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Sample records for lovastatin

  1. Lovastatin protects against experimental plague in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Ayyadurai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague is an ectoparasite-borne deadly infection caused by Yersinia pestis, a bacterium classified among the group A bioterrorism agents. Thousands of deaths are reported every year in some African countries. Tetracyclines and cotrimoxazole are used in the secondary prophylaxis of plague in the case of potential exposure to Y. pestis, but cotrimoxazole-resistant isolates have been reported. There is a need for additional prophylactic measures. We aimed to study the effectiveness of lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug known to alleviate the symptoms of sepsis, for plague prophylaxis in an experimental model. METHODOLOGY: Lovastatin dissolved in Endolipide was intraperitoneally administered to mice (20 mg/kg every day for 6 days prior to a Y. pestis Orientalis biotype challenge. Non-challenged, lovastatin-treated and challenged, untreated mice were also used as control groups in the study. Body weight, physical behavior and death were recorded both prior to infection and for 10 days post-infection. Samples of the blood, lungs and spleen were collected from dead mice for direct microbiological examination, histopathology and culture. The potential antibiotic effect of lovastatin was tested on blood agar plates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lovastatin had no in-vitro antibiotic effect against Y. pestis. The difference in the mortality between control mice (11/15; 73.5% and lovastatin-treated mice (3/15; 20% was significant (P<0.004; Mantel-Haenszel test. Dead mice exhibited Y. pestis septicemia and inflammatory destruction of lung and spleen tissues not seen in lovastatin-treated surviving mice. These data suggest that lovastatin may help prevent the deadly effects of plague. Field observations are warranted to assess the role of lovastatin in the prophylaxis of human plague.

  2. Lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus in solid state and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Department of Biochemistry of Physiologically Active Compounds, Institute of ... Keywords: lovastatin, submerged fermentation, solid state fermentation, production ... water need in up-stream processing which minimizes production expense (Holker .... authors, a slowly utilizable carbon source is preferable for high lovastatin ...

  3. Lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus in solid state and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Department of Biochemistry of Physiologically Active Compounds, Institute of ... Keywords: lovastatin, submerged fermentation, solid state fermentation, production ... water need in up-stream processing which minimizes production expense (Holker et .... Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on lovastatin yield by Aspergillus ...

  4. Lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus in solid state and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At submerged cultivation of A. terreus 4 and A. terreus 20 on five different glucose and lactose based media the highest titer of lovastatin has been obtained on lactose based media, namely 276 mg/l and 236 mg/l, respectively. Five various types of bran have been tested as solid substrates for production of lovastatin in SSF ...

  5. Biosynthesis of lovastatin using agro-industrial wastes as carrier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: LSF and SSF techniques were used to produce the drug lovastatin. High-performance liquid ... rubber for commercial purposes, but Aspergillus terreus remains the .... transfer processes, such as diffusion of gas and solutes to the cell.

  6. [Psychotic Acute Episode and Rhabdomyolysis after Lovastatin Ingestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caamaño, Beatriz H; Díaz, Jairo M González; Bracho, Daniel Guerrero; Herrera, Harold; Samur, Manuel Castro

    2012-09-01

    Statins are the most prescribed drugs worldwide given the benefit and security they offer. However, they can cause severe neurological, gastrointestinal, renal and muscular side effects. To describe the clinical course of a female patient with adverse drug reaction to Lovastatin. Case report and literature review. 52-year old woman with sudden psychosis and rhabdomyolysis secondary to Lovastatin and ending after the drug suspension. The causal relationship was corroborated with a score of 6 (probable ADR) on Naranjo's Scale. The simultaneous manifestation of psychosis and rhabdomiolysis represents an atypical and unique case following Lovastatin ingestion. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of lovastatin on rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Zhaoxia; Pei Zhuguo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of lovastatin on binding activity of nuclear factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) to NF-κB and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: The oligonucleotide corresponding to the consensus NF-κB element or the consensus AP-1 element was labeled by [γ- 32 P]-ATP. AP-1 and NF-κB binding activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), expression of MMP-9 was detected by zymography. Results: Lovastatin inhibited the expression of MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner, this effect was reversed by mevalonate and GGPP but not by squalene; lovastatin significantly decreased AP-1 and NF-κB binding activity. Conclusion: Lovastatin decreased AP-1 and NF-κB binding activity and inhibited MMP-9 expression in rabbit VSMCs by the way of inhibiting prenylation of protein but not by cholestrol-lowering, and this might be the mechanism of its arteriosclerostic plaque stabilizing effects

  8. Statistical optimization of lovastatin production by Omphalotus olearius (DC.) singer in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı, Burcu; Yamaç, Mustafa; Yıldız, Zeki; Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S

    2016-01-01

    In this study, culture conditions were optimized to improve lovastatin production by Omphalotus olearius, isolate OBCC 2002, using statistical experimental designs. The Plackett-Burman design was used to select important variables affecting lovastatin production. Accordingly, glucose, peptone, and agitation speed were determined as the variables that have influence on lovastatin production. In a further experiment, these variables were optimized with a Box-Behnken design and applied in a submerged process; this resulted in 12.51 mg/L lovastatin production on a medium containing glucose (10 g/L), peptone (5 g/L), thiamine (1 mg/L), and NaCl (0.4 g/L) under static conditions. This level of lovastatin production is eight times higher than that produced under unoptimized media and growth conditions by Omphalotus olearius. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to optimize submerged fermentation process for lovastatin production by Omphalotus olearius.

  9. Lovastatin-induced RhoA modulation and its effect on senescence in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Inkyoung; Park, Chaehwa; Kang, Won Ki

    2006-01-01

    Lovastatin inhibits a 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and prevents the synthesis of cholesterol precursors, such as farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), responsible for important cell signaling in cell proliferation and migration. Recently, the anti-cancer effect of lovastatin has been suggested in various tumor types. In this study, we showed that a low dose lovastatin induced senescence and G1 cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells. Addition of GGPP or mevalonate, but not FPP, prevented the lovastatin-induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and cell senescence. We found that constitutively active RhoA (caRhoA) reversed lovastatin-induced senescence in caRhoA-transfected PC-3 cells. Thus, we postulate that modulation of RhoA may be critical in lovastatin-induced senescence in PC-3 cells

  10. Effects of lovastatin (mevinolin) on sterol levels and on activity of azoles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, R T; Parks, L W

    1990-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic drug lovastatin (mevinolin) was found to be very effective in lowering the sterol levels of the wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lovastatin dramatically decreased the steryl ester content from 2.62 to 0.8 micrograms/mg (dry weight), whereas the free sterol content decreased only from 2.79 to 2.24 micrograms/mg (dry weight) when lovastatin was present in the medium at 10 micrograms/ml. At higher concentrations (100 micrograms/ml), lovastatin nearly abolished th...

  11. Optimizing Angkak Pigments and Lovastatin Production By Monascus purpureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASIM DANURI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Angkak pigments and lovastatin had been reported very useful as natural coloring agents, as an agent to increase thrombocyte level in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, and also as a compound that was able to control blood cholesterol level. Three strains of fungus Monascus purpureus AKI, AKII, and 915 were selected to produce angkak pigments and lovastatin in potato dextrose agar (PDA medium. The best fungus strain, which is AKII, was then applied in three kinds of rice media (white rice IR-42, red rice BP-1804-IF-9, and a combination of 1:1 (w/w white IR-42 and red rice BP-1804-IF-9 for solid fermentation. The best medium and fermentation times were determined for the production of angkak pigments and lovastatin separately. Results showed that strains, media, and duration of fermentations gave significant effect on the amount of pigment produced. Strain AKII produced highest concentration of angkak pigments. The combination of rice (White IR-42 and red rice BP-1804-IF-9 produced the highest pigment than the individual white and red rie it self. The optimum duration of fermentation was 16 days for strains AKI and AKII, but only 15 days for strain 915. Therefore the strain AKII with media combination of rice and a fermentation time of 16 days were used to investigate the additional effect of various minerals. Addition of the mineral individually gave significant increased on angkak pigment production by AKII, where as the addition of minerals mixture in the forth tube did not.

  12. Lovastatin Production by Aspergillus terreus Using Agro-Biomass as Substrate in Solid State Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Liang, Juan Boo; Ho, Yin Wan; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Goh, Yong Meng; Shokryazdan, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Ability of two strains of Aspergillus terreus (ATCC 74135 and ATCC 20542) for production of lovastatin in solid state fermentation (SSF) using rice straw (RS) and oil palm frond (OPF) was investigated. Results showed that RS is a better substrate for production of lovastatin in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin has been obtained using A. terreus ATCC 74135 and RS as substrate without additional nitrogen source (157.07 mg/kg dry matter (DM)). Although additional nitrogen source has no benefit effect on enhancing the lovastatin production using RS substrate, it improved the lovastatin production using OPF with maximum production of 70.17 and 63.76 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and A. terreus ATCC 74135, respectively (soybean meal as nitrogen source). Incubation temperature, moisture content, and particle size had shown significant effect on lovastatin production (P production (P > 0.05). Results also have shown that pH 6, 25°C incubation temperature, 1.4 to 2 mm particle size, 50% initial moisture content, and 8 days fermentation time are the best conditions for lovastatin production in SSF. Maximum production of lovastatin using optimized condition was 175.85 and 260.85 mg/kg DM for A. terreus ATCC 20542 and ATCC 74135, respectively, using RS as substrate. PMID:23118499

  13. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Hao-ming

    2009-08-05

    Lovastatin is an effective drug for treatment of hyperlipidemia. This study aimed to clone lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE and analyze the structure and function of its encoding protein. According to the lovastatin synthase gene sequence from genebank, primers were designed to amplify and clone the lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA. Bioinformatic analysis of lovE and its encoding animo acid sequence was performed through internet resources and software like DNAMAN. Target fragment lovE, almost 1500 bp in length, was amplified from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA and the secondary and three-dimensional structures of LovE protein were predicted. In the lovastatin biosynthesis process lovE is a regulatory gene and LovE protein is a GAL4-like transcriptional factor.

  14. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea

  15. Key role of alternative oxidase in lovastatin solid-state fermentation.

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    Pérez-Sánchez, Ailed; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Barrios-González, Javier

    2017-10-01

    Lovastatin is a commercially important secondary metabolite produced by Aspergillus terreus, either by solid-state fermentation or by submerged fermentation. In a previous work, we showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in idiophase positively regulates lovastatin biosynthetic genes. In addition, it has been found that lovastatin-specific production decreases with aeration in solid-state fermentation (SSF). To study this phenomenon, we determined ROS accumulation during lovastatin SSF, under high and low aeration conditions. Paradoxically, high aeration caused lower ROS accumulation, and this was the underlying reason of the aeration effect on lovastatin production. Looking for a mechanism that is lowering ROS production under those conditions, we studied alternative respiration. The alternative oxidase provides an alternative route for electrons passing through the electron transport chain to reduce oxygen. Here, we showed that an alternative oxidase (AOX) is expressed in SSF, and only during idiophase. It was shown that higher aeration induces higher alternative respiration (AOX activity), and this is a mechanism that limits ROS generation and keeps them within healthy limits and adequate signaling limits for lovastatin production. Indeed, the aox gene was induced in idiophase, i.e., at the time of ROS accumulation. Moreover, exogenous ROS (H 2 O 2 ), added to lovastatin solid-state fermentation, induced higher AOX activity. This suggests that high O 2 availability in SSF generates dangerously high ROS, so alternative respiration is induced in SSF, indirectly favoring lovastatin production. Conversely, alternative respiration was not detected in lovastatin-submerged fermentation (SmF), although exogenous ROS also induced relatively low AOX activity in SmF.

  16. Lovastatin enhances in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of rat B-cell lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozados, V.R.; Hinrichsen, L.I.; Scharovsky, O.G.; Rosario Univ., Rosario; McDonnel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Our previous demonstration of an antimetastatic effect of lovastatin, both in rat sarcoma and lymphoma tumor-models, as well as the fact that lovastatin and radiation are able to stop the cell cycle in different phases, suggested the feasibility of a combined treatment. We studied the effect of the in vitro combined treatment of a B-cell rat lymphoma (L-TACB) with lovastatin and irradiation. The results herein obtained provide new information about the role of statins as radiosensitizers. The antitumor effect of the combined treatment was higher than that elicited by either treatment alone. This effect could be a consequence, at least in part, of an enhanced apoptosis

  17. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie; Grösch, Sabine; Schad, Arno; Lackner, Karl J.; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  18. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, Christian [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Toxicology, University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Grösch, Sabine [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor Stern Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schad, Arno [Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Lackner, Karl J. [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Kaina, Bernd [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Fritz, Gerhard, E-mail: fritz@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Toxicology, University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  19. Comparing the effect of lovastatin and exercise on serum lipid profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Recently, statins, life style modification and diet have been used to treat hyperlipidaemia. Aim: The ... The results showed that exercise could reduce LDL, but lovastatin can reduce total cholesterol, TG .... Choosing drug therapy for patient with ...

  20. Inhibition of NF-κB activity in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells by lovastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Zhaoxia; Lan Xiaoli

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear factor NF-κB is believed to play an important role in regulating the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), which induce atherosclerosis, restenosis and plaque rupture. We incubated rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) with 5 μmol/L lovastatin in the presence of IL-1-α and PDGF BB (20 μg/L, respectively) to study whether lovastatin inhibited NF-κB binding activity induced by IL-1 and PDGF. The NF-κB activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA); MMP-1 and MMP-3 were measured by western blotting; and MMP-9 was detected by zymography. The result showed that lovastatin strongly reduced NF-κB activity upregulated by IL-1 combined with PDGF, and lovastatin also dose-dependently inhibited the expression of MMP-1, -3 and -9 induced by IL-1 and PDGF. It suggested that the beneficial effects of statins may extend to mechanisms beyond cholesterol reduction

  1. Enhanced production of lovastatin by Omphalotus olearius (DC.) Singer in solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı, Burcu; Yamaç, Mustafa; Yıldız, Zeki; Isikhuemnen, Omoanghe S

    2015-01-01

    Although lovastatin production has been reported for different microorganism species, there is limited information about lovastatin production by basidiomycetes. The optimization of culture parameters that enhances lovastatin production by Omphalotus olearius OBCC 2002 was investigated, using statistically based experimental designs under solid state fermentation. The Plackett Burman design was used in the first step to test the relative importance of the variables affecting production of lovastatin. Amount and particle size of barley were identified as efficient variables. In the latter step, the interactive effects of selected efficient variables were studied with a full factorial design. A maximum lovastatin yield of 139.47mg/g substrate was achieved by the fermentation of 5g of barley, 1-2mm particle diam., at 28°C. This study showed that O. olearius OBCC 2002 has a high capacity for lovastatin production which could be enhanced by using solid state fermentation with novel and cost-effective substrates, such as barley. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lovastatin from the Wheat Bran Obtained after Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchir C. Pansuriya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to extract lovastatin with minimum impurity by using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2. A strain of Aspergillus terreus UV 1617 was used to produce lovastatin by solid-state fermentation (SSF on wheat bran as a solid substrate. Extraction of lovastatin and its hydroxy acid form was initially carried out using organic solvents. Among the different screened solvents, acetonitrile was found to be the most efficient. SC-CO2 was used for extraction of lovastatin from the dry fermented matter. The effect of supercritical extraction parameters such as the amount of an in situ pretreatment solvent, temperature, pressure, flow rate and contact time were investigated. The maximum recovery of lovastatin was obtained with 5 mL of methanol as an in situ pretreatment solvent for 1.5 g of solid matrix, flow rate of the supercritical solvent 2 L/min, temperature 50 °C, and contact time 155 min at a pressure 300 bar. The lovastatin extract obtained after optimizing the conditions of supercritical fluid extraction was found to have 5-fold more HPLC purity than the organic solvent extract.

  3. Comparison between Fenugreek and Lovastatin in restoration of endothelial function in an experimental old rat model

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    "Pipelzadeh MH

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum with that of lovastatin in restoration of endothelia function in the aorta taken form aged N-Mair rats. For this purpose, 4 groups of old N-Mari rats were used (n=6, normal saline treated control group, lovastatin (10 mg/kg, orally and fengreek seed powder in normal saline suspension (100 or 500 mg/kg were administered orally daily for 8 weeks. The rate of relaxation of ephedrine- precontracted aorta to acetycholine, the lipid profiles, and histological examinations of the aorta were compared between these two groups and with a control non-treated normal saline treated group. The results showed that treatment with lovastatin and fenugreek produced significant reduction in IDL, VLDL triglyceride and total cholesterol, while HDL was increased as compared to control non-treated group. Lovastatin induced an increase in contraction/mg tissue weight. However, improvement in endothelial function was significantly increased in all treatment groups. The histological findings showed significant reduction in thickness and lipid deposits in the aorta in all treatment groups. The improvement in the epithelial function was correlated with LDL-cholesterol lowering and partly with the reduction in the thickness of the aortic intimal layer. This study demonstrated that fenugreek is as effective as lovastatin in reducing the features associated with atherosclerosis.

  4. Production of lovastatin and itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruta, Tomasz; Bizukojc, Marcin

    2017-02-01

    Aspergillus terreus is a textbook example of an industrially relevant filamentous fungus. It is used for the biotechnological production of two valuable metabolites, namely itaconic acid and lovastatin. Itaconic acid serves as a precursor in polymer industry, whereas lovastatin found its place in the pharmaceutical market as a cholesterol-lowering statin drug and a precursor for semisynthetic statins. Interestingly, their biosynthetic gene clusters were shown to reside in the common genetic neighborhood. Despite the genomic proximity of the underlying biosynthetic genes, the production of lovastatin and itaconic acid was shown to be favored by different factors, especially with respect to pH values of the broth. While there are several reviews on various aspects of lovastatin and itaconic acid production, the survey on growth conditions, biochemistry and morphology related to the formation of these two metabolites has never been presented in the comparative manner. The aim of the current review is to outline the correlations and contrasts with respect to process-related and biochemical discoveries regarding itaconic acid and lovastatin production by A. terreus.

  5. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Nègre-Arrariou, P.; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Bolhuis, P.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 ± 6 nM and 4.0 ± 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 ± 38 nM). Through

  6. Lovastatin attenuates ionizing radiation-induced normal tissue damage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrau, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Herzog, Melanie; Schad, Arno; Torzewski, Michael; Lackner, Karl J.; Fritz, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used lipid-lowering drugs. Moreover, they have pleiotropic effects on cellular stress responses, proliferation and apoptosis in vitro. Here, we investigated whether lovastatin attenuates acute and subchronic ionizing radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity in vivo. Materials and methods: Four hours to 24 h after total body irradiation (6 Gy) of Balb/c mice, acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses were analyzed. To comprise subchronic radiation toxicity, mice were irradiated twice with 2.5 Gy and analyses were performed 3 weeks after the first radiation treatment. Molecular markers of inflammation and fibrosis as well as organ toxicities were measured. Results: Lovastatin attenuated IR-induced activation of NF-κB, mRNA expression of cell adhesion molecules and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic marker genes (i.e. TNFα, IL-6, TGFβ, CTGF, and type I and type III collagen) in a tissue- and time-dependent manner. γH2AX phosphorylation stimulated by IR was not affected by lovastatin, indicating that the statin has no major impact on the induction of DNA damage in vivo. Radiation-induced thrombopenia was significantly alleviated by lovastatin. Conclusions: Lovastatin inhibits both acute and subchronic IR-induced pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses and cell death in normal tissue in vivo. Therefore, lovastatin might be useful for selectively attenuating acute and subchronic normal tissue damage caused by radiotherapy.

  7. Sensitivity to Lovastatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Deleted for Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR) Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The use of statins is well established in human therapy, and model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are commonly used in studies of drug action at molecular and cellular levels. The investigation of the resistance mechanisms towards statins may suggest new approaches to improve therapy...... based on the use of statins. We investigated the susceptibility to lovastatin of S. cerevisiae strains deleted for PDR genes, responsible for exporting hydrophobic and amphi-philic drugs, such as lovastatin. Strains deleted for the genes tested, PDR1, PDR3, PDR5 and SNQ2, exhibited remarkably different...

  8. Lovastatin in Aspergillus terreus: fermented rice straw extracts interferes with methane production and gene expression in Methanobrevibacter smithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Liang, Juan Boo; Ho, Yin Wan; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Goh, Yong Meng; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Chin, James

    2013-01-01

    Lovastatin, a natural byproduct of some fungi, is able to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3 methyl glutaryl CoA) reductase. This is a key enzyme involved in isoprenoid synthesis and essential for cell membrane formation in methanogenic Archaea. In this paper, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that lovastatin secreted by Aspergillus terreus in fermented rice straw extracts (FRSE) can inhibit growth and CH4 production in Methanobrevibacter smithii (a test methanogen). By HPLC analysis, 75% of the total lovastatin in FRSE was in the active hydroxyacid form, and in vitro studies confirmed that this had a stronger effect in reducing both growth and CH4 production in M. smithii compared to commercial lovastatin. Transmission electron micrographs revealed distorted morphological divisions of lovastatin- and FRSE-treated M. smithii cells, supporting its role in blocking normal cell membrane synthesis. Real-time PCR confirmed that both commercial lovastatin and FRSE increased (P < 0.01) the expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene (hmg). In addition, expressions of other gene transcripts in M. smithii. with a key involvement in methanogenesis were also affected. Experimental confirmation that CH4 production is inhibited by lovastatin in A. terreus-fermented rice straw paves the way for its evaluation as a feed additive for mitigating CH4 production in ruminants.

  9. Lovastatin in Aspergillus terreus: Fermented Rice Straw Extracts Interferes with Methane Production and Gene Expression in Methanobrevibacter smithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faseleh Jahromi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lovastatin, a natural byproduct of some fungi, is able to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3methyl glutaryl CoA reductase. This is a key enzyme involved in isoprenoid synthesis and essential for cell membrane formation in methanogenic Archaea. In this paper, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that lovastatin secreted by Aspergillus terreus in fermented rice straw extracts (FRSE can inhibit growth and CH4 production in Methanobrevibacter smithii (a test methanogen. By HPLC analysis, 75% of the total lovastatin in FRSE was in the active hydroxyacid form, and in vitro studies confirmed that this had a stronger effect in reducing both growth and CH4 production in M. smithii compared to commercial lovastatin. Transmission electron micrographs revealed distorted morphological divisions of lovastatin- and FRSE-treated M. smithii cells, supporting its role in blocking normal cell membrane synthesis. Real-time PCR confirmed that both commercial lovastatin and FRSE increased (P<0.01 the expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene (hmg. In addition, expressions of other gene transcripts in M. smithii. with a key involvement in methanogenesis were also affected. Experimental confirmation that CH4 production is inhibited by lovastatin in A. terreus-fermented rice straw paves the way for its evaluation as a feed additive for mitigating CH4 production in ruminants.

  10. In vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of lovastatin in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Gonçalves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Statins are among the most prescribed drugs in recent clinical practice. They are also known for their pleiotropic actions, which are independent of their lipid-lowering properties. The effect of lovastatin was investigated against carrageenan-induced paw edema in male Wistar rats (200-250 g and on leukocyte migration, as measured by carrageenan-induced peritonitis in male Swiss mice (20-25 g, which are models of acute inflammation. Lovastatin (administered 1 h prior to carrageenan, at oral doses of 2, 5, and 10 mg/kg, markedly attenuated paw edema formation in rats at the 4th hour after carrageenan injection (25, 43, and 37% inhibition, respectively. Inhibitions of 20, 45 and 80% were observed in the leukocyte migration, as evaluated by carrageenan-induced peritonitis in mice with lovastatin doses of 0.5, 1 and 5 mg/kg, as compared to controls. Furthermore, lovastatin (administered 1 h before initiation reduced the nociceptive effect of the formalin test in mice, at both phases, at doses of 2, 5, and 10 mg/kg: first phase (51, 65, and 70%, respectively and second phase (73, 57, and 66% inhibition of licking time, respectively. The anti-nociceptive activity of lovastatin was inhibited by naloxone (3 mg/kg, sc. Lovastatin (0.01, 0.1, and 1 µg/mL inhibited by 23, 79, and 86%, respectively, the release of myeloperoxidase from human neutrophils. Leukocyte (predominantly neutrophils infiltration was almost completely reduced by lovastatin treatment, as observed in the model of acute paw edema with hematoxylin and eosin staining. In addition, lovastatin decreased the number of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity. Therefore, the alterations in leukocyte activity and cytokine release could contribute to the anti-inflammatory activity of lovastatin.

  11. The neuroprotective effect of lovastatin on MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity is not mediated by PON2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Vidal, Yoshajandith; Montes, Sergio; Tristan-López, Luis; Anaya-Ramos, Laura; Teiber, John; Ríos, Camilo; Baron-Flores, Verónica; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of the pigmented dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with subsequent striatal dopamine (DA) deficiency and increased lipid peroxidation. The etiology of the disease is still unclear and it is thought that PD may be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. In the search of new pharmacological options, statins have been recognized for their potential application to treat PD, due to their antioxidant effect. The aim of this work is to contribute in the characterization of the neuroprotective effect of lovastatin in a model of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)). Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were randomly allocated into 4 groups and administered for 7 days with different pharmacological treatments. Lovastatin administration (5 mg/kg) diminished 40% of the apomorphine-induced circling behavior, prevented the striatal DA depletion and lipid peroxides formation by MPP(+) intrastriatal injection, as compared to the group of animals treated only with MPP(+). Lovastatin produced no change in paraoxonase-2 (PON2) activity. It is evident that lovastatin conferred neuroprotection against MPP(+)-induced protection but this effect was not associated with the induction of PON2 in the rat striatum. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Lovastatin Induces the Formation of Abnormal Myelin-Like Membrane Sheets in Primary Oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Olaf; De Jonge, Jenny; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    Statins, well-known inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis and protein isoprenylation, have been proposed as therapeutic drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS). As lovastatin and simvastatin, which are currently tested for their use in MS, can cross the blood-brain barrier, they may affect cellular

  13. Lovastatin-Enriched Rice Straw Enhances Biomass Quality and Suppresses Ruminal Methanogenesis

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    Mohammad Faseleh Jahromi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that solid state fermentation (SSF of agro-biomass (using rice straw as model; besides, breaking down its lignocellulose content to improve its nutritive values also produces lovastatin which could be used to suppress methanogenesis in the rumen ecosystem. Fermented rice straw (FRS containing lovastatin after fermentation with Aspergillus terreus was used as substrate for growth study of rumen microorganisms using in vitro gas production method. In the first experiment, the extract from the FRS (FRSE which contained lovastatin was evaluated for its efficacy for reduction in methane (CH4 production, microbial population, and activity in the rumen fluid. FRSE reduced total gas and CH4 productions (P<0.01. It also reduced (P<0.01 total methanogens population and increased the cellulolytic bacteria including Ruminococcus albus, Fibrobacter succinogenes (P<0.01, and Ruminococcus flavefaciens (P<0.05. Similarly, FRS reduced total gas and CH4 productions, methanogens population, but increased in vitro dry mater digestibility compared to the non-fermented rice straw. Lovastatin in the FRSE and the FRS significantly increased the expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene that produces HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme for cell membrane production in methanogenic Archaea.

