDR irradiation and bystander effects than A549. However, a comparison between the bystander effects and direct effects elicits the intensity of bystander responses of A549 cells was higher than that of NCI-H446 cells. A dose-related reduction in bystander responses was observed both in A549 cells and NCI-H446 cells, suggesting that the signaling factors involved in the bystander signaling pathways may decrease with the increase of cell damages. (authors)

  15. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Affects Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Extracellular Oxidized Cell-Free DNA: A Possible Mediator of Bystander Effect and Adaptive Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have hypothesized that the adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR is mediated by oxidized cell-free DNA (cfDNA fragments. Here, we summarize our experimental evidence for this model. Studies involving measurements of ROS, expression of the NOX (superoxide radical production, induction of apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks, antiapoptotic gene expression and cell cycle inhibition confirm this hypothesis. We have demonstrated that treatment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with low doses of IR (10 cGy leads to cell death of part of cell population and release of oxidized cfDNA. cfDNA has the ability to penetrate into the cytoplasm of other cells. Oxidized cfDNA, like low doses of IR, induces oxidative stress, ROS production, ROS-induced oxidative modifications of nuclear DNA, DNA breaks, arrest of the cell cycle, activation of DNA reparation and antioxidant response, and inhibition of apoptosis. The MSCs pretreated with low dose of irradiation or oxidized cfDNA were equally effective in induction of adaptive response to challenge further dose of radiation. Our studies suggest that oxidized cfDNA is a signaling molecule in the stress signaling that mediates radiation-induced bystander effects and that it is an important component of the development of radioadaptive responses to low doses of IR.

  16. Renal and hepatic effects following neonatal exposure to low doses of Bisphenol-A and 137Cs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, Roser; LLovet, Maria Isabel; Bellés, Montserrat; Serra, Noemí; Vallvé, Joan Carles; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2018-04-01

    137-Cesium ( 137 Cs) is one of the most important distributed radionuclides after a nuclear accident. Humans are usually co-exposed to various environmental toxicants, being Bisphenol-A (BPA) one of them. Exposure to IR and BPA in early life is of major concern, due to the higher vulnerability of developing organs. We evaluate the renal and hepatic effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) and BPA. Sixty male mice (C57BL/6J) were randomly assigned to six experimental groups (n=10) and received a single subcutaneous dose of 0.9% saline solution, 137 Cs and/or BPA on postnatal day 10: control, BPA (25 μg/kgbw), Cs4000 (4000 Bq 137 Cs/kgbw), Cs8000 (8000 Bq 137 Cs/kgbw), BPA/Cs4000 and BPA/Cs8000. At the age of two months, urines (24h) and blood samples were collected from animals of each group to determine biochemical parameters. Finally, kidneys and liver were removed to quantify DNA damage (8-OHdG), as well as to determine CYP1A2 mRNA expression. Data suggest that both BPA and 137 Cs induced renal and liver damage evidenced by oxidative stress. However, when there is a co-exposure, it seems that there are compensatory mechanisms that may reverse the damage induced by each toxic itself. Notwithstanding, more studies are necessary to better understand the synergistic mechanisms behind. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cotton Leaf worm: Inherited Effects of Low Doses of Gamma Radiation on The Progeny of Irradiated Males. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, H A; El-Naggar, S M; Shible, M M [Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, (Egypt); El-Dessouki, S A; El-Awady, S M [Biological Applications Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Full grown male pupae of the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera Littoralis (Boisd.) were gamma irradiated with low doses of 25, 50,75, and 100 Gy. The effects on reproduction, development and sex ratio were the biological aspects studied among P{sub 1}, F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3} generations. Fecundity of normal females mated with F{sub 1} or F{sub 2} males was significantly reduced for all doses. The F{sub 1} males were more sterile than their irradiated parental males, while F{sub 2} males were more fertile F{sub 1} males. Irradiation of P{sub 1} males did not clearly affect neither the percentage of mated females nor the average number of spermatophores per mated females among the individuals of P{sub 1}, F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3} generations. The percent of larvae surviving to the adult stage was gradually decreased by increasing dose to P{sub 1} male throughout the first three filial generation. The average larval and pupal durations were not affected among the progeny of P{sub 1} males for both males and females. The sex ratio among the progeny of irradiated males was nearly 1:1. 3 tabs.

