WorldWideScience

Sample records for loss-of-function mechanisms contribute

  1. Multiple loss-of-function mechanisms contribute to SCN5A-related familial sick sinus syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhong Gui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify molecular mechanisms underlying SCN5A-related sick sinus syndrome (SSS, a rare type of SSS, in parallel experiments we elucidated the electrophysiological properties and the cell surface localization of thirteen human Na(v1.5 (hNa(v1.5 mutant channels previously linked to this disease.Mutant hNa(v1.5 channels expressed by HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp and two-microelectrode voltage clamp, respectively. HEK293 cell surface biotinylation experiments quantified the fraction of correctly targeted channel proteins. Our data suggested three distinct mutant channel subtypes: Group 1 mutants (L212P, P1298L, DelF1617, R1632H gave peak current densities and cell surface targeting indistinguishable from wild-type hNa(v1.5. Loss-of-function of these mutants resulted from altered channel kinetics, including a negative shift of steady-state inactivation and a reduced voltage dependency of open-state inactivation. Group 2 mutants (E161K, T220I, D1275N gave significantly reduced whole-cell currents due to impaired cell surface localization (D1275N, altered channel properties at unchanged cell surface localization (T220I, or a combination of both (E161K. Group 3 mutant channels were non-functional, due to an almost complete lack of protein at the plasma membrane (T187I, W1421X, K1578fs/52, R1623X or a probable gating/permeation defect with normal surface localisation (R878C, G1408R.This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms, including gating abnormalities, trafficking defects, or a combination of both, are responsible for SCN5A-related familial SSS.

  2. Investigating the contribution of VAPB/ALS8 loss of function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; El Oussini, Hajer; Bercier, Valérie; Gros-Louis, François; Valdmanis, Paul N; McDearmid, Jonathan; Mejier, Inge A; Dion, Patrick A; Dupre, Nicolas; Hollinger, David; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Camu, William; Meininger, Vincent; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; René, Frédérique; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-06-15

    The mutations P56S and T46I in the gene encoding vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B/C (VAPB) cause ALS8, a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Overexpression of mutant forms of VAPB leads to cytosolic aggregates, suggesting a gain of function of the mutant protein. However, recent work suggested that the loss of VAPB function could be the major mechanism leading to ALS8. Here, we used multiple genetic and experimental approaches to study whether VAPB loss of function might be sufficient to trigger motor neuron degeneration. In order to identify additional ALS-associated VAPB mutations, we screened the entire VAPB gene in a cohort of ALS patients and detected two mutations (A145V and S160Δ). To directly address the contribution of VAPB loss of function in ALS, we generated zebrafish and mouse models with either a decreased or a complete loss of Vapb expression. Vapb knockdown in zebrafish led to swimming deficits. Mice knocked-out for Vapb showed mild motor deficits after 18 months of age yet had innervated neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Importantly, overexpression of VAPB mutations were unable to rescue the motor deficit caused by Vapb knockdown in zebrafish and failed to cause a toxic gain-of-function defect on their own. Thus, Vapb loss of function weakens the motor system of vertebrate animal models but is on its own unable to lead to a complete ALS phenotype. Our findings are consistent with the notion that VAPB mutations constitute a risk factor for motor neuron disease through a loss of VAPB function.

  3. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J. (WU-MED)

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Towards trans-diagnostic mechanisms in psychiatry: neurobehavioral profile of rats with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Bespalov, Anton; Roßmanith, Martin; Horschitz, Sandra; Berger, Stefan; Relo, Ana L; Noori, Hamid R; Schneider, Peggy; Enkel, Thomas; Bartsch, Dusan; Schneider, Miriam; Behl, Berthold; Hansson, Anita C; Schloss, Patrick; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The research domain criteria (RDoC) matrix has been developed to reorient psychiatric research towards measurable behavioral dimensions and underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a new genetic rat model with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene ( Slc6a3 _N157K) to systematically study the RDoC matrix. First, we examined the impact of the Slc6a3 _N157K mutation on monoaminergic signaling. We then performed behavioral tests representing each of the five RDoC domains: negative and positive valence systems, cognitive, social and arousal/regulatory systems. The use of RDoC may be particularly helpful for drug development. We studied the effects of a novel pharmacological approach metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR2/3 antagonism, in DAT mutants in a comparative way with standard medications. Loss of DAT functionality in mutant rats not only elevated subcortical extracellular dopamine concentration but also altered the balance of monoaminergic transmission. DAT mutant rats showed deficits in all five RDoC domains. Thus, mutant rats failed to show conditioned fear responses, were anhedonic, were unable to learn stimulus-reward associations, showed impaired cognition and social behavior, and were hyperactive. Hyperactivity in mutant rats was reduced by amphetamine and atomoxetine, which are well-established medications to reduce hyperactivity in humans. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 also normalized hyperactivity in DAT mutant rats without affecting extracellular dopamine levels. We systematically characterized an altered dopamine system within the context of the RDoC matrix and studied mGluR2/3 antagonism as a new pharmacological strategy to treat mental disorders with underlying subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Towards trans-diagnostic mechanisms in psychiatry: neurobehavioral profile of rats with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vengeliene

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The research domain criteria (RDoC matrix has been developed to reorient psychiatric research towards measurable behavioral dimensions and underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a new genetic rat model with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT gene (Slc6a3_N157K to systematically study the RDoC matrix. First, we examined the impact of the Slc6a3_N157K mutation on monoaminergic signaling. We then performed behavioral tests representing each of the five RDoC domains: negative and positive valence systems, cognitive, social and arousal/regulatory systems. The use of RDoC may be particularly helpful for drug development. We studied the effects of a novel pharmacological approach metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR2/3 antagonism, in DAT mutants in a comparative way with standard medications. Loss of DAT functionality in mutant rats not only elevated subcortical extracellular dopamine concentration but also altered the balance of monoaminergic transmission. DAT mutant rats showed deficits in all five RDoC domains. Thus, mutant rats failed to show conditioned fear responses, were anhedonic, were unable to learn stimulus-reward associations, showed impaired cognition and social behavior, and were hyperactive. Hyperactivity in mutant rats was reduced by amphetamine and atomoxetine, which are well-established medications to reduce hyperactivity in humans. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 also normalized hyperactivity in DAT mutant rats without affecting extracellular dopamine levels. We systematically characterized an altered dopamine system within the context of the RDoC matrix and studied mGluR2/3 antagonism as a new pharmacological strategy to treat mental disorders with underlying subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity.

  6. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses....... The amyloid hypothesis has dominated the field with its assumption that buildup of pathogenic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide causes disease. This paradigm has been criticized, yet most data suggest that Aβ plays a key role in the disease. Here, a new loss-of-function hypothesis is synthesized that accounts...

  7. [Multiple sclerosis, loss of functionality and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-González, Félix; Álvarez-Roldán, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    To identify the type of support and assistance that patients with multiple sclerosis need in order to cope with the loss of functionality, and to show how gender affects the perception of these needs. Interpretative-phenomenological qualitative study. Granada (Spain). Year: 2014. Intentional sample: 30 patients and 20 family caregivers. Data were gathered from 26 interviews and 4 focus groups. The data were coded and analysed with the NVivo programme. The multiple sclerosis patients and family caregivers had different perceptions of the loss of capacity to undertake activities of daily living. Being able to self care was considered the last vestige of autonomy. The women with multiple sclerosis tried to take on the responsibility of housework, but the male caregivers became gradually involved in these tasks. Gender roles were redefined with respect to housekeeping. The multiple sclerosis patients showed a need for emotional support. Some of the men had abandoned the stereotype of the strong male as a result of the decline in their health. Adaptations in the home took place without planning them in advance. The use of mobility devices started on an occasional basis. A fear of stigma was an obstacle for regular use of assistive technology. Health care for people with multiple sclerosis should include family caregivers. Gender influences the perception that caregivers and patients have of the assistance they require to maximise their quality of life. This flags up several intervention areas for the follow-up and long-term care of these patients by the healthcare system. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss of function of C9orf72 causes motor deficits in a zebrafish model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciura, Sorana; Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Latouche, Morwena; Tostivint, Hervé; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-08-01

    To define the role that repeat expansions of a GGGGCC hexanucleotide sequence of the C9orf72 gene play in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). A genetic model for ALS was developed to determine whether loss of function of the zebrafish orthologue of C9orf72 (zC9orf72) leads to abnormalities in neuronal development. C9orf72 mRNA levels were quantified in brain and lymphoblasts derived from FTLD and ALS/FTLD patients and in zebrafish. Knockdown of the zC9orf72 was performed using 2 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to block transcription. Quantifications of spontaneous swimming and tactile escape response, as well as measurements of axonal projections from the spinal cord, were performed. Significantly decreased expression of C9orf72 transcripts in brain and lymphoblasts was found in sporadic FTLD and ALS/FTLD patients with normal-size or expanded hexanucleotide repeats. The zC9orf72 is selectively expressed in the developing nervous system at developmental stages. Loss of function of the zC9orf72 transcripts causes both behavioral and cellular deficits related to locomotion without major morphological abnormalities. These deficits were rescued upon overexpression of human C9orf72 mRNA transcripts. Our results indicate C9orf72 haploinsufficiency could be a contributing factor in the spectrum of ALS/FTLD neurodegenerative disorders. Loss of function of the zebrafish orthologue of zC9orf72 expression in zebrafish is associated with axonal degeneration of motor neurons that can be rescued by expressing human C9orf72 mRNA, highlighting the specificity of the induced phenotype. These results reveal a pathogenic consequence of decreased C9orf72 levels, supporting a loss of function mechanism of disease. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  9. The loss of function of PhaC1 is a survival mechanism that counteracts the stress caused by the overproduction of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putidaΔfadBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, José I; Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-09-01

    The poly-3-hydroxylkanoate (PHA)-overproducing mutant Pseudomonas putida U ΔfadBA (PpΔfadBA) lacks the genes encoding the main β-oxidation pathway (FadBA). This strain accumulates enormous amounts of bioplastics when cultured in chemically defined media containing PHA precursors (different n-alkanoic or n-aryl-alkanoic acids) and an additional carbon source. In medium containing glucose or 4-hydroxy-phenylacetate, the mutant does not accumulate PHAs and grows just as the wild type (P. putida U). However, when the carbon source is octanoate, growth is severely impaired, suggesting that in PpΔfadBA, the metabolic imbalance resulting from a lower rate of β-oxidation, together with the accumulation of bioplastics, causes severe physiological stress. Here, we show that PpΔfadBA efficiently counteracts this latter effect via a survival mechanism involving the introduction of spontaneous mutations that block PHA accumulation. Surprisingly, genetic analyses of the whole pha cluster revealed that these mutations occurred only in the gene encoding one of the polymerases (phaC1) and that the loss of PhaC1 function was enough to prevent PHA synthesis. The influence of these mutations on the structure of PhaC1 and the existence of a protein-protein (PhaC1-PhaC2) interaction that explains the functionality of the polymerization system are discussed herein. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and incident cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Husemoen, L L N; Thyssen, J P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) could have opposing effects on cancer risk, as mutations are associated with both 10% higher serum vitamin D levels, which may protect against cancer, and with impaired skin barrier function, which may lead to higher cancer...... (HR 1·09, 95% CI 0·61-1·94), urinary cancer (HR 1·30, 95% CI 0·51-3·29), malignant melanoma (HR 1·03, 95% CI 0·41-2·58) and NMSC (HR 0·70, 95% CI 0·47-1·05). Among participants aged over 60 years at baseline, we found statistically significant lower risks of all cancers and NMSC among FLG mutation...

  11. Mechanism Design for Incentivizing Social Media Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K.; Jain, Ramesh; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. A Game theoretic framework is proposed to study the dynamics of social media networks where contribution costs are individual but gains are common. We model users as rational selfish agents, and consider domain attributes like voluntary participation, virtual reward structure, network effect, and public-sharing to model the dynamics of this interaction. The created model describes the most appropriate contribution strategy from each user's perspective and also highlights issues like 'free-rider' problem and individual rationality leading to irrational (i.e. sub-optimal) group behavior. We also consider the perspective of the system designer who is interested in finding the best incentive mechanisms to influence the selfish end-users so that the overall system utility is maximized. We propose and compare multiple mechanisms (based on optimal bonus payment, social incentive leveraging, and second price auction) to study how a system designer can exploit the selfishness of its users, to design incentive mechanisms which improve the overall task-completion probability and system performance, while possibly still benefiting the individual users.

  12. Generation of mice harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Stephen A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The zinc finger transcription factor GATA6 is believed to have important roles in the development of several organs including the liver, gastrointestinal tract and heart. However, analyses of the contribution of GATA6 toward organogenesis have been hampered because Gata6-/- mice fail to develop beyond gastrulation due to defects in extraembryonic endoderm function. We have therefore generated a mouse line harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6 using Cre/loxP technology. LoxP elements were introduced into introns flanking exon 2 of the Gata6 gene by homologous recombination in ES cells. Mice containing this altered allele were bred to homozygosity and were found to be viable and fertile. To assess the functional integrity of the loxP sites and to confirm that we had generated a Gata6 loss-of-function allele, we bred Gata6 'floxed' mice to EIIa-Cre mice in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, and to Villin-Cre mice that express Cre in the epithelial cells of the intestine. We conclude that we have generated a line of mice in which GATA6 activity can be ablated in a cell type specific manner by expression of Cre recombinase. This line of mice can be used to establish the role of GATA6 in regulating embryonic development and various aspects of mammalian physiology.

  13. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth's interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges

  14. Gain and loss of function of ALS-related mutations of TARDBP (TDP-43) cause motor deficits in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Lin, Li; Tradewell, Miranda L; Dion, Patrick A; Bercier, Valérie; Bourgouin, Patrick; Rochefort, Daniel; Bel Hadj, Samar; Durham, Heather D; Vande Velde, Christine; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2010-02-15

    TDP-43 has been found in inclusion bodies of multiple neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the TDP-43 encoding gene, TARDBP, have been subsequently reported in sporadic and familial ALS patients. In order to investigate the pathogenic nature of these mutants, the effects of three consistently reported TARDBP mutations (A315T, G348C and A382T) were tested in cell lines, primary cultured motor neurons and living zebrafish embryos. Each of the three mutants and wild-type (WT) human TDP-43 localized to nuclei when expressed in COS1 and Neuro2A cells by transient transfection. However, when expressed in motor neurons from dissociated spinal cord cultures these mutant TARDBP alleles, but less so for WT TARDBP, were neurotoxic, concomitant with perinuclear localization and aggregation of TDP-43. Finally, overexpression of mutant, but less so of WT, human TARDBP caused a motor phenotype in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos consisting of shorter motor neuronal axons, premature and excessive branching as well as swimming deficits. Interestingly, knock-down of zebrafisfh tardbp led to a similar phenotype, which was rescued by co-expressing WT but not mutant human TARDBP. Together these approaches showed that TARDBP mutations cause motor neuron defects and toxicity, suggesting that both a toxic gain of function as well as a novel loss of function may be involved in the molecular mechanism by which mutant TDP-43 contributes to disease pathogenesis.

  15. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase.

  16. Instanton contributions in reggeon quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciafaloni, M.

    1978-01-01

    The full semiclassical approximation to reggeon field theory without transverse dimensions is derived. By using Polyakov's method in Lagrangian form and paying due attention to the quantum terms of the potential it is shown that instanton contributions are able to explain the tunnel-like energy gap for α(0)-1>>lambda. (Auth.)

  17. Target genes of myostatin loss-of-function in muscles of late bovine fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocquette Jean-François

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myostatin, a muscle-specific member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta family, negatively regulates muscle development. Double-muscled (DM cattle have a loss-of-function mutation in their myostatin gene responsible for the hypermuscular phenotype. Thus, these animals are a good model for understanding the mechanisms underpinning muscular hypertrophy. In order to identify individual genes or networks that may be myostatin targets, we looked for genes that were differentially expressed between DM and normal (NM animals (n = 3 per group in the semitendinosus muscle (hypertrophied in DM animals at 260 days of fetal development (when the biochemical differentiation of muscle is intensive. A heterologous microarray (human and murine oligonucleotide sequences of around 6,000 genes expressed in muscle was used. Results Many genes were found to be differentially expressed according to genetic type (some with a more than 5-fold change, and according to the presence of one or two functional myostatin allele(s. They belonged to various functional categories. The genes down-regulated in DM fetuses were mainly those encoding extracellular matrix proteins, slow contractile proteins and ribosomal proteins. The genes up-regulated in DM fetuses were mainly involved in the regulation of transcription, cell cycle/apoptosis, translation or DNA metabolism. These data highlight features indicating that DM muscle is shifted towards a more glycolytic metabolism, and has an altered extracellular matrix composition (e.g. down-regulation of COL1A1 and COL1A2, and up-regulation of COL4A2 and decreased adipocyte differentiation (down-regulation of C1QTNF3. The altered gene expression in the three major muscle compartments (fibers, connective tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue is consistent with the well-known characteristics of DM cattle. In addition, novel potential targets of the myostatin gene were identified (MB, PLN, troponins, ZFHX1B

  18. Common loss-of-function variants of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin are a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Colin N A; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana

    2006-01-01

    most genetic studies have focused on immunological mechanisms, a primary epithelial barrier defect has been anticipated. Filaggrin is a key protein that facilitates terminal differentiation of the epidermis and formation of the skin barrier. Here we show that two independent loss-of-function genetic...... variants (R510X and 2282del4) in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are very strong predisposing factors for atopic dermatitis. These variants are carried by approximately 9% of people of European origin. These variants also show highly significant association with asthma occurring in the context of atopic...

  19. Loss of function JAK1 mutations occur at high frequency in cancers with microsatellite instability and are suggestive of immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacker, Lee A; Wu, Jeremy; Smith, Peter; Warmuth, Markus; Stephens, Philip J; Zhu, Ping; Yu, Lihua; Chmielecki, Juliann

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion is a well-recognized hallmark of cancer and recent studies with immunotherapy agents have suggested that tumors with increased numbers of neoantigens elicit greater immune responses. We hypothesized that the immune system presents a common selective pressure on high mutation burden tumors and therefore immune evasion mutations would be enriched in high mutation burden tumors. The JAK family of kinases is required for the signaling of a host of immune modulators in tumor, stromal, and immune cells. Therefore, we analyzed alterations in this family for the hypothesized signature of an immune evasion mutation. Here, we searched a database of 61,704 unique solid tumors for alterations in the JAK family kinases (JAK1/2/3, TYK2). We used The Cancer Genome Atlas and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data to confirm and extend our findings by analyzing gene expression patterns. Recurrent frameshift mutations in JAK1 were associated with high mutation burden and microsatellite instability. These mutations occurred in multiple tumor types including endometrial, colorectal, stomach, and prostate carcinomas. Analyzing gene expression signatures in endometrial and stomach adenocarcinomas revealed that tumors with a JAK1 frameshift exhibited reduced expression of interferon response signatures and multiple anti-tumor immune signatures. Importantly, endometrial cancer cell lines exhibited similar gene expression changes that were expected to be tumor cell intrinsic (e.g. interferon response) but not those expected to be tumor cell extrinsic (e.g. NK cells). From these data, we derive two primary conclusions: 1) JAK1 frameshifts are loss of function alterations that represent a potential pan-cancer adaptation to immune responses against tumors with microsatellite instability; 2) The mechanism by which JAK1 loss of function contributes to tumor immune evasion is likely associated with loss of the JAK1-mediated interferon response.

  20. Duplication and Loss of Function of Genes Encoding RNA Polymerase III Subunit C4 Causes Hybrid Incompatibility in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive barriers are commonly observed in both animals and plants, in which they maintain species integrity and contribute to speciation. This report shows that a combination of loss-of-function alleles at two duplicated loci, DUPLICATED GAMETOPHYTIC STERILITY 1 (DGS1 on chromosome 4 and DGS2 on chromosome 7, causes pollen sterility in hybrid progeny derived from an interspecific cross between cultivated rice, Oryza sativa, and an Asian annual wild rice, O. nivara. Male gametes carrying the DGS1 allele from O. nivara (DGS1-nivaras and the DGS2 allele from O. sativa (DGS2-T65s were sterile, but female gametes carrying the same genotype were fertile. We isolated the causal gene, which encodes a protein homologous to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP III subunit C4 (RPC4. RPC4 facilitates the transcription of 5S rRNAs and tRNAs. The loss-of-function alleles at DGS1-nivaras and DGS2-T65s were caused by weak or nonexpression of RPC4 and an absence of RPC4, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that gene duplication of RPC4 at DGS1 and DGS2 was a recent event that occurred after divergence of the ancestral population of Oryza from other Poaceae or during diversification of AA-genome species.

  1. Loss-of-Function Sodium Channel Mutations in Infancy A Pattern Unfolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of channelopathies in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with structurally normal hearts is a rapidly evolving story.(1) Many ion channels are involved, including loss-of-function sodium channelopathies of which the phenotypic spectrum ranges from lethal arrhythmias

  2. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of loss-of-function cardiac sodium channelopathies in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Rammeloo, Lukas A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Blom, Nico A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Loss-of-function sodium channelopathies manifest as a spectrum of diseases including Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease. OBJECTIVE To analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these disorders in children. METHODS Patients aged <= 16 years with genetically

  3. Genotype-phenotype associations in filaggrin loss-of-function mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeck, Lilla; Visser, Maaike; Kezic, Sanja; John, Swen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) have been reported to be associated with specific phenotypic characteristics such as hyperlinearity and keratosis pilaris. To study phenotypic features in patients with occupational irritant contact eczema of the hands in relation to FLG

  4. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin ge...

  5. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Claire; Ribes, Sandy; Wu, Yong; Diallo, Mamadou Tidiane; Salmon, Benjamin; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Houillier, Pascal; Müller, Dominik; Chaussain, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ) permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL). Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC), were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI). In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO) mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  6. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bardet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL. Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC, were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI. In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  7. Contributions to mechanics Markus Reiner eightieth anniversary volume

    CERN Document Server

    Abir, David

    1969-01-01

    Contributions to Mechanics presents a biographical survey of Professor Markus Reiner's life. This book is a manifestation of affection and esteem to Professor Reiner, expressed by various authors who eagerly contributed original works in the field of mechanics. Organized into five parts encompassing 26 chapters, this book begins with a biographical article of Professor Markus Reiner that includes a detailed account of his works. This text then explores the approach for the interpretation of certain features commonly accepted in quantum theory on the basis of its mathematical formalism. Other c

  8. Loss of function of ATXN1 increases amyloid beta-protein levels by potentiating beta-secretase processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; Divito, Jason R; Stevenson, Jesse A; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2010-03-19

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with complex and strong genetic inheritance. Four genes have been established to either cause familial early onset AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) or to increase susceptibility for late onset AD (APOE). To date approximately 80% of the late onset AD genetic variance remains elusive. Recently our genome-wide association screen identified four novel late onset AD candidate genes. Ataxin 1 (ATXN1) is one of these four AD candidate genes and has been indicated to be the disease gene for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which is also a neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence suggests that the excessive accumulation of Abeta, the proteolytic product of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the primary AD pathological event. In this study, we ask whether ATXN1 may lead to AD pathogenesis by affecting Abeta and APP processing utilizing RNA interference in a human neuronal cell model and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show that knock-down of ATXN1 significantly increases the levels of both Abeta40 and Abeta42. This effect could be rescued with concurrent overexpression of ATXN1. Moreover, overexpression of ATXN1 decreased Abeta levels. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanism, we show that the effect of ATXN1 expression on Abeta levels is modulated via beta-secretase cleavage of APP. Taken together, ATXN1 functions as a genetic risk modifier that contributes to AD pathogenesis through a loss-of-function mechanism by regulating beta-secretase cleavage of APP and Abeta levels.

  9. Loss of Function of ATXN1 Increases Amyloid β-Protein Levels by Potentiating β-Secretase Processing of β-Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; DiVito, Jason R.; Stevenson, Jesse A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with complex and strong genetic inheritance. Four genes have been established to either cause familial early onset AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) or to increase susceptibility for late onset AD (APOE). To date ∼80% of the late onset AD genetic variance remains elusive. Recently our genome-wide association screen identified four novel late onset AD candidate genes. Ataxin 1 (ATXN1) is one of these four AD candidate genes and has been indicated to be the disease gene for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which is also a neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence suggests that the excessive accumulation of Aβ, the proteolytic product of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the primary AD pathological event. In this study, we ask whether ATXN1 may lead to AD pathogenesis by affecting Aβ and APP processing utilizing RNA interference in a human neuronal cell model and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show that knock-down of ATXN1 significantly increases the levels of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. This effect could be rescued with concurrent overexpression of ATXN1. Moreover, overexpression of ATXN1 decreased Aβ levels. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanism, we show that the effect of ATXN1 expression on Aβ levels is modulated via β-secretase cleavage of APP. Taken together, ATXN1 functions as a genetic risk modifier that contributes to AD pathogenesis through a loss-of-function mechanism by regulating β-secretase cleavage of APP and Aβ levels. PMID:20097758

  10. Loss-of-function mutations in SLC30A8 protect against type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannick, Jason; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Beer, Nicola L; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Grarup, Niels; Burtt, Noël P; Mahajan, Anubha; Fuchsberger, Christian; Atzmon, Gil; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blangero, John; Bowden, Don W; Brandslund, Ivan; Brosnan, Julia; Burslem, Frank; Chambers, John; Cho, Yoon Shin; Christensen, Cramer; Douglas, Desirée A; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dymek, Zachary; Farjoun, Yossi; Fennell, Timothy; Fontanillas, Pierre; Forsén, Tom; Gabriel, Stacey; Glaser, Benjamin; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hanis, Craig; Hansen, Torben; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Hveem, Kristian; Ingelsson, Erik; Isomaa, Bo; Johansson, Stefan; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal; Kravic, Jasmina; Laakso, Markku; Lee, Jong-Young; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Linneberg, Allan; Masson, Gisli; Meitinger, Thomas; Mohlke, Karen L; Molven, Anders; Morris, Andrew P; Potluri, Shobha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Richard, Ann-Marie; Rolph, Tim; Salomaa, Veikko; Segrè, Ayellet V; Skärstrand, Hanna; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Sulem, Patrick; Tai, E Shyong; Teo, Yik Ying; Teslovich, Tanya; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Trimmer, Jeff K; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Voight, Benjamin F; Wilson, James G; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Njølstad, Pål R; Pedersen, Oluf; Groop, Leif; Cox, David R; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David

    2014-04-01

    Loss-of-function mutations protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets, but none have yet been described for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Through sequencing or genotyping of ~150,000 individuals across 5 ancestry groups, we identified 12 rare protein-truncating variants in SLC30A8, which encodes an islet zinc transporter (ZnT8) and harbors a common variant (p.Trp325Arg) associated with T2D risk and glucose and proinsulin levels. Collectively, carriers of protein-truncating variants had 65% reduced T2D risk (P = 1.7 × 10(-6)), and non-diabetic Icelandic carriers of a frameshift variant (p.Lys34Serfs*50) demonstrated reduced glucose levels (-0.17 s.d., P = 4.6 × 10(-4)). The two most common protein-truncating variants (p.Arg138* and p.Lys34Serfs*50) individually associate with T2D protection and encode unstable ZnT8 proteins. Previous functional study of SLC30A8 suggested that reduced zinc transport increases T2D risk, and phenotypic heterogeneity was observed in mouse Slc30a8 knockouts. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in humans provide strong evidence that SLC30A8 haploinsufficiency protects against T2D, suggesting ZnT8 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in T2D prevention.

  11. Loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1 and risk of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Liv Tybjærg; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    .2%) versus AA (99.8%) was associated with a 13% lower plasma level of apoE (P = 1 × 10(-11)). Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for N1800H AC versus AA were 4.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-12.9) for AD, 2.46 (1.10-5.50) for cerebrovascular disease, and 8.28 (2.03-33.7) for the hemorrhagic stroke......-brain barrier via apoE-mediated pathways. METHODS: We tested whether a loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1, N1800H, is associated with plasma levels of apoE and with risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in 92,726 individuals and with risk of cerebrovascular disease in 64,181 individuals. RESULTS: N1800H AC (0...... subtype. DISCUSSION: A loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1, present in 1:500 individuals, was associated with low plasma levels of apoE and with high risk of AD and cerebrovascular disease in the general population....

  12. Association between loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Fenger, Runa V; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy.......Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy....

  13. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes of stomatocytosis mutant RhAG F65S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Rivera, Alicia; Heneghan, John F.; Li, Xiaojin; Hsu, Ann; Karpatkin, Margaret; O'Neill, Allison F.; Bauer, Daniel E.; Heeney, Matthew M.; John, Kathryn; Kuypers, Frans A.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Lux, Samuel E.; Brugnara, Carlo; Westhoff, Connie M.

    2011-01-01

    Four patients with overhydrated cation leak stomatocytosis (OHSt) exhibited the heterozygous RhAG missense mutation F65S. OHSt erythrocytes were osmotically fragile, with elevated Na and decreased K contents and increased cation channel-like activity. Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type RhAG and RhAG F65S exhibited increased ouabain and bumetanide-resistant uptake of Li+ and 86Rb+, with secondarily increased 86Rb+ influx sensitive to ouabain and to bumetanide. Increased RhAG-associated 14C-methylammonium (MA) influx was severely reduced in RhAG F65S-expressing oocytes. RhAG-associated influxes of Li+, 86Rb+, and 14C-MA were pharmacologically distinct, and Li+ uptakes associated with RhAG and RhAG F65S were differentially inhibited by NH4+ and Gd3+. RhAG-expressing oocytes were acidified and depolarized by 5 mM bath NH3/NH4+, but alkalinized and depolarized by subsequent bath exposure to 5 mM methylammonium chloride (MA/MA+). RhAG F65S-expressing oocytes exhibited near-wild-type responses to NH4Cl, but MA/MA+ elicited attenuated alkalinization and strong hyperpolarization. Expression of RhAG or RhAG F65S increased steady-state cation currents unaltered by bath Li+ substitution or bath addition of 5 mM NH4Cl or MA/MA+. These oocyte studies suggest that 1) RhAG expression increases oocyte transport of NH3/NH4+ and MA/MA+; 2) RhAG F65S exhibits gain-of-function phenotypes of increased cation conductance/permeability, and loss-of-function phenotypes of decreased and modified MA/MA+ transport, and decreased NH3/NH4+-associated depolarization; and 3) RhAG transports NH3/NH4+ and MA/MA+ by distinct mechanisms, and/or the substrates elicit distinct cellular responses. Thus, RhAG F65S is a loss-of-function mutation for amine transport. The altered oocyte intracellular pH, membrane potential, and currents associated with RhAG or RhAG F65S expression may reflect distinct transport mechanisms. PMID:21849667

  14. Loss-of-function mutations in co-chaperone BAG3 destabilize small HSPs and cause cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xi; Bogomolovas, Julius; Wu, Tongbin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Canzhao; Veevers, Jennifer; Stroud, Matthew J; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaolong; Mu, Yongxin; Lao, Dieu-Hung; Dalton, Nancy D; Gu, Yusu; Wang, Celine; Wang, Michael; Liang, Yan; Lange, Stephan; Ouyang, Kunfu; Peterson, Kirk L; Evans, Sylvia M; Chen, Ju

    2017-08-01

    Defective protein quality control (PQC) systems are implicated in multiple diseases. Molecular chaperones and co-chaperones play a central role in functioning PQC. Constant mechanical and metabolic stress in cardiomyocytes places great demand on the PQC system. Mutation and downregulation of the co-chaperone protein BCL-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) are associated with cardiac myopathy and heart failure, and a BAG3 E455K mutation leads to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, the role of BAG3 in the heart and the mechanisms by which the E455K mutation leads to DCM remain obscure. Here, we found that cardiac-specific Bag3-KO and E455K-knockin mice developed DCM. Comparable phenotypes in the 2 mutants demonstrated that the E455K mutation resulted in loss of function. Further experiments revealed that the E455K mutation disrupted the interaction between BAG3 and HSP70. In both mutants, decreased levels of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) were observed, and a subset of proteins required for cardiomyocyte function was enriched in the insoluble fraction. Together, these observations suggest that interaction between BAG3 and HSP70 is essential for BAG3 to stabilize sHSPs and maintain cardiomyocyte protein homeostasis. Our results provide insight into heart failure caused by defects in BAG3 pathways and suggest that increasing BAG3 protein levels may be of therapeutic benefit in heart failure.

  15. Differential regulation of two FLNA transcripts explains some of the phenotypic heterogeneity in the loss-of-function filaminopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Zandra A; Macharg, Alison; Chang, Cheng-Yee; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Morgan, Tim; Frentz, Sophia; Wei, Wenhua; Pilch, Jacek; Hannibal, Mark; Foulds, Nicola; McGillivray, George; Leventer, Richard J; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Sugito, Stuart; Nightingale, Scott; Markie, David M; Dudding, Tracy; Kapur, Raj P; Robertson, Stephen P

    2018-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene FLNA can lead to abnormal neuronal migration, vascular and cardiac defects, and congenital intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), the latter characterized by anomalous intestinal smooth muscle layering. Survival in male hemizygotes for such mutations is dependent on retention of residual FLNA function but it is unclear why a subgroup of males with mutations in the 5' end of the gene can present with CIPO alone. Here, we demonstrate evidence for the presence of two FLNA isoforms differing by 28 residues at the N-terminus initiated at ATG +1 and ATG +82 . A male with CIPO (c.18_19del) exclusively expressed FLNA ATG +82 , implicating the longer protein isoform (ATG +1 ) in smooth muscle development. In contrast, mutations leading to reduction of both isoforms are associated with compound phenotypes affecting the brain, heart, and intestine. RNA-seq data revealed three distinct transcription start sites, two of which produce a protein isoform utilizing ATG +1 while the third utilizes ATG +82 . Transcripts sponsoring translational initiation at ATG +1 predominate in intestinal smooth muscle, and are more abundant compared with the level measured in fibroblasts. Together these observations describe a new mechanism of tissue-specific regulation of FLNA that could reflect the differing mechanical requirements of these cell types during development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-05-12

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents.

  17. IKs Gain- and Loss-of-Function In Early-Onset Lone Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Annette Buur; Refsgaard, Lena; Andersen, Martin Nybo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. The potassium current IKs is essential for cardiac repolarization. Gain-of-function mutation in KCNQ1, the gene encoding the pore-forming α-subunit of the IKs channel (KV 7.1), was the first ion channel dysfunction...... to be associated with familial AF. We hypothesized that early-onset lone AF is associated with a high prevalence of mutations in KCNQ1. METHODS AND RESULTS: We bidirectionally sequenced the entire coding sequence of KCNQ1 in 209 unrelated patients with early-onset lone AF (...-of-function phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: Mutations in the IKs channel leading to gain-of-function have previously been described in familial AF, yet this is the first time a loss-of-function mutation in KCNQ1 is associated with early-onset lone AF. These findings suggest that both gain-of function and loss...

  18. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability. 1 Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy. 2-5 The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology, neuroimaging

  19. Biallelic Loss of Function of SORL1 in an Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guennec, Kilan; Tubeuf, Hélène; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David; Quenez, Olivier; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Deleuze, Jean-François; Boland, Anne; Frebourg, Thierry; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Campion, Dominique; Martins, Alexandra; Nicolas, Gaël

    2018-01-01

    Heterozygous SORL1 protein truncating variants (PTV) are a strong risk factor for early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). In case control studies performed at the genome-wide level, PTV definition is usually straightforward. Regarding splice site variants, only those affecting canonical sites are typically included. Some other variants, not annotated as PTV, could, however, affect splicing and hence result in a loss of SORL1 function. We took advantage of the whole exome sequencing data from the 9/484 patients with a previously reported SORL1 PTV in the French EOAD series and searched for a second variant which may affect splicing and eventually result in more than 50% loss of function overall. We found that one patient, known to carry a variant predicted to disrupt the canonical 5' splice site of exon 8, also carried a second novel intronic variant predicted to affect SORL1 splicing of exon 29. Segregation analysis showed that the second variant was located in trans from the known PTV. We performed ex vivo minigene splicing assays and showed that both variants led to the generation of transcripts containing a premature stop codon. This is therefore the first evidence of a human carrying biallelic SORL1 PTV. This patient had a family history of dementia in both maternal and paternal lineages with later ages of onset than the proband himself. However, his 55 years age at onset was in the same ranges as previously published SORL1 heterozygous PTV carriers. This suggests that biallelic loss of SORL1 function is an extremely rare event that was not associated with a dramatically earlier age at onset than heterozygous SORL1 loss-of-function variant carriers, in this single patient.

  20. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine T Lim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5% variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸ including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷. Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴, demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health

  1. Loss of function mutations in EPHB4 are responsible for vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Alexandre; Ozanne, Augustin; Grondin, Cynthia; Saliou, Guillaume; Quevarec, Loic; Maurey, Helène; Aubourg, Patrick; Benachi, Alexandra; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Martinovic, Jelena; Sénat, Marie Victoire; Tawk, Marcel; Melki, Judith

    2018-04-01

    See Meschia (doi:10.1093/brain/awy066) for a scientific commentary on this article.Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation is a congenital anomaly of the cerebral vasculature representing 30% of all paediatric vascular malformations. We conducted whole exome sequencing in 19 unrelated patients presenting this malformation and subsequently screened candidate genes in a cohort of 32 additional patients using either targeted exome or Sanger sequencing. In a cohort of 51 patients, we found five affected individuals with heterozygous mutations in EPHB4 including de novo frameshift (p.His191Alafs*32) or inherited deleterious splice or missense mutations predicted to be pathogenic by in silico tools. Knockdown of ephb4 in zebrafish embryos leads to specific anomalies of dorsal cranial vessels including the dorsal longitudinal vein, which is the orthologue of the median prosencephalic vein and the embryonic precursor of the vein of Galen. This model allowed us to investigate EPHB4 loss-of-function mutations in this disease by the ability to rescue the brain vascular defect in knockdown zebrafish co-injected with wild-type, but not truncated EPHB4, mimicking the p.His191Alafs mutation. Our data showed that in both species, loss of function mutations of EPHB4 result in specific and similar brain vascular development anomalies. Recently, EPHB4 germline mutations have been reported in non-immune hydrops fetalis and in cutaneous capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation. Here, we show that EPHB4 mutations are also responsible for vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation, indicating that heterozygous germline mutations of EPHB4 result in a large clinical spectrum. The identification of EPHB4 pathogenic mutations in patients presenting capillary malformation or vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation should lead to careful follow-up of pregnancy of carriers for early detection of anomaly of the cerebral vasculature in order to propose optimal neonatal care. Endovascular

  2. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Rapid Generation of Human Genetic Loss-of-Function iPSC Lines by Simultaneous Reprogramming and Gene Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Tidball

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Specifically ablating genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs allows for studies of gene function as well as disease mechanisms in disorders caused by loss-of-function (LOF mutations. While techniques exist for engineering such lines, we have developed and rigorously validated a method of simultaneous iPSC reprogramming while generating CRISPR/Cas9-dependent insertions/deletions (indels. This approach allows for the efficient and rapid formation of genetic LOF human disease cell models with isogenic controls. The rate of mutagenized lines was strikingly consistent across experiments targeting four different human epileptic encephalopathy genes and a metabolic enzyme-encoding gene, and was more efficient and consistent than using CRISPR gene editing of established iPSC lines. The ability of our streamlined method to reproducibly generate heterozygous and homozygous LOF iPSC lines with passage-matched isogenic controls in a single step provides for the rapid development of LOF disease models with ideal control lines, even in the absence of patient tissue.

  4. Drosophila PINK1 and parkin loss-of-function mutants display a range of non-motor Parkinson's disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julienne, Hannah; Buhl, Edgar; Leslie, David S; Hodge, James J L

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is more commonly associated with its motor symptoms and the related degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that PD patients also display a wide range of non-motor symptoms, including memory deficits and disruptions of their sleep-wake cycles. These have a large impact on their quality of life, and often precede the onset of motor symptoms, but their etiology is poorly understood. The fruit fly Drosophila has already been successfully used to model PD, and has been used extensively to study relevant non-motor behaviours in other contexts, but little attention has yet been paid to modelling non-motor symptoms of PD in this genetically tractable organism. We examined memory performance and circadian rhythms in flies with loss-of-function mutations in two PD genes: PINK1 and parkin. We found learning and memory abnormalities in both mutant genotypes, as well as a weakening of circadian rhythms that is underpinned by electrophysiological changes in clock neurons. Our study paves the way for further work that may help us understand the mechanisms underlying these neglected aspects of PD, thus identifying new targets for treatments to address these non-motor problems specifically and perhaps even to halt disease progression in its prodromal phase. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms That Contribute to Bone Marrow Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Ivanusic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated a bony pathology puts a significant burden on individuals, society, and the health-care systems worldwide. Pathology that involves the bone marrow activates sensory nerve terminal endings of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors, and is the likely trigger for pain. This review presents our current understanding of how bone marrow nociceptors are influenced by noxious stimuli presented in pathology associated with bone marrow. A number of ion channels and receptors are emerging as important modulators of the activity of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors. Nerve growth factor (NGF sequestration has been trialed for the management of inflammatory bone pain (osteoarthritis, and there is significant evidence for interaction of NGF with bone marrow nociceptors. Activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 sensitizes bone marrow nociceptors and could contribute to increased sensitivity of patients to noxious stimuli in various bony pathologies. Acid-sensing ion channels sense changes to tissue pH in the bone marrow microenvironment and could be targeted to treat pathology that involves acidosis of the bone marrow. Piezo2 is a mechanically gated ion channel that has recently been reported to be expressed by most myelinated bone marrow nociceptors and might be a target for treatments directed against mechanically induced bone pain. These ion channels and receptors could be useful targets for the development of peripherally acting drugs to treat pain of bony origin.

  7. Loss of Functional Photosystem II Reaction Centres in Zooxanthellae of Corals Exposed to Bleaching Conditions: Using Fluorescence Rise Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R; Larkum, A W D; Frankart, C; Kühl, M; Ralph, P J

    2004-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching is linked to elevated sea surface temperatures, 1-2 degrees C above average, during periods of intense light. These conditions induce the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the coral host in response to photosynthetic damage in the algal symbionts. The mechanism that triggers this release has not been clearly established and to further our knowledge of this process, fluorescence rise kinetics have been studied for the first time. Corals that were exposed to elevated temperature (33 degrees C) and light (280 mumol photons m(-2) s(-1)), showed distinct changes in the fast polyphasic induction of chlorophyll-a fluorescence, indicating biophysical changes in the photochemical processes. The fluorescence rise over the first 2000ms was monitored in three species of corals for up to 8 h, with a PEA fluorometer and an imaging-PAM. Pocillopora damicornis showed the least impact on photosynthetic apparatus, while Acropora nobilis was the most sensitive, with Cyphastrea serailia intermediate between the other two species. A. nobilis showed a remarkable capacity for recovery from bleaching conditions. For all three species, a steady decline in the slope of the initial rise and the height of the J-transient was observed, indicating the loss of functional Photosystem II (PS II) centres under elevated-temperature conditions. A significant loss of PS II centres was confirmed by a decline in photochemical quenching when exposed to bleaching stress. Non-photochemical quenching was identified as a significant mechanism for dissipating excess energy as heat under the bleaching conditions. Photophosphorylation could explain this decline in PS II activity. State transitions, a component of non-photochemical quenching, was a probable cause of the high non-photochemical quenching during bleaching and this mechanism is associated with the phosphorylation-induced dissociation of the light harvesting complexes from the PS II reaction centres. This reversible process may

  8. Loss-of-Function Mutations in APOC3, Triglycerides, and Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma triglyceride levels are heritable and are correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Sequencing of the protein-coding regions of the human genome (the exome) has the potential to identify rare mutations that have a large effect on phenotype. Methods We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 18,666 genes in each of 3734 participants of European or African ancestry in the Exome Sequencing Project. We conducted tests to determine whether rare mutations in coding sequence, individually or in aggregate within a gene, were associated with plasma triglyceride levels. For mutations associated with triglyceride levels, we subsequently evaluated their association with the risk of coronary heart disease in 110,970 persons. Results An aggregate of rare mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) was associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels. Among the four mutations that drove this result, three were loss-of-function mutations: a nonsense mutation (R19X) and two splice-site mutations (IVS2+1G→A and IVS3+1G→T). The fourth was a missense mutation (A43T). Approximately 1 in 150 persons in the study was a heterozygous carrier of at least one of these four mutations. Triglyceride levels in the carriers were 39% lower than levels in noncarriers (Ptriglycerides and APOC3. Carriers of these mutations were found to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.) PMID:24941081

  9. Loss-of-Function FANCL Mutations Associate with Severe Fanconi Anemia Overlapping the VACTERL Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Annalisa; Iascone, Maria; Limongelli, Ivan; Ameziane, Najim; Gana, Simone; Della Mina, Erika; Giussani, Ursula; Ciccone, Roberto; Forlino, Antonella; Pezzoli, Laura; Rooimans, Martin A; van Essen, Antoni J; Messa, Jole; Rizzuti, Tommaso; Bianchi, Paolo; Dorsman, Josephine; de Winter, Johan P; Lalatta, Faustina; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of VACTERL syndrome can be elusive, especially in the prenatal life, due to the presence of malformations that overlap those present in other genetic conditions, including the Fanconi anemia (FA). We report on three VACTERL cases within two families, where the two who arrived to be born died shortly after birth due to severe organs' malformations. The suspicion of VACTERL association was based on prenatal ultrasound assessment and postnatal features. Subsequent chromosome breakage analysis suggested the diagnosis of FA. Finally, by next-generation sequencing based on the analysis of the exome in one family and of a panel of Fanconi genes in the second one, we identified novel FANCL truncating mutations in both families. We used ectopic expression of wild-type FANCL to functionally correct the cellular FA phenotype for both mutations. Our study emphasizes that the diagnosis of FA should be considered when VACTERL association is suspected. Furthermore, we show that loss-of-function mutations in FANCL result in a severe clinical phenotype characterized by early postnatal death. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Biallelic loss-of-function variants in DOCK3 cause muscle hypotonia, ataxia, and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, K L; Mroske, C; Moorthy, D; Sajan, S A; Velinov, M

    2017-10-01

    DOCK3 encodes the dedicator of cytokinesis 3 protein, a member of the DOCK180 family of proteins that are characterized by guanine-nucleotide exchange factor activity. DOCK3 is expressed exclusively in the central nervous system and plays an important role in axonal outgrowth and cytoskeleton reorganization. Dock3 knockout mice exhibit motor deficiencies with abnormal ataxic gait and impaired learning. We report 2 siblings with biallelic loss-of-function variants in DOCK3. Diagnostic whole-exome sequencing (WES) and chromosomal microarray were performed on a proband with severe developmental disability, hypotonia, and ataxic gait. Testing was also performed on the proband's similarly affected brother. A paternally inherited 458 kb deletion in chromosomal region 3p21.2 disrupting the DOCK3 gene was identified in both affected siblings. WES identified a nonsense variant c.382C>G (p.Gln128*) in the DOCK3 gene (NM_004947) on the maternal allele in both siblings. Common features in both affected individuals include severe developmental disability, ataxic gait, and severe hypotonia, which recapitulates the Dock3 knockout mouse phenotype. We show that complete DOCK3 deficiency in humans leads to developmental disability with significant hypotonia and gait ataxia, probably due to abnormal axonal development. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Natural Arabidopsis brx loss-of-function alleles confer root adaptation to acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujas, Bojan; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Hardtke, Christian S

    2012-10-23

    Soil acidification is a major agricultural problem that negatively affects crop yield. Root systems counteract detrimental passive proton influx from acidic soil through increased proton pumping into the apoplast, which is presumably also required for cell elongation and stimulated by auxin. Here, we found an unexpected impact of extracellular pH on auxin activity and cell proliferation rate in the root meristem of two Arabidopsis mutants with impaired auxin perception, axr3 and brx. Surprisingly, neutral to slightly alkaline media rescued their severely reduced root (meristem) growth by stimulating auxin signaling, independent of auxin uptake. The finding that proton pumps are hyperactive in brx roots could explain this phenomenon and is consistent with more robust growth and increased fitness of brx mutants on overly acidic media or soil. Interestingly, the original brx allele was isolated from a natural stock center accession collected from acidic soil. Our discovery of a novel brx allele in accessions recently collected from another acidic sampling site demonstrates the existence of independently maintained brx loss-of-function alleles in nature and supports the notion that they are advantageous in acidic soil pH conditions, a finding that might be exploited for crop breeding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A loss-of-function mutation in the nucleoporin AtNUP160 indicates that normal auxin signalling is required for a proper ethylene response in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Linda M.; Deslauriers, Stephen D.; Alvarez, Ashley A.; Larsen, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to elucidate mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of ethylene signalling, an Arabidopsis mutant with an enhanced ethylene response was identified. Subsequent characterization of this loss-of-function mutant revealed severe hypocotyl shortening in the presence of saturating ethylene along with increased expression in leaves of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes. It was subsequently determined by map-based cloning that the mutant (sar1-7) represents a loss-of-function mutation in the previously described nucleoporin AtNUP160 (At1g33410, SAR1). In support of previously reported results, the sar1-7 mutant partially restored auxin responsiveness to roots of an rce1 loss-of-function mutant, indicating that AtNUP160/SAR1 is required for proper expression of factors responsible for the repression of auxin signalling. Analysis of arf7-1/sar1-7 and arf19-1/sar1-7 double mutants revealed that mutations affecting either ARF7 or ARF19 function almost fully blocked manifestation of the sar1-7-dependent ethylene hypersensitivity phenotype, suggesting that ARF7- and ARF19-mediated auxin signalling is responsible for regulating the magnitude of and/or competence for the ethylene response in Arabidopsis etiolated hypocotyls. Consistent with this, addition of auxin to ethylene-treated seedlings resulted in severe hypocotyl shortening, reminiscent of that seen for other eer (enhanced ethylene response) mutants, suggesting that auxin functions in part synergistically with ethylene to control hypocotyl elongation and other ethylene-dependent phenomena. PMID:22238449

  13. Loss-of-function of neuroplasticity-related genes confers risk for human neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Milo R; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Li, Li; Chen, Rong; Morishita, Hirofumi; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-01-01

    High and increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders place enormous personal and economic burdens on society. Given the growing realization that the roots of neurodevelopmental disorders often lie in early childhood, there is an urgent need to identify childhood risk factors. Neurodevelopment is marked by periods of heightened experience-dependent neuroplasticity wherein neural circuitry is optimized by the environment. If these critical periods are disrupted, development of normal brain function can be permanently altered, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we aim to systematically identify human variants in neuroplasticity-related genes that confer risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Historically, this knowledge has been limited by a lack of techniques to identify genes related to neurodevelopmental plasticity in a high-throughput manner and a lack of methods to systematically identify mutations in these genes that confer risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Using an integrative genomics approach, we determined loss-of-function (LOF) variants in putative plasticity genes, identified from transcriptional profiles of brain from mice with elevated plasticity, that were associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. From five shared differentially expressed genes found in two mouse models of juvenile-like elevated plasticity (juvenile wild-type or adult Lynx1-/- relative to adult wild-type) that were also genotyped in the Mount Sinai BioMe Biobank we identified multiple associations between LOF genes and increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders across 10,510 patients linked to the Mount Sinai Electronic Medical Records (EMR), including epilepsy and schizophrenia. This work demonstrates a novel approach to identify neurodevelopmental risk genes and points toward a promising avenue to discover new drug targets to address the unmet therapeutic needs of neurodevelopmental disease.

  14. A comprehensive dataset of genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-03-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms.

  15. Loss-of-function mutations in SOX10 cause Kallmann syndrome with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Veronique; Bodereau, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Marcos, Severine; Watanabe, Yuli; Chaoui, Asma; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Vérier-Mine, Odile; Francannet, Christine; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kurtz, François-Joseph; Young, Jacques; Bertherat, Jérôme; Marlin, Sandrine; Goossens, Michel; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine; Bondurand, Nadege

    2013-05-02

    Transcription factor SOX10 plays a role in the maintenance of progenitor cell multipotency, lineage specification, and cell differentiation and is a major actor in the development of the neural crest. It has been implicated in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), a rare disorder characterized by the association between pigmentation abnormalities and deafness, but SOX10 mutations cause a variable phenotype that spreads over the initial limits of the syndrome definition. On the basis of recent findings of olfactory-bulb agenesis in WS individuals, we suspected SOX10 was also involved in Kallmann syndrome (KS). KS is defined by the association between anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to incomplete migration of neuroendocrine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells along the olfactory, vomeronasal, and terminal nerves. Mutations in any of the nine genes identified to date account for only 30% of the KS cases. KS can be either isolated or associated with a variety of other symptoms, including deafness. This study reports SOX10 loss-of-function mutations in approximately one-third of KS individuals with deafness, indicating a substantial involvement in this clinical condition. Study of SOX10-null mutant mice revealed a developmental role of SOX10 in a subpopulation of glial cells called olfactory ensheathing cells. These mice indeed showed an almost complete absence of these cells along the olfactory nerve pathway, as well as defasciculation and misrouting of the nerve fibers, impaired migration of GnRH cells, and disorganization of the olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulbs. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Sara J.; Asai, Yuka; Cordell, Heather J.; Campbell, Linda E.; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Northstone, Kate; Henderson, John; Alizadehfar, Reza; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Morgan, Kenneth; Roberts, Graham; Masthoff, Laury J. N.; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van den Akker, Peter C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Lack, Gideon; Clarke, Ann; Hull, Peter R.; Irvine, Alan D.; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    Background: IgE-mediated peanut allergy is a complex trait with strong heritability, but its genetic basis is currently unknown. Loss-of-function mutations within the filaggrin gene are associated with atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases; therefore, filaggrin is a candidate gene in the

  17. Loss-of-function mutations in SLC30A8 protect against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flannick, Jason; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Beer, Nicola L

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets, but none have yet been described for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Through sequencing or genotyping of ~150,000 individuals across 5 ancestry groups, we identified 12 rare protein-truncating va...

  18. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. © 2015 The Authors.

  19. Somatic loss of function mutations in neurofibromin 1 and MYC associated factor X genes identified by exome-wide sequencing in a wild-type GIST case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinsky, Martin G.; Rink, Lori; Cai, Kathy Q.; Capuzzi, Stephen J.; Hoang, Yen; Chien, Jeremy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Mehren, Margaret von

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10–15 % of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) lack gain of function mutations in the KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) genes. An alternate mechanism of oncogenesis through loss of function of the succinate-dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme complex has been identified for a subset of these “wild type” GISTs. Paired tumor and normal DNA from an SDH-intact wild-type GIST case was subjected to whole exome sequencing to identify the pathogenic mechanism(s) in this tumor. Selected findings were further investigated in panels of GIST tumors through Sanger DNA sequencing, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemical approaches. A hemizygous frameshift mutation (p.His2261Leufs*4), in the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene was identified in the patient’s GIST; however, no germline NF1 mutation was found. A somatic frameshift mutation (p.Lys54Argfs*31) in the MYC associated factor X (MAX) gene was also identified. Immunohistochemical analysis for MAX on a large panel of GISTs identified loss of MAX expression in the MAX-mutated GIST and in a subset of mainly KIT-mutated tumors. This study suggests that inactivating NF1 mutations outside the context of neurofibromatosis may be the oncogenic mechanism for a subset of sporadic GIST. In addition, loss of function mutation of the MAX gene was identified for the first time in GIST, and a broader role for MAX in GIST progression was suggested. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1872-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Exploring the mechanisms through which computers contribute to learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karasavvidis, I.; Karasavvidis, I.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Plomp, T.