  14. Engineered monoculture and co-culture of methylotrophic yeast for de novo production of monacolin J and lovastatin from methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqi; Tu, Xiaohu; Xu, Qin; Bai, Chenxiao; Kong, Chuixing; Liu, Qi; Yu, Jiahui; Peng, Qiangqiang; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Cai, Menghao

    2018-01-01

    As a promising one-carbon renewable substrate for industrial biotechnology, methanol has attracted much attention. However, engineering of microorganisms for industrial production of pharmaceuticals using a methanol substrate is still in infancy. In this study, the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris was used to produce anti-hypercholesterolemia pharmaceuticals, lovastatin and its precursor monacolin J, from methanol. The biosynthetic pathways for monacolin J and lovastatin were first assembled and optimized in single strains using single copies of the relevant biosynthetic genes, and yields of 60.0mg/L monacolin J and 14.4mg/L lovastatin were obtained using methanol following pH controlled monoculture. To overcome limitations imposed by accumulation of intermediates and metabolic stress in monoculture, approaches using pathway splitting and co-culture were developed. Two pathway splitting strategies for monacolin J, and four for lovastatin were tested at different metabolic nodes. Biosynthesis of monacolin J and lovastatin was improved by 55% and 71%, respectively, when the upstream and downstream modules were separately accommodated in two different fluorescent strains, split at the metabolic node of dihydromonacolin L. However, pathway distribution at monacolin J blocked lovastatin biosynthesis in all designs, mainly due to its limited ability of crossing cellular membranes. Bioreactor fermentations were tested for the optimal co-culture strategies, and yields of 593.9mg/L monacolin J and 250.8mg/L lovastatin were achieved. This study provides an alternative method for production of monacolin J and lovastatin and reveals the potential of a methylotrophic yeast to produce complicated pharmaceuticals from methanol. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lovastatin: a new “ancient” molecule for hypercholesterolaemia/dyslipidaemia treatment

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    Gianlorenzo Imperiale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Lovastatin is the first HMGCoA-reductase inhibitor used for the control of hypercholesterolaemia (USA, 1987. In Italy, it’s been authorized for the therapy of hypercholesterolaemia/dyslipidaemia since end 2005. Several studies, conducted both in primary and in secondary cardiovascular prevention, underline the favourable profile in reducing the risk for ischaemic events and their complications. This molecule has the capability to reduce plasmatic atherogenic lipids levels enough to induce clinical benefits. The safety and tolerability of lovastatin are proved even for high dosages, as well as for long term use. Pharmacoeconomic evaluations have shown the value of its choice, in particular for patients who need lipid-lowering treatment but don’t satisfy eligibility criteria for reimbursement by the Italian National Health Service, as outlined by AIFA in 2005.

  16. Lovastatin induces apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells and synergizes with doxorubicin: potential therapeutic relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosyan, Anna; Clendening, James W; Goard, Carolyn A; Penn, Linda Z

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is a rarely curable disease, for which new treatment options are required. As agents that block HMG-CoA reductase and the mevalonate pathway, the statin family of drugs are used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and have been shown to trigger apoptosis in a tumor-specific manner. Recent clinical trials show that the addition of statins to traditional chemotherapeutic strategies can increase efficacy of targeting statin-sensitive tumors. Our goal was to assess statin-induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutics, and then determine these mechanisms of action. The effect of lovastatin on ovarian cancer cell lines was evaluated alone and in combination with cisplatin and doxorubicin using several assays (MTT, TUNEL, fixed PI, PARP cleavage) and synergy determined by evaluating the combination index. The mechanisms of action were evaluated using functional, molecular, and pharmacologic approaches. We demonstrate that lovastatin induces apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells in a p53-independent manner and synergizes with doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat recurrent cases of ovarian cancer. Lovastatin drives ovarian tumor cell death by two mechanisms: first, by blocking HMG-CoA reductase activity, and second, by sensitizing multi-drug resistant cells to doxorubicin by a novel mevalonate-independent mechanism. This inhibition of drug transport, likely through inhibition of P-glycoprotein, potentiates both DNA damage and tumor cell apoptosis. The results of this research provide pre-clinical data to warrant further evaluation of statins as potential anti-cancer agents to treat ovarian carcinoma. Many statins are inexpensive, off-patent generic drugs that are immediately available for use as anti-cancer agents. We provide evidence that lovastatin triggers apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells as a single agent by a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Moreover, we also show lovastatin synergizes

  17. A Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Lovastatin for Treating Bipolar Mood Disorder: A 4-Week Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo- Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Shafiee, Sara; Ghanizadeh, Ahmd; Sigaroudi, Motahar O; Razeghian, Leila

    2017-01-01

    No trial has examined the effect of lovastatin on the brain metabolites in patients with bipolar mood disorder. Current medications for treating bipolar disorders cause metabolic syndrome. It is supposed that lovastatin not only decreases the rate of metabolic syndrome but also impacts some brain metabolites and their ratio like common treatments that are measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. 27 Manic phase patients were randomly allocated into two groups, lovastatin and placebo as their adjuant medication. Clinical symptoms were assessed at baseline, weeks 2, 4. The brain metabolites were measured at baseline and week 4. Regarding the change of clinical symptoms, no significant difference was found between two groups. However, lovastatin significantly increased the level of NAA in cingulate gyrus in comparison to the placebo group. Moreover, lovastatin more than placebo increased creatine in the left basal ganglia. Furthermore, choline/ creatine showed a significant decrease in the left basal ganglia in lovastatin group. Using MRS after treating with lovastatin showed lovastatin increases NAA in cingulate gyrus, indicating the possible effect of NAA for increasing the reduced viable neuron. Moreover, the increment of Cr by lovastatin in the left basal ganglia suggests the role of lovastatin for maintaining energy homeostasis, anti-apoptotic activity and ATP production in bipolar disorder. Some patents using lovastatin as an adjuant therapy for treating bipolar patients and depression in MDD patients are also outlined. This trial was registered in the Iranian Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.irct.ir/) (IRCT201302203930N18). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. A Review of the Effective Factors for Lovastatin Production by Aspergillus Terreus Atcc 20542 in Liquid Submerged Fermentation

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    F Jaberi Ansari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Deposition of cholesterol in the arteries is the one of the main causes of cardiovascular disease. Lovastatin is a blood cholesterol-lowering drug that inhibits 3-Hydroxy 3-methyl glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase enzyme. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effective factors for lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542. METHODS: This study is a literature review, In order to gather information, articles containing one of the words in their text, including: Cardiovascular disease, Lovastatin, HMG-CoA reductase, Liquid submerged fermentation, Aspergillus terreus were searched between 1960 and 2016 in PUBMED, NATURE, SCIENCE DIRECT and WHO databases. FINDINGS: A total of 180 papers found that of these, 70 were diagnosed article suitable for this study. According to the results, lactose as the best carbon source, soya been and yeast extract as the nitrogen source, C/N ratio of 41.3, the 107 spores/ml, the pH equal to 6.5, Fe, Zn, Mn as mineral elements and inducer such as linoleic acid at a optimum concentration causes the highest amount of lovastatin. CONCLUSION: The study shows, the source of carbon and nitrogen, the C/N, the amount and type of inoculation, pH, minerals and inducer are the most important factors affecting the morphology and oxygen uptake by the, Aspergillus terreus and hence also affect the production of lovastatin

  19. optimization of process parameters for lovastatin production under solid-state fermentation from ground corn cobs by gamma irradiated aspergillus tamarri isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar, Z.A.; Khalaf, M.A.; Meleigy, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    rapid screening method is demonstrated for isolating lovastatin overproducing strains of gamma irradiated aspergillus tamarri. the screening methodology, based on the activity of lovastatin against the yeast candida albicans. among 24 gamma irradiated isolates of a. tamarri, the isolate G-8 was selected as best producer for lovastatin. solid state fermentation (SSF)was evaluated to produce lovastatin by a. tamarri G-8 isolate using ground corn cobs as substrate. monofactorial experiments were adopted to optimize the fermentation conditions. various crucial parameters such as particle size, moisture content, ph, temperature, inoculum size and incubation time were derived. corn cobs of particle size 0.4 mm having moisture level of 60 % and ph 5 gave the highest yield of lovastatin (12.4 mg/gram dry substrate) when inoculated with a. tamarri G-8 at inoculum size 10 % and 28 degree C for 8 days.

  20. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Thomale, Jürgen [Institute of Cell Biology, University Duisburg-Essen, 45122 Essen (Germany); Schupp, Nicole [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Fritz, Gerhard, E-mail: fritz@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institute of Toxicology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury. - Highlights: • Lovastatin blocks ATM/ATR-regulated DDR of tubular cells following CisPt treatment. • Lovastatin attenuates CisPt-induced activation of protein kinase ATM in vitro. • Statin-mediated DDR inhibition is independent of initial DNA damage formation. • Statin-mediated blockage of Cis

  1. The Comparison of Gemfibrozil and Lovastatin Therapy in Patients with High LDL and Low HDL Cholesterol Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    CLI ’T i-ITI2N 20. IM~IA~iN OF ASIRACTj OF REPORT OF TIIlS PAGF OF ARrsWiIlACT i The comparison of gemfibrozil and lovastatin therapy in patients...PRESENTATIONS/SEMINARS: Jun 1990 The comparison of gemfibrozil and lovastatin in a subpopulation of patients with high LDL and low HDL cholesterol levels...aggressive ndical treatment. 2 Gemfibrozil is known to increase HDL cholesterol, decrease VLDL cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower LDL

  2. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian; Thomale, Jürgen; Schupp, Nicole; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury. - Highlights: • Lovastatin blocks ATM/ATR-regulated DDR of tubular cells following CisPt treatment. • Lovastatin attenuates CisPt-induced activation of protein kinase ATM in vitro. • Statin-mediated DDR inhibition is independent of initial DNA damage formation. • Statin-mediated blockage of Cis

  3. Lovastatin for adult patients with dengue: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most important vector-borne viral infection of man, with approximately 2 billion people living in areas at risk. Infection results in a range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection through to life-threatening shock and haemorrhage. One of the hallmarks of severe dengue is vascular endothelial disruption. There is currently no specific therapy and clinical management is limited to supportive care. Statins are a class of drug initially developed for lipid lowering. There has been considerable recent interest in their effects beyond lipid lowering. These include anti-inflammatory effects at the endothelium. In addition, it is possible that lovastatin may have an anti-viral effect against dengue. Observational data suggest that the use of statins may improve outcomes for such conditions as sepsis and pneumonia. This paper describes the protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating a short course of lovastatin therapy in adult patients with dengue. Methods/design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will investigate the effects of lovastatin therapy in the treatment of dengue. The trial will be conducted in two phases with an escalation of dose between phases if an interim safety review is satisfactory. This is an exploratory study focusing on safety and there are no data on which to base a sample size calculation. A target sample size of 300 patients in the second phase, enrolled over two dengue seasons, was chosen based on clinical judgement and feasibility considerations. In a previous randomised trial in dengue, about 10% and 30% of patients experienced at least one serious adverse event or adverse event, respectively. With 300 patients, we will have 80% power to detect an increase of 12% (from 10% to 22%) or 16% (from 30% to 46%) in the frequency of adverse events. Furthermore, this sample size ensures some power to explore the efficacy of statins. Discussion The development of a dengue therapeutic that can

  4. Interaction between Red Yeast Rice and CYP450 Enzymes/P-Glycoprotein and Its Implication for the Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Lovastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Red yeast rice (RYR can reduce cholesterol through its active component, lovastatin. This study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin in RYR products and potential RYR-drug interactions. Extracts of three registered RYR products (LipoCol Forte, Cholestin, and Xuezhikang were more effective than pure lovastatin in inhibiting the activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein. Among CYP450 enzymes, RYR showed the highest inhibition on CYP1A2 and CYP2C19, with comparable inhibitory potencies to the corresponding typical inhibitors. In healthy volunteers taking the RYR product LipoCol Forte, the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin and lovastatin acid were linear in the dose range of 1 to 4 capsules taken as a single dose and no significant accumulation was observed after multiple dosing. Concomitant use of one LipoCol Forte capsule with nifedipine did not change the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine. Yet, concomitant use of gemfibrozil with LipoCol Forte resulted in a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lovastatin acid. These findings suggest that the use of RYR products may not have effects on the pharmacokinetics of concomitant comedications despite their effects to inhibit the activities of CYP450 enzymes and P-gp, whereas gemfibrozil affects the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin acid when used concomitantly with RYR products.

  5. Pigment and Lovastatin content on the Red Rice cultivar Bah Butong and BP 1804 IF 9 which Fermented by Monascus purpureus Jmba

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    ERNAWATI KASIM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the red rice fermented by Monascus purpureus had been done. The rice consisted of 2 cultivars such as Bah Butong and BP 1804 IF 9. The aim of the research was to know the content of the pigment and lovastatin of the fermentation result/ angkak. Angkak was powdered by using blender. To measure the content of pigment, the powder was extracted by methanol. By using spectrophotometer the content of the pigment could be measured with 390 nm wave lengths for yellow pigment and 500 nm for the red pigment. For lovastatin the powder was extracted by acetonitrile and H2SO4. By using HPLC the content of lovastatin could be measured. The results showed that the highest pigment content for yellow pigment was on the PB 1804 IF 9 cultivar, and red pigment was on the Bah Butong cultivar. The highest lovastatin content was on the BP 1804 IF 9.

  6. Lovastatin for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Dengue: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorn, James; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Khanh, Lam Phung; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Tran, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Hang, Nguyen Thuy; Truong, Nguyen Thanh; Hue Tai, Luong Thi; Cam Huong, Nguyen Thi; Nhon, Vo Thanh; Van Tram, Ta; Farrar, Jeremy; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron P; Wills, Bridget

    2016-02-15

    Dengue endangers billions of people in the tropical world, yet no therapeutic is currently available. In part, the severe manifestations of dengue reflect inflammatory processes affecting the vascular endothelium. In addition to lipid lowering, statins have pleiotropic effects that improve endothelial function, and epidemiological studies suggest that outcomes from a range of acute inflammatory syndromes are improved in patients already on statin therapy. Following satisfactory review of a short pilot phase (40 mg lovastatin vs placebo in 30 cases), we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 5 days of 80 mg lovastatin vs placebo in 300 Vietnamese adults with a positive dengue NS1 rapid test presenting within 72 hours of fever onset. The primary outcome was safety. Secondary outcomes included comparisons of disease progression rates, fever clearance times, and measures of plasma viremia and quality of life between the treatment arms. Adverse events occurred with similar frequency in both groups (97/151 [64%] placebo vs 82/149 [55%] lovastatin; P = .13), and were in keeping with the characteristic clinical and laboratory features of acute dengue. We also observed no difference in serious adverse events or any of the secondary outcome measures. We found lovastatin to be safe and well tolerated in adults with dengue. However, although the study was not powered to address efficacy, we found no evidence of a beneficial effect on any of the clinical manifestations or on dengue viremia. Continuing established statin therapy in patients who develop dengue is safe.Chinese Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCTN03147572. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Normal cholesterol levels with lovastatin (Mevinolin) therapy in a child with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, C.; Grundy, S.M.; Bilheimer, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia produce no normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and as a result, LDL accumulates in plasma, causing severe premature atherosclerosis. Two years ago, liver transplantation was performed in a child with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, restoring LDL receptor activity to about 60% of normal and reducing the LDL cholesterol level by 81%. However, the patient's lipoprotein levels remained significantly elevated for her age and sex. Treatment with lovastatin (mevinolin) one year after transplantation produced a marked improvement in the patient's lipoprotein profile. The total and LDL cholesterol levels fell 40% and 49%, respectively, to values within the normal range. The level of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fell 41%, and the level of total triglycerides declined 28%. While lovastatin therapy decreased the production rate of LDL by 35%, it did not affect the LDL fractional clearance rate. Thus, the combination of liver transplantation and lovastatin restored total and LDL cholesterol levels to normal in this patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

  8. Inhibition of NF-κB Pathway and Modulation of MAPK Signaling Pathways in Glioblastoma and Implications for Lovastatin and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL Combination Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Chu Liu

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a common malignant brain tumor and it is refractory to therapy because it usually contains a mixture of cell types. The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL has been shown to induce apoptosis in a range of tumor cell types. Previously, we found that two human glioblastoma cell lines are resistant to TRAIL, while lovastatin sensitizes these glioblastoma cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma cell lines by lovastatin. Furthermore, we have confirmed the anti-tumor effect of combination therapy with lovastatin and TRAIL in the subcutaneous brain tumor model. We showed that lovastatin significantly up-regulated the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5 in glioblastoma cell lines as well as in tumor-bearing mice with peri-tumoral administration of lovastatin. Further study in glioblastoma cell lines suggested that lovastatin treatment could inhibit NF-κB and Erk/MAPK pathways but activates JNK pathway. These results suggest that lovastatin sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of DR5 level via NF-κB inactivation, but also directly induces apoptosis by dysregulation of MAPK pathway. Our in vivo study showed that local peri-tumoral co-injection of lovastatin and TRAIL substantially reduced tumor growth compared with single injection of lovastatin or TRAIL in subcutaneous nude mice model. This study suggests that combined treatment of lovastatin and TRAIL is a promising therapeutic strategy to TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma.

  9. The beneficial in vitro effects of lovastatin and chelerythrine on relaxatory response to acetylcholine in the perfused mesentric bed isolated from diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi-Hassanabad, Zahra; Imen-Shahidi, Mohsen; Fatehi, Mohammad; Farrokhfall, Khadijeh; Parsaeei, Heidar

    2006-03-27

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction (i.e. decreased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease. The present study was undertaken to determine whether diabetes induced by streptozotocin alters mesenteric responses to vasodilators and, if so, to study the acute in vitro effects of lovastatin and chelerythrine. Endothelial function was assessed in constantly perfused preparation removed from rats, 12 weeks after treatment with either saline or streptozotocin (45 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). In pre-contracted mesenteric beds (with 100 microM phenylephrine) removed from diabetic rats, the concentration response curve to acetylcholine, but not to sodium nitroprusside, was significantly reduced. Perfusion with lovastatin (10 microM for 20 min) or chelerythrine (1 microM for 20 min) significantly improved the acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in preparations removed from diabetic but not control rats. Pre-incubation of tissue with N(G)-nitro-L-argenine methyl ester hydrochloride (10 microM for 20 min) inhibited the beneficial effect of lovastatin but not chelerythrine. Pre-treatment of tissue with indomethacin (10 microM for 20 min) did not modify the effects of lovastatin or chelerythrine on acetylcholine responses. The present results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction induced by diabetes (in a resistant vasculature, such as rat mesenteric bed) may be improved by an acute exposure to either lovastatin or chelerythrine. Furthermore, our results suggest that the beneficial effect of lovastatin is mediated via the nitric oxide pathway.

  10. Controlled-release of tetracycline and lovastatin by poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid)-chitosan nanoparticles enhances periodontal regeneration in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lee, Chien-Chen; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Jan; Lai, Chern-Hsiung; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is characterized by inflammation of periodontal tissues, leading to bone resorption and tooth loss. The goal of treatment is to regenerate periodontal tissues including bone and cementum lost as a consequence of disease. The local delivery of tetracycline was proven to be effective in controlling localized periodontal infection without apparent side effects. Previous studies suggested that lovastatin has a significant role in new bone formation; however, the local delivery of lovastatin might enhance its therapeutic effects. A number of local delivery devices have been developed recently, including poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to develop a local delivery device, PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles, which allows the sequential release of tetracycline and lovastatin to effectively control local infection and promote bone regeneration in periodontitis. The size and microstructure of nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Nanoparticle Size Analyzer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The release of tetracycline and lovastatin was quantified using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect and alkaline phosphatase activity of the nanoparticles in osteoblast cell cultures as well as antibacterial activity against periodontal pathogens were investigated. Finally, the bone regeneration potential of PLGA nanoparticles in three-walled defects in beagle dogs was investigated. The results indicated that PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The volumetric analysis from micro-CT revealed significantly increased new bone formation in defects filled with nanoparticles in dogs. This novel local delivery device might be useful as an adjunctive treatment in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  11. A sensitive molecularly imprinted polymer based quartz crystal microbalance nanosensor for selective determination of lovastatin in red yeast rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Tanju; Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Karimi-Maleh, Hassan

    2015-10-15

    Lovastatin (LOV) is a statin, used to lower cholesterol which has been found as a hypolipidemic agent in commercial red yeast rice. In present study, a sensitive molecular imprinted quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor was prepared by fabricating a self-assembling monolayer formation of allylmercaptane on QCM chip surface for selective determination of lovastatin (LOV) in red yeast rice. To prepare molecular imprinted quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nanosensor, LOV imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloylamidoaspartic acid) [p(HEMA-MAAsp)] nanofilm was attached on the modified gold surface of QCM chip. The non-modified and improved surfaces were characterized by using contact angle, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The imprinted QCM sensor was validated according to the ICH guideline (International Conference on Harmonisation). The linearity range was obtained as 0.10-1.25 nM. The detection limit of the prepared material was calculated as 0.030 nM. The developed QCM nanosensor was successfully used to examine red yeast rice. Furthermore, the stability and repeatability of the prepared QCM nanosensor were studied. The spectacular long-term stability and repeatability of the prepared LOV-imprinted QCM nanosensor make them intriguing for use in QCM sensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the hypolipidemic effects of coconut water and lovastatin in rats fed fat-cholesterol enriched diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, V G; Rajamohan, T

    2008-12-01

    The coconut water presents a series of nutritional and therapeutic properties, being a natural, acid and sterile solution, which contains several biologically active components, l-arginine, ascorbic acid, minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium, which have beneficial effects on lipid levels. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that both tender and mature coconut water feeding significantly (Pcholesterol fed rats [Sandhya, V.G., Rajamohan, T., 2006. Beneficial effects of coconut water feeding on lipid metabolism in cholesterol fed rats. J. Med. Food 9, 400-407]. The current study evaluated the hypolipidemic effect of coconut water (4ml/100g body weight) with a lipid lowering drug, lovastatin (0.1/100g diet) in rats fed fat-cholesterol enriched diet ad libitum for 45 days. Coconut water or lovastatin supplementation lowered the levels of serum total cholesterol, VLDL+LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and increased HDL cholesterol in experimental rats (Pcholesterol in the liver were higher in coconut water treated rats. Coconut water supplementation increased hepatic bile acid and fecal bile acids and neutral sterols (Pcholesterol enriched diet.

  13. Controlled-release of tetracycline and lovastatin by poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid-chitosan nanoparticles enhances periodontal regeneration in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee BS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bor-Shiunn Lee,1 Chien-Chen Lee,2 Yi-Ping Wang,2 Hsiao-Jan Chen,3 Chern-Hsiung Lai,4 Wan-Ling Hsieh,1 Yi-Wen Chen2 1Graduate Institute of Oral Biology, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, 3Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 4College of Life Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Abstract: Chronic periodontitis is characterized by inflammation of periodontal tissues, leading to bone resorption and tooth loss. The goal of treatment is to regenerate periodontal tissues including bone and cementum lost as a consequence of disease. The local delivery of tetracycline was proven to be effective in controlling localized periodontal infection without apparent side effects. Previous studies suggested that lovastatin has a significant role in new bone formation; however, the local delivery of lovastatin might enhance its therapeutic effects. A number of local delivery devices have been developed recently, including poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to develop a local delivery device, PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles, which allows the sequential release of tetracycline and lovastatin to effectively control local infection and promote bone regeneration in periodontitis. The size and microstructure of nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Nanoparticle Size Analyzer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The release of tetracycline and lovastatin was quantified using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect and alkaline phosphatase activity of the nanoparticles in osteoblast cell cultures as well as antibacterial activity against periodontal pathogens were investigated. Finally, the bone regeneration potential of PLGA nanoparticles in

  14. The Effects of Tocotrienol and Lovastatin Co-Supplementation on Bone Dynamic Histomorphometry and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression in Rats with Estrogen Deficiency

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    Kok-Yong Chin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Both tocotrienol and statins are suppressors of the mevalonate pathway. Supplementation of tocotrienol among statin users could potentially protect them against osteoporosis. This study aimed to compare the effects of tocotrienol and lovastatin co-supplementation with individual treatments on bone dynamic histomorphometric indices and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 gene expression in ovariectomized rats. Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized equally into six groups. The baseline was sacrificed upon receipt. All other groups were ovariectomized, except for the sham group. The ovariectomized groups were administered orally daily with (1 lovastatin 11 mg/kg/day alone; (2 tocotrienol derived from annatto bean (annatto tocotrienol 60 mg/kg/day alone; (3 lovastatin 11 mg/kg/day, and annatto tocotrienol 60 mg/kg/day. The sham and ovariectomized control groups were treated with equal volume of vehicle. After eight weeks of treatment, the rats were sacrificed. Their bones were harvested for bone dynamic histomorphometry and BMP-2 gene expression. Rats supplemented with annatto tocotrienol and lovastatin concurrently demonstrated significantly lower single-labeled surface, but increased double-labeled surface, mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate and bone formation rate compared to individual treatments (p < 0.05. There was a parallel increase in BMP-2 gene expression in the rats receiving combined treatment (p < 0.05. The combination of annatto tocotrienol and lovastatin exerted either additively or synergistically on selected bone parameters. In conclusion, tocotrienol can augment the bone formation and mineralization in rats receiving low-dose statins. Supplementation of tocotrienol in statin users can potentially protect them from osteoporosis.

  15. Development of lovastatin-loaded poly(lactic acid microspheres for sustained oral delivery: in vitro and ex vivo evaluation

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    Guan QG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Qigang Guan,1 Wei Chen,2 Xianming Hu2 1Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical, Shenyang Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Background: A novel lovastatin (LVT-loaded poly(lactic acid microsphere suitable for oral administration was developed in this study, and in vitro and in vivo characteristics were evaluated. Methods: The designed microspheres were obtained by an improved emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The morphological examination, particle size, encapsulation ratio, drug loading, and in vitro release were characterized. Pharmacokinetics studies were used to show that microspheres possess more advantages than the conventional formulations. Results: By using the emulsion-solvent evaporation method, it was simple to prepare microspheres and easy to scale up production. The morphology of formed microspheres showed a spherical shape with a smooth surface, without any particle aggregation. Mean size of the microspheres was 2.65±0.69 µm; the encapsulation efficiency was 92.5%±3.6%, and drug loading was 16.7%±2.1%. In vitro release indicated that the LVT microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and ex vivo studies showed that after LVT was loaded to microspheres, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to the last measurable plasma concentration point and the extrapolation to time infinity increased significantly, which represented 2.63-fold and 2.49-fold increases, respectively, compared to suspensions. The rate of ex vivo clearance was significantly reduced. Conclusion: This research proved that poly(lactic acid microspheres can significantly prolong the drug circulation time in vivo and can also significantly increase the relative bioavailability of the drug. Keywords: lovastatin, microspheres, PLA, in vitro release, pharmacokinetics 

  16. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, simvastatin, lovastatin and mevastatin inhibit proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynn, Sharon A; O'Sullivan, Dermot; Eustace, Alex J; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma

    2008-01-01

    A number of recent studies have suggested that cancer incidence rates may be lower in patients receiving statin treatment for hypercholesterolemia. We examined the effects of statin drugs on in vitro proliferation, migration and invasion of melanoma cells. The ability of lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin to inhibit the melanoma cell proliferation was examined using cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays. Effects on cell migration and invasion were assessed using transwell invasion and migration chambers. Hypothesis testing was performed using 1-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. Lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin inhibited the growth, cell migration and invasion of HT144, M14 and SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. The concentrations required to inhibit proliferation of melanoma cells (0.8–2.1 μM) have previously been achieved in a phase I clinical trial of lovastatin in patients with solid tumours, (45 mg/kg/day resulted in peak plasma concentrations of approximately 3.9 μM). Our results suggest that statin treatment is unlikely to prevent melanoma development at standard doses. However, higher doses of statins may have a role to play in adjuvant therapy by inhibiting growth and invasion of melanoma cells

  17. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

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    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  18. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Bundela

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine.

