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Sample records for loss-of-function mechanisms contribute

  1. Multiple loss-of-function mechanisms contribute to SCN5A-related familial sick sinus syndrome.

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    Junhong Gui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To identify molecular mechanisms underlying SCN5A-related sick sinus syndrome (SSS, a rare type of SSS, in parallel experiments we elucidated the electrophysiological properties and the cell surface localization of thirteen human Na(v1.5 (hNa(v1.5 mutant channels previously linked to this disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mutant hNa(v1.5 channels expressed by HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp and two-microelectrode voltage clamp, respectively. HEK293 cell surface biotinylation experiments quantified the fraction of correctly targeted channel proteins. Our data suggested three distinct mutant channel subtypes: Group 1 mutants (L212P, P1298L, DelF1617, R1632H gave peak current densities and cell surface targeting indistinguishable from wild-type hNa(v1.5. Loss-of-function of these mutants resulted from altered channel kinetics, including a negative shift of steady-state inactivation and a reduced voltage dependency of open-state inactivation. Group 2 mutants (E161K, T220I, D1275N gave significantly reduced whole-cell currents due to impaired cell surface localization (D1275N, altered channel properties at unchanged cell surface localization (T220I, or a combination of both (E161K. Group 3 mutant channels were non-functional, due to an almost complete lack of protein at the plasma membrane (T187I, W1421X, K1578fs/52, R1623X or a probable gating/permeation defect with normal surface localisation (R878C, G1408R. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicates that multiple molecular mechanisms, including gating abnormalities, trafficking defects, or a combination of both, are responsible for SCN5A-related familial SSS.

  2. Quantification of the Relative Contributions of Loss-of-function and Gain-of-function Mechanisms in TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) Proteinopathies.

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    Cascella, Roberta; Capitini, Claudia; Fani, Giulia; Dobson, Christopher M; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2016-09-09

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions (FTLD-U) are two clinically distinct neurodegenerative conditions sharing a similar histopathology characterized by the nuclear clearance of TDP-43 and its associated deposition into cytoplasmic inclusions in different areas of the central nervous system. Given the concomitant occurrence of TDP-43 nuclear depletion and cytoplasmic accumulation, it has been proposed that TDP-43 proteinopathies originate from either a loss-of-function (LOF) mechanism, a gain-of-function (GOF) process, or both. We have addressed this issue by transfecting murine NSC34 and N2a cells with siRNA for endogenous murine TDP-43 and with human recombinant TDP-43 inclusion bodies (IBs). These two strategies allowed the depletion of nuclear TDP-43 and the accumulation of cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregates to occur separately and independently. Endogenous and exogenous TDP-43 were monitored and quantified using both immunofluorescence and Western blotting analysis, and nuclear functional TDP-43 was measured by monitoring the sortilin 1 mRNA splicing activity. Various degrees of TDP-43 cytoplasmic accumulation and nuclear TDP-43 depletion were achieved and the resulting cellular viability was evaluated, leading to a quantitative global analysis on the relative effects of LOF and GOF on the overall cytotoxicity. These were found to be ∼55% and 45%, respectively, in both cell lines and using both readouts of cell toxicity, showing that these two mechanisms are likely to contribute apparently equally to the pathologies of ALS and FTLD-U. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Contribution of the P2X7 1513A/C loss-of-function polymorphism to extrapulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Tunisian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Ben-Kahla, Imen; Boukadida, Jalel; Harizi, Hedi

    2011-10-01

    The P2X7 receptor has been found to be linked to an increased risk for tuberculosis in some populations. In this study, we investigate whether the P2X7 receptor plays a role in increasing susceptibility to tuberculosis in Tunisia. We examined two 1513A/C and -762T/C polymorphisms at the P2X7 receptor in 168 patients with pulmonary TB (pTB), 55 patients with extrapulmonary TB (epTB) and 150 blood donors from Tunisia. Genotyping of 1513A/C and -762T/C polymorphisms was performed in purified genomic DNA using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific PCR, respectively. The 1513C, CC and AC loss-of-function allele and genotypes were overrepresented in the epTB group compared with the control group (45% vs. 17%, P=10(-8) ; 24% vs. 4%, P=3 × 10(-7) ; 42% vs. 27%, P=10(-3) , respectively). Additionally, they were associated with 3.83-, 11.86- and 3.15-fold risks of developing this clinical tuberculosis form, respectively. No associations between the -762T/C polymorphism and tuberculosis disease, as well as disease anatomic location were observed. Collectively, our results suggest that the P2X7 1513A/C loss-of-function polymorphism may contribute to susceptibility to epTB in Tunisian populations.

  4. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

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    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex.

  5. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

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    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J. (WU-MED)

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Towards trans-diagnostic mechanisms in psychiatry: neurobehavioral profile of rats with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter gene

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    Valentina Vengeliene

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The research domain criteria (RDoC matrix has been developed to reorient psychiatric research towards measurable behavioral dimensions and underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a new genetic rat model with a loss-of-function point mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT gene (Slc6a3_N157K to systematically study the RDoC matrix. First, we examined the impact of the Slc6a3_N157K mutation on monoaminergic signaling. We then performed behavioral tests representing each of the five RDoC domains: negative and positive valence systems, cognitive, social and arousal/regulatory systems. The use of RDoC may be particularly helpful for drug development. We studied the effects of a novel pharmacological approach metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR2/3 antagonism, in DAT mutants in a comparative way with standard medications. Loss of DAT functionality in mutant rats not only elevated subcortical extracellular dopamine concentration but also altered the balance of monoaminergic transmission. DAT mutant rats showed deficits in all five RDoC domains. Thus, mutant rats failed to show conditioned fear responses, were anhedonic, were unable to learn stimulus-reward associations, showed impaired cognition and social behavior, and were hyperactive. Hyperactivity in mutant rats was reduced by amphetamine and atomoxetine, which are well-established medications to reduce hyperactivity in humans. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 also normalized hyperactivity in DAT mutant rats without affecting extracellular dopamine levels. We systematically characterized an altered dopamine system within the context of the RDoC matrix and studied mGluR2/3 antagonism as a new pharmacological strategy to treat mental disorders with underlying subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9 facilitates investigation of neural circuit disease using human iPSCs: mechanism of epilepsy caused by an SCN1A loss-of-function mutation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding the α subunit of Nav1.1 channel, can cause epilepsies with wide ranges of clinical phenotypes, which are associated with the contrasting effects of channel loss-of-function or gain-of-function. In this project, CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated genome-editing techniques were applied to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based-disease model to explore the mechanism of epilepsy caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. By fluorescently labeling GABAergic s...

  8. Bacterial adaptation through loss of function.

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    Alison K Hottes

    Full Text Available The metabolic capabilities and regulatory networks of bacteria have been optimized by evolution in response to selective pressures present in each species' native ecological niche. In a new environment, however, the same bacteria may grow poorly due to regulatory constraints or biochemical deficiencies. Adaptation to such conditions can proceed through the acquisition of new cellular functionality due to gain of function mutations or via modulation of cellular networks. Using selection experiments on transposon-mutagenized libraries of bacteria, we illustrate that even under conditions of extreme nutrient limitation, substantial adaptation can be achieved solely through loss of function mutations, which rewire the metabolism of the cell without gain of enzymatic or sensory function. A systematic analysis of similar experiments under more than 100 conditions reveals that adaptive loss of function mutations exist for many environmental challenges. Drawing on a wealth of examples from published articles, we detail the range of mechanisms through which loss-of-function mutations can generate such beneficial regulatory changes, without the need for rare, specific mutations to fine-tune enzymatic activities or network connections. The high rate at which loss-of-function mutations occur suggests that null mutations play an underappreciated role in the early stages of adaption of bacterial populations to new environments.

  9. Site-to-site interdomain communication may mediate different loss-of-function mechanisms in a cancer-associated NQO1 polymorphism

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    Medina-Carmona, Encarnación; Neira, Jose L.; Salido, Eduardo; Fuchs, Julian E.; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Timson, David J.; Pey, Angel L.

    2017-01-01

    Disease associated genetic variations often cause intracellular enzyme inactivation, dysregulation and instability. However, allosteric communication of mutational effects to distant functional sites leading to loss-of-function remains poorly understood. We characterize here interdomain site-to-site communication by which a common cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (c.C609T/p.P187S) reduces the activity and stability in vivo of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). NQO1 is a FAD-dependent, two-domain multifunctional stress protein acting as a Phase II enzyme, activating cancer pro-drugs and stabilizing p53 and p73α oncosuppressors. We show that p.P187S causes structural and dynamic changes communicated to functional sites far from the mutated site, affecting the FAD binding site located at the N-terminal domain (NTD) and accelerating proteasomal degradation through dynamic effects on the C-terminal domain (CTD). Structural protein:protein interaction studies reveal that the cancer-associated polymorphism does not abolish the interaction with p73α, indicating that oncosuppressor destabilization largely mirrors the low intracellular stability of p.P187S. In conclusion, we show how a single disease associated amino acid change may allosterically perturb several functional sites in an oligomeric and multidomain protein. These results have important implications for the understanding of loss-of-function genetic diseases and the identification of novel structural hot spots as targets for pharmacological intervention. PMID:28291250

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 facilitates investigation of neural circuit disease using human iPSCs: mechanism of epilepsy caused by an SCN1A loss-of-function mutation

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    Liu, J; Gao, C; Chen, W; Ma, W; Li, X; Shi, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Long, Y; Xu, H; Guo, X; Deng, S; Yan, X; Yu, D; Pan, G; Chen, Y; Lai, L; Liao, W; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding the α subunit of Nav1.1 channel, can cause epilepsies with wide ranges of clinical phenotypes, which are associated with the contrasting effects of channel loss-of-function or gain-of-function. In this project, CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated genome-editing techniques were applied to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based-disease model to explore the mechanism of epilepsy caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. By fluorescently labeling GABAergic subtype in iPSC-derived neurons using CRISPR/Cas9, we for the first time performed electrophysiological studies on SCN1A-expressing neural subtype and monitored the postsynaptic activity of both inhibitory and excitatory types. We found that the mutation c.A5768G, which led to no current of Nav1.1 in exogenously transfected system, influenced the properties of not only Nav current amount, but also Nav activation in Nav1.1-expressing GABAergic neurons. The two alterations in Nav further reduced the amplitudes and enhanced the thresholds of action potential in patient-derived GABAergic neurons, and led to weakened spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in the patient-derived neuronal network. Although the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) did not change significantly, when the frequencies of both sIPSCs and sEPSCs were further analyzed, we found the whole postsynaptic activity transferred from the inhibition-dominated state to excitation in patient-derived neuronal networks, suggesting that changes in sIPSCs alone were sufficient to significantly reverse the excitatory level of spontaneous postsynaptic activity. In summary, our findings fill the gap of our knowledge regarding the relationship between SCN1A mutation effect recorded on exogenously transfected cells and on Nav1.1-expressing neurons, and reveal the physiological basis underlying epileptogenesis caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. PMID:26731440

  11. Extinction and the loss of functional diversity

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    Petchey, O.L.; Gaston, K. J.

    2002-01-01

    Although it is widely thought to influence ecosystem processes, there is little consensus on an appropriate measure of functional diversity. The two major perspectives, to date, are to assume that every species is functionally unique, or to assume that some species are functionally identical, such that functional groups exist. Using a continuous measure of functional diversity (FD) derived from the quantitative functional traits of species, we show that the loss of functional diversity from s...

  12. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses....... The amyloid hypothesis has dominated the field with its assumption that buildup of pathogenic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide causes disease. This paradigm has been criticized, yet most data suggest that Aβ plays a key role in the disease. Here, a new loss-of-function hypothesis is synthesized that accounts...

  13. Is SOD1 loss of function involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

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    Saccon, Rachele A; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K A; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Fratta, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the gene superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are causative for familial forms of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. When the first SOD1 mutations were identified they were postulated to give rise to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through a loss of function mechanism, but experimental data soon showed that the disease arises from a--still unknown--toxic gain of function, and the possibility that loss of function plays a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis was abandoned. Although loss of function is not causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, here we re-examine two decades of evidence regarding whether loss of function may play a modifying role in SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. From analysing published data from patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we find a marked loss of SOD1 enzyme activity arising from almost all mutations. We continue to examine functional data from all Sod1 knockout mice and we find obvious detrimental effects within the nervous system with, interestingly, some specificity for the motor system. Here, we bring together historical and recent experimental findings to conclude that there is a possibility that SOD1 loss of function may play a modifying role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This likelihood has implications for some current therapies aimed at knocking down the level of mutant protein in patients with SOD1-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Finally, the wide-ranging phenotypes that result from loss of function indicate that SOD1 gene sequences should be screened in diseases other than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  14. From transcriptomic to protein level changes in TDP-43 and FUS loss-of-function cell models.

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    Colombrita, Claudia; Onesto, Elisa; Buratti, Emanuele; de la Grange, Pierre; Gumina, Valentina; Baralle, Francisco E; Silani, Vincenzo; Ratti, Antonia

    2015-12-01

    The full definition of the physiological RNA targets regulated by TDP-43 and FUS RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) represents an important issue in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms associated to these two proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. In the last few years several high-throughput screenings have generated a plethora of data, which are difficult to compare due to the different experimental designs and models explored. In this study by using the Affymetrix Exon Arrays, we were able to assess and compare the effects of both TDP-43 and FUS loss-of-function on the whole transcriptome using the same human neuronal SK-N-BE cell model. We showed that TDP-43 and FUS depletion induces splicing and gene expression changes mainly distinct for the two RBPs, although they may regulate common pathways, including neuron differentiation and cytoskeleton organization as evidenced by functional annotation analysis. In particular, TDP-43 and FUS were found to regulate splicing and expression of genes related to neuronal (SEPT6, SULT4A1, TNIK) and RNA metabolism (DICER, ELAVL3/HuC, POLDIP3). Our extended analysis at protein level revealed that these changes have also impact on the protein isoform ratio and content, not always in a direct correlation with transcriptomic data. Contrarily to a loss-of-function mechanism, we showed that mutant TDP-43 proteins maintained their splicing activity in human ALS fibroblasts and experimental cell lines. Our findings further contribute to define the biological functions of these two RBPs in physiological and disease state, strongly encouraging the evaluation of the identified transcriptomic changes at protein level in neuronal experimental models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism Design for Incentivizing Social Media Contributions

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    Singh, Vivek K.; Jain, Ramesh; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. A Game theoretic framework is proposed to study the dynamics of social media networks where contribution costs are individual but gains are common. We model users as rational selfish agents, and consider domain attributes like voluntary participation, virtual reward structure, network effect, and public-sharing to model the dynamics of this interaction. The created model describes the most appropriate contribution strategy from each user's perspective and also highlights issues like 'free-rider' problem and individual rationality leading to irrational (i.e. sub-optimal) group behavior. We also consider the perspective of the system designer who is interested in finding the best incentive mechanisms to influence the selfish end-users so that the overall system utility is maximized. We propose and compare multiple mechanisms (based on optimal bonus payment, social incentive leveraging, and second price auction) to study how a system designer can exploit the selfishness of its users, to design incentive mechanisms which improve the overall task-completion probability and system performance, while possibly still benefiting the individual users.

  16. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and incident cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Husemoen, L L N; Thyssen, J P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) could have opposing effects on cancer risk, as mutations are associated with both 10% higher serum vitamin D levels, which may protect against cancer, and with impaired skin barrier function, which may lead to higher cancer...... skin cancer (NMSC) (HR 1·05, 95% CI 0·84-1·31), head and neck cancer (HR 1·72, 95% CI 0·71-4·15), colorectal cancer (HR 0·82, 95% CI 0·44-1·52), bronchus and lung cancer (HR 1·34, 95% CI 0·77-2·33), breast cancer (HR 0·58, 95% CI 0·30-1·14), uterine cancer (HR 0·42, 95% CI 0·06-3·10), prostate cancer...... (HR 1·09, 95% CI 0·61-1·94), urinary cancer (HR 1·30, 95% CI 0·51-3·29), malignant melanoma (HR 1·03, 95% CI 0·41-2·58) and NMSC (HR 0·70, 95% CI 0·47-1·05). Among participants aged over 60 years at baseline, we found statistically significant lower risks of all cancers and NMSC among FLG mutation...

  17. Generation of mice harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6

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    Duncan Stephen A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The zinc finger transcription factor GATA6 is believed to have important roles in the development of several organs including the liver, gastrointestinal tract and heart. However, analyses of the contribution of GATA6 toward organogenesis have been hampered because Gata6-/- mice fail to develop beyond gastrulation due to defects in extraembryonic endoderm function. We have therefore generated a mouse line harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6 using Cre/loxP technology. LoxP elements were introduced into introns flanking exon 2 of the Gata6 gene by homologous recombination in ES cells. Mice containing this altered allele were bred to homozygosity and were found to be viable and fertile. To assess the functional integrity of the loxP sites and to confirm that we had generated a Gata6 loss-of-function allele, we bred Gata6 'floxed' mice to EIIa-Cre mice in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, and to Villin-Cre mice that express Cre in the epithelial cells of the intestine. We conclude that we have generated a line of mice in which GATA6 activity can be ablated in a cell type specific manner by expression of Cre recombinase. This line of mice can be used to establish the role of GATA6 in regulating embryonic development and various aspects of mammalian physiology.

  18. Conditional vs. Voluntary Contribution Mechanism – An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reischmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Conditional Contribution Mechanism for public good provision gives all agents the possibility to condition their contribution on the total level of contribution provided by all agents. In this experimental study the mechanism's performance is compared to the performance of the Voluntary Contribution Mechanism. In an environment with binary contribution and linear valuations subjects play the mechanisms in a repeated setting. The mechanisms are compared in one case of complete informati...

  19. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

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    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  20. NALCN channelopathies: Distinguishing gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations.

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    Bend, Eric G; Si, Yue; Stevenson, David A; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Newcomb, Tara M; Jorgensen, Erik M; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2016-09-13

    To perform genotype-phenotype analysis in an infant with congenital arthrogryposis due to a de novo missense mutation in the NALCN ion channel and explore the mechanism of pathogenicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. We performed whole-exome sequencing in a preterm neonate with congenital arthrogryposis and a severe life-threatening clinical course. We examined the mechanism of pathogenicity of the associated NALCN mutation by engineering the orthologous mutation into the nematode C elegans using CRISPR-Cas9. We identified a de novo missense mutation in NALCN, c.1768C>T, in an infant with a severe neonatal lethal form of the recently characterized CLIFAHDD syndrome (congenital contractures of the limbs and face with hypotonia and developmental delay). We report novel phenotypic features including prolonged episodes of stimulus-sensitive sustained muscular contraction associated with life-threatening episodes of desaturation and autonomic instability, extending the severity of previously described phenotypes associated with mutations in NALCN. When engineered into the C elegans ortholog, this mutation results in a severe gain-of-function phenotype, with hypercontraction and uncoordinated movement. We engineered 6 additional CLIFAHDD syndrome mutations into C elegans and the mechanism of action could be divided into 2 categories: half phenocopied gain-of-function mutants and half phenocopied loss-of-function mutants. The clinical phenotype of our patient and electrophysiologic studies show sustained muscular contraction in response to transient sensory stimuli. In C elegans, this mutation causes neuronal hyperactivity via a gain-of-function NALCN ion channel. Testing human variants of NALCN in C elegans demonstrates that CLIFAHDD can be caused by dominant loss- or gain-of-function mutations in ion channel function. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. A tale of two contribution mechanisms for nonlinear public goods.

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    Zhang, Yanling; Fu, Feng; Wu, Te; Xie, Guangming; Wang, Long

    2013-01-01

    Amounts of empirical evidence, ranging from microbial cooperation to collective hunting, suggests public goods produced often nonlinearly depend on the total amount of contribution. The implication of such nonlinear public goods for the evolution of cooperation is not well understood. There is also little attention paid to the divisibility nature of individual contribution amount, divisible vs. non-divisible ones. The corresponding strategy space in the former is described by a continuous investment while in the latter by a continuous probability to contribute all or nothing. Here, we use adaptive dynamics in finite populations to quantify and compare the roles nonlinearity of public-goods production plays in cooperation between these two contribution mechanisms. Although under both contribution mechanisms the population can converge into a coexistence equilibrium with an intermediate cooperation level, the branching phenomenon only occurs in the divisible contribution mechanism. The results shed insight into understanding observed individual difference in cooperative behavior.

  2. Duplication and Loss of Function of Genes Encoding RNA Polymerase III Subunit C4 Causes Hybrid Incompatibility in Rice

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    Giao Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive barriers are commonly observed in both animals and plants, in which they maintain species integrity and contribute to speciation. This report shows that a combination of loss-of-function alleles at two duplicated loci, DUPLICATED GAMETOPHYTIC STERILITY 1 (DGS1 on chromosome 4 and DGS2 on chromosome 7, causes pollen sterility in hybrid progeny derived from an interspecific cross between cultivated rice, Oryza sativa, and an Asian annual wild rice, O. nivara. Male gametes carrying the DGS1 allele from O. nivara (DGS1-nivaras and the DGS2 allele from O. sativa (DGS2-T65s were sterile, but female gametes carrying the same genotype were fertile. We isolated the causal gene, which encodes a protein homologous to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP III subunit C4 (RPC4. RPC4 facilitates the transcription of 5S rRNAs and tRNAs. The loss-of-function alleles at DGS1-nivaras and DGS2-T65s were caused by weak or nonexpression of RPC4 and an absence of RPC4, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that gene duplication of RPC4 at DGS1 and DGS2 was a recent event that occurred after divergence of the ancestral population of Oryza from other Poaceae or during diversification of AA-genome species.

  3. Loss-of-function variants in HIVEP2 are a cause of intellectual disability.

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    Srivastava, Siddharth; Engels, Hartmut; Schanze, Ina; Cremer, Kirsten; Wieland, Thomas; Menzel, Moritz; Schubach, Max; Biskup, Saskia; Kreiß, Martina; Endele, Sabine; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Zenker, Martin; Gupta, Siddharth; Cohen, Julie; Zink, Alexander M; Naidu, SakkuBai

    2016-04-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) affects 2-3% of the population. In the past, many genetic causes of ID remained unidentified due to its vast heterogeneity. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have shown that de novo variants underlie a significant portion of sporadic cases of ID. Applying WES to patients with ID or global developmental delay at different centers, we identified three individuals with distinct de novo variants in HIVEP2 (human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein), which belongs to a family of zinc-finger-containing transcriptional proteins involved in growth and development. Two of the variants were nonsense changes, and one was a 1 bp deletion resulting in a premature stop codon that was reported previously without clinical detail. In silico prediction programs suggest loss-of-function in the mutated allele leading to haploinsufficiency as a putative mechanism in all three individuals. All three patients presented with moderate-to-severe ID, minimal structural brain anomalies, hypotonia, and mild dysmorphic features. Growth parameters were in the normal range except for borderline microcephaly at birth in one patient. Two of the patients exhibited behavioral anomalies including hyperactivity and aggression. Published functional data suggest a neurodevelopmental role for HIVEP2, and several of the genes regulated by HIVEP2 are implicated in brain development, for example, SSTR-2, c-Myc, and genes of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, HIVEP2-knockout mice exhibit several working memory deficits, increased anxiety, and hyperactivity. On the basis of the genotype-phenotype correlation and existing functional data, we propose HIVEP2 as a causative ID gene.

  4. Loss-of-function variants of the filaggrin gene are associated with clinical reactivity to foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, C. D.; Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; Kollen, B. J.; Kukler, J.; Koppelman, G. H.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    The aim of this study was to assess the genetic association of Filaggrin loss-of-function (FLG LOF) genetic variants with food allergy, and to investigate the added value of this test in diagnosing food allergy. Clinical reactivity to foods was diagnosed by the gold standard, the double-blind,

  5. Contact dermatitis in the construction industry : the role of filaggrin loss-of-function mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, J. G.; Heederik, D.; Spee, T.; van Rooy, F. G.; Krop, E. J. M.; Koppelman, G. H.; Rustemeyer, T.; Smit, L. A. M.

    Background A high prevalence of contact dermatitis (CD) and respiratory symptoms has been observed in the construction industry, probably due to widespread exposure to irritants and allergens. It is unknown whether carriers of loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG), a known

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in SLC30A8 protect against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flannick, Jason; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Beer, Nicola L.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets, but none have yet been described for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Through sequencing or genotyping of ~150,000 individuals across 5 ancestry groups, we identified 12 rare protein-truncating va...

  7. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacArthur, D.G.; Balasubramanian, S.; Frankish, A.; Huang, N.; Morris, J.; Walter, K.; Jostins, L.; Habegger, L.; Pickrell, J.K.; Montgomery, S.B.; Albers, C.A.; Zhang, Z.D.; Conrad, D.F.; Lunter, G.; Zheng, H.; Ayub, Q.; DePristo, M.A.; Banks, E.; Hu, M.; Handsaker, R.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Fromer, M.; Jin, M.; Mu, X.J.; Khurana, E.; Ye, K.; Kay, M.; Saunders, G.I.; Suner, M.M.; Hunt, T.; Barnes, I.H.; Amid, C.; Carvalho-Silva, D.R.; Bignell, A.H.; Snow, C.; Yngvadottir, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Cooper, D.N.; Xue, Y.; Romero, I.G.; Genomes Project, C.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Pritchard, J.K.; Barrett, J.C.; Harrow, J.; Hurles, M.E.; Gerstein, M.B.; Tyler-Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to det

  8. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin gene...

  9. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bardet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL. Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC, were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI. In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  10. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of loss-of-function cardiac sodium channelopathies in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Rammeloo, Lukas A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Blom, Nico A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Loss-of-function sodium channelopathies manifest as a spectrum of diseases including Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease. OBJECTIVE To analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these disorders in children. METHODS Patients aged 98th percentile for age). RESULTS:

  11. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and atopic dermatitis as risk factors for hand eczema in apprentice nurses: part II of a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background/objectives Environmental exposure and personal susceptibility both contribute to the development of hand eczema. In this study, we investigated the effect of loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG), atopic dermatitis and wet work exposure on the development of hand eczema in apprentice nurses. Methods Dutch apprentice nurses were genotyped for the four most common FLG mutations; atopic dermatitis and hand eczema history were assessed by questionnaire. Exposur...

  12. Contributions to mechanics Markus Reiner eightieth anniversary volume

    CERN Document Server

    Abir, David

    1969-01-01

    Contributions to Mechanics presents a biographical survey of Professor Markus Reiner's life. This book is a manifestation of affection and esteem to Professor Reiner, expressed by various authors who eagerly contributed original works in the field of mechanics. Organized into five parts encompassing 26 chapters, this book begins with a biographical article of Professor Markus Reiner that includes a detailed account of his works. This text then explores the approach for the interpretation of certain features commonly accepted in quantum theory on the basis of its mathematical formalism. Other c

  13. Global metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis Polyamine Oxidase 4 (AtPAO4 loss-of-function mutants exhibiting delayed dark-induced senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Iranzu Sequera-Mutiozabal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Early and more recent studies have suggested that some polyamines (PAs, and particularly spermine (Spm, exhibit anti-senescence properties in plants. In this work, we have investigated the role of Arabidopsis Polyamine Oxidase 4 (PAO4, encoding a PA back-conversion oxidase, during dark-induced senescence. Two independent PAO4 (pao4-1 and pao4-2 loss-of-function mutants have been found that accumulate 10-fold higher Spm, and this associated with delayed entry into senescence under dark conditions. Mechanisms underlying pao4 delayed senescence have been studied using global metabolic profiling by GC-TOF/MS. pao4 mutants exhibit constitutively higher levels of important metabolites involved in redox regulation, central metabolism and signaling that support a priming status against oxidative stress. During senescence, interactions between PAs and oxidative, sugar and nitrogen metabolism have been detected that additively contribute to delayed entry into senescence. Our results indicate the occurrence of metabolic interactions between PAs, particularly Spm, with cell oxidative balance and transport/biosynthesis of amino acids as a strategy to cope with oxidative damage produced during senescence.

  14. Filaggrin gene loss-of-function mutations explain discordance of atopic dermatitis within dizygotic twin pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Elmose, Camilla; Szecsi, Pal Bela

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to examine the association between loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and atopic dermatitis (AD) and asthma in adult twins. METHODS: A previously well-characterized cohort of 575 adult twins were genotyped for the loss-of-function mutations...... in FLG (R501X, 2282del4 and R2447X) most common among northern Europeans. Subjects were examined for symptoms of atopic diseases as well as for lung function, airway responsiveness, and atopy. RESULTS: In the whole population of twins, the risk for AD was significantly increased in individuals with FLG...... no significant differences in risk for asthma by FLG mutation status in individuals with and without AD, respectively (P-value for interaction, 0.595). In 11 dizygotic twin pairs discordant for FLG mutation status, risk for AD was higher in the twin carrying the FLG mutation (five of 11 [45.5%] twins had...

  15. Effective RNAi-mediated β2-microglobulin loss of function by transgenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelkovska, Hristina; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Haynes, Nikesha; Robert, Jacques

    2013-03-15

    To impair MHC class I (class I) function in vivo in the amphibian Xenopus, we developed an effective reverse genetic loss of function approach by combining I-SceI meganuclease-mediated transgenesis with RNAi technology. We generated transgenic outbred X. laevis and isogenetic laevis/gilli cloned lines with stably silenced expression of β2-microglobulin (b2m) critical for class I function. Transgenic F1 frogs exhibited decreased surface class I expression on erythrocytes and lymphocytes, decreased frequency of peripheral CD8 T cells and impaired CD8 T cell-mediated skin allograft rejection. Additionally, b2m knockdown increased susceptibility to viral infection of F0 transgenic larvae. This loss of function strategy offers new avenues for studying ontogeny of immunity and other developmental processes in Xenopus.

  16. Effective RNAi-mediated β2-microglobulin loss of function by transgenesis in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristina Nedelkovska

    2013-01-01

    To impair MHC class I (class I function in vivo in the amphibian Xenopus, we developed an effective reverse genetic loss of function approach by combining I-SceI meganuclease-mediated transgenesis with RNAi technology. We generated transgenic outbred X. laevis and isogenetic laevis/gilli cloned lines with stably silenced expression of β2-microglobulin (b2m critical for class I function. Transgenic F1 frogs exhibited decreased surface class I expression on erythrocytes and lymphocytes, decreased frequency of peripheral CD8 T cells and impaired CD8 T cell-mediated skin allograft rejection. Additionally, b2m knockdown increased susceptibility to viral infection of F0 transgenic larvae. This loss of function strategy offers new avenues for studying ontogeny of immunity and other developmental processes in Xenopus.

  17. Evidence That Loss-of-Function Filaggrin Gene Mutations Evolved in Northern Europeans to Favor Intracutaneous Vitamin D3 Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Bikle, Daniel D; Elias, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Skin pigmentation lightened progressively to a variable extent, as modern humans emigrated out of Africa, but extreme lightening occurred only in northern Europeans. Yet, loss of pigmentation alone cannot suffice to sustain cutaneous vitamin D3 (VD3) formation at the high latitudes of northern...... Europe. We hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in the epidermal structural protein, filaggrin (FLG), could have evolved to sustain adequate VD3 status. Loss of FLG results in reduced generation of trans-urocanic acid, the principal endogenous ultraviolet-B (UV-B) filter in lightly...... UV-B penetration and intracutaneous VD3 formation, the latitude-dependent gradient in FLG mutations, likely together with other concurrent mutations in VD3 metabolic pathways, provide a non-pigment-based mechanism that sustains higher levels of circulating VD3 in northern Europeans. At the time...

  18. PyMut: a web tool for overlapping gene loss-of-function mutation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Hou, Sha; Dai, Junbiao; Sun, Zhirong

    2015-12-03

    Loss-of-function study is an effective approach to research gene functions. However, currently most of such studies have ignored an important problem (in this paper, we call it "off-target" problem), that is, if the target gene is an overlapping gene (A gene whose expressible nucleotides overlaps with that of another one), loss-of-function muta-tion by deleting the complete open reading frame (ORF) may also cause the gene it overlaps lose function, resulting a phenotype which may be rather different from that of single gene deletion. Therefore, when doing such studies, the loss-of-function mutations should be carefully designed to guarantee only the function of the target gene will be abolished. In this paper, we present PyMut, an easy-to-use web tool for biologists to design such mutations. To the best of our knowledge, PyMut is the first tool that aims to solve the "off-target" problem regarding the overlapping genes. Our web server is freely available at http://www.bioinfo.tsinghua.edu.cn/~liuke/PyMut/index.html.

  19. Leonhard Euler and his contributions to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    The career of Leonhard Euler, one of the world's most gifted scientists, is reviewed. The paper focuses on Euler's contributions to fluid mechanics and gives a perspective of how this science was born. A bibliography is included to provide the history enthusiast with a starting point for further study.

  20. Loss of Function of GALNT2 Lowers High-Density Lipoproteins in Humans, Nonhuman Primates, and Rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Christoffersen, Christina

    2016-01-01

    models. We identified two humans homozygous for loss-of-function mutations in GALNT2 who demonstrated low HDL-C. We also found that GALNT2 loss of function in mice, rats, and nonhuman primates decreased HDL-C. O-glycoproteomics studies of a human GALNT2-deficient subject validated ANGPTL3 and Apo...

  1. Sexual selection by female immunity against paternal antigens can fix loss of function alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Darius; Springer, Stevan A; Ma, Fang; Cohen, Miriam; Secrest, Patrick; Taylor, Rachel E; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2011-10-25

    Humans lack the common mammalian cell surface molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a CMAH gene inactivation, which occurred approximately three million years ago. Modern humans produce antibodies specific for Neu5Gc. We hypothesized that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies could enter the female reproductive tract and target Neu5Gc-positive sperm or fetal tissues, reducing reproductive compatibility. Indeed, female mice with a human-like Cmah(-/-) mutation and immunized to express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies show lower fertility with Neu5Gc-positive males, due to prezygotic incompatibilities. Human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are also capable of targeting paternally derived antigens and mediate cytotoxicity against Neu5Gc-bearing chimpanzee sperm in vitro. Models of populations polymorphic for such antigens show that reproductive incompatibility by female immunity can drive loss-of-function alleles to fixation from moderate initial frequencies. Initially, the loss of a cell-surface antigen can occur due to drift in isolated populations or when natural selection favors the loss of a receptor exploited by pathogens, subsequently the same loss-of-function allele can come under sexual selection because it avoids being targeted by the female immune system. Thus, we provide evidence of a link between sexual selection and immune function: Antigenicity in females can select against foreign paternal antigens on sperm and rapidly fix loss-of-function alleles. Similar circumstances existed when the CMAH null allele was polymorphic in ancestral hominins, just before the divergence of Homo from australopithecines.

  2. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of loss-of-function cardiac sodium channelopathies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Clur, Sally-Ann B; Breur, Johannes M P J; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Rammeloo, Lukas A; Wilde, Arthur A M; Blom, Nico A

    2012-12-01

    Loss-of-function sodium channelopathies manifest as a spectrum of diseases including Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease. To analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these disorders in children. Patients aged ≤ 16 years with genetically confirmed loss-of-function sodium channelopathies (SCN5A mutation), presenting with cardiac symptoms, positive family history, and/or abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG), were included. Abnormal ECG consisted of type 1 BrS ECG and/or prolonged conduction intervals (PR interval/QRS duration > 98th percentile for age). Among the cohort (n = 33, age 6 ± 5 years, 58% male subjects, 30% probands), 14 (42%) patients were symptomatic, presenting with syncope (n = 5), palpitations (n = 1), supraventricular arrhythmias (n = 3), aborted cardiac arrest (n = 3), and sudden cardiac death (n = 2). Heart rate was 91 ± 26 beats/min, PR interval 168 ± 35 ms, QRS duration 112 ± 20 ms, and heart-rate corrected QT interval 409 ± 26 ms. Conduction intervals were prolonged in 28 (85%) patients; 6 of these patients also had spontaneous type 1 BrS ECG. Eight fever-associated events occurred in 6 patients; 2 of these were vaccination-related fever episodes. Treatment included aggressive antipyretics during fever in all patients; antiarrhythmic treatment included implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (n = 4), pacemaker (n = 2), and beta-blockers, either alone (n = 3) or in combination with device (n = 2). During follow-up (4 ± 4 years), 2 previously symptomatic patients had monomorphic ventricular tachycardia; there were no deaths. Diagnosis of loss-of-function sodium channelopathies in children relies on cardiac symptoms, family history, and ECG. Fever and vaccination are potential arrhythmia triggers; conduction delay is the commonest finding on ECG. Beta-blockers have a role in preventing tachycardia-induced arrhythmias; implantable cardioverter-defibrillator should probably be reserved for severe cases. Copyright © 2012

  3. PHENOTYPIC ANALYSIS OF OsTPKb LOSS OF FUNCTION MUTANT RICE LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isayenkov S. V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of screen and analysis of two OsTPKb rice mutant lines were described. The phenotypes and growth rate level of homozygous mutant plants of both rice lines were estimated. The electron microscopy of aleurone layer from forming seeds was performed. The OsTPKb mutant plants demonstrate lower growth rate in comparison with wild type plants. The loss of function OsTPKb mutations invariably led to (semisterile rice plants. The functional disruption of OsTPKb channel has negative impact on plant growth and development. It might completely change the cell morphology of aleurone layer.

  4. Myxoma virus M156 is a specific inhibitor of rabbit PKR but contains a loss-of-function mutation in Australian virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chen; Haller, Sherry L; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2016-04-05

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus, which is highly virulent in European rabbits. The attenuation of MYXV and the increased resistance of rabbits following the release of MYXV in Australia is one of the best-documented examples of host-pathogen coevolution. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the restriction of MYXV infection to rabbits and MYXV attenuation in the field, we have studied the interaction of the MYXV protein M156 with the host antiviral protein kinase R (PKR). In yeast and cell-culture transfection assays, M156 only inhibited rabbit PKR but not PKR from other tested mammalian species. Infection assays with human HeLa PKR knock-down cells, which were stably transfected with human or rabbit PKR, revealed that only human but not rabbit PKR was able to restrict MYXV infection, whereas both PKRs were able to restrict replication of a vaccinia virus (VACV) strain that lacks the PKR inhibitors E3 and K3. Inactivation of M156R led to MYXV virus attenuation in rabbit cells, which was rescued by the ectopic expression of VACV E3 and K3. We further show that a mutation in the M156 encoding gene that was identified in more than 50% of MYXV field isolates from Australia resulted in an M156 variant that lost its ability to inhibit rabbit PKR and led to virus attenuation. The species-specific inhibition of rabbit PKR by M156 and the M156 loss-of-function in Australian MYXV field isolates might thus contribute to the species specificity of MYXV and to the attenuation in the field, respectively.

  5. Contribution of ultrasonic traveling wave to chemical-mechanical polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; He, Qing; Zheng, Mian; Liu, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The ultrasonic vibrators are introduced into the chemical-mechanical polishing devices, and in this polishing system, the ultrasonic vibrators generate ultrasonic traveling wave and keep coaxial with the polished silicon wafer rotating at given speed so as to compare the texture of the polished silicon wafers. And the experiments on the chemical-mechanical polishing with assisted ultrasonic vibration are accomplished in order to investigate the effect of the ultrasonic vibration on the chemical-mechanical polishing. Via comparing the roughness average of the two silicon wafers polished with assisted ultrasonic vibration and without assisted vibration, it is found that the morphology of the silicon wafer polished with assisted vibration is superior to that without assisted vibration, that is, this series of experiments indicate that the ultrasonic vibration is beneficial to the chemical-mechanical polishing. Aiming at understanding the contribution of the ultrasonic vibration to chemical-mechanical polishing in detail, the model of the chemical-mechanical polishing with the assisted ultrasonic vibration is built up, which establishes the relationship of the removal rate and the polishing variables such as the rotary speed of silicon wafers, the amplitude and the frequency of vibrators, the particle density of polishing slurry and the characteristics of polishing pad etc. This model not only could be used to explain the experimental results but also to illuminate the roles played by the polishing variables.

  6. Breaking down the contribution of different meteorological mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Ambroise; Tilinina, Natalia; Zolina, Olga; Gulev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Several mechanisms are held responsible for extreme atmospheric moisture into the Arctic - our case study - : extratropical cyclones, breaking Rossby waves, blocking events, etc. Based on composite analysis, all these phenomena have been associated with above average meridional moisture transport. These individual conclusions call for a synthesis in order to share the credit between the different mechanisms. However, it is impossible to break down the respective contributions by simply using their composites due to the risk of double counting. Indeed, the different phenomena may occur simultaneously and have overlapping regions of influence. As a result, building composites for one phenomenon will likely count in a portion of the others as well. This ambiguity is raised within a probabilistic framework by viewing composites as conditional expectations. For a given event A, the composite is written as the sum of each event's contribution weighted by the event's conditional probability given A. The composites for a set of events can be interpreted as a linear system whose coefficents are conditional probabilities and whose solution is each event's individual contribution. Using data from ERA Interim and cyclone tracks from the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, we solve the linear system in the case of moisture transport through 70°N. The main result is to downgrade the collective influence of extratropical cyclones due to the predominance of weak inconsequential cyclones. Transient eddies are nonetheless responsible for more than 90 % of the transport : it undermines the common but untested assumption that transient eddies are identical to extratropical cyclones.

  7. Loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1 and risk of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Liv Tybjærg; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    -brain barrier via apoE-mediated pathways. METHODS: We tested whether a loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1, N1800H, is associated with plasma levels of apoE and with risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in 92,726 individuals and with risk of cerebrovascular disease in 64,181 individuals. RESULTS: N1800H AC (0.......2%) versus AA (99.8%) was associated with a 13% lower plasma level of apoE (P = 1 × 10(-11)). Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for N1800H AC versus AA were 4.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-12.9) for AD, 2.46 (1.10-5.50) for cerebrovascular disease, and 8.28 (2.03-33.7) for the hemorrhagic stroke...... subtype. DISCUSSION: A loss-of-function mutation in ABCA1, present in 1:500 individuals, was associated with low plasma levels of apoE and with high risk of AD and cerebrovascular disease in the general population....

  8. Loss-of-Function Mutations in APPL1 in Familial Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudente, Sabrina; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Marucci, Antonella; Ludovico, Ornella; Buranasupkajorn, Patinut; Mazza, Tommaso; Hastings, Timothy; Milano, Teresa; Morini, Eleonora; Mercuri, Luana; Bailetti, Diego; Mendonca, Christine; Alberico, Federica; Basile, Giorgio; Romani, Marta; Miccinilli, Elide; Pizzuti, Antonio; Carella, Massimo; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Pascarella, Stefano; Marchetti, Piero; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Di Paola, Rosa; Doria, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly heterogeneous disorder encompassing several distinct forms with different clinical manifestations including a wide spectrum of age at onset. Despite many advances, the causal genetic defect remains unknown for many subtypes of the disease, including some of those forms with an apparent Mendelian mode of inheritance. Here we report two loss-of-function mutations (c.1655T>A [p.Leu552∗] and c.280G>A [p.Asp94Asn]) in the gene for the Adaptor Protein, Phosphotyrosine Interaction, PH domain, and leucine zipper containing 1 (APPL1) that were identified by means of whole-exome sequencing in two large families with a high prevalence of diabetes not due to mutations in known genes involved in maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). APPL1 binds to AKT2, a key molecule in the insulin signaling pathway, thereby enhancing insulin-induced AKT2 activation and downstream signaling leading to insulin action and secretion. Both mutations cause APPL1 loss of function. The p.Leu552∗ alteration totally abolishes APPL1 protein expression in HepG2 transfected cells and the p.Asp94Asn alteration causes significant reduction in the enhancement of the insulin-stimulated AKT2 and GSK3β phosphorylation that is observed after wild-type APPL1 transfection. These findings—linking APPL1 mutations to familial forms of diabetes—reaffirm the critical role of APPL1 in glucose homeostasis. PMID:26073777

  9. Loss-of-function mutations in sodium channel Nav1.7 cause anosmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Jacobi, Eric; Bufe, Bernd; Willnecker, Vivienne; Schick, Bernhard; Zizzari, Philippe; Gossage, Samuel J; Greer, Charles A; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Zufall, Frank

    2011-04-14

    Loss of function of the gene SCN9A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, causes a congenital inability to experience pain in humans. Here we show that Na(v)1.7 is not only necessary for pain sensation but is also an essential requirement for odour perception in both mice and humans. We examined human patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A and show that they are unable to sense odours. To establish the essential role of Na(v)1.7 in odour perception, we generated conditional null mice in which Na(v)1.7 was removed from all olfactory sensory neurons. In the absence of Na(v)1.7, these neurons still produce odour-evoked action potentials but fail to initiate synaptic signalling from their axon terminals at the first synapse in the olfactory system. The mutant mice no longer display vital, odour-guided behaviours such as innate odour recognition and avoidance, short-term odour learning, and maternal pup retrieval. Our study creates a mouse model of congenital general anosmia and provides new strategies to explore the genetic basis of the human sense of smell.

  10. Loss-of-function rodent models for parkin and PINK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras-Salvá, Marusela; Van Rompuy, Anne-Sophie; Heeman, Bavo; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder whose aetiology is not yet fully understood. In the past ten years, the discovery of genes linked to hereditary forms of the disease has impelled the development of animal models. These should lead to the identification of novel pathways that provide insight into the functionality of the proteins involved and the pathogenesis of the sporadic forms of the disease. In particular, loss-of-function mutations in the parkin and PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced kinase 1) genes account for most of the cases of familial autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Both parkin and PINK1 knockout rodent models are now available, which display an overall mild phenotype consisting of a mitochondrial dysfunction together with changes in dopamine metabolism and oxidative stress. However, up till now these models fail to reproduce the main hallmarks of Parkinson's disease: the dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra and the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, named Lewy bodies, in the remaining dopaminergic neurons. We here review the most important knockout and knockdown rodent models generated so far for these two recessive Parkinson's disease-causing genes. We critically feature their main characteristics and their impact on the research field, and propose some future directions for the study and modelling of the loss of function of parkin and PINK1 in rodents.

  11. Association between loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Fenger, Runa V; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy.......Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy....

  12. Contributions to Crustal Mechanics on Europa from Subterranean Ocean Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The recent discovery of subduction zones on Europa demonstrated a significant step forward in understanding the moon's surface mechanics. This work promotes the additional consideration that the surface mechanics have contributions from small relative pressure differentials in the subsurface ocean that create cracks in the surface which are then filled, sealed and healed. Crack formation can be small, as interior pressure can relatively easily breach the surface crust, generating cracks followed by common fracture formation backfilled with frozen liquid. This process will slowly increase the overall surface area of the moon with each sealed crack and fracture increasing the total surface area. This creeping growth of surface area monotonically decreases subsurface pressure which can eventually catastrophically subduct large areas of surface and so is consistent with current knowledge of observational topology on Europa. This tendency is attributed to a relatively lower energy threshold to crack the surface from interior overpressures, but a higher energy threshold to crush the spherical surface due to subsurface underpressures. Proposed mechanisms for pressure differentials include tidal forces whose Fourier components build up the resonant oscillatory modes of the subsurface ocean creating periodic under and overpressure events below the crust. This mechanism provides a means to continually reform the surface of the moon over short geological time scales. This work supported in part by federal Grant NRC-HQ-84-14-G-0059.

  13. Loss-of-function mutations in APOC3 and risk of ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High plasma levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Whether lifelong low levels of nonfasting triglycerides owing to mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) are associated with a reduced risk...... of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population is unknown. METHODS: Using data from 75,725 participants in two general-population studies, we first tested whether low levels of nonfasting triglycerides were associated with reduced risks of ischemic vascular disease and ischemic heart disease....... Second, we tested whether loss-of-function mutations in APOC3, which were associated with reduced levels of nonfasting triglycerides, were also associated with reduced risks of ischemic vascular disease and ischemic heart disease. During follow-up, ischemic vascular disease developed in 10...

  14. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected.

  15. Less is more: Independent loss-of-function OCIMENE SYNTHASE alleles parallel pollination syndrome diversification in monkeyflowers (Mimulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Foen; Byers, Kelsey J R P; Bradshaw, Harvey D

    2017-07-19

    Pollinator-mediated selection on flower phenotypes (e.g., shape, color, scent) is key to understanding the adaptive radiation of angiosperms, many of which have evolved specialized relationships with a particular guild of animal pollinators (e.g., birds, bats, moths, bees). E-β-Ocimene, a monoterpene produced by OCIMENE SYNTHASE (OS) in Mimulus lewisii, is a floral scent important in attracting the species' bumblebee pollinators. The taxa closely related to M. lewisii have evolved several different pollination syndromes, including hummingbird pollination and self pollination (autogamy). We are interested in how floral scent variation contributed to species diversification in this clade. We analyzed variation in E-β-ocimene emission within this Mimulus clade and explored its molecular basis through a combination of DNA sequencing, reverse transcriptase PCR, and enzyme functional analysis in vitro. We found that none of the taxa, other than M. lewisii, emitted E-β-ocimene from flowers. But the molecular basis underlying loss of E-β-ocimene emission is unique in each taxon, including deletion, missense, or frameshift mutations in the OS gene, and potential posttranscriptional downregulation. The molecular evidence suggests that parallel loss-of-function in OS is the best explanation for the observed pattern of E-β-ocimene emission, likely as the result of natural selection. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  16. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine T Lim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5% variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸ including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷. Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴, demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health

  17. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability.(1) Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy.(2-5) The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology

  18. Functional and Morphological Correlates in the Drosophila LRRK2 loss-of-function Model of Parkinson's Disease: Drug Effects of Withania somnifera (Dunal Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francescaelena De Rose

    Full Text Available The common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm is a simple animal species that contributed significantly to the development of neurobiology whose leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutants (LRRK2 loss-of-function in the WD40 domain represent a very interesting tool to look into physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD. Accordingly, LRRK2 Dm have also the potential to contribute to reveal innovative therapeutic approaches to its treatment. Withania somnifera Dunal, a plant that grows spontaneously also in Mediterranean regions, is known in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory and protective properties against neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of its standardized root methanolic extract (Wse on the LRRK2 loss-of-function Dm model of PD. To this end mutant and wild type (WT flies were administered Wse, through diet, at different concentrations as larvae and adults (L+/A+ or as adults (L-/A+ only. LRRK2 mutants have a significantly reduced lifespan and compromised motor function and mitochondrial morphology compared to WT flies 1% Wse-enriched diet, administered to Dm LRRK2 as L-/A+and improved a locomotor activity b muscle electrophysiological response to stimuli and also c protected against mitochondria degeneration. In contrast, the administration of Wse to Dm LRRK2 as L+/A+, no matter at which concentration, worsened lifespan and determined the appearance of increased endosomal activity in the thoracic ganglia. These results, while confirming that the LRRK2 loss-of-function in the WD40 domain represents a valid model of PD, reveal that under appropriate concentrations Wse can be usefully employed to counteract some deficits associated with the disease. However, a careful assessment of the risks, likely related to the impaired endosomal activity, is required.

  19. Functional and Morphological Correlates in the Drosophila LRRK2 loss-of-function Model of Parkinson's Disease: Drug Effects of Withania somnifera (Dunal) Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Francescaelena; Marotta, Roberto; Poddighe, Simone; Talani, Giuseppe; Catelani, Tiziano; Setzu, Maria Dolores; Solla, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Sanna, Enrico; Kasture, Sanjay; Acquas, Elio; Liscia, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) is a simple animal species that contributed significantly to the development of neurobiology whose leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutants (LRRK2) loss-of-function in the WD40 domain represent a very interesting tool to look into physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Accordingly, LRRK2 Dm have also the potential to contribute to reveal innovative therapeutic approaches to its treatment. Withania somnifera Dunal, a plant that grows spontaneously also in Mediterranean regions, is known in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory and protective properties against neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of its standardized root methanolic extract (Wse) on the LRRK2 loss-of-function Dm model of PD. To this end mutant and wild type (WT) flies were administered Wse, through diet, at different concentrations as larvae and adults (L+/A+) or as adults (L-/A+) only. LRRK2 mutants have a significantly reduced lifespan and compromised motor function and mitochondrial morphology compared to WT flies 1% Wse-enriched diet, administered to Dm LRRK2 as L-/A+and improved a) locomotor activity b) muscle electrophysiological response to stimuli and also c) protected against mitochondria degeneration. In contrast, the administration of Wse to Dm LRRK2 as L+/A+, no matter at which concentration, worsened lifespan and determined the appearance of increased endosomal activity in the thoracic ganglia. These results, while confirming that the LRRK2 loss-of-function in the WD40 domain represents a valid model of PD, reveal that under appropriate concentrations Wse can be usefully employed to counteract some deficits associated with the disease. However, a careful assessment of the risks, likely related to the impaired endosomal activity, is required.

  20. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  1. Rapid Generation of Human Genetic Loss-of-Function iPSC Lines by Simultaneous Reprogramming and Gene Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Tidball

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Specifically ablating genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs allows for studies of gene function as well as disease mechanisms in disorders caused by loss-of-function (LOF mutations. While techniques exist for engineering such lines, we have developed and rigorously validated a method of simultaneous iPSC reprogramming while generating CRISPR/Cas9-dependent insertions/deletions (indels. This approach allows for the efficient and rapid formation of genetic LOF human disease cell models with isogenic controls. The rate of mutagenized lines was strikingly consistent across experiments targeting four different human epileptic encephalopathy genes and a metabolic enzyme-encoding gene, and was more efficient and consistent than using CRISPR gene editing of established iPSC lines. The ability of our streamlined method to reproducibly generate heterozygous and homozygous LOF iPSC lines with passage-matched isogenic controls in a single step provides for the rapid development of LOF disease models with ideal control lines, even in the absence of patient tissue.