    2003-01-01

    Even though it has been established that the incorporation of computers into the teaching and learning process enhances student performance, the underlying mechanisms through which this is accomplished have been largely unexplored. The present study aims to shed light on this issue. Two groups of 10

  1. De Novo and Inherited Loss-of-Function Variants in TLK2: Clinical and Genotype-Phenotype Evaluation of a Distinct Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Miller, Kerry A; Alvi, Mohsan; Goos, Jacqueline A C; Lees, Melissa M; de Burca, Anna; Henderson, Alex; Kraus, Alison; Mikat, Barbara; de Vries, Bert B A; Isidor, Bertrand; Kerr, Bronwyn; Marcelis, Carlo; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Deshpande, Charu; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Baralle, Diana; Blair, Edward M; Engels, Hartmut; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Eason, Jacqueline; Santen, Gijs W E; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Chandler, Kate; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Payne, Katelyn; Helbig, Katherine; Radtke, Kelly; Nugent, Kimberly M; Cremer, Kirsten; Strom, Tim M; Bird, Lynne M; Sinnema, Margje; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; van Dooren, Marieke F; Alders, Marielle; Koopmans, Marije; Brick, Lauren; Kozenko, Mariya; Harline, Megan L; Klaassens, Merel; Steinraths, Michelle; Cooper, Nicola S; Edery, Patrick; Yap, Patrick; Terhal, Paulien A; van der Spek, Peter J; Lakeman, Phillis; Taylor, Rachel L; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; Pfundt, Rolph; Mercimek-Andrews, Saadet; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Kant, Sarina G; McLean, Scott; Joss, Shelagh; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Douzgou, Sofia; Wall, Steven A; Küry, Sébastien; Calpena, Eduardo; Koelling, Nils; McGowan, Simon J; Twigg, Stephen R F; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Brunner, Han G; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2018-06-07

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for the discovery of genes related to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Here, we report the identification of a distinct syndrome due to de novo or inherited heterozygous mutations in Tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) in 38 unrelated individuals and two affected mothers, using whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies, matchmaker databases, and international collaborations. Affected individuals had a consistent phenotype, characterized by mild-borderline neurodevelopmental delay (86%), behavioral disorders (68%), severe gastro-intestinal problems (63%), and facial dysmorphism including blepharophimosis (82%), telecanthus (74%), prominent nasal bridge (68%), broad nasal tip (66%), thin vermilion of the upper lip (62%), and upslanting palpebral fissures (55%). Analysis of cell lines from three affected individuals showed that mutations act through a loss-of-function mechanism in at least two case subjects. Genotype-phenotype analysis and comparison of computationally modeled faces showed that phenotypes of these and other individuals with loss-of-function variants significantly overlapped with phenotypes of individuals with other variant types (missense and C-terminal truncating). This suggests that haploinsufficiency of TLK2 is the most likely underlying disease mechanism, leading to a consistent neurodevelopmental phenotype. This work illustrates the power of international data sharing, by the identification of 40 individuals from 26 different centers in 7 different countries, allowing the identification, clinical delineation, and genotype-phenotype evaluation of a distinct NDD caused by mutations in TLK2. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathways and mechanisms in adolescence contribute to adult health inequalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Pernille; Krølner, Rikke; Rasmussen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    useful for providing an overview of what elements and mechanisms in adolescence may be of special importance for adult health inequalities. There is a lack of knowledge of how social patterns of health, health behaviours, and social relations in adolescence transfer into adulthood and to what extent...... vulnerability. METHODS: We conducted literature searches in English-language peer-reviewed journals using PubMed (from 1966 to May 2009) and PsycINFO, and combined these with hand-searches of reference lists, journals, and authors of particular relevance. RESULTS: Most health indicators are socially patterned...

  3. Contribution to diffusion mechanism study in amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaye, Jean-Marc

    1993-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the vacancy diffusion mechanism in mono-elementary and binary amorphous Lennard-Jones systems, by a molecular dynamics method. The first chapter is a review of the preceding works performed before the beginning of this thesis, the method of simulation is described in the second chapter. We showed in the following chapters that the vacancies, introduced by the removal of one atom, remain stable on a large percentage of sites, especially in the binary system. By calculating some thermodynamical values, formation and migration enthalpies and entropies, we showed that the vacancy mechanism is magnified in a disordered system, as compared to a crystal of the same composition, and therefore can explain the magnitudes of the experimental diffusion coefficients. In parallel, to measure diffusion coefficients, we have settled an experimental method based on the evolution of the resistivity of a multilayer sample during interdiffusion, a gold-silver multilayer in our case (chapter six). By measurements under pressure, the activation volume is determined and our results agree well with the preceding ones. (author) [fr

  4. [Seagrass ecosystems: contributions to and mechanisms of carbon sequestration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guang-Long; Lin, Hsing-Juh; Li, Zong-Shan; Fan, Hang-Qing; Zhou, Hao-Lang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The ocean's vegetated habitats, in particular seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes, each capture and store a comparable amount of carbon per year, forming the Earth's blue carbon sinks, the most intense carbon sinks on the planet. Seagrass meadows, characterized by high primary productivity, efficient water column filtration and sediment stability, have a pronounced capacity for carbon sequestration. This is enhanced by low decomposition rates in anaerobic seagrass sediments. The carbon captured by seagrass meadows contributes significantly to the total blue carbon. At a global scale, seagrass ecosystems are carbon sink hot spots and have profound influences on the global carbon cycle. This importance combined with the many other functions of seagrass meadows places them among the most valuable ecosystems in the world. Unfortunately, seagrasses are declining globally at an alarming rate owing to anthropogenic disturbances and climate change, making them also among the most threatened ecosystems on the Earth. The role of coastal systems in carbon sequestration has received far too little attention and thus there are still many uncertainties in evaluating carbon sequestration of global seagrass meadows accurately. To better assess the carbon sequestration of global seagrass ecosystems, a number of scientific issues should be considered with high priorities: 1) more accurate measurements of seagrass coverage at national and global levels; 2) more comprehensive research into species- and location-specific carbon sequestration efficiencies; 3) in-depth exploration of the effects of human disturbance and global climate change on carbon capture and storage by seagrass ecosystems.

  5. Contributions of non-intrusive coupling in nonlinear structural mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis, part of the ANR ICARE project, aims at developing methods for complex analysis of large scale structures. The scientific challenge is to investigate very localised areas, but potentially critical as of mechanical systems resilience. Classically, representation models, discretizations, mechanical behaviour models and numerical tools are used at both global and local scales for simulation needs of graduated complexity. Global problem is handled by a generic code with topology (plate formulation, geometric approximation...) and behaviour (homogenization) simplifications while local analysis needs implementation of specialized tools (routines, dedicated codes) for an accurate representation of the geometry and behaviour. The main goal of this thesis is to develop an efficient non-intrusive coupling tool for multi-scale and multi-model structural analysis. Constraints of non-intrusiveness result in the non-modification of the stiffness operator, connectivity and the global model solver, allowing to work in a closed source software environment. First, we provide a detailed study of global/local non-intrusive coupling algorithm. Making use of several relevant examples (cracking, elastic-plastic behaviour, contact...), we show the efficiency and the flexibility of such coupling method. A comparative analysis of several optimisation tools is also carried on, and the interacting multiple patches situation is handled. Then, non-intrusive coupling is extended to globally non-linear cases, and a domain decomposition method with non-linear re-localization is proposed. Such methods allowed us to run a parallel computation using only sequential software, on a high performance computing cluster. Finally, we apply the coupling algorithm to mesh refinement with patches of finite elements. We develop an explicit residual based error estimator suitable for multi-scale solutions arising from the non-intrusive coupling, and apply it inside an error driven local mesh

  6. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  7. Increased ethanol consumption despite taste aversion in mice with a human tryptophan hydroxylase 2 loss of function mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Francis; Doré, François Y; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2015-11-16

    Polymorphisms in the gene encoding the brain serotonin synthesis enzyme Tph2 have been identified in mental illnesses, with co-morbidity of substance use disorder. However, little is known about the impact of Tph2 gene variants on addiction. Mice expressing a human Tph2 loss of function variant were used to investigate consequences of aversive conditions on ethanol intake. Mice were familiarized either with ethanol or a solution containing both ethanol and the bittering agent quinine. Effect of familiarization to ethanol or an ethanol-quinine solution was then evaluated using a two-bottles preference test in Tph2-KI and control littermates. Mice from both genotypes displayed similar levels of ethanol consumption and quinine avoidance when habituated to ethanol alone. In contrast, addition of quinine to ethanol during the familiarization period resulted in a reduction of avoidance for the quinine-ethanol solution only in mutant mice. These results indicate that loss of function mutation in Tph2 results in greater motivation for ethanol consumption under aversive conditions and may confer enhanced sensitivity to alcohol use disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss-of-function mutations in CAST cause peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhimiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Nitoiu, Daniela; Scott, Claire A; Plagnol, Vincent; Smith, Frances J D; Wilson, Neil J; Cole, Christian; Schwartz, Mary E; McLean, W H Irwin; Wang, Huijun; Feng, Cheng; Duo, Lina; Zhou, Eray Yihui; Ren, Yali; Dai, Lanlan; Chen, Yulan; Zhang, Jianguo; Xu, Xun; O'Toole, Edel A; Kelsell, David P; Yang, Yong

    2015-03-05

    Calpastatin is an endogenous specific inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. Here we show that loss-of-function mutations in calpastatin (CAST) are the genetic causes of an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by generalized peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads, which we propose to be given the acronym PLACK syndrome. In affected individuals with PLACK syndrome from three families of different ethnicities, we identified homozygous mutations (c.607dup, c.424A>T, and c.1750delG) in CAST, all of which were predicted to encode truncated proteins (p.Ile203Asnfs∗8, p.Lys142∗, and p.Val584Trpfs∗37). Immunohistochemistry shows that staining of calpastatin is reduced in skin from affected individuals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed widening of intercellular spaces with chromatin condensation and margination in the upper stratum spinosum in lesional skin, suggesting impaired intercellular adhesion as well as keratinocyte apoptosis. A significant increase of apoptotic keratinocytes was also observed in TUNEL assays. In vitro studies utilizing siRNA-mediated CAST knockdown revealed a role for calpastatin in keratinocyte adhesion. In summary, we describe PLACK syndrome, as a clinical entity of defective epidermal adhesion, caused by loss-of-function mutations in CAST. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaali Natarajan

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25 on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1 urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2 redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; (3 OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4 mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05 in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  10. Loss-of-function CARD8 mutation causes NLRP3 inflammasome activation and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liming; Kitani, Atsushi; Similuk, Morgan; Oler, Andrew J; Albenberg, Lindsey; Kelsen, Judith; Aktay, Atiye; Quezado, Martha; Yao, Michael; Montgomery-Recht, Kim; Fuss, Ivan J; Strober, Warren

    2018-05-01

    In these studies, we evaluated the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome to Crohn's disease (CD) in a kindred containing individuals having a missense mutation in CARD8, a protein known to inhibit this inflammasome. Whole exome sequencing and PCR studies identified the affected individuals as having a V44I mutation in a single allele of the T60 isoform of CARD8. The serum levels of IL-1β in the affected individuals were increased compared with those in healthy controls, and their peripheral monocytes produced increased amounts of IL-1β when stimulated by NLRP3 activators. Immunoblot studies probing the basis of these findings showed that mutated T60 CARD8 failed to downregulate the NLRP3 inflammasome because it did not bind to NLRP3 and inhibit its oligomerization. In addition, these studies showed that mutated T60 CARD8 exerted a dominant-negative effect by its capacity to bind to and form oligomers with unmutated T60 or T48 CARD8 that impeded their binding to NLRP3. Finally, inflammasome activation studies revealed that intact but not mutated CARD8 prevented NLRP3 deubiquitination and serine dephosphorylation. CD due to a CARD8 mutation was not effectively treated by anti-TNF-α, but did respond to IL-1β inhibitors. Thus, patients with anti-TNF-α-resistant CD may respond to this treatment option.

  11. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2 is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases.

  12. A loss of function analysis of host factors influencing Vaccinia virus replication by RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa M Beard

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics.

  13. Loss-of-function analyses of the fragile X-related and dopamine receptor genes by RNA interference in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Aska; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Honda-sumi, Eri; Tomioka, Kenji; Mito, Taro; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare

    2009-08-01

    In order to explore a possibility that the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus would be a useful model to unveil molecular mechanisms of human diseases, we performed loss-of-function analyses of Gryllus genes homologous to human genes that are responsible for human disorders, fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) and Dopamine receptor (DopR). We cloned cDNAs of their Gryllus homologues, Gb'fmr1, Gb'DopRI, and Gb'DopRII, and analyzed their functions with use of nymphal RNA interference (RNAi). For Gb'fmr1, three major phenotypes were observed: (1) abnormal wing postures, (2) abnormal calling song, and (3) loss of the circadian locomotor rhythm, while for Gb'DopRI, defects of wing posture and morphology were found. These results indicate that the cricket has the potential to become a novel model system to explore human neuronal pathogenic mechanisms and to screen therapeutic drugs by RNAi. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. De novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC cause a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome and learning deficits in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugtenberg, Dorien; Reijnders, Margot R F; Fenckova, Michaela; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Bernier, Raphael; van Bon, Bregje W M; Smeets, Eric; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosch, Danielle; Eichler, Evan E; Mefford, Heather C; Carvill, Gemma L; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke Hm; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A; Santen, Gijs W E; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha M P C D; Kuenen, Sabine; Verstreken, Patrik; Pfundt, Rolph; Yntema, Helger G; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; de Vries, Bert B A; Schenck, Annette; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Vissers, Lisenka E L M

    2016-08-01

    Recently WAC was reported as a candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID) based on the identification of a de novo mutation in an individual with severe ID. WAC regulates transcription-coupled histone H2B ubiquitination and has previously been implicated in the 10p12p11 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. In this study, we report on 10 individuals with de novo WAC mutations which we identified through routine (diagnostic) exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of WAC in 2326 individuals with unexplained ID. All but one mutation was expected to lead to a loss-of-function of WAC. Clinical evaluation of all individuals revealed phenotypic overlap for mild ID, hypotonia, behavioral problems and distinctive facial dysmorphisms, including a square-shaped face, deep set eyes, long palpebral fissures, and a broad mouth and chin. These clinical features were also previously reported in individuals with 10p12p11 microdeletion syndrome. To investigate the role of WAC in ID, we studied the importance of the Drosophila WAC orthologue (CG8949) in habituation, a non-associative learning paradigm. Neuronal knockdown of Drosophila CG8949 resulted in impaired learning, suggesting that WAC is required in neurons for normal cognitive performance. In conclusion, we defined a clinically recognizable ID syndrome, caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC. Independent functional evidence in Drosophila further supported the role of WAC in ID. On the basis of our data WAC can be added to the list of ID genes with a role in transcription regulation through histone modification.

  15. Pivotal Advance: Eosinophilia in the MES rat strain is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the gene for cytochrome b(-245), alpha polypeptide (Cyba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masayuki; Li, Guixin; Hashimoto, Maiko; Nishio, Ayako; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Usami, Shin-ichi; Higuchi, Keiichi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2009-09-01

    MES is a rat strain that spontaneously develops severe blood eosinophilia as a hereditary trait. Herein, we report that eosinophilia in MES rats is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the gene for cytochrome b(-245), alpha polypeptide (Cyba; also known as p22(phox)), which is an essential component of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase complex. The MES rat has a deletion of four nucleotides, including the 5' splice donor GpT of intron 4 of the Cyba gene. As a consequence of the deletion, a 51-nucleotide sequence of intron 4 is incorporated into the Cyba transcripts. Leukocytes from the MES strain lack both CYBA protein and NADPH oxidase activity. Nevertheless, unlike patients with chronic granulomatous disease, who suffer from infections with pathogens due to similar genetic defects in NADPH oxidase, MES rats retain normal innate immune defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection. This is due to large quantities of peritoneal eosinophils in MES rats, which phagocytose and kill the bacteria. MES rat has a balance defect due to impaired formation of otoconia in the utricles and saccules. Eosinophilia of the MES rat was normalized by introduction of a normal Cyba transgene. The mechanisms by which impairment of NADPH oxidase leads to eosinophilia in the MES rat are elusive. However, our study highlights the essential role of NADPH oxidase in homeostatic regulation of innate immunity beyond conventional microbicidial functions.

  16. Loss of Function Mutation in the Palmitoyl-Transferase HHAT Leads to Syndromic 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development by Impeding Hedgehog Protein Palmitoylation and Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrythanasis, Periklis; Bernard, Pascal; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Vannier, Anne; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Borel, Christelle; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Rolland, Antoine; Desdoits-Lethimonier, Christèle; Guipponi, Michel; Zimmermann, Céline; Stévant, Isabelle; Kuhne, Françoise; Conne, Béatrice; Santoni, Federico; Lambert, Sandy; Huet, Frederic; Mugneret, Francine; Jaruzelska, Jadwiga; Faivre, Laurence; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Jégou, Bernard; Trainor, Paul A.; Resh, Marilyn D.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Nef, Serge

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins act as morphogens to control embryonic patterning and development in a variety of organ systems. Post-translational covalent attachment of cholesterol and palmitate to Hh proteins are critical for multimerization and long range signaling potency. However, the biological impact of lipid modifications on Hh ligand distribution and signal reception in humans remains unclear. In the present study, we report a unique case of autosomal recessive syndromic 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development (DSD) with testicular dysgenesis and chondrodysplasia resulting from a homozygous G287V missense mutation in the hedgehog acyl-transferase (HHAT) gene. This mutation occurred in the conserved membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) domain and experimentally disrupted the ability of HHAT to palmitoylate Hh proteins such as DHH and SHH. Consistent with the patient phenotype, HHAT was found to be expressed in the somatic cells of both XX and XY gonads at the time of sex determination, and Hhat loss of function in mice recapitulates most of the testicular, skeletal, neuronal and growth defects observed in humans. In the developing testis, HHAT is not required for Sertoli cell commitment but plays a role in proper testis cord formation and the differentiation of fetal Leydig cells. Altogether, these results shed new light on the mechanisms of action of Hh proteins. Furthermore, they provide the first clinical evidence of the essential role played by lipid modification of Hh proteins in human testicular organogenesis and embryonic development. PMID:24784881

  17. Contribution of Psychological, Social, and Mechanical Work Exposures to Low Work Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Emberland, Jan S.; Knardahl, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the contribution of specific psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures to the self-reported low level of work ability. Methods: Employees from 48 organizations were surveyed over a 2-year period (n = 3779). Changes in 16 work exposures and 3 work ability measures?the work ability index score, perceived current, and future work ability?were tested with Spearman rank correlations. Binary logistic regressions were run to determine contribution of work exposures...

  18. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  19. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing for loss-of-function in the early chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Shashank; Piacentino, Michael L; Vieceli, Felipe M; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-12-01

    The advent of CRISPR/Cas9 has made genome editing possible in virtually any organism, including those not previously amenable to genetic manipulations. Here, we present an optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 for application to early avian embryos with improved efficiency via a three-fold strategy. First, we employed Cas9 protein flanked with two nuclear localization signal sequences for improved nuclear localization. Second, we used a modified guide RNA (gRNA) scaffold that obviates premature termination of transcription and unstable Cas9-gRNA interactions. Third, we used a chick-specific U6 promoter that yields 4-fold higher gRNA expression than the previously utilized human U6. For rapid screening of gRNAs for in vivo applications, we also generated a chicken fibroblast cell line that constitutively expresses Cas9. As proof of principle, we performed electroporation-based loss-of-function studies in the early chick embryo to knock out Pax7 and Sox10, key transcription factors with known functions in neural crest development. The results show that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion causes loss of their respective proteins and transcripts, as well as predicted downstream targets. Taken together, the results reveal the utility of this optimized CRISPR/Cas9 method for targeted gene knockout in chicken embryos in a manner that is reproducible, robust and specific. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel loss-of-function mutation in OTX2 in a patient with anophthalmia and isolated growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; Lebenthal, Yael; Wyatt, Alexander W; Ragge, Nicola K; Dateki, Sumito; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2010-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the gene encoding transcription factor OTX2 were recently shown to be responsible for ocular as well as pituitary abnormalities. Here, we describe a patient with unilateral anophthalmia and short stature. Endocrine evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis revealed isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) with small anterior pituitary gland, invisible stalk, ectopic posterior lobe, and right anophthalmia on brain magnetic resonance imaging. DNA was analyzed for mutations in the HESX1, SOX2, and OTX2 genes. Molecular analysis yielded a novel heterozygous OTX2 mutation (c.270A>T, p.R90S) within the homeodomain. Functional analysis revealed that the mutation inhibited both the DNA binding and transactivation activities of the protein. This novel loss-of-function mutation is associated with anophthalmia and IGHD in a patient of Sephardic Jewish descent. We recommend that patients with GH deficiency and ocular malformation in whom genetic analysis for classic transcription factor genes (PROP1, POU1F1, HESX1, and LHX4) failed to identify alterations should be checked for the presence of mutations in the OTX2 gene.

  1. Loss-of-function myostatin mutation increases insulin sensitivity and browning of white fat in Meishan pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunbo; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Sun, Youde; Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Dezun; Xiao, Gaojun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shanshan; Gao, Ting; Chen, Yaoxing; Liu, Jie; An, Xiaorong; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2017-05-23

    Myostatin-deficient mice showed a remarkable hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, with a decreased fat mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Currently, it is unclear if the inhibition of myostatin could be used as an approach to treat human obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated if the inhibition of porcine myostatin has any effect on fat deposition and insulin sensitivity using genetically engineered Meishan pigs containing a myostatin loss-of-function mutation (Mstn -/- ). Our results indicated that, when compared with wild-type pigs, the amount of subcutaneous fat and leaf fat of Mstn -/- pigs were significantly decreased mainly due to the browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, the serum insulin level decreased and the insulin sensitivity increased significantly in Mstn -/- pigs. Moreover, we found a significant increase in levels of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle of Mstn -/- pigs, which then activating the insulin signaling pathway. Irisin-mediated regulation is not the only pathway for the activation of insulin signal in Mstn -/- skeletal muscle. This study provides valuable insight for the treatment of human obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  2. FAS/FASL are dysregulated in chordoma and their loss-of-function impairs zebrafish notochord formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luca; Pistocchi, Anna; Libera, Laura; Boari, Nicola; Mortini, Pietro; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Giordano, Antonio; Cotelli, Franco; Riva, Paola

    2014-07-30

    Chordoma is a rare malignant tumor that recapitulates the notochord phenotype and is thought to derive from notochord remnants not correctly regressed during development. Apoptosis is necessary for the proper notochord development in vertebrates, and the apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas and Fasl has been demonstrated to be involved in notochord cells regression. This study was conducted to investigate the expression of FAS/FASL pathway in a cohort of skull base chordomas and to analyze the role of fas/fasl homologs in zebrafish notochord formation. FAS/FASL expression was found to be dysregulated in chordoma leading to inactivation of the downstream Caspases in the samples analyzed. Both fas and fasl were specifically expressed in zebrafish notochord sorted cells. fas and fasl loss-of-function mainly resulted in larvae with notochord multi-cell-layer jumps organization, larger vacuolated notochord cells, defects in the peri-notochordal sheath structure and in vertebral mineralization. Interestingly, we observed the persistent expression of ntla and col2a1a, the zebrafish homologs of the human T gene and COL2A1 respectively, which are specifically up-regulated in chordoma. These results demonstrate for the first time the dysregulation of FAS/FASL in chordoma and their role in notochord formation in the zebrafish model, suggesting their possible implication in chordoma onset.

  3. Contribution to and Use of Online Knowledge Repositories: The Role of Governance Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Varol O.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing upon the concept of governance, this dissertation refers to the two most commonly employed mechanisms that ensure high quality knowledge in electronic repositories as expert-governance and community-governance. In three related but distinct essays, the dissertation examines the governance concept, and investigates contributing knowledge to…

  4. Reassessment of the putative role of BLK-p.A71T loss-of-function mutation in MODY and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefond, A; Yengo, L; Philippe, J; Dechaume, A; Ezzidi, I; Vaillant, E; Gjesing, A P; Andersson, E A; Czernichow, S; Hercberg, S; Hadjadj, S; Charpentier, G; Lantieri, O; Balkau, B; Marre, M; Pedersen, O; Hansen, T; Froguel, P; Vaxillaire, M

    2013-03-01

    MODY is believed to be caused by at least 13 different genes. Five rare mutations at the BLK locus, including only one non-synonymous p.A71T variant, were reported to segregate with diabetes in three MODY families. The p.A71T mutation was shown to abolish the enhancing effect of BLK on insulin content and secretion from pancreatic beta cell lines. Here, we reassessed the contribution of BLK to MODY and tested the effect of BLK-p.A71T on type 2 diabetes risk and variations in related traits. BLK was sequenced in 64 unelucidated MODY samples. The BLK-p.A71T variant was genotyped in a French type 2 diabetes case-control study including 4,901 cases and 4,280 controls, and in the DESIR (Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome) and SUVIMAX (Supplementation en Vitamines et Mineraux Antioxydants) population-based cohorts (n = 6,905). The variant effects were assessed by logistic and linear regression models. No rare non-synonymous BLK mutations were found in the MODY patients. The BLK p.A71T mutation was present in 52 normoglycaemic individuals, making it very unlikely that this loss-of-function mutation causes highly penetrant MODY. We found a nominal association between this variant and increased type 2 diabetes risk, with an enrichment of the mutation in the obese diabetic patients, although no significant association with BMI was identified. No mutation in BLK was found in our MODY cohort. From our findings, the BLK-p.A71T mutation may weakly influence type 2 diabetes risk in the context of obesity; however, this will require further validation.

  5. Composting projects under the Clean Development Mechanism: Sustainable contribution to mitigate climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogger, Cyrill; Beaurain, Francois; Schmidt, Tobias S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries and at the same time to assist these countries in sustainable development. While composting as a suitable mitigation option in the waste sector can clearly contribute to the former goal there are indications that high rents can also be achieved regarding the latter. In this article composting is compared with other CDM project types inside and outside the waste sector with regards to both project numbers and contribution to sustainable development. It is found that, despite the high number of waste projects, composting is underrepresented and a major reason for this fact is identified. Based on a multi-criteria analysis it is shown that composting has a higher potential for contribution to sustainable development than most other best in class projects. As these contributions can only be assured if certain requirements are followed, eight key obligations are presented.

  6. Mechanism analysis and evaluation methodology of regenerative braking contribution to energy efficiency improvement of electrified vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Chen; Zhang, Junzhi; Li, Yutong; Yuan, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The energy flow of an electric vehicle with regenerative brake is analyzed. • Methodology for measuring the regen brake contribution is discussed. • Evaluation parameters of regen brake contribution are proposed. • Vehicle tests are carried out on chassis dynamometer. • Test results verify the evaluation method and parameters proposed. - Abstract: This article discusses the mechanism and evaluation methods of contribution brought by regenerative braking to electric vehicle’s energy efficiency improvement. The energy flow of an electric vehicle considering the braking energy regeneration was analyzed. Then, methodologies for measuring the contribution made by regenerative brake to vehicle energy efficiency improvement were introduced. Based on the energy flow analyzed, two different evaluation parameters were proposed. Vehicle tests were carried out on chassis dynamometer under typical driving cycles with three different control strategies. The experimental results the difference between the proposed two evaluation parameters, and demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the evaluation methodologies proposed

  7. A Comprehensive Dataset of Genes with a Loss-of-Function Mutant Phenotype in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms. PMID:22247268

  8. Association of Rare Loss-Of-Function Alleles in HAL, Serum Histidine: Levels and Incident Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H; Muzny, Donna; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; de Vries, Paul S; Bis, Joshua C; Musani, Solomon K; Alexander, Danny; Morrison, Alanna C; Franco, Oscar H; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Dehghan, Abbas; Wilson, James G; Psaty, Bruce M; Gibbs, Richard; Wei, Peng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Histidine is a semiessential amino acid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few data are available on the associations between genetic variants, histidine levels, and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. By conducting whole exome sequencing on 1152 African Americans in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and focusing on loss-of-function (LoF) variants, we identified 3 novel rare LoF variants in HAL, a gene that encodes histidine ammonia-lyase in the first step of histidine catabolism. These LoF variants had large effects on blood histidine levels (β=0.26; P=1.2×10(-13)). The positive association with histidine levels was replicated by genotyping an independent sample of 718 ARIC African Americans (minor allele frequency=1%; P=1.2×10(-4)). In addition, high blood histidine levels were associated with reduced risk of developing incident CHD with an average of 21.5 years of follow-up among African Americans (hazard ratio=0.18; P=1.9×10(-4)). This finding was validated in an independent sample of European Americans from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) Offspring Cohort. However, LoF variants in HAL were not directly significantly associated with incident CHD after meta-analyzing results from the CHARGE Consortium. Three LoF mutations in HAL were associated with increased histidine levels, which in turn were shown to be inversely related to the risk of CHD among both African Americans and European Americans. Future investigations on the association between HAL gene variation and CHD are warranted. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Impact of loss-of-function mutations at the RNF43 locus on colorectal cancer development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Tsugio; Miyake, Keisuke; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Imamura, Yu; Arima, Kota; Kanno, Shinichi; Fu, Lingfeng; Kiyozumi, Yuki; Izumi, Daisuke; Sugihara, Hidetaka; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Miyamoto, Yuji; Sawayama, Hiroshi; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Naoya; Furukawa, Toru; Araki, Kimi; Baba, Hideo; Ishimoto, Takatsugu

    2018-05-13

    RNF43 mutations are frequently detected in colorectal cancer cells and lead to a loss of function of the ubiquitin E3 ligase. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of RNF43 mutations in a large Japanese cohort and the role of RNF43 at various stages of colorectal cancer development and progression. Mutation analysis of the RNF43 gene locus using pyrosequencing technology detected RNF43 hotspot mutations in 1 (0.88%) of 113 colorectal polyp cases and 30 (6.45%) of 465 colorectal cancer cases. Moreover, patients with colorectal cancer harboring mutated RNF43 experienced a higher recurrence rate than those harboring non-mutated RNF43. In addition, the growth of RNF43 wild-type colorectal cancer cell lines was significantly increased by RNF43 silencing. We generated Rnf43 knock-out mice in a C57BL/6N background using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Although intestinal organoids from the Rnf43 knock-out mice did not show continuous growth compared with those from the wild-type mice in the absence of R-spondin, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) mouse model demonstrated that the tumors were markedly larger in the Rnf43 knock-out mice than in the wild-type mice. These findings provide evidence that Wnt signaling activation by RNF43 mutations during the tumorigenic stage enhances tumor growth and promotes a high recurrence rate in colorectal cancer patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Loss of function in Mlo orthologs reduces susceptibility of pepper and tomato to powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zheng

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica is a serious fungal threat to greenhouse tomato and pepper production. In contrast to most powdery mildew species which are epiphytic, L. taurica is an endophytic fungus colonizing the mesophyll tissues of the leaf. In barley, Arabidopsis, tomato and pea, the correct functioning of specific homologues of the plant Mlo gene family has been found to be required for pathogenesis of epiphytic powdery mildew fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the Mlo genes in susceptibility to the endophytic fungus L. taurica. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, a loss-of-function mutation in the SlMlo1 gene results in resistance to powdery mildew disease caused by Oidium neolycopersici. When the tomato Slmlo1 mutant was inoculated with L. taurica in this study, it proved to be less susceptible compared to the control, S. lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker. Further, overexpression of SlMlo1 in the tomato Slmlo1 mutant enhanced susceptibility to L. taurica. In pepper, the CaMlo2 gene was isolated by applying a homology-based cloning approach. Compared to the previously identified CaMlo1 gene, the CaMlo2 gene is more similar to SlMlo1 as shown by phylogenetic analysis, and the expression of CaMlo2 is up-regulated at an earlier time point upon L. taurica infection. However, results of virus-induced gene silencing suggest that both CaMlo1 and CaMlo2 may be involved in the susceptibility of pepper to L. taurica. The fact that overexpression of CaMlo2 restored the susceptibility of the tomato Slmlo1 mutant to O. neolycopersici and increased its susceptibility to L. taurica confirmed the role of CaMlo2 acting as a susceptibility factor to different powdery mildews, though the role of CaMlo1 as a co-factor for susceptibility cannot be excluded.

  11. Novel loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 associated with syndromic microcephaly, blindness, and early onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Barry, Brenda J; Rajab, Anna; El-Quessny, Malak; Seman, Ann; Coury, Stephanie Newton; Barkovich, A James; Yang, Edward; Walsh, Christopher A; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Stoler, Joan M

    2016-02-01

    Exome sequencing identified homozygous loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 (c.2769delT; p.F923fs and c.3145C>T; p.R1049X) in four affected individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families. The affected individuals in our report were diagnosed with postnatal microcephaly, early-onset epilepsy, severe vision impairment, and pulmonary symptoms including bronchiectasis and recurrent respiratory infections. A heterozygous DIAPH1 mutation was originally reported in one family with autosomal dominant deafness. Recently, however, a homozygous nonsense DIAPH1 mutation (c.2332C4T; p.Q778X) was reported in five siblings in a single family affected by microcephaly, blindness, early onset seizures, developmental delay, and bronchiectasis. The role of DIAPH1 was supported using parametric linkage analysis, RNA and protein studies in their patients' cell lines and further studies in human neural progenitors cells and a diap1 knockout mouse. In this report, the proband was initially brought to medical attention for profound metopic synostosis. Additional concerns arose when his head circumference did not increase after surgical release at 5 months of age and he was diagnosed with microcephaly and epilepsy at 6 months of age. Clinical exome analysis identified a homozygous DIAPH1 mutation. Another homozygous DIAPH1 mutation was identified in the research exome analysis of a second family with three siblings presenting with a similar phenotype. Importantly, no hearing impairment is reported in the homozygous affected individuals or in the heterozygous carrier parents in any of the families demonstrating the autosomal recessive microcephaly phenotype. These additional families provide further evidence of the likely causal relationship between DIAPH1 mutations and a neurodevelopmental disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Using artificial microRNA sponges to achieve microRNA loss-of-function in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Felix Chang; Lim, Jia Kai; Zhu, Haibao; Hin, Lau Cia; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Widely observed dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer has led to substantial speculation regarding possible functions of these short, non-coding RNAs in cancer development and manipulation of miRNA expression to treat cancer. To achieve miRNA loss-of-function, miRNA sponge technology has been developed to use plasmid or viral vectors for intracellular expression of tandemly arrayed, bulged miRNA binding sites complementary to a miRNA target to saturate its ability to regulate natural mRNAs. A strong viral promoter can be used in miRNA sponge vectors to generate high-level expression of the competitive inhibitor transcripts for either transient or long-term inhibition of miRNA function. Taking the advantage of sharing a common seed sequence by members of a miRNA family, this technology is especially useful in knocking down the expression of a family of miRNAs, providing a powerful means for simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs of interest with a single inhibitor. Knockdown of overexpressed oncogenic miRNAs with the technology can be a rational therapeutic strategy for cancer, whereas inhibition of tumor-suppressive miRNAs by the sponges will be useful in deciphering functions of miRNAs in oncogenesis. Herein, we discuss the design of miRNA sponge expression vectors and the use of the vectors to gain better understanding of miRNA's roles in cancer biology and as an alternative tool for anticancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Loss of function mutations in PTPN6 promote STAT3 deregulation via JAK3 kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demosthenous, Christos; Han, Jing Jing; Hu, Guangzhen; Stenson, Mary; Gupta, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    PTPN6 (SHP1) is a tyrosine phosphatase that negatively controls the activity of multiple signaling pathways including STAT signaling, however role of mutated PTPN6 is not much known. Here we investigated whether PTPN6 might also be a potential target for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and performed Sanger sequencing of the PTPN6 gene. We have identified missense mutations within PTPN6 (N225K and A550V) in 5% (2/38) of DLBCL tumors. Site directed mutagenesis was performed to mutate wild type (WT) PTPN6 and stable cell lines were generated by lentiviral transduction of PTPN6WT, PTPN6N225K and PTPN6A550V constructs, and effects of WT or mutated PTPN6 on STAT3 signaling were analyzed. WT PTPN6 dephosphorylated STAT3, but had no effect on STAT1, STAT5 or STAT6 phosphorylation. Both PTPN6 mutants were unable to inhibit constitutive, as well as cytokines induced STAT3 activation. Both PTPN6 mutants also demonstrated reduced tyrosine phosphatase activity and exhibited enhanced STAT3 transactivation activity. Intriguingly, a lack of direct binding between STAT3 and WT or mutated PTPN6 was observed. However, compared to WT PTPN6, cells expressing PTPN6 mutants exhibited increased binding between JAK3 and PTPN6 suggesting a more dynamic interaction of PTPN6 with upstream regulators of STAT3. Consistent with this notion, both the mutants demonstrated increased resistance to JAK3 inhibitor, WHIP-154 relative to WT PTPN6. Overall, this is the first study, which demonstrates that N225K and A550V PTPN6 mutations cause loss-of-function leading to JAK3 mediated deregulation of STAT3 pathway and uncovers a mechanism that tumor cells can use to control PTPN6 substrate specificity. PMID:26565811

  14. Durable broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in pea er1 plants is conferred by natural loss-of-function mutations in PsMLO1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphry, M.; Reinstädler, A.; Ivanov, S.; Bisseling, T.; Panstruga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function alleles of plant-specific MLO (Mildew Resistance Locus O) genes confer broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in monocot (barley) and dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato) plants. Recessively inherited powdery mildew resistance in pea (Pisum sativum) er1 plants is, in many aspects,

  15. Mechanical contribution of lamellar and interlamellar elastin along the mouse aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T E; Lillie, M A; Vogl, A W; Gosline, J M; Shadwick, R E

    2015-10-15

    The mechanical properties of aortic elastin vary regionally, but the microstructural basis for this variation is unknown. This study was designed to identify the relative contributions of lamellar and interlamellar elastin to circumferential load bearing in the mouse thoracic and abdominal aortas. Forces developed in uniaxial tests of samples of fresh and autoclaved aorta were correlated with elastin content and morphology obtained from histology and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Autoclaving should render much of the interlamellar elastin mechanically incompetent. In autoclaved tissue force per unit sample width correlated with lamellar elastin content (P≪0.001) but not total elastin content. In fresh tissue at low strain where elastin dominates the mechanical response, forces were higher than in the autoclaved tissue, but force did not correlate with total elastin content. Therefore although interlamellar elastin likely contributed to the stiffness in the fresh aorta, its contribution appeared not in proportion to its quantity. In both fresh and autoclaved tissue, elastin stiffness consistently decreased along the abdominal aorta, a key area for aneurysm development, and this difference could not be fully accounted for on the basis of either lamellar or total elastin content. These findings are relevant to the development of mathematical models of arterial mechanics, particularly for mouse models of arterial diseases involving elastic tissue. In microstructural based models the quantity of each mural constituent determines its contribution to the total response. This study shows elastin's mechanical response cannot necessarily be accounted for on the basis of fibre quantity, orientation, and modulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged.

  17. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R.; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged. PMID:27119147

  18. On possible contribution of a leptoquark intermediate boson mechanism in the free neutron beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    A possible mechanism of the virtual leptoquark scalar intermediate boson exchange connected with a contribution of the right-handed nucleon currents to the free beta decay is demonstrated. The extension of the hypothesis can be associated with the realization of the same mechanism in the beta decay via the emission of right-handed neutrino (left-handed antineutrino). It is shown that a hypothesis of this kind leads to appearance of scalar and tensor terms in the effective Hamiltonian of weak interaction, and these terms include the right-handed neutrinos. The relevant experimental data are discussed [ru

  19. Contribution of psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures to low work ability: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberland, Jan S; Knardahl, Stein

    2015-03-01

    To determine the contribution of specific psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures to the self-reported low level of work ability. Employees from 48 organizations were surveyed over a 2-year period (n = 3779). Changes in 16 work exposures and 3 work ability measures-the work ability index score, perceived current, and future work ability-were tested with Spearman rank correlations. Binary logistic regressions were run to determine contribution of work exposures to low work ability. Role conflict, human resource primacy, and positive challenge were the most consistent predictors of low work ability across test designs. Role clarity and fair leadership were less consistent but prominent predictors. Mechanical exposures were not predictive. To protect employee work ability, work place interventions would benefit from focusing on reducing role conflicts and on promoting positive challenges and human resource primacy.

  20. Contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J; Diko, Sindi; Baehr, Leslie M; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C; Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-10-01

    Development of osteoarthritis commonly involves degeneration of epiphyseal trabecular bone. In previous studies, we observed 30-44% loss of epiphyseal trabecular bone (BV/TV) from the distal femur within 1 week following non-invasive knee injury in mice. Mechanical unloading (disuse) may contribute to this bone loss; however, it is unclear to what extent the injured limb is unloaded following injury, and whether disuse can fully account for the observed magnitude of bone loss. In this study, we investigated the contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone changes observed following non-invasive knee injury in mice (female C57BL/6N). We investigated changes in gait during treadmill walking, and changes in voluntary activity level using Open Field analysis at 4, 14, 28, and 42 days post-injury. We also quantified epiphyseal trabecular bone using μCT and weighed lower-limb muscles to quantify atrophy following knee injury in both ground control and hindlimb unloaded (HLU) mice. Gait analysis revealed a slightly altered stride pattern in the injured limb, with a decreased stance phase and increased swing phase. However, Open Field analysis revealed no differences in voluntary movement between injured and sham mice at any time point. Both knee injury and HLU resulted in comparable magnitudes of trabecular bone loss; however, HLU resulted in considerably more muscle loss than knee injury, suggesting another mechanism contributing to bone loss following injury. Altogether, these data suggest that mechanical unloading likely contributes to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury, but the magnitude of this bone loss cannot be fully explained by disuse. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1680-1687, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Diko, Sindi; Baehr, Leslie M.; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C.; Christiansen, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    Development of osteoarthritis commonly involves degeneration of epiphyseal trabecular bone. In previous studies, we observed 30–44% loss of epiphyseal trabecular bone (BV/TV) from the distal femur within one week following non-invasive knee injury in mice. Mechanical unloading (disuse) may contribute to this bone loss, however it is unclear to what extent the injured limb is unloaded following injury, and whether disuse can fully account for the observed magnitude of bone loss. In this study,...

  2. Loss of function at RAE2, a previously unidentified EPFL, is required for awnlessness in cultivated Asian rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho-Uehara, Kanako; Wang, Diane R; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Minami, Anzu; Nagai, Keisuke; Gamuyao, Rico; Asano, Kenji; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ayano, Madoka; Komeda, Norio; Doi, Kazuyuki; Miura, Kotaro; Toda, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Okuda, Satohiro; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Shinohara, Hidefumi; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Greenberg, Anthony; Wu, Jianzhong; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Mori, Hitoshi; McCouch, Susan R; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2016-08-09

    Domestication of crops based on artificial selection has contributed numerous beneficial traits for agriculture. Wild characteristics such as red pericarp and seed shattering were lost in both Asian (Oryza sativa) and African (Oryza glaberrima) cultivated rice species as a result of human selection on common genes. Awnedness, in contrast, is a trait that has been lost in both cultivated species due to selection on different sets of genes. In a previous report, we revealed that at least three loci regulate awn development in rice; however, the molecular mechanism underlying awnlessness remains unknown. Here we isolate and characterize a previously unidentified EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR-LIKE (EPFL) family member named REGULATOR OF AWN ELONGATION 2 (RAE2) and identify one of its requisite processing enzymes, SUBTILISIN-LIKE PROTEASE 1 (SLP1). The RAE2 precursor is specifically cleaved by SLP1 in the rice spikelet, where the mature RAE2 peptide subsequently induces awn elongation. Analysis of RAE2 sequence diversity identified a highly variable GC-rich region harboring multiple independent mutations underlying protein-length variation that disrupt the function of the RAE2 protein and condition the awnless phenotype in Asian rice. Cultivated African rice, on the other hand, retained the functional RAE2 allele despite its awnless phenotype. Our findings illuminate the molecular function of RAE2 in awn development and shed light on the independent domestication histories of Asian and African cultivated rice.

  3. Contribution of facet joints, axial compression, and composition to human lumbar disc torsion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezci, Semih E; Eleswarapu, Ananth; Klineberg, Eric O; O'Connell, Grace D

    2018-02-12

    Stresses applied to the spinal column are distributed between the intervertebral disc and facet joints. Structural and compositional changes alter stress distributions within the disc and between the disc and facet joints. These changes influence the mechanical properties of the disc joint, including its stiffness, range of motion, and energy absorption under quasi-static and dynamic loads. There have been few studies evaluating the role of facet joints in torsion. Furthermore, the relationship between biochemical composition and torsion mechanics is not well understood. Therefore, the first objective of this study was to investigate the role of facet joints in torsion mechanics of healthy and degenerated human lumbar discs under a wide range of compressive preloads. To achieve this, each disc was tested under four different compressive preloads (300-1200 N) with and without facet joints. The second objective was to develop a quantitative structure-function relationship between tissue composition and torsion mechanics. Facet joints have a significant contribution to disc torsional stiffness (∼60%) and viscoelasticity, regardless of the magnitude of axial compression. The findings from this study demonstrate that annulus fibrosus GAG content plays an important role in disc torsion mechanics. A decrease in GAG content with degeneration reduced torsion mechanics by more than an order of magnitude, while collagen content did not significantly influence disc torsion mechanics. The biochemical-mechanical and compression-torsion relationships reported in this study allow for better comparison between studies that use discs of varying levels of degeneration or testing protocols and provide important design criteria for biological repair strategies. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Contributions of chemical and mechanical surface properties and temperature effect on the adhesion at the nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awada, Houssein; Noel, Olivier; Hamieh, Tayssir; Kazzi, Yolla; Brogly, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool to investigate surface properties of model systems at the nanoscale. However, to get semi-quantitative and reproducible data with the AFM, it is necessary to establish a rigorous experimental procedure. In particular, a systematic calibration procedure of AFM measurements is necessary before producing reliable semi-quantitative data. In this paper, we study the contributions of the chemical and mechanical surface properties or the temperature influence on the adhesion energy at a local scale. To reach this objective, two types of model systems were considered. The first one is composed of rigid substrates (silicon wafers or AFM tips covered with gold) which were chemically modified by molecular self-assembling monolayers to display different surface properties (methyl and hydroxyl functional groups). The second one consists of model polymer networks (cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane) of variable mechanical properties. The comparison of the force curves obtained from the two model systems shows that the viscoelastic contributions dominate for the adhesion with polymer substrates, whereas, chemical contributions dominate for the rigid substrates. The temperature effect on the adhesion energy is also reported. Finally, we propose a relation for the adhesion energy at the nanoscale. This relation relates the energy measured during the separation of the contact to the three parameters: the surface properties of the polymer, the energy dissipated within the contact zone and the temperature.

  5. Overlapping LQT1 and LQT2 phenotype in a patient with long QT syndrome associated with loss-of-function variations in KCNQ1 and KCNH2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Perez, Guillermo J; Schmitt, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    . The proband (MMRL0362), a 32-year-old female, exhibited multiple ventricular extrasystoles and one syncope. Her ECG (QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc) = 518ms) showed an LQT2 morphology in leads V4-V6 and LQT1 morphology in leads V1-V2. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron...... borders of 7 LQTS susceptibility genes were amplified and sequenced. Variations were detected predicting a novel missense mutation (V110I) in KCNQ1, as well as a common polymorphism in KCNH2 (K897T). We expressed wild-type (WT) or V110I Kv7.1 channels in CHO-K1 cells cotransfected with KCNE1 and performed.......15 mV for K897T and WT, respectively; p loss-of-function mutation in KCNQ1 and a loss-of-function polymorphism in KCNH2. Our results suggest...

  6. Loss-of-Function of Gli3 in Mice Causes Abnormal Frontal Bone Morphology and Premature Synostosis of the Interfrontal Suture

    OpenAIRE

    Veistinen, Lotta; Takatalo, Maarit; Tanimoto, Yukiho; Kesper, Dörthe A.; Vortkamp, Andrea; Rice, David P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with polydactyly and syndactyly of the limbs and a broad spectrum of craniofacial abnormalities. Craniosynostosis of the metopic suture (interfrontal suture in mice) is an important but rare feature associated with GCPS. GCPS is caused by mutations in the transcription factor GLI3, which regulates Hedgehog signaling. The Gli3 loss-of-function (Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J) mouse largely phenocopies the human syndrome with the mice...

  7. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Tuan Ji

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain enigmatic. Accumulating evidence implicates the involvement of spinal glia in some neuropathic pain models. In this study, using a vincristine-evoked CNP rat model with obvious mechanical allodynia, we found that spinal astrocyte rather than microglia was dramatically activated. The mechanical allodynia was dose-dependently attenuated by intrathecal administratration of L-α-aminoadipate (astrocytic specific inhibitor; whereas minocycline (microglial specific inhibitor had no such effect, indicating that spinal astrocytic activation contributes to allodynia in CNP rat. Furthermore, oxidative stress mediated the development of spinal astrocytic activation, and activated astrocytes dramatically increased interleukin-1β expression which induced N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR phosphorylation in spinal neurons to strengthen pain transmission. Taken together, our findings suggest that spinal activated astrocytes may be a crucial component of the pathophysiology of CNP and "Astrocyte-Cytokine-NMDAR-neuron" pathway may be one detailed neural mechanisms underlying CNP. Thus, inhibiting spinal astrocytic activation may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating CNP.

  8. Carbon storage regulator A contributes to the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans by multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-02-01

    The carbon storage regulator A (CsrA) controls a wide variety of bacterial processes, including metabolism, adherence, stress responses, and virulence. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, harbors a homolog of csrA. Here, we generated an unmarked, in-frame deletion mutant of csrA to assess its contribution to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. In human inoculation experiments, the csrA mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation compared to its parent. Deletion of csrA resulted in decreased adherence of H. ducreyi to human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF); Flp1 and Flp2, the determinants of H. ducreyi adherence to HFF cells, were downregulated in the csrA mutant. Compared to its parent, the csrA mutant had a significantly reduced ability to tolerate oxidative stress and heat shock. The enhanced sensitivity of the mutant to oxidative stress was more pronounced in bacteria grown to stationary phase compared to that in bacteria grown to mid-log phase. The csrA mutant also had a significant survival defect within human macrophages when the bacteria were grown to stationary phase but not to mid-log phase. Complementation in trans partially or fully restored the mutant phenotypes. These data suggest that CsrA contributes to virulence by multiple mechanisms and that these contributions may be more profound in bacterial cell populations that are not rapidly dividing in the human host.

  9. A Historical Survey of Sir Karl Popper's Contribution to Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Shields

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sir Karl Popper (1902-1994, though not trained as a physicist and embarrassed early in his career by a physics error pointed out by Einstein and Bohr, ultimately made substantial contributions to the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As was often the case, Popper initially formulated his position by criticizing the views of others - in this case Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg. Underlying Popper's criticism was his belief that, first, the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics abandoned scientific realism and second, the assertion that quantum theory was complete (an assertion rejected by Einstein among others amounted to an unfalsifiable claim. Popper insisted that the most basic predictions of quantum mechanics should continue to be tested, with an eye towards falsification rather than mere adding of decimal places to confirmatory experiments. His persistent attacks on the Copenhagen interpretation were aimed not at the uncertainty principle itself and the formalism from which it was derived, but at the acceptance by physicists of an unclear epistemology and ontology that left critical questions unanswered. Quanta 2012; 1: 1–12.

  10. Shaping vulnerability to addiction - the contribution of behavior, neural circuits and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervari, Gabor; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Jentsch, J David; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2018-02-01

    Substance use disorders continue to impose increasing medical, financial and emotional burdens on society in the form of morbidity and overdose, family disintegration, loss of employment and crime, while advances in prevention and treatment options remain limited. Importantly, not all individuals exposed to abused substances effectively develop the disease. Genetic factors play a significant role in determining addiction vulnerability and interactions between innate predisposition, environmental factors and personal experiences are also critical. Thus, understanding individual differences that contribute to the initiation of substance use as well as on long-term maladaptations driving compulsive drug use and relapse propensity is of critical importance to reduce this devastating disorder. In this paper, we discuss current topics in the field of addiction regarding individual vulnerability related to behavioral endophenotypes, neural circuits, as well as genetics and epigenetic mechanisms. Expanded knowledge of these factors is of importance to improve and personalize prevention and treatment interventions in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Early life stress, HPA axis adaptation and mechanisms contributing to later health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi eManiam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, which then modulates the degree of adaptation and response to a later stressor. It is known that early life stress can impact on later health but less is known about how early life stress impairs HPA axis activity, contributing to maladaptation of the stress response system. Early life stress exposure (either prenatally or in the early postnatal period can impact developmental pathways resulting in lasting structural and regulatory changes that predispose to adulthood disease. Epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that early life stress produces long-term hyper responsiveness to stress with exaggerated circulating glucocorticoids, and enhanced anxiety and depression-like behaviours. Recently, evidence has emerged on early life stress induced metabolic derangements, for example hyperinsulinemia and altered insulin sensitivity on exposure to a high energy diet later in life. This draws our attention to the contribution of later environment to disease vulnerability. Early life stress can alter the expression of genes in peripheral tissues, such as the glucocorticoid receptor and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1. We propose that interactions between altered HPA axis activity and liver 11β-HSD1 modulates both tissue and circulating glucocorticoid availability, with adverse metabolic consequences. This review discusses the potential mechanisms underlying early life stress induced maladaptation of the HPA axis, and its subsequent effects on energy utilisation and expenditure. The effects of positive later environments as a means of ameliorating early life stress induced health deficits, and proposed mechanisms underpinning the interaction between early life stress and subsequent detrimental environmental exposures on metabolic risk will be outlined. Limitations in current methodology linking early life stress and later health outcomes will also

  12. Early-Life Stress, HPA Axis Adaptation, and Mechanisms Contributing to Later Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher; Morris, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, which then modulates the degree of adaptation and response to a later stressor. It is known that early-life stress can impact on later health but less is known about how early-life stress impairs HPA axis activity, contributing to maladaptation of the stress–response system. Early-life stress exposure (either prenatally or in the early postnatal period) can impact developmental pathways resulting in lasting structural and regulatory changes that predispose to adulthood disease. Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies have demonstrated that early-life stress produces long term hyper-responsiveness to stress with exaggerated circulating glucocorticoids, and enhanced anxiety and depression-like behaviors. Recently, evidence has emerged on early-life stress-induced metabolic derangements, for example hyperinsulinemia and altered insulin sensitivity on exposure to a high energy diet later in life. This draws our attention to the contribution of later environment to disease vulnerability. Early-life stress can alter the expression of genes in peripheral tissues, such as the glucocorticoid receptor and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1). We propose that interactions between altered HPA axis activity and liver 11β-HSD1 modulates both tissue and circulating glucocorticoid availability, with adverse metabolic consequences. This review discusses the potential mechanisms underlying early-life stress-induced maladaptation of the HPA axis, and its subsequent effects on energy utilization and expenditure. The effects of positive later environments as a means of ameliorating early-life stress-induced health deficits, and proposed mechanisms underpinning the interaction between early-life stress and subsequent detrimental environmental exposures on metabolic risk will be outlined. Limitations in current methodology linking early-life stress and later health outcomes will also be

  13. Post-transcriptional Mechanisms Contribute Little to Phenotypic Variation in Snake Venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokyta, Darin R; Margres, Mark J; Calvin, Kate

    2015-09-09

    Protein expression is a major link in the genotype-phenotype relationship, and processes affecting protein abundances, such as rates of transcription and translation, could contribute to phenotypic evolution if they generate heritable variation. Recent work has suggested that mRNA abundances do not accurately predict final protein abundances, which would imply that post-transcriptional regulatory processes contribute significantly to phenotypes. Post-transcriptional processes also appear to buffer changes in transcriptional patterns as species diverge, suggesting that the transcriptional changes have little or no effect on the phenotypes undergoing study. We tested for concordance between mRNA and protein expression levels in snake venoms by means of mRNA-seq and quantitative mass spectrometry for 11 snakes representing 10 species, six genera, and three families. In contrast to most previous work, we found high correlations between venom gland transcriptomes and venom proteomes for 10 of our 11 comparisons. We tested for protein-level buffering of transcriptional changes during species divergence by comparing the difference between transcript abundance and protein abundance for three pairs of species and one intraspecific pair. We found no evidence for buffering during divergence of our three species pairs but did find evidence for protein-level buffering for our single intraspecific comparison, suggesting that buffering, if present, was a transient phenomenon in venom divergence. Our results demonstrated that post-transcriptional mechanisms did not contribute significantly to phenotypic evolution in venoms and suggest a more prominent and direct role for cis-regulatory evolution in phenotypic variation, particularly for snake venoms. Copyright © 2015 Rokyta et al.