  18. Cotton Leaf worm: Inherited Effects of Low Doses of Gamma Radiation on The Progeny of Irradiated Males. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, H.A.; El-Naggar, S.M.; Shible, M.M.; El-Dessouki, S.A.; El-Awady, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Full grown male pupae of the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera Littoralis (Boisd.) were gamma irradiated with low doses of 25, 50,75, and 100 Gy. The effects on reproduction, development and sex ratio were the biological aspects studied among P 1 , F 1 , F 2 , F 3 generations. Fecundity of normal females mated with F 1 or F 2 males was significantly reduced for all doses. The F 1 males were more sterile than their irradiated parental males, while F 2 males were more fertile F 1 males. Irradiation of P 1 males did not clearly affect neither the percentage of mated females nor the average number of spermatophores per mated females among the individuals of P 1 , F 1 , F 2 , F 3 generations. The percent of larvae surviving to the adult stage was gradually decreased by increasing dose to P 1 male throughout the first three filial generation. The average larval and pupal durations were not affected among the progeny of P 1 males for both males and females. The sex ratio among the progeny of irradiated males was nearly 1:1. 3 tabs

  19. Studies on the effect of low dose gamma irradiation on the chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojayanaik, Manjanaik; Naroth, Kavya; Shetty, Veena; Hiriyur, Somashekarappa

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the combined effect of low dose gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at refrigeration (+4℃) and frozen (-18℃) temperatures, on the shelf life extension of fresh squid. The study was based on microbiological and physico-chemical changes occurring in the squid samples. The biochemical parameters such as total volatile base nitrogen and trimethyl amine nitrogen values for irradiated squid samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose of 3 and 5 kGy (p<0.05). pH values of squid samples were affected by both irradiation dose and storage temperature (p<0.05). Total microbial load for non- irradiated (control) squid samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures. The results revealed that the combination of irradiation and low temperature storage resulted in a significant reduction of microbial growth and extend the shelf life of squid at refrigeration and frozen temperature to about 12 and 90 days respectively. (author)

  20. The effects of prenatal irradiation with a low doses of gamma-rays on spatial memory in adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasova, L.; Smajda, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pregnant females of Wistar-strain rats were irradiated (sham-irradiated) with a dose of 1 Gy of gamma-rays on the 16 th day of pregnancy. The progeny of both irradiated and control animals was tested in Morris' water maze for spatial memory at age of 4 months. The time needed to find the hidden platform and the swimming-track were recorded using a computer aided video-tracking method. The test was repeated after 24 hours (short-time memory) and after one week (long-time memory). In short-time memory test the irradiated females needed in comparison with controls a statistically significantly longer time and a longer swimming track to find the platform. No significant differences were found in male. In long-term memory test no significant differences in both parameters followed were found in either of sexes. The results suggest, that irradiation with a low dose of gamma-rays during the period of the embryonic development of the brain can negatively influence the short-term spatial memory, but has no effect on long-time memory in rats. (authors)

  1. [A case of advanced gastric cancer with carcinomatosa peritonitis effectively treated by 5-FU and low-dose CDDP therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, E; Kunii, Y; Wada, G; Tsuchiya, S; Yamasaki, T; Sakakibara, N

    1997-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic for appetite loss and abdominal distension in August 1995. Endoscopic study revealed an advanced gastric cancer in the upper body of her stomach. Abdominal CT study revealed massive ascites and para-aortic lymph nodal involvement. Cytological study of the ascites revealed class V. She was diagnosed to be in the terminal stage of gastric cancer with carcinomatosa peritonitis. Combination chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and low-dose cisplatin (CDDP) was given by continuous intravenous injection of 5-FU 500 mg/day, and intermittent intravenous injection of CDDP 30 mg/week was performed for reduction of the ascites and her complaint. Endoscopic study 6 weeks after starting chemotherapy could not find crater of the gastric cancer but only a shallow ulcerative lesion. The biopsy specimen of that lesion was group III. No ascites and over 50% reduction of the para-aortic lymph node were found by the abdominal CT study. This state persisted over 4 weeks. No myelo-suppression, renal dysfunction or any severe side effect were observed during chemotherapy. Her performance status improved from 3 to 1.