  19. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine. PMID:26536350

  20. Chimeric anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies and lovastatin act synergistically to provide in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB.

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    Mulualem E Tilahun

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of a family of toxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that act as superantigens, activating a large fraction of the T-cell population and inducing production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS and death. Extracellular engagement of the TCR of T-cells and class II MHC of antigen presenting cells by SEB triggers the activation of many intracellular signaling processes. We engineered chimeric antibodies to block the extracellular engagement of cellular receptors by SEB and used a statin to inhibit intracellular signaling. Chimeric human-mouse antibodies directed against different neutralizing epitopes of SEB synergistically inhibited its activation of human T-cells in vitro. In the in vivo model of lethal toxic shock syndrome (TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, two of these antibodies conferred significant partial protection when administered individually, but offered complete protection in a synergistic manner when given together. Similarly, in vivo, lovastatin alone conferred only partial protection from TSS similar to single anti-SEB antibodies. However, used in combination with one chimeric neutralizing anti-SEB antibody, lovastatin provided complete protection against lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. These experiments demonstrate that in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB can be achieved by a statin of proven clinical safety and chimeric human-mouse antibodies, agents now widely used and known to be of low immunogenicity in human hosts.

  1. Lovastatin delays infection and increases survival rates in AG129 mice infected with dengue virus serotype 2.

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    Marlen Martinez-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been reported that treatment of DENV-infected cultures with Lovastatin (LOV, can affect viral assembly. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of LOV on the survival rate and viremia levels of DENV-2-infected AG129 mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were inoculated with 1 × 10(6 plaque-forming units (PFU/ml of DENV-2 and treated with LOV (200 mg/kg/day. Pre-treatment with one or three doses of LOV increased the survival rate compared to untreated mice (7.3 and 7.1 days, respectively, compared to 4.8 days. Viremia levels also decreased by 21.8% compared to untreated mice, but only in the group administered three doses prior to inoculation. When LOV was administered after viral inoculation, the survival rate increased (7.3 days in the group treated at 24 hpi, 6.8 days in the group treated at 48 hpi and 6.5 days in the group treated with two doses compared to the untreated group (4.8 days. Interestingly, the serum viral titer increased by 24.6% in mice treated at 48 hpi with a single dose of LOV and by 21.7% in mice treated with two doses (at 24 and 48 hpi of LOV compared to untreated mice. Finally histopathological changes in the liver and spleen in infected and untreated mice included massive extramedullary erythropoiesis foci and inflammatory filtration, and these characteristics were decreased or absent in LOV-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the effect of LOV on viremia depends on the timing of treatment and on the number of doses administered. We observed a significant increase in the survival rate in both schemes due to a delay in the progression of the disease. However, the results obtained in the post-treatment scheme must be handled carefully because this treatment scheme increases viremia and we do not know how this increase could affect disease progression in humans.

  2. Enhancement of solubility and therapeutic potential of poorly soluble lovastatin by SMEDDS formulation adsorbed on directly compressed spray dried magnesium aluminometasilicate liquid loadable tablets: A study in diet induced hyperlipidemic rabbits

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    Mohd Javed Qureshi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS containing lovastatin and to further explore the ability of porous Neusilin® US2 tablet as a solid carrier for SMEDDS. SMEDDS formulations of varying proportions of peceol, cremophor RH 40 and transcutol-P were selected and subjected to in-vitro evaluation, including dispersibility studies, droplet size, zeta potential measurement and release studies. The results indicated that the drug release profile of lovastatin from SMEDDS formulations was statistically significantly higher (p-value < 0.05 than the plain lovastatin powder. Thermodynamic stability studies also confirmed the stability of the prepared SMEDDS formulations. The optimized formulation, which consists of 12% of peceol, 44% of cremophor RH 40, and 44% of transcutol-P was loaded into directly compressed liquid loadable tablet of Neusilin® US2 by simple adsorption method. In order to determine the ability of Neusilin® US2 as a suitable carrier pharmacodynamics study were also carried out in healthy diet induced hyperlipidemic rabbits. Animals were administered with both liquid SMEDDS and solid SMEDDS as well. From the results obtained, Neusilin® was found to be a suitable carrier for SMEDDS and was equally effective in reducing the elevated lipid profile. In conclusion, liquid loadable tablet (LLT is predicted to be a promising technique to deliver a liquid formulation in solid state.

  3. Suppression of Remodeling Behaviors with Arachidonic Acid Modification for Enhanced in vivo Antiatherogenic Efficacies of Lovastatin-loaded Discoidal Recombinant High Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Zhang, Mengyuan; Liu, Lisha; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Wenli

    2015-10-01

    A series of in vitro evaluation in our previous studies had proved that arachidonic acid (AA) modification could suppress the remodeling behaviors of lovastatin-loaded discoidal reconstituted high density lipoprotein (LT-d-rHDL) by restraining the reactivity with lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) for reducing undesired drug leakage. This study focuses on the investigation of AA-modified LT-d-rHDL (AA-LT-d-rHDL) in atherosclerotic New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit models to explore whether AA modification could enhance drug targeting delivery and improve antiatherogenic efficacies in vivo. After pharmacokinetics of AA-LT-d-rHDL modified with different AA amount were investigated in atherosclerotic NZW rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions targeting property was assessed by ex vivo imaging of aortic tree and drug distribution. Furthermore, their antiatherogenic efficacies were elaborately evaluated and compared by typical biochemical indices. With AA modification amount augmenting, circulation time of AA-LT-d-rHDL was prolonged, and drug accumulation in the target locus was increased, eventually the significant appreciation in antiatherogenic efficacies were further supported by lower level of bad cholesterol, decreased atherosclerotic lesions areas and mean intima-media thickness (MIT), markedly attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein expression and macrophage infiltration. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that AA-LT-d-rHDL could enhance drug accumulation in atherosclerotic lesion and impede atherosclerosis progression more effectively.

  4. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of fixed dose lovastatin and niacinER combination in Asian Indian dyslipidemic patients: a multicentric study

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    Manoj Sharma

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Manoj Sharma1, Deepika R Sharma1, Vikram Singh1, RB Panwar2, HS Hira3, Bishav Mohan4, Naveen Kumar4, SK Sharma5, Rajeev Gupta61Clinical Research Division, Panacea-Biotec Ltd, New Delhi; 2SP Medical College, Bikaner; 3Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi; 4Dayanand Medical College, Ludhiana; 5SMS Medical College, Jaipur; 6Monilek Hospital and Research Center, Jaipur, India.Abstract: Asian Indian dyslipidemia is characterized by: borderline high low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo B; high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and apoA1; and high lipoprotein(a (lp[a]. We performed a controlled multicentric trial in India to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a fixed dose combination of lovastatin and niacin extended release (niacinER formulation in patients with moderate to severe dyslipidemia. Consecutive subjects that satisfied the selection criteria, agreed to an informed consent, and with no baseline presence of liver/renal disease or heart failure were enrolled in the study. After a 4-week run-in period there were 142 patients with LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL. Eleven patients were excluded because of uncontrolled hyperglycemia and 131 patients were recruited. After baseline evaluation of clinical and biochemical parameters all subjects were administered lovastatin (20 mg and niacinER (500 mg combination once daily. Dose escalation was done on basis of lipid parameters at 8 weeks and in 11 patients increased to lovastatin (20 mg and niacinER (1000 mg. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed and data was analyzed using nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Thirteen patients (10% were lost to follow-up and 4 (3% withdrew because of dermatological adverse effects: flushing, pruritus, and rash. The mean values of various lipid parameters (mg/dL at baseline, and at weeks 4, 12, and 24 respectively were: total cholesterol 233.9 ± 27, 206.3 ± 27, 189.8 ± 31, and 174.9 ± 27 mg/dL; LDL

  5. Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recombinant High-Density Lipoprotein Carrier and the Encapsulated Lovastatin in RAW264.7 Macrophage Cells Based on the Median-Effect Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cuiping; Zhao, Yi; Yang, Yun; He, Jianhua; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2018-03-05

    Recombinant high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) displays a similar anti-atherosclerotic effect with native HDL and could also be served as a carrier of cardiovascular drug for atherosclerotic plaque targeting. In our previous studies, rHDL has shown a more potent anti-atherosclerotic efficacy as compared to the other conventional nanoparticles with a payload of lovastatin (LS). Therefore, we hypothesized that a synergistic anti-atherosclerotic effect of the rHDL carrier and the encapsulated LS might exist. In this study, the dose-effect relationships and the combined effect of the rHDL and LS were quantitatively evaluated in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using the median-effect analysis, in which the rHDL carrier was regarded as a drug combined. Median-effect analysis suggested that rHDL and LS exerted a desirable synergistic inhibition on the oxLDL internalization at a ratio of 6:1 ( D m,LS : D m,rHDL ) in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. About 50% of the reduction on the intracellular lipid contents was found when RAW264.7 cells were treated with LS-loaded rHDLs at their respective median-effect dose ( D m ) concentrations and a synergistic effect on the mediating cholesterol efflux was also observed, which verified the accuracy of the results obtained from the median-effect analysis. The mechanism underlying the synergistic effect of the rHDL carrier and the drug might be attributed to their potent inhibitory effects on SR-A expression. In conclusion, the median-effect analysis was proven to be a feasible method to quantitatively evaluate the synergistic effect of the biofunctional carrier and the drug encapsulated.

  6. Lovastatin reduces neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 subfield after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: preliminary results Lovastatina reduz a lesão celular na região CA1 do hipocampo após o status epilepticus induzido pela pilocarpina: resultados preliminares

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    Pauline Rangel

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To further characterize the capacity of lovastatin to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE METHOD: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (A control rats, received neither pilocarpine nor lovastatin (n=5; (B control rats, received just lovastatin (n=5; (C rats that received just pilocarpine (n=5; (D rats that received pilocarpine and lovastatin (n=5. After pilocarpine injection (350mg/kg, i.p., only rats that displayed continuous, convulsive seizure activity were included in our study. Seizure activity was monitored behaviorally and terminated with an injection of diazepam (10 mg/kg, i.p. after 4 h of convulsive SE. The rats treated with lovastatin received two doses of 20mg/kg via an oesophagic probe immediately and 24 hours after SE induction. Seven days after pilocarpine-induced SE, all the animals were perfused and their brains were processed for histological analysis through Nissl method. RESULTS: The cell counts in the Nissl-stained sections performed within the hippocampal formation showed a significant cell loss in rats that received pilocarpine and presented SE (CA1= 26.8 ± 13.67; CA3= 38.1 ± 7.2; hilus= 43.8 ± 3.95 when compared with control group animals (Group A: CA1= 53.2 ± 9.63; CA3= 63.5 ± 13.35; hilus= 59.08 ± 10.24; Group B: CA1= 74.3 ± 8.16; CA3= 70.1 ± 3.83; hilus= 70.6 ± 5.10. The average neuronal cell number of CA1 subfield of rats that present SE and received lovastatin (44.4 ± 17.88 was statically significant increased when compared with animals that just presented SE. CONCLUSION: Lovastatin exert a neuroprotective role in the attenuation of brain damage after SE.OBJETIVO: Capacidade da lovastatina em prevenir a perda de neurônios hipocampais após o status epilepticus (SE induzido pela pilocarpina. MÉTODO: Ratos adultos Wistar foram divididos em 4 grupos: (A ratos controles que não receberam pilocarpina nem lovastatina (n=5; (B ratos

  7. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study): a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya Carlos J; Jaimes Fabian; Higuita Edwin A; Convers-Páez Sandra; Estrada Santiago; Gutierrez Francisco; Amariles Pedro; Giraldo Newar; Peñaloza Cristina; Rugeles Maria T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregul...

  8. Mechanisms of Chinese Red Yeast Rice Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    following treatment with LV and RYR. MATERIALS AND METHODS Extract and standard preparation Chinese RYR powder purchased from Botanica Bio- Science (Ojai...RYR diet contains 5% of RYR powder ( Botanica Bioscience, Ojai, CA) with the modified AIN93G diet. For lovastatin diet, lovastatin (Mylan

  9. The Potential of Different Fungal Isolates for Production of Lovostatin Under Solid State Fermentation (SSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezzat, S.M.; Ahmed, A.S.; Auda, S.M.; Younis, N.A.; Yousef, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Eleven fungal isolates were grown on different agricultural wastes (maize stalks, rice husk, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse) at a concentration of 30% to detect their ability for the production of lovastatin. The highest yield on maize stalks was obtained by Aspergillus flavus 11 while for rice husk, Aspergillus niger 12 exhibited the highest yield of lovastatin. Also Aspergillus flavus 11, Aspergillus niger 12 and A. terreus 18 were found to produce the highest lovastatin production with wheat straw and the highest yield on bagasse was obtained by A. terreus 18. Different concentrations of the best agricultural wastes (maize stalks, rice husk and wheat straw) were used as solid substrates to study their effects on lovastatin yield by the selected fungal isolates. The highest yield of lovastatin for the tested fungal isolates was obtained at 10% concentration for the three substrates and the highest yield was obtained by A. niger 14 and A. terreus 18. The influence of mutagenic agents (UV light and gamma rays) on these two potent fungal isolates in relation to lovastatin production showed that UV exposure for 120 min was the best in case of A. niger 14 while it was 30 min in case of A. terreus 18. On the other hand, gamma rays exhibited the highest lovastatin yield at exposure dose of 0.5 kGy for A. niger 14 and 0.25 kGy for A. terreus 18.

  10. Paraoxonase-1 L55M polymorphism with fatty acid composition of phospholipids in high-density lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghatreh Samani K

    2012-04-01

    Conclusion: Allele (L from L55M polymorphism had a higher frequency in patients with higher LDL-C concentrations. PON1 genotypes seemed to have a modifying role on paraoxonase-1 activity after lovastatin therapy.

  11. Isolation and identification of flavonoids from anticancer and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extracts, against cancer cell lines and NaNO2-induced neurodegeneration in mice brain. Methods: Adult ... the significant increase in cytochrome C activity ... lovastatin, calceorioside, paclitaxel, vitamins A and C ... Group IV received NaNO2 in.

  12. Single-step production of the simvastatin precursor monacolin J by engineering of an industrial strain of Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuenian; Liang, Yajing; Yang, Yong; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-07-01

    Monacolin J is a key precursor for the synthesis of simvastatin (Zocor), an important drug for treating hypercholesterolemia. Industrially, monacolin J is manufactured through alkaline hydrolysis of lovastatin, a fungal polyketide produced by Aspergillus terreus. Multistep chemical processes for the conversion of lovastatin to simvastatin are laborious, cost expensive and environmentally unfriendly. A biocatalysis process for monacolin J conversion to simvastatin has been developed. However, direct bioproduction of monacolin J has not yet been achieved. Here, we identified a lovastatin hydrolase from Penicillium chrysogenum, which displays a 232-fold higher catalytic efficiency for the in vitro hydrolysis of lovastatin compared to a previously patented hydrolase, but no activity for simvastatin. Furthermore, we showed that an industrial A. terreus strain heterologously expressing this lovastatin hydrolase can produce monacolin J through single-step fermentation with high efficiency, approximately 95% of the biosynthesized lovastatin was hydrolyzed to monacolin J. Our results demonstrate a simple and green technical route for the production of monacolin J, which makes complete bioproduction of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin feasible and promising. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and metabolite production from Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Hasan, Hanan; Harith, Hanis H; Abbas, Ali

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and the production of lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542. Sodium alginate and gelatine were used to protect the fungal pellet from mechanical force by increasing the media viscosity. Sodium alginate stimulated the production of lovastatin by up to 329.0% and sulochrin by 128.7%, with inhibitory effect on (+)-geodin production at all concentrations used. However, the use of gelatine to increase viscosity significantly suppressed lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin's production (maximum reduction at day 9 of 42.7, 60.8, and 68.3%, respectively), which indicated that the types of chemical play a major role in metabolite production. Higher viscosity increased both pellet biomass and size in all conditions. Friction significantly increased (+)-geodin's titre by 1527.5%, lovastatin by 511.1%, and sulochrin by 784.4% while reducing pellet biomass and size. Conversely, sonication produced disperse filamentous morphology with significantly lower metabolites. Sodium alginate-induced lovastatin and sulochrin production suggest that these metabolites are not affected by viscosity; rather, their production is affected by the specific action of certain chemicals. In contrast, low viscosity adversely affected (+)-geodin's production, while pellet disintegration can cause a significant production of (+)-geodin.

  14. Zeatin is indispensable for the G2-M transition in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, F; Dewitte, W; Witters, E; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Onckelen, H

    1998-04-10

    The importance of N6-isoprenoid cytokinins in the G2-M transition of Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells was investigated. Both cytokinin biosynthesis and entry in mitosis were partially blocked by application at early or late G2 of lovastatin (10 microM), an inhibitor of mevalonic acid synthesis. LC-MS/MS quantification of endogenous cytokinins proved that lovastatin affects cytokinin biosynthesis by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase. Out of eight different aminopurines and a synthetic auxin tested for their ability to override lovastatin inhibition of mitosis, only zeatin was active. Our data point to a key role for a well-defined cytokinin (here, zeatin) in the G2-M transition of tobacco BY-2 cells.

  15. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM{sub 10})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, St. Paul' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Bai, Ni [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, St. Paul' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Vincent, Renaud [Environmental Health Sciences and Research Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D. [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, St. Paul' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Van Eeden, Stephan F., E-mail: Stephan.vanEeden@hli.ubc.ca [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, St. Paul' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM{sub 10}) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM{sub 10}. New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM{sub 10}/saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM{sub 10} exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM{sub 10} impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM{sub 10} increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM{sub 10}. Taken together, statins protect against PM{sub 10}-induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal

  16. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih; Bai, Ni; Vincent, Renaud; Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D.; Van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM 10 ) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM 10 . New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM 10 /saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM 10 exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM 10 impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM 10 increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM 10 . Taken together, statins protect against PM 10 -induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM 10 ) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal macrophages, lipid accumulation, and

  17. Proteomic analysis of lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition by sampling of individual seeds at germination and removal of storage proteins by polyethylene glycol fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Song, Bin-Yan; Deng, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    the sensitivity of germination to abscisic acid. MVA pathway-derived products, cytokinins, partially reversed the lovastatin inhibition of germination and released seed thermoinhibition at 25°C. We conclude that the MVA pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is involved in lettuce seed germination...

  18. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research - Vol 16, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosynthesis of lovastatin using agro-industrial wastes as carrier substrates · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Sadia Javed, Munazzah Meraj, Saqib Mahmood, Arruje Hameed, Farah Naz, Sameera Hassan, Rao Irfan, 263-269.

  19. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2016-01-01

    -associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole...

  20. Vastatins have a distinct effect on sterol synthesis and progesterone secretion in human granulosa cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Naaktgeboren, N.; Cohen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    Lovastatin and simvastatin are strong inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis in cultured human granulosa cells, as measured within 6 days after isolation, with IC50-values of respectively 27.0 and 18.2 nM obtained after 3.5 hours of incubation with the drugs. Pravastatin is a much weaker inhibitor of

  1. Anti-cancer potential of MAPK pathway inhibition in paragangliomas-effect of different statins on mouse pheochromocytoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliedner, S.M.; Engel, T.G.P.; Lendvai, N.K.; Shankavaram, U.; Nolting, S.; Wesley, R.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Ungefroren, H.; Oldoerp, A.; Lampert, G.; Lehnert, H.; Timmers, H.J.; Pacak, K.

    2014-01-01

    To date, malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) cannot be effectively cured and thus novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Lovastatin has been shown to effectively induce apoptosis in mouse PHEO cells (MPC) and the more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived cells

  2. Different effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on sterol synthesis in various human cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Huisman, R.H.; Moshage, H.; Yap, S.H.; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    The three vastatins examined, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin, are equally strong inhibitors of the sterol synthesis in human hepatocytes in culture with IC50-values of 4.1, 8.0 and 2.0 nM, respectively. However, in the human extrahepatic cells: umbilical vascular endothelial cells, retinal

  3. Molecular Biological basis for statin resistance in naturally statin-producing organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rems, Ana; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    to lovastatin compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we investigated if MlcD confers the resistance by functional complementation of the endogenous HMG-CoA reductases in S. cerevisiae. There are two isozymes of HMG-CoA reductase in yeast, HMG1 and HMG2, both involved in the sterol biosynthetic pathway......, which leads to the synthesis of ergosterol. Following deletion of HMG1 and HMG2 genes in S. cerevisiae, we inserted the mlcD gene into the knockout mutants, and tested the resulted strains for sensitivity to lovastatin. The HMG1 and HMG2 knockout mutants were unable to grow on minimal media and had...... an increased sensitivity to lovastatin on rich media. However, insertion of the mlcD gene restored the growth of the yeast mutants and increased their resistance to lovastatin. These results show that MlcD complements the activity of the deleted HMG-CoA reductases, enabling synthesis of ergosterol in yeast...

  4. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lovastatin production by Aspergillus terreus in solid state and submerged fermentations · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T.G. Gulyamova, D.M. Ruzieva, S.M. Nasmetova, R.S. Sattarova, K.V. Lobanova, L.A. Abdulmyanova, G.A. Rasulova, 19-24 ...

  5. Batch culture fermentation of Penicillium chrysogenum and a report on the isolation, purification, identification and antibiotic activity of citrinin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; DeSouza, L.; Kamat, T.; Rodrigues, C.; Naik, C.G.

    Chem Soc., (1958) 4576-4581. 23 Lopez, C.J.L., Porcel, R.E.M., Ferron, V. M. A, Perez, S.J.A., Sevilla, F.J.M & Chisti Y. Lovastatin inhibits its own synthesis in Aspergillus terreus. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol., 31 (2004.) 48-50. 24 Barber, J...

  6. Apolipoprotein E*3-Leiden transgenic mice mode for hypolipidaemic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Pearce, N.J.; Bergö, M.; Staels, B.; Yates, J.W.; Gribble, A.D.; Bond, B.C.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Groot, P.H.E.

    1998-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APO) E*3-Leiden mice with impaired chylomicron and VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) remnant metabolism display hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. In the present study, these mice were used for testing the hypolipidaemic effect of two marketed agents, lovastatin (CAS 75330-75-5)

  7. Possible increased risk of rhabdomyolysis during concomitant use of simvastatin and gemfibrozil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanPuijenbroek, EP; DuBufVereijken, PWG; Spooren, PFMJ; VanDoormaal, JJ

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of rhabdomyolysis is one of the rare side-effects of the cholesterol-lowering agent simvastatin. During the use of lovastatin, an agent related to simvastatin, the risk of this side-effect might be increased when cyclosporin or gemfibrozil are used concomitantly. It is possible that

  8. Mevalonate Pathway Antagonist Suppresses Formation of Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma and Ovarian Carcinoma in Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kashima, Hiroyasu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jung, Jin-Gyoung; Kuan, Jen-Chun; Gu, Jinghua; Xuan, Jianhua; Sokoll, Lori; Visvanathan, Kala; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2015-10-15

    Statins are among the most frequently prescribed drugs because of their efficacy and low toxicity in treating hypercholesterolemia. Recently, statins have been reported to inhibit the proliferative activity of cancer cells, especially those with TP53 mutations. Because TP53 mutations occur in almost all ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), we determined whether statins suppressed tumor growth in animal models of ovarian cancer. Two ovarian cancer mouse models were used. The first one was a genetically engineered model, mogp-TAg, in which the promoter of oviduct glycoprotein-1 was used to drive the expression of SV40 T-antigen in gynecologic tissues. These mice spontaneously developed serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), which are known as ovarian cancer precursor lesions. The second model was a xenograft tumor model in which human ovarian cancer cells were inoculated into immunocompromised mice. Mice in both models were treated with lovastatin, and effects on tumor growth were monitored. The molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects of lovastatin were also investigated. Lovastatin significantly reduced the development of STICs in mogp-TAg mice and inhibited ovarian tumor growth in the mouse xenograft model. Knockdown of prenylation enzymes in the mevalonate pathway recapitulated the lovastatin-induced antiproliferative phenotype. Transcriptome analysis indicated that lovastatin affected the expression of genes associated with DNA replication, Rho/PLC signaling, glycolysis, and cholesterol biosynthesis pathways, suggesting that statins have pleiotropic effects on tumor cells. The above results suggest that repurposing statin drugs for ovarian cancer may provide a promising strategy to prevent and manage this devastating disease. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Mevalonate Pathway Antagonist Inhibits Proliferation of Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma and Ovarian Carcinoma in Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kashima, Hiroyasu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jung, Jin- Gyoung; Kuan, Jen-Chun; Gu, Jinghua; Xuan, Jianhua; Sokoll, Lori; Visvanathan, Kala; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Statins are among the most frequently prescribed drugs because of their efficacy and low toxicity in treating hypercholesterolemia. Recently, statins have been reported to inhibit the proliferative activity of cancer cells, especially those with TP53 mutations. Since TP53 mutations occur in almost all of the ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma, we determined if statins suppressed tumor growth in animal models of ovarian cancer. Experimental Design Two ovarian cancer mouse models were employed. The first one was a genetically engineered model, mogp-TAg, in which the promoter of oviduct glycoprotein-1 was used to drive the expression of SV40 T-antigen in gynecologic tissues. These mice spontaneously develop serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), which are known as ovarian cancer precursor lesions. The second model was a xenograft tumor model in which human ovarian cancer cells were inoculated into immunocompromised mice. Mice in both models were treated with lovastatin, and effects on tumor growth were monitored. The molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effects of lovastatin were also investigated. Results Lovastatin significantly reduced the development of STICs in mogp-TAg mice and inhibited ovarian tumor growth in the mouse xenograft model. Knockdown of prenylation enzymes in the mevalonate pathway recapitulated the lovastatin-induced anti-proliferative phenotype. Transcriptome analysis indicated that lovastatin affected the expression of genes associated with DNA replication, Rho/PLC signaling, glycolysis, and cholesterol biosynthesis pathways, suggesting that statins have pleiotropic effects on tumor cells. Conclusion The above results suggest that repurposing statin drugs for ovarian cancer may provide a promising strategy to prevent and manage this devastating disease. PMID:26109099

  10. A survey of the FDA's AERS database regarding muscle and tendon adverse events linked to the statin drug class.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholesterol management drugs known as statins are widely used and often well tolerated; however, a variety of muscle-related side effects can arise. These adverse events (AEs can have serious impact, and form a significant barrier to therapy adherence. Surveillance of post-marketing AEs is of vital importance to understand real-world AEs and reporting differences between individual statin drugs. We conducted a review of post-approval muscle and tendon AE reports in association with statin use, to assess differences within the drug class. METHODS: We analyzed all case reports from the FDA AE Reporting System (AERS database linking muscle-related AEs to statin use (07/01/2005-03/31/2011. Drugs examined were: atorvastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and fluvastatin. RESULTS: Relative risk rates for rosuvastatin were consistently higher than other statins. Atorvastatin and simvastatin showed intermediate risks, while pravastatin and lovastatin appeared to have the lowest risk rates. Relative risk of muscle-related AEs, therefore, approximately tracked with per milligram LDL-lowering potency, with fluvastatin an apparent exception. Incorporating all muscle categories, rates for atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, and lovastatin were, respectively, 55%, 26%, 17%, and 7.5% as high, as rosuvastatin, approximately tracking per milligram potency (Rosuvastatin>Atorvastatin>Simvastatin>Pravastatin ≈ Lovastatin and comporting with findings of other studies. Relative potency, therefore, appears to be a fundamental predictor of muscle-related AE risk, with fluvastatin, the least potent statin, an apparent exception (risk 74% vs rosuvastatin. INTERPRETATION: AE reporting rates differed strikingly for drugs within the statin class, with relative reporting aligning substantially with potency. The data presented in this report offer important reference points for the selection of statins for cholesterol management in

  11. Statin and rottlerin small-molecule inhibitors restrict colon cancer progression and metastasis via MACC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Manisha; Kobelt, Dennis; Walther, Wolfgang; Voss, Cynthia; Smith, Janice; Specker, Edgar; Neuenschwander, Martin; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Dahlmann, Mathias; Radetzki, Silke; Preissner, Robert; von Kries, Jens Peter; Schlag, Peter Michael; Stein, Ulrike

    2017-06-01

    MACC1 (Metastasis Associated in Colon Cancer 1) is a key driver and prognostic biomarker for cancer progression and metastasis in a large variety of solid tumor types, particularly colorectal cancer (CRC). However, no MACC1 inhibitors have been identified yet. Therefore, we aimed to target MACC1 expression using a luciferase reporter-based high-throughput screening with the ChemBioNet library of more than 30,000 compounds. The small molecules lovastatin and rottlerin emerged as the most potent MACC1 transcriptional inhibitors. They remarkably inhibited MACC1 promoter activity and expression, resulting in reduced cell motility. Lovastatin impaired the binding of the transcription factors c-Jun and Sp1 to the MACC1 promoter, thereby inhibiting MACC1 transcription. Most importantly, in CRC-xenografted mice, lovastatin and rottlerin restricted MACC1 expression and liver metastasis. This is-to the best of our knowledge-the first identification of inhibitors restricting cancer progression and metastasis via the novel target MACC1. This drug repositioning might be of therapeutic value for CRC patients.