  14. Biological Mechanisms Whereby Social Exclusion May Contribute to the Etiology of Psychosis: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selten, Jean-Paul; Booij, Jan; Buwalda, Bauke; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2017-01-03

    The purpose of this review is to examine whether a contribution of social exclusion to the pathogenesis of psychosis is compatible with the dopamine hypothesis and/or the neurodevelopmental hypothesis. Humans experience social exclusion as defeating. An animal model for defeat is the resident-intruder paradigm. The defeated animal shows evidence of an increased sensitivity to amphetamine, increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, and increased firing of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. As for humans, one study showed that amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release was significantly greater among nonpsychotic young adults with severe hearing impairment than among normal hearing controls. Two other studies reported an association between childhood trauma and increased dopamine function in striatal subregions. Several studies have suggested that the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) may play a role in the processing of social stress. Importantly, the pgACC regulates the activity of the ventral striatum through bidirectional interconnections. We are not aware of studies in humans that examined whether (proxies for) social exclusion contributes to the structural brain changes present at psychosis onset. Animal studies, however, reported that long-term isolation may lead to reductions in volume of the total brain, hippocampus, or medial prefrontal cortex. Other animal studies reported that social defeat can reduce neurogenesis. In conclusion, the answer to the question as to whether there are plausible mechanisms whereby social exclusion can contribute to the pathogenesis of psychosis is cautiously affirmative. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Tinnitus Neural Mechanisms and Structural Changes in the Brain: The Contribution of Neuroimaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetti, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of sound in the absence of an external stimulus. Chronic tinnitus usually has a high impact in many aspects of patients' lives, such as emotional stress, sleep disturbance, concentration difficulties, and so on. These strong reactions are usually attributed to central nervous system involvement. Neuroimaging has revealed the implication of brain structures in the auditory system. Objective This systematic review points out neuroimaging studies that contribute to identifying the structures involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of generation and persistence of various forms of tinnitus. Data Synthesis Functional imaging research reveals that tinnitus perception is associated with the involvement of the nonauditory brain areas, including the front parietal area; the limbic system, which consists of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and amygdala; and the hippocampal and parahippocampal area. Conclusion The neuroimaging research confirms the involvement of the mechanisms of memory and cognition in the persistence of perception, anxiety, distress, and suffering associated with tinnitus.

  17. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-01-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from ‘old' and ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the ‘young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon. PMID:23572122

  18. Carriers of loss-of-function mutations in EXT display impaired pancreatic beta-cell reserve due to smaller pancreas volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Bernelot Moens

    Full Text Available Exotosin (EXT proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME. Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46-1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69-3.36] nmol·l-1·min-1, p<0.05. Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22-10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91-12.70] nmol·l-1·min-1 p<0.05, indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04. In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors.

  19. SETD2 loss-of-function promotes renal cancer branched evolution through replication stress and impaired DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanu, N.; Grönroos, E.; Martinez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Defining mechanisms that generate intratumour heterogeneity and branched evolution may inspire novel therapeutic approaches to limit tumour diversity and adaptation. SETD2 (Su(var), Enhancer of zeste, Trithorax-domain containing 2) trimethylates histone-3 lysine-36 (H3K36me3) at sites of active t...

  20. Loss of Function of GALNT2 Lowers High-Density Lipoproteins in Humans, Nonhuman Primates, and Rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Christoffersen, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human genetics studies have implicated GALNT2, encoding GalNAc-T2, as a regulator of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism, but the mechanisms relating GALNT2 to HDL-C remain unclear. We investigated the impact of homozygous GALNT2 deficiency on HDL-C in humans and mammalian mod...

  1. Loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 impair vesicular trafficking, tropoelastin secretion and cell survival.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hucthagowder, V.; Morava, E.; Kornak, U.; Lefeber, D.J.; Fischer, B.; Dimopoulou, A.; Aldinger, A.; Choi, J.; Davis, E.C.; Abuelo, D.N.; Adamowicz, M.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Basel-Vanagaite, L.; Fernandez, B.; Greally, M.T.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Kayserili, H.; Lemyre, E.; Tekin, M.; Turkmen, S.; Tuysuz, B.; Yuksel-Konuk, B.; Mundlos, S.; Maldergem, L. van; Wevers, R.A.; Urban, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump (ATP6V0A2). The goal of this study was to define the disease mechanisms that lead to connective tissue

  2. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    . Male and female ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice do not show significant changes in anxiety-like behaviour compared to control littermates during elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) tests. Surprisingly, ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice were unresponsive to the anxiolytic effect of a low dose...... of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam....

  3. Contributions and mechanisms of action of graphite nanomaterials in ultra high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbia, Libya Ahmed

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) reaches high strength and impermeability levels by using a relatively large volume fraction of a dense binder with fine microstructure in combination with high-quality aggregates of relatively small particle size, and reinforcing fibers. The dense microstructure of the cementitions binder is achieved by raising the packing density of the particulate matter, which covers sizes ranging from few hundred nanometers to few millimeters. The fine microstructure of binder in UHPC is realized by effective use of pozzolans to largely eliminate the coarse crystalline particles which exist among cement hydrates. UHPC incorporates (steel) fibers to overcome the brittleness of its dense, finely structured cementitious binder. The main thrust of this research is to evaluate the benefits of nanmaterials in UHPC. The dense, finely structure cementitious binder as well as the large volume fraction of the binder in UHPC benefit the dispersion of nanomaterials, and their interfacial interactions. The relatively close spacing of nanomaterials within the cementitious binder of UHPC enables them to render local reinforcement effects in critically stressed regions such as those in the vicinity of steel reinforcement and prestressing strands as well as fibers. Nanomaterials can also raise the density of the binder in UHPC by extending the particle size distribution down to the few nanometers range. Comprehensive experimental studies supported by theoretical investigations were undertake in order to optimize the use of nanomaterials in UHPC, identity the UHPC (mechanical) properties which benefit from the introduction of nanomaterials, and define the mechanisms of action of nanomaterials in UHPC. Carbon nanofiber was the primary nanomaterial used in this investigation. Some work was also conducted with graphite nanoplates. The key hypotheses of the project were as follows: (i) nanomaterials can make important contributions to the packing density of the

  4. Remembering to learn: independent place and journey coding mechanisms contribute to memory transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Amir S; Shapiro, Matthew L

    2012-02-08

    The neural mechanisms that integrate new episodes with established memories are unknown. When rats explore an environment, CA1 cells fire in place fields that indicate locations. In goal-directed spatial memory tasks, some place fields differentiate behavioral histories ("journey-dependent" place fields) while others do not ("journey-independent" place fields). To investigate how these signals inform learning and memory for new and familiar episodes, we recorded CA1 and CA3 activity in rats trained to perform a "standard" spatial memory task in a plus maze and in two new task variants. A "switch" task exchanged the start and goal locations in the same environment; an "altered environment" task contained unfamiliar local and distal cues. In the switch task, performance was mildly impaired, new firing maps were stable, but the proportion and stability of journey-dependent place fields declined. In the altered environment, overall performance was strongly impaired, new firing maps were unstable, and stable proportions of journey-dependent place fields were maintained. In both tasks, memory errors were accompanied by a decline in journey codes. The different dynamics of place and journey coding suggest that they reflect separate mechanisms and contribute to distinct memory computations. Stable place fields may represent familiar relationships among environmental features that are required for consistent memory performance. Journey-dependent activity may correspond with goal-directed behavioral sequences that reflect expectancies that generalize across environments. The complementary signals could help link current events with established memories, so that familiarity with either a behavioral strategy or an environment can inform goal-directed learning.

  5. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. ALDH1A3 loss of function causes bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyavi, Mani; Abouzeid, Hana; Gawdat, Ghada; de Preux, Anne-Sophie; Xiao, Tong; Bardakjian, Tanya; Schneider, Adele; Choi, Alex; Jorgenson, Eric; Baier, Herwig; El Sada, Mohamad; Schorderet, Daniel F; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2013-08-15

    The major active retinoid, all-trans retinoic acid, has long been recognized as critical for the development of several organs, including the eye. Mutations in STRA6, the gene encoding the cellular receptor for vitamin A, in patients with Matthew-Wood syndrome and anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), have previously demonstrated the importance of retinol metabolism in human eye disease. We used homozygosity mapping combined with next-generation sequencing to interrogate patients with anophthalmia and microphthalmia for new causative genes. We used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to study a family with two affected brothers with bilateral A/M and a simplex case with bilateral anophthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm. Analysis of novel sequence variants revealed homozygosity for two nonsense mutations in ALDH1A3, c.568A>G, predicting p.Lys190*, in the familial cases, and c.1165A>T, predicting p.Lys389*, in the simplex case. Both mutations predict nonsense-mediated decay and complete loss of function. We performed antisense morpholino (MO) studies in Danio rerio to characterize the developmental effects of loss of Aldh1a3 function. MO-injected larvae showed a significant reduction in eye size, and aberrant axonal projections to the tectum were noted. We conclude that ALDH1A3 loss of function causes anophthalmia and aberrant eye development in humans and in animal model systems.

  7. Associations of filaggrin gene loss-of-function variants and human papillomavirus-related cancer and pre-cancer in Danish adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Skaaby

    Full Text Available Filaggrin proteins are expressed in the skin, oral cavity, oesophagus, and cervical mucose. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG reduce filaggrin expression and cause an impaired skin barrier function. We hypothesized that FLG mutation carriers would be more susceptible to human papillomavirus (HPV infection and thus a higher risk of HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer. We investigated the association of the FLG genotype with incidence of HPV-related cancer of cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, anus and head and neck, and pre-cancer of the cervix.We included 13,376 persons from four population-based studies conducted in the same background population in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants were genotyped for the most common FLG mutations in Europeans. Information on cancer was obtained from The Danish Cancer Registry until 11 July 2011.There were 489 cases of prevalent and 97 cases of incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer (median follow-up 11.5 years. There was a statistically significant association between FLG genotype and incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer with a hazard ratio, HR = 2.1 (95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.2, 3.7 for FLG mutation carriers vs. wild types.FLG loss-of-function mutations were associated with higher incidence of HPV-related cancers and pre-cancers that are potentially screening and vaccine preventable.

  8. Unusual long survival despite severe lung disease of a child with biallelic loss of function mutations in ABCA-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. El Boustany

    Full Text Available Homozygous or compound heterozygous for frameshift or nonsense mutations in the ATP–binding cassette transporter A3 (ABCA3 is associated with neonatal respiratory failure and death within the first year of life without lung transplantation. We report the case of a newborn baby girl who developed severe respiratory distress soon after birth. She was diagnosed with compound heterozygous frameshift mutation of the ABCA3 gene. Despite extensive treatment (intravenous corticosteroids pulse therapy, oral corticosteroids, azithromycin, and hydroxychloroquine, she developed chronic respiratory failure. As the parents refused cardio-pulmonary transplantation and couldn't resolve to an accompaniment of end of life, a tracheostomy was performed resulting in continuous mechanical ventilation. A neurodevelopmental delay and an overall muscular dystrophy were noted. At the age of 5 years, after 2 episodes of pneumothorax, the patient died from severe respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this was the first case of a child with compound heterozygous frameshift mutation who posed such an ethical dilemma with a patient surviving till the age of five years. Keywords: ABCA3 deficiency, Compound heterozygous frameshift mutation, Neonatal respiratory failure, Tracheostomy, Mechanical ventilation, Ethical dilemma

  9. Dysfunction in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria crosstalk underlies SIGMAR1 loss of function mediated motor neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Azzedine, Hamid; Chrast, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Sigma 1 receptor (SIGMAR1) have been previously identified in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disruption of Sigmar1 in mouse leads to locomotor deficits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying motor phenotypes in human and mouse with disturbed SIGMAR1 function have not been described so far. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of SIGMAR1 in motor neuron biology. Characterization of Sigmar1(-/-) mice revealed that affected animals display locomotor deficits associated with muscle weakness, axonal degeneration and motor neuron loss. Using primary motor neuron cultures, we observed that pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIGMAR1 led to motor neuron axonal degeneration followed by cell death. Disruption of SIGMAR1 function in motor neurons disturbed endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts, affected intracellular calcium signalling and was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and defects in mitochondrial dynamics and transport. These defects were not observed in cultured sensory neurons, highlighting the exacerbated sensitivity of motor neurons to SIGMAR1 function. Interestingly, the inhibition of mitochondrial fission was sufficient to induce mitochondria axonal transport defects as well as axonal degeneration similar to the changes observed after SIGMAR1 inactivation or loss. Intracellular calcium scavenging and endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition were able to restore mitochondrial function and consequently prevent motor neuron degeneration. These results uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration mediated by loss of SIGMAR1 function and provide therapeutically relevant insight into motor neuronal diseases. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Mechanism of hyperphagia contributing to obesity in brain-derived neurotrophic factor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, E A; Biddinger, J E; Jones, K R; McAdams, J; Worman, A

    2013-01-15

    Global-heterozygous and brain-specific homozygous knockouts (KOs) of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) cause late- and early-onset obesity, respectively, both involving hyperphagia. Little is known about the mechanism underlying this hyperphagia or whether BDNF loss from peripheral tissues could contribute to overeating. Since global-homozygous BDNF-KO is perinatal lethal, a BDNF-KO that spared sufficient brainstem BDNF to support normal health was utilized to begin to address these issues. Meal pattern and microstructure analyses suggested overeating of BDNF-KO mice was mediated by deficits in both satiation and satiety that resulted in increased meal size and frequency and implicated a reduction of vagal signaling from the gut to the brain. Meal-induced c-Fos activation in the nucleus of the solitary tract, a more direct measure of vagal afferent signaling, however, was not decreased in BDNF-KO mice, and thus was not consistent with a vagal afferent role. Interestingly though, meal-induced c-Fos activation was increased in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMV) of BDNF-KO mice. This could imply that augmentation of vago-vagal digestive reflexes occurred (e.g., accommodation), which would support increased meal size and possibly increased meal number by reducing the increase in intragastric pressure produced by a given amount of ingesta. Additionally, vagal sensory neuron number in BDNF-KO mice was altered in a manner consistent with the increased meal-induced activation of the DMV. These results suggest reduced BDNF causes satiety and satiation deficits that support hyperphagia, possibly involving augmentation of vago-vagal reflexes mediated by central pathways or vagal afferents regulated by BDNF levels. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  12. Loss of Function of the Nuclear Receptor NR2F2, Encoding COUP-TF2, Causes Testis Development and Cardiac Defects in 46,XX Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashamboo, Anu; Eozenou, Caroline; Jorgensen, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Emerging evidence from murine studies suggests that mammalian sex determination is the outcome of an imbalance between mutually antagonistic male and female regulatory networks that canalize development down one pathway while actively repressing the other. However, in contrast to testis formation......, the gene regulatory pathways governing mammalian ovary development have remained elusive. We performed exome or Sanger sequencing on 79 46,XX SRY-negative individuals with either unexplained virilization or with testicular/ovotesticular disorders/differences of sex development (TDSD/OTDSD). We identified...... tissue. We demonstrate a highly significant association between the NR2F2 loss-of-function mutations and this syndromic form of DSD (p = 2.44 × 10-8). We show that COUP-TF2 is highly abundant in a FOXL2-negative stromal cell population of the fetal human ovary. In contrast to the mouse, these data...

  13. A novel loss-of-function mutation in GPR54/KISS1R leads to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in a highly consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimri, Revital; Lebenthal, Yael; Lazar, Liora; Chevrier, Lucie; Phillip, Moshe; Bar, Meytal; Hernandez-Mora, Eva; de Roux, Nicolas; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2011-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54), the kisspeptin receptor, is essential for stimulation of GnRH secretion and induction of puberty. Recently loss-of-function mutations of the GPR54 have been implicated as a cause of isolated idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). The objective of the study was to identify the genetic cause of IHH in a consanguineous pedigree and to characterize the phenotypic features from infancy through early adulthood. In six patients with normosmic IHH belonging to two families of Israeli Muslim-Arab origin highly related to one another, DNA was analyzed for mutations in the GnRHR and GPR54 genes, with functional analysis of the mutation found. The five males underwent comprehensive endocrine evaluation and were under longitudinal follow-up; the one female presented in early adulthood. A new homozygous mutation (c.T815C) in GPR54 leading to a phenylalanine substitution by serine (p.F272S) was detected in all patients. Functional analysis showed an almost complete inhibition of kisspeptin-induced GPR54 signaling and a dramatic decrease of the mutated receptor expression at the cell surface. The males exhibited the same clinical features from infancy to adulthood, characterized by cryptorchidism, a relatively short penis, and no spontaneous pubertal development. The female patient presented at 18 yr with impuberism and primary amenorrhea. Repeated stimulation tests demonstrated complete gonadotropin deficiency throughout follow-up. A novel loss-of-function mutation (p.F272S) in the GPR54 gene is associated with familial normosmic IHH. Underdeveloped external genitalia and impuberism point to the major role of GPR54 in the activation of the gonadotropic axis from intrauterine life to adulthood.

  14. Homozygous loss of function BRCA1 variant causing a Fanconi-anemia-like phenotype, a clinical report and review of previous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Bruna L; Homma, Thais K; Funari, Mariana F A; Lerario, Antônio M; Leal, Aline M; Velloso, Elvira D R P; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2018-03-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare and heterogeneous genetic syndrome. It is associated with short stature, bone marrow failure, high predisposition to cancer, microcephaly and congenital malformation. Many genes have been associated with FA. Previously, two adult patients with biallelic pathogenic variant in Breast Cancer 1 gene (BRCA1) had been identified in Fanconi Anemia-like condition. The proband was a 2.5 year-old girl with severe short stature, microcephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Her parents were third degree cousins. Routine screening tests for short stature was normal. We conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) of the proband and used an analysis pipeline to identify rare nonsynonymous genetic variants that cause short stature. We identified a homozygous loss-of-function BRCA1 mutation (c.2709T > A; p. Cys903*), which promotes the loss of critical domains of the protein. Cytogenetic study with DEB showed an increased chromosomal breakage. We screened heterozygous parents of the index case for cancer and we detected, in her mother, a metastatic adenocarcinoma in an axillar lymph node with probable primary site in the breast. It is possible to consolidate the FA-like phenotype associated with biallelic loss-of-function BRCA1, characterized by microcephaly, short stature, developmental delay, dysmorphic face features and cancer predisposition. In our case, the WES allowed to establish the genetic cause of short stature in the context of a chromosome instability syndrome. An identification of BRCA1 mutations in our patient allowed precise genetic counseling and also triggered cancer screening for the patient and her family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. In Vivo Modelling of ATP1A3 G316S-Induced Ataxia in C. elegans Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Reveals Dominant Loss of Function Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altar Sorkaç

    Full Text Available The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program admitted a male patient with unclassifiable late-onset ataxia-like symptoms. Exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous de novo mutation converting glycine 316 to serine in ATP1A3, which might cause disease. ATP1A3 encodes the Na+/K+ ATPase pump α3-subunit. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination for genome editing, we modelled this putative disease-causing allele in Caenorhabditis elegans, recreating the patient amino acid change in eat-6, the orthologue of ATP1A3. The impact of the mutation on eat-6 function at the neuromuscular junction was examined using two behavioural assays: rate of pharyngeal pumping and sensitivity to aldicarb, a drug that causes paralysis over time via the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. The patient allele decreased pumping rates and caused hypersensitivity to aldicarb. Animals heterozygous for the allele exhibited similar defects, whereas loss of function mutations in eat-6 were recessive. These results indicate that the mutation is dominant and impairs the neuromuscular function. Thus, we conclude that the de novo G316S mutation in ATP1A3 likely causes or contributes to patient symptoms. More broadly, we conclude that, for conserved genes, it is possible to rapidly and easily model human diseases in C. elegans using CRIPSR/Cas9 genome editing.

  16. Mechanical branch constraints contribute to life-history variation across tree species in a Bolivian forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.; Gelder, van H.A.; Poorter, L.

    2006-01-01

    1 Trade-offs among plant traits may contribute to specialization for different environments and coexistence of plant species. This may be the first study that shows how trade-offs among branch traits contribute to variation in crown size, light requirements and maximum height across multiple

  17. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hu; Clark, Shawn T; Surendra, Anuradha; Copeland, Julia K; Wang, Pauline W; Ammar, Ron; Collins, Cathy; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Nislow, Corey; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S; Cowen, Leah E

    2015-11-01

    The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients, providing a poignant example of parallel evolution. Together, this combined clinical-genomic approach provides a high-resolution portrait of the fungal microbiome of cystic fibrosis patient lungs and identifies a genetic basis of pathogen adaptation.

  18. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hu Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients, providing a poignant example of parallel evolution. Together, this combined clinical-genomic approach provides a high-resolution portrait of the fungal microbiome of cystic fibrosis patient lungs and identifies a genetic basis of pathogen adaptation.

  19. Identification of IbeR as a Stationary-Phase Regulator in Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 that Carries a Loss-of-Function Mutation in rpoS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IbeR is a regulator present in meningitic Escherichia coli strain E44 that carries a loss-of-function mutation in the stationary-phase (SP regulatory gene rpoS. In order to determine whether IbeR is an SP regulator in E44, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS were used to compare the proteomes of a noninvasive ibeR deletion mutant BR2 and its parent strain E44 in the SP. Four up-regulated (TufB, GapA, OmpA, AhpC and three down-regulated (LpdA, TnaA, OpmC proteins in BR2 were identified when compared to E44. All these proteins contribute to energy metabolism or stress resistance, which is related to SP regulation. One of the down-regulated proteins, tryptophanase (TnaA, which is regulated by RpoS in other E. coli strains, is associated with SP regulation via production of a signal molecule indole. Our studies demonstrated that TnaA was required for E44 invasion, and that indole was able to restore the noninvasive phenotype of the tnaA mutant. The production of indole was significantly reduced in BR2, indicating that ibeR is required for the indole production via tnaA. Survival studies under different stress conditions indicated that IbeR contributed to bacteria stress resistance in the SP. Taken together, IbeR is a novel regulator contributing to the SP regulation.

  20. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  1. Naturally Occurring Missense MRGPRX2 Variants Display Loss of Function Phenotype for Mast Cell Degranulation in Response to Substance P, Hemokinin-1, Human β-Defensin-3, and Icatibant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkanfari, Ibrahim; Gupta, Kshitij; Jahan, Tahsin; Ali, Hydar

    2018-05-23

    Human mast cells (MCs) express a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) known as Mas-related GPCR X2 (MRGPRX2). Activation of this receptor by a diverse group of cationic ligands such as neuropeptides, host defense peptides, and Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases and pseudoallergic drug reactions. For most GPCRs, the extracellular (ECL) domains and their associated transmembrane (TM) domains display the greatest structural diversity and are responsible for binding different ligands. The goal of the current study was to determine if naturally occurring missense variants within MRGPRX2's ECL/TM domains contribute to gain or loss of function phenotype for MC degranulation in response to neuropeptides (substance P and hemokinin-1), a host defense peptide (human β-defensin-3) and a Food and Drug Administration-approved cationic drug (bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, icatibant). We have identified eight missense variants within MRGPRX2's ECL/TM domains from publicly available exome-sequencing databases. We investigated the ability of MRGPRX2 ligands to induce degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells individually expressing these naturally occurring MRGPRX2 missense variants. Using stable and transient transfections, we found that all variants express in rat basophilic leukemia cells. However, four natural MRGPRX2 variants, G165E (rs141744602), D184H (rs372988289), W243R (rs150365137), and H259Y (rs140862085) failed to respond to any of the ligands tested. Thus, diverse MRGPRX2 ligands use common sites on the receptor to induce MC degranulation. These findings have important clinical implications for MRGPRX2 and MC-mediated pseudoallergy and chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Contributions from cognitive neuroscience to understanding functional mechanisms of visual search.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphreys, G.W.; Hodsoll, J.; Olivers, C.N.L.; Yoon, E.Y.

    2006-01-01

    We argue that cognitive neuroscience can contribute not only information about the neural localization of processes underlying visual search, but also information about the functional nature of these processes. First we present an overview of recent work on whether search for form - colour

  3. Differences in Binding and Monitoring Mechanisms Contribute to Lifespan Age Differences in False Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandakova, Yana; Shing, Yee Lee; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    Based on a 2-component framework of episodic memory development across the lifespan (Shing & Lindenberger, 2011), we examined the contribution of memory-related binding and monitoring processes to false memory susceptibility in childhood and old age. We administered a repeated continuous recognition task to children (N = 20, 10-12 years),…

  4. Mechanisms Contributing to the Induction and Storage of Pavlovian Fear Memories in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongbeom; Pare, Denis; Nair, Satish S.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of plasticity in the amygdala vs. its afferent pathways to conditioned fear remain controversial. Some believe that thalamic and cortical neurons transmitting information about the conditioned stimulus (CS) to the lateral amygdala (LA) serve a relay function. Others maintain that thalamic and/or cortical plasticity is…

  5. The old with the die. A contribution to metaphysics of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijjas, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Since the rise of quantum mechanics also their ideological implications and consequences were discussed. Meanwhile still scarcely a metaphysical problem exists, which was not supposedly solved under calling on quantum theory. Anna Ijjas inquires the usual practice and developes a new model of the assignment of quantum mechanics and metaphysics. She discusses both the physical foundations and the classical philosophical controversies, before she draws consequencies for the relation determination of brain and consciousness, the problem of freedom of will, as well as for the question of the influence of God in the world.

  6. Contributions to naive quantum mechanics. A textbook for mathematicians and physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlmann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The present text examplifies by means of 60 citations from current textbooks for the study of physics the necessarity of a mathematically rigorous formulation of quantum mechanics. Well known statements of many physicists about quantum mechanics at their mathematical tool kit are commented in form of a dialogue und mathematical points of view. Supplemented are the representations by a selection of theorems of higher analysis relevant for quantum theory. The book applies to mathematicians and mathematically interested physicists or students with founded mathematical knowledge.

  7. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blonde, G.; Poizat, F.; Triboulet, A.

    2008-02-01

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  8. Contribution of local probes in the understanding of mechanical effect on localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignal, Vincent; Oltra, Roland; Mary, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the actual effects of mechanical stresses on the processes leading to pitting corrosion necessitates to develop both a mechanical approach and electrochemical experiments at a microscopic scale. Typical embrittlement can be observed after straining around MnS inclusions on a re-sulfurized 316 stainless steels and their corrosion sensitivity have been classified using the micro-capillary electrochemical cell technique. It has been shown that the numerical simulation of the location of stress gradients is possible before the local electrochemical analysis and could be a very interesting way to define the pitting susceptibility of micro-cracked areas during straining. (authors)

  9. The Best of Two Worlds. Article 6 mechanisms shall contribute to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm; Soezer, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were two milestone achievements in 2015. The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) put forward by Parties before the Climate Conference in Paris will have to be fully embedded in the 2030 agenda to achieve truly...... transformational, lasting impacts for low carbon and SDGs and, ultimately, resilient communities that are able to quickly respond to and recover from adverse situations....

  10. Mechanical and IL-1β Responsive miR-365 Contributes to Osteoarthritis Development by Targeting Histone Deacetylase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Studies show that excessive mechanical stress can directly damage the cartilage extracellular matrix and shift the balance in chondrocytes to favor catabolic activity over anabolism. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are emerging as important regulators in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. We have found that mechanical loading up-regulated microRNA miR-365 in growth plate chondrocytes, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation. Here, we explored the role of the mechanical responsive microRNA miR-365 in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. We found that miR-365 was up-regulated by cyclic loading and IL-1β stimulation in articular chondrocytes through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor NF-κB. miR-365 expressed significant higher level in rat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery induced OA cartilage as well as human OA cartilage from primary OA patients and traumatic OA Patients. Overexpression of miR-365 in chondrocytes increases gene expression of matrix degrading enzyme matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP13 and collagen type X (Col X. The increase in miR-365 expression in OA cartilage and in response to IL-1 may contribute to the abnormal gene expression pattern characteristic of OA. Inhibition of miR-365 down-regulated IL-1β induced MMP13 and Col X gene expression. We further showed histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4 is a direct target of miR-365, which mediates mechanical stress and inflammation in OA pathogenesis. Thus, miR-365 is a critical regulator of mechanical stress and pro-inflammatory responses, which contributes cartilage catabolism. Manipulation of the expression of miR-365 in articular chondrocytes by miR-365 inhibitor may be a potent therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis.

  11. The contribution of experimental in vivo models to understanding the mechanisms of adaptation to mechanical loading in bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Meakin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading.Jiri Heřt introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gauges to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced.Experiments combining strain gauge instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (remodeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that; over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically-adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of

  12. The Contribution of Experimental in vivo Models to Understanding the Mechanisms of Adaptation to Mechanical Loading in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, Lee B.; Price, Joanna S.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading. Jiri Hert introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gages to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced. Experiments combining strain gage instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats, and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (re)modeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice, which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles, and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of rest between them

  13. Identification of an Nav1.1 sodium channel (SCN1A) loss-of-function mutation associated with familial simple febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Gambardella, Antonio; Rusconi, Raffaella; Schiavon, Emanuele; Annesi, Ferdinanda; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Labate, Angelo; Carrideo, Sara; Chifari, Rosanna; Canevini, Maria Paola; Canger, Raffaele; Franceschetti, Silvana; Annesi, Grazia; Wanke, Enzo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) affect 5–12% of infants and children up to 6 years of age. There is now epidemiological evidence that FS are associated with subsequent afebrile and unprovoked seizures in ≈7% of patients, which is 10 times more than in the general population. Extensive genetic studies have demonstrated that various loci are responsible for familial FS, and the FEB3 autosomal-dominant locus has been identified on chromosome 2q23–24, where the SCN1A gene is mapped. However, gene mutations causing simple FS have not been found yet. Here we show that the M145T mutation of a well conserved amino acid in the first transmembrane segment of domain I of the human Nav1.1 channel α-subunit cosegregates in all 12 individuals of a large Italian family affected by simple FS. Functional studies in mammalian cells demonstrate that the mutation causes a 60% reduction of current density and a 10-mV positive shift of the activation curve. Thus, M145T is a loss-of-function mutant. These results show that monogenic FS should also be considered a channelopathy. PMID:16326807

  14. ABCC8 R1420H Loss-of-Function Variant in a Southwest American Indian Community: Association With Increased Birth Weight and Doubled Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Leslie J; Muller, Yunhua Li; Remedi, Maria Sara; Traurig, Michael; Piaggi, Paolo; Wiessner, Gregory; Huang, Ke; Stacy, Alyssa; Kobes, Sayuko; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Nichols, Colin G; Bogardus, Clifton

    2015-12-01

    Missense variants in KCNJ11 and ABCC8, which encode the KIR6.2 and SUR1 subunits of the β-cell KATP channel, have previously been implicated in type 2 diabetes, neonatal diabetes, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (HHI). To determine whether variation in these genes affects risk for type 2 diabetes or increased birth weight as a consequence of fetal hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians, missense and common noncoding variants were analyzed in individuals living in the Gila River Indian Community. A R1420H variant in SUR1 (ABCC8) was identified in 3.3% of the population (N = 7,710). R1420H carriers had higher mean birth weights and a twofold increased risk for type 2 diabetes with a 7-year earlier onset age despite being leaner than noncarriers. One individual homozygous for R1420H was identified; retrospective review of his medical records was consistent with HHI and a diagnosis of diabetes at age 3.5 years. In vitro studies showed that the R1420H substitution decreases KATP channel activity. Identification of this loss-of-function variant in ABCC8 with a carrier frequency of 3.3% affects clinical care as homozygous inheritance and potential HHI will occur in 1/3,600 births in this American Indian population. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Loss-of-Function Mutations in LGI4, a Secreted Ligand Involved in Schwann Cell Myelination, Are Responsible for Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shifeng; Maluenda, Jérôme; Marguet, Florent; Shboul, Mohammad; Quevarec, Loïc; Bonnard, Carine; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Tohari, Sumanty; Tan, Thong Teck; Kong, Mung Kei; Monaghan, Kristin G; Cho, Megan T; Siskind, Carly E; Sampson, Jacinda B; Rocha, Carolina Tesi; Alkazaleh, Fawaz; Gonzales, Marie; Rigonnot, Luc; Whalen, Sandra; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Bucourt, Martine; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Laquerrière, Annie; Reversade, Bruno; Melki, Judith

    2017-04-06

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a developmental condition characterized by multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movements. Through genetic mapping of disease loci and whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated multiplex families presenting with severe AMC, we identified biallelic loss-of-function mutations in LGI4 (leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 4). LGI4 is a ligand secreted by Schwann cells that regulates peripheral nerve myelination via its cognate receptor ADAM22 expressed by neurons. Immunolabeling experiments and transmission electron microscopy of the sciatic nerve from one of the affected individuals revealed a lack of myelin. Functional tests using affected individual-derived iPSCs showed that these germline mutations caused aberrant splicing of the endogenous LGI4 transcript and in a cell-based assay impaired the secretion of truncated LGI4 protein. This is consistent with previous studies reporting arthrogryposis in Lgi4-deficient mice due to peripheral hypomyelination. This study adds to the recent reports implicating defective axoglial function as a key cause of AMC. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The LRRK2 G2385R variant is a partial loss-of-function mutation that affects synaptic vesicle trafficking through altered protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Maria Dolores Perez; Marsicano, Silvia; Daniele, Federica; Marte, Antonella; Pischedda, Francesca; Di Cairano, Eliana; Piovesana, Ester; von Zweydorf, Felix; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Onofri, Franco; Perego, Carla; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2017-07-14

    Mutations in the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 protein contains several functional domains, including protein-protein interaction domains at its N- and C-termini. In this study, we analyzed the functional features attributed to LRRK2 by its N- and C-terminal domains. We combined TIRF microscopy and synaptopHluorin assay to visualize synaptic vesicle trafficking. We found that N- and C-terminal domains have opposite impact on synaptic vesicle dynamics. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that different proteins are bound at the two extremities, namely β3-Cav2.1 at N-terminus part and β-Actin and Synapsin I at C-terminus domain. A sequence variant (G2385R) harboured within the C-terminal WD40 domain increases the risk for PD. Complementary biochemical and imaging approaches revealed that the G2385R variant alters strength and quality of LRRK2 interactions and increases fusion of synaptic vesicles. Our data suggest that the G2385R variant behaves like a loss-of-function mutation that mimics activity-driven events. Impaired scaffolding capabilities of mutant LRRK2 resulting in perturbed vesicular trafficking may arise as a common pathophysiological denominator through which different LRRK2 pathological mutations cause disease.

  17. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  18. A case of hypocholesterolemia and steatosis in a carrier of a PCSK9 loss-of-function mutation and polymorphisms predisposing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Mathilde; Vokaer, Benoit; Seidah, Nabil G

    We report a new case of hypobetalipoproteinemia in a 44-year-old man of Peruvian origin exhibiting a heterozygous PCSK9 missense mutation (c.946 G>T, p. Gly316Cys). In vitro functional studies demonstrated that this mutation leads to a loss of function of PCSK9 on low-density lipoprotein receptor degradation. This patient exhibited liver steatosis; he was neither diabetic, nor obese or alcoholic, but is a carrier of 2 polymorphisms, p.Ile148Met (rs738409) and p.Glu167Lys (rs58542926) on PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 gene, respectively, previously shown to be associated with nonalcoholic steatosis and fibrosis evolution. These data suggested that if a resistance to hepatic steatosis mediated by the PCSK9 deficiency exists, as demonstrated in mice, it is not sufficient to prevent hepatic fatty accumulation in the case of genetic factors predisposing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diapause and quiescence: dormancy mechanisms that contribute to the geographical expansion of mosquitoes and their evolutionary success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Diego Felipe Araujo; de Albuquerque, Cleide Maria Ribeiro; Oliva, Luciana Oliveira; de Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira

    2017-06-26

    Mosquitoes are insects belonging to the order Diptera and family Culicidae. They are distributed worldwide and include approximately 3500 species, of which about 300 have medical and veterinary importance. The evolutionary success of mosquitoes, in both tropical and temperate regions, is due to the various survival strategies these insects have developed throughout their life histories. Of the many adaptive mechanisms, diapause and quiescence, two different types of dormancy, likely contribute to the establishment, maintenance and spread of natural mosquito populations. This review seeks to objectively and coherently describe the terms diapause and quiescence, which can be confused in the literature because the phenotypic effects of these mechanisms are often similar.

  20. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  1. The clean development mechanism's contribution to sustainable development: A review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm

    2007-01-01

    The challenges of how to respond to climate change and ensure sustainable development are currently high on the political agenda among the world's leading nations. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is part of the global carbon market developing rapidly as part of the Kyoto response towards...

  2. Alternative Mechanisms to Encourage Individual Contributions to Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Sandra; Keating, Jack; Lamb, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Financing vocational education and training, as part of Australia's commitment to lifelong learning, will become a greater challenge as increased spending on other public services, such as health and welfare caused by an aging population, constrains government education expenditure. This report examines a range of mechanisms to encourage…

  3. Whole-protein alanine-scanning mutagenesis of allostery: A large percentage of a protein can contribute to mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qingling; Fenton, Aron W

    2017-09-01

    Many studies of allosteric mechanisms use limited numbers of mutations to test whether residues play "key" roles. However, if a large percentage of the protein contributes to allosteric function, mutating any residue would have a high probability of modifying allostery. Thus, a predicted mechanism that is dependent on only a few residues could erroneously appear to be supported. We used whole-protein alanine-scanning mutagenesis to determine which amino acid sidechains of human liver pyruvate kinase (hL-PYK; approved symbol PKLR) contribute to regulation by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru-1,6-BP; activator) and alanine (inhibitor). Each nonalanine/nonglycine residue of hL-PYK was mutated to alanine to generate 431 mutant proteins. Allosteric functions in active proteins were quantified by following substrate affinity over a concentration range of effectors. Results show that different residues contribute to the two allosteric functions. Only a small fraction of mutated residues perturbed inhibition by alanine. In contrast, a large percentage of mutated residues influenced activation by Fru-1,6-BP; inhibition by alanine is not simply the reverse of activation by Fru-1,6-BP. Moreover, the results show that Fru-1,6-BP activation would be extremely difficult to elucidate using a limited number of mutations. Additionally, this large mutational data set will be useful to train and test computational algorithms aiming to predict allosteric mechanisms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Microscopic mechanisms contributing to the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP) for TWIP copper alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Zhang, Z J; Li, L L; An, X H; Zhang, Z F

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the concept of "twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) alloys" is broadened, and the underlying intrinsic microscopic mechanisms of the general TWIP effect are intensively explored. For the first aspect, "TWIP copper alloys" was proposed following the concept of "TWIP steels", as they share essentially the same strengthening and toughening mechanisms. For the second aspect, three intrinsic features of twinning: i.e. "dynamic development", "planarity", as well as "orientation selectivity" were derived from the detailed exploration of the deformation behavior in TWIP copper alloys. These features can be considered the microscopic essences of the general "TWIP effect". Moreover, the effective cooperation between deformation twinning and dislocation slipping in TWIP copper alloys leads to a desirable tendency: the synchronous improvement of strength and plasticity (SISP). This breakthrough against the traditional trade-off relationship, achieved by the general "TWIP effect", may provide useful strategies for designing high-performance engineering materials.

  5. ATP Supply May Contribute to Light-Enhanced Calcification in Corals More Than Abiotic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Galli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Zooxanthellate corals are known to increase calcification rates when exposed to light, a phenomenon called light-enhanced calcification that is believed to be mediated by symbionts' photosynthetic activity. There is controversy over the mechanism behind this phenomenon, with hypotheses coarsely divided between abiotic and biologically-mediated mechanisms. At the same time, accumulating evidence shows that calcification in corals relies on active ion transport to deliver the skeleton building blocks into the calcifying medium, making it is an energetically costly activity. Here we build on generally accepted conceptual models of the coral calcification machinery and conceptual models of the energetics of coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis to develop a model that can be used to isolate the biologically-mediated and abiotic effects of photosynthesis, respiration, temperature, and seawater chemistry on coral calcification rates and related metabolic costs. We tested this model on data from the Mediterranean scleractinian Cladocora caespitosa, an acidification resistant species. We concluded that most of the variation in calcification rates due to photosynthesis, respiration and temperature can be attributed to biologically-mediated mechanisms, in particular to the ATP supplied to the active ion transports. Abiotic effects are also present but are of smaller magnitude. Instead, the decrease in calcification rates caused by acidification, albeit small, is sustained by both abiotic and biologically-mediated mechanisms. However, there is a substantial extra cost of calcification under acidified conditions. Based on these findings and on a literature review we suggest that the energy aspect of coral calcification might have been so far underappreciated.

  6. REMEMBERING TO LEARN: INDEPENDENT PLACE AND JOURNEY CODING MECHANISMS CONTRIBUTE TO MEMORY TRANSFER

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar, Amir S.; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that integrate new episodes with established memories are unknown. When rats explore an environment, CA1 cells fire in place fields that indicate locations. In goal-directed spatial memory tasks, some place fields differentiate behavioral histories (journey-dependent place fields) while others do not (journey-independent place fields). To investigate how these signals inform learning and memory for new and familiar episodes, we recorded CA1 and CA3 activity in rats train...

  7. Contribution of maintenance group towards automation/mechanization in natural uranium fuel plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    Competition in an increasingly global economy has created new benchmarks. Developing successful efforts to continuously improve performance is becoming a key responsibility of engineers and managers in all organisations. Recent studies have shown that maintenance has got great impact on the overall performance and profitability of the organisations. Development of mechanization and automation in existing equipment has a direct bearing on the available manpower, production requirement, quality specification for raw material, energy consumption and working environment

  8. Contribution to numerical and mechanical modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retel, V.

    2002-12-01

    Pressurised water reactor fuel rods (PWR) are the place of nuclear fission, resulting in unstable and radioactive elements. Today, the mechanical loading on the cladding is harder and harder and is partly due to the fuel pellet movement. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the cladding needs to be simulated with models allowing to assess realistic stress and strain fields for all the running conditions. Besides, the mechanical treatment of the fuel pellet needs to be improved. The study is part of a global way of improving the treatment of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in the 1D finite elements EDF code named CYRANO3. Non-axisymmetrical multidirectional effects have to be accounted for in a context of unidirectional axisymmetrical finite elements. The aim of this work is double. Firstly a model simulating the effect of stress concentration on the cladding, due to the opening of the radial cracks of fuel, had been added in the code. Then, the fragmented state of fuel material has been taken into account in the thermomechanical calculation, through a model which led the strain and stress relaxation in the pellet due to the fragmentation, be simulated. This model has been implemented in the code for two types of fuel behaviour: elastic and viscoplastic. (author)

  9. Oxidative mechanisms contributing to the developmental neurotoxicity of nicotine and chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Dan; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2005-01-01

    Nicotine and chlorpyrifos are developmental neurotoxicants that, despite their differences in structure and mechanism of action, share many aspects for damage to the developing brain. Both are thought to generate oxidative radicals; in the current study, we evaluated their ability to produce lipid peroxidation in two in vitro models of neural cell development (PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells) and for nicotine, with treatment of adolescent rats in vivo. Nicotine and chlorpyrifos, in concentrations relevant to human exposures, elicited an increase in thiobarbituric-acid-reactive species (TBARS) in undifferentiated cells, an effect that was prevented by addition of the antioxidant, Vitamin E. Initiating differentiation with nerve growth factor, which enhances nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression, increased the TBARS response to nicotine but not chlorpyrifos, suggesting that the two agents act by different originating mechanisms to converge on the endpoint of oxidative damage. Furthermore, nicotine protected the cells from oxidative damage evoked by chlorpyrifos and similarly blocked the antimitotic effect of chlorpyrifos. Treatment of adolescent rats with nicotine elicited increases in TBARS in multiple brain regions when given in doses that simulate plasma nicotine concentrations found in smokers or at one-tenth the dose. Our results indicate that nicotine and chlorpyrifos elicit oxidative damage to developing neural cells both in vitro and in vivo, a mechanism that explains some of the neurodevelopmental endpoints that are common to the two agents. The balance between neuroprotectant and neurotoxicant actions of nicotine may be particularly important in situations where exposure to tobacco smoke is combined with other prooxidant insults

  10. Dynamic Action Potential Restitution Contributes to Mechanical Restitution in Right Ventricular Myocytes From Pulmonary Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Matthew E L; Pervolaraki, Eleftheria; Bernus, Olivier; White, Ed

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the steepened dynamic action potential duration (APD) restitution of rats with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) and right ventricular (RV) failure and tested whether the observed APD restitution properties were responsible for negative mechanical restitution in these myocytes. PAH and RV failure were provoked in male Wistar rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT) and compared with saline-injected animals (CON). Action potentials were recorded from isolated RV myocytes at stimulation frequencies between 1 and 9 Hz. Action potential waveforms recorded at 1 Hz were used as voltage clamp profiles (action potential clamp) at stimulation frequencies between 1 and 7 Hz to evoke rate-dependent currents. Voltage clamp profiles mimicking typical CON and MCT APD restitution were applied and cell shortening simultaneously monitored. Compared with CON myocytes, MCT myocytes were hypertrophied; had less polarized diastolic membrane potentials; had action potentials that were triggered by decreased positive current density and shortened by decreased negative current density; APD was longer and APD restitution steeper. APD90 restitution was unchanged by exposure to the late Na + -channel blocker (5 μM) ranolazine or the intracellular Ca 2+ buffer BAPTA. Under AP clamp, stimulation frequency-dependent inward currents were smaller in MCT myocytes and were abolished by BAPTA. In MCT myocytes, increasing stimulation frequency decreased contraction amplitude when depolarization duration was shortened, to mimic APD restitution, but not when depolarization duration was maintained. We present new evidence that the membrane potential of PAH myocytes is less stable than normal myocytes, being more easily perturbed by external currents. These observations can explain increased susceptibility to arrhythmias. We also present novel evidence that negative APD restitution is at least in part responsible for the negative mechanical restitution in PAH myocytes. Thus

  11. Iodine-125 induced DNA strand breakage: Contributions of different physical and chemical radiation action mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.

    2002-01-01

    The decay of the radioisotope 125 I into 125 Te is typically followed by the emission of two groups of approximately 10 electrons each. In deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with 125 I incorporated, these electrons produce various types of damage to DNA, e.g. single and double strand breaks. They occur through direct actions of physical tracks, or indirect actions of radicals produced in water. Among the direct actions one should consider not only the excitation and ionization of DNA by electrons but also the neutralization of highly charged 125m Te ions with electrons from neighboring molecules. The present work begins with a detailed description of electron tracks with the use of the PARTRAC code, compares results with recent experiments, and concludes with a firm assessment of the contribution to the strand break yields from the neutralization effect. (orig.)

  12. Contribution to the study of scaling mechanisms. Application to electric anti-scaling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Alain

    1982-01-01

    In order to precisely study scaling mechanisms, this research thesis first aims at a deeper understanding of natural waters and their equilibriums by developing the Legrand and Poirier graphical method, and then studies the conditions for obtaining deposited products by electrolytic way on metal substrates the surface condition of which allows a better monitoring of the first stages of the phenomenon. The author also addresses the determination of an operating principle for electrical anti-scaling systems, and the development of a test method for the assessment of their efficiency. The author also identifies some rules allowing this efficiency to be improved in the case of natural waters

  13. Mechanisms of superficial micropunctate corneal staining with sodium fluorescein: the contribution of pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandamwar, Kalika L; Garrett, Qian; Papas, Eric B

    2012-04-01

    To establish if sodium fluorescein (SFL) dye accumulation within intercellular spaces on the ocular surface contributes to the appearance of superficial punctate corneal staining. Thirteen subjects bilaterally wore PureVision™ lenses that had been pre-soaked in ReNu MultiPlus® multipurpose solution. After 1h of lens wear, corneal staining with SFL was assessed using a standard slit-lamp technique. Participants who presented with bilateral, corneal staining were selected for further evaluation. A randomly selected eye was rinsed with saline three times. Fellow eyes (control) received no rinsing. After each rinse, the appearance of SFL staining was recorded without any further instillation of the dye. To eliminate any confounding effects of staining due to residual fluorescein in the tear menisci, corneal staining was induced in freshly excised, isolated, rabbit eyes by topical administration of 0.001% PHMB and staining, rinsing and grading were performed as above. Nine out of 13 subjects presented with bilateral diffuse corneal staining (mean grade±SD: 2.4±0.7). The mean staining grades in test and control eyes respectively after each of the three rinses were (1) 2.41±0.41, 2.25±0.69 (p=0.9); (2) 2.34±0.79, 2.1±0.83 (p=0.8); and (3) 1.71±0.65, 1.60±0.79 (p=0.6) there was no significant reduction in staining with rinsing (p>0.05) and no difference was observed between test and control eyes at any sampling-point. Similar observations made in ex vivo rabbit eyes replicated these results. Pooling or accumulation of SFL solution within intercellular spaces does not appear to contribute to the appearance of superficial micropunctate corneal staining. Copyright © 2011 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does a voltage-sensitive outer envelope transport mechanism contributes to the chloroplast iron uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Ádám; Kovács, Krisztina; Müller, Brigitta; Vázquez, Saúl; Hamar, Éva; Pham, Hong Diep; Tóth, Brigitta; Abadía, Javier; Fodor, Ferenc

    2016-12-01

    Based on the effects of inorganic salts on chloroplast Fe uptake, the presence of a voltage-dependent step is proposed to play a role in Fe uptake through the outer envelope. Although iron (Fe) plays a crucial role in chloroplast physiology, only few pieces of information are available on the mechanisms of chloroplast Fe acquisition. Here, the effect of inorganic salts on the Fe uptake of intact chloroplasts was tested, assessing Fe and transition metal uptake using bathophenantroline-based spectrophotometric detection and plasma emission-coupled mass spectrometry, respectively. The microenvironment of Fe was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Transition metal cations (Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Mn 2+ ) enhanced, whereas oxoanions (NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , and BO 3 3- ) reduced the chloroplast Fe uptake. The effect was insensitive to diuron (DCMU), an inhibitor of chloroplast inner envelope-associated Fe uptake. The inorganic salts affected neither Fe forms in the uptake assay buffer nor those incorporated into the chloroplasts. The significantly lower Zn and Mn uptake compared to that of Fe indicates that different mechanisms/transporters are involved in their acquisition. The enhancing effect of transition metals on chloroplast Fe uptake is likely related to outer envelope-associated processes, since divalent metal cations are known to inhibit Fe 2+ transport across the inner envelope. Thus, a voltage-dependent step is proposed to play a role in Fe uptake through the chloroplast outer envelope on the basis of the contrasting effects of transition metal cations and oxoaninons.

  15. Both cell-autonomous mechanisms and hormones contribute to sexual development in vertebrates and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Ashley; Monteiro, Antónia

    2013-08-01

    The differentiation of male and female characteristics in vertebrates and insects has long been thought to proceed via different mechanisms. Traditionally, vertebrate sexual development was thought to occur in two phases: a primary and a secondary phase, the primary phase involving the differentiation of the gonads, and the secondary phase involving the differentiation of other sexual traits via the influence of sex hormones secreted by the gonads. In contrast, insect sexual development was thought to depend exclusively on cell-autonomous expression of sex-specific genes. Recently, however, new evidence indicates that both vertebrates and insects rely on sex hormones as well as cell-autonomous mechanisms to develop sexual traits. Collectively, these new data challenge the traditional vertebrate definitions of primary and secondary sexual development, call for a redefinition of these terms, and indicate the need for research aimed at explaining the relative dependence on cell-autonomous versus hormonally guided sexual development in animals. © 2013 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Contribution to the study of the mechanisms of turbulent diffusion and of related matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailliat, Alain.