  2. Rare loss-of-function variants in SETD1A are associated with schizophrenia and developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarjinder; Kurki, Mitja I; Curtis, David; Purcell, Shaun M; Crooks, Lucy; McRae, Jeremy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Chheda, Himanshu; Blackwood, Douglas; Breen, Gerome; Pietiläinen, Olli; Gerety, Sebastian S; Ayub, Muhammad; Blyth, Moira; Cole, Trevor; Collier, David; Coomber, Eve L; Craddock, Nick; Daly, Mark J; Danesh, John; DiForti, Marta; Foster, Alison; Freimer, Nelson B; Geschwind, Daniel; Johnstone, Mandy; Joss, Shelagh; Kirov, Georg; Körkkö, Jarmo; Kuismin, Outi; Holmans, Peter; Hultman, Christina M; Iyegbe, Conrad; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Männikkö, Minna; McCarroll, Steve A; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew M; McQuillin, Andrew; Moilanen, Jukka S; Moore, Carmel; Murray, Robin M; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Ouwehand, Willem; Paunio, Tiina; Prigmore, Elena; Rees, Elliott; Roberts, David; Sambrook, Jennifer; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Veijola, Juha; Walters, James T R; Williams, Hywel; Sullivan, Patrick F; Hurles, Matthew E; O'Donovan, Michael C; Palotie, Aarno; Owen, Michael J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2016-04-01

    By analyzing the whole-exome sequences of 4,264 schizophrenia cases, 9,343 controls and 1,077 trios, we identified a genome-wide significant association between rare loss-of-function (LoF) variants in SETD1A and risk for schizophrenia (P = 3.3 × 10(-9)). We found only two heterozygous LoF variants in 45,376 exomes from individuals without a neuropsychiatric diagnosis, indicating that SETD1A is substantially depleted of LoF variants in the general population. Seven of the ten individuals with schizophrenia carrying SETD1A LoF variants also had learning difficulties. We further identified four SETD1A LoF carriers among 4,281 children with severe developmental disorders and two more carriers in an independent sample of 5,720 Finnish exomes, both with notable neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Together, our observations indicate that LoF variants in SETD1A cause a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia. Combining these data with previous common variant evidence, we suggest that epigenetic dysregulation, specifically in the histone H3K4 methylation pathway, is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  3. Arterial mechanics considering the structural and mechanical contributions of ECM constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunjie; Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Zhang, Yanhang

    2016-08-16

    Considering the organization and engagement behavior of different extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents in the medial and adventitial layer of the arterial wall, in this study, we proposed a new constitutive model of ECM mechanics that considers the distinct structural and mechanical contributions of medial elastin, medial collagen, and adventitial collagen, to incorporate the constituent-specific fiber orientation and the sequential fiber engagement in arterial mechanics. Planar biaxial tensile testing method was used to characterize the orthotropic and hyperelastic behavior of porcine thoracic aorta. Fiber distribution functions of medial elastin, medial collagen, and adventitial collagen were incorporated into the constitutive model. Considering the sequential engagement of ECM constituents in arterial mechanics, a recruitment density function was incorporated into the model to capture the delayed engagement of adventitial collagen. A freely jointed chain model was used to capture the mechanical behavior of elastin and collagen at the fiber level. The tissue-level ECM mechanics was obtained by incorporating fiber distribution, engagement, and elastin and collagen content. The multi-scale constitutive model considering the structural and mechanical contributions of the three major ECM constituents allows us to directly incorporate information obtained from quantitative multi-photon imaging and analysis, and biochemical assay for the prediction of tissue-level mechanical response. Moreover, the model shows promises in fitting and predicting with a small set of material parameters, which has physical meanings and can be related to the structure of the ECM.

  4. CYP24A1 loss of function: Clinical phenotype of monoallelic and biallelic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Thomas O

    2017-01-16

    CYP24A1, encoding the vitamin D-24-hydroxylase, is of major clinical and physiologic importance, serving to regulate the catabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D, the physiologically active vitamin D metabolite. In addition to facilitating catabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D, CYP24A1 also enhances the turnover and elimination of 25-OHD, the abundant precursor metabolite and storage form of the vitamin. CYP24A1 can be stimulated hormonally by 1,25-(OH)2D and by FGF23, whereas CYP27B1, encoding the vitamin D-1α-hydroxylase, is stimulated hormonally by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and downregulated by FGF23. Thus CYP24A1 and CYP27B1, together, provide for alternate and regulated fates of 25-OHD, and control the availability of the active metabolite, 1,25-(OH)2D, depending upon physiologic needs. These two enzymes, are therefore central to the homeostatic control of vitamin D metabolism, and as a result affect calcium metabolism in critical ways. Disruption of CYP24A1 in mice results in elevated circulating 1,25-(OH)2D, substantiating the importance of the enzyme in the maintenance of vitamin D metabolism. The consequential skeletal phenotype in these mice further demonstrates the biologic sequelae of the disruption of the vitamin D pathway, and illustrates a specific developmental pathology mediated largely by oversupply of 1,25-(OH)2D. More recent evidence has identified loss of function mutations in CYP24A1 in association with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis in humans. Initial reports described certain variant mutations in CYP24A1 as an unrecognized cause of "Idiopathic Infantile Hypercalcemia," and more recently older children and adults have been identified with a similar phenotype. Over 25 likely disease-causing variants are described. Homozygous and compound heterozygote mutations account for the overwhelming majority of cases, however the heterozygous loss-of-function mutations of CYP24A1 do not appear to consistently result in symptomatic hypercalcemia. Considerations

  5. Effect of eda loss of function on upper jugal tooth morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Cyril; Pantalacci, Sophie; Peterkova, Renata; Tafforeau, Paul; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2009-02-01

    The Tabby/eda mice, which bear a loss of function mutation for the eda (ectodysplasinA) gene, are known to display developmental anomalies in organs with an ectodermal origin. Although the lower jugal (cheek) teeth of Tabby/eda mice have been extensively studied, upper teeth have never been investigated in detail. However, this may help us to further understand the function of the eda gene in tooth development. In this work, the shape and size of both the crown and the radicular system were studied in the Tabby/eda mice upper jugal teeth. To deal with the high morphological variability, we defined several morphotypes based on cusp numbers and position. Statistical tests were then performed within and between the different morphotypes to test the correlation between tooth size and morphology. Our analysis reveals that, as in lower teeth, eda is necessary to segment the dental lamina into three teeth with the characteristic size and proportions of the mouse. Nevertheless, since strong effects are observed in heterozygous upper teeth while lower are only mildly affected, it seems that the upper jaw is more sensitive than the lower jaw to the loss of eda function. Modifications in cusp number and the abnormal crown size of the teeth are clearly linked, and our results indicate a role of eda in cusp patterning. Moreover, we found that the Tabby mutation induces variations in the dental root pattern, sometimes associated with hypercementosis, suggesting a newly uncovered role played by eda in root patterning and formation.

  6. Recurrent MLK4 Loss-of-Function Mutations Suppress JNK Signaling to Promote Colon Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Baik, Hayeon; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Li, Yaoyong; Blyth, Karen; Mason, Susan; Chapman, Phil; Puto, Lorena A.; Read, Jon A.; Brassington, Claire; Pollard, Hannah K.; Phillips, Chris; Green, Isabelle; Overman, Ross; Collier, Matthew; Testoni, Ewelina; Miller, Crispin J.; Hunter, Tony; Sansom, Owen J.; Brognard, John

    2015-01-01

    MLK4 is a member of the mixed-lineage family of kinases that regulate the JNK, p38, and ERK kinase signaling pathways. MLK4 mutations have been identified in various human cancers including frequently in colorectal cancer, where their function and pathobiological importance has been uncertain. In this study, we assessed the functional consequences of MLK4 mutations in colon tumorigenesis. Biochemical data indicated that a majority of MLK4 mutations are loss-of-function (LOF) mutations that can exert dominant negative effects. In seeking to understand the abrogated activity of these mutants, we elucidated a new MLK4 catalytic domain structure. To determine whether MLK4 is required to maintain the tumorigenic phenotype, we reconstituted its signaling axis in colon cancer cells harboring MLK4 inactivating mutations. We found that restoring MLK4 activity reduced cell viability, proliferation, and colony formation in vitro and delayed tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistic investigations established that restoring the function of MLK4 selectively induced the JNK pathway and its downstream targets, cJUN, ATF3 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2B. Our work indicates that MLK4 is a novel tumor suppressing kinase harboring frequent LOF mutations that lead to diminished signaling in the JNK pathway and enhanced proliferation in colon cancer. PMID:26637668

  7. Loss-of-Function Mutations in APOC3, Triglycerides, and Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma triglyceride levels are heritable and are correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Sequencing of the protein-coding regions of the human genome (the exome) has the potential to identify rare mutations that have a large effect on phenotype. Methods We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 18,666 genes in each of 3734 participants of European or African ancestry in the Exome Sequencing Project. We conducted tests to determine whether rare mutations in coding sequence, individually or in aggregate within a gene, were associated with plasma triglyceride levels. For mutations associated with triglyceride levels, we subsequently evaluated their association with the risk of coronary heart disease in 110,970 persons. Results An aggregate of rare mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) was associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels. Among the four mutations that drove this result, three were loss-of-function mutations: a nonsense mutation (R19X) and two splice-site mutations (IVS2+1G→A and IVS3+1G→T). The fourth was a missense mutation (A43T). Approximately 1 in 150 persons in the study was a heterozygous carrier of at least one of these four mutations. Triglyceride levels in the carriers were 39% lower than levels in noncarriers (Ptriglycerides and APOC3. Carriers of these mutations were found to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.) PMID:24941081

  8. Loss-of-function mutations in APOC3, triglycerides, and coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jacy; Peloso, Gina M; Auer, Paul L; Crosslin, David R; Stitziel, Nathan O; Lange, Leslie A; Lu, Yingchang; Tang, Zheng-zheng; Zhang, He; Hindy, George; Masca, Nicholas; Stirrups, Kathleen; Kanoni, Stavroula; Do, Ron; Jun, Goo; Hu, Youna; Kang, Hyun Min; Xue, Chenyi; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Duga, Stefano; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Asselta, Rosanna; Girelli, Domenico; Olivieri, Oliviero; Martinelli, Nicola; Yin, Wu; Reilly, Dermot; Speliotes, Elizabeth; Fox, Caroline S; Hveem, Kristian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Nikpay, Majid; Farlow, Deborah N; Assimes, Themistocles L; Franceschini, Nora; Robinson, Jennifer; North, Kari E; Martin, Lisa W; DePristo, Mark; Gupta, Namrata; Escher, Stefan A; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Van Zuydam, Natalie; Palmer, Colin N A; Wareham, Nicholas; Koch, Werner; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Lieb, Wolfgang; Erbel, Raimund; Konig, Inke R; Kruppa, Jochen; Degenhardt, Franziska; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin P; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Psaty, Bruce M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Abecasis, Goncalo; Ordovas, Jose M; Melander, Olle; Watkins, Hugh; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ardissino, Diego; Loos, Ruth J F; McPherson, Ruth; Willer, Cristen J; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hall, Alistair S; Samani, Nilesh J; Deloukas, Panos; Schunkert, Heribert; Wilson, James G; Kooperberg, Charles; Rich, Stephen S; Tracy, Russell P; Lin, Dan-Yu; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Nickerson, Deborah A; Jarvik, Gail P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reiner, Alex P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2014-07-03

    Plasma triglyceride levels are heritable and are correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Sequencing of the protein-coding regions of the human genome (the exome) has the potential to identify rare mutations that have a large effect on phenotype. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 18,666 genes in each of 3734 participants of European or African ancestry in the Exome Sequencing Project. We conducted tests to determine whether rare mutations in coding sequence, individually or in aggregate within a gene, were associated with plasma triglyceride levels. For mutations associated with triglyceride levels, we subsequently evaluated their association with the risk of coronary heart disease in 110,970 persons. An aggregate of rare mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) was associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels. Among the four mutations that drove this result, three were loss-of-function mutations: a nonsense mutation (R19X) and two splice-site mutations (IVS2+1G→A and IVS3+1G→T). The fourth was a missense mutation (A43T). Approximately 1 in 150 persons in the study was a heterozygous carrier of at least one of these four mutations. Triglyceride levels in the carriers were 39% lower than levels in noncarriers (Pdisease among 498 carriers of any rare APOC3 mutation was 40% lower than the risk among 110,472 noncarriers (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.47 to 0.75; P=4×10(-6)). Rare mutations that disrupt APOC3 function were associated with lower levels of plasma triglycerides and APOC3. Carriers of these mutations were found to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.).

  9. Loss of function mutations in HARS cause a spectrum of inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safka Brozkova, Dana; Deconinck, Tine; Griffin, Laurie Beth; Ferbert, Andreas; Haberlova, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Lassuthova, Petra; Roth, Christian; Pilunthanakul, Thanita; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Janecke, Andreas R; Zavadakova, Petra; Chrast, Roman; Rivolta, Carlo; Zuchner, Stephan; Antonellis, Anthony; Beg, Asim A; De Jonghe, Peter; Senderek, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by distal muscle weakness and sensory loss. Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that these tRNA charging enzymes are uniquely important for the peripheral nerve. Recently, a mutation in histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) was identified in a single patient with a late-onset, sensory-predominant peripheral neuropathy; however, the genetic evidence was lacking, making the significance of the finding unclear. Here, we present clinical, genetic, and functional data that implicate HARS mutations in inherited peripheral neuropathies. The associated phenotypic spectrum is broad and encompasses axonal and demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies, including four young patients presenting with pure motor axonal neuropathy. Genome-wide linkage studies in combination with whole-exome and conventional sequencing revealed four distinct and previously unreported heterozygous HARS mutations segregating with autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy in four unrelated families (p.Thr132Ile, p.Pro134His, p.Asp175Glu and p.Asp364Tyr). All mutations cause a loss of function in yeast complementation assays, and p.Asp364Tyr is dominantly neurotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrates the role of HARS mutations in peripheral neuropathy and expands the genetic and clinical spectrum of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-related human disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 impair vesicular trafficking, tropoelastin secretion and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan; Morava, Eva; Kornak, Uwe; Lefeber, Dirk J; Fischer, Björn; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini; Aldinger, Annika; Choi, Jiwon; Davis, Elaine C; Abuelo, Dianne N; Adamowicz, Maciej; Al-Aama, Jumana; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Fernandez, Bridget; Greally, Marie T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kayserili, Hulya; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Tekin, Mustafa; Türkmen, Seval; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Yüksel-Konuk, Berrin; Mundlos, Stefan; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Wevers, Ron A; Urban, Zsolt

    2009-06-15

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump (ATP6V0A2). The goal of this study was to define the disease mechanisms that lead to connective tissue lesions in ARCL2. In a new cohort of 17 patients, DNA sequencing of ATP6V0A2 detected either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations. Considerable allelic and phenotypic heterogeneity was observed, with a missense mutation of a moderately conserved residue p.P87L leading to unusually mild disease. Abnormal N- and/or mucin type O-glycosylation was observed in all patients tested. Premature stop codon mutations led to decreased ATP6V0A2 mRNA levels by destabilizing the mutant mRNA via the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. Loss of ATP6V0A2 either by siRNA knockdown or in ARCL2 cells resulted in distended Golgi cisternae, accumulation of abnormal lysosomes and multivesicular bodies. Immunostaining of ARCL2 cells showed the accumulation of tropoelastin (TE) in the Golgi and in large, abnormal intracellular and extracellular aggregates. Pulse-chase studies confirmed impaired secretion and increased intracellular retention of TE, and insoluble elastin assays showed significantly reduced extracellular deposition of mature elastin. Fibrillin-1 microfibril assembly and secreted lysyl oxidase activity were normal in ARCL2 cells. TUNEL staining demonstrated increased rates of apoptosis in ARCL2 cell cultures. We conclude that loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 lead to TE aggregation in the Golgi, impaired clearance of TE aggregates and increased apoptosis of elastogenic cells.

  11. A rare IL33 loss-of-function mutation reduces blood eosinophil counts and protects from asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Dirk; Helgason, Hannes; Sulem, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    amino acids. The truncated IL-33 has normal intracellular localization but neither binds IL-33R/ST2 nor activates ST2-expressing cells. Together these data demonstrate that rs146597587-C is a loss of function mutation and support the hypothesis that IL-33 haploinsufficiency protects against asthma....

  12. Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Sara J.; Asai, Yuka; Cordell, Heather J.; Campbell, Linda E.; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Northstone, Kate; Henderson, John; Alizadehfar, Reza; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Morgan, Kenneth; Roberts, Graham; Masthoff, Laury J. N.; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van den Akker, Peter C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Lack, Gideon; Clarke, Ann; Hull, Peter R.; Irvine, Alan D.; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Background: IgE-mediated peanut allergy is a complex trait with strong heritability, but its genetic basis is currently unknown. Loss-of-function mutations within the filaggrin gene are associated with atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases; therefore, filaggrin is a candidate gene in the etiol

  13. No Association between Loss-of-Function Mutations in filaggrin and Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, and All-Cause Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Skaaby, Tea; Jørgensen, Torben; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Meldgaard, Michael; Szecsi, Pal B.; Stender, Steen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Background Common loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are a major predisposing risk factor for atopic disease due to reduced epidermal filaggrin protein levels. We previously observed an association between these mutations and type 2 diabetes and hypothesized that an inherited impairment of skin barrier functions could facilitate low-grade inflammation and hence increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between loss-of-function mutations in FLG and diabetes, stroke, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and all-cause mortality in the general population. Methods The R501X and 2282del4 loss-of function mutations in FLG were genotyped in four Danish study populations including a total of 13373 adults aged 15-77 years. Two of the studies also genotyped the R2447X mutation. By linkage to Danish national central registers we obtained information for all participants on dates of diagnoses of diabetes, stroke, and IHD, as well as all-cause mortality. Data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models and combined by fixed effect meta-analyses. Results In meta-analyses combining the results from the four individual studies, carriage of loss-of-function mutations in FLG was not associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) = 0.95 (0.73, 1.23), stroke (HR (95% CI) = 1.27 (0.97, 1.65), ischemic heart disease (HR (95%CI) = 0.92 (0.71, 1.19), and all-cause mortality (HR (95%CI) = 1.02 (0.83, 1.25)). Similar results were obtained when including prevalent cases in logistic regression models. Conclusion Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in FLG are not associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. However, larger studies with longer follow-up are needed to exclude any associations. PMID:24367652

  14. No association between loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Lotte N Husemoen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG are a major predisposing risk factor for atopic disease due to reduced epidermal filaggrin protein levels. We previously observed an association between these mutations and type 2 diabetes and hypothesized that an inherited impairment of skin barrier functions could facilitate low-grade inflammation and hence increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between loss-of-function mutations in FLG and diabetes, stroke, ischemic heart disease (IHD, and all-cause mortality in the general population. METHODS: The R501X and 2282del4 loss-of function mutations in FLG were genotyped in four Danish study populations including a total of 13373 adults aged 15-77 years. Two of the studies also genotyped the R2447X mutation. By linkage to Danish national central registers we obtained information for all participants on dates of diagnoses of diabetes, stroke, and IHD, as well as all-cause mortality. Data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models and combined by fixed effect meta-analyses. RESULTS: In meta-analyses combining the results from the four individual studies, carriage of loss-of-function mutations in FLG was not associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio (HR (95% confidence intervals (CI = 0.95 (0.73, 1.23, stroke (HR (95% CI = 1.27 (0.97, 1.65, ischemic heart disease (HR (95%CI = 0.92 (0.71, 1.19, and all-cause mortality (HR (95%CI = 1.02 (0.83, 1.25. Similar results were obtained when including prevalent cases in logistic regression models. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in FLG are not associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. However, larger studies with longer follow-up are needed to exclude any associations.

  15. TDP-43 loss of function inhibits endosomal trafficking and alters trophic signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Benjamin M; Hartmann, Hannelore; Serdaroglu, Alperen; Schludi, Martin H; Hornburg, Daniel; Meissner, Felix; Orozco, Denise; Colombo, Alessio; Tahirovic, Sabina; Michaelsen, Meike; Schreiber, Franziska; Haupt, Simone; Peitz, Michael; Brüstle, Oliver; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Arzberger, Thomas; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Edbauer, Dieter

    2016-11-02

    Nuclear clearance of TDP-43 into cytoplasmic aggregates is a key driver of neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), but the mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that TDP-43 knockdown specifically reduces the number and motility of RAB11-positive recycling endosomes in dendrites, while TDP-43 overexpression has the opposite effect. This is associated with delayed transferrin recycling in TDP-43-knockdown neurons and decreased β2-transferrin levels in patient CSF Whole proteome quantification identified the upregulation of the ESCRT component VPS4B upon TDP-43 knockdown in neurons. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation suggest that TDP-43 represses VPS4B transcription. Preventing VPS4B upregulation or expression of its functional antagonist ALIX restores trafficking of recycling endosomes. Proteomic analysis revealed the broad reduction in surface expression of key receptors upon TDP-43 knockdown, including ErbB4, the neuregulin 1 receptor. TDP-43 knockdown delays the surface delivery of ErbB4. ErbB4 overexpression, but not neuregulin 1 stimulation, prevents dendrite loss upon TDP-43 knockdown. Thus, impaired recycling of ErbB4 and other receptors to the cell surface may contribute to TDP-43-induced neurodegeneration by blocking trophic signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  16. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Contingent Valuation: A Comparison of Referendum and Voluntary Contribution Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Contingent valuation methods (CVM) are integral in valuating non-market environmental issues. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed and analysed, as well as numerous studies on willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA) discrepancies. Despite the concentrated and persistent focus on achieving efficient mechanisms, controversies and limitations remain. This paper applies an open-ended approach to the referendum (majority voting) method for contingent valuation as advised by Gree...

  18. 47 CFR 54.709 - Computations of required contributions to universal service support mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... universal service support mechanisms. 54.709 Section 54.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Computations of required contributions to universal service support mechanisms. (a) Prior to April 1, 2003, contributions to the universal service support mechanisms shall be based on contributors'...

  19. Multiple loss-of-function 5-O-glucosyltransferase alleles revealed in Vitis vinifera, but not in other Vitis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingzhen; Labate, Joanne A; Liang, Zhenchang; Cousins, Peter; Prins, Bernard; Preece, John E; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna; Zhong, Gan-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Wild and loss-of-function alleles of the 5 - O - glucosyltransferase gene responsible for synthesis of diglucoside anthocyanins in Vitis were characterized. The information aids marker development for tracking this gene in grape breeding. Anthocyanins in red grapes are present in two glycosylation states: monoglucoside (3-O-glucoside) and diglucoside (3, 5-di-O-glucoside). While monoglucoside anthocyanins are present in all pigmented grapes, diglucoside anthocyanins are rarely found in the cultivated grape species Vitis vinifera. Biochemically 3-O-glucoside anthocyanins can be converted into 3,5-di-O-glucoside anthocyanins by a 5-O-glucosyltransferase. In this study, we surveyed allelic variation of the 5-O-glucosyltransferase gene (5GT) in 70 V. vinifera ssp. vinifera cultivars, 52 V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris accessions, 23 Vitis hybrid grapes, and 22 accessions of seven other Vitis species. Eighteen 5GT alleles with apparent loss-of-function mutations, including seven premature stop codon mutations and six frameshift indel mutations, were discovered in V. vinifera, but not in the other Vitis species. A total of 36 5GT alleles without apparent loss-of-function mutations (W-type) were identified. These W-type alleles were predominantly present in wild Vitis species, although a few of them were also found in some V. vinifera accessions. We further evaluated some of these 5GT alleles in producing diglucoside anthocyanins by analyzing the content of diglucoside anthocyanins in a set of representative V. vinifera cultivars. Through haplotype network analysis we revealed that V. vinifera ssp. vinifera and its wild progenitor V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris shared many loss-of-function 5GT alleles and extensive divergence of the 5GT alleles was evident within V. vinifera. This work advances our understanding of the genetic diversity of 5GT and provides a molecular basis for future marker-assisted selection for improving this important wine quality trait.

  20. Efficient RNA Interference of Primary Leukemic Cells for Loss-of-Function Studies in Xenograft Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Robilant, Benedetta Nicolis; Noviello, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for efficient and highly specific gene silencing. Transduction with lentiviral vectors provides stable and long-term gene expression in slowly and non-dividing cells. This chapter describes how to couple these two technologies to efficiently silence specific genes in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells for subsequent xenotransplantation in immunocompromised mice. This approach could be used for loss-of-function studies aimed at identifying oncogenic targets in AML.

  1. Exploring the mechanisms through which computers contribute to learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karasavvidis, I.; Karasavvidis, I.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Plomp, T.

    2003-01-01

    Even though it has been established that the incorporation of computers into the teaching and learning process enhances student performance, the underlying mechanisms through which this is accomplished have been largely unexplored. The present study aims to shed light on this issue. Two groups of 10

  2. Associations of Filaggrin Gene Loss-of-Function Variants with Urinary Phthalate Metabolites and Testicular Function in Young Danish Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Niels; Meldgaard, Michael; Frederiksen, Hanne; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal Bela; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; De Meyts, Ewa Rajpert; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Filaggrin is an epidermal protein that is crucial for skin barrier function. Up to 10% of Europeans and 5% of Asians carry at least one null allele in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Reduced expression of filaggrin in carriers of the null allele is associated with facilitated transfer of allergens across the epidermis. We hypothesized that these individuals may have increased transdermal uptake of endocrine disruptors, including phthalates. Objectives: We investigated urinary excretion of phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young men with and without FLG loss-of-function variants in a cross-sectional study of 861 young men from the general Danish population. Methods: All men were genotyped for FLG R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X loss-of-function variants. We measured urinary concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites and serum levels of reproductive hormones. We also evaluated semen quality. Results: Sixty-five men (7.5%) carried at least one FLG-null allele. FLG-null carriers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of several phthalate metabolites, including a 33% higher concentration of MnBP (mono-n-butyl phthalate; 95% CI: 16, 51%). FLG-null variants were not significantly associated with reproductive hormones or semen quality parameters. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that carriers of FLG loss-of-function alleles may have higher internal exposure to phthalates, possibly due to increased transepidermal absorption. FLG loss-of-function variants may indicate susceptible populations for which special attention to transepidermal absorption of chemicals and medication may be warranted. Citation: Joensen UN, Jørgensen N, Meldgaard M, Frederiksen H, Andersson AM, Menné T, Johansen JD, Carlsen BC, Stender S, Szecsi PB, Skakkebæk NE, Rajpert-De Meyts E, Thyssen JP. 2014. Associations of filaggrin gene loss-of-function variants with urinary phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young Danish men. Environ Health Perspect 122

  3. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN4A cause severe foetal hypokinesia or 'classical' congenital myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Irina T; Thor, Michael G; Oates, Emily C; van Karnebeek, Clara; Hendson, Glenda; Blom, Eveline; Witting, Nanna; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Gabbett, Michael T; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Sframeli, Maria; Suetterlin, Karen; Sarkozy, Anna; D'Argenzio, Luigi; Hartley, Louise; Matthews, Emma; Pitt, Matthew; Vissing, John; Ballegaard, Martin; Krarup, Christian; Slørdahl, Andreas; Halvorsen, Hanne; Ye, Xin Cynthia; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Løkken, Nicoline; Werlauff, Ulla; Abdelsayed, Mena; Davis, Mark R; Feng, Lucy; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A; Morgan, Jennifer E; Laing, Nigel G; Vallance, Hilary; Ruben, Peter; Hanna, Michael G; Lewis, Suzanne; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Männikkö, Roope; Muntoni, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    mutations showed loss-of-function of the mutant Nav1.4 channels. All, apart from one, of the mutations either caused fully non-functional channels, or resulted in a reduced channel activity. Each of the affected cases carried at least one full loss-of-function mutation. In five out of six families, a second loss-of-function mutation was present on the trans allele. These functional results provide convincing evidence for the pathogenicity of the identified mutations and suggest that different degrees of loss-of-function in mutant Nav1.4 channels are associated with attenuation of the skeletal muscle action potential amplitude to a level insufficient to support normal muscle function. The results demonstrate that recessive loss-of-function SCN4A mutations should be considered in patients with a congenital myopathy.

  4. Nonperturbative contributions in quantum-mechanical models the instantonic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Casahorrán, J

    2000-01-01

    We review the euclidean path-integral formalism in connection with the one-dimensional non-relativistic particle. The configurations which allow to construct a semiclassical approximation classify themselves into either topological (instantons) and non-topological (bounces) solutions. While the instantons dominate the tunneling phenomena between classical vacua, the bounces describe the decay from a false vacuum to the true one. The quantum amplitudes consist on an exponential associated with the classical contribution multiplied by the fluctuation factor which is given by a functional determinant. The eigenfunctions as well as the energy eigenvalues of the quadratic operators at issue can be written in closed form due to the shape-invariance property. Accordingly we resort to the zeta-function method to compute the functional determinants in a systematic way. The effect of the multi-instantons configurations is also carefully considered. To illustrate the instanton calculus in a relevant model we go to the d...

  5. [Seagrass ecosystems: contributions to and mechanisms of carbon sequestration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guang-Long; Lin, Hsing-Juh; Li, Zong-Shan; Fan, Hang-Qing; Zhou, Hao-Lang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The ocean's vegetated habitats, in particular seagrasses, mangroves and salt marshes, each capture and store a comparable amount of carbon per year, forming the Earth's blue carbon sinks, the most intense carbon sinks on the planet. Seagrass meadows, characterized by high primary productivity, efficient water column filtration and sediment stability, have a pronounced capacity for carbon sequestration. This is enhanced by low decomposition rates in anaerobic seagrass sediments. The carbon captured by seagrass meadows contributes significantly to the total blue carbon. At a global scale, seagrass ecosystems are carbon sink hot spots and have profound influences on the global carbon cycle. This importance combined with the many other functions of seagrass meadows places them among the most valuable ecosystems in the world. Unfortunately, seagrasses are declining globally at an alarming rate owing to anthropogenic disturbances and climate change, making them also among the most threatened ecosystems on the Earth. The role of coastal systems in carbon sequestration has received far too little attention and thus there are still many uncertainties in evaluating carbon sequestration of global seagrass meadows accurately. To better assess the carbon sequestration of global seagrass ecosystems, a number of scientific issues should be considered with high priorities: 1) more accurate measurements of seagrass coverage at national and global levels; 2) more comprehensive research into species- and location-specific carbon sequestration efficiencies; 3) in-depth exploration of the effects of human disturbance and global climate change on carbon capture and storage by seagrass ecosystems.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in Rab escort protein 1 (REP-1 affect intracellular transport in fibroblasts and monocytes of choroideremia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Strunnikova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Choroideremia (CHM is a progressive X-linked retinopathy caused by mutations in the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1, an escort protein involved in the prenylation of Rabs. Under-prenylation of certain Rabs, as a result of loss of function mutations in REP-1, could affect vesicular trafficking, exocytosis and secretion in peripheral cells of CHM patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate this hypothesis, intracellular vesicle transport, lysosomal acidification and rates of proteolytic degradation were studied in monocytes (CD14+ fraction and primary skin fibroblasts from the nine age-matched controls and thirteen CHM patients carrying 10 different loss-of-function mutations. With the use of pHrodo BioParticles conjugated with E. coli, collagen I coated FluoSpheres beads and fluorescent DQ ovalbumin with BODYPY FL dye, we demonstrated for the first time that lysosomal pH was increased in monocytes of CHM patients and, as a consequence, the rates of proteolytic degradation were slowed. Microarray analysis of gene expression revealed that some genes involved in the immune response, small GTPase regulation, transcription, cell adhesion and the regulation of exocytosis were significantly up and down regulated in cells from CHM patients compared to controls. Finally, CHM fibroblasts secreted significantly lower levels of cytokine/growth factors such as macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha, fibroblast growth factor (FGF beta and interleukin (lL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time that peripheral cells of CHM patients had increased pH levels in lysosomes, reduced rates of proteolytic degradation and altered secretion of cytokines. Peripheral cells from CHM patients expose characteristics that were not previously recognized and could used as an alternative models to study the effects of different

  7. Subjects heterozygous for genetic loss of function of the thiazide-sensitive cotransporter have reduced blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, C; Montagnana, M; Rosberg, L; Burri, P; Almgren, P; Jönsson, A; Wanby, P; Lippi, G; Minuz, P; Hulthèn, L U; Aurell, M; Melander, O

    2008-02-01

    Gitelmańs syndrome (GS) is an inherited recessive disorder caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous loss of function mutations of the NaCl cotransporter (NCCT) gene encoding the kidney-expressed NCCT, the pharmacological target of thiazide diuretics. An observational study estimated the prevalence of GS to 19/1,000,000, in Sweden, suggesting that approximately 1% of the population carries one mutant NCCT allele. As the phenotype of GS patients, who always carry two mutant alleles, is indistinguishable from that seen in patients treated with high-dose thiazide diuretics, we aimed at investigating whether subjects carrying one mutated NCCT allele have a phenotype resembling that of treatment with low-dose thiazide diuretics. We screened first-degree relatives of 18 of our patients with an established clinical end genetic diagnosis of GS for NCCT loss of function mutations and identified 35 healthy subjects carrying one mutant allele (GS-heterozygotes). Each GS-heterozygote was assigned a healthy control subject matched for age, BMI and sex. GS-heterozygotes had markedly lower blood pressure (systolic 103.3 +/- 16.4 versus 123.2 +/- 19.4 mmHg; diastolic 62.5 +/- 10.5 versus 73.1 +/- 9.4 mmHg; P pressure and slightly higher fasting plasma glucose compared with control subjects. Our findings suggest that GS-heterozygotes, the prevalence of which can be estimated to 1%, are partially protected from hypertension through partial genetic loss of function of the NCCT. However, as our study had a case-control design, it is important to underline that any potential effects on population blood pressure and risk of future cardiovascular disease need to be examined in prospective and population-based studies.

  8. Cycles of Conditional Cooperation in a Real-Time Voluntary Contribution Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ro’i Zultan; M. Vittoria Levati

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a new way to identify conditional cooperation in a real-time version of the standard voluntary contribution mechanism. We define contribution cycles as the number of contributors a player waits for before committing to a further contribution, and use a permutation test on contribution cycles to assign a measure of conditional cooperation to each group play. The validity of the measures is tested in an experiment. We find that roughly 20% of the plays exhibit dynamics of co...

  9. Is alpha-synuclein loss-of-function a contributor to parkinsonian pathology? Evidence from non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Collier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn in Lewy bodies and neurites of midbrain dopamine neurons is diagnostic for Parkinson’s disease (PD, leading to the proposal that PD is a toxic gain-of-function synucleinopathy. Here we discuss the alternative viewpoint that α-syn displacement from synapses by misfolding and aggregation results in a toxic loss-of-function. In support of this hypothesis we provide evidence from our pilot study demonstrating that knockdown of endogenous α-syn in dopamine neurons of nonhuman primates reproduces the pattern of nigrostriatal degeneration characteristic of PD.

  10. De novo loss-of-function variants in STAG2 are associated with developmental delay, microcephaly, and congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Klein, Steven D; Mulatinho, Milene V; Senaratne, Tharanga Niroshini; Singh, Kathryn; Nguyen, Dzung C; Gallant, Natalie M; Strom, Samuel P; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Rao, Nagesh P; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2017-05-01

    The cohesin complex is an evolutionarily conserved multi-subunit protein complex which regulates sister chromatid cohesion during mitosis and meiosis. Additionally, the cohesin complex regulates DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription. The core of the complex consists of four subunits: SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and STAG1/2. Loss-of-function mutations in many of these proteins have been implicated in human developmental disorders collectively termed "cohesinopathies." Through clinical exome sequencing (CES) of an 8-year-old girl with a clinical history of global developmental delay, microcephaly, microtia with hearing loss, language delay, ADHD, and dysmorphic features, we describe a heterozygous de novo variant (c.205C>T; p.(Arg69*)) in the integral cohesin structural protein, STAG2. This variant is associated with decreased STAG2 protein expression. The analyses of metaphase spreads did not exhibit premature sister chromatid separation; however, delayed sister chromatid cohesion was observed. To further support the pathogenicity of STAG2 variants, we identified two additional female cases from the DECIPHER research database with mutations in STAG2 and phenotypes similar to our patient. Interestingly, the clinical features of these three cases are remarkably similar to those observed in other well-established cohesinopathies. Herein, we suggest that STAG2 is a dosage-sensitive gene and that heterozygous loss-of-function variants lead to a cohesinopathy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Pea powdery mildew er1 resistance is associated to loss-of-function mutations at a MLO homologous locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Stefano; Schiavulli, Adalgisa; Appiano, Michela; Marcotrigiano, Angelo R; Cillo, Fabrizio; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; Lotti, Concetta; Ricciardi, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    The powdery mildew disease affects several crop species and is also one of the major threats for pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivation all over the world. The recessive gene er1, first described over 60 years ago, is well known in pea breeding, as it still maintains its efficiency as a powdery mildew resistance source. Genetic and phytopathological features of er1 resistance are similar to those of barley, Arabidopsis, and tomato mlo powdery mildew resistance, which is caused by the loss of function of specific members of the MLO gene family. Here, we describe the obtainment of a novel er1 resistant line by experimental mutagenesis with the alkylating agent diethyl sulfate. This line was found to carry a single nucleotide polymorphism in the PsMLO1 gene sequence, predicted to result in premature termination of translation and a non-functional protein. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker was developed on the mutation site and shown to be fully co-segregating with resistance in F(2) individuals. Sequencing of PsMLO1 from three powdery mildew resistant cultivars also revealed the presence of loss-of-function mutations. Taken together, results reported in this study strongly indicate the identity between er1 and mlo resistances and are expected to be of great breeding importance for the development of resistant cultivars via marker-assisted selection.

  12. Loss-of-function mutations in CAST cause peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhimiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Nitoiu, Daniela; Scott, Claire A; Plagnol, Vincent; Smith, Frances J D; Wilson, Neil J; Cole, Christian; Schwartz, Mary E; McLean, W H Irwin; Wang, Huijun; Feng, Cheng; Duo, Lina; Zhou, Eray Yihui; Ren, Yali; Dai, Lanlan; Chen, Yulan; Zhang, Jianguo; Xu, Xun; O'Toole, Edel A; Kelsell, David P; Yang, Yong

    2015-03-05

    Calpastatin is an endogenous specific inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. Here we show that loss-of-function mutations in calpastatin (CAST) are the genetic causes of an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by generalized peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads, which we propose to be given the acronym PLACK syndrome. In affected individuals with PLACK syndrome from three families of different ethnicities, we identified homozygous mutations (c.607dup, c.424A>T, and c.1750delG) in CAST, all of which were predicted to encode truncated proteins (p.Ile203Asnfs∗8, p.Lys142∗, and p.Val584Trpfs∗37). Immunohistochemistry shows that staining of calpastatin is reduced in skin from affected individuals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed widening of intercellular spaces with chromatin condensation and margination in the upper stratum spinosum in lesional skin, suggesting impaired intercellular adhesion as well as keratinocyte apoptosis. A significant increase of apoptotic keratinocytes was also observed in TUNEL assays. In vitro studies utilizing siRNA-mediated CAST knockdown revealed a role for calpastatin in keratinocyte adhesion. In summary, we describe PLACK syndrome, as a clinical entity of defective epidermal adhesion, caused by loss-of-function mutations in CAST.

  13. Functional analysis of cardiovascular renin-angiotensin system using a gain or loss of function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, R; Aoki, M; Ogihara, T

    2000-03-01

    The study of the effect of autocrine-paracrine vasoactive modulators on cardiovascular biology is very difficult in vivo, because in vivo studies are limited. In particular, characterization of the role of components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in vivo is limited by the difficulty in manipulating individual components of the RAS as well as by methodological limitations in studying the function of a local RAS in the absence of any contribution by the circulatory system. Recent progress in in vivo gene transfer technologies has provided us with the opportunity to study cellular responses to the manipulation of the individual components (i.e., by overexpression or inhibition). Many researchers have recently developed various in vivo gene transfer techniques for cardiovascular applications. Using in vivo gene transfer approaches, the roles of various tissues in the RAS, such as cardiac angiotensin, have been identified. Such an approach may increase our understanding of the biology and pathobiology of the autocrine-paracrine system. This review discusses the potential utility of in vivo gene transfer methods.

  14. CSF1R mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids are loss of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridans, Clare; Sauter, Kristin A.; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Hume, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) in humans is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by giant neuroaxonal swellings (spheroids) within the CNS white matter. Symptoms are variable and can include personality and behavioural changes. Patients with this disease have mutations in the protein kinase domain of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) which is a tyrosine kinase receptor essential for microglia development. We investigated the effects of these mutations on Csf1r signalling using a factor dependent cell line. Corresponding mutant forms of murine Csf1r were expressed on the cell surface at normal levels, and bound CSF1, but were not able to sustain cell proliferation. Since Csf1r signaling requires receptor dimerization initiated by CSF1 binding, the data suggest a mechanism for phenotypic dominance of the mutant allele in HDLS.

  15. Sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle result from gain or loss of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Holzherr, Boris; Fauler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Five hereditary sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle have been identified. Prominent symptoms are either myotonia or weakness caused by an increase or decrease of muscle fiber excitability. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.4, initiator of the muscle action potential, is mutated in all five disorders. Pathogenetically, both loss and gain of function mutations have been described, the latter being the more frequent mechanism and involving not just the ion-conducting pore, but aberrant pores as well. The type of channel malfunction is decisive for therapy which consists either of exerting a direct effect on the sodium channel, i.e., by blocking the pore, or of restoring skeletal muscle membrane potential to reduce the fraction of inactivated channels. PMID:20237798

  16. Cycles of Conditional Cooperation in A Real-Time Voluntary Contribution Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ro’i Zultan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a new way to identify conditional cooperation in a real-time version of the standard voluntary contribution mechanism. We define contribution cycles as the number of contributors a player waits for before committing to a further contribution, and use a permutation test on contribution cycles to assign a measure of conditional cooperation to each group play. The validity of the measures is tested in an experiment. We find that roughly 20% of the plays exhibit dynamics of conditional cooperation. Moreover, notwithstanding a decline in contributions, conditional cooperation is found to be stable over time.

  17. Cycles of Conditional Cooperation in a Real-Time Voluntary Contribution Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vittoria Levati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a new way to identify conditional cooperation in a real-time version of the standard voluntary contribution mechanism. We define contribution cycles as the number of contributors a player waits for before committing to a further contribution, and use a permutation test on contribution cycles to assign a measure of conditional cooperation to each group play. The validity of the measures is tested in an experiment. We find that roughly 20% of the plays exhibit dynamics of conditional cooperation. Moreover, notwithstanding a decline in contributions, conditional cooperation is found to be stable over time.

  18. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaali Natarajan

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25 on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1 urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2 redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; (3 OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4 mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05 in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  19. Moderate land use changes plant functional composition without loss of functional diversity in India's Western Ghats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, Lisa; Ticktin, Tamara

    2015-09-01

    The fields of ecology and conservation science increasingly recognize the importance of managing for functional composition and functional diversity to maintain critical ecosystem processes and services. However, little is known about the degree to which widespread but moderate forms of land use that maintain overall vegetation structure are compatible with the conservation of functional diversity. We assessed differences in plani functional composition and functional diversity across savanna woodlands in the Western Ghats, India, managed with varying degrees of biomass extraction, livestock grazing, and ground fire. Across the gradient of moderate land uses, we found shifts in functional composition but no overall decline in functional diversity with land, use intensification. Biomass extraction was associated with changes in dispersal mode, reduced seed mass, and lower overstory functional diversity. Livestock grazing was associated with shorter overstory species, reduced seed mass, and increased understory functional diversity. Nonnative invasive species contributed to shifts in understory functional composition with livestock grazing and increased functional diversity with more intensive land use. Our study highlights both the utility and some limitations of assessing conservation value with functional diversity. These results suggest that moderate-intensity local land use can be compatible with maintenance of functional diversity in savanna woodlands of the Western Ghats, and further efforts to maximize this compatibility would benefit conservation in South India's extensive human-managed landscapes. However, using functional diversity as the sole metric by which to gauge conservation value can mask threats from invasive species and loss of diversity within categories of biotic dispersal. Therefore, functional diversity metrics are likely to provide a valuable complement to, but not replacement for, other management targets such as species composition.

  20. Loss of Function of Evc2 in Dental Mesenchyme Leads to Hypomorphic Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Takeda, H; Tsuji, T; Kamiya, N; Kunieda, T; Mochida, Y; Mishina, Y

    2017-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal-recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by short stature and postaxial polydactyly. A series of dental abnormalities, including hypomorphic enamel formation, has been reported in patients with EvC. Despite previous studies that attempted to uncover the mechanism leading to abnormal tooth development, little is known regarding how hypomorphic enamel is formed in patients with EvC. In the current study, using Evc2/ Limbin mutant mice we recently generated, we analyzed enamel formation in the mouse incisor. Consistent with symptoms in human patients, we observed that Evc2 mutant mice had smaller incisors with enamel hypoplasia. Histologic observations coupled with ameloblast marker analyses suggested that Evc2 mutant preameloblasts were capable of differentiating to secretory ameloblasts; this process, however, was apparently delayed, due to delayed odontoblast differentiation, mediated by a limited number of dental mesenchymal stem cells in Evc2 mutant mice. This concept was further supported by the observation that dental mesenchymal-specific deletion of Evc2 phenocopied the tooth abnormalities in Evc2 mutants. Overall, our findings suggest that mutations in Evc2 affect dental mesenchymal stem cell homeostasis, which further leads to hypomorphic enamel formation.

  1. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause.

  2. Shrink it or lose it: balancing loss of function with shrinking genomes in the microsporidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Patrick J; Corradi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites that have evolved an elaborate mechanism for invading animal host cells, but which have otherwise greatly reduced biological complexity. In particular, microsporidia possess the smallest autonomous nuclear genomes known (as opposed to nucleus derived organelles, or nucleomorphs), and their 'anaerobic' core carbon metabolism is severely limited. Here we compare the extremes to which these two characteristics have evolved, and contrast how their reduction has either proceeded within the constraints of an unchanging set of functions, or has reduced the functional capabilities of the cell. Specifically, we review how the smallest known nuclear genome, the 2.3 Mbp genome of Encephalitozoon intestinalis, has arrived at this diminutive form without significantly affecting its protein-coding complexity in comparison with closely related, larger genomes. In contrast to this, Enterocytozoon bieneusi has a relatively large genome, and yet has lost all enzymes necessary to synthesize ATP from sugar - imposing a major limitation on the functional capabilities of the cell. The extremity of this reduction demands a re-evaluation of metabolic processes in other microsporidia: although pathways such as glycolysis are present, comparative genomic data suggest they may not play the cellular role that they are generally assumed to play.

  3. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2 is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases.

  4. Non-Monetary Feedback Induces more Cooperation: Students and Workers in a Voluntary Contribution Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Dragone, Davide; Galeotti, Fabio; Raimondello ORSINI

    2016-01-01

    We conduct an artefactual field experiment to study and compare the behavior of workers and students in a linear voluntary contribution mechanism in which subjects can assign immaterial sanctions or rewards to the other group members. We find that both students and workers sanction group members who contribute less than the group average, and reward those who contribute more. In both subject samples, the use of non-monetary sanctions and rewards induces more cooperation. The magnitude of the ...

  5. Loss-of-Function and Gain-of-Function Mutations in KCNQ5 Cause Intellectual Disability or Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Anna; Thouta, Samrat; Mancini, Grazia M S; Naidu, Sakkubai; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; McWalter, Kirsty; Person, Richard; Mwenifumbo, Jill; Salvarinova, Ramona; Guella, Ilaria; McKenzie, Marna B; Datta, Anita; Connolly, Mary B; Kalkhoran, Somayeh Mojard; Poburko, Damon; Friedman, Jan M; Farrer, Matthew J; Demos, Michelle; Desai, Sonal; Claydon, Thomas

    2017-07-06

    KCNQ5 is a highly conserved gene encoding an important channel for neuronal function; it is widely expressed in the brain and generates M-type current. Exome sequencing identified de novo heterozygous missense mutations in four probands with intellectual disability, abnormal neurological findings, and treatment-resistant epilepsy (in two of four). Comprehensive analysis of this potassium channel for the four variants expressed in frog oocytes revealed shifts in the voltage dependence of activation, including altered activation and deactivation kinetics. Specifically, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function KCNQ5 mutations, associated with increased excitability and decreased repolarization reserve, lead to pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 cause metachondromatosis, but not Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Margot E; Boyden, Eric D; Holm, Ingrid A; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Bovée, Judith V; Pansuriya, Twinkal C; de Sousa, Sérgio B; Savarirayan, Ravi; Andreucci, Elena; Vikkula, Miikka; Garavelli, Livia; Pottinger, Caroline; Ogino, Toshihiko; Sakai, Akinori; Regazzoni, Bianca M; Wuyts, Wim; Sangiorgi, Luca; Pedrini, Elena; Zhu, Mei; Kozakewich, Harry P; Kasser, James R; Seidman, Jon G; Kurek, Kyle C; Warman, Matthew L

    2011-04-01

    Metachondromatosis (MC) is a rare, autosomal dominant, incompletely penetrant combined exostosis and enchondromatosis tumor syndrome. MC is clinically distinct from other multiple exostosis or multiple enchondromatosis syndromes and is unlinked to EXT1 and EXT2, the genes responsible for autosomal dominant multiple osteochondromas (MO). To identify a gene for MC, we performed linkage analysis with high-density SNP arrays in a single family, used a targeted array to capture exons and promoter sequences from the linked interval in 16 participants from 11 MC families, and sequenced the captured DNA using high-throughput parallel sequencing technologies. DNA capture and parallel sequencing identified heterozygous putative loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 in 4 of the 11 families. Sanger sequence analysis of PTPN11 coding regions in a total of 17 MC families identified mutations in 10 of them (5 frameshift, 2 nonsense, and 3 splice-site mutations). Copy number analysis of sequencing reads from a second targeted capture that included the entire PTPN11 gene identified an additional family with a 15 kb deletion spanning exon 7 of PTPN11. Microdissected MC lesions from two patients with PTPN11 mutations demonstrated loss-of-heterozygosity for the wild-type allele. We next sequenced PTPN11 in DNA samples from 54 patients with the multiple enchondromatosis disorders Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, but found no coding sequence PTPN11 mutations. We conclude that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 are a frequent cause of MC, that lesions in patients with MC appear to arise following a "second hit," that MC may be locus heterogeneous since 1 familial and 5 sporadically occurring cases lacked obvious disease-causing PTPN11 mutations, and that PTPN11 mutations are not a common cause of Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

  7. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 cause metachondromatosis, but not Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot E Bowen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Metachondromatosis (MC is a rare, autosomal dominant, incompletely penetrant combined exostosis and enchondromatosis tumor syndrome. MC is clinically distinct from other multiple exostosis or multiple enchondromatosis syndromes and is unlinked to EXT1 and EXT2, the genes responsible for autosomal dominant multiple osteochondromas (MO. To identify a gene for MC, we performed linkage analysis with high-density SNP arrays in a single family, used a targeted array to capture exons and promoter sequences from the linked interval in 16 participants from 11 MC families, and sequenced the captured DNA using high-throughput parallel sequencing technologies. DNA capture and parallel sequencing identified heterozygous putative loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 in 4 of the 11 families. Sanger sequence analysis of PTPN11 coding regions in a total of 17 MC families identified mutations in 10 of them (5 frameshift, 2 nonsense, and 3 splice-site mutations. Copy number analysis of sequencing reads from a second targeted capture that included the entire PTPN11 gene identified an additional family with a 15 kb deletion spanning exon 7 of PTPN11. Microdissected MC lesions from two patients with PTPN11 mutations demonstrated loss-of-heterozygosity for the wild-type allele. We next sequenced PTPN11 in DNA samples from 54 patients with the multiple enchondromatosis disorders Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, but found no coding sequence PTPN11 mutations. We conclude that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 are a frequent cause of MC, that lesions in patients with MC appear to arise following a "second hit," that MC may be locus heterogeneous since 1 familial and 5 sporadically occurring cases lacked obvious disease-causing PTPN11 mutations, and that PTPN11 mutations are not a common cause of Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

  8. Loss-of-function of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 (channelopathies) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyder, Arthur; Mazzone, Amelia; Strege, Peter R; Tester, David J; Saito, Yuri A; Bernard, Cheryl E; Enders, Felicity T; Ek, Weronica E; Schmidt, Peter T; Dlugosz, Aldona; Lindberg, Greger; Karling, Pontus; Ohlsson, Bodil; Gazouli, Maria; Nardone, Gerardo; Cuomo, Rosario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; Galeazzi, Francesca; Neri, Matteo; Portincasa, Piero; Bellini, Massimo; Barbara, Giovanni; Camilleri, Michael; Locke, G Richard; Talley, Nicholas J; D'Amato, Mauro; Ackerman, Michael J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2014-06-01

    SCN5A encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. Many patients with cardiac arrhythmias caused by mutations in SCN5A also have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether patients with IBS have SCN5A variants that affect the function of NaV1.5. We performed genotype analysis of SCN5A in 584 persons with IBS and 1380 without IBS (controls). Mutant forms of SCN5A were expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells, and functions were assessed by voltage clamp analysis. A genome-wide association study was analyzed for an association signal for the SCN5A gene, and replicated in 1745 patients in 4 independent cohorts of IBS patients and controls. Missense mutations were found in SCN5A in 13 of 584 patients (2.2%, probands). Diarrhea-predominant IBS was the most prevalent form of IBS in the overall study population (25%). However, a greater percentage of individuals with SCN5A mutations had constipation-predominant IBS (31%) than diarrhea-predominant IBS (10%; P < .05). Electrophysiologic analysis showed that 10 of 13 detected mutations disrupted NaV1.5 function (9 loss-of-function and 1 gain-of-function function). The p. A997T-NaV1.5 had the greatest effect in reducing NaV1.5 function. Incubation of cells that expressed this variant with mexiletine restored their sodium current and administration of mexiletine to 1 carrier of this mutation (who had constipation-predominant IBS) normalized their bowel habits. In the genome-wide association study and 4 replicated studies, the SCN5A locus was strongly associated with IBS. About 2% of patients with IBS carry mutations in SCN5A. Most of these are loss-of-function mutations that disrupt NaV1.5 channel function. These findings provide a new pathogenic mechanism for IBS and possible treatment options. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The P2X7 loss-of-function Glu496Ala polymorphism affects ex vivo cytokine release and protects against the cytotoxic effects of high ATP-levels

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    Wesselius Anke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P2X7 receptor plays an important role in cytokine release during the inflammatory response in vivo. Polymorphisms within the P2X7 receptor gene that lead to loss of receptor function may contribute to impaired cytokine release by immune cells. Therefore, we investigated whether a known loss-of-function polymorphism (Glu496Ala in the P2X7 receptor gene leads to alterations in cytokine release in response to ATP. Results An ex vivo whole blood model was used to induce an inflammatory reaction with the pro-inflammatory stimuli LPS and PHA (phytohemagglutinin. Blood from n=9 subjects with the Glu496Ala P2X7 SNP (P2X7MUT and n=7 ‘wild-type’ subjects (no P2X7 SNP; P2X7WT was used. Addition of ATP (0.9-3 mM to LPS/PHA-stimulated whole blood induced an increase in IL-1β release in P2X7MUT subjects, whereas decreased release was observed in P2X7WT subjects. Decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in response to ATP were shown in both P2X7MUT and P2X7WT subjects, which was less pronounced in P2X7MUT subjects. ATP at 3 mM also significantly decreased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in P2X7MUT subjects compared to P2X7WT subjects. Conclusions The presence of the non-synonymous Glu496Ala loss-of-function polymorphism within the P2X7 receptor gene is likely to be of importance in the release of cytokines during inflammation. Furthermore, this study suggests that carriers of the Glu496Ala loss-of-function polymorphism are protected against the cytotoxic effects of high ATP-levels.