  12. Pharmacological inhibition of radiation induced in vitro tumor cell/endothelium cell interactions and in vivo metastasis processes; Pharmakologische Hemmung strahleninduzierter Tumorzell-Endothelzell-Interaktionen in vitro und Metastasierungsprozesse in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Melanie

    2013-05-07

    Exposure of endothelial cells with ionizing radiation (IR) or treatment with inflammatory cytokines (e. g. TNFα) induces a Rho-GTPase and NF-κB dependent activation of the expression of various cell adhesion molecules, including E-selectin. E-selectin mediates the adhesion of tumor cells (TC) to endothelial cells and is probably involved in the extravasation step of circulating tumor cells. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (e. g. lovastatin) inhibit the function of Rho-GTPases and thus are anticipated to attenuate Rho-regulated cell-cell-adhesion as well. This study focuses on the influence of IR and TNFα on the expression of endothelial- and/or tumor cell-specific pro-adhesive factors and whether these effects are influenced by lovastatin. To this end, the effect of IR and TNFα on cell-cell-interactions between human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated using an ELISA-based cell adhesion-assay. Moreover, the influence of pre-treatment with lovastatin and other types of inhibitors on HUVEC-HT29 adhesion was monitored. Additionally, we investigated the effect of lovastatin on mRNA expression level of different cell adhesion molecules, metastatic factors and DNA-repair genes upon radiation exposure by qRT-PCR. To scrutinize the in vivo relevance of the data obtained, we investigated the effect of total body irradiation (TBI) on the mRNA expression of pro-adhesive factors in BALB/c mice. To analyze tumor cell extravasation, tumor cells were injected into the lateral tail vein of immundeficient mice, followed by total body irradiation (TBI, 4 Gy). After four weeks a large increase of lung metastases was monitored, which could be blocked by preatreatment of the mice with lovastatin, the Rac1-specific small-molecule inhibitor NSC23766 as well as the sLe{sup x}-mimetic glycyrrhizin. Summarizing, we provide evidence, that irradiation promotes upregulation of different cell adhesion molecules in vitro and

  13. Pharmacological inhibition of radiation induced in vitro tumor cell/endothelium cell interactions and in vivo metastasis processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of endothelial cells with ionizing radiation (IR) or treatment with inflammatory cytokines (e. g. TNFα) induces a Rho-GTPase and NF-κB dependent activation of the expression of various cell adhesion molecules, including E-selectin. E-selectin mediates the adhesion of tumor cells (TC) to endothelial cells and is probably involved in the extravasation step of circulating tumor cells. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (e. g. lovastatin) inhibit the function of Rho-GTPases and thus are anticipated to attenuate Rho-regulated cell-cell-adhesion as well. This study focuses on the influence of IR and TNFα on the expression of endothelial- and/or tumor cell-specific pro-adhesive factors and whether these effects are influenced by lovastatin. To this end, the effect of IR and TNFα on cell-cell-interactions between human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated using an ELISA-based cell adhesion-assay. Moreover, the influence of pre-treatment with lovastatin and other types of inhibitors on HUVEC-HT29 adhesion was monitored. Additionally, we investigated the effect of lovastatin on mRNA expression level of different cell adhesion molecules, metastatic factors and DNA-repair genes upon radiation exposure by qRT-PCR. To scrutinize the in vivo relevance of the data obtained, we investigated the effect of total body irradiation (TBI) on the mRNA expression of pro-adhesive factors in BALB/c mice. To analyze tumor cell extravasation, tumor cells were injected into the lateral tail vein of immundeficient mice, followed by total body irradiation (TBI, 4 Gy). After four weeks a large increase of lung metastases was monitored, which could be blocked by preatreatment of the mice with lovastatin, the Rac1-specific small-molecule inhibitor NSC23766 as well as the sLe x -mimetic glycyrrhizin. Summarizing, we provide evidence, that irradiation promotes upregulation of different cell adhesion molecules in vitro and stimulates

  14. Identification and expression analysis of the IPT and CKX gene families during axillary bud outgrowth in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming; Li, Guofang; Qi, Siyan; Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Xilong; Ma, Juanjuan; Zhang, Dong; Han, Mingyu

    2018-04-20

    Cytokinins (CKs) play a crucial role in promoting axillary bud outgrowth and targeting the control of CK metabolism can be used to enhance branching in plants. CK levels are maintained mainly by CK biosynthesis (isopentenyl transferase, IPT) and degradation (dehydrogenase, CKX) genes in plants. A systematic study of the IPT and CKX gene families in apple, however, has not been conducted. In the present study, 12 MdIPTs and 12 MdCKXs were identified in the apple genome. Systematic phylogenetic, structural, and synteny analyses were performed. Expression analysis of these genes in different tissues was also assessed. MdIPT and MdCKX genes exhibit distinct expression patterns in different tissues. The response of MdIPT, MdCKX, and MdPIN1 genes to various treatments (6-BA, decapitation and Lovastatin, an inhibitor of CKs synthesis) that impact branching were also investigated. Results indicated that most of the MdIPT and MdCKX, and MdPIN1 genes were upregulated by 6-BA and decapitation treatment, but inhibited by Lovastatin, a compound that effectively suppresses axillary bud outgrowth induced by decapitation. These findings suggest that cytokinin biosynthesis is required for the activation of bud break and the export of auxin from buds in apple tree with intact primary shoot apex or decapitated apple tree. MdCKX8 and MdCKX10, however, exhibited little response to decapitation, but were significantly up-regulated by 6-BA and Lovastatin, a finding that warrants further investigation in order to understand their function in bud-outgrowth. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood-brain barrier permeability and monocyte infiltration in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: a quantitative MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, S; Blezer, E L A; Schreibelt, G; Döpp, E; van der Pol, S M A; Schadee-Eestermans, I L; Nicolay, K; Dijkstra, C D; de Vries, H E

    2004-03-01

    Enhanced cerebrovascular permeability and cellular infiltration mark the onset of early multiple sclerosis lesions. So far, the precise sequence of these events and their role in lesion formation and disease progression remain unknown. Here we provide quantitative evidence that blood-brain barrier leakage is an early event and precedes massive cellular infiltration in the development of acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal correlate of multiple sclerosis. Cerebrovascular leakage and monocytes infiltrates were separately monitored by quantitative in vivo MRI during the course of the disease. Magnetic resonance enhancement of the contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA), reflecting vascular leakage, occurred concomitantly with the onset of neurological signs and was already at a maximal level at this stage of the disease. Immunohistochemical analysis also confirmed the presence of the serum-derived proteins such as fibrinogen around the brain vessels early in the disease, whereas no cellular infiltrates could be detected. MRI further demonstrated that Gd-DTPA leakage clearly preceded monocyte infiltration as imaged by the contrast agent based on ultra small particles of iron oxide (USPIO), which was maximal only during full-blown EAE. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical investigation revealed that USPIOs were present in newly infiltrated macrophages within the inflammatory lesions. To validate the use of USPIOs as a non-invasive tool to evaluate therapeutic strategies, EAE animals were treated with the immunomodulator 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, which ameliorated clinical scores. MRI showed that the USPIO load in the brain was significantly diminished in lovastatin-treated animals. Data indicate that cerebrovascular leakage and monocytic trafficking into the brain are two distinct processes in the development of inflammatory lesions during multiple sclerosis, which can

  16. Clinical evaluation of Dyslipidemia among type II diabetic patients at Public hospital Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nada F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global views emphasize the need for early; effective intervention against the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to determine the clinical practices and compliance among dyslipidemia with type II diabetes and hypertension in multiracial society. Method(s Study was carried out in out-patient department of General hospital Penang over a period of ten months (Jan - Oct 2008. Study reflects the retrospective data collection covering a period of three years from Jan 2005 - Dec 2007. Universal sampling technique was used to select all the patients' undergone treatment for diabetes type II and dyslipidemia. All the concerned approvals were obtained from Clinical research Committee (CRC. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 15®. Result(s A total of 501 diabetes type 2 patients with dyslipidemia were identified in this study. The demographic data showed that 55.9% (n = 280 were female patients and 44.1% (n = 221 were males. Patients on combination therapy of metformin with other antidiabetic agent were 79%, while 21% were on monotherapy. Lovastatin was received as monotherapy in 83% of study population, while only 17% were on combination with gemfibrozil. Means of FPG and lipid profile were reduced from the initial (2005 to the latest level (2007 significantly (p Conclusion Metformin and lovastatin use among patients of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia is significantly improved the clinical outcomes. No significant association of metformin or lovastatin is found against the hypertension. Metformin and calcium channel blocker combination therapy was found to be the best choice in the co-treatment of diabetes and hypertension.

  17. Consumer behavior in the setting of over-the-counter statin availability: lessons from the consumer use study of OTC Mevacor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Eric P

    2004-11-04

    Despite the proven benefits of statins, large numbers of patients meeting guideline criteria for therapy are not receiving these drugs. It has been suggested that over-the-counter (OTC) availability of statins would allow more consumers to use statins and achieve cardiovascular risk reduction. However, concerns have been raised as to the consumers' ability to self-manage hyperlipidemia and use statins safely. The Consumer Use Study of OTC Mevacor (CUSTOM) was designed to define consumer behaviors in the setting of OTC statin availability. The study was conducted in a simulated OTC setting and allowed consumers to purchase once-daily lovastatin 20 mg. The CUSTOM dataset includes >3,300 consumers who evaluated OTC lovastatin for potential purchase at study sites and follow-up information on purchasers for up to 6 months of self-managed therapy. These data have been analyzed to address consumers' knowledge of their cholesterol concentrations as well as their ability to make OTC use decisions based on their cardiovascular risk, avoid drug-drug interactions, self-manage their cholesterol treatment after deciding to use the OTC product, and maintain interactions with physicians while using lovastatin OTC. The results showed that most study participants appropriately self-selected OTC statin therapy and managed their treatment. Use of OTC statins by consumers needing more intensive statin therapy or facing the risk of potential drug-drug interactions remains an area of concern but occurred infrequently in CUSTOM. These data are important for making an informed risk-benefit decision concerning OTC statin availability.

  18. GSK3α/β: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Neuroendocrine Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizabal Prada, Elke Tatjana; Weis, Carla; Orth, Michael; Lauseker, Michael; Spoettl, Gerald; Maurer, Julian; Grabowski, Patricia; Grossman, Ashley; Auernhammer, Christoph Josef; Nölting, Svenja

    2017-10-02

    Introduction: GSK3α/β is a serine/threonine-kinase that plays a critical role in cancer. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the specific GSK3α/β inhibitor AR-A014418 in vitro to gain novel insights into GSK3α/β signaling in NETs. Human NET cell lines (BON1, QGP1, H727 and GOT1) were treated with different concentrations of AR-A014418 alone and in combination with lovastatin, everolimus, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and γ-irradiation. AR-A014418 significantly dose- and time-dependently decreased cell viability in all four NET cell lines through inhibition of EGFR- and mTORC1/p70S6K signaling, as well as Cyclin D3 downregulation and induction of pChk1. In all cell lines tested, FACS analysis showed an AR-A014418-induced increase in the sub-G1 phase, reflecting cell death. However, apoptosis induction was only observed in H727 cells. Furthermore, significant anti-migratory effects upon GSK3α/β inhibition were found and were associated with β-catenin downregulation in all cell lines tested. Compensatory up-regulation of pAkt and pERK in response to GSK3α/β inhibition was prevented by combining AR-A014418 with the ERK- and Akt-inhibitor lovastatin. Accordingly, the lovastatin/AR-A014418 combination was synergistic in BON1 and QGP1 cells. Moreover, AR-A014418 displayed promising chemo-sensitizing effects to 5-FU in QGP1 and slight radio-sensitizing properties in BON1 and QGP1 cells. Our data provide new insights into the role of GSK3α/β in NETs and suggest that GSK3α/β-inhibition could be a novel therapeutic option in NETs, especially in combination with lovastatin or 5-FU, depending on tumor entity. ©2017S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Main extracts and hypolipidemic effects of the Bauhinia racemosa Lam. leaf extract in HFD-fed hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Singh, Suriya P; Srivastava, Anuj; Puri, Anju

    2013-01-01

    The lipid lowering effects of ethanolic extract (BR) obtained from leaves of Bauhinia racemosa on hyperlipidemic hamsters were examined. BR showed significant lowering of lipid profile at a dose of 250 mg kg(-1) body-wt of hamster. Chloroform fraction (F2) obtained from BR showed pronounced activity at lower dose of 100 mg kg(-1). F2 gave two most active fractions (L and T) whose chromatographic separations led to the isolation of constituents 1-5, which are being reported for the first time from this natural source. The results of activity profile of the plant were found to be better than the standard drug lovastatin.

  20. Reference: 507 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Keiko et al. 2007 Feb. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(2):322-31. Higher plants have two metabolic pathways for isopr...espite the compartmentalization of these two pathways, metabolic flow occurs betw...een them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cro...lomazone, inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. The accumulation of the major products of these pathways...be involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in both the MVA and MEP pathways. Lovastatin insensitive 1, a Novel p

  1. An easy-to-perform photometric assay for methyltransferase activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäberle, Till F; Siba, Christian; Höver, Thomas; König, Gabriele M

    2013-01-01

    Methyltransferases (MTs) catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to a suitable substrate. Such methylations are important modifications in secondary metabolisms, especially on natural products produced by polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases, many of which are of special interest due to their prominent pharmacological activities (e.g., lovastatin, cyclosporin). To gain basic biochemical knowledge on the methylation process, it is of immense relevance to simplify methods concerning experimental problems caused by a large variety in substrates. Here, we present a photometric method to analyze MT activity by measuring SAM consumption in a coupled enzyme assay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Myotoxic reactions to lipid-lowering therapy are associated with altered oxidation of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Paul S; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Dong-Lim; Verity, M Anthony; Wolfson, Tanya; Henry, Robert R

    2009-02-01

    Despite exceptional efficacy and safety, fear of muscle toxicity remains a major reason statins are underutilized. Evidence suggests that statin muscle toxicity may be mediated by abnormalities in lipid metabolism. To test the hypothesis that myotubes from patients intolerant of lipid-lowering therapies have abnormal fatty acid oxidation (FAO) responses we compared muscle from 11 subjects with statin intolerance (Intolerant) with muscle from seven statin-naive volunteers undergoing knee arthroplasty (Comparator). Gross muscle pathology was graded and skeletal muscle cell cultures were produced from each subject. FAO was assessed following treatment with increasing statin concentrations. There was no difference in muscle biopsy myopathy scores between the groups. Basal octanoate oxidation was greater in Intolerant than in Comparator subjects (P = 0.03). Lovastatin-stimulated palmitate oxidation tended to be greater for Intolerant compared to Control subjects' myotubes (P = 0.07 for 5 microM and P = 0.06 for 20 microM lovastatin). In conclusion abnormalities in FAO of Intolerant subjects appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of these subjects that can be measured in their cultured myotubes.

  3. Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) - an economically viable source for antihypercholesterolemic metabolites production by Monascus purpureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, V; Vijayalakshmi, G

    2010-08-01

    Rice, parboiled rice, finger millet, germinated finger millet, broken wheat, njavara (medicinal rice), sorghum and maize were used as substrates for solid state fermentation of Monascus purpureus at 28°C for 7 days using 2% seed medium as inoculum for the production of its metabolites. The fungus exhibited good growth in all the substrates. The fermented substrates were dried at 45°C and analysed for antihypercholesterolemic metabolite statins by standardized HPLC method and dietary sterol contents by spectrophotometric method using reference standards of statin (pravastatin and lovastatin) and cholesterol, respectively. Germinated finger millet yielded higher total statin production of 5.2 g/kg dry wt with pravastatin and lovastatin content of 4.9 and 0.37 g/kg dry wt respectively than other substrates which range from 1.04-4.41 g/kg. In addition to statin, monascus fermented germinated finger millet yielded dietary sterol of 0.053 g/kg dry wt which is 7.6 folds higher than the control. The value addition of finger millet by germination and fermentation with Monascus purpureus provides scope for development of functional food.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Lettuce Seed Germination and Thermoinhibition by Sampling of Individual Seeds at Germination and Removal of Storage Proteins by Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin-Yan; Deng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Germination and thermoinhibition in lettuce (Lactuca sativa ‘Jianyexianfeng No. 1’) seeds were investigated by a proteomic comparison among dry seeds, germinated seeds at 15°C, at 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, or at 25°C in KNO3 (all sampled individually at germination), and ungerminated seeds at 25°C, a thermoinhibitory temperature. Before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, storage proteins (greater than 50% of total extractable protein) were removed by polyethylene glycol precipitation, which significantly improved the detection of less abundant proteins on two-dimensional gels. A total of 108 protein spots were identified to change more than 2-fold (P lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. Accumulation of three proteins and expression of five genes participating in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis correlated positively with seed germinability. Inhibition of this pathway by lovastatin delayed seed germination and increased the sensitivity of germination to abscisic acid. MVA pathway-derived products, cytokinins, partially reversed the lovastatin inhibition of germination and released seed thermoinhibition at 25°C. We conclude that the MVA pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is involved in lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. PMID:25736209

  5. Mechanism and treatment for the learning and memory deficits associated with mouse models of Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Seok; Ehninger, Dan; Zhou, Miou; Oh, Jun-Young; Kang, Minkyung; Kwak, Chuljung; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Butz, Delana; Araki, Toshiyuki; Cai, Ying; Balaji, J.; Sano, Yoshitake; Nam, Christine I.; Kim, Hyong Kyu; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Burger, Corinna; Neel, Benjamin G.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2015-01-01

    In Noonan Syndrome (NS) 30% to 50% of subjects show cognitive deficits of unknown etiology and with no known treatment. Here, we report that knock-in mice expressing either of two NS-associated Ptpn11 mutations show hippocampal-dependent spatial learning impairments and deficits in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In addition, viral overexpression of the PTPN11D61G in adult hippocampus results in increased baseline excitatory synaptic function, deficits in LTP and spatial learning, which can all be reversed by a MEK inhibitor. Furthermore, brief treatment with lovastatin reduces Ras-Erk activation in the brain, and normalizes the LTP and learning deficits in adult Ptpn11D61G/+ mice. Our results demonstrate that increased basal Erk activity and corresponding baseline increases in excitatory synaptic function are responsible for the LTP impairments and, consequently, the learning deficits in mouse models of NS. These data also suggest that lovastatin or MEK inhibitors may be useful for treating the cognitive deficits in NS. PMID:25383899

  6. ¹H-NMR and MS based metabolomics study of the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ze-Yun; Ding, Li-Li; Li, Jin-Mei; Xu, Bao-Li; Yang, Li; Bi, Kai-Shun; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a principle bioactive component of Curcuma longa L, is well known for its anti-hyperlipidemia effect. However, no holistic metabolic information of curcumin on hyperlipidemia models has been revealed, which may provide us an insight into the underlying mechanism. In the present work, NMR and MS based metabolomics was conducted to investigate the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet (HFD) feeding for 12 weeks. The HFD induced animals were orally administered with curcumin (40, 80 mg/kg) or lovastatin (30 mg/kg, positive control) once a day during the inducing period. Serum biochemistry assay of TC, TG, LDL-c, and HDL-c was conducted and proved that treatment of curcumin or lovastatin can significantly improve the lipid profiles. Subsequently, metabolomics analysis was carried out for urine samples. Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was employed to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemia effect of curcumin and to detect related potential biomarkers. Totally, 35 biomarkers were identified, including 31 by NMR and nine by MS (five by both). It turned out that curcumin treatment can partially recover the metabolism disorders induced by HFD, with the following metabolic pathways involved: TCA cycle, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, synthesis of ketone bodies and cholesterol, ketogenesis of branched chain amino acid, choline metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. Besides, NMR and MS based metabolomics proved to be powerful tools in investigating pharmacodynamics effect of natural products and underlying mechanisms.

  7. ¹H-NMR and MS based metabolomics study of the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yun Li

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a principle bioactive component of Curcuma longa L, is well known for its anti-hyperlipidemia effect. However, no holistic metabolic information of curcumin on hyperlipidemia models has been revealed, which may provide us an insight into the underlying mechanism. In the present work, NMR and MS based metabolomics was conducted to investigate the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet (HFD feeding for 12 weeks. The HFD induced animals were orally administered with curcumin (40, 80 mg/kg or lovastatin (30 mg/kg, positive control once a day during the inducing period. Serum biochemistry assay of TC, TG, LDL-c, and HDL-c was conducted and proved that treatment of curcumin or lovastatin can significantly improve the lipid profiles. Subsequently, metabolomics analysis was carried out for urine samples. Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA was employed to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemia effect of curcumin and to detect related potential biomarkers. Totally, 35 biomarkers were identified, including 31 by NMR and nine by MS (five by both. It turned out that curcumin treatment can partially recover the metabolism disorders induced by HFD, with the following metabolic pathways involved: TCA cycle, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, synthesis of ketone bodies and cholesterol, ketogenesis of branched chain amino acid, choline metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. Besides, NMR and MS based metabolomics proved to be powerful tools in investigating pharmacodynamics effect of natural products and underlying mechanisms.

  8. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Haeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol.

  9. Mitochondrial impairment by PPAR agonists and statins identified via immunocaptured OXPHOS complex activities and respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Dykens, James A.; Bernal, Autumn; Capaldi, Roderick A.; Will, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment is increasingly implicated in the etiology of toxicity caused by some thiazolidinediones, fibrates, and statins. We examined the effects of members of these drug classes on respiration of isolated rat liver mitochondria using a phosphorescent oxygen sensitive probe and on the activity of individual oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes using a recently developed immunocapture technique. Of the six thiazolidinediones examined, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and darglitazone potently disrupted mitochondrial respiration. In accord with these data, ciglitazone and troglitazone were also potent inhibitors of Complexes II + III, IV, and V, while darglitazone predominantly inhibited Complex IV. Of the six statins evaluated, lovastatin, simvastatin, and cerivastatin impaired mitochondrial respiration the most, with simvastatin and lovastatin impairing multiple OXPHOS Complexes. Within the class of fibrates, gemfibrozil more potently impaired respiration than fenofibrate, clofibrate, or ciprofibrate. Gemfibrozil only modestly inhibited Complex I, fenofibrate inhibited Complexes I, II + III, and V, and clofibrate inhibited Complex V. Our findings with the two complementary methods indicate that (1) some members of each class impair mitochondrial respiration, whereas others have little or no effect, and (2) the rank order of mitochondrial impairment accords with clinical adverse events observed with these drugs. Since the statins are frequently co-prescribed with the fibrates or thiazolidinediones, various combinations of these three drug classes were also analyzed for their mitochondrial effects. In several cases, the combination additively uncoupled or inhibited respiration, suggesting that some combinations are more likely to yield clinically relevant drug-induced mitochondrial side effects than others

  10. Proteomic analysis of lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition by sampling of individual seeds at germination and removal of storage proteins by polyethylene glycol fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Song, Bin-Yan; Deng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-04-01

    Germination and thermoinhibition in lettuce (Lactuca sativa 'Jianyexianfeng No. 1') seeds were investigated by a proteomic comparison among dry seeds, germinated seeds at 15°C, at 15°C after imbibition at 25°C for 48 h, or at 25°C in KNO3 (all sampled individually at germination), and ungerminated seeds at 25°C, a thermoinhibitory temperature. Before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, storage proteins (greater than 50% of total extractable protein) were removed by polyethylene glycol precipitation, which significantly improved the detection of less abundant proteins on two-dimensional gels. A total of 108 protein spots were identified to change more than 2-fold (Pseeds than in ungerminated 25°C seeds. Gene expression of 12 of those proteins correlated well with the protein accumulation. Methionine metabolism, ethylene production, lipid mobilization, cell elongation, and detoxification of aldehydes were revealed to be potentially related to lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. Accumulation of three proteins and expression of five genes participating in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis correlated positively with seed germinability. Inhibition of this pathway by lovastatin delayed seed germination and increased the sensitivity of germination to abscisic acid. MVA pathway-derived products, cytokinins, partially reversed the lovastatin inhibition of germination and released seed thermoinhibition at 25°C. We conclude that the MVA pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is involved in lettuce seed germination and thermoinhibition. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Exploitation of Aspergillus terreus for the Production of Natural Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishal Subhan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Aspergillus (A. terreus has dominated the biological production of the “blockbuster” drugs known as statins. The statins are a class of drugs that inhibit HMG-CoA reductase and lead to lower cholesterol production. The statins were initially discovered in fungi and for many years fungi were the sole source for the statins. At present, novel chemically synthesised statins are produced as inspired by the naturally occurring statin molecules. The isolation of the natural statins, compactin, mevastatin and lovastatin from A. terreus represents one of the great achievements of industrial microbiology. Here we review the discovery of statins, along with strategies that have been applied to scale up their production by A. terreus strains. The strategies encompass many of the techniques available in industrial microbiology and include the optimization of media and fermentation conditions, the improvement of strains through classical mutagenesis, induced genetic manipulation and the use of statistical design.