    1980-12-01

    The subject of this paper is the study of turbulent diffusion mechanisms and the related problems. The diffusion mechanisms considered here are those which concern a passive scalar contaminant not subject to molecular effects. The reason for this latter character is that it makes it possible to isolate in the diffusion phenomenon that which is inherent in the turbulent dispersion. The present state of this question is reviewed in Chapter I. The system of natural coordinates for following the movement of a particle and hence for describing the dispersion is that of Lagrange. For our purpose this description must be statistical. Hence, the specific properties of the probability densities of the velocities and movements in this type of coordinate are examined in Chapter II. The expressions of the probability densities of the concentration and turbulent flow of a contaminant are sought. These expressions make it possible to formulate the diffusion laws linking the mean flow and concentration to the statistical characteristics of the velocity field. These matters form the central subject of this paper and are developed in Chapter III. Although the use of Lagrange's coordinates makes it possible fairly easily to obtain the probability densities mentioned above, it does, on the other hand, rule out on examination the relations existing between Lagrangian and Eulerian probability characteristics of the velocity field moments. The experimental determination in a Lagrangian system of the probability characteristics is in fact very tricky. These questions are discussed in Chapter IV of this paper [fr

  17. Loss of Function of P2X7 Receptor Scavenger Activity in Aging Mice: A Novel Model for Investigating the Early Pathogenesis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Gu, Ben J; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Greferath, Ursula; Tran, Mai X; Dixon, Michael A; Baird, Paul N; Guymer, Robyn H; Wiley, James S; Fletcher, Erica L

    2017-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible, severe vision loss in Western countries. Recently, we identified a novel pathway involving P2X7 receptor scavenger function expressed on ocular immune cells as a risk factor for advanced AMD. In this study, we investigate the effect of loss of P2X7 receptor function on retinal structure and function during aging. P2X7-null and wild-type C57bl6J mice were investigated at 4, 12, and 18 months of age for macrophage phagocytosis activity, ocular histological changes, and retinal function. Phagocytosis activity of blood-borne macrophages decreased with age at 18 months in the wild-type mouse. Lack of P2X7 receptor function reduced phagocytosis at all ages compared to wild-type mice. At 12 months of age, P2X7-null mice had thickening of Bruchs membrane and retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction. By 18 months of age, P2X7-null mice displayed phenotypic characteristics consistent with early AMD, including Bruchs membrane thickening, retinal pigment epithelium cell loss, retinal functional deficits, and signs of subretinal inflammation. Our present study shows that loss of function of the P2X7 receptor in mice induces retinal changes representing characteristics of early AMD, providing a valuable model for investigating the role of scavenger receptor function and the immune system in the development of this age-related disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Loss-of-function nuclear factor κB subunit 1 (NFKB1) variants are the most common monogenic cause of common variable immunodeficiency in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijnenburg, Paul; Lango Allen, Hana; Burns, Siobhan O; Greene, Daniel; Jansen, Machiel H; Staples, Emily; Stephens, Jonathan; Carss, Keren J; Biasci, Daniele; Baxendale, Helen; Thomas, Moira; Chandra, Anita; Kiani-Alikhan, Sorena; Longhurst, Hilary J; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Oksenhendler, Eric; Simeoni, Ilenia; de Bree, Godelieve J; Tool, Anton T J; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Ebberink, Eduard H T M; Meijer, Alexander B; Tuna, Salih; Whitehorn, Deborah; Brown, Matthew; Turro, Ernest; Thrasher, Adrian J; Smith, Kenneth G C; Thaventhiran, James E; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2018-03-02

    The genetic cause of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) carries prognostic information. We conducted a whole-genome sequencing study assessing a large proportion of the NIHR BioResource-Rare Diseases cohort. In the predominantly European study population of principally sporadic unrelated PID cases (n = 846), a novel Bayesian method identified nuclear factor κB subunit 1 (NFKB1) as one of the genes most strongly associated with PID, and the association was explained by 16 novel heterozygous truncating, missense, and gene deletion variants. This accounted for 4% of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) cases (n = 390) in the cohort. Amino acid substitutions predicted to be pathogenic were assessed by means of analysis of structural protein data. Immunophenotyping, immunoblotting, and ex vivo stimulation of lymphocytes determined the functional effects of these variants. Detailed clinical and pedigree information was collected for genotype-phenotype cosegregation analyses. Both sporadic and familial cases demonstrated evidence of the noninfective complications of CVID, including massive lymphadenopathy (24%), unexplained splenomegaly (48%), and autoimmune disease (48%), features prior studies correlated with worse clinical prognosis. Although partial penetrance of clinical symptoms was noted in certain pedigrees, all carriers have a deficiency in B-lymphocyte differentiation. Detailed assessment of B-lymphocyte numbers, phenotype, and function identifies the presence of an increased CD21 low B-cell population. Combined with identification of the disease-causing variant, this distinguishes between healthy subjects, asymptomatic carriers, and clinically affected cases. We show that heterozygous loss-of-function variants in NFKB1 are the most common known monogenic cause of CVID, which results in a temporally progressive defect in the formation of immunoglobulin-producing B cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and characterization of dwarf 62, a loss-of-function mutation in DLT/OsGRAS-32 affecting gibberellin metabolism in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqiang; Wu, Jianguo; Weng, Shili; Zhang, Yujiang; Zhang, Dapeng; Shi, Chunhai

    2010-11-01

    A dwarf mutant, dwarf 62 (d62), was isolated from rice cultivar 93-11 by mutagenesis with γ-rays. Under normal growth conditions, the mutant had multiple abnormal phenotypes, such as dwarfism, wide and dark-green leaf blades, reduced tiller numbers, late and asynchronous heading, short roots, partial male sterility, etc. Genetic analysis indicated that the abnormal phenotypes were controlled by the recessive mutation of a single nuclear gene. Using molecular markers, the D62 gene was fine mapped in 131-kb region at the short arm of chromosome 6. Positional cloning of D62 gene revealed that it was the same locus as DLT/OsGRAS-32, which encodes a member of the GRAS family. In previous studies, the DLT/OsGRAS-32 is confirmed to play positive roles in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Sequence analysis showed that the d62 carried a 2-bp deletion in ORF region of D62 gene which led to a loss-of-function mutation. The function of D62 gene was confirmed by complementation experiment. RT-PCR analysis and promoter activity analysis showed that the D62 gene expressed in all tested tissues including roots, stems, leaves and panicles of rice plant. The d62 mutant exhibited decreased activity of α-amylase in endosperm and reduced content of endogenous GA(1). The expression levels of gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic genes including OsCPS1, OsKS1, OsKO1, OsKAO, OsGA20ox2/SD1 and OsGA2ox3 were significantly increased in d62 mutant. Briefly, these results demonstrated that the D62 (DLT/OsGRAS-32) not only participated in the regulation of BR signaling, but also influenced GA metabolism in rice.

  20. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance.

  1. Loss of function mutations in the progranulin gene are related to pro-inflammatory cytokine dysregulation in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spalletta Gianfranco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progranulin gene (PGRN encodes a pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory actions and neuronal protective effects. Accordingly, PGRN-deficient mice have been demonstrated to develop enhanced inflammation and progressive neurodegeneration. Loss of function mutations of the PGRN gene have been also reported to cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, a neurodegenerative disease leading to dementia generally in the presenium. Since neurodegeneration might be negatively impacted by chronic inflammation, the possible influence of PGRN defects on inflammatory pathways appears to be of great relevance for the understanding of neurodegeneration pathogenic processes in those patients. However, no data about the inflammatory profile of PGRN-defective subjects have been so far provided. In this study, we analyzed serum levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, TNF-α and IL-18 in FTLD patients with or without PGRN mutations, at both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic stages. We provide evidence that circulating IL-6 is increased in PGRN-mutated FTLD patients, as compared to both PGRN non-mutated FTLD patients and controls. In contrast, levels of IL-6 were not altered in asymptomatic subjects carrying the PGRN mutations. Finally, TNF-α and IL-18 serum levels did not differ among all groups of included subjects. We conclude that the profile of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines is altered in PGRN-related symptomatic FTLD. Thus, our findings point to IL-6 as a possible specific mediator and a potential therapeutic target in this monogenic disease, suggesting that an enhanced inflammatory response might be indeed involved in its progression.

  2. Compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in KIF20A are associated with a novel lethal congenital cardiomyopathy in two siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacoba J Louw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital or neonatal cardiomyopathies are commonly associated with a poor prognosis and have multiple etiologies. In two siblings, a male and female, we identified an undescribed type of lethal congenital restrictive cardiomyopathy affecting the right ventricle. We hypothesized a novel autosomal recessive condition. To identify the cause, we performed genetic, in vitro and in vivo studies. Genome-wide SNP typing and parametric linkage analysis was done in a recessive model to identify candidate regions. Exome sequencing analysis was done in unaffected and affected siblings. In the linkage regions, we selected candidate genes that harbor two rare variants with predicted functional effects in the patients and for which the unaffected sibling is either heterozygous or homozygous reference. We identified two compound heterozygous variants in KIF20A; a maternal missense variant (c.544C>T: p.R182W and a paternal frameshift mutation (c.1905delT: p.S635Tfs*15. Functional studies confirmed that the R182W mutation creates an ATPase defective form of KIF20A which is not able to support efficient transport of Aurora B as part of the chromosomal passenger complex. Due to this, Aurora B remains trapped on chromatin in dividing cells and fails to translocate to the spindle midzone during cytokinesis. Translational blocking of KIF20A in a zebrafish model resulted in a cardiomyopathy phenotype. We identified a novel autosomal recessive congenital restrictive cardiomyopathy, caused by a near complete loss-of-function of KIF20A. This finding further illustrates the relationship of cytokinesis and congenital cardiomyopathy.

  3. The concept of metabolic syndrome: contribution of visceral fat accumulation and its molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Yuji; Funahashi, Tohru; Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Although abdominal obesity or visceral obesity is considered to be one of the components of metabolic syndrome and to have an important role in a cluster of cardiovascular risks, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic criteria for this syndrome, probably because there is considerable disagreement about the location and definition of abdominal obesity or visceral obesity.In this review article, the important role of visceral fat accumulation in the development of a variety of lifestyle-related diseases is shown, including cardiovascular disease based on our clinical studies using CT scans, and the mechanism of these disorders is discussed, focusing on adipocytokines, especially adiponectin.The importance of diagnosing metabolic syndrome, in which visceral fat accumulation plays an essential role in the development of multiple risk factors, should be emphasized because lifestyle modification for the reduction of visceral fat may be very effective for the reduction of risks of this type, namely metabolic syndrome in the narrow sense.

  4. The contributions of cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging to understanding mechanisms of behavior change in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Jon; Naqvi, Nasir H; Debellis, Robert; Breiter, Hans C

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, there has been an upsurge of interest in understanding the mechanisms of behavior change (MOBC) and effective behavioral interventions as a strategy to improve addiction-treatment efficacy. However, there remains considerable uncertainty about how treatment research should proceed to address the MOBC issue. In this article, we argue that limitations in the underlying models of addiction that inform behavioral treatment pose an obstacle to elucidating MOBC. We consider how advances in the cognitive neuroscience of addiction offer an alternative conceptual and methodological approach to studying the psychological processes that characterize addiction, and how such advances could inform treatment process research. In addition, we review neuroimaging studies that have tested aspects of neurocognitive theories as a strategy to inform addiction therapies and discuss future directions for transdisciplinary collaborations across cognitive neuroscience and MOBC research. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  5. Medullary GABAergic mechanisms contribute to electroacupuncture modulation of cardiovascular depressor responses during gastric distention in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Li, Min; Longhurst, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) at P5–P6 acupoints overlying the median nerves typically reduces sympathoexcitatory blood pressure (BP) reflex responses in eucapnic rats. Gastric distention in hypercapnic acidotic rats, by activating both vagal and sympathetic afferents, decreases heart rate (HR) and BP through actions in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) and nucleus ambiguus (NAmb), leading to sympathetic withdrawal and parasympathetic activation, respectively. A GABAA mechanism in the rVLM mediates the decreased sympathetic outflow. The present study investigated the hypothesis that EA modulates gastric distention-induced hemodynamic depressor and bradycardia responses through nuclei that process parasympathetic and sympathetic outflow. Anesthetized hypercapnic acidotic rats manifested repeatable decreases in BP and HR with gastric distention every 10 min. Bilateral EA at P5–P6 for 30 min reversed the hypotensive response from −26 ± 3 to −6 ± 1 mmHg and the bradycardia from −35 ± 11 to −10 ± 3 beats/min for a period that lasted more than 70 min. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect c-Fos protein and GAD 67 mRNA expression showed that GABAergic caudal ventral lateral medulla (cVLM) neurons were activated by EA. Glutamatergic antagonism of cVLM neurons with kynurenic acid reversed the actions of EA. Gabazine used to block GABAA receptors microinjected into the rVLM or cVLM reversed EA's action on both the reflex depressor and bradycardia responses. EA modulation of the decreased HR was inhibited by microinjection of gabazine into the NAmb. Thus, EA through GABAA receptor mechanisms in the rVLM, cVLM, and NAmb modulates gastric distention-induced reflex sympathoinhibition and vagal excitation. PMID:23302958

  6. Contribution of the D-Serine-dependent pathway to the cellular mechanisms underlying cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Rouaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between age-related memory impairments and changes in functional plasticity in the aging brain has been under intense study within the last decade. In this article, we show that an impaired activation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-R by its agonist D-serine contributes to deficits of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats. Supplementation with exogenous D-serine prevents the age-related deficits of isolated NMDA-R-dependent synaptic potentials as well as those of theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation and synaptic depotentiation. Endogenous levels of D-serine are reduced in the hippocampus with aging, that correlates with a weaker expression of serine racemase synthesizing the amino acid. On the contrary, the affinity of D-serine binding to NMDA-R is not affected by aging. These results point to a critical role for the D-serine-dependent pathway in the functional alterations of the brain underlying memory impairment and provide key information in the search for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of memory deficits in the elderly.

  7. A contribution to the study of mechanical behaviour of concrete structures taking into account the effects of desiccation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.X.

    2004-12-01

    In this work, is given a model of the drying influence on the mechanical behaviour of concrete and a reliable anticipating tool is proposed for engineers. The drying of hardened concrete has several consequences on the mechanical properties of concrete. The desiccation shrinkage is the first sign, generating crack visible at the surface level under the form of crackling and core cracking particularly on the account of the presence of aggregates which prevent the shrinkage of the cement paste to make easily. Then, the elastic parameters are strongly affected (decrease of stiffness, of the Poisson coefficient). A simplified model of the stiffness loss during the drying is proposed under the form of an isotropic hydric damage. The model is validated in the unidimensional case with tests results carried out in the LML. With this model, it is possible to estimate with more accuracy the state of the hydric constraints in concrete. Numerical simulations on 3D structures are then proposed. An application to the case of a wall being manufactured is given. The contributions of the model are tested too in the case where the global mechanical response of cylindrical mortar specimens submitted to drying and to compression tests is simulated. The effect of the capillary suction as well as the increase of the elastic limit during drying are then discussed. At last, the contributions of the model for creep calculations and desiccation are presented. (O.M.)

  8. Mechanisms that contribute to the tendency to continue chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. Qualitative observations in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Linda; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Pasman, H Roeline W

    2016-03-01

    The study aims to describe mechanisms that contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. The study conducted qualitative observations of outpatient clinic visits of 28 patients with advanced cancer (glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer). We uncovered four mechanisms in daily oncology practice that can contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: (1) "presenting the full therapy sets the standard"--patients seemed to base their justification for continuing chemotherapy on the "standard" therapy with the maximum number of cycles as presented by the physician at the start of the treatment; (2) "focus on standard evaluation moments hampers evaluation of care goals"--whether or not to continue the treatment was mostly only considered at standard evaluation moments; (3) "opening question guides towards focus on symptoms"--most patients gave an update of their physical symptoms in answer to the opening question of "How are you doing?" Physicians consequently discussed how to deal with this at length, which often took up most of the visit; (4) "treatment is perceived as the only option"--patients mostly wanted to continue with chemotherapy because they felt that they had to try every available option the physician offered. Physicians also often seemed to focus on treatment as the only option. Discussing care goals more regularly with the patient, facilitated for instance by implementing early palliative care, might help counter the mechanisms and enable a more well-considered decision. This could be either stopping or continuing chemotherapy.

  9. Pascual Jordan, his contributions to quantum mechanics and his legacy in contemporary local quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert; Freie Universitaet, Berlin

    2003-05-01

    After recalling episodes from Pascual Jordan's biography including his pivotal role in the shaping of quantum field theory and his much criticized conduct during the NS regime, I draw attention to his presentation of the first phase of development of quantum field theory in a talk presented at the 1929 Kharkov conference. He starts by giving a comprehensive account of the beginnings of quantum theory, emphasising that particle-like properties arise as a consequence of treating wave-motions quantum-mechanically. He then goes on to his recent discovery of quantization of 'wave fields' and problems of gauge invariance. The most surprising aspect of Jordan's presentation is however his strong belief that his field quantization is a transitory not yet optimal formulation of the principles underlying causal, local quantum physics. The expectation of a future more radical change coming from the main architect of field quantization already shortly after his discovery is certainly quite startling. I try to answer the question to what extent Jordan's 1929 expectations have been vindicated. The larger part of the present essay consists in arguing that Jordan's plea for a formulation without 'classical correspondence crutches', i.e. for an intrinsic approach (which avoids classical fields altogether), is successfully addressed in past and recent publications on local quantum physics. (author)

  10. Novel frataxin isoforms may contribute to the pathological mechanism of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xia

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by frataxin (FXN deficiency. The nervous system and heart are the most severely affected tissues. However, highly mitochondria-dependent tissues, such as kidney and liver, are not obviously affected, although the abundance of FXN is normally high in these tissues. In this study we have revealed two novel FXN isoforms (II and III, which are specifically expressed in affected cerebellum and heart tissues, respectively, and are functional in vitro and in vivo. Increasing the abundance of the heart-specific isoform III significantly increased the mitochondrial aconitase activity, while over-expression of the cerebellum-specific isoform II protected against oxidative damage of Fe-S cluster-containing aconitase. Further, we observed that the protein level of isoform III decreased in FRDA patient heart, while the mRNA level of isoform II decreased more in FRDA patient cerebellum compared to total FXN mRNA. Our novel findings are highly relevant to understanding the mechanism of tissue-specific pathology in FRDA.

  11. Neuroinflammatory Mechanisms of Connective Tissue Fibrosis: Targeting Neurogenic and Mast Cell Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Salo, Paul T.; Befus, A. Dean; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The pathogenesis of fibrogenic wound and connective tissue healing is complex and incompletely understood. Common observations across a vast array of human and animal models of fibroproliferative conditions suggest neuroinflammatory mechanisms are important upstream fibrogenic events. Recent Advances: As detailed in this review, mast cell hyperplasia is a common observation in fibrotic tissue. Recent investigations in human and preclinical models of hypertrophic wound healing and post-traumatic joint fibrosis provides evidence that fibrogenesis is governed by a maladaptive neuropeptide-mast cell-myofibroblast signaling pathway. Critical Issues: The blockade and manipulation of these factors is providing promising evidence that if timed correctly, the fibrogenic process can be appropriately regulated. Clinically, abnormal fibrogenic healing responses are not ubiquitous to all patients and the identification of those at-risk remains an area of priority. Future Directions: Ultimately, an integrated appreciation of the common pathobiology shared by many fibrogenic connective tissue conditions may provide a scientific framework to facilitate the development of novel antifibrotic prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25785237

  12. Progranulin contributes to endogenous mechanisms of pain defense after nerve injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee-Young; Albuquerque, Boris; Häussler, Annett; Myrczek, Thekla; Ding, Aihao; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2012-04-01

    Progranulin haploinsufficiency is associated with frontotemporal dementia in humans. Deficiency of progranulin led to exaggerated inflammation and premature aging in mice. The role of progranulin in adaptations to nerve injury and neuropathic pain are still unknown. Here we found that progranulin is up-regulated after injury of the sciatic nerve in the mouse ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, most prominently in the microglia surrounding injured motor neurons. Progranulin knockdown by continuous intrathecal spinal delivery of small interfering RNA after sciatic nerve injury intensified neuropathic pain-like behaviour and delayed the recovery of motor functions. Compared to wild-type mice, progranulin-deficient mice developed more intense nociceptive hypersensitivity after nerve injury. The differences escalated with aging. Knockdown of progranulin reduced the survival of dissociated primary neurons and neurite outgrowth, whereas addition of recombinant progranulin rescued primary dorsal root ganglia neurons from cell death induced by nerve growth factor withdrawal. Thus, up-regulation of progranulin after neuronal injury may reduce neuropathic pain and help motor function recovery, at least in part, by promoting survival of injured neurons and supporting regrowth. A deficiency in this mechanism may increase the risk for injury-associated chronic pain. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: The Contribution of Different Evolutionary Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Patthy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the accompanying papers we have shown that sequence errors of public databases and confusion of paralogs and epaktologs (proteins that are related only through the independent acquisition of the same domain types significantly distort the picture that emerges from comparison of the domain architecture (DA of multidomain Metazoan proteins since they introduce a strong bias in favor of terminal over internal DA change. The issue of whether terminal or internal DA changes occur with greater probability has very important implications for the DA evolution of multidomain proteins since gene fusion can add domains only at terminal positions, whereas domain-shuffling is capable of inserting domains both at internal and terminal positions. As a corollary, overestimation of terminal DA changes may be misinterpreted as evidence for a dominant role of gene fusion in DA evolution. In this manuscript we show that in several recent studies of DA evolution of Metazoa the authors used databases that are significantly contaminated with incomplete, abnormal and mispredicted sequences (e.g., UniProtKB/TrEMBL, EnsEMBL and/or the authors failed to separate paralogs and epaktologs, explaining why these studies concluded that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is gene fusion. In contrast with the latter conclusion, our studies on high quality orthologous and paralogous Swiss-Prot sequences confirm that shuffling of mobile domains had a major role in the evolution of multidomain proteins of Metazoa and especially those formed in early vertebrates.

  14. The contribution of post-copulatory mechanisms to incipient ecological speciation in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Joshka; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Milinski, Manfred; Lenz, Tobias L

    2015-01-01

    Ecology can play a major role in species diversification. As individuals are adapting to contrasting habitats, reproductive barriers may evolve at multiple levels. While pre-mating barriers have been extensively studied, the evolution of post-mating reproductive isolation during early stages of ecological speciation remains poorly understood. In diverging three-spined stickleback ecotypes from two lakes and two rivers, we observed differences in sperm traits between lake and river males. Interestingly, these differences did not translate into ecotype-specific gamete precedence for sympatric males in competitive in vitro fertilization experiments, potentially owing to antagonistic compensatory effects. However, we observed indirect evidence for impeded development of inter-ecotype zygotes, possibly suggesting an early stage of genetic incompatibility between ecotypes. Our results show that pre-zygotic post-copulatory mechanisms play a minor role during this first stage of ecotype divergence, but suggest that genetic incompatibilities may arise at early stages of ecological speciation. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Central nervous system mechanisms contributing to the cachexia-anorexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    2000-10-01

    in the development and/or progression of cachexia-anorexia; interleukin-1, interleukin-6 (and its subfamily members such as ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibitory factor), interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have been associated with various cachectic conditions. Controversy has focused on the requirement of increased cytokine concentrations in the circulation or other body fluids (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid) to demonstrate cytokine involvement in cachexia-anorexia. Cytokines, however, also act in paracrine, autocrine, and intracrine manners, activities that cannot be detected in the circulation. In fact, paracrine interactions represent a predominant cytokine mode of action within organs, including the brain. Data show that cytokines may be involved in cachectic-anorectic processes by being produced and by acting locally in specific brain regions. Brain synthesis of cytokines has been shown in peripheral models of cancer, peripheral inflammation, and during peripheral cytokine administration; these data support a role for brain cytokines as mediators of neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of disease and in the brain-to-peripheral communication (e.g., through the autonomic nervous system). Brain mechanisms that merit significant attention in the cachexia-anorexia syndrome are those that result from interactions among cytokines, peptides/neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. These interactions could result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic activities and can involve modifications of transducing molecules and intracellular mediators. Thus, the data show that the cachexia-anorexia syndrome is multifactorial, and understanding the interactions between peripheral and brain mechanisms is pivotal to characterizing the underlying integrative pathophysiology of this disorder.

  16. Contribution of different mechanisms to the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Ahmed Rushdy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the potential factors include gene mutation, efflux pump and alteration of permeability associated with quinolone-resistance of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis and to evaluate the degree of synergistic activity of efflux pump inhibitors when combined with ciprofloxacin against resistant isolates. METHODS: Antimicrobial resistance patterns of fifty-eight Salmonella isolates were tested. Five isolates were selected to study the mechanism of resistance associated with quinolone group, including mutation in topoisomerase-encoding gene, altered cell permeability, and expression of an active efflux system. In addition, the combination between antibiotics and efflux pump inhibitors to overcome the microbial resistance was evaluated. RESULTS: Five Salmonella isolates totally resistant to all quinolones were studied. All isolates showed alterations in outer membrane proteins including disappearance of some or all of these proteins (Omp-A, Omp-C, Omp-D and Omp-F. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence/absence of the efflux pump inhibitors: carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, norepinephrin and trimethoprim. Minimum inhibitory concentration values for two of the isolates were 2-4 fold lower with the addition of efflux pump inhibitors. All five Salmonella isolates were amplified for gyrA and parC genes and only two isolates were sequenced. S. Enteritidis 22 had double mutations at codon 83 and 87 in addition to three mutations at parC at codons 67, 76 and 80 whereas S. Typhimurium 57 had three mutations at codons 83, 87 and 119, but no mutations at parC. CONCLUSIONS: Efflux pump inhibitors may inhibit the major AcrAB-TolC in Salmonella efflux systems which are the major efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in Gramnegative clinical isolates.

  17. Contributions to the study of nuclear reactions mechanism induced by heavy ions on intermediate mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, M.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented, based on Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations of the γ-ray excitation functions measured in the sup(74,76)Ge ( 12 C, xn) and sup(72,73)Ge ( 16 O,xnyp) reactions. The most usual quantities provided by the in beam γ-ray measurements such as the cross sections for the population of the final states as well as the decay scheme and the degree of alignment of these states mainly offer the means of testing models of both the reaction mechanism and nuclear properties of high excitation energies, since they concentrate information on the whole reaction process. Experimental information on sup(85,86)Sr and sup(85,86)Y, γ-decay scheme and the excitation functions for the population of the final states were obtained by sub(74,76)Ge ( 12 C,αn), n = 2-4, sup(74,76)Ge ( 14 N,xn) n = 3-5, sup(72,73)Ge ( 16 O,xnyp), x = 1-3, y=1 reactions at incident energies between 35 and 60 MW. Statistical model calculations in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been compared with the experimental γ-ray excitation functions. The competitive emission of neutrons, protons, alpha particles and gamma rays from the compound nucleus has been considered in the calculations. The calculations describe satisfactorily the total cross sections for the population of the 2n, 3n and 4n channels for 12 C + sup(74,76)Ge and 2n, np, 3n and 2np channels for 16 O + 72 Ge. The calculations are sensitive to the characteristics of the excited levels (such as spin values) but htis this sensitivity could be exploited with some reliability only if one makes use of a rather complete level scheme in the calculations. In the case of 2n, np, 3n and 2 np channels for 16 O+ 73 Ge one concludes on the reliability of consideration some structural aspects in the calculations

  18. The PTPN11 loss-of-function mutation Q510E-Shp2 causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by dysregulating mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Christine; Fine, Deborah M; Edwards, Michelle A; Reeb, Ashley N; Krenz, Maike

    2012-01-01

    The identification of mutations in PTPN11 (encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2) in families with congenital heart disease has facilitated mechanistic studies of various cardiovascular defects. However, the roles of normal and mutant Shp2 in the developing heart are still poorly understood. Furthermore, it remains unclear how Shp2 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations cause LEOPARD Syndrome (also termed Noonan Syndrome with multiple lentigines), which is characterized by congenital heart defects such as pulmonary valve stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In normal hearts, Shp2 controls cardiomyocyte size by regulating signaling through protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We hypothesized that Shp2 LOF mutations dysregulate this pathway, resulting in HCM. For our studies, we chose the Shp2 mutation Q510E, a dominant-negative LOF mutation associated with severe early onset HCM. Newborn mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of Q510E-Shp2 starting before birth displayed increased cardiomyocyte sizes, heart-to-body weight ratios, interventricular septum thickness, and cardiomyocyte disarray. In 3-mo-old hearts, interstitial fibrosis was detected. Echocardiographically, ventricular walls were thickened and contractile function was depressed. In ventricular tissue samples, signaling through Akt/mTOR was hyperactivated, indicating that the presence of Q510E-Shp2 led to upregulation of this pathway. Importantly, rapamycin treatment started shortly after birth rescued the Q510E-Shp2-induced phenotype in vivo. If rapamycin was started at 6 wk of age, HCM was also ameliorated. We also generated a second mouse model in which cardiomyocyte-specific Q510E-Shp2 overexpression started after birth. In contrast to the first model, these mice did not develop HCM. In summary, our studies establish a role for mTOR signaling in HCM caused by Q510E-Shp2. Q510E-Shp2 overexpression in the cardiomyocyte population alone was sufficient to

  19. SLO-1-channels of parasitic nematodes reconstitute locomotor behaviour and emodepside sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans slo-1 loss of function mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Welz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-gated potassium channel SLO-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans was recently identified as key component for action of emodepside, a new anthelmintic drug with broad spectrum activity. In this study we identified orthologues of slo-1 in Ancylostoma caninum, Cooperia oncophora, and Haemonchus contortus, all important parasitic nematodes in veterinary medicine. Furthermore, functional analyses of these slo-1 orthologues were performed using heterologous expression in C. elegans. We expressed A. caninum and C. oncophora slo-1 in the emodepside-resistant genetic background of the slo-1 loss-of-function mutant NM1968 slo-1(js379. Transformants expressing A. caninum slo-1 from C. elegans slo-1 promoter were highly susceptible (compared to the fully emodepside-resistant slo-1(js379 and showed no significant difference in their emodepside susceptibility compared to wild-type C. elegans (p = 0.831. Therefore, the SLO-1 channels of A. caninum and C. elegans appear to be completely functionally interchangeable in terms of emodepside sensitivity. Furthermore, we tested the ability of the 5' flanking regions of A. caninum and C. oncophora slo-1 to drive expression of SLO-1 in C. elegans and confirmed functionality of the putative promoters in this heterologous system. For all transgenic lines tested, expression of either native C. elegans slo-1 or the parasite-derived orthologue rescued emodepside sensitivity in slo-1(js379 and the locomotor phenotype of increased reversal frequency confirming the reconstitution of SLO-1 function in the locomotor circuits. A potent mammalian SLO-1 channel inhibitor, penitrem A, showed emodepside antagonising effects in A. caninum and C. elegans. The study combined the investigation of new anthelmintic targets from parasitic nematodes and experimental use of the respective target genes in C. elegans, therefore closing the gap between research approaches using model nematodes and those using target organisms

  20. Single or in Combination Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae Contribute to Varied Susceptibility to Different Carbapenems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Liou, Ci-Hong; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lin, Jung-Chung; Siu, L. Kristopher

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to carbapenems has been documented by the production of carbapenemase or the loss of porins combined with extended-spectrum β-lactamases or AmpC β-lactamases. However, no complete comparisons have been made regarding the contributions of each resistance mechanism towards carbapenem resistance. In this study, we genetically engineered mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae with individual and combined resistance mechanisms, and then compared each resistance mechanism in response to ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem, doripenem and other antibiotics. Among the four studied carbapenems, ertapenem was the least active against the loss of porins, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases. In addition to the production of KPC-2 or NDM-1 alone, resistance to all four carbapenems could also be conferred by the loss of two major porins, OmpK35 and OmpK36, combined with CTX-M-15 or DHA-1 with its regulator AmpR. Because the loss of OmpK35/36 alone or the loss of a single porin combined with bla CTX-M-15 or bla DHA-1-ampR expression was only sufficient for ertapenem resistance, our results suggest that carbapenems other than ertapenem should still be effective against these strains and laboratory testing for non-susceptibility to other carbapenems should improve the accurate identification of these isolates. PMID:24265784

  1. Seeing the same thing differently: mechanisms that contribute to assessor differences in directly-observed performance assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Peter; O'Neill, Paul; Mann, Karen; Eva, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Assessors' scores in performance assessments are known to be highly variable. Attempted improvements through training or rating format have achieved minimal gains. The mechanisms that contribute to variability in assessors' scoring remain unclear. This study investigated these mechanisms. We used a qualitative approach to study assessors' judgements whilst they observed common simulated videoed performances of junior doctors obtaining clinical histories. Assessors commented concurrently and retrospectively on performances, provided scores and follow-up interviews. Data were analysed using principles of grounded theory. We developed three themes that help to explain how variability arises: Differential Salience-assessors paid attention to (or valued) different aspects of the performances to different degrees; Criterion Uncertainty-assessors' criteria were differently constructed, uncertain, and were influenced by recent exemplars; Information Integration-assessors described the valence of their comments in their own unique narrative terms, usually forming global impressions. Our results (whilst not precluding the operation of established biases) describe mechanisms by which assessors' judgements become meaningfully-different or unique. Our results have theoretical relevance to understanding the formative educational messages that performance assessments provide. They give insight relevant to assessor training, assessors' ability to be observationally "objective" and to the educational value of narrative comments (in contrast to numerical ratings).

  2. The contribution of vascular smooth muscle, elastin and collagen on the passive mechanics of porcine carotid arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochová, P; Cimrman, R; Kuncová, J; Švíglerová, J; Miklíková, M; Liška, V; Tonar, Z

    2012-01-01

    The main components responsible for the mechanical behavior of the arterial wall are collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the medial layer. We determined the structural and mechanical changes in porcine carotid arteries after administration of Triton® X-100, elastase, and collagenase using the inflation–deflation test. The arteries were intraluminarly pressurized from 0 to 200 mmHg, and the outer diameter of the artery was measured. The pressure–strain elastic modulus was determined based on the pressure/diameter ratio. The intima–media thickness, wall thickness, thickness of the tunica adventitia layer, and the area fractions of SMCs, elastin, and collagen within the arterial wall (A A (SMC/elastin/collagen, wall)) were measured using stereological methods. The relative changes in the relevant components of the treated samples were as follows: the decrease in A A (SMC, wall) after administration of Triton® X-100 was 11% ± 7%, the decrease in A A (elastin, wall) after administration of elastase was 40% ± 22%, and the decrease in A A (collagen, wall) after the application of collagenase was 51% ± 22%. The Triton® X-100 treatment led to a decrease in the SMC content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall (outer diameter) for pressures up to 120 mmHg, and with mechanical stiffening of the arterial wall at higher pressures. Elastase led to a decrease in the elastin content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall, but not with stiffening or softening. Collagenase led to a decrease in collagen content that was associated with a change in the stiffness of the arterial wall, although the exact contribution of mechanical loading and the duration of treatment (enlargement) could not be quantified. (paper)

  3. An isotopic approach to study the recharge mechanism in Haripur plain contribution to the area from Tarbela and Khanpur lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.I.; Tasneem, M.A.; Khan, I.H.; Ahmad, M.; Akram, W.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental isotopic investigation were carried out in Haripur plain to determine the recharge mechanism in the area. The Haripur plain is bounded by river Doar (that falls in Tarbela lake) in the north mountain ranges in the east and west, while the river Haro flows on the south eastern boundary upon which Khanpur dam has been built. Effort were made to identify the different sources which recharge the aquifer in the area. Isotopic data reveals that the major source of recharge is the rainfall on adjoining hills There is no contribution of Tarbela and Khanpur lakes. The residence time varies from a few years to more than fifty years depending upon the geology of the area. 14 figs. (author)

  4. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutation R501X and 2282del4 carrier status is associated with fissured skin on the hands: results from a cross-sectional population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Ross-Hansen, K; Johansen, J D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Filaggrin metabolites act as osmolytes and are important for skin hydration. Carriers of filaggrin loss-of-function mutations have a higher prevalence of atopic dermatitis and dry skin. There is also evidence to suggest that filaggrin mutations increase the risk of hand eczema in atopic...... whether filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are associated with skin fissures on the hands and/or fingers in the general population. Design: Participants of a population based study were questioned about skin symptom and genotyped for filaggrin mutation, patch tested for nickel allergy and skin prick...... tested. Results: In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, filaggrin mutation status was significantly associated with fissured skin on the hands and/or fingers in adults (OR=1.93; CI95%=1.05-3.55) and a near significant negative interaction with atopic dermatitis (p=0.055), suggesting the effect...

  5. How much can disaster and climate science contribute to loss and damage mechanisms in international climate policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, Christian; Allen, Simon; Eicken, Hajo; Hansen, Gerrit; Stone, Dáithí

    2015-04-01

    proposals for mechanisms of financing suggested a role of causation and thus attribution of L&D to (anthropogenic) climate change. Yet, causation mechanisms are particularly delicate in terms of climate justice, development and implications of legal liabilities. Here, we outline potential contributions of science to L&D mechanisms in greater specificity, in particular for (i) threshold based mechanisms, and (ii) causation related mechanisms. We draw on recent concepts of L&D attribution suggesting a more comprehensive attribution framework based on risk concepts. We present a first-order proof-of-concept for the above mechanisms (i) and (ii), using case studies of recent disasters (both related to extreme events and gradual climate change) in the Indian Himalayas, Colombia, Alaska and Australia. We analyze whether science is in a position to substantially contribute to the different L&D policy proposals, including the question whether currently available data and datasets on climate and hazards, exposure and vulnerability are in line with such support, in particular with regards to developing country contexts. We conclude with a perspective on critical research and data needs to further strengthen L&D science and policy.

  6. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47 in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR, and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

  7. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2016-01-01

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism. PMID:26987900

  8. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Nair, Deepak T; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-05-20

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Interference and Mechanism of Dill Seed Essential Oil and Contribution of Carvone and Limonene in Preventing Sclerotinia Rot of Rapeseed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; He, Jingsheng; Tian, Jun; Zeng, Hong; Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Youwei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) seed essential oil against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and its mechanism of action. The antifungal activities of the two main constituents, namely carvone and limonene, were also measured. Mycelial growth and sclerotial germination were thoroughly inhibited by dill seed essential oil at the 1.00 μL/mL under contact condition and 0.125μL/mL air under vapor condition. Carvone also contributed more than limonene in inhibiting the growth of S. sclerotiorum. Carvone and limonene synergistically inhibited the growth of the fungus. In vivo experiments, the essential oil remarkably suppressed S. sclerotiorum, and considerable morphological alterations were observed in the hyphae and sclerotia. Inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase activities, and external medium acidification were investigated to elucidate the antifungal mechanism of the essential oil. The seed essential oil of A. graveolens can be extensively used in agriculture for preventing the oilseed crops fungal disease. PMID:26133771

  10. Interference and Mechanism of Dill Seed Essential Oil and Contribution of Carvone and Limonene in Preventing Sclerotinia Rot of Rapeseed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Ma

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dill (Anethum graveolens L. seed essential oil against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and its mechanism of action. The antifungal activities of the two main constituents, namely carvone and limonene, were also measured. Mycelial growth and sclerotial germination were thoroughly inhibited by dill seed essential oil at the 1.00 μL/mL under contact condition and 0.125μL/mL air under vapor condition. Carvone also contributed more than limonene in inhibiting the growth of S. sclerotiorum. Carvone and limonene synergistically inhibited the growth of the fungus. In vivo experiments, the essential oil remarkably suppressed S. sclerotiorum, and considerable morphological alterations were observed in the hyphae and sclerotia. Inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase activities, and external medium acidification were investigated to elucidate the antifungal mechanism of the essential oil. The seed essential oil of A. graveolens can be extensively used in agriculture for preventing the oilseed crops fungal disease.

  11. Impairments in Motor Neurons, Interneurons and Astrocytes Contribute to Hyperexcitability in ALS: Underlying Mechanisms and Paths to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Ha, Dzung; Buskila, Yossi; Ooi, Lezanne

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by the loss of motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis and death. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and nerve excitability tests, several clinical studies have identified that cortical and peripheral hyperexcitability are among the earliest pathologies observed in ALS patients. The changes in the electrophysiological properties of motor neurons have been identified in both sporadic and familial ALS patients, despite the diverse etiology of the disease. The mechanisms behind the change in neuronal signalling are not well understood, though current findings implicate intrinsic changes in motor neurons and dysfunction of cells critical in regulating motor neuronal excitability, such as astrocytes and interneurons. Alterations in ion channel expression and/or function in motor neurons has been associated with changes in cortical and peripheral nerve excitability. In addition to these intrinsic changes in motor neurons, inhibitory signalling through GABAergic interneurons is also impaired in ALS, likely contributing to increased neuronal excitability. Astrocytes have also recently been implicated in increasing neuronal excitability in ALS by failing to adequately regulate glutamate levels and extracellular K + concentration at the synaptic cleft. As hyperexcitability is a common and early feature of ALS, it offers a therapeutic and diagnostic target. Thus, understanding the underlying pathways and mechanisms leading to hyperexcitability in ALS offers crucial insight for future development of ALS treatments.

  12. HIV-1 Env and Nef Cooperatively Contribute to Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Activation via CD4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J; Sivaraman, Vijay; Zhang, Liguo; Su, Lishan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the major source of type I IFN (IFN-I) in response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. pDCs are rapidly activated during HIV-1 infection and are implicated in reducing the early viral load, as well as contributing to HIV-1-induced pathogenesis. However, most cell-free HIV-1 isolates are inefficient in activating human pDCs, and the mechanisms of HIV-1 recognition by pDCs and pDC activation are not clearly defined. In this study, we report that two genetically similar HIV-1 variants (R3A and R3B) isolated from a rapid progressor differentially activated pDCs to produce alpha interferon (IFN-α). The highly pathogenic R3A efficiently activated pDCs to induce robust IFN-α production, while the less pathogenic R3B did not. The viral determinant for efficient pDC activation was mapped to the V1V2 region of R3A Env, which also correlated with enhanced CD4 binding activity. Furthermore, we showed that the Nef protein was also required for the activation of pDCs by R3A. Analysis of a panel of R3A Nef functional mutants demonstrated that Nef domains involved in CD4 downregulation were necessary for R3A to activate pDCs. Our data indicate that R3A-induced pDC activation depends on (i) the high affinity of R3A Env for binding the CD4 receptor and (ii) Nef activity, which is involved in CD4 downregulation. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanism by which HIV-1 induces IFN-α in pDCs, which contributes to pathogenesis. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the major type I interferon (IFN-I)-producing cells, and IFN-I actually contributes to pathogenesis during chronic viral infections. How HIV-1 activates pDCs and the roles of pDCs/IFN-I in HIV-1 pathogenesis remain unclear. We report here that the highly pathogenic HIV R3A efficiently activated pDCs to induce IFN-α production, while most HIV-1 isolates are inefficient in activating pDCs. We have discovered that R3A-induced pDC activation depends on

  13. Contribution of a luminance-dependent S-cone mechanism to non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    In the watercolor configuration composed of wavy double contours, both assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading have been demonstrated depending on the luminance conditions of the inner and outer contours (IC and OC, respectively). This study investigated how the induced color in the watercolor configuration was modulated by combinations of the IC and the OC color, particularly addressing non-assimilative color spreading. In two experiments, the IC color was fixed to a certain color and combined with various colors selected from a hue circle centered at the background white color. Color spreading was quantified with a chromatic cancelation technique. Results showed that both the magnitude and the apparent hue of the color spreading were largely changed with the luminance condition. When the IC contrast (Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance) was smaller in size than the OC contrast (higher IC luminance condition), the color spreading was assimilative. When the luminance condition was reversed and the IC contrast was greater than the OC contrast (lower IC luminance condition), the color spreading was non-assimilative and yellowish. When the color spreading was analyzed in terms of cone-opponent excitations, the results were consistent with the interpretation that the color spreading is explainable by a combination of chromatic diffusion from the IC and chromatically opponent induction from the OC. The color spreading in the higher IC luminance condition mainly reflected the chromatic diffusion by both (L-M) and S cone-opponent mechanisms. The non-assimilative color spreading in the lower IC luminance condition mostly reflected S-cone mediated opponent induction and the contribution of -S inducing mechanisms was differentially large. These findings provided several constraints on possible visual mechanisms underlying the watercolor effect.

  14. Evaluating relative contribution of osmotolerance and tissue tolerance mechanisms toward salinity stress tolerance in three Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Eyles, Alieta; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    Three different species of Brassica, with differential salt sensitivity were used to understand physiological mechanisms of salt tolerance operating in these species and to evaluate the relative contribution of different strategies to cope with salt load. Brassica napus was the most tolerant species in terms of the overall performance, with Brassica juncea and Brassica oleracea being much more sensitive to salt stress with no obvious difference between them. While prominent reduction in net CO2 assimilation was observed in both sensitive species, physiological mechanisms beyond this reduction differed strongly. Brassica juncea plants possessed high osmotolerance and were able to maintain high transpiration rate but showed a significant reduction in leaf chlorophyll content and efficiency of leaf photochemistry. On the contrary, B. oleracea plants possessed the highest (among the three species) tissue tolerance but showed a very significant stomatal limitation of photosynthesis. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that the high tissue tolerance in B. oleracea was related to the ability of leaf mesophyll cells to maintain highly negative membrane potential in the presence of high apoplastic Na(+) . In addition to high osmotolerance, the most tolerant B. napus showed also lesser accumulation of toxic Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leaf, possessed moderate tissue tolerance and had a superior K(+) retention ability. Taken together, the results from this study indicate that the three Brassica species employ very different mechanisms to cope with salinity and, despite its overall sensitivity to salinity, B. oleracea could be recommended as a valuable 'donor' of tissue tolerance genes to confer this trait for marker-assisted breeding programs. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  15. Contribution of a luminance-dependent S-cone mechanism to non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eKimura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the watercolor configuration composed of wavy double contours, both assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading have been demonstrated depending on the luminance conditions of the inner and outer contours (IC and OC, respectively. This study investigated how the induced color in the watercolor configuration was modulated by combinations of the IC and the OC color, particularly addressing non-assimilative color spreading. In two experiments, the IC color was fixed to a certain color and combined with various colors selected from a hue circle centered at the background white color. Color spreading was quantified with a chromatic cancellation technique. Results showed that both the magnitude and the apparent hue of the color spreading were largely changed with the luminance condition. When the IC contrast (Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance was smaller in size than the OC contrast (higher IC luminance condition, the color spreading was assimilative. When the luminance condition was reversed and the IC contrast was greater than the OC contrast (lower IC luminance condition, the color spreading was non-assimilative and yellowish. When the color spreading was analyzed in terms of cone-opponent excitations, the results were consistent with the interpretation that the color spreading is explainable by a combination of chromatic diffusion from the IC and chromatically opponent induction from the OC. The color spreading in the higher IC luminance condition mainly reflected the chromatic diffusion by both (L–M and S cone-opponent mechanisms. The non-assimilative color spreading in the lower IC luminance condition mostly reflected S-cone mediated opponent induction and the contribution of -S inducing mechanisms was differentially large. These findings provided several constraints on possible visual mechanisms underlying the watercolor effect.

  16. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  17. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service; Le mecanisme de contribution aux Charges de Service Public d'Electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blonde, G; Poizat, F; Triboulet, A [IED, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  18. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service; Le mecanisme de contribution aux Charges de Service Public d'Electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blonde, G.; Poizat, F.; Triboulet, A. [IED, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals that Antioxidation Mechanisms Contribute to Cold Tolerance in Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.; ABB Group) Seedlings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Sheng, Ou; Hu, Chun-Hua; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Huang, Yong-Hong; Peng, Xin-Xiang; McCardle, James A.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yong; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Banana and its close relative, plantain are globally important crops and there is considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation. Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared with banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars. In this study, we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress. Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0, 6, and 24 h of cold stress at 8 °C and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28 °C. A total of 3477 plantain proteins were identified, of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments. The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction, including oxylipin biosynthesis, whereas others were associated with photosynthesis, photorespiration, and several primary metabolic processes, such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on seven differentially expressed, cold-response candidate plantain proteins to validate the proteomics data. Similar analyses of the seven candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation, and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species. Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays, demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable. Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability, reduced production of ROS, and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the increased cold tolerance in plantain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that antioxidation mechanisms contribute to cold tolerance in plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.; ABB Group) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Sheng, Ou; Hu, Chun-Hua; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Huang, Yong-Hong; Peng, Xin-Xiang; McCardle, James A; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yong; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Banana and its close relative, plantain are globally important crops and there is considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation. Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared with banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars. In this study, we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress. Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0, 6, and 24 h of cold stress at 8 °C and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28 °C. A total of 3477 plantain proteins were identified, of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments. The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction, including oxylipin biosynthesis, whereas others were associated with photosynthesis, photorespiration, and several primary metabolic processes, such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on seven differentially expressed, cold-response candidate plantain proteins to validate the proteomics data. Similar analyses of the seven candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation, and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species. Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays, demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable. Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability, reduced production of ROS, and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the increased cold tolerance in plantain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by

  1. Towards Deciphering the Hidden Mechanisms That Contribute to the Antigenic Activation Process of Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Boutin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent a major unconventional γδ T cell subset located in the peripheral blood of adults in humans and several non-human primates. Lymphocytes that constitute this transitional subset can sense subtle level changes of intracellular phosphorylated intermediates of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway (phosphoantigens, pAg, such as isopentenyl pyrophosphate, during cell stress events. This unique antigenic activation process operates in a rigorous framework that requires the expression of butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1/CD277 molecules, which are type I glycoproteins that belong to the B7 family. Several studies have further shown that pAg specifically bind to the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 linked to the antigenic activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Here, we highlight the recent advances in BTN3A1 dynamics induced upon the binding of pAg and the contribution of the different subunits to this activation process. Recent reports support that conformational modifications of BTN3A1 might represent a key step in the detection of infection or tumorigenesis by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. A better understanding of this mechanism will help optimize novel immunotherapeutical approaches that target defined functions of this unique γδ T cell subset.

  2. NRSF-dependent epigenetic mechanisms contribute to programming of stress-sensitive neurons by neonatal experience, promoting resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Taylor, A; Molet, J; Jiang, S; Korosi, A; Bolton, J L; Noam, Y; Simeone, K; Cope, J; Chen, Y; Mortazavi, A; Baram, T Z

    2018-03-01

    Resilience to stress-related emotional disorders is governed in part by early-life experiences. Here we demonstrate experience-dependent re-programming of stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons, which takes place through modification of neuronal gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms. Specifically, we found that augmented maternal care reduced glutamatergic synapses onto stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons and repressed expression of the stress-responsive gene, Crh. In hypothalamus in vitro, reduced glutamatergic neurotransmission recapitulated the repressive effects of augmented maternal care on Crh, and this required recruitment of the transcriptional repressor repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron restrictive silencing factor (NRSF). Increased NRSF binding to chromatin was accompanied by sequential repressive epigenetic changes which outlasted NRSF binding. chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq analyses of NRSF targets identified gene networks that, in addition to Crh, likely contributed to the augmented care-induced phenotype, including diminished depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors. Together, we believe these findings provide the first causal link between enriched neonatal experience, synaptic refinement and induction of epigenetic processes within specific neurons. They uncover a novel mechanistic pathway from neonatal environment to emotional resilience.

  3. ROS-mediated inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase contributes to the activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Kovacs

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants being involved in diverse physiological processes like germination, root growth, stomata closing and response to biotic and abiotic stress. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO as a biological NO donor has a very important function in NO signaling since it can transfer its NO moiety to other proteins (trans-nitrosylation. Such trans-nitrosylation reactions are equilibrium reactions and depend on GSNO level. The breakdown of GSNO and thus the level of S-nitrosylated proteins are regulated by GSNO-reductase (GSNOR. In this way, this enzyme controls S-nitrosothiol levels and regulates NO signaling. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana GSNOR activity is reversibly inhibited by H2O2 in-vitro and by paraquat-induced oxidative stress in-vivo. Light scattering analyses of reduced and oxidized recombinant GSNOR demonstrated that GSNOR proteins form dimers under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses revealed that H2O2-treatment increased the amount of oxidative modifications on Zn2+-coordinating Cys47 and Cys177. Inhibition of GSNOR results in enhanced levels of S-nitrosothiols followed by accumulation of glutathione. Moreover, transcript levels of redox-regulated genes and activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes are increased in gsnor-ko plants, which may contribute to the enhanced resistance against oxidative stress. In sum, our results demonstrate that ROS-dependent inhibition of GSNOR is playing an important role in activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms to damping oxidative damage and imply a direct crosstalk between ROS- and NO-signaling.

  4. Contribution of ankyrin-band 3 complexes to the organization and mechanical properties of the membrane skeleton of human erythrocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.

    1995-02-01

    To understand the role of ankyrin-band 3 complexes in the organization of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton and its contribution to the mechanical properties of human erythrocytes, intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets were prepared from intact and physically sheared membrane ghosts, expanded in low salt buffer, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. While the structures of intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets shared many common features, including rigid junctional complexes of spectrin, actin, and band 4.1; short stretches ({approximately}50 {angstrom}) of flexible spectrin filaments; and globular masses of ankyrin-band 3 complexes situated close to the middle of the spectrin filaments, the definition of structural units in the intact skeleton is obscured by the superposition of the two layers. However, the spatial disposition of structural elements can be clearly defined in the images of the single-layered skeleton leaflets. Partially expanded skeletal leaflets contain conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes arranged in a circular or clove-leaf configuration that straddles multiple strands of thick spectrin cables, presumably reflecting the association of ankyrin-band 3 complexes on neighboring spectrin tetramers as well as the lateral association of the spectrin filaments. Hyperexpansion of the skeleton leaflets led to dissociation of the conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes, full-extension of the spectrin tetramers, and separation of the individual strands of spectrin tetramers. Clearly defined stands of spectrin tetramers in the hyperexpanded single-layered skeletal leaflets often contained two sets of globular protein masses that divided the spectrin tetramers into three segments of approximately equal length.

  5. Loss of function mutation in LARP7, chaperone of 7SK ncRNA, causes a syndrome of facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Owain, Mohammad; Alzahrani, Fatema; Shuaib, Taghreed; Al-Shamrani, Hussain; Al-Falki, Yahya H; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Alsheddi, Tarfa; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-10-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition. Various molecular mechanisms are known to underlie the disease including impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. Here, we describe a syndromic form of PD associated with severe intellectual disability and distinct facial features in a large multiplex Saudi family. Analysis reveals a novel underlying mechanism for PD involving depletion of 7SK, an abundant cellular noncoding RNA (ncRNA), due to mutation of its chaperone LARP7. We show that 7SK levels are tightly linked to LARP7 expression across cell lines, and that this chaperone is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse embryo. The 7SK is known to influence the expression of a wide array of genes through its inhibitory effect on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) as well as its competing role in HMGA1-mediated transcriptional regulation. This study documents a critical role played by ncRNA in human development and adds to the growing list of molecular mechanisms that, when perturbed, converge on the PD phenotype. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Reassessment of the putative role of BLK-p.A71T loss-of-function mutation in MODY and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefond, A; Yengo, L; Philippe, J

    2013-01-01

    MODY is believed to be caused by at least 13 different genes. Five rare mutations at the BLK locus, including only one non-synonymous p.A71T variant, were reported to segregate with diabetes in three MODY families. The p.A71T mutation was shown to abolish the enhancing effect of BLK on insulin...... content and secretion from pancreatic beta cell lines. Here, we reassessed the contribution of BLK to MODY and tested the effect of BLK-p.A71T on type 2 diabetes risk and variations in related traits....