  10. Non-Bloom syndrome-associated partial and total loss-of-function variants of BLM helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2012-11-20

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ-like DNA helicase BLM, which functions in the maintenance of genome stability. Using a humanized model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a chimera of the N terminus of yeast Sgs1 and the C terminus of human BLM from the chromosomal SGS1 locus, we have functionally evaluated 27 BLM alleles that are not currently known to be associated with BS. We identified nine alleles with impaired function when assessed for hypersensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea (HU). Six of these alleles (P690L, R717T, W803R, Y811C, F857L, G972V) caused sensitivity to HU that was comparable to known BS-associated or helicase-dead alleles, suggesting that they may cause BS and, in the heterozygous state, act as risk factors for cancerogenesis. We also identified three alleles (R791C, P868L, G1120R) that caused intermediate sensitivity to HU; although unlikely to cause BS, these partial loss-of-function alleles may increase risk for cancers or other BS-associated complications if a person is homozygous or compound heterozygous for these alleles or if they carry a known BS-associated allele.

  11. Biallelic loss-of-function mutation in NIK causes a primary immunodeficiency with multifaceted aberrant lymphoid immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Katharina L; Klaver, Stefanie; Doğu, Figen; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Garncarz, Wojciech; Bilic, Ivan; Mace, Emily; Salzer, Elisabeth; Conde, Cecilia Domínguez; Sic, Heiko; Májek, Peter; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Vladimer, Gregory I; Haskoloğlu, Sule; Bolkent, Musa Gökalp; Küpesiz, Alphan; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pickl, Winfried F; van Zelm, Menno C; Eibel, Hermann; Orange, Jordan S; Ikincioğulları, Aydan; Boztuğ, Kaan

    2014-11-19

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders enable identification of genes with crucial roles in the human immune system. Here we study patients suffering from recurrent bacterial, viral and Cryptosporidium infections, and identify a biallelic mutation in the MAP3K14 gene encoding NIK (NF-κB-inducing kinase). Loss of kinase activity of mutant NIK, predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by functional assays, leads to defective activation of both canonical and non-canonical NF-κB signalling. Patients with mutated NIK exhibit B-cell lymphopenia, decreased frequencies of class-switched memory B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia due to impaired B-cell survival, and impaired ICOSL expression. Although overall T-cell numbers are normal, both follicular helper and memory T cells are perturbed. Natural killer (NK) cells are decreased and exhibit defective activation, leading to impaired formation of NK-cell immunological synapses. Collectively, our data illustrate the non-redundant role for NIK in human immune responses, demonstrating that loss-of-function mutations in NIK can cause multiple aberrations of lymphoid immunity.

  12. Loss-of-function mutations of SURF-1 are specifically associated with Leigh syndrome with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, V; Jaksch, M; Hofmann, S; Galimberti, C; Hoertnagel, K; Lulli, L; Freisinger, P; Bindoff, L; Gerbitz, K D; Comi, G P; Uziel, G; Zeviani, M; Meitinger, T

    1999-08-01

    Mutations of SURF-1, a gene located on chromosome 9q34, have recently been identified in patients affected by Leigh syndrome (LS), associated with deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. To investigate to what extent SURF-1 is responsible for human disorders because of COX deficiency, we undertook sequence analysis of the SURF-1 gene in 46 unrelated patients. We analyzed 24 COX-defective patients classified as having typical Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)), 6 patients classified as Leigh-like (LL(COX)) cases, and 16 patients classified as non-LS(COX) cases. Frameshift, stop, and splice mutations of SURF-1 were detected in 18 of 24 (75%) of the LS(COX) cases. No mutations were found in the LL(COX) and non-LS(COX) group of patients. Rescue of the COX phenotype was observed in transfected cells from patients harboring SURF-1 mutations, but not in transfected cell lines from 2 patients in whom no mutations were detected by sequence analysis. Loss of function of SURF-1 protein is specifically associated with LS(COX), although a proportion of LS(COX) cases must be the result of abnormalities in genes other than SURF-1. SURF-1 is the first nuclear gene to be consistently mutated in a major category of respiratory chain defects. DNA analysis can now be used to accurately diagnose LS(COX), a common subtype of Leigh syndrome.

  13. Adverse events in a newborn on valproate therapy due to loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased risk of valproate-induced toxicity has been reported in children, particularly in those younger than 2 years of age. Significant variations in valproate pharmacokinetics and shifts in the metabolic pathways towards CYP2C9-dependent metabolism seem to play some role in the age-related differences in the incidence of adverse events. We present the case of a premature patient with moderate hemorrhage in the subependymal region (grade II — intraventricular hemorrhage without ventricular dilatation, several myoclonic episodes in her right upper arm (series of jerks lasting milliseconds, and epileptiform abnormalities on the EEG (localized spike-and-wave in the left frontal region with preserved background activity who was treated with valproate. Serious side effects, consisting of bone marrow depression, hyperammonemia, and serum alkaline phosphatase elevation, were observed seventeen days after the beginning of valproate therapy. The toxic symptoms were likely the consequence of a reduced ability to metabolize valproate. The patient was demonstrated to carry two loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9 (CYP2C9*3/*3 resulting in exaggerated blood concentrations of valproate. The present case highlights the importance of assaying inborn errors in CYP2C9 gene in pediatric patients to avoid valproate-evoked serious side effects.

  14. Loss-of-function screen in rhabdomyosarcoma identifies CRKL-YES as a critical signal for tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C L; Ngo, V N; Grohar, P J; Arnaldez, F I; Asante, A; Wan, X; Khan, J; Hewitt, S M; Khanna, C; Staudt, L M; Helman, L J

    2013-11-21

    To identify novel signaling pathways necessary for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) survival, we performed a loss-of-function screen using an inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) library in an alveolar and an embryonal RMS cell line. This screen identified CRKL expression as necessary for growth of alveolar RMS and embryonal RMS both in vitro and in vivo. We also found that CRKL was uniformly highly expressed in both RMS cell lines and tumor tissue. As CRKL is a member of the CRK adapter protein family that contains an SH2 and two SH3 domains and is involved in signal transduction from multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, we evaluated CRKL interaction with multiple tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways in RMS cells. While we saw no interaction of CRKL with IGFIR, MET or PI3KAKT/mTOR pathways, we determined that CRKL signaling was associated with SRC family kinase (SFK) signaling, specifically with YES kinase. Inhibition of SFK signaling with dasatinib or another SFK inhibitor, sarcatinib, suppressed RMS cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data identify CRKL as a novel critical component of RMS growth. This study also demonstrates the use of functional screening to identify a potentially novel therapeutic target and treatment approach for these highly aggressive pediatric cancers.

  15. Loss-of-function myostatin mutation increases insulin sensitivity and browning of white fat in Meishan pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunbo; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Sun, Youde; Wang, Qingqing; Ma, Dezun; Xiao, Gaojun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shanshan; Gao, Ting; Chen, Yaoxing; Liu, Jie; An, Xiaorong; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2017-05-23

    Myostatin-deficient mice showed a remarkable hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, with a decreased fat mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Currently, it is unclear if the inhibition of myostatin could be used as an approach to treat human obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated if the inhibition of porcine myostatin has any effect on fat deposition and insulin sensitivity using genetically engineered Meishan pigs containing a myostatin loss-of-function mutation (Mstn -/- ). Our results indicated that, when compared with wild-type pigs, the amount of subcutaneous fat and leaf fat of Mstn -/- pigs were significantly decreased mainly due to the browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, the serum insulin level decreased and the insulin sensitivity increased significantly in Mstn -/- pigs. Moreover, we found a significant increase in levels of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate proteins in skeletal muscle of Mstn -/- pigs, which then activating the insulin signaling pathway. Irisin-mediated regulation is not the only pathway for the activation of insulin signal in Mstn -/- skeletal muscle. This study provides valuable insight for the treatment of human obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  16. Self-compatibility in 'Zaohong' Japanese apricot is associated with the loss of function of pollen S genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Gao, Zhi-Hong; Ni, Zhao-Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Cai, Bin-Hua

    2013-11-01

    While most Japanese apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) cultivars display typical S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility, some self-compatible (SC) cultivars have also been identified. In this study, we confirmed SC of 'Zaohong' through replicated self-pollination tests. Cross-pollination tests showed that SC of 'Zaohong' was caused by a loss of pollen function, so we determined that the S-genotype of 'Zaohong' was S 2 S 15 . Sequence analysis of the S-haplotypes of 'Zaohong' showed no mutations which were likely to alter gene function. Furthermore, expression analysis based on RT-PCR of S-locus genes revealed no differences at the transcript level when compared with 'Xiyeqing', a self-incompatible cultivar with the same S haplotypes. In addition, except for S-locus genes, a new type of F-box gene encoding a previously uncharacterised protein with high sequence similarity (61.03-64.65 %) to Prunus SFB genes was identified. Putative structural regions of PmF-box genes have been described, corresponding to regions in PmSFB alleles, but with some sequence variations. These results suggest that SC in 'Zaohong' occurs in pollen, and that other factors outside the S-locus, including PmF-box genes, might be associated with the loss of function of pollen S genes.

  17. Endowing self-binding feature restores the activities of a loss-of-function chimerized anti-GM2 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfeng; Russ, Michael; Retter, Marc; Fanger, Gary; Morgan, Charles; Kohler, Heinz; Muller, Sybille

    2007-02-01

    Our previous studies have described a rare type of antibody that spontaneously binds to itself, or homodimerizes. This self-binding, or autophilic antibody provides stronger protection against bacterial infection than a non-self-binding antibody with identical specificity and affinity, due to an increase of polymeric avidity. Furthermore, we have shown that a peptide derived from the self-binding domain of the autophilic T15 antibody can be crosslinked to the Fc carbohydrate of monoclonal antibodies specific for the B-cell receptor of B-cell tumors. These peptide-crosslinked antibodies can exert self-binding properties, leading to an increase in binding efficiency to the target cells as well as an increase in potential to induce apoptosis. Herein, we report a novel finding that crosslinking of the autophilic T15 peptide rescues a loss-of-function chimerized (ch) anti-GM2 antibody. The parental antibody demonstrates in vivo anti-tumor activity against melanoma xenografts. The T15 peptide-conjugated antibody shows the ability to bind to itself, as well as an increased binding to its antigen, ganglioside GM2. Moreover, the peptide-conjugated antibody also demonstrates an increased ability to bind to two GM2-positive tumor cell lines and notably important, restores its ability to induce apoptosis in two types of tumor cells. These results provide strong support for the clinical potential of the autophilic technology.

  18. Fatal neonatal encephalopathy and lactic acidosis caused by a homozygous loss-of-function variant in COQ9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauser, Katharina; Herebian, Diran; Haack, Tobias B; Rodenburg, Richard J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klee, Dirk; Mayatepek, Ertan; Prokisch, Holger; Distelmaier, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has an important role in mitochondrial energy metabolism by way of its functioning as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain. Genetic defects disrupting the endogenous biosynthesis pathway of CoQ10 may lead to severe metabolic disorders with onset in early childhood. Using exome sequencing in a child with fatal neonatal lactic acidosis and encephalopathy, we identified a homozygous loss-of-function variant in COQ9. Functional studies in patient fibroblasts showed that the absence of the COQ9 protein was concomitant with a strong reduction of COQ7, leading to a significant accumulation of the substrate of COQ7, 6-demethoxy ubiquinone10. At the same time, the total amount of CoQ10 was severely reduced, which was reflected in a significant decrease of mitochondrial respiratory chain succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex II/III) activity. Lentiviral expression of COQ9 restored all these parameters, confirming the causal role of the variant. Our report on the second COQ9 patient expands the clinical spectrum associated with COQ9 variants, indicating the importance of COQ9 already during prenatal development. Moreover, the rescue of cellular CoQ10 levels and respiratory chain complex activities by CoQ10 supplementation points to the importance of an early diagnosis and immediate treatment.

  19. Quantifying the contributions of structure to annulus fibrosus mechanical function using a nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Heather Lynch; Elliott, Dawn M

    2007-04-01

    The annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is comprised of concentric lamella of oriented collagen fibers embedded in a hydrated proteoglycan matrix with smaller amounts of minor collagens, elastin, and small proteoglycans. Its structure and composition enable the disc to withstand complex loads and result in inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and nonlinear mechanical behaviors. The specific contributions of the annulus fibrosus constituent structures to mechanical function remain unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use a structurally motivated, anisotropic, nonlinear strain energy model of annulus fibrosus to determine the relative contributions of its structural components to tissue mechanical behavior. A nonlinear, orthotropic hyperelastic model was developed for the annulus fibrosus. Terms to describe fibers, matrix, and interactions between annulus fibrosus structures (shear and normal to the fiber directions) were explicitly included. The contributions of these structures were analyzed by including or removing terms and determining the effect on the fit to multidimensional experimental data. Correlation between experimental and model-predicted stress, a Bland-Altman analysis of bias and standard deviation of residuals, and the contribution of structural terms to overall tissue stress were calculated. Both shear and normal interaction terms were necessary to accurately model multidimensional behavior. Inclusion of shear interactions more accurately described annulus fibrosus nonlinearity. Fiber stretch and shear interactions dominated contributions to circumferential direction stress, while normal and shear interactions dominated axial stress. The results suggest that interactions between fibers and matrix, perhaps facilitated by crosslinks, elastin, or minor collagens, augment traditional (i.e., fiber-uncrimping) models of nonlinearity.

  20. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB.

  1. A loss-of-function screen for phosphatases that regulate neurite outgrowth identifies PTPN12 as a negative regulator of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Ambjørn

    Full Text Available Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely result from activation of its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB. Although intracellular neurotrophin (NT signaling presumably reflects the combined action of kinases and phosphatases, little is known about the contributions of the latter to TrkB regulation. The issue is complicated by the fact that phosphatases belong to multiple independently evolved families, which are rarely studied together. We undertook a loss-of-function RNA-interference-based screen of virtually all known (254 human phosphatases to understand their function in BDNF/TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs accounted for 13% of the candidate regulatory phosphatases. The top classical PTP identified as a negative regulator of BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth was PTPN12 (also called PTP-PEST. Validation and follow-up studies showed that endogenous PTPN12 antagonizes tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB itself, and the downstream activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth. They reveal the complexity of phosphatase control, with several evolutionarily unrelated phosphatase families cooperating to affect this biological response

  2. A loss-of-function mutation in AtYSL1 reveals its role in iron and nicotianamine seed loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jean, Marie; Schikora, Adam; Mari, Stéphane; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2005-12-01

    The Arabidopsis Yellow Stripe 1-Like (YSL) proteins have been identified by homology with the maize (Zea mays) Yellow Stripe 1 (YS1) transporter which is responsible for iron-phytosiderophore (PS) uptake by roots in response to iron shortage. Although dicotyledonous plants do not synthesize PS, they do synthesize the PS precursor nicotianamine, a strong metal chelator essential for maintenance of iron homeostasis and copper translocation. Furthermore, ZmYS1 and the rice (Oryza sativa) protein OsYSL2 have metal-nicotianamine transport activities in heterologous expression systems. In this work, we have characterized the function of AtYSL1 in planta. Two insertional loss-of-function ysl1 mutants of Arabidopsis were found to exhibit increased nicotianamine accumulation in shoots. More importantly, seeds of both ysl1 knockouts contained less iron and nicotianamine than wild-type seeds, even when produced by plants grown in the presence of an excess of iron. This phenotype could be reverted by expressing the wild-type AtYSL1 gene in ysl1 plants. ysl1 seeds germinated slowly, but this defect was rescued by an iron supply. AtYSL1 was expressed in the xylem parenchyma of leaves, where it was upregulated in response to iron excess, as well as in pollen and in young silique parts. This pattern is consistent with long-distance circulation of iron and nicotianamine and their delivery to the seed. Taken together, our work provides strong physiological evidence that iron and nicotianamine levels in seeds rely in part on AtYSL1 function.

  3. Loss of function in Mlo orthologs reduces susceptibility of pepper and tomato to powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zheng

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica is a serious fungal threat to greenhouse tomato and pepper production. In contrast to most powdery mildew species which are epiphytic, L. taurica is an endophytic fungus colonizing the mesophyll tissues of the leaf. In barley, Arabidopsis, tomato and pea, the correct functioning of specific homologues of the plant Mlo gene family has been found to be required for pathogenesis of epiphytic powdery mildew fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the Mlo genes in susceptibility to the endophytic fungus L. taurica. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, a loss-of-function mutation in the SlMlo1 gene results in resistance to powdery mildew disease caused by Oidium neolycopersici. When the tomato Slmlo1 mutant was inoculated with L. taurica in this study, it proved to be less susceptible compared to the control, S. lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker. Further, overexpression of SlMlo1 in the tomato Slmlo1 mutant enhanced susceptibility to L. taurica. In pepper, the CaMlo2 gene was isolated by applying a homology-based cloning approach. Compared to the previously identified CaMlo1 gene, the CaMlo2 gene is more similar to SlMlo1 as shown by phylogenetic analysis, and the expression of CaMlo2 is up-regulated at an earlier time point upon L. taurica infection. However, results of virus-induced gene silencing suggest that both CaMlo1 and CaMlo2 may be involved in the susceptibility of pepper to L. taurica. The fact that overexpression of CaMlo2 restored the susceptibility of the tomato Slmlo1 mutant to O. neolycopersici and increased its susceptibility to L. taurica confirmed the role of CaMlo2 acting as a susceptibility factor to different powdery mildews, though the role of CaMlo1 as a co-factor for susceptibility cannot be excluded.

  4. A rare IL33 loss-of-function mutation reduces blood eosinophil counts and protects from asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulem, Patrick; Bjornsdottir, Unnur Steina; Lim, Ai Ching; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Brown, Michael; Garrett, Logan; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Onundarson, Pall Torfi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Gislason, David; Gislason, Thorarinn; Ludviksson, Bjorn Runar; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Boezen, H. Marike; Heinzmann, Andrea; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Waage, Johannes; Backer, Vibeke; Deichmann, Klaus A.; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Johnston, James A.; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-01-01

    IL-33 is a tissue-derived cytokine that induces and amplifies eosinophilic inflammation and has emerged as a promising new drug target for asthma and allergic disease. Common variants at IL33 and IL1RL1, encoding the IL-33 receptor ST2, associate with eosinophil counts and asthma. Through whole-genome sequencing and imputation into the Icelandic population, we found a rare variant in IL33 (NM_001199640:exon7:c.487-1G>C (rs146597587-C), allele frequency = 0.65%) that disrupts a canonical splice acceptor site before the last coding exon. It is also found at low frequency in European populations. rs146597587-C associates with lower eosinophil counts (β = -0.21 SD, P = 2.5×10–16, N = 103,104), and reduced risk of asthma in Europeans (OR = 0.47; 95%CI: 0.32, 0.70, P = 1.8×10–4, N cases = 6,465, N controls = 302,977). Heterozygotes have about 40% lower total IL33 mRNA expression than non-carriers and allele-specific analysis based on RNA sequencing and phased genotypes shows that only 20% of the total expression is from the mutated chromosome. In half of those transcripts the mutation causes retention of the last intron, predicted to result in a premature stop codon that leads to truncation of 66 amino acids. The truncated IL-33 has normal intracellular localization but neither binds IL-33R/ST2 nor activates ST2-expressing cells. Together these data demonstrate that rs146597587-C is a loss of function mutation and support the hypothesis that IL-33 haploinsufficiency protects against asthma. PMID:28273074

  5. Durable broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in pea er1 plants is conferred by natural loss-of-function mutations in PsMLO1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphry, M.; Reinstädler, A.; Ivanov, S.; Bisseling, T.; Panstruga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function alleles of plant-specific MLO (Mildew Resistance Locus O) genes confer broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in monocot (barley) and dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato) plants. Recessively inherited powdery mildew resistance in pea (Pisum sativum) er1 plants is, in many aspects,

  6. GATAD2B loss-of-function mutations cause a recognisable syndrome with intellectual disability and are associated with learning deficits and synaptic undergrowth in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, M.H.; Nijhof, B.; Fenckova, M.; Nillesen, W.M.; Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Castells-Nobau, A.; Asztalos, L.; Viragh, E.; Bon, B.W.M. van; Tezel, E.; Veltman, J.A.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, B.B. de; Ligt, J. de; Yntema, H.G.; Bokhoven, H. van; Isidor, B.; Caignec, C. Le; Lorino, E.; Asztalos, Z.; Koolen, D.A.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Schenck, A.; Kleefstra, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GATA zinc finger domain containing 2B (GATAD2B) encodes a subunit of the MeCP1-Mi-2/nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase complex involved in chromatin modification and regulation of transcription. We recently identified two de novo loss-of-function mutations in GATAD2B by whole exome s

  7. Carriers of Loss-of-Function Mutations in EXT Display Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Reserve Due to Smaller Pancreas Volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, Sophie J. Bernelot; Mooij, Hans L.; Hassing, H. Carlijne; Kruit, Janine K.; Witjes, Julia J.; de Sande, Michiel A. J. van; Nederveen, Aart J.; Xu, Ding; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2014-01-01

    Exotosin (EXT) proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF) in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME). Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development a

  8. Compensatory mechanisms contributing to keep the sagittal balance of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrey, Cédric; Roussouly, Pierre; Le Huec, Jean-Charles; D'Acunzi, Gennaro; Perrin, Gilles

    2013-11-01

    Aging spine is characterized by facet joints arthritis, degenerative disc disease, bone remodeling and atrophy of extensor muscles resulting in a progressive kyphosis of the lumbar spine. The aim of this paper is to describe the different compensatory mechanisms for patients with severe degenerative lumbar spine. According to the severity of the imbalance, three stages are observed: balanced, balanced with compensatory mechanisms and imbalanced. For the two last stages, the compensatory mechanisms permit to limit the consequences of loss of lumbar lordosis on global sagittal alignment and therefore contribute to keep the sagittal balance of the spine. The basic concept is to extend adjacent segments of the kyphotic spine allowing for compensation of the sagittal unbalance but potentially inducing adverse effects. Finally, we propose a three-step algorithm to analyze the global balance status and take into consideration the presence of the compensatory mechanisms in the spinal, pelvic and lower limb areas.

  9. Making God real and making God good: some mechanisms through which prayer may contribute to healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrmann, Tanya Marie

    2013-10-01

    Many social scientists attribute the health-giving properties of religious practice to social support. This paper argues that another mechanism may be a positive relationship with the supernatural, a proposal that builds upon anthropological accounts of symbolic healing. Such a mechanism depends upon the learned cultivation of the imagination and the capacity to make what is imagined more real and more good. This paper offers a theory of the way that prayer enables this process and provides some evidence, drawn from experimental and ethnographic work, for the claim that a relationship with a loving God, cultivated through the imagination in prayer, may contribute to good health and may contribute to healing in trauma and psychosis.

  10. Contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J; Diko, Sindi; Baehr, Leslie M; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C; Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-10-01

    Development of osteoarthritis commonly involves degeneration of epiphyseal trabecular bone. In previous studies, we observed 30-44% loss of epiphyseal trabecular bone (BV/TV) from the distal femur within 1 week following non-invasive knee injury in mice. Mechanical unloading (disuse) may contribute to this bone loss; however, it is unclear to what extent the injured limb is unloaded following injury, and whether disuse can fully account for the observed magnitude of bone loss. In this study, we investigated the contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone changes observed following non-invasive knee injury in mice (female C57BL/6N). We investigated changes in gait during treadmill walking, and changes in voluntary activity level using Open Field analysis at 4, 14, 28, and 42 days post-injury. We also quantified epiphyseal trabecular bone using μCT and weighed lower-limb muscles to quantify atrophy following knee injury in both ground control and hindlimb unloaded (HLU) mice. Gait analysis revealed a slightly altered stride pattern in the injured limb, with a decreased stance phase and increased swing phase. However, Open Field analysis revealed no differences in voluntary movement between injured and sham mice at any time point. Both knee injury and HLU resulted in comparable magnitudes of trabecular bone loss; however, HLU resulted in considerably more muscle loss than knee injury, suggesting another mechanism contributing to bone loss following injury. Altogether, these data suggest that mechanical unloading likely contributes to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury, but the magnitude of this bone loss cannot be fully explained by disuse. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1680-1687, 2016.

  11. Contribution of recovery mechanisms of microstructure during long-term creep of Gr.91 steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi-Armaki, H.; Chen, R. P.; Maruyama, K.; Igarashi, M.

    2013-02-01

    Creep rupture life and microstructural degradation have been studied in two heats of Gr.91 steels. The coarsening of subgrains and precipitates, mainly M23C6 and MX, has been evaluated during static aging and creep. Hardness of head (static aging) and gauge (creep) portions of crept samples were measured to know their relation with microstructural degradation during long-term exposure. The correlation between subgrain size and spacing of precipitates and hardness has been equated. As an example, there is a close correlation between hardness value and inverse subgrains size in Gr.91 steels, regardless of aging or creep conditions. The appearance of three recovery mechanisms was found during long-term creep, namely: strain-induced recovery, pure static recovery and strain-assisted static recovery. By equated correlations between subgrain size, precipitates and hardness, the contribution of three recovery mechanisms to subgrain coarsening and hardness drop were calculated for two creep conditions at 700 °C in long-term creep region, where breakdown of creep strength has happen. The calculated data accord well with experimental data obtained from aged and crept samples. The contribution of static recovery to the subgrain coarsening and consequent hardness drop during long-term creep increases with increasing creep time. The significant contribution of both static recovery mechanisms can result in the breakdown of creep strength in long-term creep region.

  12. On the radiation-induced segregation: Contribution of interstitial mechanism in Fe–Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechenkin, V.A.; Molodtsov, V.L.; Ryabov, V.A. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Terentyev, D., E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the diffusion characteristics of a self-interstitial atom (SIA) in BCC Fe–Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cr atoms via SIA migration mechanism. The calculations have been performed in the temperature range 600–1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5–25 at.%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. The results of atomistic simulations have been applied to evaluate the contribution of SIA diffusion mechanism to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) phenomenon. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for the contribution from both vacancy and SIA mechanisms to RIS at sinks for point defects in multi-component system. By combining available experimental data on diffusion of Fe and Cr via vacancy mechanism with the results of MD simulations for SIAs, we demonstrate that enrichment of sinks by Cr atoms is possible in the Fe–Cr alloys containing less than 13% Cr. This result is discussed in the light of available experimental data on the RIS in Fe–Cr alloys and ferritic/martensitic steels. It is predicted that the degree of the Cr enrichment goes up with decreasing Cr content in the alloy and irradiation temperature.

  13. Exome screening to identify loss-of-function mutations in the rhesus macaque for development of preclinical models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Adam S; Gibbs, Robert M; Norgren, Robert B

    2016-03-02

    Exome sequencing has been utilized to identify genetic variants associated with disease in humans. Identification of loss-of-function mutations with exome sequencing in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could lead to valuable animal models of genetic disease. Attempts have been made to identify variants in rhesus macaques by aligning exome data against the rheMac2 draft genome. However, such efforts have been impaired due to the incompleteness and annotation errors associated with rheMac2. We wished to determine whether aligning exome reads against our new, improved rhesus genome, MacaM, could be used to identify high impact, loss-of-function mutations in rhesus macaques that would be relevant to human disease. We compared alignments of exome reads from four rhesus macaques, the reference animal and three unrelated animals, against rheMac2 and MacaM. Substantially more reads aligned against MacaM than rheMac2. We followed the Broad Institute's Best Practice guidelines for variant discovery which utilizes the Genome Analysis Toolkit to identify high impact mutations. When rheMac2 was used as the reference genome, a large number of apparent false positives were identified. When MacaM was used as the reference genome, the number of false positives was greatly reduced. After examining the variant analyses conducted with MacaM as reference genome, we identified two putative loss-of-function mutations, in the heterozygous state, in genes related to human health. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations. We followed the transmission of one of these mutations (in the butyrylthiocholine gene) through three generations of rhesus macaques. Further, we demonstrated a functional decrease in butyrylthiocholinesterase activity similar to that observed in human heterozygotes with loss-of-function mutations in the same gene. The new MacaM genome can be effectively utilized to identify loss-of-function mutations in rhesus macaques without generating a high level of

  14. Composting projects under the Clean Development Mechanism: sustainable contribution to mitigate climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogger, Cyrill; Beaurain, Francois; Schmidt, Tobias S

    2011-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries and at the same time to assist these countries in sustainable development. While composting as a suitable mitigation option in the waste sector can clearly contribute to the former goal there are indications that high rents can also be achieved regarding the latter. In this article composting is compared with other CDM project types inside and outside the waste sector with regards to both project numbers and contribution to sustainable development. It is found that, despite the high number of waste projects, composting is underrepresented and a major reason for this fact is identified. Based on a multi-criteria analysis it is shown that composting has a higher potential for contribution to sustainable development than most other best in class projects. As these contributions can only be assured if certain requirements are followed, eight key obligations are presented. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The contribution of passive-elastic mechanisms to lower extremity joint kinetics during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Ben; Silder, Amy; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Thelen, Darryl G

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of passive mechanisms to lower extremity joint kinetics in normal walking at slow, comfortable, and fast speeds. Twenty healthy young adults participated in a passive testing protocol in which the relaxed lower limb was manipulated through full sagittal hip, knee, and ankle ranges of motion while kinematics and applied forces were simultaneously measured. The relationship between passive joint moments and angles was modeled by a set of exponential functions that accounted for the stretch of uniarticular structures and biarticular muscles. Subject specific walking kinematics (80%, 100%, and 120% of preferred speed) were input into the passive models to estimate joint moments, power, and work attributable to passive mechanisms. Passive hip flexion moments were substantial from late stance through early swing, absorbing approximately 40% of the net negative work done during hip extension and producing over half of the net positive work done during the hip flexor power burst (H3). Passive ankle plantarflexor moments were also produced during pre-swing, but generated a smaller percentage ( approximately 10%) of the net ankle plantarflexor power burst (A2). The joint work attributed to passive structures increased significantly (pwalking speed. The biarticular rectus femoris and gastrocnemius allowed for net passive energy absorption at the knee and subsequent return at the hip and ankle (ppassive-elastic mechanisms can contribute substantially to normal human walking and that biarticular muscles play a role in passively transferring energy between joints.

  16. A de novo loss-of-function GRIN2A mutation associated with childhood focal epilepsy and acquired epileptic aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujia; Kusumoto, Hirofumi; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Wenjuan; XiangWei, Wenshu; Shaulsky, Gil H.; Hu, Chun; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Yuan, Hongjie; Jiang, Yuwu

    2017-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) subunit GRIN2A/GluN2A mutations have been identified in patients with various neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and intellectual disability / developmental delay (ID/DD). In this study, we investigated the phenotype and underlying molecular mechanism of a GRIN2A missense mutation identified by next generation sequencing on idiopathic focal epilepsy using in vitro electrophysiology. Methods Genomic DNA of patients with epilepsy and ID/DD were sequenced by targeted next-generation sequencing within 300 genes related to epilepsy and ID/DD. The effects of one missense GRIN2A mutation on NMDAR function were evaluated by two-electrode voltage clamp current recordings and whole cell voltage clamp current recordings. Results We identified one de novo missense GRIN2A mutation (Asp731Asn, GluN2A(D731N)) in a child with unexplained epilepsy and DD. The D731N mutation is located in a portion of the agonist-binding domain (ABD) in the GluN2A subunit, which is the binding pocket for agonist glutamate. This residue in the ABD is conserved among vertebrate species and all other NMDAR subunits, suggesting an important role in receptor function. The proband shows developmental delay as well as EEG-confirmed seizure activity. Functional analyses reveal that the GluN2A(D731N) mutation decreases glutamate potency by over 3,000-fold, reduces amplitude of current response, shortens synaptic-like response time course, and decreases channel open probability, while enhancing sensitivity to negative allosteric modulators, including extracellular proton and zinc inhibition. The combined effects reduce NMDAR function. Significance We identified a de novo missense mutation in the GRIN2A gene in a patient with childhood focal epilepsy and acquired epileptic aphasia. The mutant decreases NMDAR activation suggesting NMDAR hypofunction may contribute to the epilepsy pathogenesis. PMID:28182669

  17. Contribution of spinal glia activation to mechanical hyperalgesia induced by spared nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Si-zhe; WEI Xue-zhong; ZHANG Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of spinal glial cells activation in neuropathic pain in a recently developed spared nerve injury (SNI) animal model by Decosterd and Woolf. Methods: A lesion was made to two of the three terminal branches of the sciatic nerve of rats (tibial and common peroneal nerves) leaving the sural nerve intact. Continuous intrathecai administration of propentofyliine, a glial modulating agent, 1 d before and 5 d after operation, was performed to disrupt spinal cord glia function. The vehicle was intrathecally administrated as control. The paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation (paw withdrawal mechaical threshold PWMT), body mass and motor function were determined pre- and post-surgery. Results: It produced a prolonged mechanical allodynia in the medial and lateral part of the ipsilateral hind paw in SNL models. The treatment with propentofylline significantly prevented the development of mechanical allodynia located in either medial or lateral plantar surface. Rats in two groups showed normal motor function and body weight increase. Conclusion:SNI model can be applied as a useful method with little variance in searching the mechanism of neuropathic pain. These study suggest that spinal glia activation may contribute to mechanical allodynia induced by SNI.

  18. The contribution of proteoglycans to the mechanical behavior of mineralized tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Swain, Michael V

    2014-10-01

    It has been widely shown that proteoglycans (PG) and their glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side-chains form supramolecular aggregates that interconnect the collagenous network in connective tissues and play a significant role in regulating the mechanical behavior of the extracellular matrix, particularly in soft tissues. However, collective evidence of the mechanical participation of PGs and GAGs in mineralized tissues remains poorly explored in the literature. Here, we address this knowledge gap and discuss the participation of PGs on the biomechanics of mineralized tissues including dentine, cementum and bone. We review evidence suggesting that, on a microscale, PGs regulate the hydrostatic and osmotic pressure, as well as the poroelastic behavior of dentine and bone. On the nanoscale, we review the so-called sliding filament theory and intramolecular stretching of GAGs. We also discuss recent interpretations whereby folding and unfolding of the PG protein core, potentially in association with SIBLING proteins, may be a contributing factor to the mechanical behavior of mineralized tissues. Finally, we review in vitro and in vivo studies of mineralized tissues with targeted disruption or digestion of specific PG family members, which provide further insights into their relevance to the mechanical properties of load bearing hard tissues. In summary, this review brings forth collective evidence suggesting that PGs and GAGs, although less than 5% of the tissue matrix, may play a role in the mechanical behavior and durability of mineralized tissues.

  19. Loss-of-function mutations of retromer large subunit genes suppress the phenotype of an Arabidopsis zig mutant that lacks Qb-SNARE VTI11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Niihama, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Saito, Chieko; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana zigzag (zig) is a loss-of-function mutant of Qb-SNARE VTI11, which is involved in membrane trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the vacuole. zig-1 exhibits abnormalities in shoot gravitropism and morphology. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutants of the retromer large subunit partially suppress the zig-1 phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that three paralogous VPS35 genes of Arabidopsis have partially overlapping but distinct genetic functions with respect to zig-1 suppression. Tissue-specific complementation experiments using an endodermis-specific SCR promoter show that expression of VPS35B or VPS35C cannot complement the function of VPS35A. The data suggest the existence of functionally specialized paralogous VPS35 genes that nevertheless share common functions.

  20. Loss-of-Function Mutations of Retromer Large Subunit Genes Suppress the Phenotype of an Arabidopsis zig Mutant That Lacks Qb-SNARE VTI11[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Niihama, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Saito, Chieko; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana zigzag (zig) is a loss-of-function mutant of Qb-SNARE VTI11, which is involved in membrane trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the vacuole. zig-1 exhibits abnormalities in shoot gravitropism and morphology. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutants of the retromer large subunit partially suppress the zig-1 phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that three paralogous VPS35 genes of Arabidopsis have partially overlapping but distinct genetic functions with respect to zig-1 suppression. Tissue-specific complementation experiments using an endodermis-specific SCR promoter show that expression of VPS35B or VPS35C cannot complement the function of VPS35A. The data suggest the existence of functionally specialized paralogous VPS35 genes that nevertheless share common functions. PMID:20086190

  1. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie;

    2016-01-01

    -like behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam has not been investigated. To address this question, we assessed anxiety behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam in two complementary loss-of-function mouse models including astrocyte-specific ACBP KO (ACBP(GFAP) KO) and whole-body KO (ACBP KO) mice...... of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam.......Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from its...

  2. The clean development mechanism's contribution to sustainable development: A review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm

    2007-01-01

    The challenges of how to respond to climate change and ensure sustainable development are currently high on the political agenda among the world's leading nations. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is part of the global carbon market developing rapidly as part of the Kyoto response towards......-reviewed articles and reports from the grey literature. This review of the literature serves to assess the state of knowledge on how the CDM contributes to sustainable development (SD) including poverty alleviation. The main finding of the review is that, left to market forces, the CDM does not significantly...

  3. GATAD2B loss-of-function mutations cause a recognisable syndrome with intellectual disability and are associated with learning deficits and synaptic undergrowth in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Willemsen, M. H.; Nijhof, B.; Fenckova, M.; Nillesen, W.M.; Bongers, E M H F; Castells-Nobau, A.; Asztalos, L.; Viragh, E.; Bon, B.W.M. van; Tezel, E.; Veltman, J.A.; Brunner, H G; de Vries, B B; de Ligt, J.; Yntema, H.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GATA zinc finger domain containing 2B (GATAD2B) encodes a subunit of the MeCP1-Mi-2/nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase complex involved in chromatin modification and regulation of transcription. We recently identified two de novo loss-of-function mutations in GATAD2B by whole exome sequencing in two unrelated individuals with severe intellectual disability. METHODS: To identify additional individuals with GATAD2B aberrations, we searched for microdeletions overlapping with GAT...

  4. Magnetic monopoles and dyons revisited: A useful contribution to the study of classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Renato P dos

    2015-01-01

    Graduate level physics curricula in many countries around the world, as well as senior-level undergraduate ones in some major institutions, include Classical Mechanics courses, mostly based on Goldstein's textbook masterpiece. During the discussion of central force motion, however, the Kepler problem is virtually the only serious application presented. In this paper, we present another problem that is also soluble, namely the interaction of Schwinger's dual-charged (dyon) particles. While the electromagnetic interaction of magnetic monopoles and electric charges was studied in detail some 40 years ago, we consider that a pedagogical discussion of it from an essentially classical mechanics point of view is a useful contribution for students. Following a path that generalizes Kepler's problem and Rutherford scattering, we show that they exhibit remarkable properties such as stable non-planar orbits, as well as rainbow and glory scattering, which are not present in the ordinary scattering of two singly charged p...

  5. Conformational dynamics is key to understanding loss-of-function of NQO1 cancer-associated polymorphisms and its correction by pharmacological ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnación, Medina-Carmona; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Esperanza, Padín-Gonzalez; Noel, Mesa-Torres; Salido, Eduardo; Timson, David J.; Pey, Angel L.

    2016-02-01

    Protein dynamics is essential to understand protein function and stability, even though is rarely investigated as the origin of loss-of-function due to genetic variations. Here, we use biochemical, biophysical, cell and computational biology tools to study two loss-of-function and cancer-associated polymorphisms (p.R139W and p.P187S) in human NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a FAD-dependent enzyme which activates cancer pro-drugs and stabilizes several oncosuppressors. We show that p.P187S strongly destabilizes the NQO1 dimer in vitro and increases the flexibility of the C-terminal domain, while a combination of FAD and the inhibitor dicoumarol overcome these alterations. Additionally, changes in global stability due to polymorphisms and ligand binding are linked to the dynamics of the dimer interface, whereas the low activity and affinity for FAD in p.P187S is caused by increased fluctuations at the FAD binding site. Importantly, NQO1 steady-state protein levels in cell cultures correlate primarily with the dynamics of the C-terminal domain, supporting a directional preference in NQO1 proteasomal degradation and the use of ligands binding to this domain to stabilize p.P187S in vivo. In conclusion, protein dynamics are fundamental to understanding loss-of-function in p.P187S, and to develop new pharmacological therapies to rescue this function.

  6. On the contribution of Angelo Luongo to Mechanics: in honor of his 60th birthday

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Giuseppe; D'Annibale, Francesco; Zulli, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    This paper intends to summarize the scientific production of Angelo Luongo on the occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday, focusing on his main contributions in the field of Mechanics. The task will not be easy because of the breadth of his scientific production, only apparently attributable to a restricted number of keywords. In fact, even when the work seems purely algorithmic, speculation on the physical and mechanical aspects of the problem is always present, providing new interpretations and innovative openings to a careful reader. Similarly, also the works, which apparently seem to be high-level applications, always reserve methodological aspects that are not negligible. The editorial choice to divide his papers through a small number of keywords is certainly simplistic, but offers the possibility to better highlight all the connections among his variegated production. The most original contributions of Angelo Luongo in the context of perturbation methods, linear and nonlinear dynamics and control, elastic buckling and structural analysis, bifurcation and stability of non-conservative systems, are discussed in detail. Finally, the Angelo Luongo's central role in the creation and development of activities of the international research center M&MoCS is pointed out.

  7. Contribution of Innate Cortical Mechanisms to the Maturation of Orientation Selectivity in Parvalbumin Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Velez, Dario X; Ellefsen, Kyle L; Hathaway, Ethan R; Carathedathu, Mathew C; Gandhi, Sunil P

    2017-01-25

    The maturation of cortical parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons depends on the interaction of innate and experience-dependent factors. Dark-rearing experiments suggest that visual experience determines when broad orientation selectivity emerges in visual cortical PV interneurons. Here, using neural transplantation and in vivo calcium imaging of mouse visual cortex, we investigated whether innate mechanisms contribute to the maturation of orientation selectivity in PV interneurons. First, we confirmed earlier findings showing that broad orientation selectivity emerges in PV interneurons by 2 weeks after vision onset, ∼35 d after these cells are born. Next, we assessed the functional development of transplanted PV (tPV) interneurons. Surprisingly, 25 d after transplantation (DAT) and >2 weeks after vision onset, we found that tPV interneurons have not developed broad orientation selectivity. By 35 DAT, however, broad orientation selectivity emerges in tPV interneurons. Transplantation does not alter orientation selectivity in host interneurons, suggesting that the maturation of tPV interneurons occurs independently from their endogenous counterparts. Together, these results challenge the notion that the onset of vision solely determines when PV interneurons become broadly tuned. Our results reveal that an innate cortical mechanism contributes to the emergence of broad orientation selectivity in PV interneurons.

  8. Carbon storage regulator A contributes to the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans by multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-02-01

    The carbon storage regulator A (CsrA) controls a wide variety of bacterial processes, including metabolism, adherence, stress responses, and virulence. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, harbors a homolog of csrA. Here, we generated an unmarked, in-frame deletion mutant of csrA to assess its contribution to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. In human inoculation experiments, the csrA mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation compared to its parent. Deletion of csrA resulted in decreased adherence of H. ducreyi to human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF); Flp1 and Flp2, the determinants of H. ducreyi adherence to HFF cells, were downregulated in the csrA mutant. Compared to its parent, the csrA mutant had a significantly reduced ability to tolerate oxidative stress and heat shock. The enhanced sensitivity of the mutant to oxidative stress was more pronounced in bacteria grown to stationary phase compared to that in bacteria grown to mid-log phase. The csrA mutant also had a significant survival defect within human macrophages when the bacteria were grown to stationary phase but not to mid-log phase. Complementation in trans partially or fully restored the mutant phenotypes. These data suggest that CsrA contributes to virulence by multiple mechanisms and that these contributions may be more profound in bacterial cell populations that are not rapidly dividing in the human host.

  9. Apraxia, mechanical problem solving and semantic knowledge: contributions to object usage in corticobasal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatt, Josef; Bak, Thomas; Bozeat, Sasha; Patterson, Karalyn; Hodges, John R

    2002-05-01

    To investigate the nature of the apraxia in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) five patients with CBD and five matched controls were compared on tests of: i) meaningless and symbolic gesture production, ii) a battery of semantic tasks based on 20 everyday items (involving naming and picture-picture matching according to semantic attributes, matching gestures-to-objects, object usage from name and with the real object) and iii) a novel tool test of mechanical problem solving. All five patients showed severe impairment in the production of meaningless and symbolic gestures from command, and by imitation, and were also impaired when using real objects. Deficits were not, however, restricted to action production: four were unable to match gestures to objects and all five showed impairment in the selection and usage of novel tools in the mechanical problem solving task. Surprising was the finding of an additional semantic knowledge breakdown in three cases, two of whom were markedly anomic. The apraxia in CBD is, therefore, multifactorial. There is profound breakdown in the organisation and co-ordination of motor programming. In addition, patients show central deficits in action knowledge and mechanical problem solving, which has been linked to parietal lobe pathology. General semantic memory may also be affected in CBD in some cases and this may then contribute to impaired object usage. This combination of more than one deficit relevant for object use may explain why CBD patients are far more disabled by their dyspraxia in everyday life than any other patient group.

  10. A Historical Survey of Sir Karl Popper's Contribution to Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Shields

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sir Karl Popper (1902-1994, though not trained as a physicist and embarrassed early in his career by a physics error pointed out by Einstein and Bohr, ultimately made substantial contributions to the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As was often the case, Popper initially formulated his position by criticizing the views of others - in this case Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg. Underlying Popper's criticism was his belief that, first, the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics abandoned scientific realism and second, the assertion that quantum theory was complete (an assertion rejected by Einstein among others amounted to an unfalsifiable claim. Popper insisted that the most basic predictions of quantum mechanics should continue to be tested, with an eye towards falsification rather than mere adding of decimal places to confirmatory experiments. His persistent attacks on the Copenhagen interpretation were aimed not at the uncertainty principle itself and the formalism from which it was derived, but at the acceptance by physicists of an unclear epistemology and ontology that left critical questions unanswered.Quanta 2012; 1: 1–12.

  11. [The immunological mechanisms contributing to the clinical efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) in allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Ilan; Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Sthoeger, Zev

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased dramatically in the western world. In the last 2 decades, the frequency of asthma and allergic rhinitis has doubled. Allergen specific immunotherapy [SIT] has been used successfully for more than 100 years for the treatment of allergic disorders. Allergen SIT provides not only symptomatic relief, but it is potentially curative. The immunologic mechanisms of allergen SIT include all parts of the immune system. Regulatory T cells (TR1, Treg), have a major pivotal role in the success of immunotherapy. Along with the regulatory T cells, elevated suppressor cytokines (IL-10), suppression of TH2 cells, increasing titer of specific IgG4 and gradual decline in the number and function of basophils and mast cells also contribute to the success of the treatment (SIT). The above immune mechanisms are connected and related to each other acting at different times with the treatment with SIT. In this review we focused on the current knowledge and understanding of the different immune mechanisms which are involved in the success of SIT.

  12. Cell- and molecular-level mechanisms contributing to diastolic dysfunction in HFpEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Vincent L

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the default diagnosis for patients who have symptoms of heart failure, an ejection fraction >0.5, and evidence of diastolic dysfunction. The clinical condition, which was largely unrecognized 30 years ago, is now a major health problem and currently accounts for 50% of all patients with heart failure. Clinical studies show that patients with HFpEF exhibit increased passive stiffness of the ventricles and a slower rate of pressure decline during diastole. This review discusses some of the cell- and molecular-level mechanisms that contribute to these effects and focuses on data obtained using human samples. Collagen cross linking, modulation of protein kinase G-related pathways, Ca(2+) handling, and strain-dependent detachment of cross bridges are highlighted as potential factors that could be modulated to improve ventricular function in patients with HFpEF.

  13. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.; Donohoe, B.; Katahira, R.; Ashutosh, M.; Beckham, G.; Himmel, M.; Decker, S.

    2014-04-01

    Fungal free enzymes and bacterial complexed cellulosomes deconstruct biomass using different physical mechanisms. Free enzymes, which typically contain a large proportion of GH7 cellobiohydrolase, diffuse throughout the substrate and hydrolyze primarily from the cellulose reducing end, resulting in 'sharpened' macrofibrils. In contrast, complexed cellulosomes contain a diverse array of carbohydrate binding modules and multiple catalytic specificities leading to delamination and physical peeling of the cellulose macrofibril structures. To investigate how cellulose structure contributes to recalcitrance, we compared the deconstruction of cellulose I, II, and III; using free and complexed enzyme systems. We also evaluated both systems on Clean Fractionation and alkaline pretreated biomass, which remove much of the lignin, to determine the impact on enzyme loading reduction. Free fungal enzymes demonstrated a swelling of the outer surface of the plant cell walls while removing localized disruptions, resulting in a smooth surface appearance. Cellulosomes produced cell wall surfaces with localized areas of disruption and little surface layer swelling. These studies contribute to the overall understanding of biomass recalcitrance and how combining different enzymatic paradigms may lead to the formulation of new enzyme cocktails to reduce the cost of producing sugars from plant cell wall carbohydrates.

  14. How can the Clean Development Mechanism contribute to better air quality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, S.J.A. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    Air pollutants and greenhouse gases are to a large extent emitted by the same sources, notably in the industry, transport and residential sectors. However, climate change mitigation is a global issue and is mostly driven by national and international policy. Local governments are in general more interested in improving urban air quality, which is posing serious health hazards across the globe. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) was designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, helping industrialised countries to achieve their targets under the Kyoto Protocol while contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. As of January 2009 over 4000 projects are in the pipeline. The CDM could be used by local governments and the private sector to finance projects that contribute to both climate change mitigation and better air quality. However, CDM projects in particularly the transport sector face a number of barriers. We identify the most important issues for such projects, as well as the lessons learnt and some recommendations based on four case studies in Asian cities related to biofuels and bus rapid transit systems. The main conclusions is that successful implementation of CDM projects beneficial for urban air quality depends on the applicability of approved CDM methodologies, the strong cooperation between project developers and local authorities, and the availability of data.

  15. Chemical, colloidal and mechanical contributions to the state of water in wood cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, L.; Fratzl, P.; Zemb, T.

    2016-08-01

    The properties of wood depend strongly on its water content, but the physicochemical basis for the interaction of water with cell wall components is poorly understood. Due to the importance of the problem both in the context of wood technology and the biological function of swelling and dehydration for growth stresses and seed dispersal, a wealth of descriptive data has been accumulated but a microscopic theory of water-biomolecular interactions is missing. We develop here, at a primitive level, a minimal parameter-free, coarse-grained, model of wood secondary cell walls to predict water absorption, in the form of an equation of state. It includes for the first time all three—mechanical, colloidal and chemical—contributions, taking into account the cell walls microstructure. The hydration force around the elongated cellulose crystals and entropy of mixing of the matrix polymers (hemicelluloses and lignin) are the dominant contributions driving the swelling. The elastic energy needed to swell the composite is the main term opposing water uptake. Hysteresis is not predicted but water uptake versus humidity, is reproduced in a large temperature range. Within this framework, the origin of wood dissolution and different effects of wood treatments on water sorption can be understood at the molecular level.