  2. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (ptributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Low-Dose (Single-Dose Magnesium Sulfate on Postoperative Analgesia in Hysterectomy Patients Receiving Balanced General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Taheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Aparallel, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to assess the efficacy of single low dose of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH pain relief under balanced general anesthesia. Subject and Methods. Forty women undergoing TAH surgery were assigned to two magnesium sulfate (N=20 and normal saline (N=20 groups randomly. The magnesium group received magnesium sulfate 50 mg·kg−1 in 100 mL of normal saline solution i.v as single-dose, just 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia whereas patients in control group received 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride solution at the same time. The same balanced general anesthesia was induced for two groups. Pethidine consumption was recorded over 24 hours precisely as postoperative analgesic. Pain score was evaluated with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours after the surgeries. Results. Postoperative pain score was lower in magnesium group at 6, 12, and 24 hours after the operations significantly (P<0.05. Pethidine requirement was significantly lower in magnesium group throughout 24 hours after the surgeries (P=0.0001. Conclusion. Single dose of magnesium sulfate during balanced general anesthesia could be considered as effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption after TAH.

  4. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  5. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures.

  6. Effects of low-dose ionising radiation on pituitary adenoma: is there a role for L-type calcium channel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia]. E-mail: santosr@cdtn.br

    2005-10-15

    Pituitary adenomas constitute about 6-18% of brain tumours in adults. Activation of voltage gated calcium currents can account for growth hormone over secretion in some GH-secreting pituitary adenomas that produce an acromegaly appearance and increase mortality. Ca{sup 2+} ions, as mediators of intracellular signalling, are crucial for the development of apoptosis. However, the role of [Ca{sup 2+}] in the development of apoptosis is ambiguous. In this study, the effects of low-dose ionising gamma radiation ({sup 60} Co) on rat pituitary adenoma cells survival and proliferation and the role of calcium channels on the apoptosis radio-induced were evaluated. Doses as low as 3 Gy were found to inhibit GH3 cell proliferation. Even though there was a significant number of live cells,168 hours following irradiation, they were not able to proliferate. The results indicate that the blockade of extracellular calcium influx through these channels does not interfere in the radiation-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. (author)

  7. The effect of low dose rate irradiation on the swelling of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), stainless steel components are irradiated at temperatures that may reach 400 C due to gamma heating. If large amounts of swelling (>10%) occur in these reactor internals, significant swelling related embrittlement may occur. Although fast reactor studies indicate that swelling should be insignificant at PWR temperatures, the low dose rate conditions experienced by PWR components may possibly lead to significant swelling. To address these issues, JNC and ANL have collaborated to analyze swelling in 316 stainless steel, irradiated in the EBR-II reactor at temperatures from 376-444 C, at dose rates between 4.9 x 10 -8 and 5.8 x 10 -7 dpa/s, and to doses of 56 dpa. For these irradiation conditions, the swelling decreases markedly at temperatures less than approximately 386 C, with the extrapolated swelling at 100 dpa being around 3%. For temperatures greater than 386 C, the swelling extrapolated to 100 dpa is around 9%. For a factor of two difference in dose rate, no statistically significant effect of dose rate on swelling was seen. For the range of dose rates analyzed, the swelling measurements do not support significant (>10%) swelling of 316 stainless steel in PWRs

  8. Prophylactic low-dose aspirin is effective antithrombotic therapy for combination treatments of thalidomide or lenalidomide in myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesvizky, Ruben; Martínez-Baños, Déborah; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Christos, Paul; Furst, Jessica; De Sancho, Maria; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Mazumdar, Madhu; Zafar, Faiza; Pekle, Karen; Leonard, John; Jayabalan, David; Coleman, Morton

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) patients have a propensity for thromboembolic events (TE), and treatment with thalidomide/dexamethasone or lenalidomide/dexamethasone increases this risk. This report describes the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) as primary thromboprophylaxis in three series of MM patients receiving thalidomide or lenalidomide with other drugs. In the first regimen (clarithromycin, thalidomide, dexamethasone), initiation of low-dose aspirin negated the occurrence of any further TE. In a second study, prophylactic aspirin given with thalidomide/dexamethasone resulted in a rate of TE similar to that seen with dexamethasone alone (without aspirin). A third study (n = 72) evaluated thrombosis rates with aspirin and a lenalidomide-containing regimen (clarithromycin, lenalidomide, dexamethasone). Of nine occurrences of thromboembolism, five were associated with aspirin interruption or poor compliance. Low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the incidence of thrombosis with these regimens. Routine use of aspirin as antithrombotic prophylaxis in MM patients receiving immunomodulatory drugs with corticosteroids is warranted.