  7. Upregulation of Ih expressed in IB4-negative Aδ nociceptive DRG neurons contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Lu; Lu, Na; Han, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Gui; Cong, Rui; Xie, Rou-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Kong, Wei-Wei; Hu, San-Jue; Luo, Ceng

    2015-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy represents aberrant mechanical hypersensitivity. Primary sensory neuron’s ability to sense mechanical force forms mechanotransduction. However, whether this property undergoes activity-dependent plastic changes and underlies mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain (CRP) is not clear. Here we show a new CRP model producing stable mechanical compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which induces dramatic behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Amongst nociceptive DRG neurons, a mechanically sensitive neuron, isolectin B4 negative Aδ-type (IB4− Aδ) DRG neuron displays spontaneous activity with hyperexcitability after chronic compression of cervical DRGs. Focal mechanical stimulation on somata of IB4- Aδ neuron induces abnormal hypersensitivity. Upregulated HCN1 and HCN3 channels and increased Ih current on this subset of primary nociceptors underlies the spontaneous activity together with neuronal mechanical hypersensitivity, which further contributes to the behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity associated with CRP. This study sheds new light on the functional plasticity of a specific subset of nociceptive DRG neurons to mechanical stimulation and reveals a novel mechanism that could underlie the mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26577374

  8. TDP-43 Loss-of-Function Causes Neuronal Loss Due to Defective Steroid Receptor-Mediated Gene Program Switching in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Vanden Broeck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TDP-43 proteinopathy is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related neurodegenerative disorders. Whether TDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a novel toxic gain-of-function mechanism of the aggregates or by a loss of its normal function is unknown. We increased and decreased expression of TDP-43 (dTDP-43 in Drosophila. Although upregulation of dTDP-43 induced neuronal ubiquitin and dTDP-43-positive inclusions, both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 resulted in selective apoptosis of bursicon neurons and highly similar transcriptome alterations at the pupal-adult transition. Gene network analysis and genetic validation showed that both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 directly and dramatically increased the expression of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Map205, resulting in cytoplasmic accumulations of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR and a failure to switch EcR-dependent gene programs from a pupal to adult pattern. We propose that dTDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a loss of its normal function.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in water at high temperature: contribution to a phenomenological approach to the understanding of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Pascale

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking of an alloy 600 in water at high temperature. More precisely, it aimed at determining, by using quantitative data characterizing cracking phenomenology, which mechanism(s) is (are) able to explain crack initiation and crack growth. These data concern quantitative characterization of crack initiation, of crack growth and of the influence of two cracking parameters (strain rate, medium hydrogen content). They have been obtained by quantifying cracking through the application of a morphological model. More precisely, these data are: evolution of crack density during a tensile test at slow rate, value of initial crack width with respect to grain boundary length, and relationship between crack density and medium hydrogen content. It appears that hydrogen absorption seems to be involved in the crack initiation mechanism. Crack growth mechanisms and crack growth rates are also discussed [fr

  10. Sortilin 1 Loss-of-Function Protects Against Cholestatic Liver Injury by Attenuating Hepatic Bile Acid Accumulation in Bile Duct Ligated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jibiao; Woolbright, Benjamin L; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yifeng; Matye, David; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Li, Tiangang

    2018-01-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is an intracellular trafficking receptor that mediates protein sorting in the endocytic or secretory pathways. Recent studies revealed a role of Sort1 in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid (BA) metabolism. This study further investigated the role of Sort1 in modulating BA detoxification and cholestatic liver injury in bile duct ligated mice. We found that Sort1 knockout (KO) mice had attenuated liver injury 24 h after bile duct ligation (BDL), which was mainly attributed to less bile infarct formation. Sham-operated Sort1 KO mice had about 20% larger BA pool size than sham-operated wildtype (WT) mice, but 24 h after BDL Sort1 KO mice had significantly attenuated hepatic BA accumulation and smaller BA pool size. After 14 days BDL, Sort1 KO mice showed significantly lower hepatic BA concentration and reduced expression of inflammatory and fibrotic marker genes, but similar degree of liver fibrosis compared with WT mice. Unbiased quantitative proteomics revealed that Sort1 KO mice had increased hepatic BA sulfotransferase 2A1, but unaltered phase-I BA metabolizing cytochrome P450s or phase-III BA efflux transporters. Consistently, Sort1 KO mice showed elevated plasma sulfated taurocholate after BDL. Finally, we found that liver Sort1 was repressed after BDL, which may be due to BA activation of farnesoid x receptor. In conclusion, we report a role of Sort1 in the regulation of hepatic BA detoxification and cholestatic liver injury in mice. The mechanisms underlying increased hepatic BA elimination in Sort1 KO mice after BDL require further investigation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Human SOD1 ALS Mutations in a Drosophila Knock-In Model Cause Severe Phenotypes and Reveal Dosage-Sensitive Gain- and Loss-of-Function Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Aslı; Held, Aaron; Bredvik, Kirsten; Major, Paxton; Achilli, Toni-Marie; Kerson, Abigail G; Wharton, Kristi; Stilwell, Geoff; Reenan, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and familial forms can be caused by numerous dominant mutations of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Substantial efforts have been invested in studying SOD1-ALS transgenic animal models; yet, the molecular mechanisms by which ALS-mutant SOD1 protein acquires toxicity are not well understood. ALS-like phenotypes in animal models are highly dependent on transgene dosage. Thus, issues of whether the ALS-like phenotypes of these models stem from overexpression of mutant alleles or from aspects of the SOD1 mutation itself are not easily deconvolved. To address concerns about levels of mutant SOD1 in disease pathogenesis, we have genetically engineered four human ALS-causing SOD1 point mutations (G37R, H48R, H71Y, and G85R) into the endogenous locus of Drosophila SOD1 (dsod) via ends-out homologous recombination and analyzed the resulting molecular, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes. Contrary to previous transgenic models, we have recapitulated ALS-like phenotypes without overexpression of the mutant protein. Drosophila carrying homozygous mutations rendering SOD1 protein enzymatically inactive (G85R, H48R, and H71Y) exhibited neurodegeneration, locomotor deficits, and shortened life span. The mutation retaining enzymatic activity (G37R) was phenotypically indistinguishable from controls. While the observed mutant dsod phenotypes were recessive, a gain-of-function component was uncovered through dosage studies and comparisons with age-matched dsod null animals, which failed to show severe locomotor defects or nerve degeneration. We conclude that the Drosophila knock-in model captures important aspects of human SOD1-based ALS and provides a powerful and useful tool for further genetic studies. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Contribution of deformation mechanisms to strength and ductility in two Cr-Mn grade austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef_saleh@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P. [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130, USA. (United States); Talonen, J. [Outokumpu Oyj, Box 140, FI-02201 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    The role of different deformation mechanisms in controlling mechanical properties were studied in two low-Ni, Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel grades (Types 201 and 201L) by tensile testing and microstructure examinations. Tensile tests were carried out at two different strain rates, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, in the temperature range from -80 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. It was observed that the flow properties and work hardening rate are affected significantly by temperature and strain rate for the concerned steels through variation of deformation mechanism. Deformation-induced austenite-to-martensite transformation (TRIP effect) is the dominant mechanism at temperatures below room temperature. From 50 Degree-Sign C up to 200 Degree-Sign C, plastic deformation is controlled by mechanical twinning (TWIP effect) and dislocation glide. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to study the plastic deformation accommodation and identify the primary deformation mechanisms operating in the deformed steels.

  13. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  14. A contribution to the study of mechanical behaviour of concrete structures taking into account the effects of desiccation; Contribution a l'etude du comportement mecanique des ouvrages en beton avec prise en compte des effets de la dessiccation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, F.X

    2004-12-15

    In this work, is given a model of the drying influence on the mechanical behaviour of concrete and a reliable anticipating tool is proposed for engineers. The drying of hardened concrete has several consequences on the mechanical properties of concrete. The desiccation shrinkage is the first sign, generating crack visible at the surface level under the form of crackling and core cracking particularly on the account of the presence of aggregates which prevent the shrinkage of the cement paste to make easily. Then, the elastic parameters are strongly affected (decrease of stiffness, of the Poisson coefficient). A simplified model of the stiffness loss during the drying is proposed under the form of an isotropic hydric damage. The model is validated in the unidimensional case with tests results carried out in the LML. With this model, it is possible to estimate with more accuracy the state of the hydric constraints in concrete. Numerical simulations on 3D structures are then proposed. An application to the case of a wall being manufactured is given. The contributions of the model are tested too in the case where the global mechanical response of cylindrical mortar specimens submitted to drying and to compression tests is simulated. The effect of the capillary suction as well as the increase of the elastic limit during drying are then discussed. At last, the contributions of the model for creep calculations and desiccation are presented. (O.M.)

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Trigeminal Ganglion Contributes to Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Masseter Muscle During Temporomandibular Joint Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Reio; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Urata, Kentaro; Lee, Jun; Maruno, Mitsuru; Soma, Kumi; Okada, Shinji; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iwata, Koichi

    To determine the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) signaling in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle during temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. A total of 55 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Following injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant into the TMJ, the mechanical sensitivities of the masseter muscle and the overlying facial skin were measured. Satellite glial cell (SGC) activation and TNFα expression in the TG were investigated immunohistochemically, and the effects of their inhibition on the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle were also examined. Student t test or two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni multiple comparisons test were used for statistical analyses. P < .05 was considered to reflect statistical significance. Mechanical allodynia in the masseter muscle was induced without any inflammatory cell infiltration in the muscle after TMJ inflammation. SGC activation and an increased number of TNFα-immunoreactive cells were induced in the TG following TMJ inflammation. Intra-TG administration of an inhibitor of SGC activity or of TNFα-neutralizing antibody depressed both the increased number of TG cells encircled by activated SGCs and the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter following TMJ inflammation. These findings suggest that persistent masseter hypersensitivity associated with TMJ inflammation was mediated by SGC-TG neuron interactions via TNFα signaling in the TG.

  16. Mechanical tests imaging on metallic matrix composites. Experimental contribution to homogenization methods validation and identification of phase-related mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quoc-Thang Vo

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on a matrix/inclusion metal composite. A simple method is proposed to evaluate the elastic properties of one phase while the properties of the other phase are assumed to be known. The method is based on both an inverse homogenization scheme and mechanical field's measurements by 2D digital image correlation. The originality of the approach rests on the scale studied, i.e. the microstructure scale of material: the characteristic size of the inclusions is about few tens of microns. The evaluation is performed on standard uniaxial tensile tests associated with a long-distance microscope. It allows observation of the surface of a specimen on the microstructure scale during the mechanical stress. First, the accuracy of the method is estimated on 'perfect' mechanical fields coming from numerical simulations for four microstructures: elastic or porous single inclusions having either spherical or cylindrical shape. Second, this accuracy is estimated on real mechanical field for two simple microstructures: an elasto-plastic metallic matrix containing a single cylindrical micro void or four cylindrical micro voids arranged in a square pattern. Third, the method is used to evaluate elastic properties of αZr inclusions with arbitrary shape in an oxidized Zircaloy-4 sample of the fuel cladding of a pressurized water reactor after an accident loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In all this study, the phases are assumed to have isotropic properties. (author) [fr

  17. On the contribution of local feedback mechanisms to the range of climate sensitivity in two GCM ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, M.J.; Senior, C.A.; Sexton, D.M.H.; Ingram, W.J.; Williams, K.D.; Ringer, M.A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Met Office, Exeter (United Kingdom); McAvaney, B.J.; Colman, R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Melbourne (Australia); Soden, B.J. [University of Miami, Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL (United States); Gudgel, R.; Knutson, T. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Emori, S.; Ogura, T. [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba (Japan); Tsushima, Y. [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC), Kanagawa (Japan); Andronova, N. [University of Michigan, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Li, B. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Urbana, IL (United States); Musat, I.; Bony, S. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Paris (France); Taylor, K.E. [Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Global and local feedback analysis techniques have been applied to two ensembles of mixed layer equilibrium CO{sub 2} doubling climate change experiments, from the CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project) and QUMP (Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions) projects. Neither of these new ensembles shows evidence of a statistically significant change in the ensemble mean or variance in global mean climate sensitivity when compared with the results from the mixed layer models quoted in the Third Assessment Report of the IPCC. Global mean feedback analysis of these two ensembles confirms the large contribution made by inter-model differences in cloud feedbacks to those in climate sensitivity in earlier studies; net cloud feedbacks are responsible for 66% of the inter-model variance in the total feedback in the CFMIP ensemble and 85% in the QUMP ensemble. The ensemble mean global feedback components are all statistically indistinguishable between the two ensembles, except for the clear-sky shortwave feedback which is stronger in the CFMIP ensemble. While ensemble variances of the shortwave cloud feedback and both clear-sky feedback terms are larger in CFMIP, there is considerable overlap in the cloud feedback ranges; QUMP spans 80% or more of the CFMIP ranges in longwave and shortwave cloud feedback. We introduce a local cloud feedback classification system which distinguishes different types of cloud feedbacks on the basis of the relative strengths of their longwave and shortwave components, and interpret these in terms of responses of different cloud types diagnosed by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project simulator. In the CFMIP ensemble, areas where low-top cloud changes constitute the largest cloud response are responsible for 59% of the contribution from cloud feedback to the variance in the total feedback. A similar figure is found for the QUMP ensemble. Areas of positive low cloud feedback (associated with reductions in low level

  18. Innovative financing mechanisms for sustainable ecosystem management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, G.W.; Diemont, W.H.; Groot, de R.S.; Schrijver, R.A.M.; Verhagen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing human influence on ecosystems and the ensuing unsustainable exploitation and degradation has led in many places to depletion and loss of function of these ecosystems. These problems cannot be solved by (innovative) financing mechanisms, as the causes do not lie in a lack of financing

  19. Glucuronidation as a mechanism of intrinsic drug resistance in colon cancer cells: contribution of drug transport proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Zelcer, Noam; Allen, John D.; Yao, Denggao; Boyd, Gary; Maliepaard, Mark; Friedberg, Thomas H.; Smyth, John F.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently shown that drug conjugation catalysed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) functions as an intrinsic mechanism of resistance to the topoisomerase I inhibitors 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and NU/ICRF 505 in human colon cancer cells and now report on the role of drug transport in

  20. On the contribution of electrochemical methods in the study of corrosion mechanisms in automotive body steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massinon, D.; Dauchelle, D.; Charbonnier, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Complex mechanisms and interactions seem to govern the degradation of automotive body panels. The multimaterial nature of the system (steel, coating, conversion layer and paint), together with the variety of agressions it can encounter makes it a difficult task to characterize the corrosion mechanism(s). To this aim, physical analysis of corroded surfaces have recently yielded new insights on the role of some parameters and especially the quality of the interfaces, i.e. paint/coating and coating/steel. Electrochemistry, on the other hand, has given much information on phenomena such as selective dissolution, galvanic protection of steel by a coating, or oxygen diffusion through an organic coating. More and more is being known about the role of the paint and the mechanisms of its adhesion on a metallic substrate. However, a link between those theories is still missing and a full understanding of the corrosion phenomenon has not been achieved yet. We have developed original techniques in order to look into the corroded specimens with the most sophisticated physical analysis tools. The observed phenomena can be simulated and, whenever possible, quantified. This approach requires the use of different electrochemical techniques which will be presented in this paper. (author) 8 refs., 15 figs

  1. Procedural Learning and Associative Memory Mechanisms Contribute to Contextual Cueing: Evidence from fMRI and Eye-Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, Anna; Reder, Lynne M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of eye tracking and fMRI in a contextual cueing task, we explored the mechanisms underlying the facilitation of visual search for repeated spatial configurations. When configurations of distractors were repeated, greater activation in the right hippocampus corresponded to greater reductions in the number of saccades to locate…

  2. Metabolic features involved in drought stress tolerance mechanisms in peanut nodules and their contribution to biological nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Ana Laura; Bianucci, Eliana; Castro, Stella; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2017-10-01

    Legumes belong to the most important crops worldwide. They increase soil fertility due their ability to establish symbiotic associations with soil microorganisms, known as rhizobia, capable of fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere. However, they are frequently exposed to abiotic stress conditions in particular drought. Such adverse conditions impair the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and depend largely on the legume. Therefore, two peanut cultivars with contrasting tolerance to drought, namely the more tolerant EC-98 and the sensitive Granoleico, were investigated to elucidate the relative contribution of BNF to the tolerance to drought. The tolerant cultivar EC-98 sustained growth and BNF similar to the control condition despite the reduced water potential and photosynthesis, suggesting the functioning of distinct metabolic pathways that contributed to enhance the tolerance. The biochemical and metabolomics approaches revealed that nodules from the tolerant cultivar accumulated trehalose, proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), metabolites with known function in protecting against drought stress. The amide metabolism was severely affected in nodules from the sensitive cultivar Granoleico as revealed by the low content of asparagine and glutamine in the drought stressed plants. The sensitive cultivar upon rehydration was unable to re-establish a metabolism similar to well-watered plants. This was evidenced by the low level of metabolites and, transcripts and specific activities of enzymes from the carbon (sucrose synthase) and nitrogen (glutamine synthetase) metabolism which decreased below the values of control plants. Therefore, the increased content of metabolites with protective functions under drought stress likely is crucial for the full restoration upon rehydration. Smaller changes of drought stress-related metabolites in nodule are another trait that contributes to the effective control of BNF in the tolerant peanut cultivar (EC-98). Copyright © 2017

  3. Contribution to the explanation of the spalling of small specimen without any mechanical restraint exposed to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Marcus V.G. de; Pliya, Prosper; Noumowe, Albert; Beaucour, Anne-Lise; Ortola, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of concrete subjected to high temperature is studied. The aim of the study is to explain the spalling or bursting phenomenon observed during experimental studies in the laboratory. Mechanical computations are carried out with the finite element code CAST3M developed at the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA). Heat gradient and water vapour pressure inside the concrete element are determined by using a thermo-hydrous model. Then, the mechanical stresses generated in the studied concrete element are calculated according to two behaviour assumptions: the linear isotropic elastic law and an elastoplastic model. Numerical simulations show that, during the heating cycles, tension stresses are developed in the central part and compression stresses at the surface of the cylindrical concrete element. The highest stresses appear when the surface temperature of the concrete element is about 300 o C. The tension stresses in the specimens then exceed the concrete tensile strength.

  4. Contribution to the explanation of the spalling of small specimen without any mechanical restraint exposed to high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Marcus V.G. de, E-mail: mvmorais@unb.b [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Pliya, Prosper [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Noumowe, Albert, E-mail: Albert.Noumowe@u-cergy.f [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Beaucour, Anne-Lise; Ortola, Sophie [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    The behaviour of concrete subjected to high temperature is studied. The aim of the study is to explain the spalling or bursting phenomenon observed during experimental studies in the laboratory. Mechanical computations are carried out with the finite element code CAST3M developed at the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA). Heat gradient and water vapour pressure inside the concrete element are determined by using a thermo-hydrous model. Then, the mechanical stresses generated in the studied concrete element are calculated according to two behaviour assumptions: the linear isotropic elastic law and an elastoplastic model. Numerical simulations show that, during the heating cycles, tension stresses are developed in the central part and compression stresses at the surface of the cylindrical concrete element. The highest stresses appear when the surface temperature of the concrete element is about 300 {sup o}C. The tension stresses in the specimens then exceed the concrete tensile strength.

  5. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of extraction of uranyl chloride by long chain aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, G.R.

    1965-06-01

    After having studied and developed the mechanisms which may 'a priori' explain the extraction process (co-ordination, ion association or intermediate mechanism), experience shows that ion association only should be taken into consideration. The structure of the organic complex of uranyl chloride has been defined on the basis of the study of the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium between the two phases at the equilibrium as a function of successively the activity of Cl - ions in the aqueous phase, the concentration of amine salt in the organic phase and finally of the concentration of uranium in the aqueous phase. The plotting of the results in bi-logarithmic co-ordinates enables us to propose the following formula for the extracted compound: UO 2 Cl 4 -- (NR 3 H + ) 2 . The calculation of the equilibrium constant of formation of the organic compound of uranyl chloride has been possible in the case of diluted solutions of uranium only. (author) [fr

  6. Contribution to the study of mechanical properties of nuclear fuel: atomistic modelling of the deformation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossati, P.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nuclear fuel are a complex problem, involving many coupled mechanisms occurring at different length scales. We used Molecular Dynamics models to bring some light on some of these mechanisms at the atomic scale. We devised a procedure to calculate transition pathways between some UO 2 polymorphs, and then carried out dynamics simulations of these transitions. We confirmed the stability of the cotunnite structure at high pressure using various empirical potentials, the fluorite structure being the most stable at room pressure. Moreover, we showed a reconstructive phase transition between the fluorite and cotunnite structures. We also showed the importance of the major deformation axis on the kind of transition that occur under tensile conditions. Depending on the loading direction, a scrutinyite or rutile phase can appear. We then calculated the elastic behaviour of UO 2 using different potentials. The relative agreement between them was used to produce a set of parameters to be used as input in mesoscale models. We also simulated crack propagation in UO 2 single crystals. These simulations showed secondary phases nucleation at crack tips, and hinted at the importance thereof on crack propagation at higher length-scales. We then described some properties of edge dislocations in UO 2 . The core structures were compared for various glide planes. The critical resolved shear stress was calculated for temperatures up to 2000 K. These calculations showed a link between lattice disorder at the dislocations core and the dislocations mobility. (author)

  7. Contributions to the nonlinear modeling of the mechanical behaviour of concrete and of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Krayani

    2007-12-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of the material and its loading history (at any point of the structure) is necessary to evaluate the tightness of a containment structure and therefore its durability. An elastic plastic non local damage model is developed for modelling the mechanical behaviour of concrete. A regularization technique is introduced on the part responsible of the strain-softening behaviour in order to avoid the numerical problems due to the phenomenon of localisation of damage. The constitutive law and its numerical implementation are detailed. The consistent tangent matrix is derived, where the numerical differentiation technique is applied to integrate plastic constitutive laws and to obtain a quadratic convergence with the Newton-Raphson method at Gauss-point level and in the solution of the boundary value problem. Simulations have shown the capacity of the model to reproduce the classical and complex structural behaviour of concrete. The comparisons with the isotropic damage models illustrate the improvements achieved by introducing the plasticity to the damage formulation: the mode of failure is reproduced correctly (mode I and mixed mode) and the ultimate load is in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, we present modifications of the classical non local damage model in order to take into account the boundary effects. Our justification is based on micro-mechanical arguments in which the interactions between microcracks are reduced nearby the free boundary. (author)

  8. 60 Co accumulation by scenedesnus obliquus. Mechanism of uptake and relative contribution of radionuclide adsorption and absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucho, R.; Baudin, J.P.

    1989-06-01

    In this paper are presented the results of various 60 Co accumulation and depuration experiments, carried out to assess the respective contributions of passive and active processes in the radionuclide uptake by Scenedesmus obliquus. The experiments were conduced on living illuminated cells, living cells maintained in darkness and dead cells. Exposure study shows that living illuminated cells and dead cells incorporated the same amount of available 60 Co, in the order of 65%. In contrast, the radionuclide uptake by cells in darkness was very lower. Depuration experiments show that radiocobalt release by living illuminated cells and dead cells is an exponential process including two phases. The first, during which the decrease of the radioactivity was about 80%, corresponds to elimination of the 60 Co adsorbed on the cell walls. During the second phase, the slight decrease of the radioactivity results from the intracellular 60 Co desorption. The addition of EDTA in the depuration culture medium results in an almost instantaneous loss of 80% of the accumulated radionuclide. The results clearly indicate that 60 Co uptake is mainly a passive phenomenon, since adsorption accounts for 80% of the accumulation and passive diffusion for about 10%. Metabolic assimilation contributes for a weak part [fr

  9. Shading Contributes to the Reduction of Stem Mechanical Strength by Decreasing Cell Wall Synthesis in Japonica Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longmei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Low solar radiation caused by industrial development and solar dimming has become a limitation in crop production in China. It is widely accepted that low solar radiation influences many aspects of plant development, including slender, weak stems and susceptibility to lodging. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To clarify how low solar radiation affects stem mechanical strength formation and lodging resistance, the japonica rice cultivars Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistant and W3668 (lodging-susceptible were grown under field conditions with normal light (Control and shading (the incident light was reduced by 60% with a black nylon net. The yield and yield components, plant morphological characteristics, the stem mechanical strength, cell wall components, culm microstructure, gene expression correlated with cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were measured. The results showed that shading significantly reduced grain yield attributed to reduction of spikelets per panicles and grain weight. The stem-breaking strength decreased significantly under shading treatment; consequently, resulting in higher lodging index in rice plant in both varieties, as revealed by decreased by culm diameter, culm wall thickness and increased plant height, gravity center height. Compared with control, cell wall components including non-structural carbohydrate, sucrose, cellulose, and lignin reduced quite higher. With histochemical straining, shading largely reduced lignin deposition in the sclerenchyma cells and vascular bundle cells compared with control, and decreased cellulose deposition in the parenchyma cells of culm tissue in both Wuyunjing23 and W3668. And under shading condition, gene expression involved in secondary cell wall synthesis, OsPAL, OsCOMT, OsCCoAOMT, OsCCR, and OsCAD2, and primary cell wall synthesis, OsCesA1, OsCesA3, and OsCesA8 were decreased significantly. These results suggest that gene expression involved in the reduction of

  10. Shading Contributes to the Reduction of Stem Mechanical Strength by Decreasing Cell Wall Synthesis in Japonica Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Longmei; Zhang, Wujun; Ding, Yanfeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Cambula, Elidio D; Weng, Fei; Liu, Zhenghui; Ding, Chengqiang; Tang, She; Chen, Lin; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Ganghua

    2017-01-01

    Low solar radiation caused by industrial development and solar dimming has become a limitation in crop production in China. It is widely accepted that low solar radiation influences many aspects of plant development, including slender, weak stems and susceptibility to lodging. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To clarify how low solar radiation affects stem mechanical strength formation and lodging resistance, the japonica rice cultivars Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistant) and W3668 (lodging-susceptible) were grown under field conditions with normal light (Control) and shading (the incident light was reduced by 60%) with a black nylon net. The yield and yield components, plant morphological characteristics, the stem mechanical strength, cell wall components, culm microstructure, gene expression correlated with cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were measured. The results showed that shading significantly reduced grain yield attributed to reduction of spikelets per panicles and grain weight. The stem-breaking strength decreased significantly under shading treatment; consequently, resulting in higher lodging index in rice plant in both varieties, as revealed by decreased by culm diameter, culm wall thickness and increased plant height, gravity center height. Compared with control, cell wall components including non-structural carbohydrate, sucrose, cellulose, and lignin reduced quite higher. With histochemical straining, shading largely reduced lignin deposition in the sclerenchyma cells and vascular bundle cells compared with control, and decreased cellulose deposition in the parenchyma cells of culm tissue in both Wuyunjing23 and W3668. And under shading condition, gene expression involved in secondary cell wall synthesis, OsPAL, OsCOMT, OsCCoAOMT, OsCCR , and OsCAD2 , and primary cell wall synthesis, OsCesA1, OsCesA3 , and OsCesA8 were decreased significantly. These results suggest that gene expression involved in the reduction of lignin and

  11. Contribution to the study of the amorphization mechanisms of intermetallic compounds by mechanical grinding; Contribution a l`etude des mecanismes d`amorphisation par sollicitation mecanique de composes intermetalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galy, D

    1995-01-11

    This work aims at identifying the mechanisms responsible for amorphization of NiZr and NiZr{sub 2} compounds under ball-milling. In the first part, the effect of a localized deformation is studied: the deformation is produced by indentation on bulk samples, very high local strains can be achieved by this technique. The resulting microstructure is studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No evidence for amorphization is found in these compounds, contrary to what is known to occur in silicon and germanium. Despite of their high brittleness, the NiZr and NiZr{sub 2} compounds accommodate the multiaxial localized stress by plastic deformation: dislocations multiplication and glide, micro-twinning. Dislocations (both perfect and imperfect) and micro-twins have been analysed into details for the first time. The twinning mechanism in NiZr{sub 2} has been elucidated. In the second part of this work, the microstructure of NiZr{sub 2} in the course of amorphization by ball-milling is studied by TEM observation are prepared by ultra-microtomy. The following evolution is observed: first, the material is fragmented and plastically deformed; the microstructure is refined by polygonation. Second, aggregates are formed by a fragmentation and sticking process, leading to a stationary size for the aggregates. The aggregates themselves are made of a mixture of nanocrystalline (about 10 nm) material and coarser crystallites. As milling proceeds, the latter disappear to the benefit of the former. Once aggregates are 100% nanocrystalline, the amorphous phase appears and develops to the expense of the nanocrystalline phase. At late stages, small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix are observed. No massive chemical disordering is observed but a small amount can not be ruled out. It is suggested that amorphization occurs by chemical disordering at interfaces, induced by shear waves. (Author). 76 refs., 57 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia under stretch-the relative contribution of windlass mechanism and Achilles tendon force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lin, Chun-Li; Wang, Hsien-Wen; Chou, Shih-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Stretching plays an important role in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Information on the internal stresses/strains of the plantar fascia under stretch is useful in enhancing knowledge on the stretch mechanisms. Although direct measurement can monitor plantar fascia changes, it is invasive and gathers only localized information. The purpose of this paper was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the stretch effects on plantar fascia and monitor its stress/strain distributions and concentrations. A three-dimensional foot model was developed and contained 26 bones with joint cartilages, 67 ligaments and a fan-like solid plantar fascia modeling. All tissues were idealized as linear elastic, homogeneous and isotropic whilst the plantar fascia was assigned as hyperelastic to represent its nonlinearity. The plantar fascia was monitored for its biomechanical responses under various stretch combinations: three toe dorsiflexion angles (windlass effect: 15 degrees , 30 degrees and 45 degrees ) and five Achilles tendon forces (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500N). Our results indicated that the plantar fascia strain increased as the dorsiflexion angles increased, and this phenomenon was enhanced by increasing Achilles tendon force. A stress concentration was found near the medial calcaneal tubercle, and the fascia stress was higher underneath the first foot ray and gradually decreased as it moved toward the fifth ray. The current model recreated the position of the foot when stretch is placed on the plantar fascia. The results provided a general insight into the mechanical and biomechanical aspects of the influences of windlass mechanism and Achilles tendon force on plantar fascia stress and strain distribution. These findings might have practical implications onto plantar fascia stretch approaches, and provide guidelines to its surgical release.

  13. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L.

    2007-11-01

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale (∼ 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr 2 O 3 nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr 2 O 3 nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary media and to tackle some

  14. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...... involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells...

  15. Contribution to improving reliability assessments of mechanical structural components requiring a high degree of safety using weighted Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutter, R

    1981-12-04

    Physical theories to inquire lifetime and reliability of mechanical structures or components under multiscale random stress do not exist. Today those dates were examinated e.g. in development of aircrafts and motorcars by fatigue-testing of original components and sections during long terms. Knowing the distributions of stress and material-parameters the same testing is to be realized simulationary on highspeed computers. This study gives methods to reduce the necessary computation time to attending ones even to proof reliability up to R=1-10/sup -9/. These methods were of Monte-Carlo-Simulation with weighted parameters and respect to life-history.

  16. The impact of cocaine on adult hippocampal neurogenesis: Potential neurobiological mechanisms and contributions to maladaptive cognition in cocaine addiction disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2017-10-01

    After discovering that addictive drugs alter adult neurogenesis, the potential role of adult-born hippocampal neurons in drug addiction has become a promising research field, in which cocaine is the most frequently investigated drug. Although a substantial amount of pre-clinical evidence has accumulated, additional studies are required to reveal the mechanisms by which cocaine modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) and determine whether these adult-born neurons have a role in cocaine-related behaviors, such as cocaine-mediated cognitive symptoms. First, this review will summarize the cocaine-induced alterations in a number of neurobiological factors (neurotransmitters, neurotrophins, glucocorticoids, inflammatory mediators) that likely regulate both hippocampal-dependent learning and adult hippocampal neurogenesis after cocaine exposure. A separate section will provide a detailed review of the available literature that challenges the common view that cocaine reduces adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In fact, cocaine has a short-term anti-proliferative role, but the young adult-born neurons are apparently spared, or even enhanced, following certain cocaine protocols. Thus, we will try to reconcile this evidence with the hippocampal-dependent cognitive symptoms that are typically observed in cocaine addicts, and we will propose new directions for future studies to test the relevant hypothesis. Based on the evidence presented here, the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of the many mechanisms by which cocaine sculpts hippocampus-dependent learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution to the X-ray diffraction analysis method of the micro-structural and mechanical state of heterogenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, V.

    2003-09-01

    The analysis of internal stresses through X-ray diffraction (DRX) has been used to study the micro-structure of various heterogenous materials: two-phase materials, composite materials, coated materials and alloys such as Ti-Al, Inconel-600 and 20CDV5-08 steel. In the case of the Ti-Al alloy we have achieved for the first time the experimental assessment of the compliance constant, of the level of internal stresses, and of the behaviour law of each phase as a function of the changes in duplex micro-structures. Local, direct and accurate information given by DRX have been used to feed micro-mechanical simulations and the results of the simulation are consistent with macroscopic mechanical testing. Accurate DRX analyses on CMC (ceramic matrix composite) have allowed us to confirm the thermal origin of internal stresses. As for thick copper layers made through thermal projection, DRX method combined to in-situ tensile testing has permitted us to measure the elasticity modulus and the distribution of macroscopic stresses inside the coating and the substrate. We have also determined the elastic limit of a TiN layer on a steel substrate. (A.C.)

  18. Toward an understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying dual-task performance: Contribution of comparative approaches using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kei; Funahashi, Shintaro

    2018-01-01

    The study of dual-task performance in human subjects has received considerable interest in cognitive neuroscience because it can provide detailed insights into the neural mechanisms underlying higher-order cognitive control. Despite many decades of research, our understanding of the neurobiological basis of dual-task performance is still limited, and some critical questions are still under debate. Recently, behavioral and neurophysiological studies of dual-task performance in animals have begun to provide intriguing evidence regarding how dual-task information is processed in the brain. In this review, we first summarize key evidence in neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies in humans and discuss possible reasons for discrepancies across studies. We then provide a comprehensive review of the literature on dual-task studies in animals and provide a novel working hypothesis that may reconcile the divergent results in human studies toward a unified view of the mechanisms underlying dual-task processing. Finally, we propose possible directions for future dual-task experiments in the framework of comparative cognitive neuroscience. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuronal glycogen synthesis contributes to physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinadinos, Christopher; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; Boulan, Laura; Solsona, Estel; Tevy, Maria F; Marquez, Mercedes; Duran, Jordi; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Calbó, Joaquim; Blasco, Ester; Pumarola, Marti; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose and the carbohydrate energy store for animal cells. In the brain, it is essentially found in glial cells, although it is also present in minute amounts in neurons. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin, proteins involved in suppressing glycogen synthesis, induce the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies in neuronal cells. Known as Lafora bodies (LBs), these deposits result in the aggressive neurodegeneration seen in Lafora's disease. Polysaccharide-based aggregates, called corpora amylacea (CA), are also present in the neurons of aged human brains. Despite the similarity of CA to LBs, the mechanisms and functional consequences of CA formation are yet unknown. Here, we show that wild-type laboratory mice also accumulate glycogen-based aggregates in the brain as they age. These structures are immunopositive for an array of metabolic and stress-response proteins, some of which were previously shown to aggregate in correlation with age in the human brain and are also present in LBs. Remarkably, these structures and their associated protein aggregates are not present in the aged mouse brain upon genetic ablation of glycogen synthase. Similar genetic intervention in Drosophila prevents the accumulation of glycogen clusters in the neuronal processes of aged flies. Most interestingly, targeted reduction of Drosophila glycogen synthase in neurons improves neurological function with age and extends lifespan. These results demonstrate that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to physiological aging and may therefore constitute a key factor regulating age-related neurological decline in humans. © 2014 The Authors. Aging cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. France-Germany Study. Energy transition and capacity mechanisms. A contribution to the European debate with a view to 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In most countries of the world, the electricity sector is undergoing a structural transition, driven by requirements of efficiency and sustainability: renewable capacity is witnessing a continuous growth, making the need of flexibility increase, while electricity market prices tend to decrease. In the medium-term, the power system will have to deal with increasing levels of risk, which will take different forms in France and Germany, which are the two countries this study focuses on. In France, the risk is related to the thermo-sensitive power demand, whereas in Germany the risks are related to the high penetration of intermittent renewable power generation. Both of these facets of risk lead to a high volatility of the residual demand from one hour to the next, and therefore require the power system to be more flexible. In this context, the question of whether the current market design will be able to ensure a satisfactory level of security of supply through an adequate remuneration of it actors is open. Market design is therefore a crucial point whose appropriate treatment could ensure the sustainability of the current and future power systems. An inadequate market design could in contrast lead to a massive decommissioning of power plants, including the most flexible ones, which will directly impact the security of supply in both France and Germany. The security of supply at the European level could also be at risk since France and Germany host the two largest power systems in Europe. To face these new challenges, several solutions are being planned or implemented in different countries. These solutions all involve combinations of the following ingredients: - improvements of the energy-only markets, without price caps and with higher demand-response capacities, to let the system send more accurate price signals during times of scarcity, - capacity reliability mechanisms, among them capacity mechanisms based on a targeted level of security of supply at a national

  1. Contribution to the safety of repairing mechanisms in Staphylococcus epidermidis: characterization of mutants sensible to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha Guillobel, H.C. da.

    1985-01-01

    Mutants obtained from N - methyl -N' - nitro - N - nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment of the W 5 strain or Staphylococcus epidermidis and selected for their increased UV - sensitivity were characterized according to their capacity to repair DNA damage. The original W 5 parental strain as well as several phenotypically defined strains of Escherichia coli, described in the literature, were used as a reference. The study included: the verification of cellular UVV - and MNNG - sensitivities; the determination of the bacterial potential for phage-reactivation by constitutive enzymatic mechanisms (host cell reactivation), as well as by the action of inducible repair systems (W-reactivation); the assessment of the UV-inductibility of prophage in the lysogenic hosts. (author)

  2. Mechanisms contributing to the thermal analysis of waste incineration bottom ash and quantification of different carbon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Stefania; van Zomeren, André; Costa, Giulia; Dijkstra, Joris J; Comans, Rob N J; Lombardi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this study was to identify the main compounds affecting the weight changes of bottom ash (BA) in conventional loss on ignition (LOI) tests and to obtain a better understanding of the individual processes in heterogeneous (waste) materials such as BA. Evaluations were performed on BA samples from a refuse derived fuel incineration (RDF-I) plant and a hospital waste incineration (HW-I) plant using thermogravimetric analysis and subsequent mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products. Results of TG-MS analysis on RDF-I BA indicated that the LOI measured at 550°C was due to moisture evaporation and dehydration of Ca(OH)(2) and hydrocalumite. Results for the HW-I BA showed that LOI at 550°C was predominantly related to the elemental carbon (EC) content of the sample. Decomposition of CaCO(3) around 700°C was identified in both materials. In addition, we have identified reaction mechanisms that underestimate the EC and overestimate the CaCO(3) contents of the HW-I BA during TG-MS analyses. These types of artefacts are expected to occur also when conventional LOI methods are adopted, in particular for materials that contain CaO/Ca(OH)(2) in combination with EC and/or organic carbon, such as e.g. municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom and fly ashes. We suggest that the same mechanisms that we have found (i.e. in situ carbonation) can also occur during combustion of the waste in the incinerator (between 450 and 650°C) demonstrating that the presence of carbonate in bottom ash is not necessarily indicative for weathering. These results may also give direction to further optimization of waste incineration technologies with regard to stimulating in situ carbonation during incineration and subsequent potential improvement of the leaching behavior of bottom ash. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long term corrosion of iron in concrete and in atmospheric conditions: a contribution of archaeological analogues to mechanism comprehension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, E.; Demoulin, A.; Dillman, Ph.; Neff, D.; Berge, P.; Burger, E.; Perrin, St.; L'hostis, V.; Dillman, Ph.; Millard, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The prediction of iron (or low alloy steel) corrosion on very long term period is necessary in two different purposes: (i) the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage and (ii) the French storage and repository concept for the radioactive wastes. In order to determine the evolution of corrosion processes for very long period, mechanistic models have been developed. In these models that are based on a phenomenological approach to evaluate the average corrosion rates, two different environments are considered: concrete (steel reinforcements) and atmospheric. The study of archaeological analogues is a very pertinent tool for the validation of these models. First, physico-chemical analysis on old corrosion layers lead to a precise localisation and identification of the phases present in the corrosion system. Moreover, experimental reinduced corrosions of ancient samples under controlled parameters (temperature, relative humidity) bring new insight on the mechanisms involved. In particular, one crucial question related to the wet-dry cycle is the localisation of oxygen reduction sites in the rust layer. For this purpose, specific experiments have been set up to re-corrode the ancient samples in marked medium (using 18 O 2 ). Samples were exposed to cycling between high and low relative humidity, produced by saline saturated solutions. Then cross-sections of samples obtained were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) 18 O(p,α) 15 N on the Pierre Sue Laboratory nuclear microprobe. In this presentation the 18 O distribution profiles are discussed and interpreted in order to bring new insight on corrosion mechanisms. A comparative interpretation is made for each medium (concrete and atmosphere)

  4. Cyclic mechanical stretch contributes to network development of osteocyte-like cells with morphological change and autophagy promotion but without preferential cell alignment in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Nao; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Uto, Yusuke; Sasaki, Muneteru; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Osteocytes play important roles in controlling bone quality as well as preferential alignment of biological apatite c -axis/collagen fibers. However, the relationship between osteocytes and mechanical stress remains unclear due to the difficulty of three-dimensional (3D) culture of osteocytes in vitro . The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch on 3D-cultured osteocyte-like cells. Osteocyte-like cells were established using rat calvarial osteoblasts cultured in a 3D culture system. Cyclic mechanical stretch (8% amplitude at a rate of 2 cycles min -1 ) was applied for 24, 48 and 96 consecutive hours. Morphology, cell number and preferential cell alignment were evaluated. Apoptosis- and autophagy-related gene expression levels were measured using quantitative PCR. 3D-cultured osteoblasts became osteocyte-like cells that expressed osteocyte-specific genes such as Dmp1 , Cx43 , Sost , Fgf23 and RANKL , with morphological changes similar to osteocytes. Cell number was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner under non-loaded conditions, whereas cyclic mechanical stretch significantly prevented decreased cell numbers with increased expression of anti-apoptosis-related genes. Moreover, cyclic mechanical stretch significantly decreased cell size and ellipticity with increased expression of autophagy-related genes, LC3b and atg7 . Interestingly, preferential cell alignment did not occur, irrespective of mechanical stretch. These findings suggest that an anti-apoptotic effect contributes to network development of osteocyte-like cells under loaded condition. Spherical change of osteocyte-like cells induced by mechanical stretch may be associated with autophagy upregulation. Preferential alignment of osteocytes induced by mechanical load in vivo may be partially predetermined before osteoblasts differentiate into osteocytes and embed into bone matrix.

  5. Cisplatin-induced mesenchymal stromal cells-mediated mechanism contributing to decreased antitumor effect in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolekova, Svetlana; Matuskova, Miroslava; Bohac, Martin; Toro, Lenka; Durinikova, Erika; Tyciakova, Silvia; Demkova, Lucia; Gursky, Jan; Kucerova, Lucia

    2016-01-12

    Cells of the tumor microenvironment are recognized as important determinants of the tumor biology. The adjacent non-malignant cells can regulate drug responses of the cancer cells by secreted paracrine factors and direct interactions with tumor cells. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) actively contribute to tumor microenvironment. Here we focused on their response to chemotherapy as during the treatment these cells become affected. We have shown that the secretory phenotype and behavior of mesenchymal stromal cells influenced by cisplatin differs from the naïve MSC. MSC were more resistant to the concentrations of cisplatin, which was cytotoxic for tumor cells. They did not undergo apoptosis, but a part of MSC population underwent senescence. However, MSC pretreatment with cisplatin led to changes in phosphorylation profiles of many kinases and also increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines. These changes in cytokine and phosphorylation profile of MSC led to increased chemoresistance and stemness of breast cancer cells. Taken together here we suggest that the exposure of the chemoresistant cells in the tumor microenvironment leads to substantial alterations and might lead to promotion of acquired microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance and stemness.

  6. A gene expression signature of retinoblastoma loss-of-function is a predictive biomarker of resistance to palbociclib in breast cancer cell lines and is prognostic in patients with ER positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malorni, Luca; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Guarducci, Cristina; Bonechi, Martina; Biagioni, Chiara; Hart, Christopher D; Verardo, Roberto; Di Leo, Angelo; Migliaccio, Ilenia

    2016-09-13

    Palbociclib is a CDK4/6 inhibitor that received FDA approval for treatment of hormone receptor positive (HR+) HER2 negative (HER2neg) advanced breast cancer. To better personalize patients treatment it is critical to identify subgroups that would mostly benefit from it. We hypothesize that complex alterations of the Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway might be implicated in resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors and aim to investigate whether signatures of Rb loss-of-function would identify breast cancer cell lines resistant to palbociclib. We established a gene expression signature of Rb loss-of-function (RBsig) by identifying genes correlated with E2F1 and E2F2 expression in breast cancers within The Cancer Genome Atlas. We assessed the RBsig prognostic role in the METABRIC and in a comprehensive breast cancer meta-dataset. Finally, we analyzed whether RBsig would discriminate palbociclib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cells in a large RNA sequencing-based dataset. The RBsig was associated with RB1 genetic status in all tumors (p <7e-32) and in luminal or basal subtypes (p < 7e-11 and p < 0.002, respectively). The RBsig was prognostic in the METABRIC dataset (discovery: HR = 1.93 [1.5-2.4] p = 1.4e-08; validation: HR = 2.01 [1.6-2.5] p = 1.3e-09). Untreated and endocrine treated patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer expressing high RBsig had significantly worse recurrence free survival compared to those with low RBsig (HR = 2.37 [1.8 - 3.2] p = 1.87e-08 and HR = 2.62 [1.9- 3.5] p = 8.6e-11, respectively). The RBsig was able to identify palbociclib resistant and sensitive breast cancer cells (ROC AUC = 0,7778). Signatures of RB loss might be helpful in personalizing treatment of patients with HR+/HER2neg breast cancer. Further validation in patients receiving palbociclib is warranted.

  7. Long term alteration of glass/iron systems in anoxic conditions: contribution of archaeological analogues to the study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of glass alteration mechanisms arouses a great interest over the last decades, particularly in the nuclear field, since vitrification is used to stabilize high-level radioactive wastes in many countries. In the French concept, these nuclear glasses would be stored in geological repositories. This multi-barrier system (glass matrix, stainless steel container, low carbon steel over-container, geological barrier) must ensure the durable confinement of radionuclides. But laboratory experiments do not permit to predict directly the behaviour of these materials over typically a million-year timescale and the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data to long time periods remains problematic. Part of the validation of the predictive models relies on natural and archaeological analogues. Here, the analogues considered are vitreous slags produced as wastes by a blast furnace working during the 16. century in the iron making site of Glinet (Normandy, France). The choice of these specific artefacts is due to the presence of particular interface between corrosion products and glass matrix inside the blocks. Thus, they can help us to understand the influence of iron corrosion products from the steel containers on the glass alteration mechanisms and kinetics. A first part of this work concerns the characterization of the archaeological artefacts especially the interfacial area between glass and corrosion products inside cracks using micro and nano-beam techniques (μRaman spectroscopy, FEG-SEM, TEM, STXM...). This study has enabled to suggest an alteration process with different geochemical steps that leads to alteration profile observed. One of these steps is the precipitation of an iron silicate phase. In a second time, leaching experiments were set up on a synthetic glass of similar composition than the archaeological one to understand the first stages of alteration with and without iron. Two phenomena can be observed: silicon sorption and precipitation of iron

  8. A quantitative assessment approach of feasible optical mechanisms contributing to structural color of golden-like Chrysina aurigans scarab beetles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azofeifa, D.E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Solís, A.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.; Vargas, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Under normal incidence of non-polarized light, reflection spectra from the cuticle of golden-like C. aurigans scarabs shows a broad band displayed from 525 to 950 nm, with a spectral ripple structure that consists of a uniform sequence of peaks superimposed on the main reflection band. Cross sectional Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of the cuticle initially suggest the presence of a multilayered structure. A radiative transfer matrix formalism is first applied to describe as much as possible the main features of coherent reflection spectra, by assuming optically homogenous layers distributed through the exocuticle, with chitin as the major constituent material. Additional non-coherent multiple reflections due to layers in the endocuticle are also evaluated from this approach. The presence of a pigmented micron sized structure beneath the procuticle requires the evaluation of a diffuse light contribution to the reflection. This was carried out from a four-flux radiative transfer model. Optical anisotropy is introduced by interpreting the SEM images in terms of a twisted Bouligand-type structure, and reflection spectra are evaluated from an implementation of the so-called 4×4 Berreman's formalism. We have been able to approach the main features characterizing the reflection spectra of C. aurigans' elytra following this progressive way. - Highlights: • Polarization of light reflected by the cuticle of C. aurigans scarabs is established. • The pitch of the helical structure in the cuticle is established from SEM images. • C. aurigans is a broadband natural reflector with the wider reflection band observed

  9. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the energetic contributions to π stacking in nucleic acids versus rise, twist, and slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Trent M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Parrish, Robert M; Hud, Nicholas V; Sherrill, C David

    2013-01-30

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is applied to pairs of hydrogen-bonded nucleobases to obtain the energetic components of base stacking (electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, induction/polarization, and London dispersion interactions) and how they vary as a function of the helical parameters Rise, Twist, and Slide. Computed average values of Rise and Twist agree well with experimental data for B-form DNA from the Nucleic Acids Database, even though the model computations omitted the backbone atoms (suggesting that the backbone in B-form DNA is compatible with having the bases adopt their ideal stacking geometries). London dispersion forces are the most important attractive component in base stacking, followed by electrostatic interactions. At values of Rise typical of those in DNA (3.36 Å), the electrostatic contribution is nearly always attractive, providing further evidence for the importance of charge-penetration effects in π-π interactions (a term neglected in classical force fields). Comparison of the computed stacking energies with those from model complexes made of the "parent" nucleobases purine and 2-pyrimidone indicates that chemical substituents in DNA and RNA account for 20-40% of the base-stacking energy. A lack of correspondence between the SAPT results and experiment for Slide in RNA base-pair steps suggests that the backbone plays a larger role in determining stacking geometries in RNA than in B-form DNA. In comparisons of base-pair steps with thymine versus uracil, the thymine methyl group tends to enhance the strength of the stacking interaction through a combination of dispersion and electrosatic interactions.

  10. Contribution to the knowledge of the mechanism of the electrorefining of uranium in fused salt baths (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, G.; Chauvin, G.; Coriou, H.; Hure, J.

    1961-01-01

    Very pure uranium can be obtained by electrorefining under the following conditions: electrolyte: UCl 3 (ca. 30 per cent wt.) dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic, cathode: molybdenum, atmosphere: argon, temperature: 400-450 deg. C. The detailed mechanism of the refining process has been hitherto unknown. Electrode-potential studies undertaken to fill this gap have shown that: 1. UCl prepared according to Newton contains an impurity (perhaps UH 3 ) that interferes with the yield of the cathode deposit. We propose a treatment to eliminate this impurity. 2. The quasi-reversible character of the system U +3 ↔U 0 is the principal reason for the production of high purity uranium. The cathodic deposition and anodic dissolution seem to be primary reactions. 3. The presence of moisture in the molten bath has a very harmful influence on the overall electrorefining process: the uranium obtained contains many impurities; the cathode current efficiency falls from 80 to about 10 per cent; and the anode is substantially corroded, the apparent anode current efficiency rising from 90 to about 120 per cent. An interpretation of these effects is given, based on the experimental polarization curves. (authors) [fr

  11. Contribution of human skin topography to the characterization of dynamic skin tension during senescence: morpho-mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahouani, H.; Djaghloul, M.; Vargiolu, R.; Mezghani, S.; Mansori, M. E. L.

    2014-03-01

    The structuring of the dermis with a network of collagen and elastic fibres gives a three-dimensional structure to the skin network with directions perpendicular and parallel to the skin surface. This three-dimensional morphology prints on the surface of the stratum corneum a three dimensional network of lines which express the mechanical tension of the skin at rest. To evaluate the changes of skin morphology, we used a three-dimensional confocal microscopy and characterization of skin imaging of volar forearm microrelief. We have accurately characterize the role of skin line network during chronological aging with the identification of depth scales on the network of lines (z 60 microns). During aging has been highlighted lower rows for elastic fibres, the decrease weakened the tension and results in enlargement of the plates of the microrelief, which gives us a geometric pertinent indicator to quantify the loss of skin tension and assess the stage of aging. The study of 120 Caucasian women shows that ageing in the volar forearm zone results in changes in the morphology of the line network organisation. The decrease in secondary lines (z 60 μm) and an accentuation of the anisotropy index.

  12. Contribution of human skin topography to the characterization of dynamic skin tension during senescence: morpho-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahouani, H; Djaghloul, M; Vargiolu, R; Mezghani, S; Mansori, M E L

    2014-01-01

    The structuring of the dermis with a network of collagen and elastic fibres gives a three-dimensional structure to the skin network with directions perpendicular and parallel to the skin surface. This three-dimensional morphology prints on the surface of the stratum corneum a three dimensional network of lines which express the mechanical tension of the skin at rest. To evaluate the changes of skin morphology, we used a three-dimensional confocal microscopy and characterization of skin imaging of volar forearm microrelief. We have accurately characterize the role of skin line network during chronological aging with the identification of depth scales on the network of lines (z ≤ 60μm) and the network of lines covering Langer's lines (z > 60 microns). During aging has been highlighted lower rows for elastic fibres, the decrease weakened the tension and results in enlargement of the plates of the microrelief, which gives us a geometric pertinent indicator to quantify the loss of skin tension and assess the stage of aging. The study of 120 Caucasian women shows that ageing in the volar forearm zone results in changes in the morphology of the line network organisation. The decrease in secondary lines (z ≤ 60 μm) is counterbalanced by an increase in the depth of the primary lines (z > 60 μm) and an accentuation of the anisotropy index

  13. A reactive oxygen species activation mechanism contributes to JS-K-induced apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingning; Chen, Lieqian; Tan, Guobin; Ke, Longzhi; Zhang, Sai; Chen, Hege; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-10-13

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidant stress are regulators of cancer cells. The alteration of redox status, which is induced by increased generation of ROS, results in increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K, C13H16N6O8) on proliferation and apoptosis in bladder cancer cells and explored possible ROS-related mechanisms. Our results indicated that JS-K could suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and induce apoptosis and ROS accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. With increasing concentrations of JS-K, expression of proteins that are involved in cell apoptosis increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed JS-K-induced cell apoptosis; conversely, the prooxidant oxidized glutathione (GSSG) exacerbated JS-K-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that nitrites, which were generated from the oxidation of JS-K-released NO, induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells to a lower extent through the ROS-related pathway. In addition, JS-K was shown to enhance the chemo-sensitivity of doxorubicin in bladder cancer cells. Taken together, the data suggest that JS-K-released NO induces bladder cancer cell apoptosis by increasing ROS levels, and nitrites resulting from oxidation of NO have a continuous apoptosis-inducing effect.

  14. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrergic Pathway Is the Main Contributing Mechanism in the Human Gastric Fundus Relaxation: An In Vitro Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Human gastric fundus relaxation is mediated by intrinsic inhibitory pathway. We investigated the roles of nitrergic and purinergic pathways, two known inhibitory factors in gastric motility, on spontaneous and nerve-evoked contractions in human gastric fundus muscles.Gastric fundus muscle strips (12 circular and 13 longitudinal were obtained from patients without previous gastrointestinal motility disorder who underwent gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Using these specimens, we examined basal tone, peak, amplitude, and frequency of spontaneous contractions, and peak and nadir values under electrical field stimulation (EFS, 150 V, 0.3 ms, 10 Hz, 20 s. To examine responses to purinergic and nitrergic inhibition without cholinergic innervation, atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 1 μM, MRS2500 (a purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonist, 1 μM, and N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 100 μM were added sequentially for spontaneous and electrically-stimulated contractions. Tetrodotoxin was used to confirm any neuronal involvement.In spontaneous contraction, L-NNA increased basal tone and peak in both muscle layers, while amplitude and frequency were unaffected. EFS (up to 10 Hz uniformly induced initial contraction and subsequent relaxation in a frequency-dependent manner. Atropine abolished initial on-contraction and induced only relaxation during EFS. While MRS2500 showed no additional influence, L-NNA reversed relaxation (p = 0.012 in circular muscle, and p = 0.006 in longitudinal muscle. Tetrodotoxin abolished any EFS-induced motor response.The relaxation of human gastric fundus muscle is reduced by nitrergic inhibition. Hence, nitrergic pathway appears to be the main mechanism for the human gastric fundus relaxation.