  16. Tinnitus Neural Mechanisms and Structural Changes in the Brain: The Contribution of Neuroimaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetti, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of sound in the absence of an external stimulus. Chronic tinnitus usually has a high impact in many aspects of patients' lives, such as emotional stress, sleep disturbance, concentration difficulties, and so on. These strong reactions are usually attributed to central nervous system involvement. Neuroimaging has revealed the implication of brain structures in the auditory system. Objective This systematic review points out neuroimaging studies that contribute to identifying the structures involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of generation and persistence of various forms of tinnitus. Data Synthesis Functional imaging research reveals that tinnitus perception is associated with the involvement of the nonauditory brain areas, including the front parietal area; the limbic system, which consists of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and amygdala; and the hippocampal and parahippocampal area. Conclusion The neuroimaging research confirms the involvement of the mechanisms of memory and cognition in the persistence of perception, anxiety, distress, and suffering associated with tinnitus.

  17. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Magnetic monopoles and dyons revisited: a useful contribution to the study of classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Renato P.

    2015-05-01

    Graduate-level physics curricula in many countries around the world, as well as senior-level undergraduate ones in some major institutions, include classical mechanics courses, mostly based on Goldstein’s textbook masterpiece. During the discussion of central force motion, however, the Kepler problem is virtually the only serious application presented. In this paper, we present another problem that is also soluble, namely the interaction of Schwinger’s dual-charged (dyon) particles. While the electromagnetic interaction of magnetic monopoles and electric charges was studied in detail some 40 years ago, we consider that a pedagogical discussion of it from an essentially classical mechanics point of view is a useful contribution for students. Following a path that generalizes Kepler’s problem and Rutherford scattering, we show that they exhibit remarkable properties such as stable non-planar orbits, as well as rainbow and glory scattering, which are not present in the ordinary scattering of two singly charged particles. Moreover, it can be extended further to the relativistic case and to a semi-classical quantization, which can also be included in the class discussion.

  19. Albinism in phylogenetically and geographically distinct populations of Astyanax cavefish arises through the same loss-of-function Oca2 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J B; Wilkens, H

    2013-08-01

    The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, comprises 29 populations of cave-adapted fish distributed across a vast karst region in northeastern Mexico. These populations have a complex evolutionary history, having descended from 'old' and 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stocks that invaded the region ∼6.7 and ∼2.8 MYa, respectively. This study investigates a set of captive, pigmented Astyanax cavefish collected from the Micos cave locality in 1970, in which albinism appeared over the past two decades. We combined novel coloration analyses, coding sequence comparisons and mRNA expression level studies to investigate the origin of albinism in captive-bred Micos cavefish. We discovered that albino Micos cavefish harbor two copies of a loss-of-function ocular and cutaneous albinism type II (Oca2) allele previously identified in the geographically distant Pachón cave population. This result suggests that phylogenetically young Micos cavefish and phylogenetically old Pachón cave fish inherited this Oca2 allele from the ancestral surface-dwelling taxon. This likely resulted from the presence of the loss-of-function Oca2 haplotype in the 'young' ancestral surface-dwelling stock that colonized the Micos cave and also introgressed into the ancient Pachón cave population. The appearance of albinism in captive Micos cavefish, caused by the same loss-of-function allele present in Pachón cavefish, implies that geographically and phylogenetically distinct cave populations can evolve the same troglomorphic phenotype from standing genetic variation present in the ancestral taxon.

  20. Carriers of loss-of-function mutations in EXT display impaired pancreatic beta-cell reserve due to smaller pancreas volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Bernelot Moens

    Full Text Available Exotosin (EXT proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME. Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46-1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69-3.36] nmol·l-1·min-1, p<0.05. Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22-10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91-12.70] nmol·l-1·min-1 p<0.05, indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04. In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors.

  1. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bisgaard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites in relation to the development of eczema. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379, FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p = 0.005, with a further increase in risk related to cat exposure at birth amongst children with FLG mutation (HR 11.11, 95% CI 3.79-32.60, p < 0.0001; dog exposure was moderately protective (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-1.01, p = 0.05, but not related to FLG genotype. In Manchester (n = 503 an independent and significant association of the development of eczema by age 12 mo with FLG genotype was confirmed (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.13-3.36, p = 0.02. In addition, the risk increased because of the interaction of cat ownership at birth and FLG genotype (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.35-10.81, p = 0.01, with no significant effect of the interaction with dog ownership (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.16-2.20, p = 0.43. Mite-allergen had no effects in either cohort. The observed effects were independent of sensitisation. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a significant interaction between FLG loss-of-function main mutations (501x and 2282del4 and cat ownership at birth on the development of early-life eczema in two independent birth cohorts. Our data suggest that cat but not dog ownership substantially

  2. Loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 impair vesicular trafficking, tropoelastin secretion and cell survival.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hucthagowder, V.; Morava, E.; Kornak, U.; Lefeber, D.J.; Fischer, B.; Dimopoulou, A.; Aldinger, A.; Choi, J.; Davis, E.C.; Abuelo, D.N.; Adamowicz, M.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Basel-Vanagaite, L.; Fernandez, B.; Greally, M.T.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Kayserili, H.; Lemyre, E.; Tekin, M.; Turkmen, S.; Tuysuz, B.; Yuksel-Konuk, B.; Mundlos, S.; Maldergem, L. van; Wevers, R.A.; Urban, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump (ATP6V0A2). The goal of this study was to define the disease mechanisms that lead to connective tissue l

  3. Loss of functional NADPH oxidase-2 protects against alcohol-induced bone resorption in female p47phox-/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    In bone, oxidant signaling through NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important stimulus for osteoclast differentiation and activity. We have previously demonstrated that chronic alcohol abuse produces bone loss through NOX-dependent mechanisms. In the current study, s...

  4. Gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the determination of ovarian function in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Chiara; Rossetti, Raffaella; Rusconi, Daniela; Recalcati, Maria P.; Cacciatore, Chiara; Beccaria, Elena; Calcaterra, Valeria; Invernizzi, Pietro; Larizza, Daniela; Finelli, Palma; Persani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What is the burden of X chromosome mosaicism in the occurrence of spontaneous menarche (SM) in Turner syndrome (TS)? SUMMARY ANSWER SM was significantly associated with X chromosome mosaicism in the TS patients; a mosaicism with around 10% euploid cell line may predict spontaneous pubertal development when determined by molecular-cytogenetic techniques on uncultivated tissues. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Spontaneous puberty can be observed in a minority of patients with TS, more frequently, but not exclusively, in those with a high level of 46,XX/45,X mosaicism at standard karyotype. The genetic mechanisms contributing to ovarian function in TS patients are still not determined. However, submicroscopic X-linked and autosomal copy number variations (CNVs) have recently emerged as an important genetic risk category for premature ovarian insufficiency and may be involved in modulating the TS ovarian phenotype. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A group of 40 patients with a diagnosis of TS at conventional karyotyping participated in the study; 6 patients had SM and 34 patients had primary amenorrhoea (PA). All clinical data and the patients’ DNA samples were collected over the years at a single paediatric clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The patients' samples were used to perform both genetic (Copy Number Assay) and molecular-cytogenetic (array-CGH and iFISH, interphase-FISH) analyses in order to evaluate the X chromosome mosaicism rate and to detect possible rare CNVs of genes with a known or predicted role in female fertility. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE All TS patients showed variable percentages of the 46,XX lineage, but these percentages were higher in the SM group (P < 0.01). A mosaicism around 10% for the euploid cell line may predict spontaneous pubertal development when determined by molecular-cytogenetic techniques performed in uncultivated tissues. A few CNVs involving autosomal and X-linked ovary-related loci were identified by

  5. Reduced neurobehavioral impairment from sleep deprivation in older adults: Contribution of adenosinergic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter eLandolt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A night without sleep is followed by enhanced sleepiness, increased low-frequency activity in the waking EEG, and reduced vigilant attention. The magnitude of these changes is highly variable among healthy individuals. Findings in young men of low and high subjective caffeine sensitivity suggest that adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to inter-individual differences in sleep deprivation-induced changes in EEG theta activity, as well as optimal performance on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT. In comparison to young subjects, healthy adults of older age typically feel less sleepy after sleep deprivation, and show fewer response lapses, and faster RTs and on the PVT, especially in the morning after the night without sleep. We hypothesized that age-related changes in adenosine signal transmission underlie reduced vulnerability to sleep deprivation in older individuals. To test this hypothesis, the combined effects of prolonged wakefulness and the adenosine receptor antagonist, caffeine, on an antero-posterior power gradient in EEG theta activity and PVT performance were analyzed in healthy older and caffeine-insensitive and -sensitive young men. The results show that age-related differences in sleep loss-induced changes in brain rhythmic activity and neurobehavioral functions are mirrored in young individuals of low and high sensitivity to the stimulant effects of caffeine. Moreover, the effects of sleep deprivation and caffeine on regional theta power and vigilant attention are inversely correlated across older and young age groups. Genetic variants of the adenosine A2A receptor gene contribute to individual differences in neurobehavioral performance in rested and sleep deprived state, and modulate the actions of caffeine in wakefulness and sleep. Based upon this evidence, we propose that age-related differences in A2A receptor mediated signal transduction could be involved in age-related changes in the vulnerability to acute sleep deprivation.

  6. Contribution of the forelimbs and hindlimbs of the horse to mechanical energy changes in jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Santamaría, Susana

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to gain more insight into the contribution of the forelimbs and hindlimbs of the horse to energy changes during the push-off for a jump. For this purpose, we collected kinematic data at 240 Hz from 23 5-year-old Warmbloods (average mass: 595 kg) performing free jumps over a 1.15 m high fence. From these data, we calculated the changes in mechanical energy and the changes in limb length and joint angles. The force carried by the forelimbs and the amount of energy stored was estimated from the distance between elbow and hoof, assuming that this part of the leg behaved as a linear spring. During the forelimb push, the total energy first decreased by 3.2 J kg(-1) and then increased again by 4.2 J kg(-1) to the end of the forelimb push. At the end of the forelimb push, the kinetic energy due to horizontal velocity of the centre of mass was 1.6 J kg(-1) less than at the start, while the effective energy (energy contributing to jump height) was 2.3 J kg(-1) greater. It was investigated to what extent these changes could involve passive spring-like behaviour of the forelimbs. The amount of energy stored and re-utilized in the distal tendons during the forelimb push was estimated to be on average 0.4 J kg(-1) in the trailing forelimb and 0.23 J kg(-1) in the leading forelimb. This means that a considerable amount of energy was first dissipated and subsequently regenerated by muscles, with triceps brachii probably being the most important contributor. During the hindlimb push, the muscles of the leg were primarily producing energy. The total increase in energy was 2.5 J kg(-1) and the peak power output amounted to 71 W kg(-1).

  7. Contributions and mechanisms of action of graphite nanomaterials in ultra high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbia, Libya Ahmed

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) reaches high strength and impermeability levels by using a relatively large volume fraction of a dense binder with fine microstructure in combination with high-quality aggregates of relatively small particle size, and reinforcing fibers. The dense microstructure of the cementitions binder is achieved by raising the packing density of the particulate matter, which covers sizes ranging from few hundred nanometers to few millimeters. The fine microstructure of binder in UHPC is realized by effective use of pozzolans to largely eliminate the coarse crystalline particles which exist among cement hydrates. UHPC incorporates (steel) fibers to overcome the brittleness of its dense, finely structured cementitious binder. The main thrust of this research is to evaluate the benefits of nanmaterials in UHPC. The dense, finely structure cementitious binder as well as the large volume fraction of the binder in UHPC benefit the dispersion of nanomaterials, and their interfacial interactions. The relatively close spacing of nanomaterials within the cementitious binder of UHPC enables them to render local reinforcement effects in critically stressed regions such as those in the vicinity of steel reinforcement and prestressing strands as well as fibers. Nanomaterials can also raise the density of the binder in UHPC by extending the particle size distribution down to the few nanometers range. Comprehensive experimental studies supported by theoretical investigations were undertake in order to optimize the use of nanomaterials in UHPC, identity the UHPC (mechanical) properties which benefit from the introduction of nanomaterials, and define the mechanisms of action of nanomaterials in UHPC. Carbon nanofiber was the primary nanomaterial used in this investigation. Some work was also conducted with graphite nanoplates. The key hypotheses of the project were as follows: (i) nanomaterials can make important contributions to the packing density of the

  8. Mechanisms Contributing to Suppressed Precipitation in Mt. Hua of Central China. Part I: Mountain Valley Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Zhao, Chun; Li, Zhanqing; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Significant reduction in precipitation in the past decades has been documented over many mountain ranges such as those in central and eastern China. Consistent with the increase of air pollution in these regions, it has been argued that the precipitation trend is linked to aerosol microphysical effect on suppressing warm rain. Rigorous quantitative investigations on the reasons responsible for the precipitation reduction are lacking. Here in this study, we employed an improved Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with online coupled chemistry (WRF-Chem) and conducted simulations at the convection-permitting scale to explore the major mechanisms governing changes in precipitation from orographic clouds in the Mountain (Mt.) Hua area in Central China. We find that anthropogenic pollution contributes to a ~ 40% reduction of precipitation over Mt. Hua during the one-month summer time period. The reduction is mainly associated with precipitation events associated with valleymountain circulation and a mesoscale cold front event. In this Part I paper, we scrutinize the mechanism leading to significant reduction for the cases associated with valley-mountain circulation. We find that the valley breeze is weakened by aerosols due to absorbing aerosol induced warming aloft and cooling near the surface as a result of aerosol-radiation interaction (ARI). The weakened valley breeze along with reduced water vapor in the valley due to reduced evapotranspiration as a result of surface cooling significantly reduce the transport of water vapor from the valley to mountain and the relative humidity over the mountain, thus suppressing convection and precipitation in the mountain.

  9. Computational contribution to the electrophoretic enantiomer separation mechanism and migration order using modified β-cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio Fonseca, Matheus; Santos da Silva, Ricky Cássio; Nascimento, Clebio Soares; Bastos Borges, Keyller

    2017-08-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an extremely effective technique in many kinds of separations, including separation of enantiomers. Some additional techniques may be necessary to determine the enantiomer migration order (EMO) and also the mechanism involved in chiral recognition. This paper reports the development and optimization of a CE method for enantioseparation of racemic mixture of both R- and S-stereoisomers of tramadol (TRM) with a computational contribution for the EMO determination and the responsible mechanisms for chiral distinction. Parameters such as composition and concentration of background electrolyte (BGE) and type and concentration of cyclodextrins (CD) were evaluated. For calculations, a sequential methodology was used, resorting to semiempirical Parametric Model 3 (PM3) followed by calculations accomplished using density functional theory. The best results were obtained with sulfated-β-CD (s-β-CD) and carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (cm-β-CD) as chiral selector. Calculations show that the inclusion of TRM is not a probable process due to the shape of the TRM molecule and the size CDs cavities. Therefore, the chiral recognition process occurs by the formation of association complexes between modified β-CD and groups of TRM molecules. The structural analysis of the fragments of complexes at a pH of 10 and a thermodynamic analysis of the complexes' formation process allows determining the EMO. Comparing results obtained experimentally and computationally, it seems that the developed method is adequate for separation of TRM enantiomers and the computational methodology is also adequate to get a sense of the system at a molecular level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. Methods The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. Results During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to –2, –6 and –17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Conclusions Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure). PMID:28725445

  11. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the neurological manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zou, Jia; Rensing, Nicholas R; Yang, Meihua; Wong, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy and other neurological deficits are common, disabling manifestations of the genetic disorder, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Brain inflammation has been implicated in contributing to epileptogenesis in acquired epilepsy due to brain injury, but the potential role of inflammatory mechanisms in genetic epilepsies is relatively unexplored. In this study, we investigated activation of inflammatory mediators and tested the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment on epilepsy in the Tsc1-GFAP conditional knock-out mouse model of TSC (Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice). Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting demonstrated increased expression of specific cytokines and chemokines, particularly IL-1β and CXCL10, in the neocortex and hippocampus of Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice, which was reversed by treatment with a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor. Double-labeling immunohistochemical studies indicated that the increased IL-1β was localized primarily to astrocytes. Importantly, the increase in inflammatory markers was also observed in astrocyte culture in vitro and at 2 weeks of age in Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice before the onset of epilepsy in vivo, indicating that the inflammatory changes were not secondary to seizures. Epicatechin-3-gallate, an inhibitor of IL-1β and CXCL10, at least partially reversed the elevated cytokine and chemokine levels, reduced seizure frequency, and prolonged survival of Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice. These findings suggest that mTOR-mediated inflammatory mechanisms may be involved in epileptogenesis in the genetic epilepsy, TSC.

  13. Associations of filaggrin gene loss-of-function variants and human papillomavirus-related cancer and pre-cancer in Danish adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Skaaby

    Full Text Available Filaggrin proteins are expressed in the skin, oral cavity, oesophagus, and cervical mucose. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG reduce filaggrin expression and cause an impaired skin barrier function. We hypothesized that FLG mutation carriers would be more susceptible to human papillomavirus (HPV infection and thus a higher risk of HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer. We investigated the association of the FLG genotype with incidence of HPV-related cancer of cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, anus and head and neck, and pre-cancer of the cervix.We included 13,376 persons from four population-based studies conducted in the same background population in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants were genotyped for the most common FLG mutations in Europeans. Information on cancer was obtained from The Danish Cancer Registry until 11 July 2011.There were 489 cases of prevalent and 97 cases of incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer (median follow-up 11.5 years. There was a statistically significant association between FLG genotype and incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer with a hazard ratio, HR = 2.1 (95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.2, 3.7 for FLG mutation carriers vs. wild types.FLG loss-of-function mutations were associated with higher incidence of HPV-related cancers and pre-cancers that are potentially screening and vaccine preventable.

  14. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie; Rodaros, Demetra; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Mandrup, Susanne; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2016-10-15

    Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from its binding site on the GABAA receptor. Central administration of ACBP or its cleaved fragment, commonly referred to as endozepines, induces proconflict and anxiety-like behaviour in rodents. For this reason, ACBP is known as an anxiogenic peptide. However, the role of endogenous ACBP in anxiety-like behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam has not been investigated. To address this question, we assessed anxiety behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam in two complementary loss-of-function mouse models including astrocyte-specific ACBP KO (ACBP(GFAP) KO) and whole-body KO (ACBP KO) mice. Male and female ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice do not show significant changes in anxiety-like behaviour compared to control littermates during elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) tests. Surprisingly, ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice were unresponsive to the anxiolytic effect of a low dose of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam.

  15. ALDH1A3 loss of function causes bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyavi, Mani; Abouzeid, Hana; Gawdat, Ghada; de Preux, Anne-Sophie; Xiao, Tong; Bardakjian, Tanya; Schneider, Adele; Choi, Alex; Jorgenson, Eric; Baier, Herwig; El Sada, Mohamad; Schorderet, Daniel F; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2013-08-15

    The major active retinoid, all-trans retinoic acid, has long been recognized as critical for the development of several organs, including the eye. Mutations in STRA6, the gene encoding the cellular receptor for vitamin A, in patients with Matthew-Wood syndrome and anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), have previously demonstrated the importance of retinol metabolism in human eye disease. We used homozygosity mapping combined with next-generation sequencing to interrogate patients with anophthalmia and microphthalmia for new causative genes. We used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to study a family with two affected brothers with bilateral A/M and a simplex case with bilateral anophthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm. Analysis of novel sequence variants revealed homozygosity for two nonsense mutations in ALDH1A3, c.568A>G, predicting p.Lys190*, in the familial cases, and c.1165A>T, predicting p.Lys389*, in the simplex case. Both mutations predict nonsense-mediated decay and complete loss of function. We performed antisense morpholino (MO) studies in Danio rerio to characterize the developmental effects of loss of Aldh1a3 function. MO-injected larvae showed a significant reduction in eye size, and aberrant axonal projections to the tectum were noted. We conclude that ALDH1A3 loss of function causes anophthalmia and aberrant eye development in humans and in animal model systems.

  16. A Zebrafish Loss-of-Function Model for Human CFAP53 Mutations Reveals Its Specific Role in Laterality Organ Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Emily S; Momenah, Tarek S; Al-Dagriri, Khalid; Al-Suwaid, Abdulrahman; Al-Shahrani, Safar; Jiang, Hui; Willekers, Sven; Oostveen, Yara Y; Chocron, Sonja; Postma, Alex V; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2016-02-01

    Establishing correct left-right asymmetry during embryonic development is crucial for proper asymmetric positioning of the organs. Congenital heart defects, such as dextrocardia, transposition of the arteries, and inflow or outflow tract malformations, comprise some of the most common birth defects and may be attributed to incorrect establishment of body laterality. Here, we identify new patients with dextrocardia who have mutations in CFAP53, a coiled-coil domain containing protein. To elucidate the mechanism by which CFAP53 regulates embryonic asymmetry, we used genome editing to generate cfap53 zebrafish mutants. Zebrafish cfap53 mutants have specific defects in organ laterality and randomization of asymmetric gene expression. We show that cfap53 is required for cilia rotation specifically in Kupffer's vesicle, the zebrafish laterality organ, providing a mechanism by which patients with CFAP53 mutations develop dextrocardia and heterotaxy, and confirming previous evidence that left-right asymmetry in humans is regulated through cilia-driven fluid flow in a laterality organ.

  17. SETD2 loss-of-function promotes renal cancer branched evolution through replication stress and impaired DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanu, N.; Grönroos, E.; Martinez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Defining mechanisms that generate intratumour heterogeneity and branched evolution may inspire novel therapeutic approaches to limit tumour diversity and adaptation. SETD2 (Su(var), Enhancer of zeste, Trithorax-domain containing 2) trimethylates histone-3 lysine-36 (H3K36me3) at sites of active...... proteins minichromosome maintenance complex component (MCM7) and DNA polymerase δ hindering replication fork progression, and failure to load lens epithelium-derived growth factor and the Rad51 homologous recombination repair factor at DNA breaks. Consistent with these data, we observe chromosomal...... breakpoint locations are biased away from H3K36me3 sites in SETD2 wild-type ccRCCs relative to tumours with bi-allelic SETD2 aberrations and that H3K36me3-negative ccRCCs display elevated DNA damage in vivo. These data suggest a role for SETD2 in maintaining genome integrity through nucleosome stabilization...

  18. R270C polymorphism leads to loss of function of the canine P2X7 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spildrejorde, Mari; Bartlett, Rachael; Stokes, Leanne; Jalilian, Iman; Peranec, Michelle; Sluyter, Vanessa; Curtis, Belinda L; Skarratt, Kristen K; Skora, Amanda; Bakhsh, Tahani; Seavers, Aine; McArthur, Jason D; Dowton, Mark; Sluyter, Ronald

    2014-07-15

    The relative function of the P2X7 receptor, an ATP-gated ion channel, varies between humans due to polymorphisms in the P2RX7 gene. This study aimed to assess the functional impact of P2X7 variation in a random sample of the canine population. Blood and genomic DNA were obtained from 69 dogs selected as representatives of a cross section of different breeds. P2X7 function was determined by flow cytometric measurements of dye uptake and patch-clamp measurements of inward currents. P2X7 expression was determined by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Sequencing was used to identify P2RX7 gene polymorphisms. P2X7 was cloned from an English springer spaniel, and point mutations were introduced into this receptor by site-directed mutagenesis. The relative function of P2X7 on monocytes varied between individual dogs. The canine P2RX7 gene encoded four missense polymorphisms: F103L and P452S, found in heterozygous and homozygous dosage, and R270C and R365Q, found only in heterozygous dosage. Moreover, R270C and R365Q were associated with the cocker spaniel and Labrador retriever, respectively. F103L, R270C, and R365Q but not P452S corresponded to decreased P2X7 function in monocytes but did not explain the majority of differences in P2X7 function between dogs, indicating that other factors contribute to this variability. Heterologous expression of site-directed mutants of P2X7 in human embryonic kidney-293 cells indicated that the R270C mutant was nonfunctional, the F103L and R365Q mutants had partly reduced function, and the P452S mutant functioned normally. Taken together, these data highlight that a R270C polymorphism has major functional impact on canine P2X7.

  19. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  20. Mineralization of the connective tissue: a complex molecular process leading to age-related loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Mkrtchyan, Garik V; Gneteeva, Tatiana; Buiucli, Sveatoslav; Tancowny, B; Kulka, M; Aliper, Alexander; Zhavoronkov, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Age-related metastatic mineralization of soft tissues has been considered a passive and spontaneous process. Recent data have demonstrated that calcium salt deposition in soft tissues could be a highly regulated process. Although calcification occurs in any tissue type, vascular calcification has been of particular interest due to association with atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and osteoporosis. Different mechanisms underlying calcium apatite accumulation are explored with these age-related disorders. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, oxy-lipids trigger release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation that activate calcification processes in aorta intimae. In CKD patients, renal failure alters the balance between calcium and phosphate levels usually regulated by fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), Klotho, and vitamin D, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) begin to explore an osteoblastosteoblast-like phenotype. Calcification could affect extracellular matrix along with VSMCs. Collagen is a major component of extracellular matrix and its modifications accumulate with age. The formation of cross-links between collagen fibers is regulated by the action of lysine hydroxylases and lysyl oxidase and could occur spontaneously. Oxidation-induced advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a major type of spontaneous cross-links that accelerate with age and may result in tissue stiffness, problems with recycling, and potential accumulation of calcium apatite. Applying strategies for clearing the AGEs proposed by de Grey may be more difficult in the highly mineralized extracellular matrix. We performed bioinformatic analysis of the molecular pathways underlying calcification in atherosclerotic and CKD patients, signaling pathways of collagen cross-links formation, and bone mineralization, and we propose new potential targets and review drugs for calcification treatment.

  1. PCSK9 R46L Loss-of-Function Mutation Reduces Lipoprotein(a), LDL Cholesterol, and Risk of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge; Benn, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Novel, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) inhibitors also lower lipoprotein(a) levels, but the effect on aortic valve stenosis and myocardial infarction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the PCSK9 R46L...... loss-of-function mutation is associated with lower levels of lipoprotein(a) and with reduced risk of aortic valve stenosis and myocardial infarction. DESIGN: We used two prospective cohort studies of the general population and one patient-based cohort. SETTING: Cohort studies selected at random...... individuals of Danish descent. PARTICIPANTS: We studied 103 083 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lipoprotein(a), LDL cholesterol, and PCSK9 R46L genotype and diagnoses of aortic...

  2. Association of loss-of-function mutations in the ABCA1 gene with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Stene, M.C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Context Low levels of high- density lipoprotein ( HDL) cholesterol are inversely related to cardiovascular risk. Whether this is a causal effect is unclear. Objective To determine whether genetically reduced HDL cholesterol due to heterozygosity for 4 loss- of- function mutations in ABCA1 cause...... Study ( CGPS), a cross- sectional general population study ( n= 31 241; 76 heterozygotes); and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study ( CIHDS), a case- control study ( n= 16 623; 44 heterozygotes). End points in all 3 studies were recorded during the period of January 1, 1976, through July 9, 2007....... Main Outcome Measures Levels of HDL cholesterol in the general population, cellular cholesterol efflux, and the association between IHD and HDL cholesterol and genotype. Results Heterozygotes vs noncarriers for 4 ABCA1 mutations ( P1065S, G1216V, N1800H, R2144X) had HDL cholesterol levels of 41 mg/ d...

  3. De novo loss-of-function mutations in CHD2 cause a fever-sensitive myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy sharing features with Dravet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suls, Arvid; Jaehn, Johanna A; Kecskés, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by infantile onset of therapy-resistant, fever-sensitive seizures followed by cognitive decline. Mutations in SCN1A explain about 75% of cases with Dravet syndrome; 90% of these mutations arise de novo. We studied a cohort of nine Dravet......-syndrome-affected individuals without an SCN1A mutation (these included some atypical cases with onset at up to 2 years of age) by using whole-exome sequencing in proband-parent trios. In two individuals, we identified a de novo loss-of-function mutation in CHD2 (encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2). A third...... CHD2 mutation was identified in an epileptic proband of a second (stage 2) cohort. All three individuals with a CHD2 mutation had intellectual disability and fever-sensitive generalized seizures, as well as prominent myoclonic seizures starting in the second year of life or later. To explore...

  4. Late-onset episodic ataxia type 2 associated with a novel loss-of-function mutation in the CACNA1A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-León, Ester; Banchs, Isabel; Serra, Selma A; Latorre, Pilar; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia; Corominas, Roser; Valverde, Miguel A; Volpini, Víctor; Fernández-Fernández, José M; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2009-05-15

    We report a patient with typical features of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) but with onset in the sixth decade and associated interictal hand dystonia. He was found to bear the novel heterozygous missense mutation p.Gly638Asp (c.1913G>A) in the CACNA1A gene. Functional analysis of the mutation on P/Q channels expressed in HEK 293 cells revealed a reduction of Ca(2+) current densities, a left-shift in the apparent reversal potential, the slowing of inactivation kinetics and the increase in the rate of current recovery from inactivation. These results are consistent with a decrease in Ca(2+) permeability through mutant P/Q channels. To our knowledge, this is just the second patient with late onset EA2 linked to a CACNA1A mutation and the first to carry a loss-of-function missense mutation.

  5. Mechanical branch constraints contribute to life-history variation across tree species in a Bolivian forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.; Gelder, van H.A.; Poorter, L.

    2006-01-01

    1 Trade-offs among plant traits may contribute to specialization for different environments and coexistence of plant species. This may be the first study that shows how trade-offs among branch traits contribute to variation in crown size, light requirements and maximum height across multiple sympatr

  6. Loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter disrupts an ETS-1 binding site and leads to cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiazhou; Cheng, Yibin; Yuan, Jia; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-02-01

    The cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital defect with complex etiology in humans. The molecular etiology of the CPO remains unknown. Here, we report a loss-of-function mutation in X-linked TBX22 gene (T-box 22) in a six-generation family of the CPO with obvious phenotypes of both cleft palate and hyper-nasal speech. We identify a functional -73G>A mutation in the promoter of TBX22, which is located at the core-binding site of transcription factor ETS-1 (v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence around the -73G>A mutation site is specific in primates. The mutation was detected in all five affected male members cosegregating with the affected phenotype and heterozygote occurred only in some unaffected females of the family, suggesting an X-linked transmission of the mutation in the family. The -73G>A variant is a novel single nucleotide mutation. Cell co-transfections indicated that ETS-1 could activate the TBX22 promoter. Moreover, EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that the allele A disrupts the binding site of ETS-1, thus markedly decreases the activity of the TBX22 promoter, which is likely to lead to the birth defect of the CPO without ankyloglossia. These results suggest that a loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter may cause the cleft palate through disruption of TBX22-ETS-1 pathway.

  7. IL-10R1 S138G loss-of-function polymorphism is associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis risk development in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Ben-Abderrahmen, Yosra; Boukadida, Jalel; Harizi, Hedi

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that host genetic factors are important in determining susceptibility to mycobacterial infections. More recently, functional genetic mutations affecting IL-10 receptor 1 (IL-10R1) were described. In this study, we investigated the relationship of IL-10R1 S138G loss-of-function polymorphism (A536G: rs3135932) with susceptibility to active tuberculosis (TB) in Tunisian patients. A total of 168 patients with pulmonary TB, 55 with extrapulmonary TB, and 150 control subjects were studied. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from leukocytes and used to investigate S138G polymorphism in IL-10R1 gene by multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Associations between G allele [odds ratio OR=5.01; 95% confidence intervals CI=2.58-9.77; P=10(-7)], GG genotypes [OR=9.06; 95% CI (1.58-67.33); correcting P-values using the Bonferroni method for multiple tests Pc=0.015] and AG genotype [OR=3.75; 95% CI (1.62-8.7); Pc=0.0012] with the risk development of active extrapulmonary TB were found. In contrast, the AA genotype was found to be associated with resistance to extrapulmonary TB [OR=0.19; 95% CI (0.09-0.42); Pc=6.10(-6)]. No association was found between S138G SNP and pulmonary TB. In conclusion, our study suggested the possible role of IL-10R1 S138G loss-of-function polymorphism in extrapulmonary TB susceptibility-resistance in Tunisia.

  8. Association of the IL-10 receptor A536G (S138G) loss-of-function variant with multiple sclerosis in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Fredj, Nadia; Aissi, Mouna; Ben Selma, Walid; Mahmoud, Imen; Nefzi, Faten; Frih-Ayed, Mahbouba; Boukadida, Jalel; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2017-02-22

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10), a potent anti-inflammatory T-cell cytokine, has been shown to be a regulatory cytokine that is associated with disease remission in multiple sclerosis (MS) and exerts its activity through its cognate cell surface receptor complex, IL-10 receptor 1 (IL-10R1) and IL-10R2. The purpose of this study was to investigate the IL-10R1 S138G loss-of-function polymorphism (A536G: rs3135932) for possible influence on susceptibility and outcome of MS in Tunisian patients. A total of 103 Tunisian MS patients and 160 control subjects were studied. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from leukocytes and used to investigate S138G polymorphism in IL-10R1 gene by multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Associations between G allele [odds ratio (OR) = 5.57; 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 3.26-9.54; p = 10(-7) ], GG genotypes [OR = 10.41; 95% CI = 2.28-47.58; p = 0.0007] and AG genotype [OR = 4.14; 95% CI = 2.16-7.93; p = 0.000016] with the risk development of MS were found. In contrast, the AA genotype seemed to be associated with protection against MS [OR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.09-0.30; p = 10(-7) ]. No association was found between S138G SNP and clinical features or disease activity of MS patients. In conclusion, our results suggest that S138G loss-of-function polymorphism of the IL-10R1 may be important risk factor in increasing susceptibility to MS.

  9. Differential cystine and dibasic amino acid handling after loss of function of the amino acid transporter b0,+AT (Slc7a9) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacopo, Andrea; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Cantone, Alessandra; Artunc, Ferruh; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Gehring, Nicole; Stange, Gerti; Jaenecke, Isabel; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Closs, Ellen I; Palacín, Manuel; Nunes, Virginia; Daniel, Hannelore; Lang, Florian; Capasso, Giovambattista; Wagner, Carsten A

    2013-12-15

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in SLC3A1 (rBAT) and SLC7A9 (b(0,+)AT). Gene targeting of the catalytic subunit (Slc7a9) in mice leads to excessive excretion of cystine, lysine, arginine, and ornithine. Here, we studied this non-type I cystinuria mouse model using gene expression analysis, Western blotting, clearance, and brush-border membrane vesicle (BBMV) uptake experiments to further characterize the renal and intestinal consequences of losing Slc7a9 function. The electrogenic and BBMV flux studies in the intestine suggested that arginine and ornithine are transported via other routes apart from system b(0,+). No remarkable gene expression changes were observed in other amino acid transporters and the peptide transporters in the intestine and kidney. Furthermore, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was reduced by 30% in knockout animals compared with wild-type animals. The fractional excretion of arginine was increased as expected (∼100%), but fractional excretions of lysine (∼35%), ornithine (∼16%), and cystine (∼11%) were less affected. Loss of function of b(0,+)AT reduced transport of cystine and arginine in renal BBMVs and completely abolished the exchanger activity of dibasic amino acids with neutral amino acids. In conclusion, loss of Slc7a9 function decreases the GFR and increases the excretion of several amino acids to a lesser extent than expected with no clear regulation at the mRNA and protein level of alternative transporters and no increased renal epithelial uptake. These observations indicate that transporters located in distal segments of the kidney and/or metabolic pathways may partially compensate for Slc7a9 loss of function.

  10. Identification of IbeR as a Stationary-Phase Regulator in Meningitic Escherichia coli K1 that Carries a Loss-of-Function Mutation in rpoS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IbeR is a regulator present in meningitic Escherichia coli strain E44 that carries a loss-of-function mutation in the stationary-phase (SP regulatory gene rpoS. In order to determine whether IbeR is an SP regulator in E44, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS were used to compare the proteomes of a noninvasive ibeR deletion mutant BR2 and its parent strain E44 in the SP. Four up-regulated (TufB, GapA, OmpA, AhpC and three down-regulated (LpdA, TnaA, OpmC proteins in BR2 were identified when compared to E44. All these proteins contribute to energy metabolism or stress resistance, which is related to SP regulation. One of the down-regulated proteins, tryptophanase (TnaA, which is regulated by RpoS in other E. coli strains, is associated with SP regulation via production of a signal molecule indole. Our studies demonstrated that TnaA was required for E44 invasion, and that indole was able to restore the noninvasive phenotype of the tnaA mutant. The production of indole was significantly reduced in BR2, indicating that ibeR is required for the indole production via tnaA. Survival studies under different stress conditions indicated that IbeR contributed to bacteria stress resistance in the SP. Taken together, IbeR is a novel regulator contributing to the SP regulation.

  11. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B;

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis developm...

  12. The relative contribution of mechanical stress and systemic processes in different types of osteoarthritis: the NEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.W. de; Mutsert, R. de; Cessie, S. le; Heijer, M. den; Rosendaal, F.R.; Kloppenburg, M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relative contribution of surrogates for mechanical stress and systemic processes with osteoarthritis (OA) in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. METHODS: The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity study is a population-based cohort including 6673 participants (range 45

  13. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hu Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients, providing a poignant example of parallel evolution. Together, this combined clinical-genomic approach provides a high-resolution portrait of the fungal microbiome of cystic fibrosis patient lungs and identifies a genetic basis of pathogen adaptation.

  14. Contributions to the improvement of cooling beds mechanism of profiled rolling mils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ardelean

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The cooling beds of rolling mils have a very important role in obtains of a finite product of high quality; thing so which is pointed out better at small profiles rolling mils. These cooling beds assure a conducted cooling of laminates profiles at the same time wish straightening them during the crossing of the cooling-bed fiability, a diminution of exploitation costs. The cooling beds of small profiles rolling mils of SC ISPAT-SIDERURGICA SA Hunedoara is most complex, being formed, beside the classics receive-exhaust reeling-path by a few mechanism like: separation mechanism, the mechanism of taking-over and transversal removal, grouping-removing mechanism. It’s being studied the braking mechanism at the entrance on the cooling-beds. The kinematics and cinetostatic study of this mechanism conducts to dates and conclusions, which can be used forward at the study of component parts of the mechanism using an analysing program with established finite element. Based of results obtained from the kinematics and cinetostatic analyses of the mechanism and the results of feign-modelling is suggested a new solution for the construction of component nod of this mechanism. It must be underlined the fact that, because of the very big length of cooling bed and reduplication of component parts, this thing has a favourable influence concerning the working and the exploitation of the braking mechanism, wish positive influence in global working of the cooling bed rolling mills.\tThe study can be extended for all the component mechanism of this cooling bed.

  15. Biological Mechanisms Whereby Social Exclusion May Contribute to the Etiology of Psychosis : A Narrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selten, Jean-Paul; Booij, Jan; Buwalda, Bauke; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine whether a contribution of social exclusion to the pathogenesis of psychosis is compatible with the dopamine hypothesis and/or the neurodevelopmental hypothesis. Humans experience social exclusion as defeating. An animal model for defeat is the resident-intrud

  16. Mechanisms Contributing to the Induction and Storage of Pavlovian Fear Memories in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongbeom; Pare, Denis; Nair, Satish S.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of plasticity in the amygdala vs. its afferent pathways to conditioned fear remain controversial. Some believe that thalamic and cortical neurons transmitting information about the conditioned stimulus (CS) to the lateral amygdala (LA) serve a relay function. Others maintain that thalamic and/or cortical plasticity is…

  17. Differences in Binding and Monitoring Mechanisms Contribute to Lifespan Age Differences in False Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandakova, Yana; Shing, Yee Lee; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    Based on a 2-component framework of episodic memory development across the lifespan (Shing & Lindenberger, 2011), we examined the contribution of memory-related binding and monitoring processes to false memory susceptibility in childhood and old age. We administered a repeated continuous recognition task to children (N = 20, 10-12 years),…

  18. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siechen, Scott; Yang, Shengyuan; Chiba, Akira; Saif, Taher

    2009-08-04

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynaptic cell. Our in vivo experiments on the embryonic Drosophila nervous system show that vesicle clustering at the neuromuscular presynaptic terminal depends on mechanical tension within the axons. Vesicle clustering vanishes upon severing the axon from the cell body, but is restored when mechanical tension is applied to the severed end of the axon. Clustering increases when intact axons are stretched mechanically by pulling the postsynaptic muscle. Using micro mechanical force sensors, we find that embryonic axons that have formed neuromuscular junctions maintain a rest tension of approximately 1 nanonewton. If the rest tension is perturbed mechanically, axons restore the rest tension either by relaxing or by contracting over a period of approximately 15 min. Our results suggest that neuromuscular synapses employ mechanical tension as a signal to modulate vesicle accumulation and synaptic plasticity.

  19. An Integrated Theory of Adsorption and Partition Mechanism and Eash Contribution to Solute Retention in Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿信笃; 弗莱德依瑞格涅尔

    2003-01-01

    With the combination of the the stoichiometric displacement model for retention (SDM-R) in reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and the stoichiometric displacement model for adsorption (SDM-A) in physical chemistry,the total number of moles of the re-solvated methanol of stationary phase side.nr,and that of solute side in the mobile phase,q,corresponding the one mole of the desorbing solute,were separately determined and referred as the characterization parameters of the contributions of the adsorption mechanism and partition mechanism to the solute retention,respectively.A chromatographic system of insulin,using mobile phase consisting of the pseudo-homologue of alcohols(methanol,ethanol and 2-propanol)-water and trifluoroacetic acid was employed.The maximum number of the methanol layers on the stationary phase surface was found to be 10.6,only 3 of which being valid in usual RPLC,traditionally referred as a volume process in partition mechanism.However,it still follows the SDM-R.Both of q and nr of insulin were found not to be zero,indicating that the retention mechanism of insulin is a mixed mode of partition mechanism and adsorption mechanism.When methanol is used as the organic modifier,the ratio of q/nr was 1.13,indicating the contribution to insulin retention due to partition mechanism being a bit greater than that due to adsorption mechanism.A linear relationship between q,or nr and the carbon number of the pseudo-homologue in the mobile phase was also found.As a methodology for investigating the retention mechanism retention and behavior of biopolymers.a homologue of organic solvents as the organic modifier in mobile phase has also been explored.

  20. Development on the Calculation Software Package of the Contribution Rate of Mechanization in Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces a software specially in calculating the contribution rate of machanization in agriculture by usng economy math method ,computer technology and Visual Basic 6. 0 version. The software package has friendly interface,simple operating way and accurate, feasible calculating method. It greatly changes the condition in the past which had considerable lots of data and miscellaneous and trivial methods,which were even hard to seek answer. So it has very high practicl value.

  1. Contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to variation in cancer risk among tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutstein, Michael; Moss, Joshua; Kaplan, Tommy; Cedar, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it was suggested that tissue variation in cancer risk originates from differences in the number of stem-cell divisions underlying each tissue, leading to different mutation loads. We show that this variation is also correlated with the degree of aberrant CpG island DNA methylation in normal cells. Methylation accumulates during aging in a subset of molecules, suggesting that the epigenetic landscape within a founder-cell population may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:28193856

  2. Mechanical and IL-1β Responsive miR-365 Contributes to Osteoarthritis Development by Targeting Histone Deacetylase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Studies show that excessive mechanical stress can directly damage the cartilage extracellular matrix and shift the balance in chondrocytes to favor catabolic activity over anabolism. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are emerging as important regulators in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. We have found that mechanical loading up-regulated microRNA miR-365 in growth plate chondrocytes, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation. Here, we explored the role of the mechanical responsive microRNA miR-365 in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. We found that miR-365 was up-regulated by cyclic loading and IL-1β stimulation in articular chondrocytes through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor NF-κB. miR-365 expressed significant higher level in rat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL surgery induced OA cartilage as well as human OA cartilage from primary OA patients and traumatic OA Patients. Overexpression of miR-365 in chondrocytes increases gene expression of matrix degrading enzyme matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP13 and collagen type X (Col X. The increase in miR-365 expression in OA cartilage and in response to IL-1 may contribute to the abnormal gene expression pattern characteristic of OA. Inhibition of miR-365 down-regulated IL-1β induced MMP13 and Col X gene expression. We further showed histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4 is a direct target of miR-365, which mediates mechanical stress and inflammation in OA pathogenesis. Thus, miR-365 is a critical regulator of mechanical stress and pro-inflammatory responses, which contributes cartilage catabolism. Manipulation of the expression of miR-365 in articular chondrocytes by miR-365 inhibitor may be a potent therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis.

  3. Mechanical and IL-1β Responsive miR-365 Contributes to Osteoarthritis Development by Targeting Histone Deacetylase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Tian, Shaoqi; Wang, Yuanhe; Sun, Kang; Chen, Qian

    2016-03-23

    Mechanical stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Studies show that excessive mechanical stress can directly damage the cartilage extracellular matrix and shift the balance in chondrocytes to favor catabolic activity over anabolism. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as important regulators in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. We have found that mechanical loading up-regulated microRNA miR-365 in growth plate chondrocytes, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation. Here, we explored the role of the mechanical responsive microRNA miR-365 in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). We found that miR-365 was up-regulated by cyclic loading and IL-1β stimulation in articular chondrocytes through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor NF-κB. miR-365 expressed significant higher level in rat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery induced OA cartilage as well as human OA cartilage from primary OA patients and traumatic OA Patients. Overexpression of miR-365 in chondrocytes increases gene expression of matrix degrading enzyme matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP13) and collagen type X (Col X). The increase in miR-365 expression in OA cartilage and in response to IL-1 may contribute to the abnormal gene expression pattern characteristic of OA. Inhibition of miR-365 down-regulated IL-1β induced MMP13 and Col X gene expression. We further showed histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is a direct target of miR-365, which mediates mechanical stress and inflammation in OA pathogenesis. Thus, miR-365 is a critical regulator of mechanical stress and pro-inflammatory responses, which contributes cartilage catabolism. Manipulation of the expression of miR-365 in articular chondrocytes by miR-365 inhibitor may be a potent therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis.

  4. ABCC8 R1420H Loss-of-Function Variant in a Southwest American Indian Community: Association With Increased Birth Weight and Doubled Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Leslie J; Muller, Yunhua Li; Remedi, Maria Sara; Traurig, Michael; Piaggi, Paolo; Wiessner, Gregory; Huang, Ke; Stacy, Alyssa; Kobes, Sayuko; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Nichols, Colin G; Bogardus, Clifton

    2015-12-01

    Missense variants in KCNJ11 and ABCC8, which encode the KIR6.2 and SUR1 subunits of the β-cell KATP channel, have previously been implicated in type 2 diabetes, neonatal diabetes, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (HHI). To determine whether variation in these genes affects risk for type 2 diabetes or increased birth weight as a consequence of fetal hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians, missense and common noncoding variants were analyzed in individuals living in the Gila River Indian Community. A R1420H variant in SUR1 (ABCC8) was identified in 3.3% of the population (N = 7,710). R1420H carriers had higher mean birth weights and a twofold increased risk for type 2 diabetes with a 7-year earlier onset age despite being leaner than noncarriers. One individual homozygous for R1420H was identified; retrospective review of his medical records was consistent with HHI and a diagnosis of diabetes at age 3.5 years. In vitro studies showed that the R1420H substitution decreases KATP channel activity. Identification of this loss-of-function variant in ABCC8 with a carrier frequency of 3.3% affects clinical care as homozygous inheritance and potential HHI will occur in 1/3,600 births in this American Indian population.

  5. Carbonylation and Loss-of-Function Analyses of SBPase Reveal Its Metabolic Interface Role in Oxidative Stress, Carbon Assimilation, and Multiple Aspects of Growth and Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Liang Liu; Hai-Dong Yu; Yuan Guan; Ji-Kai Li; Fang-Qing Guo

    2012-01-01

    Sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) is a Calvin cycle enzyme and functions in photosynthetic carbon fixation.We found that SBPase was rapidly carbonylated in response to methyl viologen (MV) treatments in detached leaves of Arabidopsis plants.In vitro activity analysis of the purified recombinant SBPase showed that SBPase was carbonylated by hydroxyl radicals,which led to enzyme inactivation in an H2O2 dose-dependent manner.To determine the conformity with carbonylation-caused loss in enzymatic activity in response to stresses,we isolated a loss-of-function mutant sbp,which is deficient in SBPase-dependent carbon assimilation and starch biosynthesis,sbp mutant exhibited a severe growth retardation phenotype,especially for the developmental defects in leaves and flowers where SBPASE is highly expressed.The mutation of SBPASE caused growth retardation mainly through inhibition of cell division and expansion,which can be partially rescued by exogenous application of sucrose.Our findings demonstrate that ROS-induced oxidative damage to SBPase affects growth,development,and chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis through inhibiting carbon assimilation efficiency.The data presented here provide a case study that such inactivation of SBPase caused by carbonyl modification may be a kind of adaptation for plants to restrict the operation of the reductive pentose phosphate pathway under stress conditions.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in the Nav1.7 gene underlie congenital indifference to pain in multiple human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Y P; MacFarlane, J; MacDonald, M L; Thompson, J; Dube, M-P; Mattice, M; Fraser, R; Young, C; Hossain, S; Pape, T; Payne, B; Radomski, C; Donaldson, G; Ives, E; Cox, J; Younghusband, H B; Green, R; Duff, A; Boltshauser, E; Grinspan, G A; Dimon, J H; Sibley, B G; Andria, G; Toscano, E; Kerdraon, J; Bowsher, D; Pimstone, S N; Samuels, M E; Sherrington, R; Hayden, M R

    2007-04-01

    Congenital indifference to pain (CIP) is a rare condition in which patients have severely impaired pain perception, but are otherwise essentially normal. We identified and collected DNA from individuals from nine families of seven different nationalities in which the affected individuals meet the diagnostic criteria for CIP. Using homozygosity mapping and haplotype sharing methods, we narrowed the CIP locus to chromosome 2q24-q31, a region known to contain a cluster of voltage-gated sodium channel genes. From these prioritized candidate sodium channels, we identified 10 mutations in the SCN9A gene encoding the sodium channel protein Nav1.7. The mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype, and nine of these SCN9A mutations resulted in truncation and loss-of-function of the Nav1.7 channel. These genetic data further support the evidence that Nav1.7 plays an essential role in mediating pain in humans, and that SCN9A mutations identified in multiple different populations underlie CIP.

  7. Novel loss-of-function putative aminotransferase alleles cause biosynthesis of capsinoids, nonpungent capsaicinoid analogues, in mildly pungent chili peppers (Capsicum chinense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Miwa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Yazawa, Susumu

    2010-11-24

    Capsinoids are a group of nonpungent capsaicinoid analogues produced in Capsicum fruits. They have similar bioactivities to capsaicinoids such as suppression of fat accumulation and antioxidant activity. They are more palatable ingredients in dietary supplements than capsaicinoids because of their low pungency. Previous studies on nonpungent Capsicum annuum cultivars showed that capsinoid biosynthesis is caused by loss-of-function putative aminotransferase (p-amt) alleles. This study showed that three mildly pungent cultivars of Capsicum chinense (Zavory Hot, Aji Dulce strain 2, and Belize Sweet) contain high levels of capsinoid. It was shown that these cultivars have novel p-amt alleles, which contain mutations that differ from those of C. annuum. Sequence analysis of p-amt in Belize Sweet revealed that a 5 bp insertion (TGGGC) results in a frameshift mutation. A transposable element (Tcc) was found in the p-amt of Zavory Hot and Aji Dulce strain 2. Tcc has features similar to those of the hAT transposon family. This was inserted in the fifth intron of Zavory Hot and in third intron of Aji Dulce strain 2. The p-amt alleles harboring Tcc cannot produce an active p-AMT. These mildly pungent cultivars will provide a new natural source of capsinoids.

  8. Leg mechanics contribute to establishing swing phase trajectories during memory-guided stepping movements in walking cats: a computational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir Gordon Pearson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available When quadrupeds stop walking after stepping over a barrier with their forelegs, the memory of barrier height and location is retained for many minutes. This memory is subsequently used to guide hind leg movements over the barrier when walking is resumed. The upslope of the initial trajectory of hind leg paw movements is strongly dependent on the initial location of the paw relative to the barrier. In this study, we have attempted to determine whether mechanical factors contribute significantly in establishing the slope of the paw trajectories by creating a 4-link biomechanical model of a cat hind leg and driving this model with a variety of joint-torque profiles, including average torques for a range on initial paw positions relative to the barrier. Torque profiles for individual steps were determined by an inverse dynamic analysis of leg movements in three normal cats. Our study demonstrates that limb mechanics can contribute to establishing the dependency of trajectory slope on the initial position of the paw relative to the barrier. However, an additional contribution of neuronal motor commands was indicated by the fact that the simulated slopes of paw trajectories were significantly less that the observed slopes. A neuronal contribution to the modification of paw trajectories was also revealed by our observations that both the magnitudes of knee flexor muscle EMG bursts and the initial knee flexion torques depended on initial paw position. Previous studies have shown that a shift in paw position prior to stepping over a barrier changes the paw trajectory to be appropriate for the new paw position. Our data indicate that both mechanical and neuronal factors contribute to this updating process, and that any shift in leg position during the delay period modifies the working memory of barrier location.