  12. The cholesterol, fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis pathways regulated by site 1 protease (S1P) are required for efficient replication of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Shuzo; Uno, Yukiko; Kurosaki, Yohei; Yasuda, Jiro

    2018-06-12

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV), which has a high mortality rate. Currently, no licensed vaccines or therapeutic agents have been approved for use against SFTSV infection. Here, we report that the cholesterol, fatty acid, and triglyceride synthesis pathways regulated by S1P is involved in SFTSV replication, using CHO-K1 cell line (SRD-12B) that is deficient in site 1 protease (S1P) enzymatic activity, PF-429242, a small compound targeting S1P enzymatic activity, and Fenofibrate and Lovastatin, which inhibit triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis, respectively. These results enhance our understanding of the SFTSV replication mechanism and may contribute to the development of novel therapies for SFTSV infection. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of 7-Difluoromethyl-5, 4΄-dimethoxygenistein on aorta atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia ApoE-/- mice induced by a cholesterol-rich diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yong Zhang,1,2 Lesai Li,3 Jiliang You,2 Jianguo Cao,2 Xiaohua Fu2 1Department of Hematology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 2College of Medicine, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Tumor Hospital Xiangya School of Medicine of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China Purpose: 7-Difluoromethyl-5, 4΄-dimethoxygenistein (DFMG, prepared by the difluoromethylation and alkylation of Genistein, is an active new chemical entity. Its anti-atherosclerosis effect was found in a series of studies in vitro. In this article, we explored and evaluated the anti-atherosclerosis effect via its protection of endothelial function in ApoE-/- mice that were fed a high-fat diet. Methods: Five C57BL/6J mice were selected as a control group and were fed a 1% high-fat diet (control group, n = 5. Five ApoE-/- mice that were fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks were selected as the atherosclerosis model group (model group, n = 5. In the phase I study, 25 ApoE-/- mice were provided a prophylactic treatment with different drugs at the beginning of the 16 week high-fat diet: 5 mg/gk genistein (genistein 1 group, n = 5, 5 mg/kg lovastatin (lovastatin1 group, n = 5, 2.5 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG L1 group, n = 5, 5 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG M1 group, n = 5, and 10 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG H1 group, n = 5. In the phase II study, 25 atherosclerosis model, ApoE-/- mice were treated with different drugs and fed a high-fat diet for 16 weeks: 5 mg/gk genistein (genistein 2 group, n = 5, 5 mg/kg lovastatin (lovastatin 2 group, n = 5, 2.5 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG L2 group, n = 5, 5 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG M2 group, n = 5, and 10 mg/kg DFMG (DFMG H2 group, n = 5. The plasma levels of lipids, von Willebrand factor (vWF, and nitrite were compared between phases I and II. Endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR, aortic lesion development, and quantification in thoracic aortas were measured during

  14. Towards antiviral therapies for treating dengue virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Suzanne Jf; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging human pathogen that poses a huge public health burden by infecting annually about 390 million individuals of which a quarter report with clinical manifestations. Although progress has been made in understanding dengue pathogenesis, a licensed vaccine or antiviral therapy against this virus is still lacking. Treatment of patients is confined to symptomatic alleviation and supportive care. The development of dengue therapeutics thus remains of utmost importance. This review focuses on the few molecules that were evaluated in dengue virus-infected patients: balapiravir, chloroquine, lovastatin, prednisolone and celgosivir. The lessons learned from these clinical trials can be very helpful for the design of future trials for the next generation of dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clerodendron glandulosum Coleb., Verbenaceae, ameliorates high fat diet-induced alteration in lipid and cholesterol metabolism in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RN Jadeja

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of freeze dried extract of Clerodendron glandulosum Coleb., Verbenaceae, leaves (FECG on alteration in lipid and cholesterol metabolism in high fat diet fed hyperlipidemic rats. Plasma and hepatic lipid profiles, lipid and cholesterol metabolizing enzymes in target tissues and fecal total lipids and bile acid contents were evaluated in FECG treated normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic rats. These results were compared with synthetic hypolipidemic drug Lovastatin (LVS. Results indicate that FECG was able to positively regulate induced experimental hyperlipidemia by significant alteration in plasma and tissue lipid profiles. These results can be attributed to reduced absorption, effective elimination and augmented catabolism of lipids and cholesterol possibly due to high content of saponin and phytosterols in C. glandulosum. Use of C. glandulosum extract as a potential therapeutic agent against hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia is indicated.

  16. An experimental and clinical assay with ketoconazole in the treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigman Brener

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole an azole antifungic drug which is already in the market has also been demonstrated to be active against Trypanossoma cruzi experimental infections. In this paper we confirmed the drug effect and investigated its range of activity against different T. cruzi strains naturally resistant or susceptible to both standard drugs Nifurtimox and Benznidazole used clinically in Chagas disease. Moreover, we have shown that the association of Ketoconazole plus Lovastatin (an inhibitor of sterol synthesis, which has an antiproliferative effect against T. cruzi in vitro, failed to enhance the supressive effect of Ketoconazole displayed when administered alone to infected mice. Finally, administration in chronic chagasic patients of Ketoconazole at doses used in the treatment of deep mycosis also failed to induce cure as demonstrated by parasitological and serological tests. The strategy of identify and test drugs which are already in the market and fortuitously are active against T. cruzi has been discussed.

  17. Anti-hyperlipidemic effect of Allium ampeloprasum ethanol extract in rats

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    M. Ghasemiyanpour*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: This study was designed to investigate the effect of ethanol extract of Allium ampeloprasum (Leek leaves on blood lipid profile in rats. Due to the side effects of chemical drugs and social tendency toward herbal medicines, it’s justified to propose new herbal remedies for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Thirty six adult male Wistar rats were used and divided into 6 groups. After induction of  hyperlipidemia, group I was fed with a normal diet, group II (control with high cholesterol diet (containing 5% cholesterol and 5% olive oil, group III was fed with high cholesterol diet and lovastatin (10 mg/kg, group IV with high cholesterol diet and leek extract (50 mg/kg, group V received high cholesterol diet and Allium ampeloprasum (leek extract 100 mg/kg and group VI was fed with high cholesterol diet and leek extract (250 mg/kg for 21 consecutive days through gavage. Serum cholesterol concentration, LDL, TG, HDL and ratios of CHO/HDL and LDL/HDL for each animal were analyzed by laboratory kits. Results: The regimen containing 50 mg/kg of extract resulted in a significant reduction in CHO levels (57.00 ± 2.25 mg/dL vs. 107.80 ± 3.54 mg/dL, LDL (22.00 ± 2.07 mg/dL vs. 35.80 ± 1.98 mg/dL and CHO/HDL (1.44 ± 0.07 mg/dL vs. 2.55 ± 0.06 mg/dL compared to the control group (p0.05. Conclusion: Theresults showed that ethanol extract of A. ampeloprasum could improve lipid profile comparable with lovastatin in rats. It was also conclude that 50 mg/kg dose of the extract showed the highest efficacy.

  18. Lipoprotein subclasses in the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study (MARS). Treatment effects and relation to coronary angiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, W J; Krauss, R M; Hodis, H N

    1996-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contribute to coronary artery disease. Using data from the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study, an angiographic trial of middle-aged men and women randomized to lovastatin or placebo, we investigated relationships between lipoprotein subclasses and progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Coronary artery lesion progression was determined by quantitative coronary angiography in low-grade ( or = 50% diameter stenosis), and all coronary artery lesions in 220 baseline/2-year angiogram pairs. Analytical ultracentrifugation was used to measure lipoprotein masses that were statistically evaluated for treatment group differences and relationships to progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis. All low density lipoprotein (LDL), intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) masses were significantly lowered and all high density lipoprotein (HDL) masses were significantly raised with lovastatin therapy. The mass of smallest LDL (Svedberg flotation rate [Sf] 0 to 3), IDL (Sf 12 to 20), all VLDL subclasses (Sf 20 to 60, Sf 60 to 100, and Sf 100 to 400), and peak LDL flotation rate were significantly related to the progression of coronary artery lesions, specifically low-grade lesions. Greater baseline levels of HDL3, were related to a lower likelihood of coronary artery lesion progression. In multivariate analyses, small VLDL (Sf 20 to 60) and HDL3 mass were the most important correlates of coronary artery lesion progression. These results provide further evidence for the importance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the progression of coronary artery disease. In addition, these results present new evidence for the possible protective role of HDL3 in the progression of coronary artery lesions. More specific information on coronary artery lesion progression may be obtained through the study of specific apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins.

  19. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. NMR evaluation of total statin content and HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in red yeast rice (Monascus spp. food supplements

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    Lachenmeier Dirk W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red yeast rice (i.e., rice fermented with Monascus spp., as a food supplement, is claimed to be blood cholesterol-lowering. The red yeast rice constituent monacolin K, also known as lovastatin, is an inhibitor of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase. This article aims to develop a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method to determine the total statin content of red yeast rice products. Methods The total statin content was determined by a 400 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopic method, based on the integration of the multiplet at δ 5.37-5.32 ppm of a hydrogen at the hexahydronaphthalene moiety in comparison to an external calibration with lovastatin. The activity of HMG-CoA reductase was measured by a commercial spectrophotometric assay kit. Results The NMR detection limit for total statins was 6 mg/L (equivalent to 0.3 mg/capsule, if two capsules are dissolved in 50 mL ethanol. The relative standard deviations were consistently lower than 11%. The total statin concentrations of five red yeast rice supplements were between 1.5 and 25.2 mg per specified daily dose. A dose-dependent inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme activity by the red yeast rice products was demonstrated. Conclusion A simple and direct NMR assay was developed to determine the total statin content in red yeast rice. The assay can be applied for the determination of statin content for the regulatory control of red yeast rice products.

  1. Effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy among a sample of patients in Colombia

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    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy in a sample of patients affiliated with the Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (the Colombian health system. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 January 2010-30 June 2011. From a total of 8 316 patients in 10 cities, a random sample of 600 was stratified according to dyslipidemia. Information on sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, risk factors, and pharmacological and laboratory variables were obtained from medical records. RESULTS: Subjects were predominantly female (56.2%, with a mean age of 65.1 ± 11.5 years; 93.2% had hypertension; 29.0%, diabetes mellitus; and 10.2%, a history of myocardial infarction. The patients were being treated with lovastatin (84.1% or gemfibrozil (12.3%-both at doses below what is recommended-or atorvastatin (1.8%. In patients with high cardiovascular risk, 38.6% achieved goals for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels (<100 mg/dL. Among those at moderate risk, 49.4% reached the target level (< 130 mg/dL. On average, there was a 4.9% reduction in LDL-C. Sex, age, history of cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus, use of hydrochlorothiazide, and poor therapy adherence were statistically associated with a lack of dyslipidemia control. CONCLUSIONS: Because a lack LDL-C control occurred in patients with two or more of the following variables: male, more than 55 years of age, diabetes and/or a history of cardiovascular disease, received lower doses of lovastatin, or non-adherent to treatment, it is recommended that medication be increased based on clearly-defined therapeutic goals and that comorbidities be assessed and effectively treated.

  2. Functional food red yeast rice (RYR) for metabolic syndrome amelioration: a review on pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema

    2016-05-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR), the fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus has been an integral part of Oriental food and traditional Chinese medicine, long before the discovery of their medicinal roles. With the identification of bioactive components as polyketide pigments (statins), and unsaturated fatty acids, RYR has gained a nutraceutical status. Hypercholesterolemic effect of this fermented compound has been validated and monacolin K has been recognized as the pivotal component in cholesterol alleviation. Functional similarity with commercial drug lovastatin sans the side effects has catapulted its popularity in other parts of the world as well. Apart from the hypotensive role, ameliorative benefits of RYR as anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, anticancer and osteogenic agent have emerged, fueling intense research on it. Mechanistic studies have revealed their interaction with functional agents like coenzyme Q10, astaxanthin, vitamin D, folic acid, policosanol, and berberine. On the other hand, concurrence of mycotoxin citrinin and variable content of statin has marred its integration in mainstream medication. In this disputable scenario, evaluation of the scopes and lacunae to overcome seems to contribute to an eminent area of healthcare. Red yeast rice (RYR), the rice-based fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus is a functional food. Its bioactive component monacolin K acts like synthetic drug lovastatin, without the severe side effects of the latter. RYR has been validated to lower cholesterol, control high blood pressure; confer anti-flammation, hypoglycaemic, anticancer and osteogenic properties. However, dose inconsistency and co-occurrence of toxin citrinin hampers its dietary supplementation prospect. Further research might facilitate development of RYR as a nutraceutical.

  3. Red mold rice ameliorates impairment of memory and learning ability in intracerebroventricular amyloid beta-infused rat by repressing amyloid beta accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) damaged neurons and further resulted in dementia. Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), a traditional Chinese medicine as well as health food, includes monacolins (with the same function as statins) and multifunctional metabolites. In this study, ethanol extract of RMR (RE) was used to evaluate neuroprotection against Abeta40 neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the effects of dietary administration of RMR on memory and learning abilities are confirmed in an animal model of AD rats infused with Abeta40 into the cerebral ventricle. During continuous Abeta40 infusion for 28 days, the rats of test groups were administered RMR or lovastatin. Memory and learning abilities were evaluated in the water maze and passive avoidance tasks. After sacrifice, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were collected for the examination of AD risk factors. The in vitro results clearly indicate that RE provides stronger neuroprotection in rescuing cell viability as well as repressing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. RMR administration potently reverses the memory deficit in the memory task. Abeta40 infusion increases acetylcholinesterase activity, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation and decreases total antioxidant status and superoxide dismutase activity in brain, but these damages were potently reversed by RMR administration, and the protection was more significant than that with lovastatin administration. The protection provided by RMR is able to prevent Abeta fibrils from being formed and deposited in hippocampus and further decrease Abeta40 accumulation, even though Abeta40 solution was infused into brain continuously. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. CYP109E1 is a novel versatile statin and terpene oxidase from Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkaradze, Natalia; Litzenburger, Martin; Abdulmughni, Ammar; Milhim, Mohammed; Brill, Elisa; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2017-12-01

    CYP109E1 is a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from Bacillus megaterium with a hydroxylation activity for testosterone and vitamin D3. This study reports the screening of a focused library of statins, terpene-derived and steroidal compounds to explore the substrate spectrum of this enzyme. Catalytic activity of CYP109E1 towards the statin drug-precursor compactin and the prodrugs lovastatin and simvastatin as well as biotechnologically relevant terpene compounds including ionones, nootkatone, isolongifolen-9-one, damascones, and β-damascenone was found in vitro. The novel substrates induced a type I spin-shift upon binding to P450 and thus permitted to determine dissociation constants. For the identification of conversion products by NMR spectroscopy, a B. megaterium whole-cell system was applied. NMR analysis revealed for the first time the ability of CYP109E1 to catalyze an industrially highly important reaction, the production of pravastatin from compactin, as well as regioselective oxidations generating drug metabolites (6'β-hydroxy-lovastatin, 3'α-hydroxy-simvastatin, and 4″-hydroxy-simvastatin) and valuable terpene derivatives (3-hydroxy-α-ionone, 4-hydroxy-β-ionone, 11,12-epoxy-nootkatone, 4(R)-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one, 3-hydroxy-α-damascone, 4-hydroxy-β-damascone, and 3,4-epoxy-β-damascone). Besides that, a novel compound, 2-hydroxy-β-damascenone, produced by CYP109E1 was identified. Docking calculations using the crystal structure of CYP109E1 rationalized the experimentally observed regioselective hydroxylation and identified important amino acid residues for statin and terpene binding.

  5. Effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy among a sample of patients in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Murillo-Muñoz, Maria Monica; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique

    2013-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy in a sample of patients affiliated with the Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (the Colombian health system). A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 January 2010-30 June 2011. From a total of 8 316 patients in 10 cities, a random sample of 600 was stratified according to dyslipidemia. Information on sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, risk factors, and pharmacological and laboratory variables were obtained from medical records. Subjects were predominantly female (56.2%), with a mean age of 65.1 ± 11.5 years; 93.2% had hypertension; 29.0%, diabetes mellitus; and 10.2%, a history of myocardial infarction. The patients were being treated with lovastatin (84.1%) or gemfibrozil (12.3%)-both at doses below what is recommended-or atorvastatin (1.8%). In patients with high cardiovascular risk, 38.6% achieved goals for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (<100 mg/dL). Among those at moderate risk, 49.4% reached the target level (< 130 mg/dL). On average, there was a 4.9% reduction in LDL-C. Sex, age, history of cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus, use of hydrochlorothiazide, and poor therapy adherence were statistically associated with a lack of dyslipidemia control. Because a lack LDL-C control occurred in patients with two or more of the following variables: male, more than 55 years of age, diabetes and/or a history of cardiovascular disease, received lower doses of lovastatin, or non-adherent to treatment, it is recommended that medication be increased based on clearly-defined therapeutic goals and that comorbidities be assessed and effectively treated.

  6. [Prescription patterns for antilipidemic drugs in a group of Colombian patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Jorge Enrique; Moncada, Juan Carlos; Mesa, Giovanny

    2008-03-01

    To determine patterns in antilipidemic drug prescriptions among a group of patients covered by the General Social Security System (Sistema General de Seguridad Social) in Colombia. A descriptive, observational study was conducted of 41 580 hyperlipidemics of both sexes, who were over 20 years of age, undergoing treatment from at least April to June 2006, and were residents of one of 19 cities in Colombia. A database was created to track prescription data collected by the pharmaceutical company that dispenses medications to the patients. The mean age was 58.4+/-13.5 years; 58.9% of the participants were women. Of the total number of patients, 95.6% were receiving monotherapy, while 4.4% were receiving two or more antilipidemics. Prescriptions were ranked as follows: statins (70.9%), fibrates (27.5%), bile acid sequestrant resins (0.9%), and others (0.7%), all at low dosage levels. The most common therapy combinations were lovastatin + gemfibrozil (n = 1 568), cholestyramine + gemfibrozil (n = 92), and cholestyramine + lovastatin (n = 78). Comedications most frequently prescribed were: antihypertensive (60.9%), antiinflammatory (56.5%), antiulcer (22.9%), and antidiabetes drugs (20.6%), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 3.8%). Antianginals and ASA were being underused, while antiinflamatories and antiulcer drugs were being overused. Dyslipidemia is a primary risk factor for developing coronary heart disease and stroke, frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in Colombia and the world. All of the antilipidemics are being used at lower-than-recommended dosage levels. Clearly there is a need for creating educational strategies to address these prescribing habits and for exploring clinical results of the pharmaceuticals studied.

  7. Lysosomotropic cationic drugs induce cytostatic and cytotoxic effects: Role of liposolubility and autophagic flux and antagonism by cholesterol ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Alexandre; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2016-08-15

    Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments determines an antiproliferative effect that has a potential interest in oncology, as shown by clinical data and trials involving chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. To further characterize the mechanism of this effect, we studied a series of 6 substituted triethylamine (s-Et{sub 3}N) drugs that encompasses a wide range of liposolubility (amiodarone, quinacrine, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, lidocaine, and procainamide). Three tumor cell lines and primary human endothelial cells were exploited in proliferation assays (48 h, cell counts). Accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II and the apoptotic marker cleaved PARP1 (immunoblots), cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and endocytic function were further tested in the p53-null histiocytic lymphoma U937 line. A profound and desynchronized antiproliferative effect was observed in response to all s-Et{sub 3}Ns with essentially no cell type specificity. Predictors of s-Et{sub 3}N potency were liposolubility and the acute accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II (6 h-treatments). For each s-Et{sub 3}N, there was an antiproliferative concentration range where cytotoxicity and apoptosis were not triggered in U937 cells (24–48 h-treatments). Quinacrine was the most potent cytostatic drug (1–5 μM). Co-treatment of cells with inhibitors of cholesterol, β-cyclodextrin or lovastatin, partially reversed the antiproliferative effect of each s-Et{sub 3}N. The cytopathology induced by cationic drug accumulation includes a cytostatic effect. Its intensity is cell type- and p53-independent, but predicted by the inhibition of autophagic flux and by the liposolubility of individual drugs and alleviated by cholesterol ablation. The superiority of quinacrine, biomarker value of LC3 II and antagonism by a statin may be clinically relevant. - Highlights: • Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments induces a cytostatic effect. • A series of substituted triethylamines has been

  8. Retrospective analysis of the effects of a highly standardized mixture of Berberis aristata, Silybum marianum, and monacolins K and KA in patients with dyslipidemia

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    Di Pierro F

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Pietro Putignano,2 Tarcisio Ferrara,3 Carmela Raiola,4 Giuliana Rapacioli,5 Nicola Villanova6 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy; 2Outpatient Diabetic Clinic, University Hospital San Gerardo, Monza, Italy; 3District 63, Cava de’ Tirreni-Costa d’Amalfi, Salerno, Italy; 4Outpatient Clinic “Ordine di Malta”, Naples, Italy; 5AIOR, Piacenza, Italy; 6Metabolic Disorders, S. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy Background: Berberis aristata, because of its berberine content, and Monascus purpureus fermented rice, because of the presence of monacolins (naturally derived statins, are widely investigated food-grade ingredients used to formulate cholesterol-lowering supplements. Although they are extensively used, berberine is poorly absorbed and monacolins are poorly chemically characterized, not standardized, and possibly contaminated with toxic compounds. Silymarin is reported to enhance berberine absorption, while Monakopure™-K20 (MK-20 is a highly standardized red yeast rice containing monacolins K and KA in the ratio of 1:1 but not secondary monacolins, dehydromonacolins, or citrinin.Aim: The effects of a cholesterol-lowering supplement (Berberol®K containing berberine, silymarin, and MK-20 (BSM in patients with dyslipidemia were clinically analyzed.Methods: The clinical role of BSM in naïve and in statin-intolerant patients was retrospectively evaluated and the effects observed were compared with those obtained in patients without treatment or treated with lovastatin.Results: Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels were approximately 4%, 6%, and 11% lower, respectively, and the creatine phosphokinase increase was reduced in patients treated with BSM compared to those treated with lovastatin. Similar results were also obtained in statin-intolerant subjects where BSM was administered as add-on therapy to ezetimibe or fenofibrate. Conclusion: BSM is a food supplement

  9. Lysosomotropic cationic drugs induce cytostatic and cytotoxic effects: Role of liposolubility and autophagic flux and antagonism by cholesterol ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, Alexandre; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments determines an antiproliferative effect that has a potential interest in oncology, as shown by clinical data and trials involving chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. To further characterize the mechanism of this effect, we studied a series of 6 substituted triethylamine (s-Et 3 N) drugs that encompasses a wide range of liposolubility (amiodarone, quinacrine, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, lidocaine, and procainamide). Three tumor cell lines and primary human endothelial cells were exploited in proliferation assays (48 h, cell counts). Accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II and the apoptotic marker cleaved PARP1 (immunoblots), cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and endocytic function were further tested in the p53-null histiocytic lymphoma U937 line. A profound and desynchronized antiproliferative effect was observed in response to all s-Et 3 Ns with essentially no cell type specificity. Predictors of s-Et 3 N potency were liposolubility and the acute accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II (6 h-treatments). For each s-Et 3 N, there was an antiproliferative concentration range where cytotoxicity and apoptosis were not triggered in U937 cells (24–48 h-treatments). Quinacrine was the most potent cytostatic drug (1–5 μM). Co-treatment of cells with inhibitors of cholesterol, β-cyclodextrin or lovastatin, partially reversed the antiproliferative effect of each s-Et 3 N. The cytopathology induced by cationic drug accumulation includes a cytostatic effect. Its intensity is cell type- and p53-independent, but predicted by the inhibition of autophagic flux and by the liposolubility of individual drugs and alleviated by cholesterol ablation. The superiority of quinacrine, biomarker value of LC3 II and antagonism by a statin may be clinically relevant. - Highlights: • Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments induces a cytostatic effect. • A series of substituted triethylamines has been studied in 4 cell

  10. Chinese red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus for primary hyperlipidemia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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    Grimsgaard Sameline

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extracts of Chinese red yeast rice (RYR, a traditional dietary seasoning of Monascus purpureus contains several active ingredients including lovastatin, and several trials of its possible lipid-lowering effects have been conducted. This meta-analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of RYR preparations on lipid modification in primary hyperlipidemia. We included randomized controlled trials testing RYR preparation, compared with placebo, no treatment, statins, or other active lipid-lowering agents in people with hyperlipidemia through searching PubMed, CBMdisk, TCMLARS, the Cochrane Library, and AMED up to December 2004. Ninety-three randomized trials (9625 participants were included and three RYR preparations (Cholestin, Xuezhikang and Zhibituo were tested. The methodological quality of trial reports was generally low in terms of generation of the allocation sequence, allocation concealment, blinding, and intention-to-treat. The combined results showed significant reduction of serum total cholesterol levels (weighted mean difference -0.91 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval -1.12 to -0.71, triglycerides levels (-0.41 mmol/L, -0.6 to -0.22, and LDL-cholesterol levels (-0.73 mmol/L, -1.02 to -0.043, and increase of HDL-cholesterol levels (0.15 mmol/L, 0.09 to 0.22 by RYR treatment compared with placebo. The lipid modification effects appeared to be similar to pravastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, atorvastatin, or fluvastatin. Compared with non-statin lipid lowering agents, RYR preparations appeared superior to nicotinate and fish oils, but equal to or less effective than fenofibrate and gemfibrozil. No significant difference in lipid profile was found between Xuezhikang and Zhibituo. RYR preparations were associated with non-serious adverse effects such as dizziness and gastrointestinal discomfort. Current evidence shows short-term beneficial effects of RYR preparations on lipid modification. More rigorous trials are needed, and long

  11. Red Mold Rice Mitigates Oral Carcinogenesis in 7,12-Dimethyl-1,2-Benz[a]anthracene-Induced Oral Carcinogenesis in Hamster

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    Ruei-Lan Tsai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of oral tumor has exponentially increased in recent years; however, the effective therapies or prevention strategies are not sufficient. Red mold rice is a traditional Chinese food, and several reports have demonstrated that red mold rice had an anti-tumor effect. However, the possible anti-tumor mechanisms of the red mold rice are unclear. In this study, we examined the anti-tumor effect of red mold rice on 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA-induced oral tumor in hamster. The ethanol extract of red mold rice (RMRE treatment significantly decreases the levels of DMBA-induced reactive oxygen species, nitro oxide and prostaglandin E2 than those of the lovastatin-treated group (P < .001. Moreover, RMRE decreases the formation of oral tumor induced by DMBA. Monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin or other red mold rice metabolites had been reported to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress and exerted anti-tumor effects. Therefore, we evaluated the anti-inflammation and anti-oxidative stress effects of monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin and citrinin in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW264.7 cells. We found that RMRE reduced the LPS-induced nitrite levels in RAW264.7 cells better than monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin or citrinin (P < .05.