  16. Species-specific Mechanisms Contributing to the Mesophication of Upland Oak Stands in the Absence of Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babl, E. K.; Alexander, H. D.; Siegert, C. M.; Willis, J. L.; Berry, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Upland oak forests of the eastern United States are shifting dominance towards shade-tolerant, fire-intolerant species. This shift is hypothesized to be driven by anthropogenic fire suppression and lead to mesophication, a positive feedback loop where shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species (i.e. mesophytes) create a cool, moist understory, reducing forest flammability and promoting their own proliferation at the expense of pyrophytic, shade-intolerant species such as oaks. There have been few empirical studies identifying mechanisms of mesophication, and these studies have yet to extensively explore potential mesophytes other than red maple (Acer rubrum). To address this issue, we sampled four hypothesized mesophytes (A. rubrum, A. saccharum, Carya glabra, and Fagus grandifolia) and two upland oak species (Quercus alba and Q. montana) across a gradient of sizes (20-60 cm DBH) in western Kentucky. We quantified canopy, bark, and leaf litter traits among upland oaks and mesophytes that may lead to differences in forest flammability. Preliminary results show that mesophytes had thinner and smoother bark than upland oaks and an increased canopy volume (normalized to stem volume), traits known to influence water movement through the canopy and understory microclimate. Maple leaf litter also decomposed faster, which could decrease fuel loads; after 6 months, red and sugar maple leaf litter lost 37% of original mass compared to 32%, 22%, and 14% mass loss in hickory, oak, and American beech litter, respectively. Furthermore, volumetric soil moisture of the soil organic layer beneath the canopies of mesophytes was 62% moister two days following a rainfall event compared to oaks. These differences in soil organic layer water retention after rainfall could lead to fuel discontinuity. These findings suggest that mesophytes may alter future forest flammability through their bark, canopy, and leaf litter traits which may modify fuel moisture, loads, and continuity and that a

  17. Impairment of Interrelated Iron- and Copper Homeostatic Mechanisms in Brain Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters. PMID:23055972

  18. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Deconinck, Tine; Craiu, Dana; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudy; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Hirst, Jennifer; Afawi, Zaid; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Depienne, Christel; De Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Dimova, Petia; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jahn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes; Lerche, Holger; Marini, Carla; Muhle, Hiltrud; Rosenow, Felix; Serratosa, Jose M.; Møller, Rikke S.; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; Talvik, Tiina; Von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Zara, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-function variants (p.Gln46Profs*9 and p.Arg97*) was further investigated in a patient's fibroblast cell line. We show that the premature stop mutations in AP4S1 result in a reduction of all AP-4 subunits and loss of AP-4 complex assembly. Recruitment of the AP-4 accessory protein tepsin, to the membrane was also abolished. In retrospect, the clinical phenotype in the family is consistent with previous reports of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. Our study reports the second family with mutations in AP4S1 and describes the first two patients with loss of AP4S1 and seizures. We further discuss seizure phenotypes in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies. PMID:25552650

  19. Comparison of two different dust emission mechanisms over the Horqin Sandy Land area: Aerosols contribution and size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Tingting; Li, Xiaolan; Zhang, Hongsheng; Cai, Xuhui; Song, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Dust aerosols (PM10) emission fluxes due to convective turbulent dust emissions (CTDE) and saltation-bombardment and/or aggregation-disintegration dust emissions (SADE) events were comparatively studied using the data obtained from the Naiman station over the Horqin Sandy Land area in Inner Mongolia, China from 2011 to 2015. The annual cumulative dust fluxes released by CTDE events was about one third of that by SADE events, with the order of 103∼104 μg m-2 s-1. The particle size distributions (PSDs) with diameter between 0.1 and 20 μm during CTDE and SADE events over the Horqin Sandy Land area were simulated based on the fragmentation theory, respectively. The results indicated that an improved equation based on fragmentation theory could be applied to describe the PSDs over the Horqin site which may be because the scale-invariant fragmentation theory mainly explains the PSDs of free dust particles on the surface, which differ from the PSDs of suspend airborne dust and the improved equation was more applicable to the PSDs of SADE events because the dust emission mechanism of SADE are saltation bombardment and aggregation disintegration. The number-related mean aerosol diameters (DN) barely varied under different friction velocity (u*) for SADE events, while the volume-related mean aerosol diameters (DV) changed distinctly with the change of u*. For CTDE events, the DN and DV had no obvious relationship with the change of u* because the dominating influence factor during CTDE event was thermal convection rather than u*. The mass-related PSDs usually exhibited a peak between 0.45 and 0.70 μm during SADE events, while for CTDE events there was a wide peak in the range of 0.10 0.70 μm. The results suggest that DN should be not be recommended as an individual parameter to describe the PSDs. The mass-related PSDs can effectively distinguish the SADE and CTDE events.

  20. Identification of corrosion and damage mechanisms by using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis: contribution to failure analysis case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulos, G.; Vazdirvanidis, A.

    2014-03-01

    Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of corrosion failures of copper and machineable brass alloys during service. Typical corrosion failures of the presented case histories mainly focussed on stress corrosion cracking and dezincification that acted as the major degradation mechanisms in components used in piping and water supply systems. SEM assessment, coupled with EDS spectroscopy, revealed the main cracking modes together with the root-source(s) that are responsible for the damage initiation and evolution. In addition, fracture surface observations contributed to the identification of the incurred fracture mechanisms and potential environmental issues that stimulated crack initiation and propagation. Very frequently, the detection of chlorides among the corrosion products served as a suggestive evidence of the influence of working environment on passive layer destabilisation and metal dissolution.

  1. Contribution of large-sized primary sensory neuronal sensitization to mechanical allodynia by upregulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels via cyclooxygenase 1 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yan; Fu, Han; Yang, Yan; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Lin, Qing; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Under physiological state, small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are believed to mediate nociceptive behavioral responses to painful stimuli. However, recently it has been found that a number of large-sized neurons are also involved in nociceptive transmission under neuropathic conditions. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms that large-sized DRG neurons mediate nociception are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of large-sized neurons in bee venom (BV)-induced mechanical allodynia and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Behaviorally, it was found that mechanical allodynia was still evoked by BV injection in rats in which the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-positive DRG neurons were chemically deleted. Electrophysiologically, in vitro patch clamp recordings of large-sized neurons showed hyperexcitability in these neurons. Interestingly, the firing pattern of these neurons was changed from phasic to tonic under BV-inflamed state. It has been suggested that hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels (HCN) expressed in large-sized DRG neurons contribute importantly to repeatedly firing. So we examined the roles of HCNs in BV-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistent with the overexpression of HCN1/2 detected by immunofluorescence, HCNs-mediated hyperpolarization activated cation current (I h ) was significantly increased in the BV treated samples. Pharmacological experiments demonstrated that the hyperexcitability and upregulation of I h in large-sized neurons were mediated by cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-prostaglandin E2 pathway. This is evident by the fact that the COX-1 inhibitor significantly attenuated the BV-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that BV can excite the large-sized DRG neurons at least in part by increasing I h through activation of COX-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple origins of the phenol reaction negative phenotype in foxtail millet, Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv., were caused by independent loss-of-function mutations of the polyphenol oxidase (Si7PPO) gene during domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahiko; Yuo, Takahisa; Ohta, Takeshi; Hitomi, Eriko; Ichitani, Katsuyuki; Kawase, Makoto; Taketa, Shin; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Foxtail millet shows variation in positive phenol color reaction (Phr) and negative Phr in grains, but predominant accessions of this crop are negative reaction type, and the molecular genetic basis of the Phr reaction remains unresolved. In this article, we isolated polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene responsible for Phr using genome sequence information and investigated molecular genetic basis of negative Phr and crop evolution of foxtail millet. First of all, we searched for PPO gene homologs in a foxtail millet genome database using a rice PPO gene as a query and successfully found three copies of the PPO gene. One of the PPO gene homologs on chromosome 7 showed the highest similarity with PPO genes expressed in hulls (grains) of other cereal species including rice, wheat, and barley and was designated as Si7PPO. Phr phenotypes and Si7PPO genotypes completely co-segregated in a segregating population. We also analyzed the genetic variation conferring negative Phr reaction. Of 480 accessions of the landraces investigated, 87 (18.1 %) showed positive Phr and 393 (81.9 %) showed negative Phr. In the 393 Phr negative accessions, three types of loss-of-function Si7PPO gene were predominant and independently found in various locations. One of them has an SNP in exon 1 resulting in a premature stop codon and was designated as stop codon type, another has an insertion of a transposon (Si7PPO-TE1) in intron 2 and was designated as TE1-insertion type, and the other has a 6-bp duplication in exon 3 resulting in the duplication of 2 amino acids and was designated as 6-bp duplication type. As a rare variant of the stop codon type, one accession additionally has an insertion of a transposon, Si7PPO-TE2, in intron 2 and was designated as "stop codon +TE2 insertion type". The geographical distribution of accessions with positive Phr and those with three major types of negative Phr was also investigated. Accessions with positive Phr were found in subtropical and tropical regions at

  3. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  4. Mechanisms of Action Contributing to Reductions in Suicide Attempts Following Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Military Personnel: A Test of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Wood, David S; May, Alexis; Peterson, Alan L; Wertenberger, Evelyn; Rudd, M David

    2018-01-01

    Brief cognitive behavioral therapy (BCBT) is associated with significant reductions in suicide attempts among military personnel. However, the underlying mechanisms of action contributing to reductions in suicide attempts in effective psychological treatments remain largely unknown. The present study conducted a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of BCBT versus treatment as usual (TAU) to examine the mechanisms of action hypothesized by the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPT): perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and fearlessness about death. In a sample of 152 active duty U.S. Army personnel with recent suicide ideation or attempts, there were significantly fewer suicide attempts in BCBT, but there were no differences between treatment groups from baseline to 6 months postbaseline on any of the 3 IPT constructs or their interactions. Tests of the moderated mediation failed to support an indirect effect for the IPT model, regardless of which IPT variables were specified as mediators or moderators. Results suggest that the IPT's hypothesized mechanisms of action do not account for reductions in suicide attempts in BCBT. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  5. Severe hypertriglyceridemia due to two novel loss-of-function lipoprotein lipase gene mutations (C310R/E396V) in a Chinese family associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Yu; Sun, Xiaofang; Wang, Ping; Chi, Jingwei; Hou, Xu; Wang, Yangang

    2017-07-18

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is widely expressed in skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles as well as adipose tissue and involved in the catabolism of triglyceride. Herein we have systematically characterized two novel loss-of-function mutations in LPL from a Chinese family in which afflicted members were manifested by severe hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent pancreatitis. DNA sequencing revealed that the proband was a heterozygote carrying a novel c.T928C (p.C310R) mutation in exon 6 of the LPL gene. Another member of the family was detected to be a compound heterozygote who along with the c.T928C mutation also carried a novel missense mutation c.A1187T (p.E396V) in exon 8 of the LPL gene. Furthermore, COS-1 cells were transfected with lentiviruses containing the mutant LPL genes. While C310R markedly reduced the overall LPL protein level, COS-1 cells carrying E396V or double mutations contained similar overall LPL protein levels to the wild-type. The specific activity of the LPL mutants remained at comparable magnitude to the wild-type. However, few LPL were detected in the culture medium for the mutants, suggesting that both mutations caused aberrant triglyceride catabolism. More specifically, E396V and double mutations dampened the transport of LPL to the cell surface, while for the C310R mutation, reducing LPL protein level might be involved. By characterizing these two novel LPL mutations, this study has expanded our understanding on the pathogenesis of familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG).

  6. Temporal order of RNase IIIb and loss-of-function mutations during development determines phenotype in pleuropulmonary blastoma / DICER1 syndrome: a unique variant of the two-hit tumor suppression model [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Brenneman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB is the most frequent pediatric lung tumor and often the first indication of a pleiotropic cancer predisposition, DICER1 syndrome, comprising a range of other individually rare, benign and malignant tumors of childhood and early adulthood. The genetics of DICER1-associated tumorigenesis are unusual in that tumors typically bear neomorphic missense mutations at one of five specific “hotspot” codons within the RNase IIIb domain of DICER 1, combined with complete loss of function (LOF in the other allele. We analyzed a cohort of 124 PPB children for predisposing DICER1 mutations and sought correlations with clinical phenotypes. Over 70% have inherited or de novo germline LOF mutations, most of which truncate the DICER1 open reading frame. We identified a minority of patients who have no germline mutation, but are instead mosaic for predisposing DICER1 mutations. Mosaicism for RNase IIIb domain hotspot mutations defines a special category of DICER1 syndrome patients, clinically distinguished from those with germline or mosaic LOF mutations by earlier onsets and numerous discrete foci of neoplastic disease involving multiple syndromic organ sites. A final category of PBB patients lack predisposing germline or mosaic mutations and have sporadic (rather than syndromic disease limited to a single PPB tumor bearing tumor-specific RNase IIIb and LOF mutations. We propose that acquisition of a neomorphic RNase IIIb domain mutation is the rate limiting event in DICER1-associated tumorigenesis, and that distinct clinical phenotypes associated with mutational categories reflect the temporal order in which LOF and RNase IIIb domain mutations are acquired during development.

  7. Two siblings with isolated GH deficiency due to loss-of-function mutation in the GHRHR gene: successful treatment with growth hormone despite late admission and severe growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih; Legendre, Maria; Amselem, Serge; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Hacıhamdioğlu, Bülent; Savaş Erdeve, Senay; Oçal, Gönül

    2010-01-01

    Patients with growth hormone releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) mutations exhibit pronounced dwarfism and are phenotypically and biochemically indistinguishable from other forms of isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD). We presented here two siblings with clinical findings of IGHD due to a nonsense mutation in the GHRHR gene who reached their target height in spite of late GH treatment. Two female siblings were admitted to our clinic with severe short stature at the age of 13.8 (patient 1) and 14.8 years (patient 2). On admission, height in patient 1 was 107 cm (-8.6 SD) and 117 cm (-6.7 SD) in patient 2. Bone age was delayed in both patients (6 years and 9 years). Clinical and biochemical analyses revealed a diagnosis of complete IGHD (peak GH levels on stimulation test was 0.06 ng/mL in patient 1 and 0.16 ng/mL in patient 2). Patients were given recombinant human GH treatment. Genetic analysis of the GH and GHRHR genes revealed that both patientscarried the GHRHR gene mutation p.Glu72X (c.214 G>T) in exon 3 in homozygous (or hemizygous) state. After seven years of GH treatment, the patients reached a final height appropriate for their target height. Final height was 151 cm (-1.5 SD) in patient 1 and 153 cm (-1.2 SD) in patient 2. In conclusion, genetic analysis is indicated in IGHD patients with severe growth failure and a positive family history. In spite of the very late diagnosis in these two patients who presented with severe growth deficit due to homozygous loss-of-function mutations in GHRHR, their final heights reached the target height.

  8. HIV Protease Inhibitor Use During Pregnancy Is Associated With Decreased Progesterone Levels, Suggesting a Potential Mechanism Contributing to Fetal Growth Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Eszter; Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Loutfy, Mona R.; Yudin, Mark H.; Murphy, Kellie E.; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Shah, Rajiv; MacGillivray, Jay; Silverman, Michael; Serghides, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background. Protease inhibitor (PI)–based combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is administered during pregnancy to prevent perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. However, PI use has been associated with adverse birth outcomes, including preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. The mechanisms underlying these outcomes are unknown. We hypothesized that PIs contribute to these adverse events by altering progesterone levels. Methods. PI effects on trophoblast progesterone production were assessed in vitro. A mouse pregnancy model was used to assess the impact of PI-based cART on pregnancy outcomes and progesterone levels in vivo. Progesterone levels were assessed in plasma specimens from 27 HIV-infected and 17 HIV-uninfected pregnant women. Results. PIs (ritonavir, lopinavir, and atazanavir) but not nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors reduced trophoblast progesterone production in vitro. In pregnant mice, PI-based cART but not dual-NRTI therapy was associated with significantly lower progesterone levels that directly correlated with fetal weight. Progesterone supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in fetal weight. We observed lower progesterone levels and smaller infants in HIV-infected women receiving PI-based cART, compared with the control group. In HIV-infected women, progesterone levels correlated significantly with birth weight percentile. Conclusions. Our data suggest that PI use in pregnancy may lead to lower progesterone levels that could contribute to adverse birth outcomes. PMID:25030058

  9. HIV protease inhibitor use during pregnancy is associated with decreased progesterone levels, suggesting a potential mechanism contributing to fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Eszter; Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Loutfy, Mona R; Yudin, Mark H; Murphy, Kellie E; Walmsley, Sharon L; Shah, Rajiv; MacGillivray, Jay; Silverman, Michael; Serghides, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-based combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is administered during pregnancy to prevent perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. However, PI use has been associated with adverse birth outcomes, including preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. The mechanisms underlying these outcomes are unknown. We hypothesized that PIs contribute to these adverse events by altering progesterone levels. PI effects on trophoblast progesterone production were assessed in vitro. A mouse pregnancy model was used to assess the impact of PI-based cART on pregnancy outcomes and progesterone levels in vivo. Progesterone levels were assessed in plasma specimens from 27 HIV-infected and 17 HIV-uninfected pregnant women. PIs (ritonavir, lopinavir, and atazanavir) but not nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors reduced trophoblast progesterone production in vitro. In pregnant mice, PI-based cART but not dual-NRTI therapy was associated with significantly lower progesterone levels that directly correlated with fetal weight. Progesterone supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in fetal weight. We observed lower progesterone levels and smaller infants in HIV-infected women receiving PI-based cART, compared with the control group. In HIV-infected women, progesterone levels correlated significantly with birth weight percentile. Our data suggest that PI use in pregnancy may lead to lower progesterone levels that could contribute to adverse birth outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. The loss-of-function disease-mutation G301R in the Na+/K+-ATPase α2 isoform decreases lesion volume and improves functional outcome after acute spinal cord injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Ditte Gry; Isaksen, Toke Jost; Lund, Minna Christiansen; Dursun, Safinaz; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2017-09-08

    The Na + /K + -ATPases are transmembrane ion pumps important for maintenance of ion gradients across the plasma membrane that serve to support multiple cellular functions, such as membrane potentials, regulation of cellular volume and pH, and co-transport of signaling transmitters in all animal cells. The α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase subunit isoform is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, which us the sharp Na + -gradient maintained by the sodium pump necessary for astroglial metabolism. Prolonged ischemia induces an elevation of [Na + ] i , decreased ATP levels and intracellular pH owing to anaerobic metabolism and lactate accumulation. During ischemia, Na + /K + -ATPase-related functions will naturally increase the energy demand of the Na + /K + -ATPase ion pump. However, the role of the α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase in contusion injury to the spinal cord remains unknown. We used mice heterozygous mice for the loss-of-function disease-mutation G301R in the Atp1a2 gene (α 2 +/G301R ) to study the effect of reduced α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase expression in a moderate contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) model. We found that α 2 +/G301R mice display significantly improved functional recovery and decreased lesion volume compared to littermate controls (α 2 +/+ ) 7 days after SCI. The protein level of the α 1 isoform was significantly increased, in contrast to the α 3 isoform that significantly decreased 3 days after SCI in both α 2 +/G301R and α 2 +/+ mice. The level of the α 2 isoform was significantly decreased in α 2 +/G301R mice both under naïve conditions and 3 days after SCI compared to α 2 +/+ mice. We found no differences in astroglial aquaporin 4 levels and no changes in the expression of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL1) and cytokines (TNF, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-5) between genotypes, just as no apparent differences were observed in location and activation of CD45 and F4/80 positive microglia and infiltrating leukocytes. Our proof of concept study

  11. Molecular mechanisms of renal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Roland; Melk, Anette

    2017-09-01

    Epidemiologic, clinical, and molecular evidence suggest that aging is a major contributor to the increasing incidence of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. The aging kidney undergoes complex changes that predispose to renal pathology. The underlying molecular mechanisms could be the target of therapeutic strategies in the future. Here, we summarize recent insight into cellular and molecular processes that have been shown to contribute to the renal aging phenotype.The main clinical finding of renal aging is the decrease in glomerular filtration rate, and its structural correlate is the loss of functioning nephrons. Mechanistically, this has been linked to different processes, such as podocyte hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and gradual microvascular rarefaction. Renal functional recovery after an episode of acute kidney injury is significantly worse in elderly patients. This decreased regenerative potential, which is a hallmark of the aging process, may be caused by cellular senescence. Accumulation of senescent cells could explain insufficient repair and functional loss, a view that has been strengthened by recent studies showing that removal of senescent cells results in attenuation of renal aging. Other potential mechanisms are alterations in autophagy as an important component of a disturbed renal stress response and functional differences in the inflammatory system. Promising therapeutic measures to counteract these age-related problems include mimetics of caloric restriction, pharmacologic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and novel strategies of senotherapy with the goal of reducing the number of senescent cells to decrease aging-related disease in the kidney. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis: a structural MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Andrea; Strammer, Erzsebet; Aradi, Mihaly; Orsi, Gergely; Perlaki, Gabor; Hajnal, Andras; Sandor, Janos; Banati, Miklos; Illes, Eniko; Zaitsev, Alexander; Herold, Robert; Guttmann, Charles R G; Illes, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind) may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus). Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed), processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex) and socially relevant information (left temporal pole). Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients.

  13. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis: a structural MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mike

    Full Text Available Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus. Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed, processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex and socially relevant information (left temporal pole. Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients.

  14. Membrane microdomain-associated uroplakin IIIa contributes to Src-dependent mechanisms of anti-apoptotic proliferation in human bladder carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kihira

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of p145met/β-subunit of hepatocyte growth factor receptor by epidermal growth factor receptor and Src contributes to the anti-apoptotic growth of human bladder carcinoma cell 5637 under serum-starved conditions. Here, we show that some other cell lines of human bladder carcinoma, but not other types of human cancer cells, also exhibit Src-dependent, anti-apoptotic proliferation under serum-starved conditions, and that low-density, detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains (MD serve as a structural platform for signaling events involving p145met, EGFR, and Src. As an MD-associated molecule that may contribute to bladder carcinoma-specific cellular function, we identified uroplakin IIIa (UPIIIa, an urothelium-specific protein. Results obtained so far revealed: 1 UPIIIa undergoes partial proteolysis in serum-starved cells; 2 a specific antibody to the extracellular domain of UPIIIa inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and the activation of Src, and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells; and 3 knockdown of UPIIIa by short interfering RNA also promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. GM6001, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP, inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. Furthermore, serum starvation promotes expression and secretion of the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor in a manner that depends on the functions of MMP, Src, and UPIIIa. These results highlight a hitherto unknown signaling network involving a subset of MD-associated molecules in the anti-apoptotic mechanisms of human bladder carcinoma cells.

  15. Contribution of transcription factor, SP1, to the promotion of HB-EGF expression in defense mechanism against the treatment of irinotecan in ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Nam, Sung Ouk; Odawara, Takashi; Manabe, Sadao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Takada, Shuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a worst histological subtype than other ovarian malignant tumor. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of HB-EGF–targeted therapy for OCCC and to identify the transcription factor that contributed to the induction of HB-EGF by SN38 treatment in OCCC cells. HB-EGF was highly expressed in OCCC cells, and an increase of HB-EGF was induced by SN38 which had only antitumor effect among conventional anticancer agents on OCCC. A specific inhibitor of HB-EGF, a cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), led to a synergistic increase in the number of apoptotic OCCC cells with the treatment of SN38. The luciferase assay with 5′-deletion promoter constructs identified a GC-rich element between −125 and −178 (the distal transcription start site was denoted +1) as a cis-regulatory region, and the treatment of SN38 induced luciferase activity in this region. An in silico and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis estimated that SP1 bound to the cis-regulatory region of HB-EGF in OCCC cells. Real-time PCR and cell viability assays showed that the transfection of a small interfering RNA targeting SP1 suppressed the expression of HB-EGF induced by SN38, resulting in the enhanced sensitivity of SN38. Taken together, these results indicate that induction of HB-EGF expression contributed to defense mechanism against treatment of SN38 through the transcriptional activity of SP1 in OCCC cells

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation Activates B Cells Polyclonally and Induces Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression: A Mechanism Underlying Autoimmunity and Its Contribution to Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keiko; Kumata, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yuji; Satoh, Yukio; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Hara, Sayuri; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease that results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, and the reactivation of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B lymphocytes induces the differentiation of host B cells into plasma cells. We previously reported that some EBV-infected B cells had thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) as surface immunoglobulins (Igs), and EBV reactivation induced these TRAb+EBV+ cells to produce TRAbs. EBV reactivation induces Ig production from host B cells. The purpose of the present study was to examine total Ig productions from B cell culture fluids and to detect activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 in culture B cells during EBV reactivation induction and then we discussed the mechanisms of EBV reactivation-induced Ig production in relation to autoimmunity. We showed that the EBV reactivation induces the production of every isotype of Ig and suggested that the Ig production was catalyzed by AID through LMP1 and NF-κB. The results that the amount of IgM was significantly larger compared with IgG suggested the polyclonal B cell activation due to LMP1. We proposed the pathway of EBV reactivation induced Ig production; B cells newly infected with EBV are activated by polyclonal B cell activation and produce Igs through plasma cell differentiation induced by EBV reactivation. LMP1-induced AID enabled B cells to undergo class-switch recombination to produce every isotype of Ig. According to this mechanism, EBV rescues autoreactive B cells to produce autoantibodies, which contribute to the development and exacerbation of autoimmune diseases.

  17. p16(INK4a suppression by glucose restriction contributes to human cellular lifespan extension through SIRT1-mediated epigenetic and genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although caloric restriction (CR has been shown to increase lifespan in various animal models, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been revealed. We developed an in vitro system to mimic CR by reducing glucose concentration in cell growth medium which excludes metabolic factors and allows assessment of the effects of CR at the cellular and molecular level. We monitored cellular proliferation of normal WI-38, IMR-90 and MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction (GR can inhibit cellular senescence and significantly extend cellular lifespan compared with cells receiving normal glucose (NG in the culture medium. Moreover, GR decreased expression of p16(INK4a (p16, a well-known senescence-related gene, in all of the tested cell lines. Over-expressed p16 resulted in early replicative senescence in glucose-restricted cells suggesting a crucial role of p16 regulation in GR-induced cellular lifespan extension. The decreased expression of p16 was partly due to GR-induced chromatin remodeling through effects on histone acetylation and methylation of the p16 promoter. GR resulted in an increased expression of SIRT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, which has positive correlation with CR-induced longevity. The elevated SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of the Akt/p70S6K1 signaling pathway in response to GR. Furthermore, knockdown of SIRT1 abolished GR-induced p16 repression as well as Akt/p70S6K1 activation implying that SIRT1 may affect p16 repression through direct deacetylation effects and indirect regulation of Akt/p70S6K1 signaling. Collectively, these results provide new insights into interactions between epigenetic and genetic mechanisms on CR-induced longevity that may contribute to anti-aging approaches and also provide a general molecular model for studying CR in vitro in mammalian systems.

  18. Upregulation of Ih expressed in IB4-negative Aδ nociceptive DRG neurons contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Lu Liu; Na Lu; Wen-Juan Han; Rong-Gui Chen; Rui Cong; Rou-Gang Xie; Yu-Fei Zhang; Wei-Wei Kong; San-Jue Hu; Ceng Luo

    2015-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy represents aberrant mechanical hypersensitivity. Primary sensory neuron?s ability to sense mechanical force forms mechanotransduction. However, whether this property undergoes activity-dependent plastic changes and underlies mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain (CRP) is not clear. Here we show a new CRP model producing stable mechanical compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which induces dramatic behavioral mechanical hypersensit...

  19. Molecular medicine of fragile X syndrome: based on known molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ling-Qian; Duan, Ran-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Extensive research on fragile X mental retardation gene knockout mice and mutant Drosophila models has largely expanded our knowledge on mechanism-based treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In light of these findings, several clinical trials are now underway for therapeutic translation to humans. Electronic literature searches were conducted using the PubMed database and ClinicalTrials.gov. The search terms included "fragile X syndrome", "FXS and medication", "FXS and therapeutics" and "FXS and treatment". Based on the publications identified in this search, we reviewed the neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS patients and the potential pathogenic mechanisms to monitor the progress of FXS research, from basic studies to clinical trials. The pathological mechanisms of FXS were categorized on the basis of neuroanatomy, synaptic structure, synaptic transmission and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) loss of function. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS were described to motivate extensive research into the region-specific pathologies in the brain responsible for FXS behavioural manifestations. Mechanism-directed molecular medicines were classified according to their target pathological mechanisms, and the most recent progress in clinical trials was discussed. Current mechanism-based studies and clinical trials have greatly contributed to the development of FXS pharmacological therapeutics. Research examining the extent to which these treatments provided a rescue effect or FMRP compensation for the developmental impairments in FXS patients may help to improve the efficacy of treatments.

  20. Aging exacerbates obesity-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in perivascular adipose tissue in mice: a paracrine mechanism contributing to vascular redox dysregulation and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-07-01

    Obesity in the elderly individuals is increasing at alarming rates and there is evidence suggesting that elderly individuals are more vulnerable to the deleterious cardiovascular effects of obesity than younger individuals. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote the development of cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced inflammation in perivascular adipose tissue, which contributes to increased vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in a paracrine manner. To test this hypothesis, we assessed changes in the secretome, reactive oxygen species production, and macrophage infiltration in periaortic adipose tissue of young (7 month old) and aged (24 month old) high-fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. High-fat diet-induced vascular reactive oxygen species generation significantly increased in aged mice, which was associated with exacerbation of endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. In young animals, high-fat diet-induced obesity promoted oxidative stress in the perivascular adipose tissue, which was associated with a marked proinflammatory shift in the profile of secreted cytokines and chemokines. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and significantly increased macrophage infiltration in periaortic adipose tissue. Using cultured arteries isolated from young control mice, we found that inflammatory factors secreted from the perivascular fat tissue of obese aged mice promote significant prooxidative and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in the vascular wall, mimicking the aging phenotype. Overall, our findings support an important role for localized perivascular adipose tissue inflammation in exacerbation of vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in aging, an effect that likely enhances the risk for development of cardiovascular diseases from obesity in the elderly individuals.

  1. Left ventricular beat-to-beat performance in atrial fibrillation: Contribution of Frank-Starling mechanism after short rather than long intervals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, A.T.M.; Blanksma, P.K.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gelder, I.C. van; Kam, P.J. de; Hillege, H.L.; Niemeijer, M.G.; Lie, K.I.; Meijler, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate control mechanisms of the varying left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by a randomly irregular ventricular response, resulting in continuous variation in left ventricular beat-to-beat mechanical behavior and

  2. Contribution to the numerical study of concrete behaviour and of reinforced concrete structures submitted to coupled thermal and mechanical solicitations: a damageable thermo-elasto-plastic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechnech, W.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this research is the development of an Finite Element model for the analysis of reinforced concrete structures under thermal, mechanical loadings or any combination of them. An available synthesis of results on the concrete behavior under thermal solicitation is exposed. The different behavior of concrete that can be founded notably in thermo-mechanical analysis (Damage, unilateral phenomenon, thermo-mechanical interaction,...) are underlined. The various families of modeling are analyzed thereafter while underlining the important aspects of the behavior that each one can re-transcribe. A new thermo-plastic damage model for plain concrete subjected to combined thermal and cyclic loading is developed using the concept of plastic-work-hardening and stiffness degradation in continuum damage mechanics. Two damage variables are used: the first one for mechanical action and the second one for thermal action. Further, thermo-mechanical interaction strains have been introduced to describe the influence of mechanical loading on the physical process of thermal expansion of concrete. The constitutive relations for elastoplastic responses are decoupled from the degradation damage responses by using the effective stress concept. This method provides advantages in the numerical implementation. A simple and thermodynamically consistent scalar degradation model is introduced to simulate the effect of damage on elastic stiffness and its recovery during crack opening and closing. Efficient computational algorithms for the proposed model are subsequently explored and performance of this model is demonstrated with numerical examples. (author)

  3. LEFT-VENTRICULAR BEAT-TO-BEAT PERFORMANCE IN ATRIAL-FIBRILLATION - CONTRIBUTION OF FRANK-STARLING MECHANISM AFTER SHORT RATHER THAN LONG RR INTERVALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOSSELINK, ATM; BLANKSMA, PK; CRIJNS, HJGM; VANGELDER, IC; DEKAM, PJ; HILLEGE, HL; NIEMEIJER, MG; LIE, KI; MEIJLER, FL

    1995-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to evaluate control mechanisms of the varying left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation. Background. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by a randomly irregular ventricular response, resulting in continuous variation in left ventricular beat-to-beat

  4. Contribution to the study of the sintering mechanisms of uranium powders in the {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} phases; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de frittage de poudre d'uranium en phases {alpha}, {beta}, et {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinteau, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    This study of the sintering mechanisms of uranium powders prepared by calci-thermy has been effected using continuous dilatometric measurements of the shrinkage of samples previously compressed at room temperature in purified argon gas. The tests carried out in the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} phases have led to the observation that the first step of the sintering appears to be governed by a volume self-diffusion mechanism; the activation heat values found for the sintering mechanisms are close to those deduced during studies of volume self-diffusion using the direct radio-tracer method. Furthermore it has been possible to show that in the {gamma} domain a second sintering mechanism occurs involving much longer sintering times; the heats of activation are much lower and this appears to indicate that there occurs a mechanism involving pore elimination by grain boundary diffusion of the vacancies. Furthermore, the dilatometric tests have shown the simultaneous influence of two important parameters in this work: grain boundaries and the diffusion coefficients. In the second part of the report are given results concerning the examination of sintered samples by various methods with a view to elucidating their structure and some of their physical properties. In this way it has been possible, by carrying out metallographic examinations after etching by ionic bombardment, to determine the changes in the porosity of the three phases {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}, as well as the structure and the nature of the inclusions in each sample. Density and porosity measurements have also been carried out. The variations in these two sets of results make it possible to confirm the preceding dilatometric end micro-graphic examinations. Finally a detailed dilatometric study of the samples sintered in the {gamma} phase has shown the effect of oxide layers, associated with the existence of porosity, on the amplitudes and temperatures of the allotropic transformations, these latter being

  5. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of extraction of uranyl chloride by long chain aliphatic amines; Contribution a l'etude du mecanisme d'extraction du chlorure d'uranyle par les amines aliphatiques a longues chaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, G R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    After having studied and developed the mechanisms which may 'a priori' explain the extraction process (co-ordination, ion association or intermediate mechanism), experience shows that ion association only should be taken into consideration. The structure of the organic complex of uranyl chloride has been defined on the basis of the study of the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium between the two phases at the equilibrium as a function of successively the activity of Cl{sup -} ions in the aqueous phase, the concentration of amine salt in the organic phase and finally of the concentration of uranium in the aqueous phase. The plotting of the results in bi-logarithmic co-ordinates enables us to propose the following formula for the extracted compound: UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup --}(NR{sub 3}H{sup +}){sub 2}. The calculation of the equilibrium constant of formation of the organic compound of uranyl chloride has been possible in the case of diluted solutions of uranium only. (author) [French] Apres avoir expose et developpe les mecanismes qui a priori pouvaient expliquer le processus d'extraction (coordination, association d'ions ou mecanisme intermediaire), le recours a l'experience a finalement permis de ne retenir que l'association d'ions. La structure du complexe organique de chlorure d'uranyle a ete definie a partir de l'etude de la variation du coefficient de partage de l'uranium entre les deux phases a l'equilibre en fonction successivement de l'activite des ions Cl{sup -} en phase aqueuse, de la concentration de sel d'amine en phase organique et enfin de la concentration d'uranium de la phase aqueuse. La representation bilogarithmique des resultats de ces essais a permis de proposer la formule suivante pour le compose extrait: UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup --}(NR{sub 3}H{sup +}){sub 2}. Le calcul de la constante d'equilibre de formation du compose organique de chlorure d'uranyle a ete seulement possible pour les solutions diluees en uranium. (auteur)

  6. A Randomized Trial to Assess the Contribution of a Novel Thorax Support Vest (Corset) in Preventing Mechanical Complications of Median Sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, Philippe P; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Cantone, Silvia; Ferraz, Marcus V; Cannas, Mario; Tesler, Ugo F

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical complications of median sternotomy may cause significant morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgical patients. This study was aimed at assessing the role of Posthorax support vest (Epple, Inc., Vienna, Austria) in the prevention of sternal complications and the improvement of anatomical healing in patients at high risk for mechanical sternal dehiscence after cardiac surgery by mean of median sternotomy. A prospective, randomized, study was performed and 310 patients with predisposing factors for sternal dehiscence after sternotomy for cardiac surgery were included. The patients were divided into two groups: patients who received the Posthorax support vest after surgery, and patients who did not. Primary variables assessed included the incidence of mechanical sternal complications, the quality of sternal healing, the rate of re-operation, the duration of hospitalization, rate and duration of hospital, re-admission for sternal complications. Secondary variables assessed were the post-operative pain, the number of requests for supplemental analgesia and the quality of life measured by means of the EQ-5D format. Patients using vest demonstrated a lower incidence of mechanical sternal complications, a better anatomical sternum healing, lower hospital stay, no re-operations for sternal dehiscence before discharge and lower re-admissions for mechanical sternal complication. In addition, patients using a vest reported a better quality of life with better freedom from limitations in mobility, self-care, and pain. Our findings demonstrate that the use of the Posthorax vest reduces post-sternotomy mechanical complications and improves the healing of the sternotomy, the clinical course, and the post-operative quality of life.

  7. Contributions to naive quantum mechanics. A textbook for mathematicians and physicists; Beitraege zur naiven Quantenmechanik. Ein Leitfaden fuer Mathematiker und Physiker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlmann, Martin

    2009-07-01

    The present text examplifies by means of 60 citations from current textbooks for the study of physics the necessarity of a mathematically rigorous formulation of quantum mechanics. Well known statements of many physicists about quantum mechanics at their mathematical tool kit are commented in form of a dialogue und mathematical points of view. Supplemented are the representations by a selection of theorems of higher analysis relevant for quantum theory. The book applies to mathematicians and mathematically interested physicists or students with founded mathematical knowledge.

  8. The old with the die. A contribution to metaphysics of quantum mechanics; Der Alte mit dem Wuerfel. Ein Beitrag zur Metaphysik der Quantenmechanik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ijjas, Anna

    2011-07-01

    Since the rise of quantum mechanics also their ideological implications and consequences were discussed. Meanwhile still scarcely a metaphysical problem exists, which was not supposedly solved under calling on quantum theory. Anna Ijjas inquires the usual practice and developes a new model of the assignment of quantum mechanics and metaphysics. She discusses both the physical foundations and the classical philosophical controversies, before she draws consequencies for the relation determination of brain and consciousness, the problem of freedom of will, as well as for the question of the influence of God in the world.

  9. Disconnection Mechanism and Regional Cortical Atrophy Contribute to Impaired Processing of Facial Expressions and Theory of Mind in Multiple Sclerosis: A Structural MRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mike, Andrea; Strammer, Erzsebet; Aradi, Mihaly; Orsi, Gergely; Perlaki, Gabor; Hajnal, Andras; Sandor, Janos; Banati, Miklos; Illes, Eniko; Zaitsev, Alexander; Herold, Robert; Guttmann, Charles R. G.; Illes, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind) may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional...

  10. Gene Overexpression: Uses, Mechanisms, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The classical genetic approach for exploring biological pathways typically begins by identifying mutations that cause a phenotype of interest. Overexpression or misexpression of a wild-type gene product, however, can also cause mutant phenotypes, providing geneticists with an alternative yet powerful tool to identify pathway components that might remain undetected using traditional loss-of-function analysis. This review describes the history of overexpression, the mechanisms that are responsible for overexpression phenotypes, tests that begin to distinguish between those mechanisms, the varied ways in which overexpression is used, the methods and reagents available in several organisms, and the relevance of overexpression to human disease. PMID:22419077

  11. Mechanisms of Physical Activity Limitation in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vogiatzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients’ quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  12. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  13. Contribution to the knowledge of the mechanism of the electrorefining of uranium in fused salt baths (1961); Contribution a la connaissance du mecanisme de l'electroraffinage de l'uranium en bains de sels fondus (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisde, G; Chauvin, G; Coriou, H; Hure, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    Very pure uranium can be obtained by electrorefining under the following conditions: electrolyte: UCl{sub 3} (ca. 30 per cent wt.) dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic, cathode: molybdenum, atmosphere: argon, temperature: 400-450 deg. C. The detailed mechanism of the refining process has been hitherto unknown. Electrode-potential studies undertaken to fill this gap have shown that: 1. UCl prepared according to Newton contains an impurity (perhaps UH{sub 3}) that interferes with the yield of the cathode deposit. We propose a treatment to eliminate this impurity. 2. The quasi-reversible character of the system U{sup +3}{r_reversible}U{sup 0} is the principal reason for the production of high purity uranium. The cathodic deposition and anodic dissolution seem to be primary reactions. 3. The presence of moisture in the molten bath has a very harmful influence on the overall electrorefining process: the uranium obtained contains many impurities; the cathode current efficiency falls from 80 to about 10 per cent; and the anode is substantially corroded, the apparent anode current efficiency rising from 90 to about 120 per cent. An interpretation of these effects is given, based on the experimental polarization curves. (authors) [French] De l'uranium a un tres haut degre de purete peut etre obtenu par electroraffinage clans les conditions suivantes: electrolyte = UCl{sub 3} (30 pour cent en poids env.) dissous dans l'eutectique LiCl-KCl, cathode = tige de molybdene, atmosphere = argon, temperature = 400 a 450 deg. C. Toutefois, on ne connaissait pas, jusqu'a present, le mecanisme intime du processus de raffinage. Des etudes de potentiels d'electrodes, entreprises pour tenter de combler cette lacune, nous ont permis de mettre en evidence differents points : 1. UCl{sub 3} prepare selon la methode de Newton contient une impurete (peut-etre UH{sub 3}) qui nuit au rendement du depot cathodique. Nous proposons un traitement d'elimination de cette impurete. 2. Le caractere de quasi

  14. The contribution of the endogenous TRPV1 ligands 9-HODE and 13-HODE to nociceptive processing and their role in peripheral inflammatory pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalem, Mohammad; Wong, Amy; Millns, Paul; Arya, Pallavi Huma; Chan, Michael Siang Liang; Bennett, Andrew; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria; Kendall, David A

    2013-04-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) plays a fundamental role in the detection of heat and inflammatory pain responses. Here we investigated the contribution of two potential endogenous ligands [9- and 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE)] to TRPV1-mediated noxious responses and inflammatory pain responses. 9- and 13-HODE, and their precursor, linoleic acid, were measured in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and in the hindpaws of control and carrageenan-inflamed rats by liquid chromatography/tandem electrospray mass spectrometry. Calcium imaging studies of DRG neurons were employed to determine the role of TRPV1 in mediating linoleic acid, 9-HODE- and 13-HODE-evoked responses, and the contribution of 15-lipoxygenase to the generation of the HODEs. Behavioural studies investigated the contribution of 9- and 13-HODE and 15-lipoxygenase to inflammatory pain behaviour. 9-HODE (35 ± 7 pmol g(-1)) and 13-HODE (32 ± 6 pmol g(-1)) were detected in hindpaw tissue, but were below the limits of detection in DRGs. Following exposure to linoleic acid, 9- and 13-HODE were detected in DRGs and TRPV1 antagonist-sensitive calcium responses evoked, which were blocked by the 15-lipoxygenase inhibitor PD146176 and an anti-13-HODE antibody. Levels of linoleic acid were significantly increased in the carrageenan-inflamed hindpaw (P PD146176 significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. This study demonstrates that, although 9- and 13-HODE can activate TRPV1 in DRG cell bodies, the evidence for a role of these lipids as endogenous peripheral TRPV1 ligands in a model of inflammatory pain is at best equivocal. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Conclusions regarding fracture mechanics testing and evaluation of small specimens - As evidenced by the finnish contribution to the IAEA CRP3 programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, K; Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Ahlstrand, R [Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), Helsinki (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    An extensive mechanical property evaluation has been carried out on various specimens (a Japanese steel plate (JRQ), a French forging material (FFA) and a Japanese forging material (JFL)) in the as-received and irradiated conditions. The mechanical properties measured at different temperatures include Charpy-V notch and instrumented pre-cracked Charpy data and static and dynamic elastic-plastic fracture toughness based on the J-integral, with various specimen size and geometry. Test analysis lead to conclusions regarding the use of small specimen fracture mechanical tests for investigating irradiation effects: CVN{sub pc} and RCT type specimens are suitable for determining the materials fracture toughness even in the ductile/brittle transition region provided the elastic-plastic parameter K{sub JC} is applied together with a statistical size correction. These two specimen types yield equivalent results for the fracture toughness transition shift. Charpy-V appears not to be suitable for estimating the static fracture toughness transition shift. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Contribution to a hydro-chemo-mechanical multi-mechanisms model based on the multi-scale and multi components structure of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites: experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Trinh, M.H.; Imbert, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The fundamental features of the Callovo Oxfordian argillite, namely the structure and the pore size distribution are considered to propose a model consistent with its mechanical behavior. The model deals with the main mechanisms selected: damage, plasticity and swelling. Structure of Argillites as fundamental base of mechanical behavior Callovian-Oxfordian argillites present specific characteristics: - a strong mineralogical heterogeneity made up from 23% to 25% of quartz, 20% to 27% of carbonate, 40% to 50% of argillaceous minerals and 5% to 10% various mineral; - a low porosity comprised between 12 to 15%, associated with the following pore size distribution: 14% of nano-pores, majority 81% of meso-pores and 5% of macro-pores; - a low Biot coefficient, around 0.6; - no cementing (within the meaning of a concrete). Four basic mechanisms are considered likely to explain the structure of argillite in place: - mechanical consolidation obtained by increasing external stress, - chemical consolidation by reduction in dielectric constant (leaching of chlorides), - thermal consolidation, - filling of the macro-porosity by precipitation of a carbonated phase (calcite). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate the weight of these mechanisms. Results show that mechanic and thermal consolidations, in the fields of stress and temperature encountered in situ by argillite during geological history, and chemical consolidation could not alone explain the state the high density without macro porosity. An assumption advanced to explain is the filling of macro porosity by non argillaceous mineral precipitation, in particular calcite that would confer to in situ argillite an apparent over-consolidation from a mechanical point of view. This assumption is partially validated by some experiments: - Percolation tests were made with hydrochloric acid on bulky and sound argillite to remove the carbonates in the macro-porosity; they

  17. Hyperoxia-induced developmental plasticity of the hypoxic ventilatory response in neonatal rats: contributions of glutamate-dependent and PDGF-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavis, Ryan W; DeAngelis, Kathryn J; Horowitz, Terry C; Reedich, Lisa M; March, Ryan J

    2014-01-15

    Rats reared in hyperoxia exhibit a sustained (vs. biphasic) hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) at an earlier age than untreated, Control rats. Given the similarity between the sustained HVR obtained after chronic exposure to developmental hyperoxia and the mature HVR, it was hypothesized that hyperoxia-induced plasticity and normal maturation share common mechanisms such as enhanced glutamate and nitric oxide signaling and diminished platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling. Rats reared in 21% O2 (Control) or 60% O2 (Hyperoxia) from birth until 4-5 days of age were studied after intraperitoneal injection of drugs targeting these pathways. Hyperoxia rats receiving saline showed a sustained HVR to 12% O2, but blockade of NMDA glutamate receptors (MK-801) restored the biphasic HVR typical of newborn rats. Blockade of PDGF-β receptors (imatinib) had no effect on the pattern of the HVR in Hyperoxia rats, although it attenuated ventilatory depression during the late phase of the HVR in Control rats. Neither nitric oxide synthase inhibitor used in this study (nNOS inhibitor I and l-NAME) altered the pattern of the HVR in Control or Hyperoxia rats. Drug-induced changes in the biphasic HVR were not correlated with changes in metabolic rate. Collectively, these results suggest that developmental hyperoxia hastens the transition from a biphasic to sustained HVR by upregulating glutamate-dependent mechanisms and downregulating PDGF-dependent mechanisms, similar to the changes underlying normal postnatal maturation of the biphasic HVR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CIEMAT’s contribution to the phase II of the OECD-NEA RIA benchmark on thermo-mechanical fuel codes performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagrado, I.C.; Vallejo, I.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    As a part of the international efforts devoted to validate and/or update the current fuel safety criteria, the OECD-NEA has launched a second phase of the RIA benchmark on thermomechanical fuel codes performance. CIEMAT contributes simulating the ten scenarios proposed with FRAPTRAN and SCANAIR. Both codes lead to similar predictions during the heating-up; however, during the cooling-down significant deviations may appear. They are mainly caused by the estimations of gap closure and re-opening and the clad to water heat exchange approaches. The uncertainty analysis performed for the SCANAIR estimations leads to uncertainty ranges below 15% and 28% for maximum temperatures and deformations, respectively. The corresponding sensitivity analysis shows that, in addition to the injected energy, special attention should be paid to fuel thermal expansion and clad yield stress models. (Author)

  19. nonlinMIP contribution to CMIP6: model intercomparison project for non-linear mechanisms: physical basis, experimental design and analysis principles (v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Good

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available nonlinMIP provides experiments that account for state-dependent regional and global climate responses. The experiments have two main applications: (1 to focus understanding of responses to CO2 forcing on states relevant to specific policy or scientific questions (e.g. change under low-forcing scenarios, the benefits of mitigation, or from past cold climates to the present day, or (2 to understand the state dependence (non-linearity of climate change – i.e. why doubling the forcing may not double the response. State dependence (non-linearity of responses can be large at regional scales, with important implications for understanding mechanisms and for general circulation model (GCM emulation techniques (e.g. energy balance models and pattern-scaling methods. However, these processes are hard to explore using traditional experiments, which explains why they have had so little attention in previous studies. Some single model studies have established novel analysis principles and some physical mechanisms. There is now a need to explore robustness and uncertainty in such mechanisms across a range of models (point 2 above, and, more broadly, to focus work on understanding the response to CO2 on climate states relevant to specific policy/science questions (point 1. nonlinMIP addresses this using a simple, small set of CO2-forced experiments that are able to separate linear and non-linear mechanisms cleanly, with a good signal-to-noise ratio – while being demonstrably traceable to realistic transient scenarios. The design builds on the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and CMIP6 DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima protocols, and is centred around a suite of instantaneous atmospheric CO2 change experiments, with a ramp-up–ramp-down experiment to test traceability to gradual forcing scenarios. In all cases the models are intended to be used with CO2 concentrations rather than CO2 emissions as the input. The

  20. nonlinMIP contribution to CMIP6: model intercomparison project for non-linear mechanisms: physical basis, experimental design and analysis principles (v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Peter; Andrews, Timothy; Chadwick, Robin; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Lowe, Jason A.; Schaller, Nathalie; Shiogama, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    nonlinMIP provides experiments that account for state-dependent regional and global climate responses. The experiments have two main applications: (1) to focus understanding of responses to CO2 forcing on states relevant to specific policy or scientific questions (e.g. change under low-forcing scenarios, the benefits of mitigation, or from past cold climates to the present day), or (2) to understand the state dependence (non-linearity) of climate change - i.e. why doubling the forcing may not double the response. State dependence (non-linearity) of responses can be large at regional scales, with important implications for understanding mechanisms and for general circulation model (GCM) emulation techniques (e.g. energy balance models and pattern-scaling methods). However, these processes are hard to explore using traditional experiments, which explains why they have had so little attention in previous studies. Some single model studies have established novel analysis principles and some physical mechanisms. There is now a need to explore robustness and uncertainty in such mechanisms across a range of models (point 2 above), and, more broadly, to focus work on understanding the response to CO2 on climate states relevant to specific policy/science questions (point 1). nonlinMIP addresses this using a simple, small set of CO2-forced experiments that are able to separate linear and non-linear mechanisms cleanly, with a good signal-to-noise ratio - while being demonstrably traceable to realistic transient scenarios. The design builds on the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) and CMIP6 DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima) protocols, and is centred around a suite of instantaneous atmospheric CO2 change experiments, with a ramp-up-ramp-down experiment to test traceability to gradual forcing scenarios. In all cases the models are intended to be used with CO2 concentrations rather than CO2 emissions as the input. The understanding

  1. Two different motor learning mechanisms contribute to learning reaching movements in a rotated visual environment [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Way Tong Chu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Practice of movement in virtual-reality and other artificially altered environments has been proposed as a method for rehabilitation following neurological injury and for training new skills in healthy humans.  For such training to be useful, there must be transfer of learning from the artificial environment to the performance of desired skills in the natural environment.  Therefore an important assumption of such methods is that practice in the altered environment engages the same learning and plasticity mechanisms that are required for skill performance in the natural environment.  We test the hypothesis that transfer of learning may fail because the learning and plasticity mechanism that adapts to the altered environment is different from the learning mechanism required for improvement of motor skill.  In this paper, we propose that a model that separates skill learning and environmental adaptation is necessary to explain the learning and aftereffects that are observed in virtual reality experiments.  In particular, we studied the condition where practice in the altered environment should lead to correct skill performance in the original environment. Our 2-mechanism model predicts that aftereffects will still be observed when returning to the original environment, indicating a lack of skill transfer from the artificial environment to the original environment. To illustrate the model prediction, we tested 10 healthy participants on the interaction between a simple overlearned motor skill (straight hand movements to targets in different directions and an artificially altered visuomotor environment (rotation of visual feedback of the results of movement.  As predicted by the models, participants show adaptation to the altered environment and after-effects on return to the baseline environment even when practice in the altered environment should have led to correct skill performance.  The presence of aftereffect under all conditions that

  2. Contributions: SAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Contributions: SAGE. Space Alternating Generalized Expectation (SAGE) Maximization algorithm provides an iterative approach to parameter estimation when direct maximization of the likelihood function may be infeasible. Complexity is less in those applications ...

  3. Various Contributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Various Contributions. Developed an Off –Diagonal MIMO Canceller to mitigate Upstream Crosstalk in VDSL. Developed a low complexity, Expectation Maximization based iterative Crosstalk cancellation. Developed an optimal way of computational complexity ...

  4. Original contributions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hefere

    Original contributions ... Results suggest that there is a significant positive ... psychological abuse, including economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, stalking, damage ... or maintaining the structure and function of the African home (Alio et al., 2011; Jewkes,. Levin ... Revictimisation occurs due to emotional violence and.

  5. An EG-VEGF-dependent decrease in homeobox gene NKX3.1 contributes to cytotrophoblast dysfunction: a possible mechanism in human fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, P; Brouillet, S; Pratt, A; Borg, Aj; Kalionis, B; Goffin, F; Tsatsaris, V; Munaut, C; Feige, Jj; Benharouga, M; Fournier, T; Alfaidy, N

    2015-07-21

    Idiopathic fetal growth restriction (FGR) is frequently associated with placental insufficiency. Previous reports have provided evidence that EG-VEGF (endocrine gland derived-vascular endothelial growth factor), a placental secreted protein, is expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy, controls both trophoblast proliferation and invasion, and its increased expression is associated with human FGR. In this study, we hypothesise that EG-VEGF-dependent change in placental homeobox gene expressions contribute to trophoblast dysfunction in idiopathic FGR. The changes in EG-VEGF-dependent homeobox gene expressions were determined using a Homeobox gene cDNA array on placental explants of 8-12 weeks' gestation after stimulation with EG-VEGF in vitro for 24 hours. The Homeobox gene array identified a >5-fold increase in HOXA9, HOXC8, HOXC10, HOXD1, HOXD8, HOXD9 and HOXD11, while NKX 3.1 showed a >2 fold-decrease in mRNA expression compared to untreated controls. Homeobox gene NKX3.1 was selected as a candidate because it is a downstream target of EG-VEGF and its expression and functional role are largely unknown in control and idiopathic FGR-affected placentae. Real-time PCR and immunoblotting showed a significant decrease in NKX3.1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, in placentae from FGR compared to control pregnancies. Gene inactivation in vitro using short-interference RNA specific for NKX3.1 demonstrated an increase in BeWo cell differentiation and a decrease in HTR8-SVneo proliferation. We conclude that the decreased expression of homeobox gene NKX3.1 down-stream of EG-VEGF may contribute to the trophoblast dysfunction associated with idiopathic FGR pregnancies.

  6. Contribution to very inelastic collisions. Emission mechanism of light charged particles and angular momentum transfer in 40Ar (280 MeV) + 58Ni nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, R.