  9. Contribution of collagen and elastin fibers to the mechanical behavior of an abdominal connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levillain, A; Orhant, M; Turquier, F; Hoc, T

    2016-08-01

    The linea alba is a complex structure commonly involved in hernia formation. Knowledge of its mechanical behavior is essential to design suitable meshes and reduce the risk of recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between the mechanical properties of the linea alba and the organization of collagen and elastin fibers. For that purpose, longitudinal and transversal samples were removed from four porcine and three human linea alba, to perform tensile tests under a biphotonic confocal microscope, in each direction. Microscopic observation revealed a tissue composed of two layers, made of transversal collagen fibers in the dorsal side and oblique collagen fibers in the ventral side. This particular architecture led to an anisotropic mechanical behavior, with higher stress in the transversal direction. During loading, oblique fibers of the ventral layer reoriented toward the tensile axis in both directions, while fibers of the dorsal layer remained in the transversal direction. This rotation of oblique fibers progressively increased the stiffness of the tissue and induced a non-linear stress-stretch relation. Elastin fibers formed a layer covering the collagen fibers and followed their movement, suggesting that they ensure their elastic recoil. All of these results demonstrated the strong relationships between the microstructure and the mechanical behavior of the linea alba.

  10. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07811.001 PMID:26623515

  11. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  12. Glacier Sensitivity in the Monsoonal Himalayas: Relative Contributions of Feedback Mechanisms to Regional Glacier Mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. S.; Rupper, S.

    2016-12-01

    Despite their societal relevance, glacier mass balances across High Mountain Asia (HMA) remain poorly constrained due, in part, to the limited number of direct measurements, regional climate heterogeneity, and uncertainty in glacier mass balance models. Many studies that model glaciers throughout HMA cite surface feedbacks as an important factor affecting glacier melt, however, little has been done to actually quantify their effects. This study develops a fully distributed surface energy- and mass-balance model to quantify the contributions of 3 surface feedbacks to glacier mass balance. The 3 target feedbacks are an accumulation/snow depth feedback, a sensible heat feedback, and an albedo feedback. The model follows well-known energy balance methods, but includes unique "switches" which allow individual feedbacks to be independently turned on and off. The model applies meteorological inputs from the High Asia Refined analysis to an idealized glacier for 4 different climate settings in HMA. The results show that surface feedbacks increase melt by up to 67% for a +1°C temperature forcing, but that feedback contributions vary significantly under different climate settings. For any given glacier, the feedback strength is highest near the equilibrium line altitude. Furthermore, feedbacks that directly reduce surface albedo consistently contribute the most to glacier mass loss. Feedback magnitude depends most strongly on the frequency of snowfall events occurring concurrently with the melt season, and on the magnitude of incoming shortwave radiation for that region. These results highlight the potential significance of feedbacks on glacier mass balance in HMA, what conditions maximize these feedback magnitudes, and what regions are likely most sensitive to them. They also highlight physical processes that need to be especially well constrained in future glacier mass balance models for glaciers in regions with high feedback sensitivity. Creating glacier mass balance

  13. The Contribution of Experimental in vivo Models to Understanding the Mechanisms of Adaptation to Mechanical Loading in Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, Lee B; Price, Joanna S; Lanyon, Lance E

    2014-01-01

    Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones' strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading. Jiri Hert introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gages to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced. Experiments combining strain gage instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats, and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (re)modeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice, which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that over the physiological strain range, bone's mechanically adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles, and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of rest between them.

  14. The contribution of experimental in vivo models to understanding the mechanisms of adaptation to mechanical loading in bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Meakin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading.Jiri Heřt introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gauges to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced.Experiments combining strain gauge instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (remodeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that; over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically-adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of

  15. Lactate Contribution to the Tumor Microenvironment: Mechanisms, Effects on Immune Cells and Therapeutic Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B.; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells leads to enhanced glucose uptake and the conversion of a larger fraction of pyruvate into lactate, even under normoxic conditions; this phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis is largely known as the Warburg effect. This metabolic reprograming serves to generate biosynthetic precursors, thus facilitating the survival of rapidly proliferating malignant cells. Extracellular lactate directs the metabolic reprograming of tumor cells, thereby serving as an additional selective pressure. Besides tumor cells, stromal cells are another source of lactate production in the tumor microenvironment, whose role in both tumor growth and the antitumor immune response is the subject of intense research. In this review, we provide an integral perspective of the relationship between lactate and the overall tumor microenvironment, from lactate structure to metabolic pathways for its synthesis, receptors, signaling pathways, lactate-producing cells, lactate-responding cells, and how all contribute to the tumor outcome. We discuss the role of lactate as an immunosuppressor molecule that contributes to tumor evasion and we explore the possibility of targeting lactate metabolism for cancer treatment, as well as of using lactate as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:26909082

  16. Lactate contribution to the tumor microenvironment: mechanisms, effects on immune cells and therapeutic relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana eRomero-Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of cells leads to enhanced glucose uptake and the conversion of a larger fraction of pyruvate into lactate, even under normoxic conditions; this phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis is largely known as the Warburg effect. This metabolic reprogramming serves to generate biosynthetic precursors, thus facilitating the survival of rapidly proliferating malignant cells. Extracellular lactate directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, thereby serving as an additional selective pressure. Besides tumor cells, stromal cells are another source of lactate production in the tumor microenvironment, whose role in both tumor growth and the anti-tumor immune response is the subject of intense research. In this review, we provide an integral perspective of the relationship between lactate and the overall tumor microenvironment, from lactate structure to metabolic pathways for its synthesis, receptors, signaling pathways, lactate-producing cells, lactate-responding cells, and how all contribute to the tumor outcome. We discuss the role of lactate as a immunosuppressor molecule that contributes to tumor evasion and explore the possibility of targeting lactate metabolism for cancer treatment, as well as of using lactate as a prognostic biomarker.

  17. Do pathogen-specific defense mechanisms contribute to wound-induced resistance in tomato?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Doriana; Demaria, Daniele; Calderini, Ornella; Ferraris, Lucia; Valentino, Danila; Arcioni, Sergio; Tamietti, Giacomo; Cardinale, Francesca

    2008-05-01

    A network of shared intermediates/components and/or common molecular outputs in biotic and abiotic stress signaling has long been known, but the possibility of effective influence between differently triggered stresses (co-protection) is less studied. Recent observations show that wounding induces transient protection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to four pathogens with a range of lifestyles, locally and systemically. The contribution of ethylene (ET) in basal but also in wound-induced resistance to each pathogen, although dispensable, is demonstrated to be positive (Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora capsici) or negative (Fusarium oxysporum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato). Furthermore, the expression of several defense markers is influenced locally and/or systemically by wounding and ET, and might be part of that core of conserved molecular responses whereby an abiotic stress such as wounding imparts co-resistance to biotic stress. In this addendum, we speculate on some of the physiological responses to wounding that might contribute to the modulation of resistance in a more pathogen-specific manner.

  18. Both cell-autonomous mechanisms and hormones contribute to sexual development in vertebrates and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Ashley; Monteiro, Antónia

    2013-08-01

    The differentiation of male and female characteristics in vertebrates and insects has long been thought to proceed via different mechanisms. Traditionally, vertebrate sexual development was thought to occur in two phases: a primary and a secondary phase, the primary phase involving the differentiation of the gonads, and the secondary phase involving the differentiation of other sexual traits via the influence of sex hormones secreted by the gonads. In contrast, insect sexual development was thought to depend exclusively on cell-autonomous expression of sex-specific genes. Recently, however, new evidence indicates that both vertebrates and insects rely on sex hormones as well as cell-autonomous mechanisms to develop sexual traits. Collectively, these new data challenge the traditional vertebrate definitions of primary and secondary sexual development, call for a redefinition of these terms, and indicate the need for research aimed at explaining the relative dependence on cell-autonomous versus hormonally guided sexual development in animals.

  19. Quantum-Mechanical Contributions to Numerical Simulations of Charged Particle Transport at the DNA Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Christophe; Galassi, Mariel E.; Weck, Philippe F.; Fojón, Omar; Hanssen, Jocelyn; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    Two quantum mechanical models (CB1 and CDW-EIS) are here presented to provide accurate multiple differential and total cross sections for describing the two most important ionizing processes, namely, ionization and capture induced by heavy charged particles in targets of biological interest. Water and DNA bases are then successively investigated by reporting in particular a detailed study of the influence of the target description on the cross section calculations.

  20. The contribution of inspiratory muscles function to exercise limitation in heart failure: pathophysiological mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge P. Ribeiro; Chiappa, Gaspar R.; Carine C. Callegaro

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure induces histological, metabolic and functional adaptations in the inspiratory muscles. This inspiratory muscle weakness, which occurs in 30% to 50% of the heart failure patients, is associated with reduction in the functional capacity, reduction in the quality of life and with a poor prognosis in these individuals. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain the role of the inspiratory muscles in the exer...

  1. Numerical investigation of the hydro-mechanical contribution to seismic attenuation in damaged rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Nele; Jänicke, Ralf; Renner, Jörg; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The investigation of hydro-mechanical processes, in particular the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media, is essential for the physical interpretation of data obtained from seismic exploration. Here, we specifically investigate attenuation processes in fluid-saturated porous rock containing fracture networks to identify effective hydro-mechanical properties by numerical simulation. The main purpose of this work is the characterization of the overall hydro-mechanical properties by computational homogenization. We determine an effective Skempton coefficient by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Fracture networks are stochastically generated to mimic geological in-situ situations. The fractures are approximated as ellipses with aspect ratios up to 1/100, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits with high permeabilities. Simulations are designed on the material scale with and without conservation of fluid mass in the control volume. Using computational homogenization approaches, we define an effective Skempton coefficient. A range of fracture networks with different characteristic properties is studied for different varieties of fractures. On the material scale we find strongly heterogeneous pressure propagation in the fracture network and the surrounding rock, respectively. The pressure diffusion is much faster in the fracture network than in the matrix, rendering the macroscopic hydro-mechanical behavior strongly time dependent. The effective Skempton coefficient converges to an ensemble-specific instantaneous value and to 1 for long-time studies. The ultimate objective of our study is to evaluate whether constraints on the structure of fracture networks can be deduced from observations of attenuation and its frequency dependence.

  2. Magnetic monopoles and dyons revisited: A useful contribution to the study of classical mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Renato P. dos

    2015-01-01

    Graduate level physics curricula in many countries around the world, as well as senior-level undergraduate ones in some major institutions, include Classical Mechanics courses, mostly based on Goldstein's textbook masterpiece. During the discussion of central force motion, however, the Kepler problem is virtually the only serious application presented. In this paper, we present another problem that is also soluble, namely the interaction of Schwinger's dual-charged (dyon) particles. While the...

  3. The visceral pericardium: macromolecular structure and contribution to passive mechanical properties of the left ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöbsis, Paul D.; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Wen, Han; Rothstein, Emily C.; Horvath, Keith A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on the passive mechanical properties of the myocardium, which determines left ventricular (LV) diastolic mechanics, but the significance of the visceral pericardium (VP) has not been extensively studied. A unique en face three-dimensional volumetric view of the porcine VP was obtained using two-photon excitation fluorescence to detect elastin and backscattered second harmonic generation to detect collagen, in addition to standard light microscopy with histological staining. Below a layer of mesothelial cells, collagen and elastin fibers, extending several millimeters, form several distinct layers. The configuration of the collagen and elastin layers as well as the location of the VP at the epicardium providing a geometric advantage led to the hypothesis that VP mechanical properties play a role in the residual stress and passive stiffness of the heart. The removal of the VP by blunt dissection from porcine LV slices changed the opening angle from 53.3 ± 10.3 to 27.3 ± 5.7° (means ± SD, P < 0.05, n = 4). In four porcine hearts where the VP was surgically disrupted, a significant decrease in opening angle was found (35.5 ± 4.0°) as well as a rightward shift in the ex vivo pressure-volume relationship before and after disruption and a decrease in LV passive stiffness at lower LV volumes (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate the significant and previously unreported role that the VP plays in the residual stress and passive stiffness of the heart. Alterations in this layer may occur in various disease states that effect diastolic function. PMID:17933976

  4. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, M.

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution imaging techniques. Also, translating findings between model substrates to intact biomass is critical for evaluating enzyme performance. Here we employ a fungal free enzyme cocktail, a complexed cellulosomal system, and a combination of the two to investigate saccharification mechanisms on cellulose I, II and III along with corn stover from Clean Fractionation (CF), which is an Organosolv pretreatment. The insoluble Cellulose Enriched Fraction (CEF) from CF contains mainly cellulose with minor amounts of residual hemicellulose and lignin, the amount of which depends on the CF pretreatment severity. Enzymatic digestions at both low and high-solids loadings demonstrate that CF reduces the amount of enzyme required to depolymerize polysaccharides relative to deacetylated, dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of the biomass provides evidence for the different mechanisms of enzymatic deconstruction between free and complexed enzyme systems, and reveals the basis for the synergistic relationship between the two enzyme paradigms on a process-relevant substrate for the first time. These results also demonstrate that the presence of lignin, rather than cellulose morphology, is more detrimental to cellulosome action than to free cellulases. As enzyme costs are a major economic driver for biorefineries, this study provides key inputs for the evaluation of CF as a pretreatment method for biomass conversion.

  5. The Contribution of Immune Evasive Mechanisms to Parasite Persistence in Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Elisangela Oliveira; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre; Feijó, Daniel Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites that give rise to a range of diseases called Leishmaniasis that affects annually an estimated 1.3 million people from 88 countries. Leishmania donovani and Leishmania (L.) infantum chagasi are responsible to cause the visceral leishmaniasis. The parasite can use assorted strategies to interfere with the host homeostasis to establish persistent infections that without treatment can be lethal. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms involved in the parasite subversion of the host protective immune response and how alterations of host tissue physiology and vascular remodeling during VL could affect the organ-specific immunity against Leishmania parasites. PMID:27148272

  6. Two different motor learning mechanisms contribute to learning reaching movements in a rotated visual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Virginia Way Tong; Sanger, Terence David

    2014-01-01

    Practice of movement in virtual-reality and other artificially altered environments has been proposed as a method for rehabilitation following neurological injury and for training new skills in healthy humans.  For such training to be useful, there must be transfer of learning from the artificial environment to the performance of desired skills in the natural environment.  Therefore an important assumption of such methods is that practice in the altered environment engages the same learning and plasticity mechanisms that are required for skill performance in the natural environment.  We test the hypothesis that transfer of learning may fail because the learning and plasticity mechanism that adapts to the altered environment is different from the learning mechanism required for improvement of motor skill.  In this paper, we propose that a model that separates skill learning and environmental adaptation is necessary to explain the learning and aftereffects that are observed in virtual reality experiments.  In particular, we studied the condition where practice in the altered environment should lead to correct skill performance in the original environment. Our 2-mechanism model predicts that aftereffects will still be observed when returning to the original environment, indicating a lack of skill transfer from the artificial environment to the original environment. To illustrate the model prediction, we tested 10 healthy participants on the interaction between a simple overlearned motor skill (straight hand movements to targets in different directions) and an artificially altered visuomotor environment (rotation of visual feedback of the results of movement).  As predicted by the models, participants show adaptation to the altered environment and after-effects on return to the baseline environment even when practice in the altered environment should have led to correct skill performance.  The presence of aftereffect under all conditions that involved changes in

  7. Innate immune control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: mechanisms contributing to combating systemic Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovars remain a serious problem worldwide. While serovar Typhi causes significant morbidity and mortality that is restricted to humans, serovar Typhimurium causes gastroenteritidis in humans and can also infect other animals. As mice with the susceptible Nramp1 locus get systemic infection with serovar Typhimurium, murine infection models using this serovar have been widely used to decipher the immune mechanisms required to survive systemic Salmonella infection. This review summarizes recent studies in murine infection models that have advanced our understanding of the events that occur during the first days after oral Salmonella infection. The pathways of bacterial penetration across the intestinal epithelium, bacterial spread to draining (mesenteric) lymph nodes and dissemination to systemic tissues is discussed. The response of myeloid cell populations, including dendritic cells, inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, during the early stage of infection is also discussed. Finally, the mechanisms driving recruitment of myeloid cells to infected intestinal lymphoid tissues and what is known about Toll-like receptor signaling pathways in innate immunity to Salmonella infection is also discussed.

  8. A loss-of-function mutation in the SLC9A6 gene causes X-linked mental retardation resembling Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yumi; Hosoki, Kana; Matsushita, Masafumi; Funatsuka, Makoto; Saito, Kayoko; Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Saitoh, Shinji

    2011-12-01

    SLC9A6 mutations have been reported in families in whom X-linked mental retardation (XMR) mimics Angelman syndrome (AS). However, the relative importance of SLC9A6 mutations in patients with an AS-like phenotype or XMR has not been fully investigated. Here, the involvement of SLC9A6 mutations in 22 males initially suspected to have AS but found on genetic testing not to have AS (AS-like cohort), and 104 male patients with XMR (XMR cohort), was investigated. A novel SLC9A6 mutation (c.441delG, p.S147fs) was identified in one patient in the AS-like cohort, but no mutation was identified in XMR cohort, suggesting mutations in SLC9A6 are not a major cause of the AS-like phenotype or XMR. The patient with the SLC9A6 mutation showed the typical AS phenotype, further demonstrating the similarity between patients with AS and those with SLC9A6 mutations. To clarify the effect of the SLC9A6 mutation, we performed RT-PCR and Western blot analysis on lymphoblastoid cells from the patient. Expression of the mutated transcript was significantly reduced, but was restored by cycloheximide treatment, indicating the presence of nonsense mediated mRNA decay. Western blot analysis demonstrated absence of the normal NHE6 protein encoded for by SLC9A6. Taken together, these findings indicate a loss-of-function mutation in SLC9A6 caused the phenotype in our patient. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations cause a phenotypic spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like features, ocular hypertelorism, large fontanelle and X-linked inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Frank J.; Ansari, Morad; Braunholz, Diana; Concepción Gil-Rodríguez, María; Decroos, Christophe; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Fincher, Christopher T.; Kaur, Maninder; Bando, Masashige; Amor, David J.; Atwal, Paldeep S.; Bahlo, Melanie; Bowman, Christine M.; Bradley, Jacquelyn J.; Brunner, Han G.; Clark, Dinah; Del Campo, Miguel; Di Donato, Nataliya; Diakumis, Peter; Dubbs, Holly; Dyment, David A.; Eckhold, Juliane; Ernst, Sarah; Ferreira, Jose C.; Francey, Lauren J.; Gehlken, Ulrike; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hall, Bryan D.; Hennekam, Raoul; Hudgins, Louanne; Hullings, Melanie; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Yntema, Helger; Innes, A. Micheil; Kline, Antonie D.; Krumina, Zita; Lee, Hane; Leppig, Kathleen; Lynch, Sally Ann; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Mannini, Linda; Mckee, Shane; Mehta, Sarju G.; Micule, Ieva; Mohammed, Shehla; Moran, Ellen; Mortier, Geert R.; Moser, Joe-Ann S.; Noon, Sarah E.; Nozaki, Naohito; Nunes, Luis; Pappas, John G.; Penney, Lynette S.; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Petersen, Michael B.; Puisac, Beatriz; Revencu, Nicole; Roeder, Elizabeth; Saitta, Sulagna; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Schindeler, Karen L.; Siu, Victoria M.; Stark, Zornitza; Strom, Samuel P.; Thiese, Heidi; Vater, Inga; Willems, Patrick; Williamson, Kathleen; Wilson, Louise C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Wierzba, Jolanta; Musio, Antonio; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Pié, Juan; Christianson, David W.; Krantz, Ian D.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL, encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for >80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ∼5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutations in the X-linked gene HDAC8 as the cause of a small number of CdLS cases. Here, we report a cohort of 38 individuals with an emerging spectrum of features caused by HDAC8 mutations. For several individuals, the diagnosis of CdLS was not considered prior to genomic testing. Most mutations identified are missense and de novo. Many cases are heterozygous females, each with marked skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood DNA. We also identified eight hemizygous males who are more severely affected. The craniofacial appearance caused by HDAC8 mutations overlaps that of typical CdLS but often displays delayed anterior fontanelle closure, ocular hypertelorism, hooding of the eyelids, a broader nose and dental anomalies, which may be useful discriminating features. HDAC8 encodes the lysine deacetylase for the cohesin subunit SMC3 and analysis of the functional consequences of the missense mutations indicates that all cause a loss of enzymatic function. These data demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in HDAC8 cause a range of overlapping human developmental phenotypes, including a phenotypically distinct subgroup of CdLS. PMID:24403048

  10. Analyses of loss-of-function mutations of the MITF gene suggest that haploinsufficiency is a cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobukuni, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, A.; Takeda, Kazushisa; Skarka, Hana; Tachibana, Masayoshi [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by a pigmentation anomaly and hearing impairment due to lack of melanocyte. Previous work has linked a subset of families with WS2 (WS2A) to the MITF gene that encodes a transcription factor with a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) motif and that is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Several splice-site and missense mutations have been reported in individuals affected with WS2A. In this report, we have identified two novel point mutations in the MITF gene in affected individuals from two different families with WS2A. The two mutations (C760{r_arrow}T and C895{r_arrow}T) create stop codons in exons 7 and 8, respectively. Corresponding mutant alleles predict the truncated proteins lacking HLH-Zip or Zip structure. To understand how these mutations cause WS2 in heterozygotes, we generated mutant MITF cDNAs and used them for DNA-binding and luciferase reporter assays. The mutated MITF proteins lose the DNA-binding activity and fail to transactivate the promoter of tyrosinase, a melanocyte-specific enzyme. However, these mutated proteins do not appear to interfere with the activity of wild-type MITF protein in these assays, indicating that they do not show a dominant-negative effect. These findings suggest that the phenotypes of the two families with WS2A in the present study are caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of the two alleles of the MITF gene, resulting in haploinsufficiency of the MITF protein, the protein necessary for normal development of melanocytes. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance.

  12. Contribution of the D-Serine-dependent pathway to the cellular mechanisms underlying cognitive aging

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    Emilie Rouaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between age-related memory impairments and changes in functional plasticity in the aging brain has been under intense study within the last decade. In this article, we show that an impaired activation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-R by its agonist D-serine contributes to deficits of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats. Supplementation with exogenous D-serine prevents the age-related deficits of isolated NMDA-R-dependent synaptic potentials as well as those of theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation and synaptic depotentiation. Endogenous levels of D-serine are reduced in the hippocampus with aging, that correlates with a weaker expression of serine racemase synthesizing the amino acid. On the contrary, the affinity of D-serine binding to NMDA-R is not affected by aging. These results point to a critical role for the D-serine-dependent pathway in the functional alterations of the brain underlying memory impairment and provide key information in the search for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of memory deficits in the elderly.

  13. Contribution of α- and β-Adrenergic Mechanisms to the Development of Pulmonary Edema

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    Beate Rassler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous or exogenous catecholamines can induce pulmonary edema (PE. This may occur in human pathologic conditions such as in pheochromocytoma or in neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE but can also be provoked after experimental administration of adrenergic agonists. PE can result from stimulation with different types of adrenergic stimulation. With -adrenergic treatment, it develops more rapidly, is more severe with abundant protein-rich fluid in the alveolar space, and is accompanied by strong generalized inflammation in the lung. Similar detrimental effects of -adrenergic stimulation have repeatedly been described and are considered to play a pivotal role in NPE or in PE in patients with pheochromocytoma. Although -adrenergic agonists have often been reported to prevent or attenuate PE by enhancing alveolar fluid clearance, PE may also be induced by -adrenergic treatment as can be observed in tocolysis. In experimental models, infusion of -adrenergic agonists induces less severe PE than -adrenergic stimulation. The present paper addresses the current understanding of the possible contribution of - and -adrenergic pathways to the development of PE.

  14. Neutrophil-Derived Exosomes: A New Mechanism Contributing to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Amandine; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Droit, Arnaud; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils infiltrate the airways of patients with asthma of all severities, yet their role in the pathogenesis of asthma and their contribution to airway remodeling is largely unknown. We hypothesized that neutrophils modulate airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation in asthma by releasing bioactive exosomes. These newly discovered nano-sized vesicles have the capacity to modulate immune responses, cell migration, cell differentiation, and other aspects of cell-to-cell communication. The aim of the study is to determine whether bioactive exosomes are released by neutrophils, and, if so, characterize their proteomic profile and evaluate their capacity to modulate ASM cell proliferation. Exosomes were isolated from equine neutrophil supernatants by differential centrifugation and filtration methods, followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Nanovesicles were characterized using electron microscopy, particle size determination, and proteomic analyses. Exosomes were cocultured with ASM cells and analyzed for exosome internalization by confocal microscopy. ASM proliferation was measured using an impedance-based system. Neutrophils release exosomes that have characteristic size, morphology, and exosomal markers. We identified 271 proteins in exosomes from both LPS and unstimulated neutrophils, and 16 proteins that were differentially expressed, which carried proteins associated with immune response and positive regulation of cell communication. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived exosomes were rapidly internalized by ASM cells and altered their proliferative properties. Upon stimulation of LPS, neutrophil-derived exosomes can enhance the proliferation of ASM cells and could therefore play an important role in the progression of asthma and promoting airway remodeling in severe and corticosteroid-insensitive patients with asthma.

  15. Exploring vortex enhancement and manipulation mechanisms in jellyfish that contributes to energetically efficient propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad J; Costello, John H; Colin, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    The ability of animals to propel themselves efficiently through a fluid medium is ecologically advantageous. Flexible components that influence vortex interactions are widespread among animal propulsors. However the mechanisms by which vortices are enhanced and appropriately positioned for thrust generation are still poorly understood. Here, we describe how kinematic propulsor movements of a jellyfish can enhance and reposition a vortex ring that allows the recapture of wake energy for secondary thrust generation and efficient locomotion. We use high-speed video and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to resolve kinematics simultaneously with fluid structures. These results provide new insight into how animals can manipulate fluid structures to reduce metabolic energy demands of swimming muscles and may have implications in bio-inspired design.

  16. [Psychopathology and various mechanisms contributing to the formation of the Kandinsky syndrome in acute alcoholic hallucinosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliamova, N M

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients with acute alcoholic hallucinosis associated with the Kandinsky syndrome were examined clinicopsychopathologically. Manifestation of the Kandinsky syndrome was limited by associative automatism in patients with stage II alcoholism with transient hallucinosis lasting 2-4 days. In patients with stage III alcoholism with more prolonged (6-9 days) psychoses, the non-extensive Kandinsky syndrome manifested itself in integrity. Psychopathological phenomena of the syndrome in the picture of acute alcoholic hallucinosis were notable for their descriptiveness, concreteness, extreme simplicity, and instability. Senestopathic and kinesthetic automatisms were localized at the sites of real painful disorders. Therefore, apart from cerebral disorders, the peripheral sensory mechanisms are considered to be of importance in the genesis of the Kandinsky syndrome.

  17. The contributions of cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging to understanding mechanisms of behavior change in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Jon; Naqvi, Nasir H; Debellis, Robert; Breiter, Hans C

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, there has been an upsurge of interest in understanding the mechanisms of behavior change (MOBC) and effective behavioral interventions as a strategy to improve addiction-treatment efficacy. However, there remains considerable uncertainty about how treatment research should proceed to address the MOBC issue. In this article, we argue that limitations in the underlying models of addiction that inform behavioral treatment pose an obstacle to elucidating MOBC. We consider how advances in the cognitive neuroscience of addiction offer an alternative conceptual and methodological approach to studying the psychological processes that characterize addiction, and how such advances could inform treatment process research. In addition, we review neuroimaging studies that have tested aspects of neurocognitive theories as a strategy to inform addiction therapies and discuss future directions for transdisciplinary collaborations across cognitive neuroscience and MOBC research.

  18. A peripheral endocannabinoid mechanism contributes to glucocorticoid-mediated metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Nicole P; Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Li, Xiaosong; Vemuri, V Kiran; Wood, Jodi-Anne; Li, Zhiying; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Schwartz, Gary J; Makriyannis, Alexandros M; Kunos, George; Hillard, Cecilia J; McEwen, Bruce S; Hill, Matthew N

    2015-01-06

    Glucocorticoids are known to promote the development of metabolic syndrome through the modulation of both feeding pathways and metabolic processes; however, the precise mechanisms of these effects are not well-understood. Recent evidence shows that glucocorticoids possess the ability to increase endocannabinoid signaling, which is known to regulate appetite, energy balance, and metabolic processes through both central and peripheral pathways. The aim of this study was to determine the role of endocannabinoid signaling in glucocorticoid-mediated obesity and metabolic syndrome. Using a mouse model of excess corticosterone exposure, we found that the ability of glucocorticoids to increase adiposity, weight gain, hormonal dysregulation, hepatic steatosis, and dyslipidemia was reduced or reversed in mice lacking the cannabinoid CB1 receptor as well as mice treated with the global CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Similarly, a neutral, peripherally restricted CB1 receptor antagonist (AM6545) was able to attenuate the metabolic phenotype caused by chronic corticosterone, suggesting a peripheral mechanism for these effects. Biochemical analyses showed that chronic excess glucocorticoid exposure produced a significant increase in hepatic and circulating levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide, whereas no effect was observed in the hypothalamus. To test the role of the liver, specific and exclusive deletion of hepatic CB1 receptor resulted in a rescue of the dyslipidemic effects of glucocorticoid exposure, while not affecting the obesity phenotype or the elevations in insulin and leptin. Together, these data indicate that glucocorticoids recruit peripheral endocannabinoid signaling to promote metabolic dysregulation, with hepatic endocannabinoid signaling being especially important for changes in lipid metabolism.

  19. Medicago truncatula symbiotic peptide NCR247 contributes to bacteroid differentiation through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila; Maróti, Gergely; Durgő, Hajnalka; Györgypál, Zoltán; Lima, Rui M; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kereszt, Attila; Mergaert, Peter; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-04-08

    Symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legume plants results in the formation of root nodules where plant cells are fully packed with nitrogen fixing bacteria. In the host cells, the bacteria adapt to the intracellular environment and gain the ability for nitrogen fixation. Depending on the host plants, the symbiotic fate of bacteria can be either reversible or irreversible. In Medicago and related legume species, the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. Approximately 600 of them are nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides produced in the rhizobium-infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts, and concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation, whereas the symbiotic function of individual NCRs is unknown. This study focused on NCR247, a cationic peptide exhibiting in vitro antimicrobial activities. We show that NCR247 acts in those nodule cells where bacterial cell division is arrested and cell elongation begins. NCR247 penetrates the bacteria and forms complexes with many bacterial proteins. Interaction with FtsZ required for septum formation is one of the host interventions for inhibiting bacterial cell division. Complex formation with the ribosomal proteins affects translation and contributes to altered proteome and physiology of the endosymbiont. Binding to the chaperone GroEL amplifies the NCR247-modulated biological processes. We show that GroEL1 of Sinorhizobium meliloti is required for efficient infection, terminal differentiation, and nitrogen fixation.

  20. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: The Contribution of Different Evolutionary Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Patthy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the accompanying papers we have shown that sequence errors of public databases and confusion of paralogs and epaktologs (proteins that are related only through the independent acquisition of the same domain types significantly distort the picture that emerges from comparison of the domain architecture (DA of multidomain Metazoan proteins since they introduce a strong bias in favor of terminal over internal DA change. The issue of whether terminal or internal DA changes occur with greater probability has very important implications for the DA evolution of multidomain proteins since gene fusion can add domains only at terminal positions, whereas domain-shuffling is capable of inserting domains both at internal and terminal positions. As a corollary, overestimation of terminal DA changes may be misinterpreted as evidence for a dominant role of gene fusion in DA evolution. In this manuscript we show that in several recent studies of DA evolution of Metazoa the authors used databases that are significantly contaminated with incomplete, abnormal and mispredicted sequences (e.g., UniProtKB/TrEMBL, EnsEMBL and/or the authors failed to separate paralogs and epaktologs, explaining why these studies concluded that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is gene fusion. In contrast with the latter conclusion, our studies on high quality orthologous and paralogous Swiss-Prot sequences confirm that shuffling of mobile domains had a major role in the evolution of multidomain proteins of Metazoa and especially those formed in early vertebrates.

  1. Human Hemorrhagic Fever Causing Arenaviruses: Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Virus Virulence and Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Shao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses include multiple human pathogens ranging from the low-risk lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV to highly virulent hemorrhagic fever (HF causing viruses such as Lassa (LASV, Junin (JUNV, Machupo (MACV, Lujo (LUJV, Sabia (SABV, Guanarito (GTOV, and Chapare (CHPV, for which there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures. Why some arenaviruses can cause virulent human infections while others cannot, even though they are isolated from the same rodent hosts, is an enigma. Recent studies have revealed several potential pathogenic mechanisms of arenaviruses, including factors that increase viral replication capacity and suppress host innate immunity, which leads to high viremia and generalized immune suppression as the hallmarks of severe and lethal arenaviral HF diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of the roles of each of the four viral proteins and some known cellular factors in the pathogenesis of arenaviral HF as well as of some human primary cell-culture and animal models that lend themselves to studying arenavirus-induced HF disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained from these studies can be applied towards the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines against these deadly human pathogens.

  2. [Alpha fetoprotein and neonatal jaundice. Contribution to the study of a physiopathologic mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourne, C E; Brettes, J P; Guez, G; Ritter, J; Gandar, R

    1977-01-01

    The increase in the maternal plasma A.F.P. level is due to an hypoxia of the foetus. The prospective study of 851 single pregnancies shows that there is a significant rise in the A.F.P. levels during the last days of the pregnancy if the babies are going to exhibit a so-called physiological jaundice at birth: the decrease of the A.F.P. levels in these cases is four times slower than in normal cases. The prospective study of another group of 404 pregnancies gave the same results for the A.F.P. level of the blood of the umbilical cord. Statistical analysis showed that the pathological conditions capable of increasing the A.F.P. levels are related to neo-natal jaundice. The neo-natal jaundice may be due to a factor of foetal hypoxia capable of inducing an over stimulation of the foetal erythropoiesis. The results of this mechanism would be a quantitative disequilibrium between an increased hemolysis and a reduced bilirubine fixation capacity during the neo-natal period.

  3. Self-clearance mechanism of mitochondrial E3 ligase MARCH5 contributes to mitochondria quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song-Hee; Park, Yong-Yea; Yoo, Young-Suk; Cho, Hyeseong

    2016-01-01

    MARCH5, a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase, controls mitochondrial dynamics proteins and misfolded proteins, and has been proposed to play a role in mitochondria quality control. However, it remains unclear how mutant MARCH5 found in cancer tissues is removed from cells. Here, we show that mutation in the MARCH5 ligase domain increased its half-life fourfold, resulting in a drastic increase in its protein level. Abnormal accumulation of the E3 ligase-defective MARCH5 mutants MARCH5(H43W) and MARCH5(C65/68S) was diminished by overexpression of active MARCH5(WT) ; the mutant proteins were degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that MARCH5 forms homodimers, and that substitution of Gly to Leu at the first putative GxxxG dimerization motif, but not the second, resulted in a loss of dimeric interaction. Moreover, overexpression of the dimerization-defective mutant MARCH5(4GL) could not decrease the level of accumulated MARCH5(H43W) , suggesting that dimerization of MARCH5 is necessary for self-clearance. Abnormal accumulation of MARCH5(H43W) and mitochondrial hyperfusion led to NF-ĸB activation, which was suppressed by overexpression of MARCH5(WT) . Together, the data reveal a self-protective mechanism involving MARCH5, which can target its own dysfunctional mutant for degradation in order to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis.

  4. Novel frataxin isoforms may contribute to the pathological mechanism of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xia

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by frataxin (FXN deficiency. The nervous system and heart are the most severely affected tissues. However, highly mitochondria-dependent tissues, such as kidney and liver, are not obviously affected, although the abundance of FXN is normally high in these tissues. In this study we have revealed two novel FXN isoforms (II and III, which are specifically expressed in affected cerebellum and heart tissues, respectively, and are functional in vitro and in vivo. Increasing the abundance of the heart-specific isoform III significantly increased the mitochondrial aconitase activity, while over-expression of the cerebellum-specific isoform II protected against oxidative damage of Fe-S cluster-containing aconitase. Further, we observed that the protein level of isoform III decreased in FRDA patient heart, while the mRNA level of isoform II decreased more in FRDA patient cerebellum compared to total FXN mRNA. Our novel findings are highly relevant to understanding the mechanism of tissue-specific pathology in FRDA.

  5. Computational sensitivity analysis to identify muscles that can mechanically contribute to shoulder deformity following brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Dustin L; Plate, Johannes F; Li, Zhongyu; Saul, Katherine R

    2014-02-01

    Two mechanisms, strength imbalance or impaired longitudinal muscle growth, potentially cause osseous and postural shoulder deformity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Our objective was to determine which muscles, via either deformity mechanism, were mechanically capable of producing forces that could promote shoulder deformity. In an upper limb computational musculoskeletal model, we simulated strength imbalance by allowing each muscle crossing the shoulder to produce 30% of its maximum force. To simulate impaired longitudinal muscle growth, the functional length of each muscle crossing the shoulder was reduced by 30%. We performed a sensitivity analysis to identify muscles that, through either simulated deformity mechanism, increased the posteriorly directed, compressive glenohumeral joint force consistent with osseous deformity or reduced the shoulder external rotation or abduction range of motion consistent with postural deformity. Most of the increase in the posterior glenohumeral joint force by the strength imbalance mechanism was caused by the subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, and infraspinatus. Posterior glenohumeral joint force increased the most owing to impaired growth of the infraspinatus, subscapularis, and long head of biceps. Through the strength imbalance mechanism, the subscapularis, anterior deltoid, and pectoralis major muscles reduced external shoulder rotation by 28°, 17°, and 10°, respectively. Shoulder motion was reduced by 40° to 56° owing to impaired growth of the anterior deltoid, subscapularis, and long head of triceps. The infraspinatus, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, long head of biceps, anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, and long head of triceps were identified in this computational study as being the most capable of producing shoulder forces that may contribute to shoulder deformity following brachial plexus birth palsy. The muscles mechanically capable of producing deforming shoulder forces should be the focus of

  6. Central nervous system mechanisms contributing to the cachexia-anorexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    2000-10-01

    in the development and/or progression of cachexia-anorexia; interleukin-1, interleukin-6 (and its subfamily members such as ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibitory factor), interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have been associated with various cachectic conditions. Controversy has focused on the requirement of increased cytokine concentrations in the circulation or other body fluids (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid) to demonstrate cytokine involvement in cachexia-anorexia. Cytokines, however, also act in paracrine, autocrine, and intracrine manners, activities that cannot be detected in the circulation. In fact, paracrine interactions represent a predominant cytokine mode of action within organs, including the brain. Data show that cytokines may be involved in cachectic-anorectic processes by being produced and by acting locally in specific brain regions. Brain synthesis of cytokines has been shown in peripheral models of cancer, peripheral inflammation, and during peripheral cytokine administration; these data support a role for brain cytokines as mediators of neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of disease and in the brain-to-peripheral communication (e.g., through the autonomic nervous system). Brain mechanisms that merit significant attention in the cachexia-anorexia syndrome are those that result from interactions among cytokines, peptides/neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. These interactions could result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic activities and can involve modifications of transducing molecules and intracellular mediators. Thus, the data show that the cachexia-anorexia syndrome is multifactorial, and understanding the interactions between peripheral and brain mechanisms is pivotal to characterizing the underlying integrative pathophysiology of this disorder.

  7. Cardiovascular responses of the anterior claustrum; its mechanism; contribution of medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Sheybanifar, Mehrnoosh; Nasimi, Ali

    2013-12-01

    The anterior claustrum (CLa) has bilateral connections with the areas involved in cardiovascular regulation, though its role in cardiovascular control is not yet understood. This study was performed to find the cardiovascular responsive region of the CLa by stimulating all parts of the CLa with l-glutamate, and to find the possible mechanisms mediating its responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. We also investigated the possible involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex in the cardiovascular responses of the CLa. The effect of microinjection of l-glutamate (50-100 nl, 0.25 M) was tested throughout the Cla and only in one area at 2.7 mm rostral to bregma, 1.8-2.0 midline and 4.5-5.6mm vertical, significant decreases in arterial pressure were elicited (-21.71±2.1 mmHg, P<0.001, t-test) with no significant change in heart rate. Administration (i.v.) of the muscarinic receptor blocker, atropine, had no effect on the change in mean arterial pressure in response to glutamate stimulation, suggesting that the parasympathetic system was not involved in this response. However, administration (i.v.) of the nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium dichloride abolished the depressor response to glutamate, suggesting that CLa stimulation decreases sympathetic outflow to the cardiovascular system. In addition, microinjection of the reversible synaptic blocker, cobalt chloride, into the medial prefrontal cortex greatly attenuated the depressor response elicited by microinjection of glut into the CLa. Thus for the first time, we found the cardiovascular responsive region of the anterior claustrum. Also we showed that its response is mediated through the medial prefrontal cortex. © 2013.

  8. Contribution of different mechanisms to the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Ahmed Rushdy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the potential factors include gene mutation, efflux pump and alteration of permeability associated with quinolone-resistance of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis and to evaluate the degree of synergistic activity of efflux pump inhibitors when combined with ciprofloxacin against resistant isolates. METHODS: Antimicrobial resistance patterns of fifty-eight Salmonella isolates were tested. Five isolates were selected to study the mechanism of resistance associated with quinolone group, including mutation in topoisomerase-encoding gene, altered cell permeability, and expression of an active efflux system. In addition, the combination between antibiotics and efflux pump inhibitors to overcome the microbial resistance was evaluated. RESULTS: Five Salmonella isolates totally resistant to all quinolones were studied. All isolates showed alterations in outer membrane proteins including disappearance of some or all of these proteins (Omp-A, Omp-C, Omp-D and Omp-F. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence/absence of the efflux pump inhibitors: carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, norepinephrin and trimethoprim. Minimum inhibitory concentration values for two of the isolates were 2-4 fold lower with the addition of efflux pump inhibitors. All five Salmonella isolates were amplified for gyrA and parC genes and only two isolates were sequenced. S. Enteritidis 22 had double mutations at codon 83 and 87 in addition to three mutations at parC at codons 67, 76 and 80 whereas S. Typhimurium 57 had three mutations at codons 83, 87 and 119, but no mutations at parC. CONCLUSIONS: Efflux pump inhibitors may inhibit the major AcrAB-TolC in Salmonella efflux systems which are the major efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in Gramnegative clinical isolates.

  9. Mechanisms contributing to the regional haemodynamic effects of neurotensin in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1992-01-01

    1. The regional haemodynamic effects of i.v. bolus doses of neurotensin (10-1000 ng) were assessed in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats chronically instrumented with miniaturized, pulsed Doppler probes. 2. Neurotensin caused increases in blood pressure, together with dose-related tachycardias and constrictions in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia elicited by the 1000 ng dose of neurotensin was preceded by a transient bradycardia. 3. In the presence of phentolamine, the pressor effect of neurotensin (1000 ng) was converted into a hypotensive effect, accompanied by reduced tachycardic and constrictor responses in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia was not preceded by a bradycardia. 4. In the presence of phentolamine and propranolol, the pressor and bradycardic responses to neurotensin were unaffected, whereas the tachycardia was abolished. The renal vasconstrictor effect was smaller, while the constrictions in the superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds were not different from those in untreated rats. 5. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), the pressor effects elicited by neurotensin (300 and 1000 ng) were reduced as were the constrictor responses in the renal (at the dose of 300 ng), superior mesenteric (at the dose of 300 ng) and hindquarters (at both doses) vascular beds. The bradycardia elicited by neurotensin (1000 ng) was absent, whereas the tachycardia was potentiated. 6. The results indicate that in conscious, intact rats neurotensin appears to exert cardiovascular influences through activation of sympathoadrenal mechanisms and also through non-adrenergic effects on the heart, renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The latter effects appear to involve capsaicin-sensitive nerves.

  10. Molecular Characterization of eutF Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 Identifies eutF Lesions as Partial-Loss-of-Function tonB Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael G.; O’Toole, George A.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    1999-01-01

    The eutF locus of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was identified as a locus necessary for the utilization of ethanolamine as a sole carbon source. Initial models suggested that EutF was involved in either ethanolamine transport or was a transcriptional regulator of an ethanolamine transporter. Phenotypic characterization of eutF mutants suggested EutF was somehow involved in 1,2-propanediol, propionate, and succinate utilization. Here we provide evidence that two alleles defining the eutF locus, Δ903 and eutF1115, are partial-loss-of-function tonB alleles. Both mutations were complemented by plasmids containing a wild-type allele of the Escherichia coli tonB gene. Immunoblot analysis using TonB monoclonal antibodies detected a TonB fusion protein in strains carrying eutF alleles. Molecular analysis of the Δ903 allele identified a deletion that resulted in the fusion of the 3′ end of tonB with the 3′ end of trpA. In-frame translation of the tonB-trpA fusion resulted in the final 9 amino acids of TonB being replaced by a 45-amino-acid addition. We isolated a derivative of a strain carrying allele Δ903 that regained the ability to grow on ethanolamine as a carbon and energy source. The molecular characterization of the mutation that corrected the Eut− phenotype caused by allele Δ903 showed that the new mutation was a deletion of two nucleotides at the tonB-trpA fusion site. This deletion resulted in a frameshift that replaced the 45-amino-acid addition with a 5-amino-acid addition. This change resulted in a TonB protein with sufficient activity to restore growth on ethanolamine and eut operon expression to nearly wild-type levels. It was concluded that the observed EutF phenotypes were due to the partial loss of TonB function, which is proposed to result in reduced cobalamin and ferric siderophore transport in an aerobic environment; thus, the eutF locus does not exist. PMID:9882647

  11. Contributions of microbiome and mechanical deformation to intestinal bacterial overgrowth and inflammation in a human gut-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Li, Hu; Collins, James J; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-01-05

    A human gut-on-a-chip microdevice was used to coculture multiple commensal microbes in contact with living human intestinal epithelial cells for more than a week in vitro and to analyze how gut microbiome, inflammatory cells, and peristalsis-associated mechanical deformations independently contribute to intestinal bacterial overgrowth and inflammation. This in vitro model replicated results from past animal and human studies, including demonstration that probiotic and antibiotic therapies can suppress villus injury induced by pathogenic bacteria. By ceasing peristalsis-like motions while maintaining luminal flow, lack of epithelial deformation was shown to trigger bacterial overgrowth similar to that observed in patients with ileus and inflammatory bowel disease. Analysis of intestinal inflammation on-chip revealed that immune cells and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin together stimulate epithelial cells to produce four proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) that are necessary and sufficient to induce villus injury and compromise intestinal barrier function. Thus, this human gut-on-a-chip can be used to analyze contributions of microbiome to intestinal pathophysiology and dissect disease mechanisms in a controlled manner that is not possible using existing in vitro systems or animal models.

  12. Integrating cell biology, image analysis, and computational mechanical modeling to analyze the contributions of cellulose and xyloglucan to stomatal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yue; Yi, Hojae; Kandemir, Baris; Wang, James Z; Puri, Virendra M; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-06-01

    Cell walls are likely to be essential determinants of the amazing strength and flexibility of the guard cells that surround each stomatal pore in plants, but surprisingly little is known about cell wall composition, organization, and dynamics in guard cells. Recent analyses of cell wall organization and stomatal function in the guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with defects in cellulose and xyloglucan have allowed for the development of new hypotheses about the relative contributions of these components to guard cell function. Advanced image analysis methods can allow for the automated detection of key structures, such as microtubules (MTs) and Cellulose Synthesis Complexes (CSCs), in guard cells, to help determine their contributions to stomatal function. A major challenge in the mechanical modeling of dynamic biological structures, such as guard cell walls, is to connect nanoscale features (e.g., wall polymers and their molecular interactions) with cell-scale mechanics; this challenge can be addressed by applying multiscale computational modeling that spans multiple spatial scales and physical attributes for cell walls.

  13. Single or in combination antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae contribute to varied susceptibility to different carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Liou, Ci-Hong; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lin, Jung-Chung; Siu, L Kristopher

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to carbapenems has been documented by the production of carbapenemase or the loss of porins combined with extended-spectrum β-lactamases or AmpC β-lactamases. However, no complete comparisons have been made regarding the contributions of each resistance mechanism towards carbapenem resistance. In this study, we genetically engineered mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae with individual and combined resistance mechanisms, and then compared each resistance mechanism in response to ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem, doripenem and other antibiotics. Among the four studied carbapenems, ertapenem was the least active against the loss of porins, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases. In addition to the production of KPC-2 or NDM-1 alone, resistance to all four carbapenems could also be conferred by the loss of two major porins, OmpK35 and OmpK36, combined with CTX-M-15 or DHA-1 with its regulator AmpR. Because the loss of OmpK35/36 alone or the loss of a single porin combined with bla CTX-M-15 or bla DHA-1-ampR expression was only sufficient for ertapenem resistance, our results suggest that carbapenems other than ertapenem should still be effective against these strains and laboratory testing for non-susceptibility to other carbapenems should improve the accurate identification of these isolates.

  14. Contribution to the physical-mechanical study of cement CRS basis of dune-sand powder and other minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Saci; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2016-07-01

    The Portland cements are increasingly used for the manufacture of cement materials (mortar or concrete). Sighting the increasing demand of the cement in the field of construction, and the wealth of our country of minerals. It is time to value these local materials in construction materials and in the manufacture of cement for the manufacture of a new type of cement or for the improvement of the cement of characteristics for several reasons either technical, or ecological or economic or to improve certain properties to the State fees or hardened. The uses of mineral additions remain associated to disadvantages on the time of solidification and the development of the mechanical resistance at the young age [8]. The objective of our work is to study the effects of the incorporation of additions minerals such the pozzolan (active addition) [3], slag of blast furnace (active addition) [4] and the sand dune powder (inert addition) on the physico-mechanical properties of compositions of mortar collaborated compositions according to different binary combinations basis of these additions. This will allow selecting of optimal dosages of these combinations the more efficient, from the point of view of mechanical resistanceas well. The results of this research work confirm that the rate of 10% of pozzolan, slag or powder of dune sand contributes positively on the development of resistance in the long term, at of this proportion time,there is a decrease in the latter except for the slag (20 - 40%) [4]Seems the more effective resistors and physical properties.

  15. The contribution of vascular smooth muscle, elastin and collagen on the passive mechanics of porcine carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochová, P; Kuncová, J; Svíglerová, J; Cimrman, R; Miklíková, M; Liška, V; Tonar, Z

    2012-08-01

    The main components responsible for the mechanical behavior of the arterial wall are collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the medial layer. We determined the structural and mechanical changes in porcine carotid arteries after administration of Triton® X-100, elastase, and collagenase using the inflation-deflation test. The arteries were intraluminarly pressurized from 0 to 200 mmHg, and the outer diameter of the artery was measured. The pressure-strain elastic modulus was determined based on the pressure/diameter ratio. The intima-media thickness, wall thickness, thickness of the tunica adventitia layer, and the area fractions of SMCs, elastin, and collagen within the arterial wall (A(A)(SMC/elastin/collagen, wall)) were measured using stereological methods. The relative changes in the relevant components of the treated samples were as follows: the decrease in A(A)(SMC, wall) after administration of Triton® X-100 was 11% ± 7%, the decrease in A(A)(elastin, wall) after administration of elastase was 40% ± 22%, and the decrease in A(A)(collagen, wall) after the application of collagenase was 51% ± 22%. The Triton® X-100 treatment led to a decrease in the SMC content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall (outer diameter) for pressures up to 120 mmHg, and with mechanical stiffening of the arterial wall at higher pressures. Elastase led to a decrease in the elastin content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall, but not with stiffening or softening. Collagenase led to a decrease in collagen content that was associated with a change in the stiffness of the arterial wall, although the exact contribution of mechanical loading and the duration of treatment (enlargement) could not be quantified.

  16. A randomised controlled trial to prevent hospital readmissions and loss of functional ability in high risk older adults: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Anne M

    2011-08-01

    collection is undertaken at baseline within 72 hours of hospital admission, 4 weeks following hospital discharge, 12 weeks following hospital discharge, and 24 weeks following hospital discharge. Outcome assessors are blinded to group allocation. Primary outcomes are emergency hospital readmissions and health service use, functional status, psychosocial well-being and cost effectiveness. Discussion The acute hospital sector comprises the largest component of health care system expenditure in developed countries, and older adults are the most frequent consumers. There are few trials to demonstrate effective models of transitional care to prevent emergency readmissions, loss of functional ability and independence in this population following an acute hospital admission. This study aims to address that gap and provide information for future health service planning which meets client needs and lowers the use of acute care services. Trial Registration No Australian & New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000202369

  17. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  18. Contribution of opioid and metabotropic glutamate receptor mechanisms to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, Yosuke; Mally, Abhijith D; Zhang, Fan; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-07-15

    The contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) and opioid receptors to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) was investigated in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia using LY341495 (a group II mGluR antagonist) and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist). Slow infusion cystometry was used to measure the volume threshold (i.e., bladder capacity) for inducing a large bladder contraction. After measuring the bladder capacity during saline infusion, 0.25% acetic acid (AA) was infused to irritate the bladder, activate the nociceptive C-fiber bladder afferents, and induce bladder overactivity. AA significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 26.6 ± 4.7% of saline control capacity. TNS (5 Hz, 0.2 ms) at 2 and 4 times the threshold (T) intensity for inducing an observable toe movement significantly increased bladder capacity to 62.2 ± 8.3% at 2T (P < 0.01) and 80.8 ± 9.2% at 4T (P = 0.0001) of saline control capacity. LY341495 (0.1-5 mg/kg iv) did not change bladder overactivity, but completely suppressed the inhibition induced by TNS at a low stimulus intensity (2T) and partially suppressed the inhibition at high intensity (4T). Following administration of LY341495, naloxone (0.01 mg/kg iv) completely eliminated the high-intensity TNS-induced inhibition. However, without LY341495 treatment a 10 times higher dose (0.1 mg/kg) of naloxone was required to completely block TNS inhibition. These results indicate that interactions between group II mGluR and opioid receptor mechanisms contribute to TNS inhibition of AA-induced bladder overactivity. Understanding neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying TNS inhibition of bladder overactivity is important for the development of new treatments for bladder disorders.