  12. Prehispanic Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals in the Treatment of Dyslipidemia Associated to Cardiovascular Disease: a Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Hoyo, Alejandro; Romo-Araiza, Alejandra; Meneses-Mayo, Marcos; Guttiérrez-Salmeán, Gabriela

    2017-01-27

    Dyslipidemia is an important modifi able risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which are responsible for a large number of mortality and disability cases around the globe. Different strategies have been used within the treatment of dyslipidemia, including lifestyle modifi cations, pharmacologic therapy, as well as functional foods and nutraceuticals. Functional foods have been used worldwide since ancient times, particularly, the prehispanic civilizations utilized several as medicinal foods. In the current pandemic of dyslipidemia as well as the nutritional transition, particularly in Latin America, the use of native functional foods represents an attractive target for the treatment and/ or prevention of these conditions. In this mini-review, evidence regarding different functional foods such as cacao, amaranth, chia, nopal, spirulina, as well as their nutraceutical compounds, including fl avonoids, omega-3 PUFAs, fi ber, prebiotics, lovastatin, c-phycocyanin, among others, and their mechanism of action are presented and discussed. Although such foods certainly are considered as attractive potential agents to target dyslipidemia thus decrease the associated cardiometabolic risk, we conclude that for most of the presented functional foods there is currently not enough evidence to support its recommendation and every-day use.

  13. Quality of Bread Supplemented with Antrodia
salmonea-Fermented Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Rao-Chi; Ulziijargal, Enkhjargal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fermented grains of buckwheat, oat, embryo rice and wheat, which were prepared by solid-state fermentation with Antrodia salmonea, and the mycelium was used to substitute 7% of wheat flour to make bread. No difference in proximate composition, texture profile and contents of non-volatile taste components was observed among bread samples. White bread and bread supplemented with mycelium and fermented grains looked different. Bread supplemented with fermented grains had similar thermal properties, which differed from those of white bread and bread supplemented with mycelium. Bread supplemented with fermented grains contained substantial mass fractions (on dry mass basis) of adenosine (0.92–1.96 µg/g), ergosterol (24.53–30.12 µg/g), ergothioneine (2.16–3.18 µg/g) and γ-aminobutyric acid (2.20–2.45 µg/g). In addition, bread supplemented with mycelium contained lovastatin (0.43 µg/g). White bread and bread supplemented with fermented grains had similar sensory results. Overall, fermented grains could be incorporated into bread to provide beneficial effects. PMID:27904408

  14. Adaptation to statins restricts human tumour growth in Nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follet, Julie; Rémy, Lionel; Hesry, Vincent; Simon, Brigitte; Gillet, Danièle; Auvray, Pierrick; Corcos, Laurent; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Statins have long been used as anti-hypercholesterolemia drugs, but numerous lines of evidence suggest that they may also bear anti-tumour potential. We have recently demonstrated that it was possible to isolate cancer cells adapted to growth in the continuous presence of lovastatin. These cells grew more slowly than the statin-sensitive cells of origin. In the present study, we compared the ability of both statin-sensitive and statin-resistant cells to give rise to tumours in Nude mice. HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells and L50 statin-resistant derivatives were injected subcutaneously into Nude mice and tumour growth was recorded. At the end of the experiment, tumours were recovered and marker proteins were analyzed by western blotting, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. L50 tumours grew more slowly, showed a strong decrease in cyclin B1, over-expressed collagen IV, and had reduced laminin 332, VEGF and CD34 levels, which, collectively, may have restricted cell division, cell adhesion and neoangiogenesis. Taken together, these results showed that statin-resistant cells developed into smaller tumours than statin-sensitive cells. This may be reflective of the cancer restricting activity of statins in humans, as suggested from several retrospective studies with subjects undergoing statin therapy for several years

  15. Role of Statin Drugs for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Vu, Lisa; Joe, Edwina; Kirk, Julienne K

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To review the potential role and specific impact of statin drugs in women with PCOS. The evidence for this use of statins in PCOS is limited and still under further investigation. Materials and methods: A search was conducted using PubMed, DynaMed and PubMedHealth databases through October 16, 2016 using the terms polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA, statin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin . English-language trials evaluating statins in PCOS were obtained and incorporated if they provided relevant data for providers. Results: We summarize twelve trials involving statins in PCOS. The trials were predominantly 12 weeks to 3 months in length (8 of the 12 trials) and low to moderate dose of statin drugs were used. The majority (10 of 12) of the trials show that statins reduce testosterone levels or other androgen hormones (DHEA-S and androstenedione), half of the trials evaluating LH/FSH ratio show an improvement, and all had positive effects on lipid profiles. Conclusion: Statins show promising improvements in serum levels of androgens and LH/FSH ratios translating to improved cardiovascular risk factors above and beyond simply lowering LDL levels. More investigation is needed to determine if statins can clinically impact women with PCOS long term, particularly those who are young and are not yet candidates for traditional preventative treatment with a statin medication.

  16. Directed Evolution and Structural Characterization of a Simvastatin Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xue; Xie, Xinkai; Pashkov, Inna; Sawaya, Michael R.; Laidman, Janel; Zhang, Wenjun; Cacho, Ralph; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; UCLA

    2010-02-02

    Enzymes from natural product biosynthetic pathways are attractive candidates for creating tailored biocatalysts to produce semisynthetic pharmaceutical compounds. LovD is an acyltransferase that converts the inactive monacolin J acid (MJA) into the cholesterol-lowering lovastatin. LovD can also synthesize the blockbuster drug simvastatin using MJA and a synthetic {alpha}-dimethylbutyryl thioester, albeit with suboptimal properties as a biocatalyst. Here we used directed evolution to improve the properties of LovD toward semisynthesis of simvastatin. Mutants with improved catalytic efficiency, solubility, and thermal stability were obtained, with the best mutant displaying an {approx}11-fold increase in an Escherichia coli-based biocatalytic platform. To understand the structural basis of LovD enzymology, seven X-ray crystal structures were determined, including the parent LovD, an improved mutant G5, and G5 cocrystallized with ligands. Comparisons between the structures reveal that beneficial mutations stabilize the structure of G5 in a more compact conformation that is favorable for catalysis.

  17. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis modify the response of F1B hamsters to dietary very long chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasma lipoprotein response of F1B Golden-Syrian hamsters fed diets high in very long chain (VLC n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA is paradoxical to that observed in humans. This anomaly is attributed, in part, to low lipoprotein lipase activity and is dependent on cholesterol status. To further elucidate the mechanism(s for these responses, hamsters were fed diets containing supplemental fish oil (VLC n-3 PUFA or safflower oil (n-6 PUFA (both 10% [w/w] and either cholesterol-supplemented (0.1% cholesterol [w/w] or cholesterol-depleted (0.01% cholesterol [w/w] and 10 days prior to killing fed 0.15% lovastatin+2% cholestyramine [w/w]. Results Cholesterol-supplemented hamsters fed fish oil, relative to safflower oil, had higher non-high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (P Conclusion These data suggest disturbing cholesterol homeostasis in F1B hamsters alters their response to dietary fatty acids, which is reflected in altered plasma lipoprotein patterns and regulation of genes associated with their metabolism.

  18. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  19. Tramesan, a novel polysaccharide from Trametes versicolor. Structural characterization and biological effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Scarpari

    Full Text Available Mushrooms represent a formidable source of bioactive compounds. Some of these may be considered as biological response modifiers; these include compounds with a specific biological function: antibiotics (e.g. plectasin, immune system stimulator (e,g, lentinan, antitumor agents (e.g. krestin, PSK and hypolipidemic agents (e.g. lovastatin inter alia. In this study, we focused on the Chinese medicinal mushroom "yun zhi", Trametes versicolor, traditionally used for (cit. "replenish essence and qi (vital energy". Previous studies indicated the potential activity of extracts from culture filtrate of asexual mycelia of T. versicolor in controlling the growth and secondary metabolism (e.g. mycotoxins of plant pathogenic fungi. The quest of active principles produced by T. versicolor, allowed us characterising an exo-polysaccharide released in its culture filtrate and naming it Tramesan. Herein we evaluate the biological activity of Tramesan in different organisms: plants, mammals and plant pathogenic fungi. We suggest that the bioactivity of Tramesan relies mostly on its ability to act as pro antioxidant molecule regardless the biological system on which it was applied.

  20. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppasamy Venkadeswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt. These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats.

  1. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Ruban, Vasanthakumar Vasantha; Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Anandhi, Ramalingam; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt) in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt) for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt). These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats.

  2. Neutralization of antibody-enhanced dengue infection by VIS513, a pan serotype reactive monoclonal antibody targeting domain III of the dengue E protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Luke N.; Ong, Li Ching; Rowley, Kirk J.; Winnett, Alexander; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Hobbie, Sven; Shriver, Zachary; Babcock, Gregory J.; Alonso, Sylvie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2018-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection imposes enormous health and economic burden worldwide with no approved treatment. Several small molecules, including lovastatin, celgosivir, balapiravir and chloroquine have been tested for potential anti-dengue activity in clinical trials; none of these have demonstrated a protective effect. Recently, based on identification and characterization of cross-serotype neutralizing antibodies, there is increasing attention on the potential for dengue immunotherapy. Here, we tested the ability of VIS513, an engineered cross-neutralizing humanized antibody targeting the DENV E protein domain III, to overcome antibody-enhanced infection and high but brief viremia, which are commonly encountered in dengue patients, in various in vitro and in vivo models. We observed that VIS513 efficiently neutralizes DENV at clinically relevant viral loads or in the presence of enhancing levels of DENV immune sera. Single therapeutic administration of VIS513 in mouse models of primary infection or lethal secondary antibody-enhanced infection, reduces DENV titers and protects from lethal infection. Finally, VIS513 administration does not readily lead to resistance, either in cell culture systems or in animal models of dengue infection. The findings suggest that rapid viral reduction during acute DENV infection with a monoclonal antibody is feasible. PMID:29425203

  3. Insights into Monascus biology at the genetic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yanchun; Lei, Ming; Mao, Zejing; Zhou, Youxiang; Chen, Fusheng

    2014-05-01

    The genus of Monascus was nominated by van Tieghem in 1884, but its fermented product-red mold rice (RMR), namely red yeast rice, has been used as folk medicines, food colorants, and fermentation starters for more than thousands of years in oriental countries. Nowadays, RMR is widely developed as food supplements around the world due to its functional compounds such as monacolin K (MK, also called lovastatin) and γ-aminobutyric acid. But the usage of RMR also incurs controversy resulting from contamination of citrinin (a kind of mycotoxin) produced by some Monascus strains. In the past decade, it has made great progress to Monascus spp. at the genetic level with the application of molecular biology techniques to restrain the citrinin production and increase the yields of MK and pigment in RMR, as well as aid Monascus classification and phylogenesis. Up to now, hundreds of papers about Monascus molecular biology (MMB) have been published in the international primary journals. However, to our knowledge, there is no MMB review issued until now. In this review, current understanding of Monascus spp. from the view of molecular biology will be covered and insights into research areas that need to be further investigated will also be discussed.

  4. A staged screening of registered drugs highlights remyelinating drug candidates for clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleuteri, C.; Olla, S.; Veroni, C.; Umeton, R.; Mechelli, R.; Romano, S.; Buscarinu, Mc.; Ferrari, F.; Calò, G.; Ristori, G.; Salvetti, M.; Agresti, C.

    2017-04-01

    There is no treatment for the myelin loss in multiple sclerosis, ultimately resulting in the axonal degeneration that leads to the progressive phase of the disease. We established a multi-tiered platform for the sequential screening of drugs that could be repurposed as remyelinating agents. We screened a library of 2,000 compounds (mainly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds and natural products) for cellular metabolic activity on mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPC), identifying 42 molecules with significant stimulating effects. We then characterized the effects of these compounds on OPC proliferation and differentiation in mouse glial cultures, and on myelination and remyelination in organotypic cultures. Three molecules, edaravone, 5-methyl-7-methoxyisoflavone and lovastatin, gave positive results in all screening tiers. We validated the results by retesting independent stocks of the compounds, analyzing their purity, and performing dose-response curves. To identify the chemical features that may be modified to enhance the compounds’ activity, we tested chemical analogs and identified, for edaravone, the functional groups that may be essential for its activity. Among the selected remyelinating candidates, edaravone appears to be of strong interest, also considering that this drug has been approved as a neuroprotective agent for acute ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Japan.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Triboulet

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide, increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  6. What is a food and what is a medicinal product in the European Union? Use of the benchmark dose (BMD) methodology to define a threshold for "pharmacological action".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Steffen, Christian; el-Atma, Oliver; Maixner, Sibylle; Löbell-Behrends, Sigrid; Kohl-Himmelseher, Matthias

    2012-11-01

    The decision criterion for the demarcation between foods and medicinal products in the EU is the significant "pharmacological action". Based on six examples of substances with ambivalent status, the benchmark dose (BMD) method is evaluated to provide a threshold for pharmacological action. Using significant dose-response models from literature clinical trial data or epidemiology, the BMD values were 63mg/day for caffeine, 5g/day for alcohol, 6mg/day for lovastatin, 769mg/day for glucosamine sulfate, 151mg/day for Ginkgo biloba extract, and 0.4mg/day for melatonin. The examples for caffeine and alcohol validate the approach because intake above BMD clearly exhibits pharmacological action. Nevertheless, due to uncertainties in dose-response modelling as well as the need for additional uncertainty factors to consider differences in sensitivity within the human population, a "borderline range" on the dose-response curve remains. "Pharmacological action" has proven to be not very well suited as binary decision criterion between foods and medicinal product. The European legislator should rethink the definition of medicinal products, as the current situation based on complicated case-by-case decisions on pharmacological action leads to an unregulated market flooded with potentially illegal food supplements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  8. [Rhabdomyolysis and severe hepatotoxicity due to a drug-drug interaction between ritonavir and simvastatin. Could we use the most cost-effective statin in all human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Carla; Also, Maria Antonia; Pericas, Juan Manuel; Letang, Emili; Tuset, Montse; Miró, Josep Maria

    2014-11-01

    Drugs like statins may induce rhabdomyolysis. Simvastatin and lovastatin have a high hepatic metabolism and their potential toxicity could be increased by interactions with other drugs that reduce their metabolism. A case-report is presented of an HIV-infected patient treated with antiretroviral drugs who developed a rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure and liver toxicity when simvastatin was substituted for atorvastatin. A literature review is also presented. The patient required hospital admission and showed a favorable response after hydration and urine alkalinization. There were 4 additional cases published of which there was one death. Drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of statin induced rhabdomyolysis. In order to evaluate them properly, physicians at all levels of clinical care should be aware of all drugs prescribed to their patients and the contraindicated combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Statin Drugs for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cassidy Vu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the potential role and specific impact of statin drugs in women with PCOS. The evidence for this use of statins in PCOS is limited and still under further investigation.Materials and methods: A search was conducted using PubMed, DynaMed and PubMedHealth databases through October 16, 2016 using the terms polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA , statin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. English-language trials evaluating statins in PCOS were obtained and incorporated if they provided relevant data for providers.Results: We summarize twelve trials involving statins in PCOS. The trials were predominantly 12 weeks to 3 months in length (8 of the 12 trials and low to moderate dose of statin drugs were used. The majority (10 of 12 of the trials show that statins reduce testosterone levels or other androgen hormones (DHEA-S and androstenedione, half of the trials evaluating LH/FSH ratio show an improvement, and all had positive effects on lipid profiles.Conclusion: Statins show promising improvements in serum levels of androgens and LH/FSH ratios translating to improved cardiovascular risk factors above and beyond simply lowering LDL levels. More investigation is needed to determine if statins can clinically impact women with PCOS long term, particularly those who are young and are not yet candidates for traditional preventative treatment with a statin medication. 

  10. Effects of Urtica dioica extract on lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Zamansoltani, Farzaneh; Abbasi, Esmail; Daneshi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Zangivand, Amir-Abdollah

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the effects of extract of Urtica dioica, a perennial herb in Iran, on lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic rats. The effects of Urtica dioica extract were tested by using it as a supplement in a high-cholesterol diet. Male rats were fed a high cholesterol diet (10 mL/kg) for 4 weeks with Urtica dioica extract (100 or 300 mg/kg) or 10 mg/kg lovastatin supplementation to study the hypocholesterolemic effects of Urtica dioica on plasma lipid levels, hepatic enzymes activities, and liver histopathological changes. Urtica dioica extract at 100 and 300 mg/kg significantly reduced the levels of total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and also markedly decreased liver enzymes and weight in animals with a high cholesterol diet. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that in the 100 mg/kg extract of Urtica dioica group, the appearance of the liver cells was similar to the control group, and steatosis and inflammation were not found. In the 300 mg/kg extract of Urtica dioica group, mild steatosis was observed but mononuclear inflammatory infiltration was not found. The hepatic histopathological results reflect the correlation of Urtica dioica extract with both liver weight and the levels of plasma TC and LDL-C. These results indicate that Urtica dioica extract has hypocholesterolemic effects in the animal model.

  11. Involvement of membrane sterols in hypergravity-induced modifications of growth and cell wall metabolism in plant stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, T.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Suzuki, M.; Muranaka, T.; Hoson, T.

    Organisms living on land resist the gravitational force by constructing a tough body Plants have developed gravity resistance responses after having first went ashore more than 500 million years ago The mechanisms of gravity resistance responses have been studied under hypergravity conditions which are easily produced on earth by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which is involved in synthesis of terpenoids such as membrane sterols In the present study we examined the role of membrane sterols in gravity resistance in plants by analyzing sterol levels of stem organs grown under hypergravity conditions and by analyzing responses to hypergravity of the organs whose sterol level was modulated Hypergravity inhibited elongation growth but stimulated lateral expansion of Arabidopsis hypocotyls and azuki bean epicotyls Under hypergravity conditions sterol levels were kept high as compared with 1 g controls during incubation Lovastatin an inhibitor HMGR prevented lateral expansion as the gravity resistance response in azuki bean epicotyls Similar results were obtained in analyses with loss of function mutants of HMGR in Arabidopsis It has been shown that sterols play a role in cellulose biosynthesis probably as the primer In wild type Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity increased the cellulose content but it did not influence the content in HMGR mutants These results suggest that hypergravity increases

  12. Mevinolin-induced changes in cholesterol synthesis and protein glycosylation in lymphocytes of hypercholesterolemics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.; Premkumar, N.D.; Ramachandran, C.K.; Melnykovych, G.; Dujovne, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Mevinolin (lovastatin, MVN), a potent competitive inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HMGR), has proven to be an effective hypolipidemic agent in patients with non-homozygous primary hypercholesterolemia. Since inhibition of HMGR can also reduce the synthesis of non-sterol mevalonate products such as dolichols, it was of interest to examine the dolichol-mediated cellular reactions in MVN-treated patients. Blood was collected from patients after various durations of MVN therapy. Peripheral lymphocytes were isolated using Ficoll-Paque gradient. The cells were suspended in RPMI-1640 medium and pulsed in the presence of 14 C-2-acetate or 3 H-mannose for 30 min. At the end of incubation the radioactivity recovered in non-saponifiable fraction ( 14 C) or TCA precipitable protein ( 3 H) was measured. Cholesterol synthesis continued to fall gradually and remained low throughout, in direct correlation with falls in plasma LDL cholesterol levels. Incorporation of mannose into protein fraction was reduced by the 1st month of therapy, remained low until the 7th month and recovered by the 10th month while on MVN. In summary, MVN appears to reduce cholesterol synthesis continuously but its inhibitory effect on glycosylation seems to be overcome after prolonged therapy. This escape effect could result from a rebound increase in HMGR in response to its competitive inhibition by MVN

  13. Twenty-second Fungal Genetics Conference - Asilomar, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan D. Walton

    2003-06-30

    The purpose of the Twenty Second Fungal Genetics Conference is to bring together scientists and students who are interested in genetic approaches to studying the biology of filamentous fungi. It is intended to stimulate thinking and discussion in an atmosphere that supports interactions between scientists at different levels and in different disciplines. Topics range from the basic to the applied. Filamentous fungi impact human affairs in many ways. In the environment they are the most important agents of decay and nutrient turnover. They are used extensively in the food industry for the production of food enzymes such as pectinase and food additives such as citric acid. They are used in the production of fermented foods such as alcoholic drinks, bread, cheese, and soy sauce. More than a dozen species of mushrooms are used as foods directly. Many of our most important antibiotics, such as penicillin, cyclosporin, and lovastatin, come from fungi. Fungi also have many negative impacts on human health and economics. Fungi are serious pathogens in immuno-compromised patients. Fungi are the single largest group of plant pathogens and thus a serious limit on crop productivity throughout the world. Many fungi are allergenic, and mold contamination of residences and commercial buildings is now recognized as a serious public health threat. As decomposers, fungi cause extensive damage to just about all natural and synthetic materials.

  14. Biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids in Solanaceae plants: involvement of an aldehyde intermediate during C-26 amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Okawa, Akiko; Moriuchi, Yuka; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2013-05-01

    The C-26 amino group of steroidal alkaloids, such as tomatine, is introduced during an early step of their biosynthesis from cholesterol. In the present study, the mechanism of C-26 amination was reinvestigated by administering stable isotope labeled compounds, such as (26,26,26,27,27,27-(2)H6)cholesterol during biosynthesis of tomatine, solanine and solasonine. The chemical compositions of tomatine and solanine so obtained were analyzed by LC-MS after administering the d6-cholesterol to a tomato seedling and a potato shoot, respectively. The resulting spectra indicated that two deuterium atoms were eliminated from C-26 of cholesterol during biosynthesis. Furthermore, administration of (6-(13)C(2)H3)mevalonate in combination with lovastatin to an eggplant seedling, followed by GC-MS analysis of solasodine after TMS derivatization established that two deuterium atoms were eliminated from C-26 of cholesterol during solasonine biosynthesis. These findings are in contrast to an earlier observation that one hydrogen atom was lost from C-26 during tomatidine biosynthesis, and suggest that C-26 nitrogen atom addition involves an aldehyde intermediate. Thus, it is proposed that the C-26 amination reaction that occurs during steroidal alkaloid biosynthesis proceeds by way of a transamination mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of steroid 5-α reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young-Kyo; Zhu, Bing; Jeon, Tae-Il; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  16. Heterologous expression of MlcE in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides resistance to natural and semi-synthetic statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Their extensive use in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases placed statins among the best selling drugs. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory for the production of high concentrations of natural statins will require establishment of a non-destructive self-resistance mechanism to overcome the undesirable growth inhibition effects of statins. To establish active export of statins from yeast, and thereby detoxification, we integrated a putative efflux pump-encoding gene mlcE from the mevastatin-producing Penicillium citrinum into the S. cerevisiae genome. The resulting strain showed increased resistance to both natural statins (mevastatin and lovastatin and semi-synthetic statin (simvastatin when compared to the wild type strain. Expression of RFP-tagged mlcE showed that MlcE is localized to the yeast plasma and vacuolar membranes. We provide a possible engineering strategy for improvement of future yeast based production of natural and semi-synthetic statins. Keywords: Polyketide, Statins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Transport, Cell factory, Resistance

  17. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-02

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety.

  18. Cocobiota: Implications for Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Petyaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of dark chocolate and other cocoa-based products is a complex multistage process beginning with spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation driven in the postharvest period by different microorganisms derived from the environment. Cocobiota defined as the association of microbial species involved in cocoa bean fermentation may have considerable impact on the medicinal properties of cocoa products via various primary and secondary metabolites, whose presence in dark chocolate and other cocoa-derived products has to be taken into consideration when analyzing medicinal effects of cocoa. Metabolites of acetic acid and lactic acid bacteria, two major cocobiota members, are recently shown to have considerable antifungal and cholesterol-lowering activities and promote the formation of short chain fatty acids and mannitol, an important prebiotic capable of modifying gut microbiota. Penicillium citrinum, a major type of fungi identifiable in fermented cocoa beans, produces a thermostable alkaloid, Penicitrinine A, as well as lovastatin, compounds with antineoplastic and cholesterol-lowering abilities, respectively. Moreover, recent results suggest that bacterial and fungal metabolites produced by cocobiota have a significant anti-infective potential. Therefore, various metabolites produced by cocobiota can mimic some medicinal effects of dark chocolate and other cocoa-derived products previously attributed to cocoa flavonoids and methylxanthines and need to be thoroughly investigated in in vitro and in vivo systems.

  19. Human Vascular Microphysiological System for in vitro Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C E; Yen, R W; Perez, S M; Bedell, H W; Povsic, T J; Reichert, W M; Truskey, G A

    2016-02-18

    In vitro human tissue engineered human blood vessels (TEBV) that exhibit vasoactivity can be used to test human toxicity of pharmaceutical drug candidates prior to pre-clinical animal studies. TEBVs with 400-800 μM diameters were made by embedding human neonatal dermal fibroblasts or human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in dense collagen gel. TEBVs were mechanically strong enough to allow endothelialization and perfusion at physiological shear stresses within 3 hours after fabrication. After 1 week of perfusion, TEBVs exhibited endothelial release of nitric oxide, phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction, and acetylcholine-induced vasodilation, all of which were maintained up to 5 weeks in culture. Vasodilation was blocked with the addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). TEBVs elicited reversible activation to acute inflammatory stimulation by TNF-α which had a transient effect upon acetylcholine-induced relaxation, and exhibited dose-dependent vasodilation in response to caffeine and theophylline. Treatment of TEBVs with 1 μM lovastatin for three days prior to addition of Tumor necrosis factor - α (TNF-α) blocked the injury response and maintained vasodilation. These results indicate the potential to develop a rapidly-producible, endothelialized TEBV for microphysiological systems capable of producing physiological responses to both pharmaceutical and immunological stimuli.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and mode of action of biological control for suppression of ganoderma boninense in oil palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A.; Abdullah, S.; Rossall, S.; Chong, K.P.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of potential antagonists, a commercial product containing combinations of microorganisms (TR1) to control Ganoderma boninense growth was investigated in this research. TR1 contained multiple strains of Bacillus spp. and Trichoderma spp. The results from field experiments showed that TR1 was all able to reduce the colonization of G. boninense, based on re-isolation of the pathogen onto a selective medium and the reduction of ergosterol content compared to untreated controls. Effectiveness of TR1 was therefore further investigated for mode of action studies. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations of Ganoderma mycelium, recovered from bioassay plates on which TR1 had inhibited fungal growth, showed that the mycelium was highly disrupted and lysed after exposure to the treatment. The production of potentially antifungal components produced by TR1 microbes in broth cultures was further investigated using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LCMS). Several antimicrobial compounds, which could inhibit G. boninense were detected, including pyrene-1,6-dione, 12-deoxyaklanonic acid, N-methyl-a-aminoisobutyric acid, 4-O-8',5"-5'-dehydrotriferulic acid, halstoctacosanolide A, N-acetyl-leu-leu-tyr-amide, 12-oxo-10Z-dodecenoic acid, Gly-Met-OH and lovastatin. These metabolites probably contribute to the antagonistic effect against G. boninense. The use of TR1 could offer an alternative to the use of fungicides and is worthy of further investigation for the control of Ganoderma infection of oil palm. (author)

  1. Application of PC-SAFT and cubic equations of state for the correlation of solubility of some pharmaceutical and statin drugs in SC-CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah El Hadj. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the solubilities of some anti-inflammatory (nabumetone, phenylbutazone and salicylamide and statin drugs (fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin were correlated using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT with one-parameter mixing rule and commonly used cubic equations of state Peng-Robinson (PR and Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK combining with van-der Waals-1 parameter (VDW1 and van-der Waals-2 parameters (VDW2 mixing rules. The experimental data for studied compounds were taken from literature at temperature and pressure in ranges (308-348 K and (100-360 bar respectively. The critical properties required for the correlation with PR and SRK were estimated using Gani and Noonalol contribution group methods whereas, PC-SAFT pure-component parameters; segment number (m, segment diameter (σ and energy parameter (ε/k have been estimated by tihic’s group contribution method for nabumetone. For phenylbutazone and salicylamide those parameters were determined using a linear correlation. For statin drugs, PC-SAFT parameters were fitted to solubility data, and binary interaction parameters (kij and lij have been obtained by fitting the experimental data. The result was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data and showed that PC-SAFT approach can be used to model solid-SCF equilibrium with better correlation accuracy than cubic equations of state.