    1981-07-01

    This work ends a particularly detailed study on very inelastic collisions in 40 A (280 MeV) + 58 Ni reaction. The two experiments in coincidence (fragment-fragment and particle-fragment) which are this work basis, essentially experimental, are the following of the very precise inclusive measurements already done on this system. They allowed to precise many important aspects of the reaction mechanism. Conclusions from a precise analysis of the fragment kinematics near the mass symmetry is the new aspect of this study. Information implicitely contained in the two complementary fragment angular correlation width are particularly detailed. Concerning the particle-fragment coincidence experiment, a quantitative analysis method of the invariant cross sections (in the reaction plane) has been developed; it shows clearly what is the origin of the emitted particles. The result of a two-stage mechanism allows to interpret simply the anisotropy out-of-plane of the alpha particle emission. The individual spin has been obtained for the first time for each of the two fragments of very inelastic collisions in nearly all the mass asymmetry domain [fr

  7. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damodaran, T.V.; Attia, M.K.; Abou-Donia, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7–14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  8. Early-life adversity programs emotional functions and the neuroendocrine stress system: the contribution of nutrition, metabolic hormones and epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Kit-Yi; Naninck, Eva F G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies have shown that early-life adversities, such as abuse or neglect, can increase the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. Remarkably, the lasting consequences of stress during this sensitive period on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and emotional function closely resemble the long-term effects of early malnutrition and suggest a possible common pathway mediating these effects. During early-life, brain development is affected by both exogenous factors, like nutrition and maternal care as well as by endogenous modulators including stress hormones. These elements, while mostly considered for their independent actions, clearly do not act alone but rather in a synergistic manner. In order to better understand how the programming by early-life stress takes place, it is important to gain further insight into the exact interplay of these key elements, the possible common pathways as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate their effects. We here review evidence that exposure to both early-life stress and early-life under-/malnutrition similarly lead to life-long alterations on the neuroendocrine stress system and modify emotional functions. We further discuss how the different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and next suggest a possible role for the early-life adversity induced alterations in metabolic hormones and nutrient availability in shaping later stress responses and emotional function throughout life, possibly via epigenetic mechanisms. Such knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies, which gives the advantage of viewing the synergistic action of a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity.

  9. Integrated metabolo-proteomic approach to decipher the mechanisms by which wheat QTL (Fhb1 contributes to resistance against Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Gunnaiah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance in plants to pathogen attack can be qualitative or quantitative. For the latter, hundreds of quantitative trait loci (QTLs have been identified, but the mechanisms of resistance are largely unknown. Integrated non-target metabolomics and proteomics, using high resolution hybrid mass spectrometry, were applied to identify the mechanisms of resistance governed by the fusarium head blight resistance locus, Fhb1, in the near isogenic lines derived from wheat genotype Nyubai. FINDINGS: The metabolomic and proteomic profiles were compared between the near isogenic lines (NIL with resistant and susceptible alleles of Fhb1 upon F. graminearum or mock-inoculation. The resistance-related metabolites and proteins identified were mapped to metabolic pathways. Metabolites of the shunt phenylpropanoid pathway such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides, phenolic glucosides and flavonoids were induced only in the resistant NIL, or induced at higher abundances in resistant than in susceptible NIL, following pathogen inoculation. The identities of these metabolites were confirmed, with fragmentation patterns, using the high resolution LC-LTQ-Orbitrap. Concurrently, the enzymes of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis such as cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, flavonoid O-methyltransferase, agmatine coumaroyltransferase and peroxidase were also up-regulated. Increased cell wall thickening due to deposition of hydroxycinnamic acid amides and flavonoids was confirmed by histo-chemical localization of the metabolites using confocal microscopy. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that the resistance in Fhb1 derived from the wheat genotype Nyubai is mainly associated with cell wall thickening due to deposition of hydroxycinnamic acid amides, phenolic glucosides and flavonoids, but not with the conversion of deoxynivalenol to less toxic deoxynivalenol 3-O-glucoside.

  10. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, M.

    2002-11-01

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  11. The mechanisms underlying sexual differentiation of behavior and physiology in mammals and birds: relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko eMaekawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From a classical viewpoint, sex-specific behavior and physiological functions as well as the brain structures of mammals such as rats and mice, have been thought to be influenced by perinatal sex steroids secreted by the gonads. Sex steroids have also been thought to affect the differentiation of the sex-typical behavior of a few members of the avian order Galliformes, including the Japanese quail and chickens, during their development in ovo. However, recent mammalian studies that focused on the artificial shuffling or knockout of the sex-determining gene, Sry, have revealed that sex chromosomal effects may be associated with particular types of sex-linked differences such as aggression levels, social interaction, and autoimmune diseases, independently of sex steroid-mediated effects. In addition, studies on naturally occurring, rare phenomena such as gynandromorphic birds and experimentally constructed chimeras in which the composition of sex chromosomes in the brain differs from that in the other parts of the body, indicated that sex chromosomes play certain direct roles in the sex-specific differentiation of the gonads and the brain. In this article, we review the relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes in the determination of brain functions related to sexual behavior and reproductive physiology in mammals and birds.

  12. Natural heterotrophic feeding by a temperate octocoral with symbiotic zooxanthellae: a contribution to understanding the mechanisms of die-off events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coma, Rafel; Llorente-Llurba, Eduard; Serrano, Eduard; Gili, Josep-Maria; Ribes, Marta

    2015-06-01

    Octocorals are among the most emblematic and representative organisms of sublittoral communities in both tropical and temperate seas. Eunicella singularis is the most abundant gorgonian in shallow waters and the only gorgonian with symbiotic zooxanthellae in the Mediterranean Sea. We studied the natural diet and prey capture rate of this species over an annual cycle and characterized prey digestion time over the natural temperature regime. The species captured zooplankton prey between 40 and 920 µm. A mean content of 0.14 ± 0.02 prey polyp-1 was observed throughout the year. The strong pattern of decrease in digestion time with temperature increase (from 25 h at 13 °C to 8 h at 21 °C) allowed us to estimate that the prey capture rate was 0.017 ± 0.002 prey polyp-1 h-1 (mean ± SE); the ingestion rate exhibited a seasonal pattern with higher values in spring (0.007 µg C polyp-1 h-1). Feeding on zooplankton had a low contribution to the respiratory expenses of E. singularis except in early spring. Then, heterotrophic nutrition in the natural environment seems unable to meet basal metabolic requirements, especially in summer and fall. This result, in conjunction with the documented collapse of photosynthetic capacity above a warm temperature threshold, indicates the occurrence of a resource acquisition limitation that may play a role in the repeated summer die-off events of the species.

  13. The perfectionism model of binge eating: testing unique contributions, mediating mechanisms, and cross-cultural similarities using a daily diary methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Simon B; Sabourin, Brigitte C; Hall, Peter A; Hewitt, Paul L; Flett, Gordon L; Gralnick, Tara M

    2014-12-01

    The perfectionism model of binge eating (PMOBE) is an integrative model explaining the link between perfectionism and binge eating. This model proposes socially prescribed perfectionism confers risk for binge eating by generating exposure to 4 putative binge triggers: interpersonal discrepancies, low interpersonal esteem, depressive affect, and dietary restraint. The present study addresses important gaps in knowledge by testing if these 4 binge triggers uniquely predict changes in binge eating on a daily basis and if daily variations in each binge trigger mediate the link between socially prescribed perfectionism and daily binge eating. Analyses also tested if proposed mediational models generalized across Asian and European Canadians. The PMOBE was tested in 566 undergraduate women using a 7-day daily diary methodology. Depressive affect predicted binge eating, whereas anxious affect did not. Each binge trigger uniquely contributed to binge eating on a daily basis. All binge triggers except for dietary restraint mediated the relationship between socially prescribed perfectionism and change in daily binge eating. Results suggested cross-cultural similarities, with the PMOBE applying to both Asian and European Canadian women. The present study advances understanding of the personality traits and the contextual conditions accompanying binge eating and provides an important step toward improving treatments for people suffering from eating binges and associated negative consequences.

  14. Contribution of nitrogen oxides to the acidification of rain (part 2). Evaluation of nitrate production mechanisms in a droplet by fog chemical model simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, A. (and others) (CRIEPI, Komae-shi (Japan). Komae Research Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    The fog chemical model developed in the previous work was applied to various types of fog. Simulated results of Cl[sup -], NO[sub 3][sup -] and SO[sub 4][sup 2-] concentrations in fogwater by the fog chemical model almost agreed with observed values in case the fog total ionic concentration was above 1000 [mu]eg/1. The chemical compositions of ideal water droplets formed under various atmospheric conditions based on observation data were predicted by the fog chemical model. About 80% of HNO[sub 3] and HCl in the atmosphere were scavenged by the droplets in all the cases. SO[sub 2] scavenging ratio by a droplet was dependent mainly on the pH of the droplet. When the droplet pH was decreased by dissolution of HNO[sub 3] and HCl, aqueous phase sulfate production was inhibited by decrease of SO[sub 2] solubility in the droplet. Contribution of HNO[sub 3] in the atmosphere was larger than that of SO[sub 2] to the acidification of highly acidic fogwater observed in Kanto district. In addition, HCl was considered to play an important role, as well as HNO[sub 3], in the acidification of fogwater.

  15. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  16. Contribution of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient conditions to Fe-removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Kasturiarachchi, Jagath C; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2008-05-01

    Severe contamination of water resources including groundwater with iron (Fe) due to various anthropogenic activities has been a major environmental problem in industrial areas of Sri Lanka. Hence, the use of the obnoxious weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) in constructed wetlands (floating aquatic macrophyte-based plant treatment systems) to phytoremediate Fe-rich wastewaters seems to be an appealing option. Although several studies have documented that hyacinths are good metal-accumulating plants none of these studies have documented the ability of this plant grown under different nutrient conditions to remove heavy metals from wastewaters. This paper, therefore, reports the phytoremediation efficiencies of water hyacinth grown under different nutrient conditions for Fe-rich wastewaters in batch-type constructed wetlands. This study was conducted for 15 weeks after 1-week acclimatization by culturing young water hyacinth plants (average height of 20+/-2cm) in 590L capacity fiberglass tanks under different nutrient concentrations of 1-fold [28 and 7.7mg/L of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP), respectively], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold with synthetic wastewaters containing 9.27Femg/L. Another set-up of hyacinths containing only Fe as a heavy metal but without any nutrients (i.e., 0-fold) was also studied. A mass balance was carried out to investigate the phytoremediation efficiencies and to determine the different mechanisms governing Fe removal from the wastewaters. Fe removal was largely due to phytoremediation mainly through the process of rhizofiltration and chemical precipitation of Fe2O3 and FeOH3 followed by flocculation and sedimentation. However, chemical precipitation was more significant especially during the first 3 weeks of the study. Plants grown in the 0-fold set-up showed the highest phytoremediation efficiency of 47% during optimum growth at the 6th week with a highest accumulation of 6707Femg/kg dry

  17. Remedial action of matrices contaminated by cobalt with supercritical CO_2: contribution to the understanding of the complex formation mechanisms and to the diphasic transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, Florence

    2001-01-01

    Soils rehabilitation using supercritical CO_2 seems an interesting alternative way to existing techniques. No effluents are generated during the supercritical fluid extraction, which is the main advantage of this process. In order to be extracted by this techniques, metals or radionuclides have to be complexed by suitable chelating agents. Beta-diketones and dithiocarbamates (fluorinated or not) have been chosen. The first part of this work deals with chemical equilibria mechanisms study in an aqueous phase. Experiments show a very weak cobalt complexation kinetics with acetylacetone. Moreover, this complex exhibit a hydrophilic behaviour. On the other hand, cobalt and dithiocarbamate instantaneously from a chelate which is very hydrophobic. Mass transfer between extracting and aqueous phases (hexane and SC CO_2) are also investigated. Supercritical CO_2 seems to have a greater affinity towards fluorinated beta-diketones than hexane. This tendency is confirmed by in situ commercial chelates (fluorinates or not) solubility measurements using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. However, cobalt-beta-diketonates are hydrophilic because of their partial hydration. This kind of chelating agents is not suitable to cobalt supercritical fluid extraction from an aqueous phase. Inversely, distribution coefficients of hydrophobic dithiocarbamates are higher than beta-diketonates, whatever the extracting solvent is. Metals extraction from an aqueous matrix seems possible with these chelating agents. (author) [fr

  18. Mechanism of protection induced by group A Streptococcus vaccine candidate J8-DT: contribution of B and T-cells towards protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Pandey

    Full Text Available Vaccination with J8-DT, a leading GAS vaccine candidate, results in protective immunity in mice. Analysis of immunologic correlates of protection indicated a role of J8-specific antibodies that were induced post-immunization. In the present study, several independent experimental approaches were employed to investigate the protective immunological mechanisms involved in J8-DT-mediated immunity. These approaches included the passive transfer of mouse or rabbit immune serum/antibodies in addition to selective depletion of T-cell subsets prior to bacterial challenge. Passive transfer of J8-DT antiserum/antibodies from mice and rabbits conferred significant resistance against challenge to mice. To exclude the possibility of involvement of other host immune factors, the studies were repeated in SCID mice, which highlighted the need for an ongoing immune response for long-lived protection. Depletion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell subsets confirmed that an active de novo immune response, involving CD4(+ T-helper cells, is required for continued synthesis of antibodies resulting in protection against GAS infection. Taken together these results indicate an involvement of CD4(+ T-cells in J8-DT-mediated protection possibly via an ability to maintain antibody levels. These results have considerable relevance to the development of a broad spectrum passive immunotherapy for GAS disease.

  19. Sharpened cortical tuning and enhanced cortico-cortical communication contribute to the long-term neural mechanisms of visual motion perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nihong; Bi, Taiyong; Zhou, Tiangang; Li, Sheng; Liu, Zili; Fang, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Much has been debated about whether the neural plasticity mediating perceptual learning takes place at the sensory or decision-making stage in the brain. To investigate this, we trained human subjects in a visual motion direction discrimination task. Behavioral performance and BOLD signals were measured before, immediately after, and two weeks after training. Parallel to subjects' long-lasting behavioral improvement, the neural selectivity in V3A and the effective connectivity from V3A to IPS (intraparietal sulcus, a motion decision-making area) exhibited a persistent increase for the trained direction. Moreover, the improvement was well explained by a linear combination of the selectivity and connectivity increases. These findings suggest that the long-term neural mechanisms of motion perceptual learning are implemented by sharpening cortical tuning to trained stimuli at the sensory processing stage, as well as by optimizing the connections between sensory and decision-making areas in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of the organic anion transporter OAT2 to the renal active tubular secretion of creatinine and mechanism for serum creatinine elevations caused by cobicistat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Zhang, Xuexiang; Hao, Jia; Huang, Jane; Kosaka, Alan; Birkus, Gabriel; Murray, Bernard P; Bannister, Roy; Cihlar, Tomas; Huang, Yong; Ray, Adrian S

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics including the pharmacoenhancer cobicistat increase serum creatinine by inhibiting its renal active tubular secretion without affecting the glomerular filtration rate. This study aimed to define the transporters involved in creatinine secretion, applying that knowledge to establish the mechanism for xenobiotic-induced effects. The basolateral uptake transporters organic anion transporter OAT2 and organic cation transporters OCT2 and OCT3 were found to transport creatinine. At physiologic creatinine concentrations, the specific activity of OAT2 transport was over twofold higher than OCT2 or OCT3, establishing OAT2 as a likely relevant creatinine transporter and further challenging the traditional view that creatinine is solely transported by a cationic pathway. The apical multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters MATE1 and MATE2-K demonstrated low-affinity and high-capacity transport. All drugs known to affect creatinine inhibited OCT2 and MATE1. Similar to cimetidine and ritonavir, cobicistat had the greatest effect on MATE1 with a 50% inhibition constant of 0.99 μM for creatinine transport. Trimethoprim potently inhibited MATE2-K, whereas dolutegravir preferentially inhibited OCT2. Cimetidine was unique, inhibiting all transporters that interact with creatinine. Thus, the clinical observation of elevated serum creatinine in patients taking cobicistat is likely a result of OCT2 transport, facilitating intracellular accumulation, and MATE1 inhibition.

  1. Contribution of the organic anion transporter OAT2 to the renal active tubular secretion of creatinine and mechanism for serum creatinine elevations caused by cobicistat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Zhang, Xuexiang; Hao, Jia; Huang, Jane; Kosaka, Alan; Birkus, Gabriel; Murray, Bernard P; Bannister, Roy; Cihlar, Tomas; Huang, Yong; Ray, Adrian S

    2014-01-01

    Many xenobiotics including the pharmacoenhancer cobicistat increase serum creatinine by inhibiting its renal active tubular secretion without affecting the glomerular filtration rate. This study aimed to define the transporters involved in creatinine secretion, applying that knowledge to establish the mechanism for xenobiotic-induced effects. The basolateral uptake transporters organic anion transporter OAT2 and organic cation transporters OCT2 and OCT3 were found to transport creatinine. At physiologic creatinine concentrations, the specific activity of OAT2 transport was over twofold higher than OCT2 or OCT3, establishing OAT2 as a likely relevant creatinine transporter and further challenging the traditional view that creatinine is solely transported by a cationic pathway. The apical multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters MATE1 and MATE2-K demonstrated low-affinity and high-capacity transport. All drugs known to affect creatinine inhibited OCT2 and MATE1. Similar to cimetidine and ritonavir, cobicistat had the greatest effect on MATE1 with a 50% inhibition constant of 0.99 μM for creatinine transport. Trimethoprim potently inhibited MATE2-K, whereas dolutegravir preferentially inhibited OCT2. Cimetidine was unique, inhibiting all transporters that interact with creatinine. Thus, the clinical observation of elevated serum creatinine in patients taking cobicistat is likely a result of OCT2 transport, facilitating intracellular accumulation, and MATE1 inhibition. PMID:24646860

  2. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of crack in amorphous silica: study by the molecular dynamics of crack in amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brutzel, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the mechanism which occurs during the crack at the atomic scale in amorphous silica. The difficulties of the experimental observations at this length scale lead us to use numerical studies by molecular dynamics to access to the dynamical and the thermodynamical informations. We have carried out large simulations with 500000 atoms and studied the structure of the amorphous silica before to studying their behaviours under an imposed strain. The structure of this simulated amorphous silica settled in three length scales. In small length scale between 0 and 5 angstrom glass is composed of tetrahedra, this is close to the crystalline structure. In intermediate length scale between 3 and 10 angstrom tetrahedra are connected together and build rings of different sizes composed in majority between 5 and 7 tetrahedra. In bigger length scale between 15 and 60 angstrom, areas with high density of rings are surrounded by areas with low density of rings. These structural considerations play an important role in initiation and propagation of a crack. Indeed. in this length scale. crack propagates by growth and coalescence of some small cavities which appear in area with low density of rings behind the crack tip. The cavities dissipate the stress with carries away a delay to propagation of the crack. This phenomenons seems ductile and leads to non linear elastic behaviour near the crack tip. We have also shown that the addition of alkali in the amorphous silica changes the structure by creation of nano-porosities and leads to enhance the ductility during the crack propagation. (author)

  3. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hua

    2008-11-01

    detected in this region can account for the production of hydroperoxides, while the moderate level of NOx suppressed the formation of hydroperoxides. High concentrations of hydroperoxides were detected in samples of rainwater collected in a heavy shower on 25 July when a typhoon passed through, indicating that a considerable mixing ratio of hydroperoxides, particularly MHP, resided above the boundary layer, which might be transported on a regional scale and further influence the redistribution of HOx and ROx radicals. It was found that hydroperoxides, in particular H2O2, play an important role in the formation of secondary sulfate in the aerosol phase, where the heterogeneous reaction might contribute substantially. A negative correlation between hydroperoxides and water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, a considerable fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA, was observed, possibly providing field evidence for the importance of hydroperoxides in the formation of SOA found in previous laboratory studies. We suggest that hydroperoxides act as an important link between sulfate and organic aerosols, which needs further study and should be considered in current atmospheric models.

  4. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, W.; Chen, Z. M.; Jie, C. Y.; Kondo, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Takegawa, N.; Chang, C. C.; Lu, K. D.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kita, K.; Wang, H. L.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hu, M.

    2008-11-01

    in samples of rainwater collected in a heavy shower on 25 July when a typhoon passed through, indicating that a considerable mixing ratio of hydroperoxides, particularly MHP, resided above the boundary layer, which might be transported on a regional scale and further influence the redistribution of HOx and ROx radicals. It was found that hydroperoxides, in particular H2O2, play an important role in the formation of secondary sulfate in the aerosol phase, where the heterogeneous reaction might contribute substantially. A negative correlation between hydroperoxides and water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC), a considerable fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA), was observed, possibly providing field evidence for the importance of hydroperoxides in the formation of SOA found in previous laboratory studies. We suggest that hydroperoxides act as an important link between sulfate and organic aerosols, which needs further study and should be considered in current atmospheric models.

  5. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field,Tarim Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study is undertaken to understand how calcite precipitation and dissolution contributes to depth-related changes in porosity and permeability of gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Kela 2 gas field of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China. Sandstone samples and pore water samples are col-lected from well KL201 in the Tarim Basin. Vertical profiles of porosity, permeability, pore water chem-istry, and the relative volume abundance of calcite/dolomite are constructed from 3600 to 4000 m below the ground surface within major oil and gas reservoir rocks. Porosity and permeability values are in-versely correlated with the calcite abundance, indicating that calcite dissolution and precipitation may be controlling porosity and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Pore water chemistry exhibits a sys-tematic variation from the Na2SO4 type at the shallow depth (3600-3630 m), to the NaHCO3 type at the intermediate depth (3630―3695 m),and to the CaCl2 type at the greater depth (3728―3938 m). The geochemical factors that control the calcite solubility include pH, temperature, pressure, Ca2+ concen-tration, the total inorganic carbon concentration (ΣCO2), and the type of pore water. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium and mass conservation laws are applied to calculate the calcite saturation state as a function of a few key parameters. The model calculation illustrates that the calcite solubility is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of pore water, mainly the concentration difference between the total dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved calcium concentration (i.e., [ΣCO2] -[Ca2+]). In the Na2SO4 water at the shallow depth, this index is close to 0, pore water is near the calcite solubility. Calcite does not dissolve or precipitate in significant quantities. In the NaHCO3 water at the intermedi-ate depth, this index is greater than 0, and pore water is supersaturated with respect to calcite. Massive calcite precipitation was observed at this depth

  6. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    . This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 μm/year. (author)

  7. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanikea B. King

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1 exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits.

  8. About the complete loss of functions assumed by redundant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaretto, Y.; Cayol, A.; Fourest, M.; Guimbail, H.

    1980-04-01

    Are to be taken into account situations resulting from loss of redundant safety systems. Two ways of approach were to be probed: evaluation of the failure probability and analysis of the consequences of those situations. The first way leads to improve reliability of concerned systems, the second way to set up mitigating means. Before TMI-2 occured, safety advices had already been issued about three kinds of situations: anticipated transients without scram, loss of ultimate heat sink, simultaneous loss of out-and inside power supplies. That, in some cases, something had to be done to improve safety showed the rightness of the concern. Next step is the study of the loss of both normal and emergency feedwater: The regulatory request has been issued on September 1979

  9. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lanikea B; Koch, Marta; Murphy, Keith R; Velazquez, Yoheilly; Ja, William W; Tomchik, Seth M

    2016-04-07

    Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1) exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits. Copyright © 2016 King et al.

  10. Abstracts of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  11. The N Terminus of the Retinoblastoma Protein Inhibits DNA Replication via a Bipartite Mechanism Disrupted in Partially Penetrant Retinoblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysov, Sergiy I.; Nepon-Sixt, Brook S.

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (RbN) harbors in-frame exon deletions in partially penetrant hereditary retinoblastomas and is known to impair cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, how such RbN deletions contribute to Rb tumor- and growth-suppressive functions is unknown. Here we establish that RbN directly inhibits DNA replication initiation and elongation using a bipartite mechanism involving N-terminal exons lost in cancer. Specifically, Rb exon 7 is necessary and sufficient to target and inhibit the replicative CMG helicase, resulting in the accumulation of inactive CMGs on chromatin. An independent N-terminal loop domain, which forms a projection, specifically blocks DNA polymerase α (Pol-α) and Ctf4 recruitment without affecting DNA polymerases ε and δ or the CMG helicase. Individual disruption of exon 7 or the projection in RbN or Rb, as occurs in inherited cancers, partially impairs the ability of Rb/RbN to inhibit DNA replication and block G1-to-S cell cycle transit. However, their combined loss abolishes these functions of Rb. Thus, Rb growth-suppressive functions include its ability to block replicative complexes via bipartite, independent, and additive N-terminal domains. The partial loss of replication, CMG, or Pol-α control provides a potential molecular explanation for how N-terminal Rb loss-of-function deletions contribute to the etiology of partially penetrant retinoblastomas. PMID:26711265

  12. Radioinduced intestinal fibrosis: from molecular mechanisms to therapy applications. Contribution of the TGF--β1, of the CTGF and of the transduction pathway of the Rho/ROCK signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydont, V.

    2006-12-01

    Delayed radiation enteritis is an intestinal fibrosis induced by accidental or therapeutic radiation for pelvic and abdominal cancer treatments. Studies of molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of fibrosis have showed the respective contribution of CTGF, low TGF-β1 concentrations and Rho/ROCK pathway. Thus, based on the relationship between CTGF, TGF-β1 and Rho pathway, 2 therapeutics strategies have been develop. First, a pravastatin curative gift leads to a fibro-lysis involving an inhibition of Rho and in cascade a reduction of CTGF expression and extracellular matrix deposition. The data suggest that reversal of established radiation fibrosis in the gut is possible. Second, a pravastatin prophylactic gift prevents the installation of a chronic fibrosis but does not protect the tumor. On the base of these results, the radiation therapy department of the Institut Gustave Roussy will soon initiate 2 clinical trials. (author)

  13. Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: a current perspective of genome distribution, evolution, and function : Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: genomic organization, evolution, and molecular mechanism models contribute broadly to plant pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Preeti; Acharya, Vishal

    2018-02-01

    STAND P-loop NTPase is the common weapon used by plant and other organisms from all three kingdoms of life to defend themselves against pathogen invasion. The purpose of this study is to review comprehensively the latest finding of plant STAND P-loop NTPase related to their genomic distribution, evolution, and their mechanism of action. Earlier, the plant STAND P-loop NTPase known to be comprised of only NBS-LRRs/AP-ATPase/NB-ARC ATPase. However, recent finding suggests that genome of early green plants comprised of two types of STAND P-loop NTPases: (1) mammalian NACHT NTPases and (2) NBS-LRRs. Moreover, YchF (unconventional G protein and members of P-loop NTPase) subfamily has been reported to be exceptionally involved in biotic stress (in case of Oryza sativa), thereby a novel member of STAND P-loop NTPase in green plants. The lineage-specific expansion and genome duplication events are responsible for abundance of plant STAND P-loop NTPases; where "moderate tandem and low segmental duplication" trajectory followed in majority of plant species with few exception (equal contribution of tandem and segmental duplication). Since the past decades, systematic research is being investigated into NBS-LRR function supported the direct recognition of pathogen or pathogen effectors by the latest models proposed via 'integrated decoy' or 'sensor domains' model. Here, we integrate the recently published findings together with the previous literature on the genomic distribution, evolution, and distinct models proposed for functional molecular mechanism of plant STAND P-loop NTPases.

  14. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: a dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákány, J; Fromental-Ramain, C; Warot, X; Duboule, D

    1997-12-09

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose-response is observed in the morphogenesis of the penian bone, the baculum, which further suggests that digits and external genitalia share this genetic control mechanism. A progressive reduction in the dose of Hox gene products led first to ectrodactyly, then to olygodactyly and adactyly. Interestingly, this transition between the pentadactyl to the adactyl formula went through a step of polydactyly. We propose that in the distal appendage of polydactylous short-digited ancestral tetrapods, such as Acanthostega, the HoxA complex was predominantly active. Subsequent recruitment of the HoxD complex contributed to both reductions in digit number and increase in digit length. Thus, transition through a polydactylous limb before reaching and stabilizing the pentadactyl pattern may have relied, at least in part, on asynchronous and independent changes in the regulation of HoxA and HoxD gene complexes.

  15. Modeling glial contributions to seizures and epileptogenesis: cation-chloride cotransporters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid M Rusan

    Full Text Available Flies carrying a kcc loss-of-function mutation are more seizure-susceptible than wild-type flies. The kcc gene is the highly conserved Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of K+/Cl- cotransporter genes thought to be expressed in all animal cell types. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal requirements for kcc loss-of-function to modify seizure-susceptibility in flies. Targeted RNA interference (RNAi of kcc in various sets of neurons was sufficient to induce severe seizure-sensitivity. Interestingly, kcc RNAi in glia was particularly effective in causing seizure-sensitivity. Knockdown of kcc in glia or neurons during development caused a reduction in seizure induction threshold, cell swelling, and brain volume increase in 24-48 hour old adult flies. Third instar larval peripheral nerves were enlarged when kcc RNAi was expressed in neurons or glia. Results suggest that a threshold of K+/Cl- cotransport dysfunction in the nervous system during development is an important determinant of seizure-susceptibility in Drosophila. The findings presented are the first attributing a causative role for glial cation-chloride cotransporters in seizures and epileptogenesis. The importance of elucidating glial cell contributions to seizure disorders and the utility of Drosophila models is discussed.

  16. 4D strain localisation and fracture propagation in granite: the relative contribution of seismic and aseismic mechanisms to damage evolution during an in-situ triaxial deformation experiment at SOLEIL synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, A. L.; Fusseis, F.; Butler, I. B.; Flynn, M.; King, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present 4D x-ray data documenting strain localisation and fracture propagation in a microgranite, collected during a triaxial deformation experiment on the imaging beamline PSICHE at SOLEIL synchrotron. We loaded to failure a 2.97 mm diameter x 9.46 mm long cylindrical sample of Ailsa Craig microgranite, heat treated to 600 °C. The sample was deformed at 15 MPa confining pressure and 3x10-5 s-1 strain rate in a novel, x-ray transparent triaxial deformation apparatus, designed and built at the University of Edinburgh. 21 microtomographic volumes were acquired in intervals of 5-20 MPa (decreasing as failure approached), including one scan at peak differential stress of 200 MPa and three post-failure scans. A constant stress level was maintained during scanning and individual datasets were collected in 10 minutes using a white beam with an energy maximum at 66 keV in a spiral configuration. Reconstructions yielded image stacks of 1700x1700x4102 voxels with a voxel size of 2.7 μm. We analysed strain localisation and fracture propagation in the time series data. Local changes in volumetric and shear strains between time steps were quantified using 3D digital image correlation [1]. Fractures were segmented using a Multiscale Hessian fracture filter [2] and analysed for their orientations, dimensions and spatial distributions, and changes in these between time steps. In combination, these analyses show the extent and evolution of both local aseismic deformation and microcracking and their relative contributions to the overall damage evolution. Our data provides direct evidence of ongoing deformation processes, complementing the seminal results of Lockner et al. [3], who first imaged fault growth using acoustic emissions locations. Our results provide further insight into the aseismic mechanisms that dissipate >90% of the overall strain energy [4], and the interactions between these mechanisms and the developing microcracks. They also provide experimental verification

  17. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  18. Upregulation of the sodium channel NaVβ4 subunit and its contributions to mechanical hypersensitivity and neuronal hyperexcitability in a rat model of radicular pain induced by local DRG inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenrui; Tan, Zhi-Yong; Barbosa, Cindy; Strong, Judith A.; Cummins, Theodore R.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    High frequency spontaneous firing in myelinated sensory neurons plays a key role in initiating pain behaviors in several different models, including the radicular pain model in which the rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are locally inflamed. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 contributes to pain behaviors and spontaneous activity in this model. Among all the isoforms in adult DRG, NaV1.6 is the main carrier of TTX-sensitive resurgent Na currents that allow high-frequency firing. Resurgent currents flow after a depolarization or action potential, as a blocking particle exits the pore. In most neurons the regulatory β4 subunit is potentially the endogenous blocker. We used in vivo siRNA mediated knockdown of NaVβ4 to examine its role in the DRG inflammation model. NaVβ4 but not control siRNA almost completely blocked mechanical hypersensitivity induced by DRG inflammation. Microelectrode recordings in isolated whole DRGs showed that NaVβ4 siRNA blocked the inflammation-induced increase in spontaneous activity of Aβ neurons, and reduced repetitive firing and other measures of excitability. NaVβ4 was preferentially expressed in larger diameter cells; DRG inflammation increased its expression and this was reversed by NaVβ4 siRNA, based on immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. NaVβ4 siRNA also reduced immunohistochemical NaV1.6 expression. Patch clamp recordings of TTX-sensitive Na currents in acutely cultured medium diameter DRG neurons showed that DRG inflammation increased transient and especially resurgent current; effects blocked by NaVβ4 siRNA. NaVβ4 may represent a more specific target for pain conditions that depend on myelinated neurons expressing NaV1.6. PMID:26785322

  19. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  20. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  1. Mechanical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Darbyshire, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Alan Darbyshire's best-selling text book provides five-star high quality content to a potential audience of 13,000 engineering students. It explains the most popular specialist units of the Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering and Operations & Maintenance Engineering pathways of the new 2010 BTEC National Engineering syllabus. This challenging textbook also features contributions from specialist lecturers, ensuring that no stone is left unturned.

  2. The relative contributions of function, perceived psychological burden and partner support to cognitive distress in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Susan M; Bond, Malcolm J; Harrington, Ann; Belan, Ingrid

    2016-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a genitourinary disease of increasing incidence. Despite improvements in treatment, outcomes remain equivocal with high recurrence rates. It is associated with poor psychosocial outcomes due to reduced functioning of the genitourinary system. The objective of these analyses was to query whether reported loss of function or the perception of psychological burden caused by this functional impedance was the key to understanding psychosocial outcomes. The sample comprised 119 participants with a confirmed diagnosis of bladder cancer. They completed a self-report questionnaire comprising the Bladder Cancer Index, Mini-mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale and standard sociodemographic details. Simple mediation and serial mediation were used to explore the potential for psychological burden to mediate associations between loss of function and cognitive distress, and the potential additional contribution of positive partner support on these relationships. Age and duration of cancer were considered as covariates. Simple mediation demonstrated that the association between function and cognitive distress was fully mediated by perceived psychological burden. Serial mediation, which allowed for the addition of partner support, again demonstrated full mediation, with partner support being the key predictive variable. These analyses emphasise the importance of an appreciation of individuals' interpretation of the burden occasioned by bladder cancer and the role of a supportive partner. The implications for management discussions and support services in alleviating negative psychological outcomes in bladder cancer are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Contribution of the clean development mechanism to sustainable energy production. The energy sector in the West African Economic and Monetary Union - Case study: Benin, Burkina Faso, Niger and Togo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoguina, H.

    2007-07-01

    This study assesses the contribution of the CDM to Sustainable Development in energy sectors in the West African Economic and Monetary Union, concentrating on Benin, Burkina Faso, Niger and Togo. Through a cross-sectional survey of different stakeholder groups, the prospective sustainable development criteria for the CDM are examined and prospective small-scale CDM projects are analysed. One efficient option to reduce transaction costs to small scale CDM projects is the creation of a regional centre for capacity building and project pre-validation. This study analyses how the WAEMU could be used as a vehicle to attract CDM financing. (orig.)

  4. Social Contributions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gyorgy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contributions have an important impact on payroll policy. Also, social contributions represent a significant budgetary revenue item which can be viewed at the edge between taxation and insurance. Social contributions in Romania experienced many changes which ended in 2008. Nowadays, they are within a long transaction period towards partial externalization of the insurance activity to privately managed funds. The aim of this paper is to analyse the homogeneity of Romanian social security public scheme using annual data extracted from 2002-2009.The main findings reveal that social contributions reached the pinnacle of diversification, being too many, some of them with a small contribution rates; fiscal reforms which reduced contribution rates advantaged employers, and state will be interested to externalize this activity as far private sector will be able to assume this responsibility and the budgetary effects are acceptable for the public finance.

  5. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  6. Major contributions to science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Andre

    1991-03-15

    It may look difficult to describe the scientific contributions of Léon Van Hove, who started his career as a pure mathematician, and then a mathematical physicist, and ended it as a phenomenologist and an adseveral of Léon's students, in particular N. Hugenholtz. In this domain, his contributions were numerous and fundamental.

  7. Major contributions to science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Andre

    1991-01-01

    It may look difficult to describe the scientific contributions of Léon Van Hove, who started his career as a pure mathematician, and then a mathematical physicist, and ended it as a phenomenologist and an adseveral of Léon's students, in particular N. Hugenholtz. In this domain, his contributions were numerous and fundamental

  8. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms; Corrosion generalisee des alliages a base nickel en milieu aqueux a haute temperature: apport a la comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L

    2007-11-15

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale ({approx} 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary

  9. Mechanisms of reaction and energy dissipation in the nucleus-nucleus symmetric collisions at 25 to 74 MeV/u: contribution of exclusive measurements of the INDRA multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, V.

    1995-04-01

    This work is about the first experimental results obtained with the INDRA multidetector. First, the characterization of reaction mechanisms is performed. For complete events, global description of the collision is performed and compared with theoretical calculations. Dissipative binary mechanisms represent the largest part of the cross section for violent collisions whatever the bombarding energy (from 25 to 74 MeV/u) for the studied systems (Ar + KCl and Xe + Sn). The two outgoing products decay takes place through light charged particle and fragment emission. The reconstruction of the two primary sources is achieved, allowing thus the study of the evolution of the energy dissipation. Excitation energies exceeding 10 MeV/u are reached. The decay of the primary outgoing partners can be understood in a statistical model approach and the role of collective modes like expansion energy seems to be negligible. The study of the angular distributions points out angular momentum effects, 'proximity effect' and a dynamical ternary process corresponding to the emission of a light fragment in between the two heavier products. For the most violent collisions, events can also be interpreted in terms of the multifragmentation of a single source, at least for the Xe + Sn system at 50 MeV/u (80 m barn). For the lower incident energies, fusion residues associated to the largest dissipations are recognized, but the cross sections is small (35 m barn for the Ar + KCl system at 32 MeV/u). (author)

  10. O-GlcNAcylation of cardiac Nav1.5 contributes to the development of arrhythmias in diabetic hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Hu, Lili; Xie, Jinyan; Chen, Sisi; Huang, Lin; Xu, Zixuan; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Yuan, Ping; Yan, Xia; Jin, Jiejin; Shen, Yang; Zhu, Wengen; Fu, Linghua; Chen, Qi; Yu, Jianhua; Hu, Jianxin; Cao, Qing; Wan, Rong; Hong, Kui

    2018-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications are major causes of mortality and morbidity in diabetic patients. The mechanisms underlying the progression of diabetic heart (DH) to ventricular arrhythmias are unclear. O-linked GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible post-translational modification for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.5) is subjected to O-linked GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc), which plays an essential role in DH-induced arrhythmias. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 200-230 g) were treated with a single high-dose of streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg) to generate a rat model of diabetes. STZ-induced 3-month diabetic rats displayed increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. The elevated O-GlcNAc modification was correlated with decreases in both total and cytoplasmic Nav1.5 expression in vivo and in vitro. In addition, both co-immunoprecipitation and immunostaining assays demonstrated that hyperglycemia could increase the O-GlcNAc-modified Nav1.5 levels and decrease the interaction between Nav1.5 and Nav1.5-binding proteins Nedd4-2/SAP-97. Furthermore, patch-clamp measurements in HEK-293 T cells showed that Nav1.5 current densities decreased by 30% after high-glucose treatment, and the sodium currents increased via O-GlcNAc inhibition. Our data suggested that hyperglycemia increased the O-GlcNAc modification of Nav1.5 expression and decreased the interaction between Nav1.5 and Nedd4-2/SAP-97, which led to the abnormal expression and distribution of Nav1.5, loss of function of the sodium channel, and prolongation of the PR/QT interval. Excessive O-GlcNAc modification of Nav1.5 is a novel signaling event, which may be an underlying contributing factor for the development of the arrhythmogenesis in DH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Study of mechanisms and kinetics of Sodium-CO2 interactions. Contribution to the evaluation of an energy conversion system with supercritical CO2 for sodium fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, L.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD study consisted in studying reactive mechanisms and kinetics of sodium-CO 2 interactions, in the frame of the assessment of an energy conversion system with supercritical CO 2 for fast breeder reactors cooled by sodium. The approach was the following. First of all, the interactions between sodium and CO 2 have been brought to light by laboratory experiments associated with products analysis. They have enabled the establishment of a coherent mechanism, in agreement with literature data, and gave preliminary indications on the reaction kinetics. In order to estimate a more detailed reaction kinetics, we tried to approach the phenomenon that appears in the case of a leak in a sodium-CO 2 heat exchanger. Geometry of such heat exchangers is not fixed for the moment, even if the development of compact exchangers is foreseen. Then, free jets of CO 2 in liquid sodium have been modeled in order to obtain, by identification, kinetics parameters of the reaction. Those parameters, estimated with such a geometry, will remain valid with a much complex geometry, that will better represent the real exchanger. An experimental bench has been defined and built to realize those jets. The first laboratory experiments have concluded in the existence of different reactive mechanisms according to the temperature level. A threshold has been brought to light around 500 C. Below this one, reaction appears moderated, or even, slow, with a medium exothermicity, and appears after an induction period that depends on the temperature,and which duration could reach several hours. At contrary, above this threshold, it seems rapid and more exothermic. Below 500 C, sodium oxalate is produced, and then reacts with sodium in an exothermic way, following the reactions: CO 2 + Na →1/4 Na 2 C 2 O 4 + 1/4 CO + 1/4 Na 2 CO 3 (5) 4 Na + Na 2 C 2 O 4 → 3 Na 2 O + CO + C (6) Above 500 C, sodium carbonate is produced, and can then possibly react with sodium in an endothermic way, following the

  12. Summaries of poster contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The 10. meeting covered subjects on the application of electron microscopy in numerous fields such as biology and medicine, solid state physics, semiconductor research and production, crystallography, materials science, and chemistry of polymers. 174 summaries of poster contributions are included

  13. Micro-seismicity induced by hydrocarbon production: contribution to localization of events and identification of the source mechanisms through the use of dynamic friction models; Contribution a la localisation des evenements et l'identification des mecanismes au foyer en micro-sismicite induite par l'exploitation d'hydrocarbures. Utilisation des modeles de frottement dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammedi, H.

    2002-11-01

    Oil production or any injection of fluid in a geological medium is likely to impose variations of stresses which might generate micro-seismicity. We examine whether the use of dynamic friction models could allow for a better determination of mechanics on the fault plane from borehole seismometers. We sought to identify the friction law model from seismogram observation. Before dealing with this inverse problem, we examined the direct problem generating synthetic seismograms at virtual stations, on the basis of a postulated friction law using the FD3D earthquake simulation code and the AXITRA radiation computation code. Treatment of two different laws, one of which is an original variation of the Dietrich-Ruina law, leads to similar seismograms. This might indicate that systematic inversion for the friction law only from seismogram observation might reveal difficult. (authors)

  14. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de sorption aux interfaces solide-liquide: application aux cas des apatites et des oxy-hydroxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, M

    2002-11-15

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  15. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of extraction of uranyl chloride by long chain aliphatic amines; Contribution a l'etude du mecanisme d'extraction du chlorure d'uranyle par les amines aliphatiques a longues chaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, G.R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    After having studied and developed the mechanisms which may 'a priori' explain the extraction process (co-ordination, ion association or intermediate mechanism), experience shows that ion association only should be taken into consideration. The structure of the organic complex of uranyl chloride has been defined on the basis of the study of the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium between the two phases at the equilibrium as a function of successively the activity of Cl{sup -} ions in the aqueous phase, the concentration of amine salt in the organic phase and finally of the concentration of uranium in the aqueous phase. The plotting of the results in bi-logarithmic co-ordinates enables us to propose the following formula for the extracted compound: UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup --}(NR{sub 3}H{sup +}){sub 2}. The calculation of the equilibrium constant of formation of the organic compound of uranyl chloride has been possible in the case of diluted solutions of uranium only. (author) [French] Apres avoir expose et developpe les mecanismes qui a priori pouvaient expliquer le processus d'extraction (coordination, association d'ions ou mecanisme intermediaire), le recours a l'experience a finalement permis de ne retenir que l'association d'ions. La structure du complexe organique de chlorure d'uranyle a ete definie a partir de l'etude de la variation du coefficient de partage de l'uranium entre les deux phases a l'equilibre en fonction successivement de l'activite des ions Cl{sup -} en phase aqueuse, de la concentration de sel d'amine en phase organique et enfin de la concentration d'uranium de la phase aqueuse. La representation bilogarithmique des resultats de ces essais a permis de proposer la formule suivante pour le compose extrait: UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup --}(NR{sub 3}H{sup +}){sub 2}. Le calcul de la constante d'equilibre de formation du compose organique de chlorure d

  16. Mechanical properties of dental restorative materials: relative contribution of laboratory tests Propriedades mecânicas dos materiais dentários restauradores: contribuição relativa dos ensaios laboratoriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Wang

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of dental products that are launched on the market becomes the correct selection of these materials a difficult task. Although the mechanical properties do not necessarily represent their actual clinical performance, they are used to guide the effects of changes in their composition or processing on these properties. Also, these tests might help somehow the clinician to choose once comparisons between former formulations and new ones, as well as, with the leading brand, are highlighted by manufactures. This paper presents a review of the most important laboratory tests. In this manner, the knowledge of these tests will provide a critical opinion related to the properties of different dental materials.Uma grande variedade de produtos odontológicos que são lançados no mercado faz da seleção do material uma difícil tarefa. Apesar das propriedades mecânicas não representarem necessariamente o seu real desempenho clínico, os testes são utilizados para orientar os efeitos das alterações das composições do material ou a evolução das suas propriedades. Além disso, estas propriedades podem ajudar o clínico de alguma forma na seleção correta, uma vez que a comparação entre as formulações anteriores e as mais recentes, assim como as líderes de mercado são mais destacadas pelos fabricantes. Este artigo apresenta uma revisão dos testes laboratoriais mais importantes. Desta forma, o conhecimento destes ensaios fornecerá uma opinião crítica relacionada às propriedades dos diferentes materiais dentários.

  17. Heater test in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri URL. Gas release and water redistribution - Contribution to heater experiment (HE); Rock and bentonite thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the nearfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beside salt and granite, clay formations are investigated as potential host rocks for disposing radioactive waste. In Switzerland in the canton Jura close to the city of St. Ursanne, an underground laboratory was built in the vicinity of the reconnaissance gallery of a motorway tunnel. Since 1995, a consortium of 12 international organisations is running this laboratory for investigating the suitability of the Opalinus clay formation with regard to disposal of radioactive waste. In 1999, the Heater Experiment B (HE-B) was started for investigating the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes of the Opalinus clay in interaction with the bentonite buffer. The principal contractors of this project were the Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S. A. (ENRESA), the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, and the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA). GRS participated in that experiment for determining the subjects of gas generation, gas release, water content, and water redistribution in the Opalinus clay during heating. This was achieved by analysing gas and water samples from the test field before, during, and after the heating period and by performing geoelectric tomography measurements in the heated region. The in-situ measurements were supported by an additional laboratory programme. This report deals with the work of GRS performed in this project during the years 1999 to 2005. All the results obtained in the frame of the project are presented. Additional laboratory measurements conducted by the Pore Water Laboratory at CIEMAT in Madrid are also presented. The participation of GRS was funded by German Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWA) under the contract No. 02 E 9602 and by the Commission of the European Communities under the contract No. FIKW.CT-2001-00132. (orig.)

  18. Biogas from landfills embankments: the Brazilian contribution for the management of urban solid residues and the greenhouse effect mitigation through the mechanisms for clean development; Biogas de aterros: a contribuicao do Brasil na gestao de residuos solidos urbanos e na mitigacao do efeito estufa atraves dos mecanismos de desenvolvimento limpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Gleide B.M.; Guimaraes, Hoji Y' a Henda da R.; Andrade, Euridice S. Mamede de; Teixeira, Gisele Pereira; Freitas, Marcos A.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2008-07-01

    This paper studies the clean development mechanism (CDM) for sanitary sewage in Brazil, as instruments for flexibilization and mitigation of the effects of climate changes coming from the global heating. This research presents the assessments of the CDM projects for sanitary sewage in Brazil, considering the Project Conception Documents (PCD) approved until November 2007. The paper presents some methodologies for studying of energy generation potential from the biogas originated in sanitary sewage. The paper also contributes to projects of carbon credit commercialization, and relevance of the CDM instrument for the adequate management expansion of the residence solid residues as well, and advances in the implantation of sanitary embankments in Brazil.

  19. Panel acoustic contribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Formulations are derived to analyze the relative panel acoustic contributions of a vibrating structure. The essence of this analysis is to correlate the acoustic power flow from each panel to the radiated acoustic pressure at any field point. The acoustic power is obtained by integrating the normal component of the surface acoustic intensity, which is the product of the surface acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity reconstructed by using the Helmholtz equation least squares based nearfield acoustical holography, over each panel. The significance of this methodology is that it enables one to analyze and rank relative acoustic contributions of individual panels of a complex vibrating structure to acoustic radiation anywhere in the field based on a single set of the acoustic pressures measured in the near field. Moreover, this approach is valid for both interior and exterior regions. Examples of using this method to analyze and rank the relative acoustic contributions of a scaled vehicle cabin are demonstrated.

  20. Study of the effect of the nature of aggregates on the mechanical behaviour of the concrete in hot and dry zones «Contribution of the curing» Etude de l’effet de la nature des granulats sur le comportement mécanique du béton en zones chaudes et arides «Contribution de la cure»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendjillali K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laghouat est parmi les villes de l’Algérie riches en matériaux de différentes natures, tels que les roches calcaires massives et les matériaux alluvionnaires meubles siliceux et silico-calcaires. L’objectif premier de ce travail est d’établir une comparaison des performances mécaniques des bétons préparés avec de granulats de natures différentes. Nôtre second objectif est l’étude de l’influence de la cure sur la résistance à la compression et la résistance à la flexion des bétons étudiés. Les échantillons sont conservés sous un climat chaud et sec réel qui est le climat de Laghouat. Nous avons utilisé comme cure: le film plastique, la toile de jute mouillée et l’immersion dans l’eau. A travers ce travail expérimental, nous avons pu constater que les meilleures résistances à la compression sont obtenues dans les bétons à sable siliceux et celles à la flexion sont obtenues dans les bétons à granulats calcaires. La conservation du béton dans une ambiance aride sans protection augmente sa résistance mécanique à jeune âge, mais à long terme, cette dernière chute d’une façon significative. L’étude a mis en évidence la nécessité de l’emploi d’un super plastifiant et de l’application immédiate de la cure pour le bétonnage en climat chaud. Laghouat is among the cities of Algeria rich in materials of various natures, such as the massive limestone rocks and the natural river materials. The first objective of this work is to establish a comparison of the mechanical performances between concretes with aggregates of different natures. The second objective is to study the effect of curing on the compressive and the flexural strength of concretes. Samples are conserved under a real hot and dry climate which is the climate of Laghouat. We used as curing: plastic film, wet hessian and immersing in water. Through this work, we noticed that the best compressive strengths are obtained in concretes

  1. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of crack in amorphous silica: study by the molecular dynamics of crack in amorphous silica; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de rupture dans les amorphes: etude par dynamique moleculaire de la rupture de verre de silice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Brutzel, L

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the mechanism which occurs during the crack at the atomic scale in amorphous silica. The difficulties of the experimental observations at this length scale lead us to use numerical studies by molecular dynamics to access to the dynamical and the thermodynamical informations. We have carried out large simulations with 500000 atoms and studied the structure of the amorphous silica before to studying their behaviours under an imposed strain. The structure of this simulated amorphous silica settled in three length scales. In small length scale between 0 and 5 angstrom glass is composed of tetrahedra, this is close to the crystalline structure. In intermediate length scale between 3 and 10 angstrom tetrahedra are connected together and build rings of different sizes composed in majority between 5 and 7 tetrahedra. In bigger length scale between 15 and 60 angstrom, areas with high density of rings are surrounded by areas with low density of rings. These structural considerations play an important role in initiation and propagation of a crack. Indeed. in this length scale. crack propagates by growth and coalescence of some small cavities which appear in area with low density of rings behind the crack tip. The cavities dissipate the stress with carries away a delay to propagation of the crack. This phenomenons seems ductile and leads to non linear elastic behaviour near the crack tip. We have also shown that the addition of alkali in the amorphous silica changes the structure by creation of nano-porosities and leads to enhance the ductility during the crack propagation. (author)

  2. Fisher's Contributions to Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 9. Fisher's Contributions to Statistics. T Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 9 September 1997 pp 32-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/09/0032-0037. Author Affiliations.

  3. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 12. Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar. General Article Volume 11 Issue 12 December 2006 pp 10-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/12/0010-0020. Keywords.

  4. The contribution of epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P. van den; Voorrips, L.; Hertz-Picciotto, I.; Shuker, D.; Boeing, H.; Speijers, G.; Guittard, C.; Kleiner, J.; Knowles, M.; Wolk, A.; Goldbohm, A.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies directly contribute data on risk (or benefit) in humans as the investigated species, and in the full food intake range normally encountered by humans. This paper starts with introducing the epidemiologic approach, followed by a discussion of perceived differences between

  5. Mechanics without mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Joshua

    2018-05-01

    At the time of Heinrich Hertz's premature death in 1894, he was regarded as one of the leading scientists of his generation. However, the posthumous publication of his treatise in the foundations of physics, Principles of Mechanics, presents a curious historical situation. Although Hertz's book was widely praised and admired, it was also met with a general sense of dissatisfaction. Almost all of Hertz's contemporaries criticized Principles for the lack of any plausible way to construct a mechanism from the "hidden masses" that are particularly characteristic of Hertz's framework. This issue seemed especially glaring given the expectation that Hertz's work might lead to a model of the underlying workings of the ether. In this paper I seek an explanation for why Hertz seemed so unperturbed by the difficulties of constructing such a mechanism. In arriving at this explanation, I explore how the development of Hertz's image-theory of representation framed the project of Principles. The image-theory brings with it an austere view of the "essential content" of mechanics, only requiring a kind of structural isomorphism between symbolic representations and target phenomena. I argue that bringing this into view makes clear why Hertz felt no need to work out the kinds of mechanisms that many of his readers looked for. Furthermore, I argue that a crucial role of Hertz's hypothesis of hidden masses has been widely overlooked. Far from acting as a proposal for the underlying structure of the ether, I show that Hertz's hypothesis ruled out knowledge of such underlying structure.

  6. Bacterial Cell Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, George K; Weibel, Douglas B

    2017-07-25

    Cellular mechanical properties play an integral role in bacterial survival and adaptation. Historically, the bacterial cell wall and, in particular, the layer of polymeric material called the peptidoglycan were the elements to which cell mechanics could be primarily attributed. Disrupting the biochemical machinery that assembles the peptidoglycan (e.g., using the β-lactam family of antibiotics) alters the structure of this material, leads to mechanical defects, and results in cell lysis. Decades after the discovery of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes, the mechanisms that underlie their positioning and regulation are still not entirely understood. In addition, recent evidence suggests a diverse group of other biochemical elements influence bacterial cell mechanics, may be regulated by new cellular mechanisms, and may be triggered in different environmental contexts to enable cell adaptation and survival. This review summarizes the contributions that different biomolecular components of the cell wall (e.g., lipopolysaccharides, wall and lipoteichoic acids, lipid bilayers, peptidoglycan, and proteins) make to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell mechanics. We discuss the contribution of individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in cell mechanics and the tools that make it possible to quantitatively decipher the biochemical machinery that contributes to bacterial cell mechanics. Advances in this area may provide insight into new biology and influence the development of antibacterial chemotherapies.