  19. How much can disaster and climate science contribute to loss and damage mechanisms in international climate policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, Christian; Allen, Simon; Eicken, Hajo; Hansen, Gerrit; Stone, Dáithí

    2015-04-01

    proposals for mechanisms of financing suggested a role of causation and thus attribution of L&D to (anthropogenic) climate change. Yet, causation mechanisms are particularly delicate in terms of climate justice, development and implications of legal liabilities. Here, we outline potential contributions of science to L&D mechanisms in greater specificity, in particular for (i) threshold based mechanisms, and (ii) causation related mechanisms. We draw on recent concepts of L&D attribution suggesting a more comprehensive attribution framework based on risk concepts. We present a first-order proof-of-concept for the above mechanisms (i) and (ii), using case studies of recent disasters (both related to extreme events and gradual climate change) in the Indian Himalayas, Colombia, Alaska and Australia. We analyze whether science is in a position to substantially contribute to the different L&D policy proposals, including the question whether currently available data and datasets on climate and hazards, exposure and vulnerability are in line with such support, in particular with regards to developing country contexts. We conclude with a perspective on critical research and data needs to further strengthen L&D science and policy.

  20. Contributions of extracellular matrix signaling and tissue architecture to nuclear mechanisms and spatial organization of gene expression control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2009-09-01

    Post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation are interconnected nuclear mechanisms that ultimately lead to the changes in chromatin structure necessary to carry out epigenetic gene expression control. Tissue differentiation is characterized by a specific gene expression profile in association with the acquisition of a defined tissue architecture and function. Elements critical for tissue differentiation, like extracellular stimuli, adhesion and cell shape properties, and transcription factors all contribute to the modulation of gene expression and thus, are likely to impinge on the nuclear mechanisms of epigenetic gene expression control. In this review, we analyze how these elements modify chromatin structure in a hierarchical manner by acting on the nuclear machinery. We discuss how mechanotransduction via the structural continuum of the cell and biochemical signaling to the cell nucleus integrate to provide a comprehensive control of gene expression. The role of nuclear organization in this control is highlighted, with a presentation of differentiation-induced nuclear structure and the concept of nuclear organization as a modulator of the response to incoming signals.

  1. Interference and Mechanism of Dill Seed Essential Oil and Contribution of Carvone and Limonene in Preventing Sclerotinia Rot of Rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bingxin; Ban, Xiaoquan; Huang, Bo; He, Jingsheng; Tian, Jun; Zeng, Hong; Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Youwei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) seed essential oil against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and its mechanism of action. The antifungal activities of the two main constituents, namely carvone and limonene, were also measured. Mycelial growth and sclerotial germination were thoroughly inhibited by dill seed essential oil at the 1.00 μL/mL under contact condition and 0.125μL/mL air under vapor condition. Carvone also contributed more than limonene in inhibiting the growth of S. sclerotiorum. Carvone and limonene synergistically inhibited the growth of the fungus. In vivo experiments, the essential oil remarkably suppressed S. sclerotiorum, and considerable morphological alterations were observed in the hyphae and sclerotia. Inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase activities, and external medium acidification were investigated to elucidate the antifungal mechanism of the essential oil. The seed essential oil of A. graveolens can be extensively used in agriculture for preventing the oilseed crops fungal disease.

  2. Interference and Mechanism of Dill Seed Essential Oil and Contribution of Carvone and Limonene in Preventing Sclerotinia Rot of Rapeseed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Ma

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dill (Anethum graveolens L. seed essential oil against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and its mechanism of action. The antifungal activities of the two main constituents, namely carvone and limonene, were also measured. Mycelial growth and sclerotial germination were thoroughly inhibited by dill seed essential oil at the 1.00 μL/mL under contact condition and 0.125μL/mL air under vapor condition. Carvone also contributed more than limonene in inhibiting the growth of S. sclerotiorum. Carvone and limonene synergistically inhibited the growth of the fungus. In vivo experiments, the essential oil remarkably suppressed S. sclerotiorum, and considerable morphological alterations were observed in the hyphae and sclerotia. Inhibition of ergosterol synthesis, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase activities, and external medium acidification were investigated to elucidate the antifungal mechanism of the essential oil. The seed essential oil of A. graveolens can be extensively used in agriculture for preventing the oilseed crops fungal disease.

  3. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wei [Department of Out-Patient, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ren, Ning [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wu, Sheng-Xi, E-mail: shengxi@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li, Yong-Qi, E-mail: devneuro@fmmu.edu.cn [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  4. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service; Le mecanisme de contribution aux Charges de Service Public d'Electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blonde, G.; Poizat, F.; Triboulet, A. [IED, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that antioxidation mechanisms contribute to cold tolerance in plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.; ABB Group) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Sheng, Ou; Hu, Chun-Hua; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Huang, Yong-Hong; Peng, Xin-Xiang; McCardle, James A; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yong; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Banana and its close relative, plantain are globally important crops and there is considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation. Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared with banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars. In this study, we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress. Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0, 6, and 24 h of cold stress at 8 °C and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28 °C. A total of 3477 plantain proteins were identified, of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments. The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction, including oxylipin biosynthesis, whereas others were associated with photosynthesis, photorespiration, and several primary metabolic processes, such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on seven differentially expressed, cold-response candidate plantain proteins to validate the proteomics data. Similar analyses of the seven candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation, and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species. Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays, demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable. Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability, reduced production of ROS, and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the increased cold tolerance in plantain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by

  6. Receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic attenuation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Neal; Borgquist, Amanda; Wang, Kate; Jeffery, Garrett S; Kelly, Martin J; Wagner, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We examined the receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic modulation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance. Food intake and, in some cases, O2 consumption, CO2 production and the respiratory exchange ratio were evaluated in ovariectomized female guinea pigs treated s.c. with the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 or its cremephor/ethanol/0.9% saline vehicle, and either with estradiol benzoate (EB), the estrogen receptor (ER) α agonist PPT, the ERβ agonist DPN, the Gq-coupled membrane ER agonist STX, the GPR30 agonist G-1 or their respective vehicles. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in hypothalamic slices. EB, STX, PPT and G-1 decreased daily food intake. Of these, EB, STX and PPT blocked the WIN 55,212-2-induced increase in food intake within 1-4 h. The estrogenic diminution of cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia correlated with a rapid (within 15 min) attenuation of cannabinoid-mediated decreases in glutamatergic synaptic input onto arcuate neurons, which was completely blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and attenuated by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). STX, but not PPT, mimicked this rapid estrogenic effect. However, PPT abolished the cannabinoid-induced inhibition of glutamatergic neurotransmission in cells from animals treated 24 h prior. The estrogenic antagonism of this presynaptic inhibition was observed in anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons. These data reveal that estrogens negatively modulate cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance via Gq-coupled membrane ER- and ERα-mediated mechanisms involving activation of PKC and PKA. As such, they further our understanding of the pathways through which estrogens act to temper cannabinoid sensitivity in regulating energy homeostasis in females.

  7. Dynamic iso-resistive trunk extension simulation: contributions of the intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to spinal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarani, S Zeinali; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hemami, H; Mousavi, S J; Parnianpour, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles and the role of intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to ensure the spinal stability are significant issues in spinal biomechanics. A computational model of spine under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was used to simulate iso-resistive trunk movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. In this study, the trunk extension movement at various resistance levels while extending from 60 degrees flexion to the upright posture was investigated. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization algorithm increased antagonistic activities for all resistance levels demonstrating that the co-activation caused an increase in the intrinsic stiffness of the spine and its stability in a feed-forward manner. During the acceleration phase of the movement, extensors activity increased while flexors activity decreased in response to the higher resistance. The co-activation ratio noticed in the braking phase of the movement increased with higher resistance. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, reflexive feed-back noticeably decreased the induced deviation of the velocity and position profiles from the desired ones at all resistance levels. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that both intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms contribute to the trunk stability. The rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals that Antioxidation Mechanisms Contribute to Cold Tolerance in Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.;ABB Group) Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaosong Yang; Junhua Wu; Chunyu Li; Yuerong Wei; Ou Sheng; Chunhua Hu; Ruibin Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Banana and its close relative,plantain are globally important crops and there is of considerable interest in optimizing their cultivation.Plantain has superior cold tolerance compared to banana and a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms and responses of plantain to cold stress has great potential value for developing cold tolerant banana cultivars.In this study,we used iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the temporal responses of plantain to cold stress.Plantain seedlings were exposed for 0,6 and 24 h of cold stress at 8℃ and subsequently allowed to recover for 24 h at 28℃.A total of 3,477 plantain proteins were identified,of which 809 showed differential expression from the three treatments.The majority of differentially expressed proteins were predicted to be involved in oxidation-reduction,including oxylipin biosynthesis,while others were associated with photosynthesis,photorespiration and several primary metabolic processes,such as carbohydrate metabolic process and fatty acid beta-oxidation.Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays were performed on 7 differentially expressed,cold-response candidate plantain proteins in order to validate the proteomics data.Similar analyses of the 7 candidate proteins were performed in cold-sensitive banana to examine possible functional conservation and to compare the results to equivalent responses between the two species.Consistent results were achieved by Western blot and enzyme activity assays,demonstrating that the quantitative proteomics data collected in this study are reliable.Our results suggest that an increase of antioxidant capacity through adapted ROS scavenging capability,reduced production of ROS and decreased lipid peroxidation contribute to molecular mechanisms for the higher cold tolerance in plantain.To the best of our knowledge,this is the first report of a global investigation on molecular responses of plantain to cold stress by proteomic analysis.

  9. NRSF-dependent epigenetic mechanisms contribute to programming of stress-sensitive neurons by neonatal experience, promoting resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Taylor, A; Molet, J; Jiang, S; Korosi, A; Bolton, J L; Noam, Y; Simeone, K; Cope, J; Chen, Y; Mortazavi, A; Baram, T Z

    2017-01-10

    Resilience to stress-related emotional disorders is governed in part by early-life experiences. Here we demonstrate experience-dependent re-programming of stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons, which takes place through modification of neuronal gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms. Specifically, we found that augmented maternal care reduced glutamatergic synapses onto stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons and repressed expression of the stress-responsive gene, Crh. In hypothalamus in vitro, reduced glutamatergic neurotransmission recapitulated the repressive effects of augmented maternal care on Crh, and this required recruitment of the transcriptional repressor repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron restrictive silencing factor (NRSF). Increased NRSF binding to chromatin was accompanied by sequential repressive epigenetic changes which outlasted NRSF binding. chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq analyses of NRSF targets identified gene networks that, in addition to Crh, likely contributed to the augmented care-induced phenotype, including diminished depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors. Together, we believe these findings provide the first causal link between enriched neonatal experience, synaptic refinement and induction of epigenetic processes within specific neurons. They uncover a novel mechanistic pathway from neonatal environment to emotional resilience.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 10 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.240.

  10. Size distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban atmosphere: sorption mechanism and source contributions to respiratory deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yan; Li, Xiang; Xu, Ting Ting; Cheng, Tian Tao; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jian Min; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    In order to better understand the particle size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their source contribution to human respiratory system, size-resolved PAHs have been studied in ambient aerosols at a megacity Shanghai site during a 1-year period (2012-2013). The results showed the PAHs had a bimodal distribution with one mode peak in the fine-particle size range (0.4-2.1 µm) and another mode peak in the coarse-particle size range (3.3-9.0 µm). Along with the increase in ring number of PAHs, the intensity of the fine-mode peak increased, while the coarse-mode peak decreased. Plotting of log(PAH / PM) against log(Dp) showed that all slope values were above -1, suggesting that multiple mechanisms (adsorption and absorption) controlled the particle size distribution of PAHs. The total deposition flux of PAHs in the respiratory tract was calculated as being 8.8 ± 2.0 ng h-1. The highest lifetime cancer risk (LCR) was estimated at 1.5 × 10-6, which exceeded the unit risk of 10-6. The LCR values presented here were mainly influenced by accumulation mode PAHs which came from biomass burning (24 %), coal combustion (25 %), and vehicular emission (27 %). The present study provides us with a mechanistic understanding of the particle size distribution of PAHs and their transport in the human respiratory system, which can help develop better source control strategies.

  11. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  12. Contribution of ankyrin-band 3 complexes to the organization and mechanical properties of the membrane skeleton of human erythrocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.

    1995-02-01

    To understand the role of ankyrin-band 3 complexes in the organization of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton and its contribution to the mechanical properties of human erythrocytes, intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets were prepared from intact and physically sheared membrane ghosts, expanded in low salt buffer, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. While the structures of intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets shared many common features, including rigid junctional complexes of spectrin, actin, and band 4.1; short stretches ({approximately}50 {angstrom}) of flexible spectrin filaments; and globular masses of ankyrin-band 3 complexes situated close to the middle of the spectrin filaments, the definition of structural units in the intact skeleton is obscured by the superposition of the two layers. However, the spatial disposition of structural elements can be clearly defined in the images of the single-layered skeleton leaflets. Partially expanded skeletal leaflets contain conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes arranged in a circular or clove-leaf configuration that straddles multiple strands of thick spectrin cables, presumably reflecting the association of ankyrin-band 3 complexes on neighboring spectrin tetramers as well as the lateral association of the spectrin filaments. Hyperexpansion of the skeleton leaflets led to dissociation of the conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes, full-extension of the spectrin tetramers, and separation of the individual strands of spectrin tetramers. Clearly defined stands of spectrin tetramers in the hyperexpanded single-layered skeletal leaflets often contained two sets of globular protein masses that divided the spectrin tetramers into three segments of approximately equal length.

  13. ROS-mediated inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase contributes to the activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Kovacs

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants being involved in diverse physiological processes like germination, root growth, stomata closing and response to biotic and abiotic stress. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO as a biological NO donor has a very important function in NO signaling since it can transfer its NO moiety to other proteins (trans-nitrosylation. Such trans-nitrosylation reactions are equilibrium reactions and depend on GSNO level. The breakdown of GSNO and thus the level of S-nitrosylated proteins are regulated by GSNO-reductase (GSNOR. In this way, this enzyme controls S-nitrosothiol levels and regulates NO signaling. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana GSNOR activity is reversibly inhibited by H2O2 in-vitro and by paraquat-induced oxidative stress in-vivo. Light scattering analyses of reduced and oxidized recombinant GSNOR demonstrated that GSNOR proteins form dimers under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses revealed that H2O2-treatment increased the amount of oxidative modifications on Zn2+-coordinating Cys47 and Cys177. Inhibition of GSNOR results in enhanced levels of S-nitrosothiols followed by accumulation of glutathione. Moreover, transcript levels of redox-regulated genes and activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes are increased in gsnor-ko plants, which may contribute to the enhanced resistance against oxidative stress. In sum, our results demonstrate that ROS-dependent inhibition of GSNOR is playing an important role in activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms to damping oxidative damage and imply a direct crosstalk between ROS- and NO-signaling.

  14. Mechanical energetic contributions from individual muscles and elastic prosthetic feet during symmetric unilateral transtibial amputee walking: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmitrewicz, Robert J; Neptune, Richard R; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2007-01-01

    Energy storage and return (ESAR) foot-ankle prostheses have been developed in an effort to improve gait performance in lower-limb amputees. However, little is known about their effectiveness in providing the body segment mechanical energetics normally provided by the ankle muscles. The objective of this theoretical study was to use muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of unilateral transtibial amputee and non-amputee walking to identify the contributions of ESAR prostheses to trunk support, forward propulsion and leg swing initiation and how individual muscles must compensate in order to produce a normal, symmetric gait pattern. The simulation analysis revealed the ESAR prosthesis provided the necessary trunk support, but it could not provide the net trunk forward propulsion normally provided by the plantar flexors and leg swing initiation normally provided by the biarticular gastrocnemius. To compensate, the residual leg gluteus maximus and rectus femoris delivered increased energy to the trunk for forward propulsion in early stance and late stance into pre-swing, respectively, while the residual iliopsoas delivered increased energy to the leg in pre- and early swing to help initiate swing. In the intact leg, the soleus, gluteus maximus and rectus femoris delivered increased energy to the trunk for forward propulsion in the first half of stance, while the iliopsoas increased the leg energy it delivered in pre- and early swing. Thus, the energy stored and released by the ESAR prosthesis combined with these muscle compensations was able to produce a normal, symmetric gait pattern, although various neuromuscular and musculoskeletal constraints may make such a pattern non-optimal.

  15. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutation R501X and 2282del4 carrier status is associated with fissured skin on the hands: results from a cross-sectional population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Ross-Hansen, K; Johansen, J D

    2012-01-01

    tested. Results: In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, filaggrin mutation status was significantly associated with fissured skin on the hands and/or fingers in adults (OR=1.93; CI95%=1.05-3.55) and a near significant negative interaction with atopic dermatitis (p=0.055), suggesting the effect...... was predominantly in subjects without AD. Conclusions: Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations seem not only to increase the risk of atopic dermatitis and dry skin but also the risk of fissures on the hands and/or fingers in subjects without atopic dermatitis. Prophylactic emollient therapy should be particularly...

  16. Loss of function mutation in LARP7, chaperone of 7SK ncRNA, causes a syndrome of facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Owain, Mohammad; Alzahrani, Fatema; Shuaib, Taghreed; Al-Shamrani, Hussain; Al-Falki, Yahya H; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Alsheddi, Tarfa; Colak, Dilek; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-10-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition. Various molecular mechanisms are known to underlie the disease including impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. Here, we describe a syndromic form of PD associated with severe intellectual disability and distinct facial features in a large multiplex Saudi family. Analysis reveals a novel underlying mechanism for PD involving depletion of 7SK, an abundant cellular noncoding RNA (ncRNA), due to mutation of its chaperone LARP7. We show that 7SK levels are tightly linked to LARP7 expression across cell lines, and that this chaperone is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse embryo. The 7SK is known to influence the expression of a wide array of genes through its inhibitory effect on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) as well as its competing role in HMGA1-mediated transcriptional regulation. This study documents a critical role played by ncRNA in human development and adds to the growing list of molecular mechanisms that, when perturbed, converge on the PD phenotype. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Honeybee Colony Thermoregulation – Regulatory Mechanisms and Contribution of Individuals in Dependence on Age, Location and Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut; Brodschneider, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Honeybee larvae and pupae are extremely stenothermic, i.e. they strongly depend on accurate regulation of brood nest temperature for proper development (33–36°C). Here we study the mechanisms of social thermoregulation of honeybee colonies under changing environmental temperatures concerning the contribution of individuals to colony temperature homeostasis. Beside migration activity within the nest, the main active process is “endothermy on demand” of adults. An increase of cold stress (cooling of the colony) increases the intensity of heat production with thoracic flight muscles and the number of endothermic individuals, especially in the brood nest. As endothermy means hard work for bees, this eases much burden of nestmates which can stay ectothermic. Concerning the active reaction to cold stress by endothermy, age polyethism is reduced to only two physiologically predetermined task divisions, 0 to ∼2 days and older. Endothermic heat production is the job of bees older than about two days. They are all similarly engaged in active heat production both in intensity and frequency. Their active heat production has an important reinforcement effect on passive heat production of the many ectothermic bees and of the brood. Ectothermy is most frequent in young bees (<∼2 days) both outside and inside of brood nest cells. We suggest young bees visit warm brood nest cells not only to clean them but also to speed up flight muscle development for proper endothermy and foraging later in their life. Young bees inside brood nest cells mostly receive heat from the surrounding cell wall during cold stress, whereas older bees predominantly transfer heat from the thorax to the cell wall. Endothermic bees regulate brood comb temperature more accurately than local air temperature. They apply the heat as close to the brood as possible: workers heating cells from within have a higher probability of endothermy than those on the comb surface. The findings show that thermal

  18. Honeybee colony thermoregulation--regulatory mechanisms and contribution of individuals in dependence on age, location and thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Stabentheiner

    Full Text Available Honeybee larvae and pupae are extremely stenothermic, i.e. they strongly depend on accurate regulation of brood nest temperature for proper development (33-36 degrees C. Here we study the mechanisms of social thermoregulation of honeybee colonies under changing environmental temperatures concerning the contribution of individuals to colony temperature homeostasis. Beside migration activity within the nest, the main active process is "endothermy on demand" of adults. An increase of cold stress (cooling of the colony increases the intensity of heat production with thoracic flight muscles and the number of endothermic individuals, especially in the brood nest. As endothermy means hard work for bees, this eases much burden of nestmates which can stay ectothermic. Concerning the active reaction to cold stress by endothermy, age polyethism is reduced to only two physiologically predetermined task divisions, 0 to approximately 2 days and older. Endothermic heat production is the job of bees older than about two days. They are all similarly engaged in active heat production both in intensity and frequency. Their active heat production has an important reinforcement effect on passive heat production of the many ectothermic bees and of the brood. Ectothermy is most frequent in young bees (< approximately 2 days both outside and inside of brood nest cells. We suggest young bees visit warm brood nest cells not only to clean them but also to speed up flight muscle development for proper endothermy and foraging later in their life. Young bees inside brood nest cells mostly receive heat from the surrounding cell wall during cold stress, whereas older bees predominantly transfer heat from the thorax to the cell wall. Endothermic bees regulate brood comb temperature more accurately than local air temperature. They apply the heat as close to the brood as possible: workers heating cells from within have a higher probability of endothermy than those on the comb

  19. Reassessment of the putative role of BLK-p.A71T loss-of-function mutation in MODY and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefond, A; Yengo, L; Philippe, J;

    2013-01-01

    MODY is believed to be caused by at least 13 different genes. Five rare mutations at the BLK locus, including only one non-synonymous p.A71T variant, were reported to segregate with diabetes in three MODY families. The p.A71T mutation was shown to abolish the enhancing effect of BLK on insulin co...... content and secretion from pancreatic beta cell lines. Here, we reassessed the contribution of BLK to MODY and tested the effect of BLK-p.A71T on type 2 diabetes risk and variations in related traits.......MODY is believed to be caused by at least 13 different genes. Five rare mutations at the BLK locus, including only one non-synonymous p.A71T variant, were reported to segregate with diabetes in three MODY families. The p.A71T mutation was shown to abolish the enhancing effect of BLK on insulin...

  20. Importance of mechanics and kinematics in determining the stiffness contribution of the vertebral column during body-caudal-fin swimming in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, Bryan N; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2014-02-01

    Whole-body stiffness in fishes has important consequences for swimming mode, speed and efficiency, but the contribution of vertebral column stiffness to whole-body stiffness is unclear. In our opinion, this lack of clarity is due in part to the lack of studies that have measured both in vitro mechanical properties of the vertebral column as well as in vivo vertebral kinematics in the same species. Some lack of clarity may also come from real variation in the mechanical role of the vertebral column across species. Previous studies, based on either mechanics or kinematics alone, suggest species-specific variation in vertebral column locomotor function that ranges from highly stiff regimes that contribute greatly to whole-body stiffness, and potentially act as a spring, to highly compliant regimes that only prohibit excessive flexion of the intervertebral joints. We review data collected in combined investigations of both mechanics and kinematics of three species, Myxine glutinosa, Acipenser transmontanus, and Morone saxatilis, to illustrate how mechanical testing within the context of the in vivo kinematics more clearly distinguishes the role of the vertebral column in each species. In addition, we identify species for which kinematic data are available, but mechanical data are lacking. We encourage further investigation of these species to fill these mechanical data gaps. Finally, we hope these future combined analyses will identify certain morphological, mechanical, or kinematic parameters that might be associated with certain vertebral column functional regimes with respect to body stiffness.

  1. The association of the vanin-1 N131S variant with blood pressure is mediated by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and loss of function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Juan Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High blood pressure (BP is the most common cardiovascular risk factor worldwide and a major contributor to heart disease and stroke. We previously discovered a BP-associated missense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism-rs2272996-in the gene encoding vanin-1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane pantetheinase. In the present study, we first replicated the association of rs2272996 and BP traits with a total sample size of nearly 30,000 individuals from the Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network (COGENT of African Americans (P=0.01. This association was further validated using patient plasma samples; we observed that the N131S mutation is associated with significantly lower plasma vanin-1 protein levels. We observed that the N131S vanin-1 is subjected to rapid endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD as the underlying mechanism for its reduction. Using HEK293 cells stably expressing vanin-1 variants, we showed that N131S vanin-1 was degraded significantly faster than wild type (WT vanin-1. Consequently, there were only minimal quantities of variant vanin-1 present on the plasma membrane and greatly reduced pantetheinase activity. Application of MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, resulted in accumulation of ubiquitinated variant protein. A further experiment demonstrated that atenolol and diltiazem, two current drugs for treating hypertension, reduce the vanin-1 protein level. Our study provides strong biological evidence for the association of the identified SNP with BP and suggests that vanin-1 misfolding and degradation are the underlying molecular mechanism.

  2. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome.

  3. Disrupted plasma membrane localization and loss of function reveal regions of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 involved in structural integrity and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivillac, Nicole M I; Wasal, Karanvir; Villani, Daniela F; Naydenova, Zlatina; Hanna, W J Brad; Coe, Imogen R

    2009-10-01

    Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1) is an integral membrane protein that transports nucleosides and analog drugs across cellular membranes. Very little is known about intracellular processing and localization of hENT1. Here we show that disruption of a highly conserved triplet (PWN) near the N-terminus, or the last eight C-terminal residues (two hydrophobic triplets separated by a positive arginine) result in loss of plasma membrane localization and/or transport function. To understand the role of specific residues within these regions, we studied the localization patterns of N- or C-terminal deletion and/or substitution mutants of GFP-hENT1 using confocal microscopy. Quantification of GFP-hENT1 (mutant and wildtype) protein at the plasma membrane was conducted using nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) binding. Functionality of the GFP-hENT1 mutants was determined by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by measurement of uridine uptake. Mutation of the proline within the PWN motif disrupts plasma membrane localization. C-terminal mutations (primarily within the hydrophobic triplets) lead to hENT1 retention within the cell (e.g. in the ER). Some mutants still localize to the plasma membrane but show reduced transport activity. These data suggest that these two regions contribute to the structural integrity and thus correct processing and function of hENT1.

  4. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-07

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD.

  5. Alternate efflux pump mechanism may contribute to drug resistance in extensively drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data show an nsSNP in the drrA efflux pump gene that may result in upregulation of drug efflux mechanisms in MTB strains. It is therefore imperative to understand the mechanism of efflux and its role in drug resistance, which will enable the identification of new drug targets and development of new drug regimens to counteract the drug efflux mechanism of MTB.

  6. Chronic Gamma-Irradiation Induces a Dose-Rate-Dependent Pro-inflammatory Response and Associated Loss of Function in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, T; Le Gallic, C; Stefani, J; Dublineau, I; Yentrapalli, R; Harms-Ringdahl, M; Haghdoost, S

    2015-04-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is dose and dose-rate relationship for radiation-induced cardiovascular diseases. The response of endothelial cells to different low dose rates may contribute to help estimate risks for cardiovascular diseases by providing mechanistic understanding. In this study we investigated whether chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure had an effect on the inflammatory response of endothelial cells and their function. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were chronically exposed to radiation at a dose of 1.4 mGy/h or 4.1 mGy/h for 1, 3, 6 or 10 weeks. We determined the pro-inflammatory profile of HUVECs before and during radiation exposure, and investigated the functional consequences of this radiation exposure by measuring their capacity to form vascular networks in matrigel. Expression levels of adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1, IL-6 and TNF-α were analyzed. When a total dose of 2 Gy was given at a rate of 4.1 mGy/h, we observed an increase in IL-6 and MCP-1 release into the cell culture media, but this was not observed at 1.4 mGy/h. The increase in the inflammatory profile induced at the dose rate of 4.1 mGy/h was also correlated with a decrease in the capacity of the HUVECs to form a vascular network in matrigel. Our results suggest that dose rate is an important parameter in the alteration of HUVEC inflammatory profile and function.

  7. A Model of Compound Heterozygous, Loss-of-Function Alleles Is Broadly Consistent with Observations from Complex-Disease GWAS Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleal S Sanjak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic component of complex disease risk in humans remains largely unexplained. A corollary is that the allelic spectrum of genetic variants contributing to complex disease risk is unknown. Theoretical models that relate population genetic processes to the maintenance of genetic variation for quantitative traits may suggest profitable avenues for future experimental design. Here we use forward simulation to model a genomic region evolving under a balance between recurrent deleterious mutation and Gaussian stabilizing selection. We consider multiple genetic and demographic models, and several different methods for identifying genomic regions harboring variants associated with complex disease risk. We demonstrate that the model of gene action, relating genotype to phenotype, has a qualitative effect on several relevant aspects of the population genetic architecture of a complex trait. In particular, the genetic model impacts genetic variance component partitioning across the allele frequency spectrum and the power of statistical tests. Models with partial recessivity closely match the minor allele frequency distribution of significant hits from empirical genome-wide association studies without requiring homozygous effect sizes to be small. We highlight a particular gene-based model of incomplete recessivity that is appealing from first principles. Under that model, deleterious mutations in a genomic region partially fail to complement one another. This model of gene-based recessivity predicts the empirically observed inconsistency between twin and SNP based estimated of dominance heritability. Furthermore, this model predicts considerable levels of unexplained variance associated with intralocus epistasis. Our results suggest a need for improved statistical tools for region based genetic association and heritability estimation.

  8. MFAP5 loss-of-function mutations underscore the involvement of matrix alteration in the pathogenesis of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Mathieu; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Aubart, Mélodie; Hanna, Nadine; Kessler, Ketty; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Tosolini, Laurent; Ho-Tin-Noe, Benoit; Regalado, Ellen; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Faivre, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Dulac, Yves; Busa, Tiffany; Gouya, Laurent; Milewicz, Dianna M; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2014-12-04

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with major life-threatening complications. The disease displays great genetic heterogeneity with some forms allelic to Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and an important number of cases still remain unexplained at the molecular level. Through whole-exome sequencing of affected members in a large TAAD-affected family, we identified the c.472C>T (p.Arg158(∗)) nonsense mutation in MFAP5 encoding the extracellular matrix component MAGP-2. This protein interacts with elastin fibers and the microfibrillar network. Mutation screening of 403 additional probands identified an additional missense mutation of MFAP5 (c.62G>T [p.Trp21Leu]) segregating with the disease in a second family. Functional analyses performed on both affected individual's cells and in vitro models showed that these two mutations caused pure or partial haploinsufficiency. Thus, alteration of MAGP-2, a component of microfibrils and elastic fibers, appears as an initiating mechanism of inherited TAAD.

  9. TDP-43 Loss-of-Function Causes Neuronal Loss Due to Defective Steroid Receptor-Mediated Gene Program Switching in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Vanden Broeck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TDP-43 proteinopathy is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related neurodegenerative disorders. Whether TDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a novel toxic gain-of-function mechanism of the aggregates or by a loss of its normal function is unknown. We increased and decreased expression of TDP-43 (dTDP-43 in Drosophila. Although upregulation of dTDP-43 induced neuronal ubiquitin and dTDP-43-positive inclusions, both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 resulted in selective apoptosis of bursicon neurons and highly similar transcriptome alterations at the pupal-adult transition. Gene network analysis and genetic validation showed that both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 directly and dramatically increased the expression of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Map205, resulting in cytoplasmic accumulations of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR and a failure to switch EcR-dependent gene programs from a pupal to adult pattern. We propose that dTDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a loss of its normal function.

  10. TRPC1 contributes to light-touch sensation and mechanical responses in low-threshold cutaneous sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Sheldon R; Dietrich, Alexander; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2012-02-01

    The cellular proteins that underlie mechanosensation remain largely enigmatic in mammalian systems. Mechanically sensitive ion channels are thought to distinguish pressure, stretch, and other types of tactile signals in skin. Transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) is a candidate mechanically sensitive channel that is expressed in primary afferent sensory neurons. However, its role in the mechanical sensitivity of these neurons is unclear. Here, we investigated TRPC1-dependent responses to both innocuous and noxious mechanical force. Mechanically evoked action potentials in cutaneous myelinated A-fiber and unmyelinated C-fiber neurons were quantified using the ex vivo skin-nerve preparation to record from the saphenous nerve, which terminates in the dorsal hairy skin of the hindpaw. Our data reveal that in TRPC1-deficient mice, mechanically evoked action potentials were decreased by nearly 50% in slowly adapting Aβ-fibers, which largely innervate Merkel cells, and in rapidly adapting Aδ-Down-hair afferent fibers compared with wild-type controls. In contrast, differences were not found in slowly adapting Aδ-mechanoreceptors or unmyelinated C-fibers, which primarily respond to nociceptive stimuli. These results suggest that TRPC1 may be important in the detection of innocuous mechanical force. We concurrently investigated the role of TRPC1 in behavioral responses to mechanical force to the plantar hindpaw skin. For innocuous stimuli, we developed a novel light stroke assay using a "puffed out" cotton swab. Additionally, we used repeated light, presumably innocuous punctate stimuli with a low threshold von Frey filament (0.68 mN). In agreement with our electrophysiological data in light-touch afferents, TRPC1-deficient mice exhibited nearly a 50% decrease in behavioral responses to both the light-stroke and light punctate mechanical assays when compared with wild-type controls. In contrast, TRPC1-deficient mice exhibited normal paw withdrawal response to

  11. Homozygosity for a Recessive Loss-of-Function Mutation of the NRL Gene Is Associated With a Variant of Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Hadas; Blumen, Sergiu C; Braverman, Itzhak; Hanna, Rana; Tiosano, Beatrice; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for severe visual complaints by Bukharan Jewish patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing were used to test for NRL, PABPN1, and NR2E3 mutations. Complete ophthalmic examination included best-corrected visual acuity, biomicroscopic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence. Detailed electroretinography (ERG) testing was conducted including expanded International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision protocol for light-adapted and dark-adapted conditions, measurements of S-cone function, and ON-OFF light-adapted ERG. The index patients were homozygotes for both a dominant mutation of the PABPN1 gene, (GCN)13, and a recessive mutation of the NRL gene, p.R31X, on chromosome 14q11.1, leading to early-onset OPMD accompanied by night blindness and reduced visual acuity. No mutations were found in the NR2E3 gene. Both patients were of Bukharan Jewish origin, but from unrelated families. Electroretinography responses of both patients were dominated by short-wavelength-sensitive mechanisms, with no detectable rod function, similar to the ERG responses of individuals with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) due to NR2E3 mutations. Heterozygotes for the PABPN1 and NRL mutations demonstrated normal fundi and ERG responses. Homozygosity for the recessive NRL mutation described here appears to be associated with a distinct retinal phenotype, demonstrating ERG characteristics similar to those of ESCS patients. This report expands the spectrum of NRL recessive mutations, as well as the genetic spectrum of ESCS, and indicates a new syndrome of OPMD with an ESCS-like phenotype.

  12. Detection, Diagnosis and Prognosis: Contribution to the energy challenge: Proceedings of the Meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, T. R. (Editor); Willard, W. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of failure detection, diagnosis and prognosis to the energy challenge is discussed. Areas of special emphasis included energy management, techniques for failure detection in energy related systems, improved prognostic techniques for energy related systems and opportunities for detection, diagnosis and prognosis in the energy field.

  13. Genotype-specific effects of Mecp2 loss-of-function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett Syndrome model mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie eRietveld

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a progressive neurological disorder primarily caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. The heterozygous female brain consists of mosaic of neurons containing both wildtype MeCP2 (MeCP2+ and mutant MeCP2 (MeCP2-. 3-dimensional morphological analysis was performed on individually genotyped layer V pyramidal neurons in the primary motor cortex of heterozygous (Mecp2+/- and wild-type (Mecp2+/+ female mice (>6 mo. from the Mecp2tm1.1Jae line. Comparing basal dendrite morphology, soma and nuclear size of MeCP2+ to MeCP2- neurons reveals a significant cell autonomous, genotype specific effect of Mecp2. MeCP2- neurons have 15% less total basal dendritic length, predominantly in the region 70-130 μm from the cell body and on average 3 fewer branch points, specifically loss in the 2nd and 3rd branch orders. Soma and nuclear areas of neurons of mice were analyzed across a range of ages (5-21 mo. and X-chromosome inactivation (XCI ratios (12-56%. On average, MeCP2- somata and nuclei were 15% and 13% smaller than MeCP2+ neurons respectively. In most respects branching morphology of neurons in wild-type brains (MeCP2 WT was not distinguishable from MeCP2+ but somata and nuclei of MeCP2 WT neurons were larger than those of MeCP2+ neurons. These data reveal cell autonomous effects of Mecp2 mutation on dendritic morphology, but also suggest non-cell autonomous effects with respect to cell size. MeCP2+ and MeCP2- neuron sizes were not correlated with age, but were correlated with XCI ratio. Unexpectedly the MeCP2- neurons were smallest in brains where the XCI ratio was highly skewed towards MeCP2+, i.e. wild-type. This raises the possibility of cell non-autonomous effects that act through mechanisms other than globally secreted factors; perhaps competition for synaptic connections influences cell size and morphology in the genotypically mosaic brain of RTT model mice.

  14. Genotype-specific effects of Mecp2 loss-of-function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett syndrome model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Leslie; Stuss, David P; McPhee, David; Delaney, Kerry R

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurological disorder primarily caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The heterozygous female brain consists of mosaic of neurons containing both wild-type MeCP2 (MeCP2+) and mutant MeCP2 (MeCP2-). Three-dimensional morphological analysis was performed on individually genotyped layer V pyramidal neurons in the primary motor cortex of heterozygous (Mecp2(+/-) ) and wild-type (Mecp2(+/+) ) female mice ( > 6 mo.) from the Mecp2(tm1.1Jae) line. Comparing basal dendrite morphology, soma and nuclear size of MeCP2+ to MeCP2- neurons reveals a significant cell autonomous, genotype specific effect of Mecp2. MeCP2- neurons have 15% less total basal dendritic length, predominantly in the region 70-130 μm from the cell body and on average three fewer branch points, specifically loss in the second and third branch orders. Soma and nuclear areas of neurons of mice were analyzed across a range of ages (5-21 mo.) and X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) ratios (12-56%). On average, MeCP2- somata and nuclei were 15 and 13% smaller than MeCP2+ neurons respectively. In most respects branching morphology of neurons in wild-type brains (MeCP2 WT) was not distinguishable from MeCP2+ but somata and nuclei of MeCP2 WT neurons were larger than those of MeCP2+ neurons. These data reveal cell autonomous effects of Mecp2 mutation on dendritic morphology, but also suggest non-cell autonomous effects with respect to cell size. MeCP2+ and MeCP2- neuron sizes were not correlated with age, but were correlated with XCI ratio. Unexpectedly the MeCP2- neurons were smallest in brains where the XCI ratio was highly skewed toward MeCP2+, i.e., wild-type. This raises the possibility of cell non-autonomous effects that act through mechanisms other than globally secreted factors; perhaps competition for synaptic connections influences cell size and morphology in the genotypically mosaic brain of RTT model mice.

  15. Contribution of deformation mechanisms to strength and ductility in two Cr-Mn grade austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef_saleh@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P. [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130, USA. (United States); Talonen, J. [Outokumpu Oyj, Box 140, FI-02201 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    The role of different deformation mechanisms in controlling mechanical properties were studied in two low-Ni, Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel grades (Types 201 and 201L) by tensile testing and microstructure examinations. Tensile tests were carried out at two different strain rates, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, in the temperature range from -80 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. It was observed that the flow properties and work hardening rate are affected significantly by temperature and strain rate for the concerned steels through variation of deformation mechanism. Deformation-induced austenite-to-martensite transformation (TRIP effect) is the dominant mechanism at temperatures below room temperature. From 50 Degree-Sign C up to 200 Degree-Sign C, plastic deformation is controlled by mechanical twinning (TWIP effect) and dislocation glide. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to study the plastic deformation accommodation and identify the primary deformation mechanisms operating in the deformed steels.

  16. Loss-of-function mutants and overexpression lines of the Arabidopsis cyclin CYCA1;2/Tardy Asynchronous Meiosis exhibit different defects in prophase-i meiocytes but produce the same meiotic products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixing Wang

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, loss-of-function mutations in the A-type cyclin CYCA1;2/Tardy Asynchronous Meiosis (TAM gene lead to the production of abnormal meiotic products including triads and dyads. Here we report that overexpression of TAM by the ASK1:TAM transgene also led to the production of triads and dyads in meiosis, as well as shriveled seeds, in a dominant fashion. However, the partial loss-of-function mutant tam-1, an ASK1:TAM line, and the wild type differed in dynamic changes in chromosome thread thickness from zygotene to diplotene. We also found that the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in male meiocytes in tam-1 and tam-2 (a null allele frequently formed a tight cluster at the pachytene and diplotene stages, in contrast to the infrequent occurrences of such clusters in the wild type and the ASK1:TAM line. Immunolocalization studies of the chromosome axial component ASY1 revealed that ASY1 was highly expressed at the appropriate male meiotic stages but not localized to the chromosomes in tam-2. The level of ASY1, however, was greatly reduced in another ASK1:TAM line with much overexpressed TAM. Our results indicate that the reduction and increase in the activity of TAM differentially affect chromosomal morphology and the action of ASY1 in prophase I. Based on these results, we propose that either the different meiotic defects or a common defect such as missing ASY1 on the chromosomal axes triggers a hitherto uncharacterized cell cycle checkpoint in the male meiocytes in the tam mutants and ASK1:TAM lines, leading to the production of the same abnormal meiotic products.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms and Evolutionary Processes Contributing to Accelerated Divergence of Gene Expression on the Drosophila X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolon, Joseph D.; Stevenson, Kraig R.; McManus, C. Joel; Yang, Bing; Graveley, Brenton R.; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    In species with a heterogametic sex, population genetics theory predicts that DNA sequences on the X chromosome can evolve faster than comparable sequences on autosomes. Both neutral and nonneutral evolutionary processes can generate this pattern. Complex traits like gene expression are not predicted to have accelerated evolution by these theories, yet a “faster-X” pattern of gene expression divergence has recently been reported for both Drosophila and mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that accelerated adaptive evolution of cis-regulatory sequences on the X chromosome is responsible for this pattern by comparing the relative contributions of cis- and trans-regulatory changes to patterns of faster-X expression divergence observed between strains and species of Drosophila with a range of divergence times. We find support for this hypothesis, especially among male-biased genes, when comparing different species. However, we also find evidence that trans-regulatory differences contribute to a faster-X pattern of expression divergence both within and between species. This contribution is surprising because trans-acting regulators of X-linked genes are generally assumed to be randomly distributed throughout the genome. We found, however, that X-linked transcription factors appear to preferentially regulate expression of X-linked genes, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for this result. The contribution of trans-regulatory variation to faster-X expression divergence was larger within than between species, suggesting that it is more likely to result from neutral processes than positive selection. These data show how accelerated evolution of both coding and noncoding sequences on the X chromosome can lead to accelerated expression divergence on the X chromosome relative to autosomes. PMID:26041937

  18. Contribution to the explanation of the spalling of small specimen without any mechanical restraint exposed to high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Marcus V.G. de, E-mail: mvmorais@unb.b [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Pliya, Prosper [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Noumowe, Albert, E-mail: Albert.Noumowe@u-cergy.f [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Beaucour, Anne-Lise; Ortola, Sophie [Cergy-Pontoise University - L2MGC, 5 mail Gay-Lussac Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    The behaviour of concrete subjected to high temperature is studied. The aim of the study is to explain the spalling or bursting phenomenon observed during experimental studies in the laboratory. Mechanical computations are carried out with the finite element code CAST3M developed at the French Atomic Energy Agency (CEA). Heat gradient and water vapour pressure inside the concrete element are determined by using a thermo-hydrous model. Then, the mechanical stresses generated in the studied concrete element are calculated according to two behaviour assumptions: the linear isotropic elastic law and an elastoplastic model. Numerical simulations show that, during the heating cycles, tension stresses are developed in the central part and compression stresses at the surface of the cylindrical concrete element. The highest stresses appear when the surface temperature of the concrete element is about 300 {sup o}C. The tension stresses in the specimens then exceed the concrete tensile strength.

  19. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-06-30

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells.

  20. Shading Contributes to the Reduction of Stem Mechanical Strength by Decreasing Cell Wall Synthesis in Japonica Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longmei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Low solar radiation caused by industrial development and solar dimming has become a limitation in crop production in China. It is widely accepted that low solar radiation influences many aspects of plant development, including slender, weak stems and susceptibility to lodging. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To clarify how low solar radiation affects stem mechanical strength formation and lodging resistance, the japonica rice cultivars Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistant and W3668 (lodging-susceptible were grown under field conditions with normal light (Control and shading (the incident light was reduced by 60% with a black nylon net. The yield and yield components, plant morphological characteristics, the stem mechanical strength, cell wall components, culm microstructure, gene expression correlated with cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were measured. The results showed that shading significantly reduced grain yield attributed to reduction of spikelets per panicles and grain weight. The stem-breaking strength decreased significantly under shading treatment; consequently, resulting in higher lodging index in rice plant in both varieties, as revealed by decreased by culm diameter, culm wall thickness and increased plant height, gravity center height. Compared with control, cell wall components including non-structural carbohydrate, sucrose, cellulose, and lignin reduced quite higher. With histochemical straining, shading largely reduced lignin deposition in the sclerenchyma cells and vascular bundle cells compared with control, and decreased cellulose deposition in the parenchyma cells of culm tissue in both Wuyunjing23 and W3668. And under shading condition, gene expression involved in secondary cell wall synthesis, OsPAL, OsCOMT, OsCCoAOMT, OsCCR, and OsCAD2, and primary cell wall synthesis, OsCesA1, OsCesA3, and OsCesA8 were decreased significantly. These results suggest that gene expression involved in the reduction of

  1. Neuromuscular contributions to the age-related reduction in muscle power: Mechanisms and potential role of high velocity power training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Neal B; Connelly, Denise M; Rice, Charles L; Hunter, Susan W; Doherty, Timothy J

    2017-05-01

    Although much of the literature on neuromuscular changes with aging has focused on loss of muscle mass and isometric strength, deficits in muscle power are more pronounced with aging and may be a more sensitive measure of neuromuscular degeneration. This review aims to identify the adaptations to the neuromuscular system with aging, with specific emphasis on changes that result in decreased muscle power. We discuss how these changes in neuromuscular performance can affect mobility, and ultimately contribute to an increased risk for falls in older adults. Finally, we evaluate the literature regarding high-velocity muscle power training (PT), and its potential advantages over conventional strength training for improving functional performance and mitigating fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. One-electron versus electron-electron interaction contributions to the spin-spin coupling mechanism in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: analysis of basic electronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-12-22

    For the first time, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism is decomposed into one-electron and electron-electron interaction contributions to demonstrate that spin-information transport between different orbitals is not exclusively an electron-exchange phenomenon. This is done using coupled perturbed density-functional theory in conjunction with the recently developed J-OC-PSP [=J-OC-OC-PSP: Decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization)] method. One-orbital contributions comprise Ramsey response and self-exchange effects and the two-orbital contributions describe first-order delocalization and steric exchange. The two-orbital effects can be characterized as external orbital, echo, and spin transport contributions. A relationship of these electronic effects to zeroth-order orbital theory is demonstrated and their sign and magnitude predicted using simple models and graphical representations of first order orbitals. In the case of methane the two NMR spin-spin coupling constants result from totally different Fermi contact coupling mechanisms. (1)J(C,H) is the result of the Ramsey response and the self-exchange of the bond orbital diminished by external first-order delocalization external one-orbital effects whereas (2)J(H,H) spin-spin coupling is almost exclusively mitigated by a two-orbital steric exchange effect. From this analysis, a series of prediction can be made how geometrical deformations, electron lone pairs, and substituent effects lead to a change in the values of (1)J(C,H) and (2)J(H,H), respectively, for hydrocarbons.

  3. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  4. A quantitative assessment approach of feasible optical mechanisms contributing to structural color of golden-like Chrysina aurigans scarab beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofeifa, D. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Solís, A.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.; Vargas, W. E.

    2015-07-01

    Under normal incidence of non-polarized light, reflection spectra from the cuticle of golden-like C. aurigans scarabs shows a broad band displayed from 525 to 950 nm, with a spectral ripple structure that consists of a uniform sequence of peaks superimposed on the main reflection band. Cross sectional Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of the cuticle initially suggest the presence of a multilayered structure. A radiative transfer matrix formalism is first applied to describe as much as possible the main features of coherent reflection spectra, by assuming optically homogenous layers distributed through the exocuticle, with chitin as the major constituent material. Additional non-coherent multiple reflections due to layers in the endocuticle are also evaluated from this approach. The presence of a pigmented micron sized structure beneath the procuticle requires the evaluation of a diffuse light contribution to the reflection. This was carried out from a four-flux radiative transfer model. Optical anisotropy is introduced by interpreting the SEM images in terms of a twisted Bouligand-type structure, and reflection spectra are evaluated from an implementation of the so-called 4×4 Berreman's formalism. We have been able to approach the main features characterizing the reflection spectra of C. aurigans' elytra following this progressive way.

  5. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead......Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation...... to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1...

  6. Mechanisms contributing to the thermal analysis of waste incineration bottom ash and quantification of different carbon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Stefania; van Zomeren, André; Costa, Giulia; Dijkstra, Joris J; Comans, Rob N J; Lombardi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this study was to identify the main compounds affecting the weight changes of bottom ash (BA) in conventional loss on ignition (LOI) tests and to obtain a better understanding of the individual processes in heterogeneous (waste) materials such as BA. Evaluations were performed on BA samples from a refuse derived fuel incineration (RDF-I) plant and a hospital waste incineration (HW-I) plant using thermogravimetric analysis and subsequent mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products. Results of TG-MS analysis on RDF-I BA indicated that the LOI measured at 550°C was due to moisture evaporation and dehydration of Ca(OH)(2) and hydrocalumite. Results for the HW-I BA showed that LOI at 550°C was predominantly related to the elemental carbon (EC) content of the sample. Decomposition of CaCO(3) around 700°C was identified in both materials. In addition, we have identified reaction mechanisms that underestimate the EC and overestimate the CaCO(3) contents of the HW-I BA during TG-MS analyses. These types of artefacts are expected to occur also when conventional LOI methods are adopted, in particular for materials that contain CaO/Ca(OH)(2) in combination with EC and/or organic carbon, such as e.g. municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom and fly ashes. We suggest that the same mechanisms that we have found (i.e. in situ carbonation) can also occur during combustion of the waste in the incinerator (between 450 and 650°C) demonstrating that the presence of carbonate in bottom ash is not necessarily indicative for weathering. These results may also give direction to further optimization of waste incineration technologies with regard to stimulating in situ carbonation during incineration and subsequent potential improvement of the leaching behavior of bottom ash.

  7. Long term corrosion of iron in concrete and in atmospheric conditions: a contribution of archaeological analogues to mechanism comprehension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.; Demoulin, A.; Dillman, Ph.; Neff, D.; Berge, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS, Lab. Pierre Sue, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Burger, E.; Perrin, St. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME, Lab. d' Etude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); L' hostis, V. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME, Lab. d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et Argiles, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dillman, Ph. [IRAMAT-CNRS UMR 5060, 33 - Pessac (France); Millard, A. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DM2S/SEMT, Lab. de Mecanique Systemes et Simulation, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The prediction of iron (or low alloy steel) corrosion on very long term period is necessary in two different purposes: (i) the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage and (ii) the French storage and repository concept for the radioactive wastes. In order to determine the evolution of corrosion processes for very long period, mechanistic models have been developed. In these models that are based on a phenomenological approach to evaluate the average corrosion rates, two different environments are considered: concrete (steel reinforcements) and atmospheric. The study of archaeological analogues is a very pertinent tool for the validation of these models. First, physico-chemical analysis on old corrosion layers lead to a precise localisation and identification of the phases present in the corrosion system. Moreover, experimental reinduced corrosions of ancient samples under controlled parameters (temperature, relative humidity) bring new insight on the mechanisms involved. In particular, one crucial question related to the wet-dry cycle is the localisation of oxygen reduction sites in the rust layer. For this purpose, specific experiments have been set up to re-corrode the ancient samples in marked medium (using {sup 18}O{sub 2}). Samples were exposed to cycling between high and low relative humidity, produced by saline saturated solutions. Then cross-sections of samples obtained were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N on the Pierre Sue Laboratory nuclear microprobe. In this presentation the {sup 18}O distribution profiles are discussed and interpreted in order to bring new insight on corrosion mechanisms. A comparative interpretation is made for each medium (concrete and atmosphere)

  8. A gene expression signature of retinoblastoma loss-of-function is a predictive biomarker of resistance to palbociclib in breast cancer cell lines and is prognostic in patients with ER positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malorni, Luca; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Guarducci, Cristina; Bonechi, Martina; Biagioni, Chiara; Hart, Christopher D; Verardo, Roberto; Di Leo, Angelo; Migliaccio, Ilenia

    2016-09-13

    Palbociclib is a CDK4/6 inhibitor that received FDA approval for treatment of hormone receptor positive (HR+) HER2 negative (HER2neg) advanced breast cancer. To better personalize patients treatment it is critical to identify subgroups that would mostly benefit from it. We hypothesize that complex alterations of the Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway might be implicated in resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors and aim to investigate whether signatures of Rb loss-of-function would identify breast cancer cell lines resistant to palbociclib. We established a gene expression signature of Rb loss-of-function (RBsig) by identifying genes correlated with E2F1 and E2F2 expression in breast cancers within The Cancer Genome Atlas. We assessed the RBsig prognostic role in the METABRIC and in a comprehensive breast cancer meta-dataset. Finally, we analyzed whether RBsig would discriminate palbociclib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cells in a large RNA sequencing-based dataset. The RBsig was associated with RB1 genetic status in all tumors (p <7e-32) and in luminal or basal subtypes (p < 7e-11 and p < 0.002, respectively). The RBsig was prognostic in the METABRIC dataset (discovery: HR = 1.93 [1.5-2.4] p = 1.4e-08; validation: HR = 2.01 [1.6-2.5] p = 1.3e-09). Untreated and endocrine treated patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer expressing high RBsig had significantly worse recurrence free survival compared to those with low RBsig (HR = 2.37 [1.8 - 3.2] p = 1.87e-08 and HR = 2.62 [1.9- 3.5] p = 8.6e-11, respectively). The RBsig was able to identify palbociclib resistant and sensitive breast cancer cells (ROC AUC = 0,7778). Signatures of RB loss might be helpful in personalizing treatment of patients with HR+/HER2neg breast cancer. Further validation in patients receiving palbociclib is warranted.