  2. Aspergillus Species and Their Associated Mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Gallo, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is among the most abundant and widely distributed organism on earth, and at the moment comprises 339 known species. It is one of the most important economically fungal genus and the biotechnological use of Aspergillus species is related to production of soy sauce, of different hydrolytic enzymes (amylases, lipases) and organic acid (citric acid, gluconic acid), as well as biologically active metabolites such as lovastatin. Although they are not considered to be major cause of plant diseases, Aspergillus species are responsible for several disorders in various plants and plant products, especially as opportunistic storage moulds. The notable consequence of their presence is contamination of foods and feeds by mycotoxins, among which the most important are aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, and, at a less extent, fumonisins. Aflatoxins B 1 , B 2 , G 1 , G 2 are the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins, due to their extreme hepatocarcinogenicity; ochratoxin A is a potent nephrotoxin, it is also carcinogenic, teratogenic, and immunotoxic in rats and possibly in humans; fumonisins are hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic with potential carcinogenic effects on rat and mice. In this chapter we summarize the main aspects of morphology, ecology, epidemiology, and toxigenicity of Aspergillus foodborne pathogens which belong to sections Flavi, Circumdati, and Nigri, occurring in several agricultural products and responsible of aflatoxin, ochratoxin A, and fumonisins contamination of food and feed.

  3. Dose-dependent dual effects of cholesterol and desmosterol on J774 macrophage proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Cueva, Paloma de la; Ferruelo, Antonio J.; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Lasuncion, Miguel A.; Martinez-Botas, Javier; Gomez-Coronado, Diego

    2008-01-01

    We addressed the ability of native, oxidized and acetylated low-density lipoproteins (nLDL, oxLDL and acLDL, respectively) and desmosterol to act as sources of sterol for the proliferation of J774A.1 macrophages. Treatment with 0.5 μM lovastatin and lipoprotein-deficient serum suppressed cell proliferation. This inhibition was effectively prevented by nLDL, but only to a lesser extent by oxLDL. AcLDL, despite its ability to deliver a higher amount of cholesterol to J774 macrophages than the other LDLs, was dependent on mevalonate supply to sustain cell proliferation. Similarly, exogenous desmosterol, which is not converted into cholesterol in J774 cells, required the simultaneous addition of mevalonate to support optimal cell growth. Expression of hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase mRNA was potently down-regulated by acLDL and exogenous desmosterol, but the effect was weaker with other sterol sources. We conclude that nLDL is more efficient than modified LDL in sustaining macrophage proliferation. Despite the requirement of cholesterol or desmosterol for J774 cell proliferation, excessive provision of either sterol limits mevalonate availability, thus suppressing cell proliferation.

  4. Dose-dependent dual effects of cholesterol and desmosterol on J774 macrophage proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara [Servicio de Bioquimica-Investigacion, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar, km 9, 28034 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Cueva, Paloma de la; Ferruelo, Antonio J; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos [Servicio de Bioquimica-Investigacion, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar, km 9, 28034 Madrid (Spain); Lasuncion, Miguel A [Servicio de Bioquimica-Investigacion, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar, km 9, 28034 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Universidad de Alcala, Alcala de Henares (Spain); Martinez-Botas, Javier [Servicio de Bioquimica-Investigacion, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar, km 9, 28034 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Coronado, Diego [Servicio de Bioquimica-Investigacion, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar, km 9, 28034 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: diego.gomez@hrc.es

    2008-12-12

    We addressed the ability of native, oxidized and acetylated low-density lipoproteins (nLDL, oxLDL and acLDL, respectively) and desmosterol to act as sources of sterol for the proliferation of J774A.1 macrophages. Treatment with 0.5 {mu}M lovastatin and lipoprotein-deficient serum suppressed cell proliferation. This inhibition was effectively prevented by nLDL, but only to a lesser extent by oxLDL. AcLDL, despite its ability to deliver a higher amount of cholesterol to J774 macrophages than the other LDLs, was dependent on mevalonate supply to sustain cell proliferation. Similarly, exogenous desmosterol, which is not converted into cholesterol in J774 cells, required the simultaneous addition of mevalonate to support optimal cell growth. Expression of hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase mRNA was potently down-regulated by acLDL and exogenous desmosterol, but the effect was weaker with other sterol sources. We conclude that nLDL is more efficient than modified LDL in sustaining macrophage proliferation. Despite the requirement of cholesterol or desmosterol for J774 cell proliferation, excessive provision of either sterol limits mevalonate availability, thus suppressing cell proliferation.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  6. Assaying embryotoxicity in the test tube: current limitations of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) challenging its applicability domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling, Christian; Hayess, Katrin; Peters, Annelieke K; Steemans, Margino; Spielmann, Horst; Luch, Andreas; Seiler, Andrea E M

    2012-05-01

    Testing for embryotoxicity in vitro is an attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is such a method, and it has been formally validated by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. A number of recent studies have underscored the potential of this method. However, the EST performed well below the 78% accuracy expected from the validation study using a new set of chemicals and pharmaceutical compounds, and also of toxicity criteria, tested to enlarge the database of the validated EST as part of the Work Package III of the ReProTect Project funded within the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union. To assess the performance and applicability domain of the EST we present a detailed review of the substances and their effects in the EST being nitrofen, ochratoxin A, D-penicillamine, methylazoxymethanol, lovastatin, papaverine, warfarin, β-aminopropionitrile, dinoseb, furosemide, doxylamine, pravastatin, and metoclopramide. By delineation of the molecular mechanisms of the substances we identify six categories of reasons for misclassifications. Some of these limitations might also affect other in vitro methods assessing embryotoxicity. Substances that fall into these categories need to be included in future validation sets and in validation guidelines for embryotoxicity testing. Most importantly, we suggest conceivable improvements and additions to the EST which will resolve most of the limitations.

  7. Quality of Bread Supplemented with Antrodia salmonea-Fermented Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao-Chi Chien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented grains of buckwheat, oat, embryo rice and wheat, which were prepared by solid-state fermentation with Antrodia salmonea, and the mycelium was used to substitute 7 % of wheat flour to make bread. No difference in proximate composition, texture profile and contents of non-volatile taste components was observed among bread samples. White bread and bread supplemented with mycelium and fermented grains looked different. Bread supplemented with fermented grains had similar thermal properties, which differed from those of white bread and bread supplemented with mycelium. Bread supplemented with fermented grains contained substantial mass fractions (on dry mass basis of adenosine (0.92–1.96 μg/g, ergosterol (24.53–30.12 μg/g, ergothioneine (2.16–3.18 μg/g and γ-aminobutyric acid (2.20–2.45 μg/g. In addition, bread supplemented with mycelium contained lovastatin (0.43 μg/g. White bread and bread supplemented with fermented grains had similar sensory results. Overall, fermented grains could be incorporated into bread to provide beneficial effects.

  8. Patrones de prescripción de antilipémicos en un grupo de pacientes colombianos Prescription patterns for antilipidemic drugs in a group of Colombian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado

    2008-03-01

    were over 20 years of age, undergoing treatment from at least April to June 2006, and were residents of one of 19 cities in Colombia. A database was created to track prescription data collected by the pharmaceutical company that dispenses medications to the patients. RESULTS: The mean age was 58.4 ± 13.5 years; 58.9% of the participants were women. Of the total number of patients, 95.6% were receiving monotherapy, while 4.4% were receiving two or more antilipidemics. Prescriptions were ranked as follows: statins (70.9%, fibrates (27.5%, bile acid sequestrant resins (0.9%, and others (0.7%, all at low dosage levels. The most common therapy combinations were lovastatin + gemfibrozil (n = 1 568, cholestyramine + gemfibrozil (n = 92, and cholestyramine + lovastatin (n = 78. Comedications most frequently prescribed were: antihypertensive (60.9%, antiinflammatory (56.5%, antiulcer (22.9%, and antidiabetes drugs (20.6%, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 3.8%. Antianginals and ASA were being underused, while antiinflamatories and antiulcer drugs were being overused. CONCLUSIONS: Dyslipidemia is a primary risk factor for developing coronary heart disease and stroke, frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in Colombia and the world. All of the antilipidemics are being used at lower-than-recommended dosage levels. Clearly there is a need for creating educational strategies to address these prescribing habits and for exploring clinical results of the pharmaceuticals studied.

  9. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis modify the response of F1B hamsters to dietary very long chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Jaime L; Matthan, Nirupa R; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2011-10-21

    The plasma lipoprotein response of F1B Golden-Syrian hamsters fed diets high in very long chain (VLC) n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is paradoxical to that observed in humans. This anomaly is attributed, in part, to low lipoprotein lipase activity and is dependent on cholesterol status. To further elucidate the mechanism(s) for these responses, hamsters were fed diets containing supplemental fish oil (VLC n-3 PUFA) or safflower oil (n-6 PUFA) (both 10% [w/w]) and either cholesterol-supplemented (0.1% cholesterol [w/w]) or cholesterol-depleted (0.01% cholesterol [w/w] and 10 days prior to killing fed 0.15% lovastatin+2% cholestyramine [w/w]). Cholesterol-supplemented hamsters fed fish oil, relative to safflower oil, had higher non-high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (P safflower oil, had lower non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (P < 0.001) which were associated with lower hepatic SREBP-1c (p < 0.05) but not apo B-100, apo E or ACAT-2 mRNA or protein levels. Independent of cholesterol status, fish oil fed hamsters had lower HDL cholesterol concentrations (p < 0.001), which were associated with lower hepatic apoA-I protein levels (p < 0.05). These data suggest disturbing cholesterol homeostasis in F1B hamsters alters their response to dietary fatty acids, which is reflected in altered plasma lipoprotein patterns and regulation of genes associated with their metabolism.

  10. Polyketide synthases of Diaporthe helianthi and involvement of DhPKS1 in virulence on sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Michelina; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Pane, Catello; Monti, Maurilia Maria; Firrao, Giuseppe; Vergara, Mariarosaria; Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano; Vannacci, Giovanni; Scala, Felice

    2018-01-06

    The early phases of Diaporthe helianthi pathogenesis on sunflower are characterized by the production of phytotoxins that may play a role in host colonisation. In previous studies, phytotoxins of a polyketidic nature were isolated and purified from culture filtrates of virulent strains of D. helianthi isolated from sunflower. A highly aggressive isolate (7/96) from France contained a gene fragment of a putative nonaketide synthase (lovB) which was conserved in a virulent D. helianthi population. In order to investigate the role of polyketide synthases in D. helianthi 7/96, a draft genome of this isolate was examined. We were able to find and phylogenetically analyse 40 genes putatively coding for polyketide synthases (PKSs). Analysis of their domains revealed that most PKS genes of D. helianthi are reducing PKSs, whereas only eight lacked reducing domains. Most of the identified PKSs have orthologs shown to be virulence factors or genetic determinants for toxin production in other pathogenic fungi. One of the genes (DhPKS1) corresponded to the previously cloned D. helianthi lovB gene fragment and clustered with a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) -PKS hybrid/lovastatin nonaketide like A. nidulans LovB. We used DhPKS1 as a case study and carried out its disruption through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in the isolate 7/96. D. helianthi DhPKS1 deleted mutants were less virulent to sunflower compared to the wild type, indicating a role for this gene in the pathogenesis of the fungus. The PKS sequences analysed and reported here constitute a new genomic resource that will be useful for further research on the biology, ecology and evolution of D. helianthi and generally of fungal plant pathogens.

  11. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S.

    1990-01-01

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and β-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6'exomethylene SV (I), 6'CH 2 OH-SV (II), 6'COOH-SV (III) and a β-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6' is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However 3 H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding 14 C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man

  12. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  13. Modulation of Immune Disorders Induced-Arthritis in γ- Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thabet, N.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capability of a laboratory preparation mixture Nano Selenium-lovastatin (Lov-Se) against oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade in irradiated and/or adjuvant arthritic rats. The experimental animals were divided into: adjuvant free groups and adjuvant induced groups. Rats were exposed to whole body γ-radiation (2 Gy every 3 days up to total dose of 8 Gy) and received oral administration of 1 ml Lov-Se mixture (≈ 20 mg kg - 1 Lov and 0.1 mg kg - 1 day - 1 Se) for 14 successive days. Animal model of arthritis was organized by subcutaneous injection of complete freund’s adjuvant. The antioxidant parameters (heart GSH-Px, CAT, SOD, XDH, GSH and blood Se), and oxidant markers (heart XO, NO, protein carbonyls and TBARS) and Also, the inflammatory molecules (serum TNF-α, CRP and RF) were determined. In irradiated Lov-Se rats, the results obtained reveals that, TBARS, protein carbonyl, TNF-α, CRP levels, and XO, CAT and SOD activities were significantly ameliorated as compared to irradiated rats. Also, heart GSH, NO levels, XDH, GSH-Px activities and blood Se level were significantly improved. In addition, the administration of Lov-Se to the arthritic and arthritic irradiated rats ameliorates the disturbance occurs in oxidative stress, inflammatory cascades and antioxidant indicators when compared to control rats. In conclusion, the proper administration of Lov-Se mixture might reduce the radiation-induced heart injury via amending the antioxidant molecules and decreasing lipid and protein oxidation. Also, it could be suggested that Lov-Se mixture might posses a considerable anti-inflammatory properties

  14. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J.; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M.; Weaver, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD 7.0 ) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC 50 values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein

  15. Regulation of apoptosis in human melanoma and neuroblastoma cells by statins, sodium arsenite and TRAIL: a role of combined treatment versus monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma cells by sodium arsenite or statins (simvastatin and lovastatin) dramatically modified activities of the main cell signaling pathways resulting in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and in a downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels. Through heme degradation and the production of carbon monoxide and biliverdin, HO-1 plays a protective role in different scenario of oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial apoptosis. Both sodium arsenite and statins could be efficient inducers of apoptosis in some melanoma cell lines, but often exhibited only modest proapoptotic activity in others, due to numerous protective mechanisms. We demonstrated in the present study that treatment by sodium arsenite or statins with an additional inhibition of HO-1 expression (or activation) caused a substantial upregulation of apoptosis in melanoma cells. Sodium arsenite- or statin-induced apoptosis was independent of BRAF status (wild type versus V600E) in melanoma lines. Monotreatment required high doses of statins (20–40 μM) for effective induction of apoptosis. As an alternative approach, pretreatment of melanoma cells with statin at decreased doses (5–20 μM) dramatically enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, due to suppression of the NF-κB and STAT3-transcriptional targets (including COX-2) and downregulation of cFLIP-L (a caspase-8 inhibitor) protein levels. Furthermore, combined treatment with sodium arsenite and TRAIL or simvastatin and TRAIL efficiently induced apoptotic commitment in human neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our findings on enhancing effects of combined treatment of cancer cells using statin and TRAIL provide the rationale for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:21910007

  16. A Systematic Review of the Mysterious Caterpillar Fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis in Dong-ChongXiaCao (冬蟲夏草 Dōng Chóng Xià Cǎo) and Related Bioactive Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Hsieh, Chienyan; Lin, Fang-Yi; Hsu, Tai-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The caterpillar fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn.† Cordyceps sinensis), which was originally used in traditional Tibetan and Chinese medicine, is called either “yartsa gunbu” or “DongChongXiaCao (冬蟲夏草 Dōng Chóng Xià Cǎo)” (“winter worm-summer grass”), respectively. The extremely high price of DongChongXiaCao, approximately USD $20,000 to 40,000 per kg, has led to it being regarded as “soft gold” in China. The multi-fungi hypothesis has been proposed for DongChongXiaCao; however, Hirsutella sinensis is the anamorph of O. sinensis. In Chinese, the meaning of “DongChongXiaCao” is different for O. sinensis, Cordyceps spp.,‡ and Cordyceps spƒ. Over 30 bioactivities, such as immunomodulatory, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, have been reported for wild DongChongXiaCao and for the mycelia and culture supernatants of O. sinensis. These bioactivities derive from over 20 bioactive ingredients, mainly extracellular polysaccharides, intracellular polysaccharides, cordycepin, adenosine, mannitol, and sterols. Other bioactive components have been found as well, including two peptides (cordymin and myriocin), melanin, lovastatin, γ-aminobutyric acid, and cordysinins. Recently, the bioactivities of O. sinensis were described, and they include antiarteriosclerosis, antidepression, and antiosteoporosis activities, photoprotection, prevention and treatment of bowel injury, promotion of endurance capacity, and learning-memory improvement. H. sinensis has the ability to accelerate leukocyte recovery, stimulate lymphocyte proliferation, antidiabetes, and improve kidney injury. Starting January 1st, 2013, regulation will dictate that one fungus can only have one name, which will end the system of using separate names for anamorphs. The anamorph name “H. sinensis” has changed by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants to O. sinensis. PMID:24716152

  17. Statin-associated muscle-related adverse effects: a case series of 354 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, Stephanie; Evans, Marcella A; Denenberg, Julie O; Golomb, Beatrice A

    2010-06-01

    To characterize the properties and natural history of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin)-associated muscle-related adverse effects (MAEs). Patient-targeted postmarketing adverse-effect surveillance approach coupling survey design with an open-ended narrative. University-affiliated health care system. Three hundred fifty-four patients (age range 34-86 yrs) who self-reported muscle-related problems associated with statin therapy. Patients with perceived statin-associated MAEs completed a survey assessing statin drugs and dosages; characteristics of the MAEs; time course of onset, resolution, or recurrence; and impact on quality of life (QOL). Cases were assessed for putative drug adverse-effect causality by using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale criteria and were evaluated for inclusion in groups for which mortality benefit with statins has been shown. Patients reported muscle pain (93%), fatigue (88%), and weakness (85%). Three hundred patients (85%) met literature criteria for probable or definite drug adverse-effect causality. Ninety-four percent of atorvastatin usages (240/255) generated MAEs versus 61% of lovastatin usages (38/62, pstatins reproduced MAEs in 100% of 39 rechallenges versus 73% (29/40) with lower potency rechallenges (pstatin initiation varied (median 14 wks); some MAEs occurred after long-term symptom-free use. Recurrence with rechallenge had a significantly shorter latency to onset (median 2 wks). The MAEs adversely affected all assessed functional and QOL domains. Most patients with probable or definite MAEs were in categories for which available randomized controlled trial evidence shows no trend to all-cause mortality benefit with statin therapy. This study complements available information on the properties and natural history of statin-associated MAEs, affirming dose dependence and strong QOL impact. The data indicating a dose-dependent relationship between MAE risk and recurrence suggest

  18. Early dengue virus protein synthesis induces extensive rearrangement of the endoplasmic reticulum independent of the UPR and SREBP-2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Peña

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of intracellular membranes has been long reported to be a common feature in diseased cells. In this study, we used dengue virus (DENV to study the role of the unfolded protein response (UPR and sterol-regulatory-element-binding-protein-2 (SREBP-2 pathway in the rearrangement and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER early after infection. Using laser scanning confocal and differential interference contrast microscopy, we demonstrate that rearrangement and expansion of the ER occurs early after DENV-2 infection. Through the use of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells deficient in XBP1 and ATF6, we show that ER rearrangement early after DENV infection is independent of the UPR. We then demonstrate that enlargement of the ER is independent of the SREBP-2 activation and upregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We further show that this ER rearrangement is not inhibited by the treatment of DENV-infected cells with the cholesterol-inhibiting drug lovastatin. Using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D and the translation elongation inhibitor cycloheximide, we show that de novo viral protein synthesis but not host transcription is necessary for expansion and rearrangement of the ER. Lastly, we demonstrate that viral infection induces the reabsorption of lipid droplets into the ER. Together, these results demonstrate that modulation of intracellular membrane architecture of the cell early after DENV-2 infection is driven by viral protein expression and does not require the induction of the UPR and SREBP-2 pathways. This work paves the way for further study of virally-induced membrane rearrangements and formation of cubic membranes.

  19. Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Enriched Phosphatidylcholine Attenuated Hepatic Steatosis Through Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism in Rats with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjun; Shi, Di; Tian, Yingying; Liu, Yuntao; Zhan, Qiping; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world. Disturbed cholesterol metabolism plays a crucial role in the development of NAFLD. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of EPA-PC extracted from sea cucumber on liver steatosis and cholesterol metabolism in NAFLD. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups (normal control group, model group, lovastatin group, low- and high-dose EPA groups, and low- and high-dose EPA-PC groups). Model rats were established by administering a diet containing 1% orotic acid. To determine the possible cholesterol metabolism promoting mechanism of EPA-PC, we analyzed the transcription of key genes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. EPA-PC dramatically alleviated hepatic lipid accumulation, reduced the serum TC concentration, and elevated HDLC levels in NAFLD rats. Fecal neutral cholesterol excretion was also promoted by EPA-PC administration. Additionally, EPA-PC decreased the mRNA expression of hydroxymethyl glutaric acid acyl (HMGR) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A), and increased the transcription of sterol carrying protein 2 (SCP2). Moreover, EPA-PC stimulated the transcription of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α (PPARα) and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) as well as its modulators, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CAMKK). Based on the results, the promoting effects of EPA-PC on NAFLD may be partly associated with the suppression of cholesterol synthesis via HMGR inhibition and the enhancement of fecal cholesterol excretion through increased SCP2 transcription. The underlying mechanism may involve stimulation of PPARα and AMPK.

  20. Effects of a series of acidic drugs on L-lactic acid transport by the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yat Hei; Belanger, Francois; Lu, Jennifer; Turgeon, Jacques; Michaud, Veronique

    2018-03-07

    Drug-induced myopathy is a serious side effect that often requires removal of a medication from a drug regimen. For most drugs, the underlying mechanism of drug-induced myopathy remains unclear. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate L-lactic acid transport, and inhibition of MCTs may potentially lead to perturbation of L-lactic acid accumulation and muscular disorders. Therefore, we hypothesized that L-lactic acid transport may be involved in the development of drug-induced myopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory potential of 24 acidic drugs on L-lactic acid transport using breast cancer cell lines Hs578T and MDA-MB-231, which selectively express MCT1 and MCT4, respectively. The influx transport of L-lactic acid was minimally inhibited by all drugs tested. The efflux transport was next examined: loratadine (IC50: 10 and 61 µM) and atorvastatin (IC50: 78 and 41 µM) demonstrated the greatest potency for inhibition of L-lactic acid efflux by MCT1 and MCT4, respectively. Acidic drugs including fluvastatin, cerivastatin, simvastatin acid, lovastatin acid, irbesartan and losartan exhibited weak inhibitory potency on L-lactic acid efflux. Our results suggest that some acidic drugs, such as loratadine and atorvastatin, can inhibit the efflux transport of L-lactic acid. This inhibition may cause an accumulation of intracellular L-lactic acid leading to acidification and muscular disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song, Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e -aq), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with rad OH determined, (6.96±0.16)×10 9, (2.92±0.06)×10 9, (4.16±0.13)×10 9, and (3.13±0.15)×10 9 M -1 s -1, and for e -aq (2.31±0.06)×10 9, (0.45±0.01)×10 9, (1.26±0.01)×10 9, and (0.69±0.02)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  2. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( · OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e - aq ), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with · OH determined, (6.96±0.16)x10 9 , (2.92±0.06)x10 9 , (4.16±0.13)x10 9 , and (3.13±0.15)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , and for e - aq (2.31±0.06)x10 9 , (0.45±0.01)x10 9 , (1.26±0.01)x10 9 , and (0.69±0.02)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137 Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  3. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Behnaz, E-mail: brazavi@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ({sup {center_dot}O}H) and reducing aqueous electron (e{sup -}{sub aq}), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with {sup {center_dot}O}H determined, (6.96{+-}0.16)x10{sup 9}, (2.92{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (4.16{+-}0.13)x10{sup 9}, and (3.13{+-}0.15)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and for e{sup -}{sub aq} (2.31{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (0.45{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, (1.26{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, and (0.69{+-}0.02)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  4. Effect of Gamma Radiation on the Microbial Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farag Marzouk Marea Mosalam

    2013-01-01

    Monasus purpureus Monascus is an ascomycete's fungus traditionally used for the production of food colorants, fermented foods and beverages in southern China, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines. Species of Monascus are mainly employed in the production of red rice (Hesseltine, 1965), (Lin, 1973) and food colouring pigments (Wong and Koehler, 1983). This fungus divided into six species namely, M. ruber, M. pilosus, M. purpureus, M. floridans, M. pallens and M. sanguineus. The species with the greatest significance in the food industry are M. ruber, M. purpureus and M. pilosus (Martınkova and Patakova, 1999). The fungus Monascus has been traditionally used in East Asia for the production of fermented rice which served as a red food colorant. Nowadays, this natural dye is also used in European countries. Most studies have addressed the production of red orange oligoketides by the genus Monascus (Evans, and Wang, 1984) and their biological activities (Martfnkovi et al., 1995). M. purpureus has been used commercially to produce valuable secondary metabolites; ankaflavin and monascin (yellow pigments), monascorubrin and rubropunctanin (orange pigments), monascorubramine and rubropuctamine (red pigments) ( Wong et al.,1981), as well as antihypercholesterolemic agent, monacolin K (lovastatin), hypotensive agent, Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) ( Su et al .,2003), antioxidant compounds, dimerumic acid (Aniya et al.,1999) and an antibacterial compound, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzoic acid (Wu et al., 2000). Red mold rice also contains unsaturated fatty acids that may also help to reduce serum lipids (Wang et al., 1997), total cholesterol and triglyceride levels levels (Wong et al., 1981). Red mold rice is also contains phytosterols such as beta sitosterol and campesterol (Heber et al., 1999) which are interfere with cholesterol absorption in the intestine (Moghadasian and Frohlich, 1999).The combination of such dietary sterols with statin drugs has been

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi response to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors: morphophysiological alterations leading to cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luis Kessler

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC(50/72 h or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC(100/24 h. Incubation with inhibitors at the EC(50/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC(50/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC(100/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP, culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the "point of no return" in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite.