  7. Contributions to statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, P C

    1965-01-01

    Contributions to Statistics focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in statistics. The book is presented to Professor P. C. Mahalanobis on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The selection first offers information on the recovery of ancillary information and combinatorial properties of partially balanced designs and association schemes. Discussions focus on combinatorial applications of the algebra of association matrices, sample size analogy, association matrices and the algebra of association schemes, and conceptual statistical experiments. The book then examines latt

  8. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  9. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  10. Deciphering complement mechanisms: The contributions of structural biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arlaud, G.J.; Barlow, P.N.; Gaboriaud, C.; Gros, P.; Narayana, S.V.L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the resolution of the first three-dimensional structure of a complement component in 1980, considerable efforts have been put into the investigation of this system through structural biology techniques, resulting in about a hundred structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank by the beginning

  11. Erwin Schroedinger: Collected papers V. 1. Contributions to statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroedinger, E.

    1984-01-01

    38 publications reprinted in this volume show that the interest for statistical problems accompanied Schroedinger during his entire scientific career. Already in his second paper he worked on the magnetism of solid states. The classical considerations come close to the heart of diamagnetism and also to the origin of paramagnetism. In classical investigations of the specific heat Schroedinger helped through abstract theory but also by analysing a gigantic amount of experimental material. In 1926 he and F. Kohlrausch actually played the 'Urngame of Ehrenfest' as a model of the H-curve and published the results. Inclination towards experimenting, sequences of measurements and statistical evaluation of experimental data led to papers on the foundation of the theory of probability, where he tries to put the subjective probability concept on into a systematic framework. Two earlier papers on dynamics of the elastic chain remained particularly valuable. By solving the initial value problem with Bessel-functions this many-body-problem is led to an explicit discussion. These studies are likely to be the roots of another keynote in Schroedinger's thinking, namely, the irreversibility. 1945 a statistical theory of chain-reactions was published under the inconspicuous title of 'Probability Problems in Nuclear Chemistry'. In his last work Schroedinger turns off in a wrong direction: it is that energy should only be a statistical concept and should not be conserved in elementary processes, but somehow only in the mean. These short remarks only illuminate the diversity of the material in this volume, but testify Schroedinger's deep understanding in this field. (W.K.)

  12. Jesuits' Contribution to Meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udías, Agustín

    1996-10-01

    Starting in the middle of the nineteenth century, as part of their scientific tradition, Jesuits founded a considerable number of meteorological observatories throughout the world. In many countries, Jesuits established and maintained the first meteorological stations during the period from 1860 to 1950. The Jesuits' most important contribution to atmospheric science was their pioneer work related to the study and forecast of tropical hurricanes. That research was carried out at observatories of Belén (Cuba), Manila (Philippines), and Zikawei (China). B. Viñes, M. Decheyrens, J. Aigué, and C.E. Deppermann stood out in this movement.

  13. Examining suicide: imaging's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    For many people, the death of hope leads inexorably to the conclusion that the only viable solution, the only way to put an end to unendurable pain, is suicide. What leads a person to commit this final, desperate act, and how might we predict, intervene, and prevent suicide? Health care workers, including radiologic technologists, can play an important role in detecting warning signs in patients and in better understanding what factors may lead to suicide. Although certain forms of suicide such as suicide bombings and assisted suicide are beyond its scope, this article explores medical imaging's contributions to the study of this phenomenon.

  14. Contributions to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbeck, O.W.; Matucha, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The ten papers presented at a festive colloquium held on November 14, 1988 in Frankfurt to honour Prof. Peter Wincierz deal with the texture and mechanical anisotropy of zirconium alloys (by E. Tenckhoff), materials for cladding tubes (H. Boehm), aluminium materials achieved by near technology (W. Bunk), dispersion-strengthened materials (H. Fischmeister), materials for plain bearings (K.H. Matucha), and the archeometallurgy of copper (H.-G. Bachmann). (MM) [de

  15. Radioinduced intestinal fibrosis: from molecular mechanisms to therapy applications. Contribution of the TGF--{beta}1, of the CTGF and of the transduction pathway of the Rho/ROCK signal; La fibrose intestinale radio-induite: des mecanismes moleculaires aux applications therapeutiques. Roles du TGF-{beta}1, du CTGF et de la voie de transduction du signal Rho/ROCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydont, V

    2006-12-15

    Delayed radiation enteritis is an intestinal fibrosis induced by accidental or therapeutic radiation for pelvic and abdominal cancer treatments. Studies of molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of fibrosis have showed the respective contribution of CTGF, low TGF-{beta}1 concentrations and Rho/ROCK pathway. Thus, based on the relationship between CTGF, TGF-{beta}1 and Rho pathway, 2 therapeutics strategies have been develop. First, a pravastatin curative gift leads to a fibro-lysis involving an inhibition of Rho and in cascade a reduction of CTGF expression and extracellular matrix deposition. The data suggest that reversal of established radiation fibrosis in the gut is possible. Second, a pravastatin prophylactic gift prevents the installation of a chronic fibrosis but does not protect the tumor. On the base of these results, the radiation therapy department of the Institut Gustave Roussy will soon initiate 2 clinical trials. (author)

  16. Defined contribution health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    2001-03-01

    This Issue Brief discusses the emerging issue of "defined contribution" (DC) health benefits. The term "defined contribution" is used to describe a wide variety of approaches to the provision of health benefits, all of which have in common a shift in the responsibility for payment and selection of health care services from employers to employees. DC health benefits often are mentioned in the context of enabling employers to control their outlay for health benefits by avoiding increases in health care costs. DC health benefits may also shift responsibility for choosing a health plan and the associated risks of choosing a plan from employers to employees. There are three primary reasons why some employers currently are considering some sort of DC approach. First, they are once again looking for ways to keep their health care cost increases in line with overall inflation. Second, some employers are concerned that the public "backlash" against managed care will result in new legislation, regulations, and litigation that will further increase their health care costs if they do not distance themselves from health care decisions. Third, employers have modified not only most employee benefit plans, but labor market practices in general, by giving workers more choice, control, and flexibility. DC-type health benefits have existed as cafeteria plans since the 1980s. A cafeteria plan gives each employee the opportunity to determine the allocation of his or her total compensation (within employer-defined limits) among various employee benefits (primarily retirement or health). Most types of DC health benefits currently being discussed could be provided within the existing employment-based health insurance system, with or without the use of cafeteria plans. They could also allow employees to purchase health insurance directly from insurers, or they could drive new technologies and new forms of risk pooling through which health care services are provided and financed. DC health

  17. Contributing to Functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the design of computer supported joint action spaces. It is argued against a view of functionality as residing in computer applications. In such a view the creation of functionality is equivalent to the creation of computer applications. Functionality, in the view...... advocated in this paper, emerges in the specific dynamic interplay of actors, objectives, structures, practices and means. In this view, functionality is the result of creating, harnessing and inhabiting computer supported joint action spaces. The successful creation and further development of a computer...... supported joint action space comprises a whole range of appropriate design contributions. The approach is illustrated by the example of the creation of the computer supported joint action space "exchange network of voluntary union educators". As part of the effort a group of participants created...

  18. Contributing from the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    empirical study, I focused on kindergarten children’s first-person perspectives on the electronic media technologies they deemed subjectively relevant for conducting everyday life in the practice of their kindergarten. The concept of the children’s perspectives opens possibilities for transcending...... of the practice researcher when engaging with her/his potential co-researchers and the investigated, socio-materially mediated practice. The paper will argue that making sense of first-person perspectives – here on conducting a life with media technologies – presupposes that the researcher conceptualizes him....../herself as a contributor to an investigated practice, as inextricably entangled with the conducts of life of the others in relation to the conditions in practice. Doing research in the kindergarten thus becomes a mutual and collective endeavor, to which pedagogues, parents, children, and the researcher contribute. Even...

  19. Puzzling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, M. Oskar

    2009-01-01

    The basis of a good mechanical puzzle is often a puzzling mechanism. This article will introduce some new puzzling mechanisms, like two knots that engage like gears, a chain whose links can be interchanged, and flat gears that do not come apart. It illustrates how puzzling mechanisms can be transformed into real mechanical puzzles, e.g., by…

  20. Contributions to quantum probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1: On the existence of quantum representations for two dichotomic measurements. Under which conditions do outcome probabilities of measurements possess a quantum-mechanical model? This kind of problem is solved here for the case of two dichotomic von Neumann measurements which can be applied repeatedly to a quantum system with trivial dynamics. The solution uses methods from the theory of operator algebras and the theory of moment problems. The ensuing conditions reveal surprisingly simple relations between certain quantum-mechanical probabilities. It also shown that generally, none of these relations holds in general probabilistic models. This result might facilitate further experimental discrimination between quantum mechanics and other general probabilistic theories. Chapter 2: Possibilistic Physics. I try to outline a framework for fundamental physics where the concept of probability gets replaced by the concept of possibility. Whereas a probabilistic theory assigns a state-dependent probability value to each outcome of each measurement, a possibilistic theory merely assigns one of the state-dependent labels ''possible to occur'' or ''impossible to occur'' to each outcome of each measurement. It is argued that Spekkens' combinatorial toy theory of quantum mechanics is inconsistent in a probabilistic framework, but can be regarded as possibilistic. Then, I introduce the concept of possibilistic local hidden variable models and derive a class of possibilistic Bell inequalities which are violated for the possibilistic Popescu-Rohrlich boxes. The chapter ends with a philosophical discussion on possibilistic vs. probabilistic. It can be argued that, due to better falsifiability properties, a possibilistic theory has higher predictive power than a probabilistic one. Chapter 3: The quantum region for von Neumann measurements with postselection. It is determined under which conditions a probability distribution on a finite set can occur as the outcome

  1. Contributions to quantum probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2010-06-25

    Chapter 1: On the existence of quantum representations for two dichotomic measurements. Under which conditions do outcome probabilities of measurements possess a quantum-mechanical model? This kind of problem is solved here for the case of two dichotomic von Neumann measurements which can be applied repeatedly to a quantum system with trivial dynamics. The solution uses methods from the theory of operator algebras and the theory of moment problems. The ensuing conditions reveal surprisingly simple relations between certain quantum-mechanical probabilities. It also shown that generally, none of these relations holds in general probabilistic models. This result might facilitate further experimental discrimination between quantum mechanics and other general probabilistic theories. Chapter 2: Possibilistic Physics. I try to outline a framework for fundamental physics where the concept of probability gets replaced by the concept of possibility. Whereas a probabilistic theory assigns a state-dependent probability value to each outcome of each measurement, a possibilistic theory merely assigns one of the state-dependent labels ''possible to occur'' or ''impossible to occur'' to each outcome of each measurement. It is argued that Spekkens' combinatorial toy theory of quantum mechanics is inconsistent in a probabilistic framework, but can be regarded as possibilistic. Then, I introduce the concept of possibilistic local hidden variable models and derive a class of possibilistic Bell inequalities which are violated for the possibilistic Popescu-Rohrlich boxes. The chapter ends with a philosophical discussion on possibilistic vs. probabilistic. It can be argued that, due to better falsifiability properties, a possibilistic theory has higher predictive power than a probabilistic one. Chapter 3: The quantum region for von Neumann measurements with postselection. It is determined under which conditions a probability distribution on a

  2. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  3. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  4. Contribution to postnonclassical psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any psychological paradigm needs a psychopathological system that helps professionals to describe and explain the behavioral expressions that deviate from “normal” (whether this term is used with the semantic property of statistical or ideal adaptations. In this work, I seek to present the system that I have been developing since 1998 among the psychologists at the Instituto Vegotsky de Lisboa (Vygotsky Institute of Lisbon, Portugal, to understand psychopathology with regard to the vygotskian approach. It was conceived and designed according to the work of Rita Mendes Leal and her contribution to socioemotional development theory, AR Luria’s systemic and dynamic theory of the human brain, the theory of Activity (dyatel’nost of AN Leont’ev, and the psychopathological German school of E Kraepelin, presented and disseminated in Portugal in the early twentieth century by Professor Sobral Cid. It is intended to be a proposal to colleagues who are interested in postnonclassical psychology and a request for arguments.

  5. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  6. Loss-of-function mutation in RUSC2 causes intellectual disability and secondary microcephaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alwadei, A.H.; Benini, R.; Mahmoud, A.; Alasmari, A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Alfadhel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited aberrancies in intracellular vesicular transport are associated with a variety of neurological and non-neurological diseases. RUSC2 is a gene found on chromosome 9p13.3 that codes for iporin, a ubiquitous protein with high expression in the brain that interacts with Rab proteins (GTPases

  7. Loss-of-function mutation in RUSC2 causes intellectual disability and secondary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadei, Ali H; Benini, Ruba; Mahmoud, Adel; Alasmari, Ali; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Alfadhel, Majid

    2016-12-01

    Inherited aberrancies in intracellular vesicular transport are associated with a variety of neurological and non-neurological diseases. RUSC2 is a gene found on chromosome 9p13.3 that codes for iporin, a ubiquitous protein with high expression in the brain that interacts with Rab proteins (GTPases implicated in intracellular protein trafficking). Although mutations in Rab proteins have been described as causing brain abnormalities and intellectual disability, until now no disease-causing mutations in RUSC2 have ever been reported in humans. We describe, to our knowledge for the first time, three patients with inherited homozygous nonsense mutations identified in RUSC2 on whole-exome sequencing. All three patients had central hypotonia, microcephaly, and moderate to severe intellectual disability. Two patients had additional features of early-onset epilepsy and absence of the splenium. This report adds to the ever-expanding landscape of genetic causes of intellectual disability and increases our understanding of the cellular processes underlying this important neurological entity. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  8. Loss of function NFKB1 variants are the most common monogenic cause of CVID in Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijnenburg, Paul; Lango Allen, Hana; Burns, Siobhan O.; Greene, Daniel; Jansen, Machiel H.; Staples, Emily; Stephens, Jonathan; Carss, Keren J.; Biasci, Daniele; Baxendale, Helen; Thomas, Moira; Chandra, Anita; Kiani-Alikhan, Sorena; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Seneviratne, Suranjith L.; Oksenhendler, Eric; Simeoni, Ilenia; de Bree, Godelieve J.; Tool, Anton T. J.; van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Ebberink, Eduard H. T. M.; Meijer, Alexander B.; Tuna, Salih; Whitehorn, Deborah; Brown, Matthew; Turro, Ernest; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Thaventhiran, James E.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2018-01-01

    The genetic etiology of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) carries prognostic information. We conducted a whole-genome sequencing study assessing a large proportion of the NIHR-BioResource - Rare Disease cohort. In the predominantly European study population of principally sporadic unrelated PID

  9. Endogenous network states predict gain or loss of functions for genetic mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaowei; Su, Hang; Yu, Helin; Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Cancers have been typically characterized by genetic mutations. Patterns of such mutations have traditionally been analysed by posteriori statistical association approaches. One may ponder the possibility of a priori determination of any mutation regularity. Here by exploring biological processes implied in a mechanistic theory recently developed (the endogenous molecular-cellular network theory), we found that the features of genetic mutations in cancers may be predicted without any prior knowledge of mutation propensities. With hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as an example, we found that the normal hepatocyte and cancerous hepatocyte can be represented by robust stable states of one single endogenous network. These stable states, specified by distinct patterns of expressions or activities of proteins in the network, provide means to directly identify a set of most probable genetic mutations and their effects in HCC. As the key proteins and main interactions in the network are conserved through cell types in an organism, similar mutational features may also be found in other cancers. This analysis yielded straightforward and testable predictions on accumulated and preferred mutation spectra in normal tissue. The validation of predicted cancer state mutation patterns demonstrates the usefulness and potential of a causal dynamical framework to understand and predict genetic mutations in cancer. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Molecular characterization of the llama FGF5 gene and identification of putative loss of function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverio, M S; Vidal-Rioja, L; Frank, E N; Di Rocco, F

    2017-12-01

    Llama, the most numerous domestic camelid in Argentina, has good fiber-production ability. Although a few genes related to other productive traits have been characterized, the molecular genetic basis of fiber growth control in camelids is still poorly understood. Fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) is a secreted signaling protein that controls hair growth in humans and other mammals. Mutations in the FGF5 gene have been associated with long-hair phenotypes in several species. Here, we sequenced the llama FGF5 gene, which consists of three exons encoding 813 bp. cDNA analysis from hair follicles revealed the expression of two FGF5 alternative spliced transcripts, in one of which exon 2 is absent. DNA variation analysis showed four polymorphisms in the coding region: a synonymous SNP (c.210A>G), a single base deletion (c.348delA), a 12-bp insertion (c.351_352insCATATAACATAG) and a non-sense mutation (c.499C>T). The deletion was always found together with the insertion forming a haplotype and producing a putative truncated protein of 123 amino acids. The c.499C>T mutation also leads to a premature stop codon at position 168. In both cases, critical functional domains of FGF5, including one heparin binding site, are lost. All animals analyzed were homozygous for one of the deleterious mutations or compound heterozygous for both (i.e. c.348delA, c.351_352insCATATAACATAG/c.499T). Sequencing of guanaco samples showed that the FGF5 gene encodes a full-length 270-amino acid protein. These results suggest that FGF5 is likely functional in short-haired wild species and non-functional in the domestic fiber-producing species, the llama. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  11. Arts syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in PRPS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brouwer, Arjan P. M.; Williams, Kelly L.; Duley, John A.; van Kuilenburg, Andre B. P.; Nabuurs, Sander B.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zoetekouw, Lida; Banning, Martijn J. G.; Roeffen, Melissa; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Weaving, Linda; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Donald, Jennifer A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Christodoulou, John; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Arts syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, early-onset hypotonia, ataxia, delayed motor development, hearing impairment, and optic atrophy. Linkage analysis in a Dutch family and an Australian family suggested that the candidate gene maps to Xq22.1-q24.

  12. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  13. A role for BELLRINGER in cell wall development is supported by loss-of-function phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain transcription factors play critical roles in metazoan development. BELLRINGER (BLR, one such transcription factor, is involved in diverse developmental processes in Arabidopsis, acting in vascular differentiation, phyllotaxy, flower and fruit development. BLR also has a redundant role in meristem maintenance. Cell wall remodelling underpins many of these processes, and BLR has recently been shown to regulate expression of PECTIN METHYL-ESTERASE 5 (PME5, a cell wall modifying enzyme in control of phyllotaxy. We have further explored the role of BLR in plant development by analysing phenotypes and gene expression in a series of plants over-expressing BLR, and generating combinatorial mutants with blr, brevipedicellus (bp, a member of the KNOX1 family of transcription factors that has previously been shown to interact with blr, and the homeodomain transcription factor revoluta (rev, required for radial patterning of the stem. Results Plants over-expressing BLR exhibited a wide range of phenotypes. Some were defective in cell size and demonstrated misregulation of genes predominantly affecting cell wall development. Other lines with more extreme phenotypes failed to generate lateral organs, consistent with BLR repressing transcription in the shoot apex. Cell wall dynamics are also affected in blr mutant plants, and BLR has previously been shown to regulate vascular development in conjunction with BP. We found that when bp and blr were combined with rev, a set of defects was observed that were distinct from those of bp blr lines. In these triple mutants xylem development was most strikingly affected, resulting in an almost complete lack of vessels and xylem parenchyma with secondary thickening. Conclusions Our data support a role for BLR in ordering the shoot apex and, in conjunction with BP and REV, playing a part in determining the composition and organisation of the vascular system. Microarray analysis strongly indicates that the striking vascular phenotypes of blr bp rev triple mutants and plants over-expressing BLR result from the misregulation of a suite of genes, targets of BLR in wild type plants, that determine cell size and structure in the developing vasculature.

  14. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A.; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E.; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(−/−) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5G...

  15. Identification and validation of loss of function variants in clinical contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lescai, Francesco; Marasco, Elena; Bacchelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate variant calling pipeline for exome sequencing data is becoming increasingly more important in translational medicine projects and clinical contexts. Within GOSgene, which facilitates genetic analysis as part of a joint effort of the University College London and the G...

  16. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Elaine T.; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S.; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M.; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B.; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Daly, Mark J.; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent

  17. The hands in health and disease of individuals with filaggrin loss-of-function mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jeanette; Menné, Torkil; Carlsen, Berit C

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 years, we have performed filaggrin genotyping in patients with eczema seen in our hand eczema clinic. We present pictures of healthy and diseased hands from individuals with filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations to describe a clinical entity of hand eczema. We show that xerosis...... and hyperkeratosis on the dorsal aspects of the hands and fingers, as well as palmar hyperlinearity, should alert the clinician about a possible inherited barrier abnormality of the skin resulting from FLG mutations. The series of photographs range from the hands of an individual with FLG mutations but no history...... of eczema, to the hands of individuals with typical and atypical filaggrin hand eczema, and finally to the hands of an individual with FLG mutations and hand eczema caused by exposure to irritants and allergens. We briefly discuss this possible subtype of hand eczema, present pathomechanisms, and indicate...

  18. Characterizations of a loss-of-function mutation in the Kir3.4 channel subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Ravn, Lasse Steen; Schmitt, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    and two-electrode voltage-clamp revealed that Kir3.4-G247R basal current was reduced compared to wild-type Kir3.4 and co-expression with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 2 showed that also the acetylcholine induced current was severely reduced in Kir3.4-G247R, indicating that the mutation...... the lack of clear clinical manifestations and further studies are necessary to elucidate if mutations in Kir3.4 are predisposing AF. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-28...

  19. Progressive Loss of Function in a Limb Enhancer during Snake Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvon, Evgeny Z.; Kamneva, Olga K.; Melo, Uirá S.; Barozzi, Iros; Osterwalder, Marco; Mannion, Brandon J.; Tissières, Virginie; Pickle, Catherine S.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Lee, Elizabeth A.; Kato, Momoe; Garvin, Tyler H.; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Afzal, Veena; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Rubin, Edward M.; Dickel, Diane E.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Visel, Axel

    2016-10-20

    The evolution of body shape is thought to be tightly coupled to changes in regulatory sequences, but specific molecular events associated with major morphological transitions in vertebrates have remained elusive. In this paper, we identified snake-specific sequence changes within an otherwise highly conserved long-range limb enhancer of Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Transgenic mouse reporter assays revealed that the in vivo activity pattern of the enhancer is conserved across a wide range of vertebrates, including fish, but not in snakes. Genomic substitution of the mouse enhancer with its human or fish ortholog results in normal limb development. In contrast, replacement with snake orthologs caused severe limb reduction. Synthetic restoration of a single transcription factor binding site lost in the snake lineage reinstated full in vivo function to the snake enhancer. Our results demonstrate changes in a regulatory sequence associated with a major body plan transition and highlight the role of enhancers in morphological evolution.

  20. Effect of eda loss of function on upper jugal tooth morphology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charles, C.; Pantalacci, S.; Peterková, Renata; Tafforeau, P.; Laudet, V.; Viriot, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 2 (2009), s. 299-308 ISSN 1932-8486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/05/2665; GA MŠk OC B23.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : dentition * jugal teeth * morphology Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2009

  1. Long-term social dynamics drive loss of function in pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum Andersen, Sandra; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that social interactions between bacterial cells can drive evolutionary change at the population level, but significant challenges limit attempts to assess the relevance of these findings to natural populations, where selection pressures are unknown. We have increasingly...... sophisticated methods for monitoring phenotypic and genotypic dynamics in bacteria causing infectious disease, but in contrast, we lack evidence-based adaptive explanations for those changes. Evolutionary change during infection is often interpreted as host adaptation, but this assumption neglects to consider...... social dynamics shown to drive evolutionary change in vitro. We provide evidence to show that long-term behavioral dynamics observed in a pathogen are driven by selection to outcompete neighboring conspecific cells through social interactions. We find that Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, causing lung...

  2. Culture adaptation of malaria parasites selects for convergent loss-of-function mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Antoine; Affara, Muna; Assefa, Samuel A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Conway, David J

    2017-01-24

    Cultured human pathogens may differ significantly from source populations. To investigate the genetic basis of laboratory adaptation in malaria parasites, clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates were sampled from patients and cultured in vitro for up to three months. Genome sequence analysis was performed on multiple culture time point samples from six monoclonal isolates, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants emerging over time were detected. Out of a total of five positively selected SNPs, four represented nonsense mutations resulting in stop codons, three of these in a single ApiAP2 transcription factor gene, and one in SRPK1. To survey further for nonsense mutants associated with culture, genome sequences of eleven long-term laboratory-adapted parasite strains were examined, revealing four independently acquired nonsense mutations in two other ApiAP2 genes, and five in Epac. No mutants of these genes exist in a large database of parasite sequences from uncultured clinical samples. This implicates putative master regulator genes in which multiple independent stop codon mutations have convergently led to culture adaptation, affecting most laboratory lines of P. falciparum. Understanding the adaptive processes should guide development of experimental models, which could include targeted gene disruption to adapt fastidious malaria parasite species to culture.

  3. Comparing the loss of functional independence of older adults in the U.S. and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Joelle H; Feng, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Functional loss among older adults is known to follow a hierarchical sequence, but little is known about whether such sequences differ across socio-cultural contexts. The aim of this study is to construct activities of daily livings (ADL) scales for oldest-old adults in the United States and China so as to compare their functional loss sequences. We use data from the Asset and Health Dynamics of the Oldest Old (n=1607) and Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (n=5570) for years 1998-2008. ADL items are calibrated within a scale using the Rasch measurement model. Rasch scores are averaged across survey waves to identify the ADL loss sequence for each study population. We also assess scale stability over measurement periods. Factor analyses confirm that the ADL items in each study population can be combined meaningfully to form a hierarchical sequence. Internal consistency assessed by Cronbach's alpha is high (0.81 to 0.95). We find that bathing is the first activity that both older Americans and Chinese have difficulty with, while eating is the last activity. There are, however, differences in the rank order for toileting (ranked more challenging in the Chinese sample) and dressing (ranked more challenging in the U.S. sample). Item orderings are stable over time. The results highlight the relative importance of bathing in the functional loss sequence for older adults, regardless of socio-cultural context. Health interventions are needed to address deficits in the bathroom environment, especially in developing countries like China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M

    2016-01-01

    nuclear receptor (RORβ), in four affected family members. In addition, two de novo variants (c.218T>C/p.(Leu73Pro); c.1249_1251delACG/p.(Thr417del)) were identified in sporadic patients by trio-based exome sequencing. We also found two de novo deletions in patients with behavioral and cognitive impairment...... in various types of epilepsies in the past few years. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family with GGE consistent with the diagnosis of eyelid myoclonia with absences. We found a nonsense variant (c.196C>T/p.(Arg66*)) in RORB, which encodes the beta retinoid-related orphan...

  5. Loss-of-function variants in ADCY3 increase risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Moltke, Ida; Andersen, Mette K

    2018-01-01

    We have identified a variant in ADCY3 (encoding adenylate cyclase 3) associated with markedly increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the Greenlandic population. The variant disrupts a splice acceptor site, and carriers have decreased ADCY3 RNA expression. Additionally, we observe...

  6. Enu mutagenesis identifies a novel platelet phenotype in a loss-of-function Jak2 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Anderson

    Full Text Available Utilizing ENU mutagenesis, we identified a mutant mouse with elevated platelets. Genetic mapping localized the mutation to an interval on chromosome 19 that encodes the Jak2 tyrosine kinase. We identified a A3056T mutation resulting in a premature stop codon within exon 19 of Jak2 (Jak2(K915X, resulting in a protein truncation and functionally inactive enzyme. This novel platelet phenotype was also observed in mice bearing a hemizygous targeted disruption of the Jak2 locus (Jak2(+/-. Timed pregnancy experiments revealed that Jak2(K915X/K915X and Jak2(-/- displayed embryonic lethality; however, Jak2(K915X/K915X embryos were viable an additional two days compared to Jak2(-/- embryos. Our data suggest that perturbing JAK2 activation may have unexpected consequences in elevation of platelet number and correspondingly, important implications for treatment of hematological disorders with constitutive Jak2 activity.

  7. Natriuretic peptides in developing medaka embryos: implications in cardiac development by loss-of-function studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Okubo, Kataaki; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial NP (ANP) and B-type NP (BNP), and their receptor, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-A have attracted attention of many basic and clinical researchers because of their potent renal and cardiovascular actions. In this study, we used medaka, Oryzias latipes, as a model species to pursue the physiological functions of NPs because it is a suitable model for developmental analyses. Medaka has two ligands, BNP and C-type NP3 (CNP3) (but not ANP), that have greater affinity for the two O. latipes GC-A receptors (OLGC), OLGC7 and OLGC2, respectively. CNP3 is the ancestral molecule of cardiac NPs. Initially, we examined developmental expression of cardiac NP/receptor combinations, BNP/OLGC7 and CNP3/OLGC2, using quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. BNP and CNP3 mRNA increased at stages 25 (onset of ventricular formation) and 22 (appearance of heart anlage), respectively, whereas both receptor mRNAs increased at as early as stage 12. BNP/OLGC7 transcripts were found in arterial/ventricular tissues and CNP3/OLGC2 transcripts in venous/atrial tissues by in situ hybridization. Thus, BNP and CNP3 can act locally on cardiac myocytes in a paracrine/autocrine fashion. Double knockdown of BNP/OLGC7 genes impaired ventricular development by causing hypoplasia of ventricular myocytes as evidenced by reduced bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. CNP3 knockdown induced hypertrophy of atria and activated the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, it appears that BNP is important for normal ventricular, whereas CNP3 is important for normal atrial development and performance, a role usually taken by ANP in other vertebrates. The current study provides new insights into the role of cardiac NPs in cardiac development in vertebrates.

  8. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  9. A hotspot in the glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding domain susceptible to loss of function mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuelos, Jesus; Shin, Soon Cheon; Lu, Nick Z.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to treat a variety of inflammatory disorders and certain cancers. However, GC resistance occurs in subsets of patients. We found that EL4 cells, a GC-resistant mouse thymoma cell line, harbored a point mutation in their GC receptor (GR) gene, resulting in the substitution of arginine 493 by a cysteine in the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Allelic discrimination analyses revealed that the R493C mutation occurred on both alleles. In the absence of GCs, the GR in EL4 cells localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and upon dexamethasone treatment underwent nuclear translocation, suggesting the ligand binding ability of the GR in EL4 cells was intact. In transient transfection assays, the R493C mutant could not transactivate the MMTV-luciferase reporter. Site-directed mutagenesis to revert the R493C mutation restored the transactivation activity. Cotransfection experiments showed that the R493C mutant did not inhibit the transcriptional activities of the wild-type GR. In addition, the R493C mutant did not repress either the AP-1 or NF-κB reporters as effectively as WT GR. Furthermore, stable expression of the WT GR in the EL4 cells enabled GC-mediated gene regulation, specifically upregulation of IκBα and downregulation of interferon γ and interleukin 17A. Arginine 493 is conserved among multiple species and all human nuclear receptors and its mutation has also been found in the human GR, androgen receptor, and mineralocorticoid receptor. Thus, R493 is necessary for the transcriptional activity of the GR and a hotspot for mutations that result in GC resistance. PMID:25676786

  10. MicroRNA-27a Is Induced by Leucine and Contributes to Leucine-Induced Proliferation Promotion in C2C12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangmang Liu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leucine, a branched chain amino acid, is well known to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. However, the role of leucine in myoblast proliferation remains unclear. In this study, we found that leucine could promote proliferation of C2C12 cells. Moreover, expressions of miR-27a and myostatin (a bona fide target of miR-27a were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, following leucine treatment. We also found that miR-27a loss-of-function by transfection of a miR-27a inhibitor suppressed the promotion of myoblast proliferation caused by leucine. Our results suggest that miR-27a is induced by leucine and contributes to leucine-induced proliferation promotion of myoblast.

  11. CONTRIBUTION OF INDIRECT TAXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIRCULESCU MARIA FELICIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The work is based on the fact that at any time and in any society, taxation is regarded as undesirable for all taxpayers. The existence and it's manifestation is justified, because the operation of any company involves costs that must be covered by sufficient resources. Since ancient times, each state has adopted its own tax system, more or less perfected, as the state has experienced a greater or lesser economic and military power At the base of this work stays the fact that tax systems are a key factor influencing the overall efficiency of the economy. They determine the size tendency to save, invest and work, influencing the increase in production and employment, which is essential sights integral economic strategy, making tax reform an important component of economic reform. This paper aims to analyze the indirect taxes and their contribution to the public revenues in Romania, the purpose paper contains an analysis based on statistical series as indirect taxation is where tax harmonization was possible. Through analyzes, the paper aims to provide answers to the problem of the contradiction between the growing need for budgetary revenues, which entails a continuous amplification and diversification of taxation, on the one hand, and the need to stimulate economic development, on the other hand. The harmonization of indirect taxation had been achieved since this touches the free movement of goods and the freedom to supply services, not being able to say the same thing about direct taxation, which is why the European Community Treaty does not specify expressly the alignment of direct taxation, considering that direct taxation is a matter of Internal Policies that, for a country free option.

  12. Reappraising entrapment neuropathies--mechanisms, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Annina B; Nee, Robert J; Coppieters, Michel W

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies can be difficult because symptoms and signs often do not follow textbook descriptions and vary significantly between patients with the same diagnosis. Signs and symptoms which spread outside of the innervation territory of the affected nerve or nerve root are common. This Masterclass provides insight into relevant mechanisms that may account for this extraterritorial spread in patients with entrapment neuropathies, with an emphasis on neuroinflammation at the level of the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, as well as changes in subcortical and cortical regions. Furthermore, we describe how clinical tests and technical investigations may identify these mechanisms if interpreted in the context of gain or loss of function. The management of neuropathies also remains challenging. Common treatment strategies such as joint mobilisation, neurodynamic exercises, education, and medications are discussed in terms of their potential to influence certain mechanisms at the site of nerve injury or in the central nervous system. The mechanism-oriented approach for this Masterclass seems warranted given the limitations in the current evidence for the diagnosis and management of entrapment neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  14. Regulatory mechanisms of anthrax toxin receptor 1-dependent vascular and connective tissue homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besschetnova, Tatiana Y; Ichimura, Takaharu; Katebi, Negin; St Croix, Brad; Bonventre, Joseph V; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis is linked to fibrotic processes in fibroproliferative diseases, but insights into pathophysiological processes are limited, due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling endothelial and fibroblastic homeostasis. We demonstrate here that the matrix receptor anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1), also known as tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8), is an essential component of these mechanisms. Loss of TEM8 function in mice causes reduced synthesis of endothelial basement membrane components and hyperproliferative and leaky blood vessels in skin. In addition, endothelial cell alterations in mutants are almost identical to those of endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma lesions, including activated VEGF receptor signaling in endothelial cells, increased expression of the downstream targets VEGF and CXCL12, and increased numbers of macrophages and mast cells. In contrast, loss of TEM8 in fibroblasts leads to increased rates of synthesis of fiber-forming collagens, resulting in progressive fibrosis in skin and other organs. Compromised interactions between TEM8-deficient endothelial and fibroblastic cells cause dramatic reduction in the activity of the matrix-degrading enzyme MMP2. In addition to insights into mechanisms of connective tissue homeostasis, our data provide molecular explanations for vascular and connective tissue abnormalities in GAPO syndrome, caused by loss-of-function mutations in ANTXR1. Furthermore, the loss of MMP2 activity suggests that fibrotic skin abnormalities in GAPO syndrome are, in part, the consequence of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying syndromes (NAO, Torg and Winchester) with multicentric skin nodulosis and osteolysis caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in MMP2. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, A J M

    2004-01-01

    The mechanics of fluids and the mechanics of solids represent the two major areas of physics and applied mathematics that meet in continuum mechanics, a field that forms the foundation of civil and mechanical engineering. This unified approach to the teaching of fluid and solid mechanics focuses on the general mechanical principles that apply to all materials. Students who have familiarized themselves with the basic principles can go on to specialize in any of the different branches of continuum mechanics. This text opens with introductory chapters on matrix algebra, vectors and Cartesian ten

  16. dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of the Drosophila Imd pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aparicio

    Full Text Available The Drosophila humoral innate immune response fights infection by producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs through the microbe-specific activation of the Toll or the Imd signaling pathway. Upon systemic infection, the production of AMPs is both positively and negatively regulated to reach a balanced immune response required for survival. Here, we report the function of the dRYBP (drosophila Ring and YY1 Binding Protein protein, which contains a ubiquitin-binding domain, in the Imd pathway. We have found that dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of AMP production: upon systemic infection with Gram-negative bacteria, Diptericin expression is up-regulated in the absence of dRYBP and down-regulated in the presence of high levels of dRYBP. Epistatic analyses using gain and loss of function alleles of imd, Relish, or skpA and dRYBP suggest that dRYBP functions upstream or together with SKPA, a member of the SCF-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex, to repress the Imd signaling cascade. We propose that the role of dRYBP in the regulation of the Imd signaling pathway is to function as a ubiquitin adaptor protein together with SKPA to promote SCF-dependent proteasomal degradation of Relish. Beyond the identification of dRYBP as a novel component of Imd pathway regulation, our results also suggest that the evolutionarily conserved RYBP protein may be involved in the human innate immune response.

  17. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  18. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  19. Introducing and modeling inefficiency contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Kronborg, Dorte; Matthews, Kent

    2016-01-01

    -called inefficiency contributions, which are defined as the relative contributions from specific variables to the overall levels of inefficiencies. A statistical model for distinguishing the inefficiency contributions between subgroups is proposed and the method is illustrated on a data set on Chinese banks....

  20. Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventilation is a life support treatment. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that helps people breathe when ... to breathe enough on their own. The mechanical ventilator is also called a ventilator , respirator, or breathing ...

  1. Sarco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA contribute to GPCR-mediated taste perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Iguchi

    Full Text Available The sense of taste is important for providing animals with valuable information about the qualities of food, such as nutritional or harmful nature. Mammals, including humans, can recognize at least five primary taste qualities: sweet, umami (savory, bitter, sour, and salty. Recent studies have identified molecules and mechanisms underlying the initial steps of tastant-triggered molecular events in taste bud cells, particularly the requirement of increased cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](c for normal taste signal transduction and transmission. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms controlling the removal of elevated [Ca(2+](c from the cytosol of taste receptor cells (TRCs and how the disruption of these mechanisms affects taste perception. To investigate the molecular mechanism of Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs, we sought the molecules involved in [Ca(2+](c regulation using a single-taste-cell transcriptome approach. We found that Serca3, a member of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase (SERCA family that sequesters cytosolic Ca(2+ into endoplasmic reticulum, is exclusively expressed in sweet/umami/bitter TRCs, which rely on intracellular Ca(2+ release for signaling. Serca3-knockout (KO mice displayed significantly increased aversive behavioral responses and greater gustatory nerve responses to bitter taste substances but not to sweet or umami taste substances. Further studies showed that Serca2 was mainly expressed in the T1R3-expressing sweet and umami TRCs, suggesting that the loss of function of Serca3 was possibly compensated by Serca2 in these TRCs in the mutant mice. Our data demonstrate that the SERCA family members play an important role in the Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs and that mutation of these proteins may alter bitter and perhaps sweet and umami taste perception.

  2. Mechanical design

    CERN Document Server

    Risitano, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    METHODOLOGICAL STATEMENT OF ENGINEERING DESIGNApproaches to product design and developmentMechanical design and environmental requirementsPROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALSMaterials for mechanical designCharacterization of metalsStress conditionsFatigue of materialsOptimum material selection in mechanical designDESIGN OF MECHANICAL COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMSFailure theoriesHertz theoryLubrificationShafts and bearingsSplines and keysSpringsFlexible machine elementsSpur gearsPress and shrink fitsPressure tubesCouplingsClutchesBrakes

  3. NLC Mechanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    text only Mechanical Systems.gif (14697 bytes) NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC Permanent Magnets Organization Overview The Mechanical Systems Group Organization is shown on the NLC Project Group Organization Chart (Next Linear Collider Technical Web Page). The Mechanical Systems Group operates on a matrixed

  4. Mechanical Kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Jerry N.

    Mechanical kinesiology is defined as a study of the mechanical factors affecting human movement, i.e., applying the physical laws of mechanics to the study of human motor behavior. This textbook on the subject is divided into thirty lessons. Each lesson is organized into three parts: a part on the text proper; a part entitled "study…

  5. Mechanisms Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo

    2006-01-01

    Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design such mechan......Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design...... using criteria such as size, performance parameters, operation environment, etc. Content: Understanding Mechanisms Design (2 weeks) Definitions, mechanisms representations, kinematic diagrams, the four bar linkage, mobility, applications of mechanisms, types of mechanisms, special mechanisms, the design......: equations for various mechanisms. At the end of this module you will be able to analyze existing mechanisms and to describe their movement. Designing mechanisms (7 weeks) Type synthesis and dimensional synthesis, function generation, path generation, three precision points in multi-loop mechanisms...

  6. Discrete mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Caltagirone, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental principles of mechanics to re-establish the equations of Discrete Mechanics. It introduces physics and thermodynamics associated to the physical modeling.  The development and the complementarity of sciences lead to review today the old concepts that were the basis for the development of continuum mechanics. The differential geometry is used to review the conservation laws of mechanics. For instance, this formalism requires a different location of vector and scalar quantities in space. The equations of Discrete Mechanics form a system of equations where the H

  7. Discrete mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of time throughout all phases of mechanics: classical mechanics, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and relativistic quantum theory. As an example of the relativistic quantum field theory, the case of a massless scalar field interacting with an arbitrary external current is discussed. The comparison between the new discrete theory and the usual continuum formalism is presented. An example is given of a two-dimensional random lattice and its duel. The author notes that there is no evidence that the discrete mechanics is more appropriate than the usual continuum mechanics

  8. 75 FR 34388 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... contributions equal to 3 percent of the employee's basic pay will be deducted from his or her pay and... employees who are rehired after a separation in service of 31 or more calendar days and who are eligible to participate in the TSP will automatically have 3 percent of their basic pay contributed to the TSP, unless...

  9. Understanding the CDM's contribution to technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Malte; Holzer, Andreas; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2008-01-01

    Developing countries are increasingly contributing to global greenhouse gas emissions and, consequently, climate change as a result of their rapid economic growth. In order to reduce their impact, the private sector needs to be engaged in the transfer of low-carbon technology to those countries. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is currently the only market mechanism aimed at triggering changes in the pattern of emissions-intensive activities in developing countries and is likely to play a role in future negotiations. In this paper, we analyse how the CDM contributes to technology transfer. We first develop a framework from the literature that delineates the main factors which characterise technology transfer. Second, we apply this framework to the CDM by assessing existing empirical studies and drawing on additional expert interviews. We find that the CDM does contribute to technology transfer by lowering several technology-transfer barriers and by raising the transfer quality. On the basis of this analysis, we give preliminary policy recommendations

  10. Temporal contribution to gravitational WKB-like calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedova, Valeria; Pilling, Terry; Gill, Andrea de; Singleton, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the radiation arising from quantum fields placed in a gravitational background (e.g. Hawking radiation) can be derived using a quasi-classical calculation. Here we show that this method has a previously overlooked temporal contribution to the quasi-classical amplitude. The source of this temporal contribution lies in different character of time in general relativity versus quantum mechanics. Only when one takes into account this temporal contribution does one obtain the canonical temperature for the radiation. Although in this Letter the specific example of radiation in de Sitter space-time is used, the temporal contribution is a general contribution to the radiation given off by any gravitational background where the time coordinate changes its signature upon crossing a horizon. Thus, the quasi-classical method for gravitational backgrounds contains subtleties not found in the usual quantum mechanical tunneling problem

  11. Mechanical drawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ho Seon; Lee, Geun Hui

    2004-04-15

    This book deals with how to read and draw the mechanical drawing, which includes the basic of drawing like purpose, kinds, and criterion, projection, special projection drawing, omission of the figure, section, and types of section, dimensioning method, writing way of allowable limit size, tolerance of regular size, parts list and assembling drawing, fitting, mechanical elements like screw, key, pin, rivet, spring, bearing, pipe, valve, welding, geometric tolerance and mechanical materials.

  12. Classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to classical mechanics at a level intermediate between the typical undergraduate and advanced graduate level. This text describes the background and tools for use in the fields of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, particle physics, and relativity. Students who have had basic undergraduate classical mechanics or who have a good understanding of the mathematical methods of physics will benefit from this book.

  13. Mechanical science

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, W C

    2013-01-01

    This book gives comprehensive coverage of mechanical science for HNC/HND students taking mechanical engineering courses, including all topics likely to be covered in both years of such courses, as well as for first year undergraduate courses in mechanical engineering. It features 500 problems with answers and 200 worked examples. The third edition includes a new section on power transmission and an appendix on mathematics to help students with the basic notation of calculus and solution of differential equations.

  14. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracca, A; Rechtman S, R

    1985-08-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject.

  15. Einstein's statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracca, A.; Rechtman S, R.

    1985-01-01

    The foundation of equilibrium classical statistical mechanics were laid down in 1902 independently by Gibbs and Einstein. The latter's contribution, developed in three papers published between 1902 and 1904, is usually forgotten and when not, rapidly dismissed as equivalent to Gibb's. We review in detail Einstein's ideas on the foundations of statistical mechanics and show that they constitute the beginning of a research program that led Einstein to quantum theory. We also show how these ideas may be used as a starting point for an introductory course on the subject. (author)

  16. Relativistic wave mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corinaldesi, Ernesto

    1963-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, this text provides readers with a background in relativistic wave mechanics and prepares them for the study of field theory. The treatment originated as a series of lectures from a course on advanced quantum mechanics that has been further amplified by student contributions.An introductory section related to particles and wave functions precedes the three-part treatment. An examination of particles of spin zero follows, addressing wave equation, Lagrangian formalism, physical quantities as mean values, translation and rotat

  17. Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This book offers a broad overview of the potential of continuum mechanics to describe a wide range of macroscopic phenomena in real-world problems. Building on the fundamentals presented in the authors' previous book, Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica(R), this new work explores interesting models of continuum mechanics, with an emphasis on exploring the flexibility of their applications in a wide variety of fields.Specific topics, which have been chosen to show the power of continuum mechanics to characterize the experimental behavior of real phenomena, include: * various aspects of nonlin

  18. COP 21: the national contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouette, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This article comments the content of the national contributions (the so-called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDC) which every country should have transmitted to the UN before the COP 21. In fact, 148 contributions, i.e. 75 per cent of the expected ones, have been transmitted. The author recalls that the content of these contributions had to obey some principles which had been defined in Lima in 2014, and that each country must identify its objectives in terms of mitigation (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (reduction of the vulnerability of natural and human systems). The author comments some specific commitments regarding climate, emission reduction, adaptation to climate change, and more particularly evokes the Ethiopian contribution which is considered as exemplary

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian, Schahram

    2014-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a major psychiatric disorder that lacks a unifying neuropathology, while currently available pharmacological treatments provide only limited benefits to many patients. This review will discuss how the field of neuroepigenetics could contribute to advancements of the existing knowledge on the neurobiology and treatment of psychosis. Genome-scale mapping of DMA methylation, histone modifications and variants, and chromosomal loopings for promoter-enhancer interactions and other epigenetic determinants of genome organization and function are likely to provide important clues about mechanisms contributing to dysregulated expression of synaptic and metabolic genes in schizophrenia brain, including the potential links to the underlying genetic risk architecture and environmental exposures. In addition, studies in animal models are providing a rapidly increasing list of chromatin-regulatory mechanisms with significant effects on cognition and complex behaviors, thereby pointing to the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drug targets in the nervous system.

  20. Discrete variational Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lall, S; West, M

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a canonical choice of a Hamiltonian theory corresponding to the theory of discrete Lagrangian mechanics. We make use of Lagrange duality and follow a path parallel to that used for construction of the Pontryagin principle in optimal control theory. We use duality results regarding sensitivity and separability to show the relationship between generating functions and symplectic integrators. We also discuss connections to optimal control theory and numerical algorithms

  1. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  2. Automotive Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Ralph C.; And Others

    This curriculum guide, which was validated by vocational teachers and mechanics in the field, describes the competencies needed by entry-level automotive mechanics. This guide lists 15 competencies; for each competency, various tasks with their performance objective, student learning experiences, suggested instructional techniques, instructional…

  3. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  4. College mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Şengül, Caner

    2016-01-01

    College Mechanics QueBank has been designed to be different, enthusiastic, interesting and helpful to you. Therefore, it is not just a test bank about mechanics but also it is like a compass in order to find your way in mechanics Each chapter in this book is put in an order to follow a hierarchy of the mechanics topics; from vectors to simple harmonic motion. Throughout the book there are many multiple choice and long answer questions for you to solve. They have been created for YGS, LYS, SAT, IB or other standardized exams in the world because mechanics has no boundaries and so Physics has no country. Learn the main principle of each chapter and explore the daily life applications. Then you can start to solve the questions by planning a problem solving method carefully. Finally, enjoy solving the questions and discover the meachanics of the universe once more.

  5. Damage-associated responses of the host contribute to defence against cyst nematodes but not root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Jehangir; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Mendy, Badou; Anwer, Muhammad Arslan; Habash, Samer S; Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid

    2017-12-16

    When nematodes invade and subsequently migrate within plant roots, they generate cell wall fragments (in the form of oligogalacturonides; OGs) that can act as damage-associated molecular patterns and activate host defence responses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating damage responses in plant-nematode interactions remain unexplored. Here, we characterized the role of a group of cell wall receptor proteins in Arabidopsis, designated as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs), during infection with the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. PGIPs are encoded by a family of two genes in Arabidopsis, and are involved in the formation of active OG elicitors. Our results show that PGIP gene expression is strongly induced in response to cyst nematode invasion of roots. Analyses of loss-of-function mutants and overexpression lines revealed that PGIP1 expression attenuates infection of host roots by cyst nematodes, but not root-knot nematodes. The PGIP1-mediated attenuation of cyst nematode infection involves the activation of plant camalexin and indole-glucosinolate pathways. These combined results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying plant damage perception and response pathways during infection by cyst and root-knot nematodes, and establishes the function of PGIP in plant resistance to cyst nematodes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. ECN contributions to GLOBAL `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL `95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL).

  7. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  8. ECN contributions to GLOBAL '95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL '95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL)

  9. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  10. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, A.I.M.

    1981-01-01

    This book, based on a thirty lecture course given to students at the beginning of their second year, covers the quantum mechanics required by physics undergraduates. Early chapters deal with wave mechanics, including a discussion of the energy states of the hydrogen atom. These are followed by a more formal development of the theory, leading to a discussion of some advanced applications and an introduction to the conceptual problems associated with quantum measurement theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. (U.K.)

  11. Indexing mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.G.; Parker, G.E.; Berry, R.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the indexing mechanism described can be used in a nuclear reactor fuel element inspection rig. It comprises a tubular body adapted to house a canister containing a number of fuel elements located longtitudinally, and has two chucks spaced apart for displacing the fuel elements longitudinally in a stepwise manner, together with a plunger mechanism for displacing them successively into the chucks. A measuring unit is located between the chucks for measuring the diameter of the fuel elements at intervals about their circumferences, and a secondary indexing mechanism is provided for rotating the measuring unit in a stepwise manner. (U.K.)

  12. Robot Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Lenarcic, Jadran; Stanišić, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the area of robot mechanisms, primarily considering industrial manipulators and humanoid arms. The book is intended for both teaching and self-study. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of kinematic analysis and the design of robot mechanisms. The coverage of topics is untypical. The focus is on robot kinematics. The book creates a balance between theoretical and practical aspects in the development and application of robot mechanisms, and includes the latest achievements and trends in robot science and technology.

  13. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  14. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, Nivaldo A

    2018-01-01

    Analytical mechanics is the foundation of many areas of theoretical physics including quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and has wide-ranging applications in engineering and celestial mechanics. This introduction to the basic principles and methods of analytical mechanics covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, rigid bodies, small oscillations, canonical transformations and Hamilton–Jacobi theory. This fully up-to-date textbook includes detailed mathematical appendices and addresses a number of advanced topics, some of them of a geometric or topological character. These include Bertrand's theorem, proof that action is least, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, constrained Hamiltonian systems, non-integrability criteria, KAM theory, classical field theory, Lyapunov functions, geometric phases and Poisson manifolds. Providing worked examples, end-of-chapter problems, and discussion of ongoing research in the field, it is suitable for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students studying analyt...

  15. Engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Dietmar; Schröder, Jörg; Wall, Wolfgang A; Rajapakse, Nimal

    Statics is the first volume of a three-volume textbook on Engineering Mechanics. The authors, using a time-honoured straightforward and flexible approach, present the basic concepts and principles of mechanics in the clearest and simplest form possible to advanced undergraduate engineering students of various disciplines and different educational backgrounds. An important objective of this book is to develop problem solving skills in a systematic manner. Another aim of this volume is to provide engineering students as well as practising engineers with a solid foundation to help them bridge the gap between undergraduate studies on the one hand and advanced courses on mechanics and/or practical engineering problems on the other. The book contains numerous examples, along with their complete solutions. Emphasis is placed upon student participation in problem solving. The contents of the book correspond to the topics normally covered in courses on basic engineering mechanics at universities and colleges. Now in i...

  16. Supersymmetric mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelle, Kellogg S

    2007-01-01

    With the development of the electronic archives in high-energy physics, there has been increasing questioning of the role of traditional publishing styles, particularly in the production of conference books. One aspect of traditional publishing that still receives wide appreciation, however, is in the production of well-focussed pedagogical material. The present two-volume edition, 'Supersymmetric Mechanics-Vol 1', edited by S Bellucci and 'Supersymmetric Mechanics-Vol 2', edited by S Bellucci, S Ferrara and A Marrani, is a good example of the kind of well-digested presentation that should still find its way into university libraries. This two-volume set presents the material of a set of pedagogical lectures presented at the INFN National Laboratory in Frascati over a two-year period on the subject of supersymmetric mechanics. The articles include the results of discussions with the attending students after the lectures. Overall, this makes for a useful compilation of material on a subject that underlies much of the current effort in supersymmetric approaches to cosmology and the unification programme. The first volume comprises articles on 'A journey through garden algebras' by S Bellucci, S J Gates Jr and E Orazi on linear supermultiplet realizations in supersymmetric mechanics,'Supersymmetric mechanics in superspace' by S Bellucci and S Krivonos, 'Noncommutative mechanics, Landau levels, twistors and Yang-Mills amplitudes' by V P Nair, 'Elements of (super) Hamiltonian formalism' by A Nersessian and 'Matrix mechanics' by C Sochichiu. The second volume consists entirely of a masterful presentation on 'The attractor mechanism and space time singularities' by S Ferrara. This presents a comprehensive and detailed overview of the structure of supersymmetric black hole solutions in supergravity, critical point structure in the scalar field moduli space and the thermodynamic consequences. This second volume alone makes the set a worthwhile addition to the research

  17. Soil Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Verruijt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This book is the text for the introductory course of Soil Mechanics in the Department of Civil Engineering of the Delft University of Technology, as I have given from 1980 until my retirement in 2002. It contains an introduction into the major principles and methods of soil mechanics, such as the analysis of stresses, deformations, and stability. The most important methods of determining soil parameters, in the laboratory and in situ, are also described. Some basic principles of applied mecha...

  18. ANGDelMut – a web-based tool for predicting and analyzing functional loss mechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated angiogenin mutations [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2mc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya K Padhi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ANGDelMut is a web-based tool for predicting the functional consequences of missense mutations in the angiogenin (ANG protein, which is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Missense mutations in ANG result in loss of either ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or both of these functions, and in turn cause ALS. However, no web-based tools are available to predict whether a newly identified ANG mutation will possibly lead to ALS. More importantly, no web-implemented method is currently available to predict the mechanisms of loss-of-function(s of ANG mutants. In light of this observation, we developed the ANGDelMut web-based tool, which predicts whether an ANG mutation is deleterious or benign. The user selects certain attributes from the input panel, which serves as a query to infer whether a mutant will exhibit loss of ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or whether the overall stability will be affected. The output states whether the mutation is deleterious or benign, and if it is deleterious, gives the possible mechanism(s of loss-of-function. T