  9. A gene expression signature of retinoblastoma loss-of-function is a predictive biomarker of resistance to palbociclib in breast cancer cell lines and is prognostic in patients with ER positive early breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malorni, Luca; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Guarducci, Cristina; Bonechi, Martina; Biagioni, Chiara; Hart, Christopher D.; Verardo, Roberto; Leo, Angelo Di; Migliaccio, Ilenia

    2016-01-01

    Palbociclib is a CDK4/6 inhibitor that received FDA approval for treatment of hormone receptor positive (HR+) HER2 negative (HER2neg) advanced breast cancer. To better personalize patients treatment it is critical to identify subgroups that would mostly benefit from it. We hypothesize that complex alterations of the Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway might be implicated in resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors and aim to investigate whether signatures of Rb loss-of-function would identify breast cancer cell lines resistant to palbociclib. We established a gene expression signature of Rb loss-of-function (RBsig) by identifying genes correlated with E2F1 and E2F2 expression in breast cancers within The Cancer Genome Atlas. We assessed the RBsig prognostic role in the METABRIC and in a comprehensive breast cancer meta-dataset. Finally, we analyzed whether RBsig would discriminate palbociclib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cells in a large RNA sequencing-based dataset. The RBsig was associated with RB1 genetic status in all tumors (p <7e-32) and in luminal or basal subtypes (p < 7e-11 and p < 0.002, respectively). The RBsig was prognostic in the METABRIC dataset (discovery: HR = 1.93 [1.5-2.4] p = 1.4e-08; validation: HR = 2.01 [1.6-2.5] p = 1.3e-09). Untreated and endocrine treated patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer expressing high RBsig had significantly worse recurrence free survival compared to those with low RBsig (HR = 2.37 [1.8 − 3.2] p = 1.87e−08 and HR = 2.62 [1.9− 3.5] p = 8.6e−11, respectively). The RBsig was able to identify palbociclib resistant and sensitive breast cancer cells (ROC AUC = 0,7778). Signatures of RB loss might be helpful in personalizing treatment of patients with HR+/HER2neg breast cancer. Further validation in patients receiving palbociclib is warranted. PMID:27634906

  10. Dual Mechanisms of Translation Initiation of the Full-Length HIV-1 mRNA Contribute to Gag Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Matias; Cohen, Éric A.; Lopez-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The precursor group-specific antigen (pr55Gag) is central to HIV-1 assembly. Its expression alone is sufficient to assemble into virus-like particles. It also selects the genomic RNA for encapsidation and is involved in several important virus-host interactions for viral assembly and restriction, making its synthesis essential for aspects of viral replication. Here, we show that the initiation of translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is mediated through both a cap-dependent and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated mechanisms. In support of this notion, pr55Gag synthesis was maintained at 70% when cap-dependent translation initiation was blocked by the expression of eIF4G- and PABP targeting viral proteases in two in vitro systems and in HIV-1-expressing cells directly infected with poliovirus. While our data reveal that IRES-dependent translation of the viral genomic RNA ensures pr55Gag expression, the synthesis of other HIV-1 proteins, including that of pr160Gag/Pol, Vpr and Tat is suppressed early during progressive poliovirus infection. The data presented herein implies that the unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA utilizes both cap-dependent and IRES-dependent translation initiation to supply pr55Gag for virus assembly and production. PMID:23861855

  11. DAP10 contributes to CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxic effector mechanisms during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessmann, Manuela; Rausch, Alexandra; Rückerl, Dominik; Adams, Pamela Scott; Simon, Markus; Gilfillan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Ehlers, Stefan; Hölscher, Christoph

    2011-05-01

    The activating C-type lectin-like receptor NKG2D, which is expressed by mouse NK cells and activated CD8 T cells, was previously demonstrated to be involved in tumor rejection and as a defense mechanism against viral and bacterial infections. Because CD8 T cells are important for protective immune responses during chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and represent a promising target for new vaccine strategies to prevent human pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we studied the immune response in mice deficient for the NKG2D adapter molecule DAP10 during experimental TB. After aerosol infection, DAP10-defcient mice displayed an unimpaired recruitment, activation and development of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Whereas the frequency of interferon-gamma-producing CD8 T cells from Mtb-infected DAP10-defcient mice was not affected, CD8 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the absence of DAP10. The loss of cytotoxic activity in DAP10-deficient CD8 T cells was associated with an impaired release of cytotoxic granules. Together, our results suggest that during Mtb infection DAP10 is required for maximal cytolytic activity of CD8 T cells.

  12. Dual mechanisms of translation initiation of the full-length HIV-1 mRNA contribute to gag synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Monette

    Full Text Available The precursor group-specific antigen (pr55(Gag is central to HIV-1 assembly. Its expression alone is sufficient to assemble into virus-like particles. It also selects the genomic RNA for encapsidation and is involved in several important virus-host interactions for viral assembly and restriction, making its synthesis essential for aspects of viral replication. Here, we show that the initiation of translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is mediated through both a cap-dependent and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES-mediated mechanisms. In support of this notion, pr55(Gag synthesis was maintained at 70% when cap-dependent translation initiation was blocked by the expression of eIF4G- and PABP targeting viral proteases in two in vitro systems and in HIV-1-expressing cells directly infected with poliovirus. While our data reveal that IRES-dependent translation of the viral genomic RNA ensures pr55(Gag expression, the synthesis of other HIV-1 proteins, including that of pr160(Gag/Pol, Vpr and Tat is suppressed early during progressive poliovirus infection. The data presented herein implies that the unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA utilizes both cap-dependent and IRES-dependent translation initiation to supply pr55(Gag for virus assembly and production.

  13. Gonadal and nongonadal mechanisms contribute to the prepubertal hiatus in gonadotropin secretion in the female rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C R; deRidder, C M; Plant, T M

    1995-07-01

    suppressed, and the ovary contributes significantly to the prepubertal restraint on gonadotropin secretion. We also report the serendipitous finding that a precipitous, albeit transient, decline in circulating gonadotropin concentrations occurred in juvenile monkeys after separation from their mothers and relocation to individual cages. This suppression, which was accompanied by elevated plasma cortisol levels, was apparently not related to any impairment in growth.

  14. Contributing Factors for Morbidity and Mortality in Patients with Organophosphate Poisoning on Mechanical Ventilation: A Retrospective Study in a Teaching Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Gurulingappa; Nikhil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most common causes of poisoning in agricultural based developing countries like India is due to Organophosphorus (OP) compound. Its widespread use and easy availability has increased the likelihood of poisoning with these compounds. Aim To study the morbidity and mortality in patients with acute OP poisoning requiring mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study constituting patients of all age groups admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with diagnosis of OP poisoning between January 2015 to December 2015. Of 66 OP poisoning cases those patients who went against medical advice, 20 were excluded from the study and thus 46 patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient’s relatives and presenting symptoms. Demographic data, month of the year, age of patient, mode of poisoning, cholinesterase levels, duration of mechanical ventilation and mortality were recorded. Data are presented as mean±SD. Results A 97.83% (45/46) of cases were suicidal. Out of 46, 9 were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Duration of mechanical ventilation varied from less than 48 hours to more than 7 days. Mortality rate was 50%, 0% and 100% in those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 7 days, 2 to 7 days and poisoning, cholinesterase levels and duration of ventilation were independent predictors of death and all of them contributed to the mortality. Overall mortality rate in those who required mechanical ventilation was 22.22%. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality due to OP poisoning is directly proportional to the age, severity of poisoning and duration of mechanical ventilation and inversely proportional to serum cholinesterase level. PMID:28208980

  15. WE-AB-204-07: Spatiotemporal Distribution of the FDG PET Tracer in Solid Tumors: Contributions of Diffusion and Convection Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, M [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD and KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sefidgar, M [IKI University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazmara, H [KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheikhbahaei, S; Marcus, C; Ashrafinia, S; Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A M [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, a mathematical model is utilized to simulate FDG distribution in tumor tissue. In contrast to conventional compartmental modeling, tracer distributions across space and time are directly linked together (i.e. moving beyond ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to utilizing partial differential equations (PDEs) coupling space and time). The diffusion and convection transport mechanisms are both incorporated to model tracer distribution. We aimed to investigate the contributions of these two mechanisms on FDG distribution for various tumor geometries obtained from PET/CT images. Methods: FDG transport was simulated via a spatiotemporal distribution model (SDM). The model is based on a 5K compartmental model. We model the fact that tracer concentration in the second compartment (extracellular space) is modulated via convection and diffusion. Data from n=45 patients with pancreatic tumors as imaged using clinical FDG PET/CT imaging were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. Tumors with varying shapes and sizes were assessed in order to investigate the effects of convection and diffusion mechanisms on FDG transport. Numerical methods simulating interstitial flow and solute transport in tissue were utilized. Results: We have shown the convection mechanism to depend on the shape and size of tumors whereas diffusion mechanism is seen to exhibit low dependency on shape and size. Results show that concentration distribution of FDG is relatively similar for the considered tumors; and that the diffusion mechanism of FDG transport significantly dominates the convection mechanism. The Peclet number which shows the ratio of convection to diffusion rates was shown to be of the order of 10−{sup 3} for all considered tumors. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that even though convection leads to varying tracer distribution profiles depending on tumor shape and size, the domination of

  16. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eSkjørringe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers i.e. the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCB have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain-iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1 and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters

  17. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain.

  18. Mechanisms contributing to differential regulation of PAX3 downstream target genes in normal human epidermal melanocytes versus melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Danielle; Boyle, Glen M; Ziman, Mel; Medic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug resistant form of skin cancer. It arises from melanocytes, the pigment producing cells of the skin. The formation of these melanocytes is driven by the transcription factor PAX3 early during embryonic development. As a result of alternative splicing, the PAX3 gene gives rise to eight different transcripts which encode isoforms that have different structures and activate different downstream target genes involved in pathways of cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. Furthermore, post-translational modifications have also been shown to alter the functions of PAX3. We previously identified PAX3 downstream target genes in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Here we assessed the effects of PAX3 down-regulation on this panel of target genes in primary melanocytes versus melanoma cells. We show that PAX3 differentially regulates various downstream target genes involved in cell proliferation in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. To determine mechanisms behind this differential downstream target gene regulation, we performed immunoprecipitation to assess post-translational modifications of the PAX3 protein as well as RNAseq to determine PAX3 transcript expression profiles in melanocytes compared to melanoma cells. Although PAX3 was found to be post-translationally modified, there was no qualitative difference in phosphorylation and ubiquitination between melanocytes and melanoma cells, while acetylation of PAX3 was reduced in melanoma cells. Additionally, there were differences in PAX3 transcript expression profiles between melanocytes and melanoma cells. In particular the PAX3E transcript, responsible for reducing melanocyte proliferation and increasing apoptosis, was found to be down-regulated in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. These results suggest that alternate transcript expression profiles activate different downstream target genes leading to the melanoma phenotype.

  19. Contribution of central versus sweat gland mechanisms to the seasonal change of sweating function in young sedentary males and females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Sato, Maki

    2011-03-01

    In summer and winter, young, sedentary male ( N = 5) and female ( N = 7) subjects were exposed to heat in a climate chamber in which ambient temperature (Ta) was raised continuously from 30 to 42°C at a rate of 0.1°C min-1 at a relative humidity of 40%. Sweat rates (SR) were measured continuously on forearm, chest and forehead together with tympanic temperature (Tty), mean skin temperature ( {overline {{T}} {{s}}} ) and mean body temperature ( {overline {{T}} {{b}}} ) . The rate of sweat expulsions (Fsw) was obtained as an indicator of central sudomotor activity. Tty and ( {overline {{T}} {{b}}} ) were significantly lower during summer compared with winter in males; SR was not significantly different between summer and winter in males, but was significantly higher during summer in females; SR during winter was higher in males compared with females. The regression line relating Fsw to ( {overline {{T}} {{b}}} ) shifted significantly from winter to summer in males and females, but the magnitude of the shift was not significantly different between the two subject groups. The regression line relating SR to Fsw was steepened significantly from winter to summer in males and females, and the change in the slope was significantly greater in females than in males. Females showed a lower slope in winter and a similar slope in summer compared to males. It was concluded that sweating function was improved during summer mediated by central sudomotor and sweat gland mechanisms in males and females, and, although the change of sweat gland function from winter to summer was greater in females as compared with males, the level of increased sweat gland function during summer was similar between the two subject groups.

  20. Structures of PHR Domains from Mus musculus Phr1 (Mycbp2) Explain the Loss-of-Function Mutation (Gly1092 → Glu) of the C. elegans Ortholog RPM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Rutter, Marc E.; Gheyi, Tarun; Abrams, Benjamin; Wang, Yingchun; Atwell, Shane; Luz, John G.; Thompson, Devon A.; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher; Jin, Yishi; Klemke, Richard L.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K. (Rutgers); (UCSC); (Lilly); (UCSD)

    2010-11-15

    PHR [PAM (protein associated with Myc)-HIW (Highwire)-RPM-1 (regulator of presynaptic morphology 1)] proteins are conserved, large multi-domain E3 ubiquitin ligases with modular architecture. PHR proteins presynaptically control synaptic growth and axon guidance and postsynaptically regulate endocytosis of glutamate receptors. Dysfunction of neuronal ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. PHR proteins are characterized by the presence of two PHR domains near the N-terminus, which are essential for proper localization and function. Structures of both the first and second PHR domains of Mus musculus (mouse) Phr1 (MYC binding protein 2, Mycbp2) have been determined, revealing a novel {beta} sandwich fold composed of 11 antiparallel {beta}-strands. Conserved loops decorate the apical side of the first PHR domain (MmPHR1), yielding a distinct conserved surface feature. The surface of the second PHR domain (MmPHR2), in contrast, lacks significant conservation. Importantly, the structure of MmPHR1 provides insights into a loss-of-function mutation, Gly1092 {yields} Glu, observed in the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog RPM-1.

  1. Statutory caps: an involuntary contribution to the medical malpractice insurance crisis or a reasonable mechanism for obtaining affordable health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupkovich, P J

    1993-01-01

    A medical malpractice insurance crisis occurred in the mid-1970s and mid-1980s evidenced by escalating malpractice insurance rates and increasing numbers of malpractice claims. Insurance companies maintained that the increase in insurance rates was necessary because of the sharp rise in the number of malpractice lawsuits, astronomical damage awards, and ineffective mechanisms to prevent and to eliminate nonmeritorious claims. Physicians responded by forming their own insurance companies, cancelling high-risk procedures, and orchestrating intensive legislative lobbying for tort reform. Insurance companies, physicians, and the legislature collaborated efforts to resolve this medical malpractice crisis. A national debate erupted regarding the proper way to address the medical malpractice insurance crisis. Insurance companies and physicians pressured state legislatures to reform liability laws that, in their opinion, permitted recovery of excessive damage awards by plaintiffs. Consumer groups and lawyers suggested tighter regulation of the insurance industry. State legislatures, in an attempt to remedy the perception that injured plaintiffs were overcompensated for their injuries, enacted "tort reform legislation," which included statutory caps on damages recoverable in medical malpractice actions. As a result of the extensive lobbying effort by physicians and insurance companies, twenty-seven states enacted statutes limiting recovery of damages in medical malpractice lawsuits. Lawyers responded by challenging state malpractice legislation on constitutional grounds, alleging violations of federal and state equal protection and due process clauses and the Seventh Amendment right to a jury trial. Opponents of the cap also asserted violations of state constitution provisions such as the "open courts" provision or the "special legislation" clause. To date, the state courts have held that statutory caps are unconstitutional. Statutory caps and other tort reform measures are

  2. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain.

  3. Multiple origins of the phenol reaction negative phenotype in foxtail millet, Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv., were caused by independent loss-of-function mutations of the polyphenol oxidase (Si7PPO) gene during domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahiko; Yuo, Takahisa; Ohta, Takeshi; Hitomi, Eriko; Ichitani, Katsuyuki; Kawase, Makoto; Taketa, Shin; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Foxtail millet shows variation in positive phenol color reaction (Phr) and negative Phr in grains, but predominant accessions of this crop are negative reaction type, and the molecular genetic basis of the Phr reaction remains unresolved. In this article, we isolated polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene responsible for Phr using genome sequence information and investigated molecular genetic basis of negative Phr and crop evolution of foxtail millet. First of all, we searched for PPO gene homologs in a foxtail millet genome database using a rice PPO gene as a query and successfully found three copies of the PPO gene. One of the PPO gene homologs on chromosome 7 showed the highest similarity with PPO genes expressed in hulls (grains) of other cereal species including rice, wheat, and barley and was designated as Si7PPO. Phr phenotypes and Si7PPO genotypes completely co-segregated in a segregating population. We also analyzed the genetic variation conferring negative Phr reaction. Of 480 accessions of the landraces investigated, 87 (18.1 %) showed positive Phr and 393 (81.9 %) showed negative Phr. In the 393 Phr negative accessions, three types of loss-of-function Si7PPO gene were predominant and independently found in various locations. One of them has an SNP in exon 1 resulting in a premature stop codon and was designated as stop codon type, another has an insertion of a transposon (Si7PPO-TE1) in intron 2 and was designated as TE1-insertion type, and the other has a 6-bp duplication in exon 3 resulting in the duplication of 2 amino acids and was designated as 6-bp duplication type. As a rare variant of the stop codon type, one accession additionally has an insertion of a transposon, Si7PPO-TE2, in intron 2 and was designated as "stop codon +TE2 insertion type". The geographical distribution of accessions with positive Phr and those with three major types of negative Phr was also investigated. Accessions with positive Phr were found in subtropical and tropical regions at

  4. Insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying mammalian P2X7 receptor functions and contributions in diseases, revealed by structural modeling and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Hua eJiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs, a member of the ionotropic P2X receptor family with distinctive functional properties, play an important part in mediating extracellular ATP signaling in health and disease. A clear delineation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the key receptor properties, such as ATP-binding, ion permeation, and large pore formation of the mammalian P2X7Rs, is still lacking, but such knowledge is crucial for a better understanding of their physiological functions and contributions in diseases and for development of therapeutics. The recent breakthroughs in determining the atomic structures of the zebrafish P2X4.1R in the closed and ATP-bound open states have provided the long-awaited structural information. The human P2RX7 gene is abundant with non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (NS-SNPs, which generate a repertoire of human P2X7Rs with point mutations. Characterizations of the NS-SNPs identified in patients of various disease conditions and the resulting mutations have informed previously unknown molecular mechanisms determining the mammalian P2X7R functions and diseases. In this review, we will discuss the new insights into such mechanisms provided by structural modeling and recent functional and genetic linkage studies of NS-SNPs.

  5. Transgenic Mouse Model of Ventricular Preexcitation and Atrioventricular Reentrant Tachycardia Induced by an AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Loss-of-Function Mutation Responsible for Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Jasvinder S.; Rajawat, Yadavendra S.; Rami, Tapan G.; Gollob, Michael H.; Wang, Zhinong; Yuan, Ruiyong; Marian, A.J.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Weilbacher, Donald; Taffet, George E.; Davies, Joanna K.; Carling, David; Khoury, Dirar S.; Roberts, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background We identified a gene (PRKAG2) that encodes the γ-2 regulatory subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) with a mutation (Arg302Gln) responsible for familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. The human phenotype consists of ventricular preexcitation, conduction abnormalities, and cardiac hypertrophy. Methods and Results To elucidate the molecular basis for the phenotype, transgenic mice were generated by cardiac-restricted expression of the wild-type (TGWT) and mutant(TGR302Q) PRKAG2 gene with the cardiac-specific promoter α-myosin heavy chain. ECG recordings and intracardiac electrophysiology studies demonstrated the TGR302Q mice to have ventricular preexcitation (PR interval 10±2 versus 33±5 ms in TGWT, P<0.05) and a prolonged QRS (20±5 versus 10±1 ms in TGWT, P<0.05). A distinct AV accessory pathway was confirmed by electrical and pharmacological stimulation and substantiated by induction of orthodromic AV reentrant tachycardia. Enzymatic activity of AMPK in the mutant heart was significantly reduced (0.009±0.003 versus 0.025±0.001 nmol · min−1 · g−1 in nontransgenic mice), presumably owing to the mutation disrupting the AMP binding site. Excessive cardiac glycogen was observed. Hypertrophy was confirmed by increases in heart weight (296 versus 140 mg in TGWT) and ventricular wall thickness. Conclusions We have developed a genetic animal model of WPW that expresses a mutation responsible for a familial form of WPW syndrome with a phenotype identical to that of the human, including induction of supraventricular arrhythmia. The defect is due to loss of function of AMPK. Elucidation of the molecular basis should provide insight into development of the cardiac conduction system and accessory pathways. PMID:15611370

  6. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  7. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms contribute to maintain the JAK/STAT pathway aberrantly activated in T-type large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramo, Antonella; Gattazzo, Cristina; Passeri, Francesca; Lico, Albana; Tasca, Giulia; Cabrelle, Anna; Martini, Veronica; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Ave, Elisa; Boscaro, Elisa; Piazza, Francesco; Facco, Monica; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2013-05-09

    The JAK/STAT pathway is altered in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. In all patients, leukemic LGLs display upregulation of phosphorylated STAT3 (P-STAT3) that activates expression of many antiapoptotic genes. To investigate the mechanisms maintaining STAT3 aberrantly phosphorylated using transcriptional protein and functional assays, we analyzed interleukin (IL)-6 and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), 2 key factors of the JAK/STAT pathway that induce and inhibit STAT3 activation, respectively. We showed that IL-6 was highly expressed and released by the patients' peripheral blood LGL-depleted population, accounting for a trans-signaling process. By neutralizing IL-6 or its specific receptor with specific antibodies, a significant reduction of P-STAT3 levels and, consequently, LGL survival was demonstrated. In addition, we found that SOCS3 was down-modulated in LGL and unresponsive to IL-6 stimulation. By treating neoplastic LGLs with a demethylating agent, IL-6-mediated SOCS3 expression was restored with consequent P-STAT3 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 down-modulation. Methylation in the SOCS3 promoter was not detectable, suggesting that an epigenetic inhibition mechanism occurs at a different site. Our data indicate that loss of the inhibitor SOCS3 cooperates with IL-6 to maintain JAK/STAT pathway activation, thus contributing to leukemic LGL survival, and suggest a role of demethylating agents in the treatment of this disorder.

  8. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  9. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Ingraham

    Full Text Available Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  10. Interaction between GPR120 p.R270H loss-of-function variant and dietary fat intake on incident type 2 diabetes risk in the D.E.S.I.R. study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamri, A; Bonnefond, A; Meyre, D; Balkau, B; Roussel, R; Marre, M; Froguel, P; Fumeron, F

    2016-10-01

    GPR120 (encoded by FFAR4) is a lipid sensor that plays an important role in the control of energy balance. GPR120 is activated by long chain fatty acids (FAs) including omega-3 FAs. In humans, the loss of function p.R270H variant of the gene FFAR4 has been associated with a lower protein activity, an increased risk of obesity and higher fasting plasma glucose levels. The aim of this study was to investigate whether p.R270H interacts with dietary fat intake to modulate the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D, 198 incident; 368 prevalent cases) and overweight (787 incident and 2891 prevalent cases) in the prospective D.E.S.I.R. study (n = 5,212, 9 years follow-up). The association of p.R270H with dietary fat and total calories was assessed by linear mixed models. The interaction between p.R270H and dietary fat on T2D and overweight was assessed by logistic regression analysis. The p.R270H variant had a minor allele frequency of 1.45% and was not significantly associated with total calories intake, fat intake or the total calories derived from fat (%). However, there was a significant interaction between p.R270H and dietary fat modulating the incidence of T2D (Pinteraction = 0.02) where the H-carriers had a higher risk of T2D than RR homozygotes in the low fat intake category only. The interaction between p.R270H and fat intake modulating the incidence and prevalence of overweight was not significant. The p.R270H variant of GPR120 modulates the risk of T2D in interaction with dietary fat intake in the D.E.S.I.R. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane microdomain-associated uroplakin IIIa contributes to Src-dependent mechanisms of anti-apoptotic proliferation in human bladder carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kihira

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of p145met/β-subunit of hepatocyte growth factor receptor by epidermal growth factor receptor and Src contributes to the anti-apoptotic growth of human bladder carcinoma cell 5637 under serum-starved conditions. Here, we show that some other cell lines of human bladder carcinoma, but not other types of human cancer cells, also exhibit Src-dependent, anti-apoptotic proliferation under serum-starved conditions, and that low-density, detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains (MD serve as a structural platform for signaling events involving p145met, EGFR, and Src. As an MD-associated molecule that may contribute to bladder carcinoma-specific cellular function, we identified uroplakin IIIa (UPIIIa, an urothelium-specific protein. Results obtained so far revealed: 1 UPIIIa undergoes partial proteolysis in serum-starved cells; 2 a specific antibody to the extracellular domain of UPIIIa inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and the activation of Src, and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells; and 3 knockdown of UPIIIa by short interfering RNA also promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. GM6001, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP, inhibits the proteolysis of UPIIIa and promotes apoptosis in serum-starved cells. Furthermore, serum starvation promotes expression and secretion of the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor in a manner that depends on the functions of MMP, Src, and UPIIIa. These results highlight a hitherto unknown signaling network involving a subset of MD-associated molecules in the anti-apoptotic mechanisms of human bladder carcinoma cells.

  12. Disconnection mechanism and regional cortical atrophy contribute to impaired processing of facial expressions and theory of mind in multiple sclerosis: a structural MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mike

    Full Text Available Successful socialization requires the ability of understanding of others' mental states. This ability called as mentalization (Theory of Mind may become deficient and contribute to everyday life difficulties in multiple sclerosis. We aimed to explore the impact of brain pathology on mentalization performance in multiple sclerosis. Mentalization performance of 49 patients with multiple sclerosis was compared to 24 age- and gender matched healthy controls. T1- and T2-weighted three-dimensional brain MRI images were acquired at 3Tesla from patients with multiple sclerosis and 18 gender- and age matched healthy controls. We assessed overall brain cortical thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis and the scanned healthy controls, and measured the total and regional T1 and T2 white matter lesion volumes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Performances in tests of recognition of mental states and emotions from facial expressions and eye gazes correlated with both total T1-lesion load and regional T1-lesion load of association fiber tracts interconnecting cortical regions related to visual and emotion processing (genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus. Both of these tests showed correlations with specific cortical areas involved in emotion recognition from facial expressions (right and left fusiform face area, frontal eye filed, processing of emotions (right entorhinal cortex and socially relevant information (left temporal pole. Thus, both disconnection mechanism due to white matter lesions and cortical thinning of specific brain areas may result in cognitive deficit in multiple sclerosis affecting emotion and mental state processing from facial expressions and contributing to everyday and social life difficulties of these patients.

  13. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  14. Female-driven mechanisms, ejaculate size and quality contribute to the lower fertility of sex-ratio distorter males in Drosophila simulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montchamp-Moreau Catherine

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex-ratio meiotic drive refers to the preferential transmission of the X chromosome by XY males. The loss of Y-bearing sperm is caused by an X-linked distorter and results in female-biased progeny. The fertility of sex-ratio (SR males expressing the distorter is usually strongly reduced compared to wild-type males, especially when they are in competition. The aim of this study was to identify the post-copulatory mechanisms that lower the fertility of SR males in Drosophila simulans. Parameters contributing to male fertility were measured in single and double mating conditions. Results The most detrimental effect on SR males fertility is due to the size of their ejaculate which is half that of wild-type males. Sperm viability and sperm use by the females are also reduced. Sex-ratio males are poor sperm competitors in both offence and defence. We found evidence for sperm release from the female reproductive tract that specifically affects SR males. It results in the removal of stored sperm from a first SR mate without the action of the sperm of the second male. In addition, females mated once with an SR male remate more frequently with wild-type males. Conclusion The paternity reduction of SR males in competitive conditions is greater than that attributable to their low sperm production and could prevent the spread of distorter X chromosomes in populations when multiple mating occur. The female-driven mechanisms are shown to play a major role both throughout the post-copulatory selective process and increased polyandry. The variation in male reproductive performance may drive the evolution of sexual learning capability of females.

  15. p16(INK4a suppression by glucose restriction contributes to human cellular lifespan extension through SIRT1-mediated epigenetic and genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    Full Text Available Although caloric restriction (CR has been shown to increase lifespan in various animal models, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been revealed. We developed an in vitro system to mimic CR by reducing glucose concentration in cell growth medium which excludes metabolic factors and allows assessment of the effects of CR at the cellular and molecular level. We monitored cellular proliferation of normal WI-38, IMR-90 and MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction (GR can inhibit cellular senescence and significantly extend cellular lifespan compared with cells receiving normal glucose (NG in the culture medium. Moreover, GR decreased expression of p16(INK4a (p16, a well-known senescence-related gene, in all of the tested cell lines. Over-expressed p16 resulted in early replicative senescence in glucose-restricted cells suggesting a crucial role of p16 regulation in GR-induced cellular lifespan extension. The decreased expression of p16 was partly due to GR-induced chromatin remodeling through effects on histone acetylation and methylation of the p16 promoter. GR resulted in an increased expression of SIRT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, which has positive correlation with CR-induced longevity. The elevated SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of the Akt/p70S6K1 signaling pathway in response to GR. Furthermore, knockdown of SIRT1 abolished GR-induced p16 repression as well as Akt/p70S6K1 activation implying that SIRT1 may affect p16 repression through direct deacetylation effects and indirect regulation of Akt/p70S6K1 signaling. Collectively, these results provide new insights into interactions between epigenetic and genetic mechanisms on CR-induced longevity that may contribute to anti-aging approaches and also provide a general molecular model for studying CR in vitro in mammalian systems.

  16. Hypoxia-Mediated Down-Regulation of Bid and Bax in Tumors Occurs via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms and Contributes to Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Janine T.; Cawthorne, Christopher J.; Williams, Kaye J.; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradley G.; Wilson, Clare; Miller, Crispin; Demonacos, Costas; Stratford, Ian J.; Dive, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    Solid tumors with disorganized, insufficient blood supply contain hypoxic cells that are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drug resistance, an obstacle to curative treatment of solid tumors, can occur via suppression of apoptosis, a process controlled by pro- and antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 protein family. Oxygen deprivation of human colon cancer cells in vitro provoked decreased mRNA and protein levels of proapoptotic Bid and Bad. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) was dispensable for the down-regulation of Bad but required for that of Bid, consistent with the binding of HIF-1α to a hypoxia-responsive element (positions −8484 to −8475) in the bid promoter. Oxygen deprivation resulted in proteosome-independent decreased expression of Bax in vitro, consistent with a reduction in global translation efficiency. The physiological relevance of Bid and Bax down-regulation was confirmed in tumors in vivo. Oxygen deprivation resulted in decreased drug-induced apoptosis and clonogenic resistance to agents with different mechanisms of action. The contribution of Bid and/or Bax down-regulation to drug responsiveness was demonstrated by the relative resistance of normoxic cells that had no or reduced expression of Bid and/or Bax and by the finding that forced expression of Bid in hypoxic cells resulted in increased sensitivity to the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide. PMID:15024076

  17. Mechanism of pluronic effect on P-glycoprotein efflux system in blood-brain barrier: contributions of energy depletion and membrane fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakova, E V; Li, S; Vinogradov, S V; Alakhov, V Y; Miller, D W; Kabanov, A V

    2001-11-01

    Pluronic block copolymer, P85, inhibits the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux system and increases the permeability of a broad spectrum of drugs in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This study examines the mechanisms by which P85 inhibits Pgp using bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMEC) as an in vitro model of the BBB. The hypothesis was that simultaneous alterations in intracellular ATP levels and membrane fluidization in BBMEC monolayers by P85 results in inhibition of the drug efflux system. The methods included the use of 1) standard Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 to assay the Pgp efflux system in BBMEC, 2) luciferin/luciferase assay for ATP intracellular levels, and 3) 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene for membrane microviscosity. Using 3H-labeled P85 and fluorescein-labeled P85 for confocal microscopy, this study suggests that P85 accumulates in the cells and intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria where it can interfere with metabolic processes. Following exposure of BBMEC to P85, the ATP levels were depleted, and microviscosity of the cell membranes was decreased. Furthermore, P85 treatment decreased Pgp ATPase activity in membranes expressing human Pgp. A combination of experiments examining the kinetics, concentration dependence, and directionality of P85 effects on Pgp-mediated efflux in BBMEC monolayers suggests that both energy depletion (decreasing ATP pool available for Pgp) and membrane fluidization (inhibiting Pgp ATPase activity) are critical factors contributing to the activity of the block copolymer in the BBB.

  18. Contribution of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) Collagen IV to the Mechanical Properties of the Glomerular Basement Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a vital part of the blood-urine filtration barrier in the kidneys. In healthy GBMs, the main tension-resisting component is alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) type IV collagen, but in some diseases it is replaced by other collagen IV isoforms. As a result, the GBM becomes leaky and disorganized, ultimately resulting in kidney failure. Our goal is to understanding the biomechanical aspects of the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains and how their absence could be responsible for (1) the initial injury to the GBM and (2) progression to kidney failure. A combination of experiments and computational models were designed for that purpose. A model basement membrane was used to compare experimentally the distensibility of tissues with the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains present and missing. The experiments showed basement membranes containing alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains were less distensible. It has been postulated that the higher level of lateral cross-linking (supercoiling) in the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks contributes additional strength/stability to basement membranes. In a computational model of supercoiled networks, we found that supercoiling greatly increased the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreased the permeability, which is well suited for the needs of the GBM. It is also known that the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks are more protected from enzymatic degradation, and we explored their significance in GBM remodeling. Our simulations showed that the more protected network was needed to prevent the system from entering a dangerous feedback cycle due to autoregulation mechanisms in the kidneys. Overall, the work adds to the evidence of biomechanical differences between the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks and other collagen IV networks, points to supercoiling as the main source of biomechanical differences, discusses the suitability of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV

  19. Bidirectional binding property of high glycine-tyrosine keratin-associated protein contributes to the mechanical strength and shape of hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Ryo; Abe, Ryota; Ishii, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Kiyoshi, Masato; Nöcker, Bernd; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2013-09-01

    Since their first finding in wool 50years ago, keratin-associated proteins (KAPs), which are classified into three groups; high sulfur (HS) KAPs, ultra high sulfur (UHS) KAPs, and high glycine-tyrosine (HGT) KAPs, have been the target of curiosity for scientists due to their characteristic amino acid sequences. While HS and UHS KAPs are known to function in disulfide bond crosslinking, the function of HGT KAPs remains unknown. To clarify the function as well as the binding partners of HGT KAPs, we prepared KAP8.1 and other KAP family proteins, the trichocyte intermediate filament proteins (IFP) K85 and K35, the head domain of K85, and the C subdomain of desmoplakin C-terminus (DPCT-C) and investigated the interactions between them in vitro. Western blot analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicate that KAP8.1 binds to the head domain of K85, which is helically aligned around the axis of the intermediate filament (IF). From these results and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of bundled filament complex in vitro, we propose that the helical arrangement of IFs found in the orthocortex, which is uniquely distributed on the convex fiber side of the hair, is regulated by KAP8.1. Structure-dependent binding of DPCT-C to trichocyte IFP was confirmed by Western blotting, ITC, and circular dichroism. Moreover, DPCT-C also binds to some HGT KAPs. It is probable that such bidirectional binding property of HGT KAPs contribute to the mechanical robustness of hair.

  20. Molecular medicine of fragile X syndrome: based on known molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ling-Qian; Duan, Ran-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Extensive research on fragile X mental retardation gene knockout mice and mutant Drosophila models has largely expanded our knowledge on mechanism-based treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In light of these findings, several clinical trials are now underway for therapeutic translation to humans. Electronic literature searches were conducted using the PubMed database and ClinicalTrials.gov. The search terms included "fragile X syndrome", "FXS and medication", "FXS and therapeutics" and "FXS and treatment". Based on the publications identified in this search, we reviewed the neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS patients and the potential pathogenic mechanisms to monitor the progress of FXS research, from basic studies to clinical trials. The pathological mechanisms of FXS were categorized on the basis of neuroanatomy, synaptic structure, synaptic transmission and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) loss of function. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS were described to motivate extensive research into the region-specific pathologies in the brain responsible for FXS behavioural manifestations. Mechanism-directed molecular medicines were classified according to their target pathological mechanisms, and the most recent progress in clinical trials was discussed. Current mechanism-based studies and clinical trials have greatly contributed to the development of FXS pharmacological therapeutics. Research examining the extent to which these treatments provided a rescue effect or FMRP compensation for the developmental impairments in FXS patients may help to improve the efficacy of treatments.

  1. 健康老年人功能状态丧失相关因素分析%Correlative factor analysis of loss of functional status in healthy elderly people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项建民

    2005-01-01

    关.老年人正常功能状态与社会支持、经济状况、心理和精神状态有关.%BACKGROUND: Health status of elderly people is an important problem concerned by the whole society. To find the way of preventing loss of functional status of daily life for elderly people is the key to generally improving the quality of life in elderly people.OBJECTIVE: To observe the main characteristics of function loss in healthy elderly people and analyze the influencing factors of the change of functional indexes in elderly people in normal functional status.DESIGN: Contrast observation; Logistic analysis.SETTING: Student's Office, Shangrao Normal College.PARTICIPANTS: All the data were from the sampling questionnaire survey on health status of 1 700 people including retired cadres and employees from 11 cities of Jiangxi province. The survey was conducted by Senile Physical Education Association of Jiangxi Province in January 2004.METHODS: The test was performed depending on 4 indexes in physical self-maintenance scale including dressing, taking food, bathing and toileting along with other indexes of shopping, calling, riding, going upstairs to the third floor, walking for 1 000 m, taking things by fingers and squatting & standing. These 11 indexes were used for evaluating the functional status of daily life in elderly people. According to international definition,people with difficulty in one or more indexes could be defined as ability loss of self-cave in daily life. The participants were demanded to give the score of difficulty in independently completing each activity including not difficult (1), somewhat difficult (2), very difficult (3), completely impossible (4). The total sum of 11 scores was defined as functional status index of daily life. Its value reflected the whole situation of functional status of daily life in elderly people. The higher the index was, the worse the functional status was. Comparison was conducted among groups of different gender and age

  2. Sim1a and Arnt2 contribute to hypothalamo-spinal axon guidance by regulating Robo2 activity via a Robo3-dependent mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schweitzer, Jörn; Löhr, Heiko; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Hübscher, Katrin; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    .... Although Netrin/Dcc- and Robo/Slit-mediated attractive and repulsive guidance of commissural axons have been extensively studied, little is known about mechanisms controlling mediolateral positioning...

  3. Left ventricular beat-to-beat performance in atrial fibrillation: Contribution of Frank-Starling mechanism after short rather than long intervals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, A.T.M.; Blanksma, P.K.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gelder, I.C. van; Kam, P.J. de; Hillege, H.L.; Niemeijer, M.G.; Lie, K.I.; Meijler, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate control mechanisms of the varying left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by a randomly irregular ventricular response, resulting in continuous variation in left ventricular beat-to-beat mechanical behavior and hemodynam

  4. Contribution to the study of the sintering mechanisms of uranium powders in the {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} phases; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de frittage de poudre d'uranium en phases {alpha}, {beta}, et {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinteau, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    This study of the sintering mechanisms of uranium powders prepared by calci-thermy has been effected using continuous dilatometric measurements of the shrinkage of samples previously compressed at room temperature in purified argon gas. The tests carried out in the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} phases have led to the observation that the first step of the sintering appears to be governed by a volume self-diffusion mechanism; the activation heat values found for the sintering mechanisms are close to those deduced during studies of volume self-diffusion using the direct radio-tracer method. Furthermore it has been possible to show that in the {gamma} domain a second sintering mechanism occurs involving much longer sintering times; the heats of activation are much lower and this appears to indicate that there occurs a mechanism involving pore elimination by grain boundary diffusion of the vacancies. Furthermore, the dilatometric tests have shown the simultaneous influence of two important parameters in this work: grain boundaries and the diffusion coefficients. In the second part of the report are given results concerning the examination of sintered samples by various methods with a view to elucidating their structure and some of their physical properties. In this way it has been possible, by carrying out metallographic examinations after etching by ionic bombardment, to determine the changes in the porosity of the three phases {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}, as well as the structure and the nature of the inclusions in each sample. Density and porosity measurements have also been carried out. The variations in these two sets of results make it possible to confirm the preceding dilatometric end micro-graphic examinations. Finally a detailed dilatometric study of the samples sintered in the {gamma} phase has shown the effect of oxide layers, associated with the existence of porosity, on the amplitudes and temperatures of the allotropic transformations, these latter being

  5. LEFT-VENTRICULAR BEAT-TO-BEAT PERFORMANCE IN ATRIAL-FIBRILLATION - CONTRIBUTION OF FRANK-STARLING MECHANISM AFTER SHORT RATHER THAN LONG RR INTERVALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOSSELINK, ATM; BLANKSMA, PK; CRIJNS, HJGM; VANGELDER, IC; DEKAM, PJ; HILLEGE, HL; NIEMEIJER, MG; LIE, KI; MEIJLER, FL

    1995-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to evaluate control mechanisms of the varying left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation. Background. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by a randomly irregular ventricular response, resulting in continuous variation in left ventricular beat-to-beat mechanica

  6. The old with the die. A contribution to metaphysics of quantum mechanics; Der Alte mit dem Wuerfel. Ein Beitrag zur Metaphysik der Quantenmechanik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ijjas, Anna

    2011-07-01

    Since the rise of quantum mechanics also their ideological implications and consequences were discussed. Meanwhile still scarcely a metaphysical problem exists, which was not supposedly solved under calling on quantum theory. Anna Ijjas inquires the usual practice and developes a new model of the assignment of quantum mechanics and metaphysics. She discusses both the physical foundations and the classical philosophical controversies, before she draws consequencies for the relation determination of brain and consciousness, the problem of freedom of will, as well as for the question of the influence of God in the world.

  7. Identification of common mechanisms by which human and mouse cytomegalovirus seven-transmembrane receptor homologues contribute to in vivo phenotypes in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2013-01-01

    The mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue (CKR) M33 is required for salivary gland tropism and efficient reactivation from latency, phenotypes partially rescued by the human cytomegalovirus CKR US28. Herein, we demonstrate that complementation of salivary gland tropism is mediated...... predominantly by G protein-dependent signaling conserved with that of M33; in contrast, both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways contribute to the latency phenotypes. A novel M33-dependent replication phenotype in cultured bone marrow macrophages is also described....

  8. Zebrafish models for nemaline myopathy reveal a spectrum of nemaline bodies contributing to reduced muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztal, Tamar E; Zhao, Mo; Williams, Caitlin; Oorschot, Viola; Parslow, Adam C; Giousoh, Aminah; Yuen, Michaela; Hall, Thomas E; Costin, Adam; Ramm, Georg; Bird, Phillip I; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M; Stemple, Derek L; Currie, Peter D; Cooper, Sandra T; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness and the presence of rod-like (nemaline) bodies. The genetic etiology of nemaline myopathy is becoming increasingly understood with mutations in ten genes now known to cause the disease. Despite this, the mechanism by which skeletal muscle weakness occurs remains elusive, with previous studies showing no correlation between the frequency of nemaline bodies and disease severity. To investigate the formation of nemaline bodies and their role in pathogenesis, we generated overexpression and loss-of-function zebrafish models for skeletal muscle α-actin (ACTA1) and nebulin (NEB). We identify three distinct types of nemaline bodies and visualize their formation in vivo, demonstrating these nemaline bodies not only exhibit different subcellular origins, but also have distinct pathological consequences within the skeletal muscle. One subtype is highly dynamic and upon breakdown leads to the accumulation of cytoplasmic actin contributing to muscle weakness. Examination of a Neb-deficient model suggests this mechanism may be common in nemaline myopathy. Another subtype results from a reduction of actin and forms a more stable cytoplasmic body. In contrast, the final type originates at the Z-disk and is associated with myofibrillar disorganization. Analysis of zebrafish and muscle biopsies from ACTA1 nemaline myopathy patients demonstrates that nemaline bodies also possess a different protein signature. In addition, we show that the ACTA1(D286G) mutation causes impaired actin incorporation and localization in the sarcomere. Together these data provide a novel examination of nemaline body origins and dynamics in vivo and identifies pathological changes that correlate with muscle weakness.

  9. Mechanisms of Physical Activity Limitation in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vogiatzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients’ quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  10. Suspended sediment load and mechanical erosion in the Senegal Basin — Estimation of the surface runoff concentration and relative contributions of channel and slope erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Z.; Gac, J. Y.; Probst, J. L.

    1987-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to propose a method to better understand the suspended sediment dynamics in the Senegal Basin, and the behaviour of the river particulate load at Bakel gauging station (218,000 km 2) during the period 1979-1984. The method is based on the estimation of surface discharge using a simple hydrological model which allows separation of the different flow components of the annual hydrograph. Then the suspended sediment loads can be correlated with the surface discharge. During the study period, the mean annual flow (330 m 3s -1) represented only 46% of the mean long-term flow (1903-1984), and the mean yearly particulate load carried by the Senegal River was about 1.9 million tons. Two approaches are used to estimate the different contributions to the river's suspended sediment transport. The main contribution originates from slope erosion, which supplies 50-80% of the total sediment transport and the second originates from channel erosion. The suspended sediment concentration in the surface runoff, primarily calculated by a global annual method, ranges from 0.9 to 1.6 gl -1 and averages 1.3 gl -1. After correction for channel erosion input, this concentration is reduced to 1.1 gl -1.

  11. In-vivo quantitative proteomics reveals a key contribution of post-transcriptional mechanisms to the circadian regulation of liver metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Robles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators that drive the rhythmic expression of a broad array of genes, orchestrating metabolism and physiology. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play essential roles in modulating temporal gene expression for proper circadian function, particularly for the molecular mechanism of the clock. Due to technical limitations in large-scale, quantitative protein measurements, it remains unresolved to what extent the circadian clock regulates metabolism by driving rhythms of protein abundance. Therefore, we aimed to identify global circadian oscillations of the proteome in the mouse liver by applying in vivo SILAC mouse technology in combination with state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the 3000 proteins accurately quantified across two consecutive cycles, 6% showed circadian oscillations with a defined phase of expression. Interestingly, daily rhythms of one fifth of the liver proteins were not accompanied by changes at the transcript level. The oscillations of almost half of the cycling proteome were delayed by more than six hours with respect to the corresponding, rhythmic mRNA. Strikingly we observed that the length of the time lag between mRNA and protein cycles varies across the day. Our analysis revealed a high temporal coordination in the abundance of proteins involved in the same metabolic process, such as xenobiotic detoxification. Apart from liver specific metabolic pathways, we identified many other essential cellular processes in which protein levels are under circadian control, for instance vesicle trafficking and protein folding. Our large-scale proteomic analysis reveals thus that circadian post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play a key role in the temporal orchestration of liver metabolism and physiology.

  12. Two different motor learning mechanisms contribute to learning reaching movements in a rotated visual environment [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Way Tong Chu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Practice of movement in virtual-reality and other artificially altered environments has been proposed as a method for rehabilitation following neurological injury and for training new skills in healthy humans.  For such training to be useful, there must be transfer of learning from the artificial environment to the performance of desired skills in the natural environment.  Therefore an important assumption of such methods is that practice in the altered environment engages the same learning and plasticity mechanisms that are required for skill performance in the natural environment.  We test the hypothesis that transfer of learning may fail because the learning and plasticity mechanism that adapts to the altered environment is different from the learning mechanism required for improvement of motor skill.  In this paper, we propose that a model that separates skill learning and environmental adaptation is necessary to explain the learning and aftereffects that are observed in virtual reality experiments.  In particular, we studied the condition where practice in the altered environment should lead to correct skill performance in the original environment. Our 2-mechanism model predicts that aftereffects will still be observed when returning to the original environment, indicating a lack of skill transfer from the artificial environment to the original environment. To illustrate the model prediction, we tested 10 healthy participants on the interaction between a simple overlearned motor skill (straight hand movements to targets in different directions and an artificially altered visuomotor environment (rotation of visual feedback of the results of movement.  As predicted by the models, participants show adaptation to the altered environment and after-effects on return to the baseline environment even when practice in the altered environment should have led to correct skill performance.  The presence of aftereffect under all conditions that

  13. Mechanisms of sustained high firing rates in two classes of vestibular nucleus neurons: differential contributions of resurgent Na, Kv3, and BK currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittis, Aryn H; Moghadam, Setareh H; du Lac, Sascha

    2010-09-01

    To fire at high rates, neurons express ionic currents that work together to minimize refractory periods by ensuring that sodium channels are available for activation shortly after each action potential. Vestibular nucleus neurons operate around high baseline firing rates and encode information with bidirectional modulation of firing rates up to several hundred Hz. To determine the mechanisms that enable these neurons to sustain firing at high rates, ionic currents were measured during firing by using the action potential clamp technique in vestibular nucleus neurons acutely dissociated from transgenic mice. Although neurons from the YFP-16 line fire at rates higher than those from the GIN line, both classes of neurons express Kv3 and BK currents as well as both transient and resurgent Na currents. In the fastest firing neurons, Kv3 currents dominated repolarization at all firing rates and minimized Na channel inactivation by rapidly transitioning Na channels from the open to the closed state. In slower firing neurons, BK currents dominated repolarization at the highest firing rates and sodium channel availability was protected by a resurgent blocking mechanism. Quantitative differences in Kv3 current density across neurons and qualitative differences in immunohistochemically detected expression of Kv3 subunits could account for the difference in firing range within and across cell classes. These results demonstrate how divergent firing properties of two neuronal populations arise through the interplay of at least three ionic currents.

  14. NADP-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis Roots Contributes in the Mechanism of Defence against the Nitro-Oxidative Stress Induced by Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B.; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    NADPH regeneration appears to be essential in the mechanism of plant defence against oxidative stress. Plants contain several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases including isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), and malic enzyme (ME). In Arabidopsis seedlings grown under salinity conditions (100 mM NaCl) the analysis of physiological parameters, antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) and content of superoxide radical (O2   ∙−), nitric oxide (NO), and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) indicates a process of nitro-oxidative stress induced by NaCl. Among the analysed NADPH-generating dehydrogenases under salinity conditions, the NADP-ICDH showed the maximum activity mainly attributable to the root NADP-ICDH. Thus, these data provide new insights on the relevance of the NADP-ICDH which could be considered as a second barrier in the mechanism of response against the nitro-oxidative stress generated by salinity. PMID:22649311

  15. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7-14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  16. The mechanisms underlying sexual differentiation of behavior and physiology in mammals and birds: relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko eMaekawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From a classical viewpoint, sex-specific behavior and physiological functions as well as the brain structures of mammals such as rats and mice, have been thought to be influenced by perinatal sex steroids secreted by the gonads. Sex steroids have also been thought to affect the differentiation of the sex-typical behavior of a few members of the avian order Galliformes, including the Japanese quail and chickens, during their development in ovo. However, recent mammalian studies that focused on the artificial shuffling or knockout of the sex-determining gene, Sry, have revealed that sex chromosomal effects may be associated with particular types of sex-linked differences such as aggression levels, social interaction, and autoimmune diseases, independently of sex steroid-mediated effects. In addition, studies on naturally occurring, rare phenomena such as gynandromorphic birds and experimentally constructed chimeras in which the composition of sex chromosomes in the brain differs from that in the other parts of the body, indicated that sex chromosomes play certain direct roles in the sex-specific differentiation of the gonads and the brain. In this article, we review the relative contributions of sex steroids and sex chromosomes in the determination of brain functions related to sexual behavior and reproductive physiology in mammals and birds.