  6. Statins Suppress Ebola Virus Infectivity by Interfering with Glycoprotein Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Flint, Mike; Bergeron, Éric; McElroy, Anita K; Chatterjee, Payel; Albariño, César G; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2018-05-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is a major public health concern due to high fatality rates and limited effective treatments. Statins, widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs, have pleiotropic mechanisms of action and were suggested as potential adjunct therapy for Ebola virus disease (EVD) during the 2013-2016 outbreak in West Africa. Here, we evaluated the antiviral effects of statin (lovastatin) on EBOV infection in vitro Statin treatment decreased infectious EBOV production in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in the hepatic cell line Huh7. Statin treatment did not interfere with viral entry, but the viral particles released from treated cells showed reduced infectivity due to inhibition of viral glycoprotein processing, as evidenced by decreased ratios of the mature glycoprotein form to precursor form. Statin-induced inhibition of infectious virus production and glycoprotein processing was reversed by exogenous mevalonate, the rate-limiting product of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, but not by low-density lipoprotein. Finally, statin-treated cells produced EBOV particles devoid of the surface glycoproteins required for virus infectivity. Our findings demonstrate that statin treatment inhibits EBOV infection and suggest that the efficacy of statin treatment should be evaluated in appropriate animal models of EVD. IMPORTANCE Treatments targeting Ebola virus disease (EVD) are experimental, expensive, and scarce. Statins are inexpensive generic drugs that have been used for many years for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and have a favorable safety profile. Here, we show the antiviral effects of statins on infectious Ebola virus (EBOV) production. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which statin regulates EBOV particle infectivity by preventing glycoprotein processing and incorporation into virus particles. Additionally, statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Since inflammation and dysregulation of the immune

  7. The effect of germinated fenugreek seeds and clofibrat on blood cholesterol level and aortic fatty streak in rabbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bahram delfan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the excess of fat and stiffness of arteries sidewalls in which specific areas of the circulatory system are involved, causing specific signs based on the involved area, the characteristics of the lesion, and the severity of involvement. The only factor necessary to cause atherosclerosis is the high level of LDL cholesterol. Today, drugs such as lovastatin, clofibrate, and Klystramyn are applied to reduce LDL and increase HDL levels. Material and methods: The effect of fenugreek seeds without any drugs or with clofibrat on blood lipids profile and fatty streak forming were evaluated in 25 male healthy rabbits. The rabbits were divided into 5 group of 5 and received the following diets and drugs for 45 days: Group Ι, normal diet without any drugs Group Π, high cholesterol diet without any drugs Group ΙΙΙ, high cholesterol diet in addition to germinated fenugreek seeds powder (600 mg bid Group ΙV, high cholesterol diet in addition to clofibrat (50 mg bid and GroupV, high cholesterol diet in addition to clofibrat (50 mg bid and germinated fenugreek seeds powder (600 mg bid. The blood samples were collected after overnight fasting at the beginning and at the end of the test period and were estimated for lipids profile. Also autopsy and aortic cross-sectional sampling was conducted for microscopic study after the experiment. Result: The serum total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels of groups ΙΙΙ, ΙV,V increased less than those in group Π but HDL levels in groups ΙΙΙ, ΙV and V increased more than that in group Π (P<0.001. Furthermore, the intensity of fatty streak was less in group V. Conclusion: This result indicates the usefulness of fenugreek seeds in the management of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis (P<0.05

  8. Antihepatoma and Liver Protective Potentials of Ganoderma Lucidum (靈芝 Ling Zhi Fermented in a Medium Containing Black Soybean (黑豆 Hēi Dòu and Astragalus Membranaceus (生黃耆 Shēng Huáng Qí

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yuan Su

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antihepatoma activity and liver protective function of the fermentation products (5 L fermenator of Ganoderma lucidum (GL; 靈芝 Ling Zhi cultivated in a medium containing black soybean (BS; 黑豆 Hēi Dòu and Astragalus membranaceus (AM; 生黃耆 Shēng Huáng Qí at different fermentation temperatures were investigated in this study. Hep 3B cells pretreated with lovastatin were used to study the antihepatoma activity, and possible active components were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced primary rat hepatocyte injury was further used to evaluate the liver protective activity of the fermentation products. While all the GL broth filtrates do not inhibit the growth of Hep 3B cells, the ethanolic extract from GL-2 mycelia (GL-2-mE, cultivated in the medium containing BS (50 g/L and AM (20 g/L at 24 °C for 11 days showed the best antihepatoma activity (IC50 26.6 μg/mL than the other ethanolic extracts from GL mycelia, GL fruiting body, BS, and AM did. The antihepatoma activities were correlated with some unknown active components in these samples. Furthermore, GL-2-mE (100 μg/mL without harmful effect on the growth of normal primary rat hepatocytes significantly maintained cell viability, reduced lactate dehydrogenase leakage, lowered lipid peroxidation, and increased glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase activities in the CCl4-induced damaged primary rat hepatocytes.

  9. Isoprenylation is required for the processing of the lamin A precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.A.; Hosick, T.J.; Sinensky, M.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear lamina proteins, prelamin A, lamin B, and a 70-kD lamina-associated protein, are posttranslationally modified by a metabolite derived from mevalonate. This modification can be inhibited by treatment with (3-R,S)-3-fluoromevalonate, demonstrating that it is isoprenoid in nature. We have examined the association between isoprenoid metabolism and processing of the lamin A precursor in human and hamster cells. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by mevinolin (lovastatin) specifically depletes endogenous isoprenoid pools and inhibits the conversion of prelamin A to lamin A. Prelamin A processing is also blocked by mevalonate starvation of Mev-1, a CHO cell line auxotrophic for mevalonate. Moreover, inhibition of prelamin A processing by mevinolin treatment is rapidly reversed by the addition of exogenous mevalonate. Processing of prelamin A is, therefore, dependent on isoprenoid metabolism. Analysis of the conversion of prelamin A to lamin A by two independent methods, immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gel electrophoresis, demonstrates that a precursor-product relationship exists between prelamin A and lamin A. Analysis of R,S-[5-3H(N)]mevalonate-labeled cells shows that the rate of turnover of the isoprenoid group from prelamin A is comparable to the rate of conversion of prelamin A to lamin A. These results suggest that during the proteolytic maturation of prelamin A, the isoprenylated moiety is lost. A significant difference between prelamin A processing, and that of p21ras and the B-type lamins that undergo isoprenylation-dependent proteolytic maturation, is that the mature form of lamin A is no longer isoprenylated

  10. A Systematic Review of the Mysterious Caterpillar Fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis in DongChongXiaCao (冬蟲夏草 Dōng Chóng Xià Cǎo and Related Bioactive Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chen Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The caterpillar fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn.† Cordyceps sinensis, which was originally used in traditional Tibetan and Chinese medicine, is called either “yartsa gunbu” or “DongChongXiaCao (冬蟲夏草 Dōng Chóng Xià Cǎo” (“winter worm-summer grass”, respectively. The extremely high price of DongChongXiaCao, approximately USD $20,000 to 40,000 per kg, has led to it being regarded as “soft gold” in China. The multi-fungi hypothesis has been proposed for DongChongXiaCao; however, Hirsutella sinensis is the anamorph of O. sinensis. In Chinese, the meaning of “DongChongXiaCao” is different for O. sinensis, Cordyceps spp.,‡ and Cordyceps spƒ. Over 30 bioactivities, such as immunomodulatory, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, have been reported for wild DongChongXiaCao and for the mycelia and culture supernatants of O. sinensis. These bioactivities derive from over 20 bioactive ingredients, mainly extracellular polysaccharides, intracellular polysaccharides, cordycepin, adenosine, mannitol, and sterols. Other bioactive components have been found as well, including two peptides (cordymin and myriocin, melanin, lovastatin, γ-aminobutyric acid, and cordysinins. Recently, the bioactivities of O. sinensis were described, and they include antiarteriosclerosis, antidepression, and antiosteoporosis activities, photoprotection, prevention and treatment of bowel injury, promotion of endurance capacity, and learning-memory improvement. H. sinensis has the ability to accelerate leukocyte recovery, stimulate lymphocyte proliferation, antidiabetes, and improve kidney injury. Starting January 1st, 2013, regulation will dictate that one fungus can only have one name, which will end the system of using separate names for anamorphs. The anamorph name “H. sinensis” has changed by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants to O. sinensis.

  11. Discovery and quantitative structure-activity relationship study of lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors as selective insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yang-Yang; Li, Yuan-Mei; Yin, Yue; Chen, Shan-Shan; Kai, Zhen-Peng

    2017-09-01

    In a previous study we have demonstrated that insect 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) can be a potential selective insecticide target. Three series of inhibitors were designed on the basis of the difference in HMGR structures from Homo sapiens and Manduca sexta, with the aim of discovering potent selective insecticide candidates. An in vitro bioassay showed that gem-difluoromethylenated statin analogues have potent effects on JH biosynthesis of M. sexta and high selectivity between H. sapiens and M. sexta. All series II compounds {1,3,5-trisubstituted [4-tert-butyl 2-(5,5-difluoro-2,2-dimethyl-6-vinyl-4-yl) acetate] pyrazoles} have some effect on JH biosynthesis, whereas most of them are inactive on human HMGR. In particular, the IC 50 value of compound II-12 (37.8 nm) is lower than that of lovastatin (99.5 nm) and similar to that of rosuvastatin (24.2 nm). An in vivo bioassay showed that I-1, I-2, I-3 and II-12 are potential selective insecticides, especially for lepidopteran pest control. A predictable and statistically meaningful CoMFA model of 23 inhibitors (20 as training sets and three as test sets) was obtained with a value of q 2 and r 2 of 0.66 and 0.996 respectively. The final model suggested that a potent insect HMGR inhibitor should contain suitable small and non-electronegative groups in the ring part, and electronegative groups in the side chain. Four analogues were discovered as potent selective lepidopteran HMGR inhibitors, which can specifically be used for lepidopteran pest control. The CoMFA model will be useful for the design of new selective insect HMGR inhibitors that are structurally related to the training set compounds. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Differences of statin activity in 2D and 3D pancreatic cancer cell cultures

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    Paškevičiūtė M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Miglė Paškevičiūtė,1 Vilma Petrikaitė1,21Department of Drug Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania; 2Department of Biothermodynamics and Drug Design, Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology, Vilnius, LithuaniaPurpose: To evaluate the anticancer activity of lovastatin (LOVA, mevastatin (MEVA, pitavastatin (PITA, and simvastatin (SIMVA in 2D and 3D models of three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (BxPC-3, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1.Methods: The effect of statins on cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. The activity of statins in 3D pancreatic cancer cell cultures was examined by measuring the size change of spheroids. The type of cell death was identified by cell staining with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. The activity of statins on the clonogenicity of cancer cells was tested by evaluating the effect on the colony-forming ability of cells.Results: The rank order of the activity of tested statins on cell viability was as follows: PITA > SIMVA > LOVA > MEVA. Among the tested statins, PITA had the greatest effect on cell viability (half maximal effective concentration values after 72 h on BxPC-3, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 cells were 1.4±0.4 µM, 1.0±0.2 µM, and 1.0±0.5 µM, respectively. PITA also showed the strongest effect on tumor spheroid growth. Statins suppressed the colony formation of cancer cells. PITA demonstrated the greatest reduction in colony size and number. Apoptosis and necrosis assay results showed that at lower concentrations statins mostly induced cell death through apoptosis, whereas higher concentrations of compounds activated also necrotic processes.Conclusion: Statins, especially PITA, demonstrate an anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 in both 2D and 3D models.Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, cell viability, spheroid, apoptosis

  13. Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Sami T; Hantash, Hadi Abu; Jambart, Selim; El-Zaheri, Mohamed M; Rachoin, Rachoin; Chalfoun, Amal; Lahoud, Layla; Okkeh, Osama; Bramlage, Peter; Brudi, Philippe; Ambegaonkar, Baishali M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Therefore, as part of the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS), we have analyzed the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and risk factors for dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan. This cross-sectional, multicenter study enrolled 617 patients at 13 hospitals in Lebanon and Jordan. Patients were at least 45 years old and had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient characteristics contributing to dyslipidemia during statin therapy. Our findings indicated that 55.9% of statin-treated patients (mean age 60.3 years, 47% female) in Lebanon and Jordan did not achieve goal levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which were dependent on Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk, and 70% of patients (76% men and 63.3% of women) were at very high cardiovascular risk. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals were not achieved in 67.2% of those with very high cardiovascular risk. The most commonly prescribed statin was atorvastatin (44.6%), followed by simvastatin (27.7%), rosuvastatin (21.2%), fluvastatin (3.3%), pravastatin (3%), and lovastatin (0.2%). Approximately half of the population was treated with a statin dose potency of 4, equaling 40 mg of simvastatin. In Lebanon and Jordan, the strongest independent associations with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol not at goal were current smoking (odds ratio [OR] 1.96; 95% confidence [CI] 1.25-3.08), diabetes mellitus (OR 2.53; 95% CI 1.70-3.77), and ischemic heart disease (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.45-3.53), while alcohol consumption was associated with reduced risk (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.03-0.57). We observed that many patients in Lebanon and Jordan experienced persistent dyslipidemia during statin treatment, supporting the notion that novel lipid-lowering strategies need to be developed. Also, social programs aimed at combating the

  14. Two-way pharmacokinetic interaction studies between saxagliptin and cytochrome P450 substrates or inhibitors: simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole

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    Patel C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chirag G Patel, Li Li, Suzette Girgis, David M Kornhauser, Ernest U Frevert, David W BoultonBristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: Many medicines, including several cholesterol-lowering agents (eg, lovastatin, simvastatin, antihypertensives (eg, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil, and antifungals (eg, ketoconazole are metabolized by and/or inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 metabolic pathway. These types of medicines are commonly coprescribed to treat comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the potential for drug-drug interactions of these medicines with new medicines for T2DM must be carefully evaluated.Objective: To investigate the effects of CYP3A4 substrates or inhibitors, simvastatin (substrate, diltiazem (moderate inhibitor, and ketoconazole (strong inhibitor on the pharmacokinetics and safety of saxagliptin, a CYP3A4/5 substrate; and the effects of saxagliptin on these agents in three separate studies.Methods: Healthy subjects were administered saxagliptin 10 mg or 100 mg. Simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole doses of 40 mg once daily, 360 mg once daily, and 200 mg twice daily, respectively, were used to determine two-way pharmacokinetic interactions.Results: Coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole increased mean area under the concentration-time curve values (AUC of saxagliptin by 12%, 109%, and 145%, respectively, versus saxagliptin alone. Mean exposure (AUC of the CYP3A4-generated active metabolite of saxagliptin, 5-hydroxy saxagliptin, decreased with coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem, and ketoconazole by 2%, 34%, and 88%, respectively. All adverse events were considered mild or moderate in all three studies; there were no serious adverse events or deaths.Conclusion: Saxagliptin, when coadministered with simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole, was safe and generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. Clinically

  15. Application of infrared thermal imaging in the study of preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese medicine health food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2009-08-01

    To explore the assessing technique which could objectively reflect the characteristics of Chinese medicine in the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, four balance features of infrared thermal images (ITI) corresponding to the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance of blood circulation of human body were studied. First, the ITI features of the middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history were compared with those of the healthy youth. It was found that the balance state of the youth was significantly better than that of the middle-aged and elderly, Pfood with the function of helping to decrease serum lipid, on the balance features. The subjects were middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history. Shengyi capsule was taken by the trial group while Xuezhikang capsule (with lovastatin as the main effective component) by the control group for 108 days. The balance features of ITI showed that Shengyi was significantly better than Xuezhikang in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation (including the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance). The relative efficacy rate was 81.0% for the trial group and 33.3% for the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups (P=0.002). Shengyi could effectively decrease the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) but the effect of Xuezhikang in decreasing total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C was better than Shengyi. Though the lipid-lowering effect of Shengyi was not as good as Xuezhikang, ITI reflected the obvious advantage of Shengyi in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation which indicated that helping to decrease serum lipid is only part of the health function of Shengyi. The physiology and pathology basis of the influences of Shengyi on the four balance features and its relationship with the clinical outcome deserves further study. So the prospect of infrared thermal imaging is indicated as

  16. A Proposed Algorithm of Screening and Management of Lipids in Adults for Iranian Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Esmaeil Managheb

    2016-01-01

    regular exercise. Lifestyle modifications include diet, aerobic exercise, weight control, smoking cessation, evaluation of alcohol consumption; and a nutritional supplement containing sitostanol ester, a saturated derivative of plants’ seed oil (6. Diet and exercise are the cornerstones of treatment for asymptomatic patients with dyslipidemia (6. Smoking cessation reduces coronary event rate by about 50% within one to two years of stopping. Among the benefits of smoking cessation is a 5-10% increase in HDL-C (3. Clinicians should initiate statin therapy regardless of LDL, in patients with established ASCVD. Statins are the drugs of choice for lowering LDL-cholesterol, and aggressive treatment with statins should be pursued (6. Large scale clinical event trials include lovastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin atorvastatin, and rosuvastatin (3. Statin Dose Intensity is shown in Table 1 (3.

  17. National Drug Formulary review of statin therapeutic group using the multiattribute scoring tool

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    Ramli A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azuana Ramli,1,3 Syed Mohamed Aljunid,1,2 Saperi Sulong,2 Faridah Aryani Md Yusof31United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2International Centre for Casemix and Clinical Coding (ITCC, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Pharmaceutical Services Division, Ministry of Health, Petaling Jaya, MalaysiaPurpose: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are extensively used in treating hypercholesterolemia. The statins available in Malaysia include atorvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, simvastatin, and fluvastatin. Over the years, they have accumulated in the National Drug Formulary; hence, the need for review. Effective selection of the best drugs to remain in the formulary can become complex due to the multiple drug attributes involved, and is made worse by the limited time and resources available. The multiattribute scoring tool (MAST systematizes the evaluation of the drug attributes to facilitate the drug selection process. In this study, a MAST framework was developed to rank the statins based on their utilities or benefits.Methods: Published literature on multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA were studied and five sessions of expert group discussions were conducted to build the MAST framework and to review the evidence. The attributes identified and selected for analysis were efficacy (clinical efficacy, clinical endpoints, safety (drug interactions, serious side effects and documentation, drug applicability (drug strength/formulation, indications, dose frequency, side effects, food–drug interactions, and dose adjustments, and cost. The average weights assigned by the members for efficacy, safety, drug applicability and cost were 32.6%, 26.2%, 24.1%, and 17.1%, respectively. The utility values of the attributes were scored based on the published evidence or/and agreements during the group discussions. The attribute scores were added up

  18. Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus: functional food with antioxidant -antimicrobial activityand an important source of Vitamin D and medicinal compounds

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    Simone Parola

    2017-10-01

    , eritadenine, lovastatin, lentinan, and lenthionine. Results: 13 strains of each mushroom species have been cultivated on different wood logs. Seven strains of shiitake and six strains of oyster mushroom were able to produce sporocarps. Antioxidant levels in water extracts from dried mushrooms produced significatively different results on the basis of strains and of wood. Both mushrooms demonstrated higher radical scavenging activity in log cultivation than substrates cultivation, which was subsequently used as reference. Furthermore, all strains of P. ostreatus demonstrated the lowest level of antioxidant activity at 4°C, a significant increase towards 50°C and a limited decrease towards 80°C. The same trend was observed for shiitake extracts. Concerning the shiitake mushroom only, crude water extracts showed an interesting antibacterial activity against the model microorganisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A comparison was also performed between the best performing strain extract and the commercial antibiotic Ceftriaxone against P. aeruginosa, assessing that 20 mg of crude extract corresponds to 0.2 mg of the pure antibiotic when studied by means of disk diffusion assay. Conclusions: The results suggested that the cultivation of both shiitake and oyster mushrooms on logs could enhance the content of antioxidant and antibacterial activities, compared to the cultivation of mushrooms on sawdust substrates. Radical scavenging and antibacterial activity depends both on L. edodes strain and the log type. The bacteriostatic/bactericidal activity of the best performer strain may depend on a pH and solvent treatment sensitive substance. Secondary metabolites such as ergothioneine and vitamin D2 from both shiitake and oyster were released just after water extraction: this suggests that the transformation/cooking processes may produce a loss of characteristic mushroom biological properties in water. Further evaluation of biologically relevant compounds content

  19. Statins and risk of diabetes mellitus

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    Richard Tjan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, which reduces HMG-CoA to mevalonate, the precursor of cholesterol via squalene. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase results in a decrease in cholesterol production. Since 1987, when the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approved lovastatin for clinical use,(1 statins have been widely used for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary heart disease (CHD, which is associated with high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. Statins are also used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, since this carries a high risk of CHD. Statins have several adverse effects, to which must now be added new onset diabetes. In 2012 the FDA issued a warning about the risk of newly developed diabetes mellitus in older persons, such that statin labels now include information on glycemic effects, including diabetes and increases in hemoglobin A1c or fasting plasma glucose.(2 According to the results of a recent meta-analysis involving 13,966 40+-year patients newly treated with statins between 1 January 1977 and 31 March 2011, a moderate but significant increase was found in the risk of new onset diabetes within the first two years of using regular higher potency statins (rosuvastatin >10 mg, atorvastatin >20 mg, and simvastatin >40 mg, compared with lower potency drugs. Therefore these investigators caution clinicians regarding the use of higher potency statins in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.(2 The use of a new drug carries a “built-in time-bomb”, because nothing is known about its side effects, except for those revealed by animal tests and limited clinical trials. Even a multicenter clinical trial cannot be expected to reveal all possible adverse reactions associated with a new drug. As an illustration, in patients without diabetes mellitus, more than 345 000 cases were needed to detect an increase in fasting

  20. Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar ST

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sami T Azar,1 Hadi Abu Hantash,2 Selim Jambart,3 Mohammad M El-Zaheri,4 Rachoin Rachoin,5 Amal Chalfoun,6 Layla Lahoud,6 Osama Okkeh,2 Peter Bramlage,7 Philippe Brudi,8 Baishali M Ambegaonkar81American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Istishari Hospital, Amman, Jordan; 3St Joseph University Faculty of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Jordan Hospital, Amman, Jordan; 5Notre Dame des Secours Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon; 6MSD Levant, Beirut, Lebanon; 7Institut für Pharmakologie und präventive Medizin, Mahlow, Germany; 8Merck and Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USABackground: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Therefore, as part of the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS, we have analyzed the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and risk factors for dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan.Methods: This cross-sectional, multicenter study enrolled 617 patients at 13 hospitals in Lebanon and Jordan. Patients were at least 45 years old and had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient characteristics contributing to dyslipidemia during statin therapy.Results: Our findings indicated that 55.9% of statin-treated patients (mean age 60.3 years, 47% female in Lebanon and Jordan did not achieve goal levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which were dependent on Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE risk, and 70% of patients (76% men and 63.3% of women were at very high cardiovascular risk. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals were not achieved in 67.2% of those with very high cardiovascular risk. The most commonly prescribed statin was atorvastatin (44.6%, followed by simvastatin (27.7%, rosuvastatin (21.2%, fluvastatin (3.3%, pravastatin (3%, and lovastatin (0.2%. Approximately half of the population was treated with a statin dose potency of 4, equaling 40 mg of simvastatin. In

  1. Best practices: an electronic drug alert program to improve safety in an accountable care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Sara; Lustig, Adam; Malsin, Luanne; Carley, Blake; Westrich, Kimberly D; Dubois, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO), one of the most promising and talked about new models of care, focuses on improving communication and care transitions by tying potential shared savings to specific clinical and financial benchmarks. An important factor in meeting these benchmarks is an ACO's ability to manage medications in an environment where medical and pharmacy care has been integrated. The program described in this article highlights the critical components of Marshfield Clinic's Drug Safety Alert Program (DSAP), which focuses on prioritizing and communicating safety issues related to medications with the goal of reducing potential adverse drug events. Once the medication safety concern is identified, it is reviewed to evaluate whether an alert warrants sending prescribers a communication that identifies individual patients or a general communication to all physicians describing the safety concern. Instead of basing its decisions regarding clinician notification about drug alerts on subjective criteria, the Marshfield Clinic's DSAP uses an internally developed scoring system. The scoring system includes criteria developed from previous drug alerts, such as level of evidence, size of population affected, severity of adverse event identified or targeted, litigation risk, available alternatives, and potential for duration of medication use. Each of the 6 criteria is assigned a weight and is scored based upon the content and severity of the alert received.  In its first 12 months, the program targeted 6 medication safety concerns involving the following medications: topiramate, glyburide, simvastatin, citalopram, pioglitazone, and lovastatin. Baseline and follow-up prescribing data were gathered on the targeted medications. Follow-up review of prescribing data demonstrated that the DSAP provided quality up-to-date safety information that led to changes in drug therapy and to decreases in potential adverse drug events. In aggregate, nearly 10,000 total

  2. Impact of statins on risk of new onset diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J

    2016-10-01

    .84, 95% CI 1.63–2.09. Pravastatin had the lowest risk (adjusted HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.32–1.81 while those who were exposed to more than one statin were at the highest risk of NODM (adjusted HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.93–2.37. It has been concluded that all statins are associated with the risk of NODM in patients with IHD, and it is believed that our study would contribute to a better understanding of statin and NODM association by analyzing statin use in the real-world setting. Periodic screening and monitoring for diabetes are warranted during prolonged statin therapy in patients with IHD. Keywords: Atorvastatin, Fluvastatin, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Pitavastatin, Pravastatin, Simvastatin, Ischemic heart disease, IHD, new onset diabetes mellitus, NODM

  3. Las estatinas: Actividad biológica y producción biotecnológica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Chegwin-Angarita

    2012-08-01

    treatment, breast-cancer, colorectal, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and pancreas cancer. The beneficial side effects on bone metabolism should not be left aside due to its association with the increase of bone mineral density, the protector effect against Alzheimer and other types of dementia, possibly due to its participation in the relationship between β-amyloid and the cholesterol levels. The need of its production at large amounts has led biotechnologists to the optimization of biotechnology processes seeking for a better performance on short-time processing; finding results as worth as those obtained from basiodiomycetes, eliminating the problems generated by the toxins in the micromycetes. These processes correspond to fermentations whether in liquid state or in solid state solid being the former the most used. Even  though biosynthesis of statins is  deeply linked  as much to the fungus as to the strain of the same, the composition of the culture, aeration, pellet’s morphology, agitation, fermentation processing type, pH , temperature, light, inoculation type, are determinant variables to the optimization of biotechnological production of these bio-actives. Comparative studies show that sometimes, solid state fermentation (SSF, present some advantages over liquid state fermentation (LSF with both a greater amount and fast processing of the product. However, the lovastatin production through SSF present difficulties and limitations as much as there many variables of the process that required to be controlled.  In this review are presented the most relevant results in the latest 12 years, related with both fields, bio-actions, and the biotechnology of the production of statins type 1. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors; mushroom growing; bioactions.

  4. Las estatinas: Actividad biológica y producción biotecnológica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Chegwin-Angarita

    2012-07-01

    treatment, breast-cancer, colorectal, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and pancreas cancer. The beneficial side effects on bone metabolism should not be left aside due to its association with the increase of bone mineral density, the protector effect against Alzheimer and other types of dementia, possibly due to its participation in the relationship between β-amyloid and the cholesterol levels. The need of its production at large amounts has led biotechnologists to the optimization of biotechnology processes seeking for a better performance on short-time processing; finding results as worth as those obtained from basiodiomycetes, eliminating the problems generated by the toxins in the micromycetes. These processes correspond to fermentations whether in liquid state or in solid state solid being the former the most used. Even  though biosynthesis of statins is  deeply linked  as much to the fungus as to the strain of the same, the composition of the culture, aeration, pellet’s morphology, agitation, fermentation processing type, pH , temperature, light, inoculation type, are determinant variables to the optimization of biotechnological production of these bio-actives. Comparative studies show that sometimes, solid state fermentation (SSF, present some advantages over liquid state fermentation (LSF with both a greater amount and fast processing of the product. However, the lovastatin production through SSF present difficulties and limitations as much as there many variables of the process that required to be controlled.  In this review are presented the most relevant results in the latest 12 years, related with both fields, bio-actions, and the biotechnology of the production of statins type 1. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors; mushroom growing; bioactions.