  9. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  10. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  11. Low doses of haloperidol combined with ondansetron are not effective for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in susceptible patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Gil, Leonor; López-Olaondo, Luis; Pueyo, Javier; Callejas, Raquel; Duque, Paula; Carrascosa, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    In this observational study we reviewed the efficacy and side effects of different antiemetic combinations used in our hospital for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) prophylaxis in high-risk women undergoing highly emetogenic surgery. After reviewing retrospectively the medical records of patients undergoing highly emetogenic elective surgeries under general anaesthesia, we selected 368 women whose Apfel risk score was ≥ 3 and receiving a combination of 2 antiemetics for PONV prophylaxis. We analysed the incidence of PONV at 2, 6, 12 and 24h after surgery, antiemetic rescue requirements, pattern of occurrence of PONV, side effects and level of sedation were also assessed. The main goal was complete response defined as no PONV within 24h after surgery. Ondansetron 4mg i.v. plus dexamethasone 8mg i.v. (O&Dex), haloperidol 1mg i.v. (O&Hal1), haloperidol 2mg i.v. (O&Hal2) or droperidol 1.25mg i.v. (O&Dro) were the combinations most frequently used. The complete response was better in groups O&Dex: 68.5% (CI: 58-78), O&Hal2: 64.1% (CI: 53-74) and O&Dro 63% (CI: 52-73) than in group O&Hal1: 41.3% (CI: 31-52) (p<0,01). Peak incidence of PONV occurred within the 2-6h period. The incidence of side effects was higher in group O&Hal2. In high risk patients for PONV who underwent highly emetogenic surgeries, the efficacy of low-dose haloperidol (1mg) in combination is limited. Higher doses (2mg) are more effective but its use is associated with a high incidence of side effects. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of azacitidine compared with low-doses of chemotherapy (LDC in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Candelaria-Hernández

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroductionMyelodysplastic syndrome (MDS comprises a group of clonal hematological disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progressive bone marrow failure. It increases the risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Therapeutic benefit should include overall survival increase (OS, hematological improvement, transfusion dependence and time to progression to AML decrease.ObjectiveAssess, from a Mexican health-care perspective, the cost-effectiveness of azacitidine compared with low-doses of chemotherapy (LDC plus best supportive care (BSC for the treatment of adult patients with intermediate-2 and high-risk MDS, who are not eligible for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We developed a cost-effectiveness survival analysis model of three stages: MDS, AML, and death. OS and costs are extrapolated beyond three-year time horizon. Discount rate of 5% was applied. To estimate the model cycle probability transition to mortality state, survival curves were constructed for each treatment arm using individual patient-level data from Study AZA-001. Unitary costs are from public price list, and profiles for the management of MDS and AML were collected separately using a structured questionnaire. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA were conducted by simultaneously sampling from estimated probability distributions of model parameters.ResultsOverall survival was projected to increase by 72.26 weeks with azacitidine. Incremental expected total costs for azacitidine compared to LDC was MXN$68,045. However, the cost of the drug therapy was lower with azacitidine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for azacitidine compared to LDC was MXN$48,932 per life-year gained (LYG. PSA showed that azacitidine was a highly cost-effective option in 96.49% of the simulated cases in MXN$180,000/LYG willingness-to-pay.ConclusionsCompared with LDC, azacitidine represents a cost-effective treatment alternative in patients

  13. Stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the activity of chicken liver and spleen plasma membrane Ca+2 ATPase during different periods of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islamov, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Effect of pre incubative irradiation of chickens on the activity of chicken liver and spleen plasma membrane Ca +2 -ATPase in 13, 15, 17 day embryos and 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 day chickens has been studied. Low doses of radiation are discovered to stimulate liver and spleen enzyme activity. On the basis of data obtained it is suggested that in the cells of radiosensitive and radio resistive organs molecular mechanisms of stimulating effect of low doses are similar. (author). 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  14. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiations. Evidence of effect of pre-irradiation of culture medium on subsequent growth in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus lividus in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conter, A.; Planel, H.

    1986-01-01

    In order to distinguish the direct effects of low dose of ionizing radiations at the cellular level from those indirect through the culture medium, we have compared proliferation of Synechococcus lividus grown in pre-irradiated medium to proliferation of cultures grown in non-irradiated medium. A stimulation of growth was observed at the 7th day in cultures inoculated with cells selected in deceleration phase, while an inhibition occured in cultures inoculated with exponential growing cells. Addition of catalase (100 U/ml) counteracted the stimulating effect but did not change the inhibiting effect induced by pre-irradiated medium. Results demonstrated the indirect effect of low