  17. Sharpened cortical tuning and enhanced cortico-cortical communication contribute to the long-term neural mechanisms of visual motion perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nihong; Bi, Taiyong; Zhou, Tiangang; Li, Sheng; Liu, Zili; Fang, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Much has been debated about whether the neural plasticity mediating perceptual learning takes place at the sensory or decision-making stage in the brain. To investigate this, we trained human subjects in a visual motion direction discrimination task. Behavioral performance and BOLD signals were measured before, immediately after, and two weeks after training. Parallel to subjects' long-lasting behavioral improvement, the neural selectivity in V3A and the effective connectivity from V3A to IPS (intraparietal sulcus, a motion decision-making area) exhibited a persistent increase for the trained direction. Moreover, the improvement was well explained by a linear combination of the selectivity and connectivity increases. These findings suggest that the long-term neural mechanisms of motion perceptual learning are implemented by sharpening cortical tuning to trained stimuli at the sensory processing stage, as well as by optimizing the connections between sensory and decision-making areas in the brain.

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the expression of immune related genes in the livers of dairy cows fed a high concentrate diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Chang

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications critically regulate the expression of immune-related genes in response to inflammatory stimuli. It has been extensively reported that a high concentrate (HC diet can trigger systemic inflammation in dairy cows, yet it is unclear whether epigenetic regulation is involved in the expression of immune genes in the livers of dairy cows. This study aimed to investigate the impact of epigenetic modifications on the expression of immune-related genes.In eight mid-lactating cows, we installed a rumen cannula and catheters of the portal and hepatic veins. Cows were randomly assigned to either the treatment group fed a high concentrate (HC diet (60% concentrate + 40% forage, n = 4 or a control group fed a low concentrate (LC diet (40% concentrate + 60% forage, n = 4.After 10 weeks of feeding, the rumen pH was reduced, and levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the rumen, and portal and hepatic veins were notably increased in the HC group compared with the LC group. The expression levels of detected immune response-related genes, including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, cytokines, chemokines, and acute phase proteins, were significantly up-regulated in the livers of cows fed a HC diet. Chromatin loosening at the promoter region of four candidate immune-related genes (TLR4, LPS-binding protein, haptoglobin, and serum amyloid A3 was elicited, and was strongly correlated with enhanced expression of these genes in the HC group. Demethylation at the promoter region of all four candidate immune-related genes was accompanied by chromatin decompaction.After HC diet feeding, LPS derived from the digestive tract translocated to the liver via the portal vein, enhancing hepatic immune gene expression. The up-regulation of these immune genes was mediated by epigenetic mechanisms, which involve chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Our findings suggest that modulating epigenetic mechanisms could provide novel ways to treat systemic inflammatory

  19. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  20. Contribution of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient conditions to Fe-removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Kasturiarachchi, Jagath C; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2008-05-01

    Severe contamination of water resources including groundwater with iron (Fe) due to various anthropogenic activities has been a major environmental problem in industrial areas of Sri Lanka. Hence, the use of the obnoxious weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) in constructed wetlands (floating aquatic macrophyte-based plant treatment systems) to phytoremediate Fe-rich wastewaters seems to be an appealing option. Although several studies have documented that hyacinths are good metal-accumulating plants none of these studies have documented the ability of this plant grown under different nutrient conditions to remove heavy metals from wastewaters. This paper, therefore, reports the phytoremediation efficiencies of water hyacinth grown under different nutrient conditions for Fe-rich wastewaters in batch-type constructed wetlands. This study was conducted for 15 weeks after 1-week acclimatization by culturing young water hyacinth plants (average height of 20+/-2cm) in 590L capacity fiberglass tanks under different nutrient concentrations of 1-fold [28 and 7.7mg/L of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP), respectively], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold with synthetic wastewaters containing 9.27Femg/L. Another set-up of hyacinths containing only Fe as a heavy metal but without any nutrients (i.e., 0-fold) was also studied. A mass balance was carried out to investigate the phytoremediation efficiencies and to determine the different mechanisms governing Fe removal from the wastewaters. Fe removal was largely due to phytoremediation mainly through the process of rhizofiltration and chemical precipitation of Fe2O3 and FeOH3 followed by flocculation and sedimentation. However, chemical precipitation was more significant especially during the first 3 weeks of the study. Plants grown in the 0-fold set-up showed the highest phytoremediation efficiency of 47% during optimum growth at the 6th week with a highest accumulation of 6707Femg/kg dry

  1. Contribution to crack sizing by phased array ultrasonic techniques: part 2: comparison with optical, magnetic particles, fracture mechanics and metallography for last significant crack tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P. [Ontario Power Generation, Inc., Pickering, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-11-15

    The paper presents phased array results for 1-D linear array probes of high frequency (7-10 MHz) in L-, and S-waves for detecting the crack shape and the last significant tip. Fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks with height ranging from 1.6 mm to 20.4 mm were detected in welded samples, piping welds and straight bars with thickness between 1.6 mm to 38 mm. The results of S-scan display are compared with different methods: optical, magnetic particles, fracture mechanics and metallography. The experimental results concluded the undersizing trend of PAUT in detecting the last crack tip or closure, in spite of using dynamic depth focusing, and/or focusing on crack tip. The average undersizing error is - 0.4 mm. This error increases for cracks with depth >12 mm. The largest errors occur when the crack is sized from outer surface coupled with initiation from the outside surface with propagation towards the inside surface. These errors were reduced by a combination of shear and longitudinal waves and by increasing the angular resolution. (author)

  2. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field, Tarim Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU BingSong; DONG HaiLiang; RUAN Zhuang

    2008-01-01

    This study is undertaken to understand how calcite precipitation and dissolution contributes to depth-related changes in porosity and permeability of gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Kela 2 gas field of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China. Sandstone samples and pore water samples are collected from well KL201 in the Tarim Basin. Vertical profiles of porosity, permeability, pore water chemistry, and the relative volume abundance of calcite/dolomite are constructed from 3600 to 4000 m below the ground surface within major oil and gas reservoir rocks. Porosity and permeability values are inversely correlated with the calcite abundance, indicating that calcite dissolution and precipitation may be controlling porosity and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Pore water chemistry exhibits a systematic variation from the Na2SO4 type at the shallow depth (3600-3630 m), to the NaHCO3 type at the intermediate depth (3630-3695 m), and to the CaCl2 type at the greater depth (3728-3938 m). The geochemical factors that control the calcite solubility include pH, temperature, pressure, Ca2+ concentration, the total inorganic carbon concentration (∑CO2), and the type of pore water. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium and mass conservation laws are applied to calculate the calcite saturation state as a function of a few key parameters. The model calculation illustrates that the calcite solubility is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of pore water, mainly the concentration difference between the total dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved calcium concentration (i.e., [ΣCO2]-[Ca2+]). In the Na2SO4 water at the shallow depth, this index is close to 0, pore water is near the calcite solubility. Calcite does not dissolve or precipitate in significant quantities. In the NaHCO3 water at the intermediate depth, this index is greater than 0, and pore water is supersaturated with respect to calcite. Massive calcite precipitation was observed at this depth interval and

  3. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contributions to a neurophysiology of meaning: the interpretation of written messages could be an automatic stimulus-reaction mechanism before becoming conscious processing of information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Maffei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even though the interpretation of natural language messages is generally conceived as the result of a conscious processing of the message content, the influence of unconscious factors is also well known. What is still insufficiently known is the way such factors work. We have tackled interpretation assuming it is a process, whose basic features are the same for the whole humankind, and employing a naturalistic approach (careful observation of phenomena in conditions the closest to “natural” ones, and precise description before and independently of data statistical analysis.Methodology. Our field research involved a random sample of 102 adults. We presented them with a complete real world-like case of written communication using unabridged message texts. We collected data (participants’ written reports on their interpretations in controlled conditions through a specially designed questionnaire (closed and opened answers; then, we treated it through qualitative and quantitative methods.Principal Findings. We gathered some evidence that, in written message interpretation, between reading and the attribution of conscious meaning, an intermediate step could exist (we named it “disassembling” which looks like an automatic reaction to the text words/expressions. Thus, the process of interpretation would be a discontinuous sequence of three steps having different natures: the initial “decoding” step (i.e., reading, which requires technical abilities, disassembling (the automatic reaction, an unconscious passage and the final conscious attribution of meaning. If this is true, words and expressions would firstly function like physical stimuli, before being taken into account as symbols. Such hypothesis, once confirmed, could help explaining some links between the cultural (human communication and the biological (stimulus-reaction mechanisms as the basis for meanings dimension of humankind.

  5. Contributions to a neurophysiology of meaning: the interpretation of written messages could be an automatic stimulus-reaction mechanism before becoming conscious processing of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Roberto; Convertini, Livia S; Quatraro, Sabrina; Ressa, Stefania; Velasco, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Even though the interpretation of natural language messages is generally conceived as the result of a conscious processing of the message content, the influence of unconscious factors is also well known. What is still insufficiently known is the way such factors work. We have tackled interpretation assuming it is a process, whose basic features are the same for the whole humankind, and employing a naturalistic approach (careful observation of phenomena in conditions the closest to "natural" ones, and precise description before and independently of data statistical analysis). Methodology. Our field research involved a random sample of 102 adults. We presented them with a complete real world-like case of written communication using unabridged message texts. We collected data (participants' written reports on their interpretations) in controlled conditions through a specially designed questionnaire (closed and opened answers); then, we treated it through qualitative and quantitative methods. Principal Findings. We gathered some evidence that, in written message interpretation, between reading and the attribution of conscious meaning, an intermediate step could exist (we named it "disassembling") which looks like an automatic reaction to the text words/expressions. Thus, the process of interpretation would be a discontinuous sequence of three steps having different natures: the initial "decoding" step (i.e., reading, which requires technical abilities), disassembling (the automatic reaction, an unconscious passage) and the final conscious attribution of meaning. If this is true, words and expressions would firstly function like physical stimuli, before being taken into account as symbols. Such hypothesis, once confirmed, could help explaining some links between the cultural (human communication) and the biological (stimulus-reaction mechanisms as the basis for meanings) dimension of humankind.

  6. Potential Contribution of Antioxidant Mechanism in the Defensive Effect of Lycopene Against Partial Sciatic Nerve Ligation Induced Behavioral, Biochemical and Histopathological Modification in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R; Tyagi, N

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe and unbearable condition which arises due to activation of peripheral nociceptors after tissue damage, neuropathic pain is caused from anomalous physiology of central or peripheral nervous system and it may not be related to the ongoing tissue damage or inflammation. Involvement of oxidative damage has been reported in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of lycopene to quench the free radicals produced as a result of the increased oxidative stress in neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced in wistar rats by partial sciatic nerve ligation. The effect was evaluated by assessing various behavioral parameters (thermal hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia), biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase) as well as histopathological parameters in sciatic nerve. During the experiment group of 8 rats each was administered drugs once daily intraperitonealy (I.P.) and naïve groups, sham group and sciatic nerve ligated group were treated with vehicle for the duration of 14 days. Partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) significantly caused thermal hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia and oxidative damage compared to normal and sham groups. Daily administration of lycopene (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg) and gabapentin (100 mg/kg) considerably reversed hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia and attenuated oxidative stress when compared to control group. There was significant histological improvement in the in the architecture of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. The results indicated that free radical generation mechanism might be involved in PSNL induced behavior, biochemical and histopathological changes in wistar rats.

  7. Alternative mechanism for anti-obesity effect of dehydroepiandrosterone: possible contribution of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibition in rodent adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Noriko; Minamitani, Erika; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu

    2011-12-20

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been suggested to have an anti-obesity effect; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. The effect of DHEA on adipocytes opposes that of glucocorticoids, which potentiate adipogenesis. The key to the intracellular activation of glucocorticoids in adipocytes is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which catalyses the production of active glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents) from an inactive 11-keto form (cortisone in humans and 11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents). In humans and rodents, intracellular glucocorticoid reactivation is exaggerated in obese adipose tissue. Using differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we demonstrated that DHEA inhibited about 15.6% of 11β-HSD1 activity at a concentration of 1 μM within 10min. Inhibition was also observed in a cell-free system composed of microsomes prepared from rat adipose tissue and NADPH, a coenzyme of 11β-HSD1. A kinetic study revealed that DHEA acted as a non-competitive inhibitor of 11β-HSD1. Moreover, conversion from DHEA to estrogens was not observed by sensitive semi-micro HPLC equipped with electrochemical detector. These results indicate that the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 by DHEA depends on neither the transcriptional pathway nor the nonspecific manner. This is the first demonstration that the anti-obesity effect of DHEA is exerted by non-transcriptional inhibition of 11β-HSD1 in rodent adipocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Macrophage subsets in mechanical brain injury (MBI)--a contribution to timing of MBI based on immunohistochemical methods: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Jakob, S; Mann, S; Saternus, K S; Pedal, I; Meissner, C

    2009-05-01

    Cortical hemorrhages as a consequence of closed mechanical brain injury (MBI) trigger an inflammatory response including a distinct increase of macrophages. According to published data this reactive macrophage population is heterogenous as to their immunological properties. The expression of certain immunohistochemically detectable epitopes of macrophages, however, may correlate with the posttraumatic interval (PTI). In a pilot study, 50 selected cases of cortical hemorrhages with 1 min to 1.5 years PTI were examined by light microscopy and macrophages were labeled with CD68-, HLA-D-, HAM-56-, LN-5-, and 25F9-antibodies, while hemosiderin was detected by a Prussian-blue reaction. Qualitative and semiquantitative investigations were performed. The semiquantitative study included 5 different classes. The results of the study revealed a distinct timetable of the appearance of macrophages labeled with certain antibodies. While HLA-D immunoreactivity was detected after a PTI of 6h in the cortex and white matter bordering the traumatic hemorrhage, CD68 immunopositive macrophages were present after 12h, LN-5 and HAM-56 after 48h, and 25F9 within 10d. Hemosiderin-containing macrophages were detectable within 100h in the same region. Within the hemorrhage itself a certain immunoreactivity of macrophages starts several hours before: CD68 after 3h, LN-5 after 24h, HAM-56 after 31h, hemosiderin after 76h, and 25F9 after 4d. For forensic purposes these observations are of crucial importance because the time course of the appearance of certain immunopositive macrophages labeled with different antibodies allows a differentiated timing of contusional injuries; however, the cause of this different immunopositive reaction remains unexplained. The observed time dependency of different macrophage antigen expressions in cortical hemorrhages after closed head injury is a suitable method to estimate the PTI and will allow a forensic reliable estimation if future investigations are

  9. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field,Tarim Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study is undertaken to understand how calcite precipitation and dissolution contributes to depth-related changes in porosity and permeability of gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Kela 2 gas field of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China. Sandstone samples and pore water samples are col-lected from well KL201 in the Tarim Basin. Vertical profiles of porosity, permeability, pore water chem-istry, and the relative volume abundance of calcite/dolomite are constructed from 3600 to 4000 m below the ground surface within major oil and gas reservoir rocks. Porosity and permeability values are in-versely correlated with the calcite abundance, indicating that calcite dissolution and precipitation may be controlling porosity and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Pore water chemistry exhibits a sys-tematic variation from the Na2SO4 type at the shallow depth (3600-3630 m), to the NaHCO3 type at the intermediate depth (3630―3695 m),and to the CaCl2 type at the greater depth (3728―3938 m). The geochemical factors that control the calcite solubility include pH, temperature, pressure, Ca2+ concen-tration, the total inorganic carbon concentration (ΣCO2), and the type of pore water. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium and mass conservation laws are applied to calculate the calcite saturation state as a function of a few key parameters. The model calculation illustrates that the calcite solubility is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of pore water, mainly the concentration difference between the total dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved calcium concentration (i.e., [ΣCO2] -[Ca2+]). In the Na2SO4 water at the shallow depth, this index is close to 0, pore water is near the calcite solubility. Calcite does not dissolve or precipitate in significant quantities. In the NaHCO3 water at the intermedi-ate depth, this index is greater than 0, and pore water is supersaturated with respect to calcite. Massive calcite precipitation was observed at this depth

  10. Atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides during PRIDE-PRD'06, China: their concentration, formation mechanism and contribution to secondary aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hua

    2008-11-01

    detected in this region can account for the production of hydroperoxides, while the moderate level of NOx suppressed the formation of hydroperoxides. High concentrations of hydroperoxides were detected in samples of rainwater collected in a heavy shower on 25 July when a typhoon passed through, indicating that a considerable mixing ratio of hydroperoxides, particularly MHP, resided above the boundary layer, which might be transported on a regional scale and further influence the redistribution of HOx and ROx radicals. It was found that hydroperoxides, in particular H2O2, play an important role in the formation of secondary sulfate in the aerosol phase, where the heterogeneous reaction might contribute substantially. A negative correlation between hydroperoxides and water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, a considerable fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA, was observed, possibly providing field evidence for the importance of hydroperoxides in the formation of SOA found in previous laboratory studies. We suggest that hydroperoxides act as an important link between sulfate and organic aerosols, which needs further study and should be considered in current atmospheric models.

  11. Contribution of Variants in CHRNA5/A3/B4 Gene Cluster on Chromosome 15 to Tobacco Smoking: From Genetic Association to Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Jiang, Keran; Yuan, Wenji; Cui, Wenyan; Li, Ming D

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of preventable death and morbidity throughout the world. Many compounds are present in tobacco, but nicotine is the primary addictive one. Nicotine exerts its physiological and pharmacological roles in the brain through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels consisting of five membrane-spanning subunits that can modulate the release of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, glutamate, and GABA and mediate fast signal transmission at synapses. Considering that there are 12 nAChR subunits, it is highly likely that subunits other than α4 and β2, which have been intensively investigated, also are involved in nicotine addiction. Consistent with this hypothesis, a number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent candidate gene-based associated studies investigating the genetic variants associated with nicotine dependence (ND) and smoking-related phenotypes have shed light on the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster on chromosome 15, which encodes the α5, α3, and β4 nAChR subunits, respectively. These studies demonstrate two groups of risk variants in this region. The first one is marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968 in exon 5 of CHRNA5, which changes an aspartic acid residue into asparagine at position 398 (D398N) of the α5 subunit protein sequence, and it is tightly linked SNP rs1051730 in CHRNA3. The second one is SNP rs578776 in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of CHRNA3, which has a low correlation with rs16969968. Although the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying these associations remain to be further elucidated, recent findings have shown that α5* (where "*" indicates the presence of additional subunits) nAChRs located in the medial habenulo-interpeduncular nucleus (mHb-IPN) are involved in the control of nicotine self-administration in rodents. Disruption of α5* nAChR signaling diminishes the aversive effects of nicotine on the mHb-IPN pathway

  12. Poster contributions; Contributions par affiches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegraud, K.; Gatilova, I.; Guaitella, O.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Rousseau, A.; Aranchuk, L.E.; Larour, J.; Asad, S.; Tendero, C.; Tixier, C.; Jaoul, C.; Tristant, P.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Leniniven, C.; Assouar, M.B.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Aubert, X.; Rousseau, A.; Sadeghi, N.; Bekstein, A.; Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.; Bousquet, A.; Granier, A.; Cartry, G.; Calafat, M.; Escaich, D.; Raynaud, P.; Clergereaux, R.; Cardoso, R.P.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Cavarroc, M.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Celestin, S.; Guaitella, O.; Bourdon, A.; Rousseau, A.; Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.; Cavarroc, M.; Boufendi, I.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Pegourie, B.; Clairet, F.; Gil, C.; Gros, G.; Gunn, J.; Joffrin, E.; Hertout, P.; Costin, C.; Choimet, J.B.; Minea, T.; Couedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Samarian, A.A.; Cousin, R.; Larour, J.; Gouard, P.; Raymond, P.; Curley, G.A.; Booth, J.P.; Corr, C.S.; Foldes, T.; Guillon, J.; Czarny, O.; Huysmans, G.; Daniel, A.; Belmonte, T.; Poucques, L. de; Imbert, J.C.; Teule-Gay, L.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Devaux, S.; Manfredi, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Dong, B.; Bauchire, J.M.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Magnier, P.; Hong, D.; Duluard, C.; Tillocher, T.; Mekkakia Maaza, N.; Dussart, R.; Mellhaoui, X.; Lefaucheux, P.; Puech, M.; Ranson, P.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.; Fubiani, G.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Gatilova, L.; Allegraud, K.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Cartry, G.; Rousseau, A.; Gauthier, J.C.; Fourment, C.; Schurtz, G.; Nicolai, Ph.; Peyrusse, O.; Feugeas, J.L

    2006-07-01

    This document gathers the poster contributions among which 11 are relevant for fusion plasmas or particle acceleration: 1) the spectral study of a micro plasma from an X-pinch explosion; 2) experiments with a plasma density greater than the Greenwald value via the injection of icicles in Tore-Supra; 3) Bezier's surfaces and finite elements method for non-linear MHD; 4) 2-dimensional simulation of the RF casings before the ICRF antennas in tokamaks; 5) negative ion sources for ITER; 6) experimental characterization of electron heat transport on the laser integration line; 7) comparison of fluctuation measurement methods of plasma density via reflectometry in mode-o and mode-x in Tore-Supra; 8) water-bag model applied to kinetics equations of magnetic fusion plasmas; 9) computerized simulation of electron acceleration in plasma waves generated in a capillary pipe through laser wakefield; 10) the slowing-down of an alpha particle in a strongly magnetized dense plasma; and 11) stochastic processes of particle trapping by a wave in a magnetized plasma. (A.C.)

  13. Abstracts of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  14. Loss of functional GABAA receptors in the Alzheimer diseased brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems are known to be severely disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). GABAergic neurotransmission, in contrast, is generally thought to be well preserved. Evidence from animal models and human postmortem tissue suggest GABAergic remodeling in the AD brain. Nevertheless, there is no information on changes, if any, in the electrophysiological properties of human native GABA receptors as a consequence of AD. To gain such information, we have microtransplanted cell membranes, isolated from temporal cortices of control and AD brains, into Xenopus oocytes, and recorded the electrophysiological activity of the transplanted GABA receptors. We found an age-dependent reduction of GABA currents in the AD brain. This reduction was larger when the AD membranes were obtained from younger subjects. We also found that GABA currents from AD brains have a faster rate of desensitization than those from non-AD brains. Furthermore, GABA receptors from AD brains were slightly, but significantly, less sensitive to GABA than receptors from non-AD brains. The reduction of GABA currents in AD was associated with reductions of mRNA and protein of the principal GABA receptor subunits normally present in the temporal cortex. Pairwise analysis of the transcripts within control and AD groups and analyses of the proportion of GABA receptor subunits revealed down-regulation of α1 and γ2 subunits in AD. In contrast, the proportions of α2, β1, and γ1 transcripts were up-regulated in the AD brains. Our data support a functional remodeling of GABAergic neurotransmission in the human AD brain. PMID:22691495

  15. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanikea B. King

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1 exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits.

  16. 农业机械化对农业和农村经济贡献率理论分析%Theoretical Analysis on the Contributing Ratio of Agricultural Mechanization to Rural Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程智强; 贾栓祥; 洪仁彪

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural mechanization makes contribution to agricultural production, which brings about the production increment resulting from increasing invented farm machinery and from raising the productivity of farm machinery. The contributing ratio can be measured with the proportion of the coefficient of machinery output elasticity in the sum of those of all factors' output elasticities. The quantity of farm machinery's contribution to raising labor productivity is decided by the quantity of its contribution to the production increment and of its substitution for labor force. And that to rural economy is in direct proportion to the growth rate of labor productivity resulted from farm machinery, the ratio of nonagricultural output value to rural GDP, the number of labors engaging in agriculture.%机械化对农业产出增长的贡献不仅包含农业机械投入量增减对产出的影响,而且应包括农业机械生产率提高的作用,贡献率大小可用农业机械产出弹性在规模弹性中的比值衡量;机械化对农业劳动生产率增长的贡献大小决定于它对农业产出增长的贡献大小和对农业劳动力的替代作用;农业机械化在某一时期对农村经济的贡献与由它产生的劳动生产率增长率成正比,与非农产业产值占农村社会总产值的比重成正比,与初期从事农业的劳动力数量成正比。

  17. Emerin self-assembly mechanism: role of the LEM domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Camille; Celli, Florian; Hendriks, Kitty; Zinke, Maximilian; Essawy, Nada; Herrada, Isaline; Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Theillet, François-Xavier; Alpha-Bazin, Béatrice; Armengaud, Jean; Coirault, Catherine; Lange, Adam; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    At the nuclear envelope, the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin contributes to the interface between the nucleoskeleton and the chromatin. Emerin is an essential actor of the nuclear response to a mechanical signal. Genetic defects in emerin cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. It was proposed that emerin oligomerization regulates nucleoskeleton binding, and impaired oligomerization contributes to the loss of function of emerin disease-causing mutants. We here report the first structural characterization of emerin oligomers. We identified an N-terminal emerin region from amino acid 1 to amino acid 132 that is necessary and sufficient for formation of long curvilinear filaments. In emerin monomer, this region contains a globular LEM domain and a fragment that is intrinsically disordered. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analysis identifies the LEM β-fragment as part of the oligomeric structural core. However, the LEM domain alone does not self-assemble into filaments. Additional residues forming a β-structure are observed within the filaments that could correspond to the unstructured region in emerin monomer. We show that the delK37 mutation causing muscular dystrophy triggers LEM domain unfolding and increases emerin self-assembly rate. Similarly, inserting a disulfide bridge that stabilizes the LEM folded state impairs emerin N-terminal region self-assembly, whereas reducing this disulfide bridge triggers self-assembly. We conclude that the LEM domain, responsible for binding to the chromatin protein BAF, undergoes a conformational change during self-assembly of emerin N-terminal region. The consequences of these structural rearrangement and self-assembly events on emerin binding properties are discussed. © 2016 The Authors Journal compilation © 2016 FEBS.

  18. NTPDASE4 gene products cooperate with the adenovirus E4orf4 protein through PP2A-dependent and -independent mechanisms and contribute to induction of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital-Shacham, Meirav; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2014-06-01

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces nonclassical apoptosis in mammalian cells through at least two complementing pathways regulated by the interactions of E4orf4 with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Src kinases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, which do not express Src, E4orf4 induces PP2A-dependent toxicity. The yeast Golgi apyrase Ynd1 was found to contribute to E4orf4-mediated toxicity and to interact with the PP2A-B55α regulatory subunit. In addition, a mammalian Ynd1 orthologue, the NTPDASE4 gene product Golgi UDPase, was shown to physically interact with E4orf4. Here we report that knockdown of NTPDASE4 suppressed E4orf4-induced cell death. Conversely, overexpression of the NTPDASE4 gene products Golgi UDPase and LALP70 enhanced E4orf4-induced cell killing. We found that similarly to results obtained in yeast, the apyrase activity of mammalian UDPase was not required for its contribution to E4orf4-induced toxicity. The interaction between E4orf4 and UDPase had two consequences: a PP2A-dependent one, resulting in increased UDPase levels, and a PP2A-independent outcome that led to dissociation of large UDPase-containing protein complexes. The present report extends our findings in yeast to E4orf4-mediated death of mammalian cells, and combined with previous results, it suggests that the E4orf4-NTPDase4 pathway, partly in association with PP2A, may provide an alternative mechanism for the E4orf4-Src pathway to contribute to the cytoplasmic death function of E4orf4. The adenovirus E4orf4 protein contributes to regulation of the progression of virus infection from the early to the late phase, and when expressed alone, it induces a unique caspase-independent programmed cell death which is more efficient in cancer cells than in normal cells. The interactions of E4orf4 with cellular proteins that mediate its functions, such as PP2A and Src kinases, are highly conserved in evolution. The results presented here reveal that the NTPDASE4 gene product Golgi UDPase

  19. Dielectric response of MgO-added Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} ceramics under bias electric field: Examination of contributing mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaofei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); School of Mathematics and Physics, Hubei Ploytechnic University, Huangshi, 435003 (China); Xu Qing, E-mail: xuqing@whut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhan Di; Liu Hanxing; Chen Wen; Huang Duanping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-02-01

    The structure and dielectric properties of (1-x)wt% Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3}-xwt% MgO (x=0.5-60) ceramics were studied. The specimens with x{<=}1 had a single-phase perovskite structure and those with higher MgO contents presented a biphasic structure comprising Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} and MgO phases. The temperature dependence of the dielectric properties showed a frequency-dispersion behavior. The dielectric constants of the ceramics under bias electric field displayed an obvious deviation from the behavior as predicted by the phenomenological Johnson model. These dielectric phenomena were explained in relation to Mg{sup 2+} doping and polar nano-regions (PNRs) in Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} phase. Fitting the dielectric constants to a multipolarization mechanism model resolved intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the dielectric non-linearity of the ceramics. Characteristic parameters of the contributions were determined from the fitting. Increasing MgO content led to a monotonous enhancement of the anharmonic coefficient ({alpha}). The polarization of PNRs tended to decrease with the increase of MgO content while the size of PNRs was insensitive to MgO content.

  20. Microorganisms and mechanisms that contribute to Rhizoctonia disease suppression on wheat%小麦丝核菌病害抑制作用的相关微生物及其机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen John BARNETT

    2005-01-01

    由Rhizoctonia solani引起的小麦丝核菌根腐病是世界范围内小麦的主要病害之一.保留作物残体的精耕栽培制度可使土壤变为对病害有抑制作用的抑病土.研究了南澳大利亚埃文抑病土壤中与抑制作用相关的生物体.分离到许多在苗期抑制病害的细菌 (Pantoea agglomerans, Exiguobacterium acetylicum, 微杆菌以及Streptomyces),木霉菌和食真菌线虫.研究结果表明,埃文抑病土的抑病作用与多种生物有关,其作用机理也多种多样.%Rhizoctonia root rot caused by Rhizoctoniasolani is a major disease of wheat worldwide. Under intensive cropping with retention of crop residue management regimes, soils can become suppressive to Rhizoctonia root rot. The organisms that contribute to suppression were investigated in a disease suppressive soil at Avon in South Australia. A diverse range of organisms including bacteria (Pantoea agglomerans, Exiguobacterium acetylicum,Microbacteria and Streptomyces),Trichoderma fungi and fungal feeding nematodes were isolated and shown to suppress Rhizoctonia root rot in wheat seedling bioassays. It is concluded that multiple different organisms contribute to disease suppression at Avon through different mechanisms.

  1. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  2. Redox cycling of a copper complex with benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone contributes to its enhanced antitumor activity, but no change in the mechanism of action occurs after chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Li, Cuiping; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Zhou, Pingxin; Yuan, Yanbin; Zhou, Sufeng; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2016-03-01

    Many anticancer drugs used in the clinical have potent metal chelating ability. The formed metal complex(es) may exhibit improved (or antagonistic) antitumor activity. However, the underlying mechanism has received limited attention. Therefore, investigation of the mechanism involved in the change upon chelation is required to extend our understanding of the effects of various drugs. In the present study, the proliferation inhibition effect of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (BNMPH) and its copper complex on tumor cell lines was investigated. The copper chelate exhibited almost a 10-fold increase in antitumor activity (with IC50 copper complex induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caused upregulation of caspase 8 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2, indicating that apoptosis was involved in the cytotoxic effects. DNA fragmentation noted in the comet assay further supported ROS involvement. The present study indicated that BNMPH and its copper complex effectively induced S phase arrest and the cell cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin D1. The formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and an increase in cleaved LC3-II demonstrated that autophagy occurred in the HepG2 cells treated with the agents. Taken together, BNMPH and its copper complex exhibited proliferation inhibition via apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and autophagy, which was dependent on ROS. The enhanced antitumor activity of the copper complex was due to its redox-cycling ability, but the mechanism was not altered compared to BNMPH. Our findings may significantly contribute to the understanding of the anti-proliferative effect of BNMPH and its copper complex.

  3. Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: a current perspective of genome distribution, evolution, and function : Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: genomic organization, evolution, and molecular mechanism models contribute broadly to plant pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Preeti; Acharya, Vishal

    2017-09-12

    STAND P-loop NTPase is the common weapon used by plant and other organisms from all three kingdoms of life to defend themselves against pathogen invasion. The purpose of this study is to review comprehensively the latest finding of plant STAND P-loop NTPase related to their genomic distribution, evolution, and their mechanism of action. Earlier, the plant STAND P-loop NTPase known to be comprised of only NBS-LRRs/AP-ATPase/NB-ARC ATPase. However, recent finding suggests that genome of early green plants comprised of two types of STAND P-loop NTPases: (1) mammalian NACHT NTPases and (2) NBS-LRRs. Moreover, YchF (unconventional G protein and members of P-loop NTPase) subfamily has been reported to be exceptionally involved in biotic stress (in case of Oryza sativa), thereby a novel member of STAND P-loop NTPase in green plants. The lineage-specific expansion and genome duplication events are responsible for abundance of plant STAND P-loop NTPases; where "moderate tandem and low segmental duplication" trajectory followed in majority of plant species with few exception (equal contribution of tandem and segmental duplication). Since the past decades, systematic research is being investigated into NBS-LRR function supported the direct recognition of pathogen or pathogen effectors by the latest models proposed via 'integrated decoy' or 'sensor domains' model. Here, we integrate the recently published findings together with the previous literature on the genomic distribution, evolution, and distinct models proposed for functional molecular mechanism of plant STAND P-loop NTPases.

  4. Different RNA splicing mechanisms contribute to diverse infective outcome of classical swine fever viruses of differing virulence: insights from the deep sequencing data in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhou, Yulu; Liang, Wulong; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying RNA splicing regulation in response to viral infection are poorly understood. Classical swine fever (CSF), one of the most economically important and highly contagious swine diseases worldwide, is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to obtain the digital gene expression (DGE) profile in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC) to identify different response genes for CSFV by using both Shimen and C strains. The numbers of clean tags obtained from the libraries of the control and both CSFV-infected libraries were 3,473,370, 3,498,355, and 3,327,493 respectively. In the comparison among the control, CSFV-C, and CSFV-Shimen groups, 644, 158, and 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were confirmed in the three groups. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of these DEGs were enriched in spliceosome, ribosome, proteasome, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, cell cycle, focal adhesion, Wnt signalling pathway, etc., where the processes differ between CSFV strains of differing virulence. To further elucidate important mechanisms related to the differential infection by the CSFV Shimen and C strains, we identified four possible profiles to assess the significantly expressed genes only by CSFV Shimen or CSFV C strain. GO analysis showed that infection with CSFV Shimen and C strains disturbed 'RNA splicing' of SUVEC, resulting in differential 'gene expression' in SUVEC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was identified as a significant response regulator contributed to impact on SUVEC function for CSFV Shimen. This computational study suggests that CSFV of differing virulence could induce alterations in RNA splicing regulation in the host cell to change cell metabolism, resulting in acute haemorrhage and pathological damage or infectious tolerance.

  5. Modeling glial contributions to seizures and epileptogenesis: cation-chloride cotransporters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid M Rusan

    Full Text Available Flies carrying a kcc loss-of-function mutation are more seizure-susceptible than wild-type flies. The kcc gene is the highly conserved Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of K+/Cl- cotransporter genes thought to be expressed in all animal cell types. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal requirements for kcc loss-of-function to modify seizure-susceptibility in flies. Targeted RNA interference (RNAi of kcc in various sets of neurons was sufficient to induce severe seizure-sensitivity. Interestingly, kcc RNAi in glia was particularly effective in causing seizure-sensitivity. Knockdown of kcc in glia or neurons during development caused a reduction in seizure induction threshold, cell swelling, and brain volume increase in 24-48 hour old adult flies. Third instar larval peripheral nerves were enlarged when kcc RNAi was expressed in neurons or glia. Results suggest that a threshold of K+/Cl- cotransport dysfunction in the nervous system during development is an important determinant of seizure-susceptibility in Drosophila. The findings presented are the first attributing a causative role for glial cation-chloride cotransporters in seizures and epileptogenesis. The importance of elucidating glial cell contributions to seizure disorders and the utility of Drosophila models is discussed.

  6. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: a dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákány, J; Fromental-Ramain, C; Warot, X; Duboule, D

    1997-12-09

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose-response is observed in the morphogenesis of the penian bone, the baculum, which further suggests that digits and external genitalia share this genetic control mechanism. A progressive reduction in the dose of Hox gene products led first to ectrodactyly, then to olygodactyly and adactyly. Interestingly, this transition between the pentadactyl to the adactyl formula went through a step of polydactyly. We propose that in the distal appendage of polydactylous short-digited ancestral tetrapods, such as Acanthostega, the HoxA complex was predominantly active. Subsequent recruitment of the HoxD complex contributed to both reductions in digit number and increase in digit length. Thus, transition through a polydactylous limb before reaching and stabilizing the pentadactyl pattern may have relied, at least in part, on asynchronous and independent changes in the regulation of HoxA and HoxD gene complexes.

  7. Spinal D-Serine Increases PKC-Dependent GluN1 Phosphorylation Contributing to the Sigma-1 Receptor-Induced Development of Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sheu-Ran; Moon, Ji-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2017-04-01

    We have recently shown that spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) activation facilitates nociception via an increase in phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor GluN1 subunit (pGluN1). The present study was designed to examine whether the Sig-1R-induced facilitative effect on NMDA-induced nociception is mediated by D-serine, and whether D-serine modulates spinal pGluN1 expression and the development of neuropathic pain after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Intrathecal administration of the D-serine degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase attenuated the facilitation of NMDA-induced nociception induced by the Sig-1R agonist, 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexane carboxylate. Exogenous D-serine increased protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent (Ser896) pGluN1 expression and facilitated NMDA-induced nociception, which was attenuated by preteatment with the PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine. In CCI mice, administration of the serine racemase inhibitor, L-serine O-sulfate potassium salt or D-amino acid oxidase on postoperative days 0 to 3 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and pGluN1 expression on day 3 after CCI surgery. Intrathecal administration of D-serine restored MA as well as the GluN1 phosphorylation on day 3 after surgery that was suppressed by the Sig-1R antagonist, N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide or the astrocyte inhibitor, fluorocitrate. In contrast, D-serine had no effect on CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia or GluN1 expression. These results indicate that spinal D-serine: 1) mediates the facilitative effect of Sig-1R on NMDA-induced nociception, 2) modulates PKC-dependent pGluN1 expression, and 3) ultimately contributes to the induction of MA after peripheral nerve injury.

  8. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  9. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  10. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  11. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  12. Regulation of number and size of digits by posterior Hox genes: A dose-dependent mechanism with potential evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zákány, József; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Warot, Xavier; Duboule, Denis

    1997-01-01

    The proper development of digits, in tetrapods, requires the activity of several genes of the HoxA and HoxD homeobox gene complexes. By using a variety of loss-of-function alleles involving the five Hox genes that have been described to affect digit patterning, we report here that the group 11, 12, and 13 genes control both the size and number of murine digits in a dose-dependent fashion, rather than through a Hox code involving differential qualitative functions. A similar dose–response is observed in the morphogenesis of the penian bone, the baculum, which further suggests that digits and external genitalia share this genetic control mechanism. A progressive reduction in the dose of Hox gene products led first to ectrodactyly, then to olygodactyly and adactyly. Interestingly, this transition between the pentadactyl to the adactyl formula went through a step of polydactyly. We propose that in the distal appendage of polydactylous short-digited ancestral tetrapods, such as Acanthostega, the HoxA complex was predominantly active. Subsequent recruitment of the HoxD complex contributed to both reductions in digit number and increase in digit length. Thus, transition through a polydactylous limb before reaching and stabilizing the pentadactyl pattern may have relied, at least in part, on asynchronous and independent changes in the regulation of HoxA and HoxD gene complexes. PMID:9391088

  13. Plants Possess a Cyclic Mitochondrial Metabolic Pathway similar to the Mammalian Metabolic Repair Mechanism Involving Malate Dehydrogenase and l-2-Hydroxyglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüdig, Meike; Maier, Alexander; Scherrers, Isabell; Seidel, Laura; Jansen, Erwin E W; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Engqvist, Martin K M; Maurino, Veronica G

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic side reactions can give rise to the formation of wasteful and toxic products that are removed by metabolite repair pathways. In this work, we identify and characterize a mitochondrial metabolic repair mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana involving malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) and l-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (l-2HGDH). We analyze the kinetic properties of both A. thaliana mMDH isoforms, and show that they produce l-2-hydroxyglutarate (l-2HG) from 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) at low rates in side reactions. We identify A. thaliana l-2HGDH as a mitochondrial FAD-containing oxidase that converts l-2HG back to 2-KG. Using loss-of-function mutants, we show that the electrons produced in the l-2HGDH reaction are transferred to the mitochondrial electron transport chain through the electron transfer protein (ETF). Thus, plants possess the biochemical components of an l-2HG metabolic repair system identical to that found in mammals. While deficiencies in the metabolism of l-2HG result in fatal disorders in mammals, accumulation of l-2HG in plants does not adversely affect their development under a range of tested conditions. However, orthologs of l-2HGDH are found in all examined genomes of viridiplantae, indicating that the repair reaction we identified makes an essential contribution to plant fitness in as yet unidentified conditions in the wild.

  14. Social Contributions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gyorgy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contributions have an important impact on payroll policy. Also, social contributions represent a significant budgetary revenue item which can be viewed at the edge between taxation and insurance. Social contributions in Romania experienced many changes which ended in 2008. Nowadays, they are within a long transaction period towards partial externalization of the insurance activity to privately managed funds. The aim of this paper is to analyse the homogeneity of Romanian social security public scheme using annual data extracted from 2002-2009.The main findings reveal that social contributions reached the pinnacle of diversification, being too many, some of them with a small contribution rates; fiscal reforms which reduced contribution rates advantaged employers, and state will be interested to externalize this activity as far private sector will be able to assume this responsibility and the budgetary effects are acceptable for the public finance.

  15. Mechanical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Darbyshire, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Alan Darbyshire's best-selling text book provides five-star high quality content to a potential audience of 13,000 engineering students. It explains the most popular specialist units of the Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering and Operations & Maintenance Engineering pathways of the new 2010 BTEC National Engineering syllabus. This challenging textbook also features contributions from specialist lecturers, ensuring that no stone is left unturned.

  16. Contributions to industrial statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is about statistics' contributions to industry. It is an article compendium comprising four articles divided in two blocks: (i) two contributions for a water supply company, and (ii) significance of the effects in Design of Experiments. In the first block, great emphasis is placed on how the research design and statistics can be applied to various real problems that a water company raises and it aims to convince water management companies that statistics can be very useful to impr...

  17. Mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion in congenital hyperinsulinism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tingting; Li, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    The role of amino acids in the regulation of insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is highlighted in three forms of congenital hyperinsulinism (HI), namely gain-of-function mutations of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), loss-of-function mutations of ATP-dependent potassium channels, and a deficiency of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Studies on disease mouse models of HI suggest that amino acid oxidation and signaling effects are the major mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated in...

  18. [Participation of proteinkinase CK2 in regulation of human erythrocytes plasma membrane redox system activity: relative contribution of ca(2+)-dependent and ca(2+)-independent mechanisms of its activation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovenko, I N; Zhirnov, V V; Kozachenko, O P; Shablykin, O V; Brovarets', V S

    2012-01-01

    Involvement of protein kinase CK2 (2.7.11.1) in modulation of live cells trans-plasma membrane electron transport was first discovered. Using human erythrocytes a decrease of plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) activity is shown under the action of specific protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. Using inhibitory analysis the activity regulation of human erythrocytes PMRS by Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent mechanisms were investigated. It was shown that functional Ca(2+)-antagonists (nitrendipine and calmidazolium) significantly increased, and functional Ca(2+)-agonists to some extent reduced or did not affect the trans-plasma membrane electron transport in these cells.

  19. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms; Corrosion generalisee des alliages a base nickel en milieu aqueux a haute temperature: apport a la comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L

    2007-11-15

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale ({approx} 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary

  20. Introduction to quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to give a very brief introduction to Quantum Mechanics for an audience of mathematicians. I will follow Segal's approach to Quantum Mechanics paying special attention to algebraic issues. The usual representation of Quantum Mechanics on Hilbert spaces is also discussed.

  1. 微生物在近海氮循环过程的贡献与驱动机制%Contribution and mechanism of microbe-driving nitrogen cycling processes in coastal ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚骏; 张晓黎

    2013-01-01

    Human activities introduced increased amounts of nitrogen in coastal oceans, caus- ing eutrophication and numerous ecological and environmental problems. It is crucial to better illustrate and understand the function and contribution of the microbe-driving nitrogen cycle within the coastal ecosystems, especially under the global change background. This review focuses on the rates, fluxes, contribution and functional gene quantity of microbes in nitrogen fixation, ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, and anammox in coastal sediments. The controls of major physiochemical and biological factors (e.g. temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, labile dissolved organic carbon, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, submerged macrophytes and benthic animals) on these processes, as well as functionally related microbial groups and pathways (e.g. ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea and nitrate reduction), are summarized.%人类活动导致海岸带氮超载而富营养化,进而引起更多的生态环境问题.在全球变化背景下,进一步揭示微生物驱动的氮循环过程的驱动机制及贡献,对评价与预测近海生态系统服务功能变化、管理决策等至关重要.本文介绍了固氮、氨化、硝化、反硝化、硝酸盐铵化、厌氧氨氧化过程在近海多种生境沉积物中的生物地球化学(速率、通量、贡献)与微生物生态学(功能类群丰度)特征及时空变化规律,阐述温度、溶氧、盐度、活性溶解有机碳、无机氮、沉水植物、底栖动物活动等因素对各过程速率的影响及对各竞争性类群或过程(氨氧化细菌/氨氧化古菌,反硝化/硝酸盐铵化/厌氧氨氧化)的调控机制,并简析了海岸带微生物氮循环研究所面临的机遇与挑战.

  2. What contributes to depression in Parkinson's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Schrag, A.; M. Jahanshahi; Quinn, N P

    2001-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common problem in patients with Parkinson's disease, but its mechanism is poorly understood. It is thought that neurochemical changes contribute to its occurrence, but it is unclear why some patients develop depression and others do not. Using a community-based sample of patients with Parkinson's disease, we investigated the contributions of impairment, disability and handicap to depression in Parkinson's disease. Methods: Ninety-seven patients seen in a popula...

  3. HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 expression and pRb phosphorylation in infected podocytes: cell-cycle mechanisms contributing to the proliferative phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Mohammad

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aberrant cell-cycle progression of HIV-1-infected kidney cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy, however the mechanisms whereby HIV-1 induces infected glomerular podocytes or infected tubular epithelium to exit quiescence are largely unknown. Here, we ask whether the expression of HIV-1 genes in infected podocytes induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression, hallmarks of cyclin D1-mediated G1 → S phase progression. Results We assessed cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in two well-characterized models of HIV-associated nephropathy pathogenesis: HIV-1 infection of cultured podocytes and HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26. Compared to controls, cultured podocytes expressing HIV-1 genes, and podocytes and tubular epithelium from hyperplastic nephrons in Tg26 kidneys, had increased levels of phospho-pRb (Ser780, a target of active cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 known to promote G1 → S phase progression. HIV-1-infected podocytes showed markedly elevated cyclin D1 mRNA and cyclin D1 protein, the latter of which did not down-regulate during cell-cell contact or differentiation, suggesting post-transcriptional stabilization of cyclin D1 protein levels by HIV-1. The selective suppression of HIV-1 transcription by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, abrogated cyclin D1 expression, underlying the requirement for HIV-1 encoded products to induce cyclin D1. Indeed, HIV-1 virus deleted of nef failed to induce cyclin D1 mRNA to the level of other single gene mutant viruses. Conclusions HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in infected podocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 activates cyclin D1-dependent cell-cycle mechanisms to promote proliferation of infected renal epithelium.

  4. Peripheral contributions to visceral hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, G F

    1999-03-01

    and, along with activated mechanically insensitive receptors, increase the afferent barrage into the spinal cord, contributing to the development of visceral hyperalgesia.

  5. Micro-seismicity induced by hydrocarbon production: contribution to localization of events and identification of the source mechanisms through the use of dynamic friction models; Contribution a la localisation des evenements et l'identification des mecanismes au foyer en micro-sismicite induite par l'exploitation d'hydrocarbures. Utilisation des modeles de frottement dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammedi, H.

    2002-11-01

    Oil production or any injection of fluid in a geological medium is likely to impose variations of stresses which might generate micro-seismicity. We examine whether the use of dynamic friction models could allow for a better determination of mechanics on the fault plane from borehole seismometers. We sought to identify the friction law model from seismogram observation. Before dealing with this inverse problem, we examined the direct problem generating synthetic seismograms at virtual stations, on the basis of a postulated friction law using the FD3D earthquake simulation code and the AXITRA radiation computation code. Treatment of two different laws, one of which is an original variation of the Dietrich-Ruina law, leads to similar seismograms. This might indicate that systematic inversion for the friction law only from seismogram observation might reveal difficult. (authors)

  6. Contribution to the study of sorption mechanisms at solid-liquid interfaces: application to the cases of apatites and oxy-hydroxides; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de sorption aux interfaces solide-liquide: application aux cas des apatites et des oxy-hydroxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc, M

    2002-11-15

    Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the transport of toxic and radioactive elements in surface and underground water in contact with solid matter. Selenium, which is one of the long-lived radionuclides present in radioactive waste, is characterized by several oxidation states and by anionic species in aqueous solutions. In order to predict its transport, we need a good knowledge of its sorption processes. We have studied the sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on two types of solids present in natural media or which have been proposed as additives to active barriers: hydroxy-apatites, fluoro-apatite and iron oxi-hydroxides (goethite and hematite). Sorption mechanisms have been studied through an approach including several different and complementary methods: titrimetry, zeta-metry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, etc... Results showed that Se(VI) is much less sorbed than Se(VI) on both types of solids. For Se(IV) the sorption mechanisms are different for iron oxides and apatites. On oxides, sorption increases when pH decreases. It can be interpreted by a surface complexation model, essentially through an inner sphere complex (monodentate or bidentate). Modelling of Se sorption curves was performed after the determination of acido-basic properties of oxides. However, the determination of the intrinsic properties of oxides is disturbed by several parameters identified as impurities, evolution of the solid in solution, kinetic and solubility of the solid. For apatites, selenium sorption proceeds by exchange with superficial groups, with a maximum of fixation at approximately pH 8. Thanks to XPS measurements and the elaboration of a mathematical model, we could determine the depth of penetration of both selenium and cadmium on apatites. (author)

  7. Biotransformation of a novel positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 contributes to seizure-like adverse events in rats involving a receptor agonism-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Thomas M; Rook, Jerri M; Noetzel, Meredith J; Morrison, Ryan D; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D; Vinson, Paige N; Xiang, Zixiu; Jones, Carrie K; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Stauffer, Shaun R; Conn, P Jeffrey; Daniels, J Scott

    2013-09-01

    Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a novel strategy for therapeutic intervention into multiple central nervous system disorders, including schizophrenia. Recently, a number of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of mGlu5 were discovered to exhibit in vivo efficacy in rodent models of psychosis, including PAMs possessing varying degrees of agonist activity (ago-PAMs), as well as PAMs devoid of agonist activity. However, previous studies revealed that ago-PAMs can induce seizure activity and behavioral convulsions, whereas pure mGlu5 PAMs do not induce these adverse effects. We recently identified a potent and selective mGlu5 PAM, VU0403602, that was efficacious in reversing amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. The compound also induced time-dependent seizure activity that was blocked by coadministration of the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine. Consistent with potential adverse effects induced by ago-PAMs, we found that VU0403602 had significant allosteric agonist activity. Interestingly, inhibition of VU0403602 metabolism in vivo by a pan cytochrome P450 (P450) inactivator completely protected rats from induction of seizures. P450-mediated biotransformation of VU0403602 was discovered to produce another potent ago-PAM metabolite-ligand (M1) of mGlu5. Electrophysiological studies in rat hippocampal slices confirmed agonist activity of both M1 and VU0403602 and revealed that M1 can induce epileptiform activity in a manner consistent with its proconvulsant behavioral effects. Furthermore, unbound brain exposure of M1 was similar to that of the parent compound, VU0403602. These findings indicate that biotransformation of mGlu5 PAMs to active metabolite-ligands may contribute to the epileptogenesis observed after in vivo administration of this class of allosteric receptor modulators.

  8. Aluminum(III) interferes with the structure and the activity of the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (Pin1): a new mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Ji; Lin, Tao; Han, Yong-Guang; Luo, Yue; Xi, Lei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2013-09-01

    The enzyme peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (Pin1) may play an important role in preventing the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The structural and functional stability of Pin1 is extremely important. Previously, we have determined the stability of Pin1 under stressed conditions, such as thermal treatment and acidic-pH. Considering that aluminum (Al(III)) is well known for its potential neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of AD, we examined whether Al(III) affects the structure and function of Pin1, by means of a PPIase activity assay, intrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, FTIR, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements mainly show that Al(III) may bind to the clusters nearby W11 and W34 in the WW domain of Pin1, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of the two tryptophan residues, which possibly results in the decreased binding affinity of Pin1 to substrates. The secondary structural analysis as revealed by FTIR and CD measurements indicate that Al(III) induces the increase in β-sheet and the decrease in α-helix in Pin1. Furthermore, the changes of the thermodynamic parameters for Pin1 as monitored by DSC confirm that the thermal stability of Pin1 significantly increases in the presence of Al(III). The Al(III)-induced structural changes of Pin1 result in a sharp decrease of the PPIase activity of Pin1. To some extent, our research is suggestive that Al(III) may inhibit the isomerization activity of Pin1 in vivo, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  9. NFκB induces overexpression of bovine FcRn: a novel mechanism that further contributes to the enhanced immune response in genetically modified animals carrying extra copies of FcRn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenak, Judit; Doleschall, Márton; Bender, Balázs; Mayer, Balázs; Schneider, Zita; Doleschall, Zoltán; Zhao, Yaofeng; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Hammarström, Lennart; Oster, Wolfgang; Kacskovics, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Among the many functions of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, it binds to IgG-opsonized antigen complexes and propagates their traffic into lysosomes where antigen processing occurs. We previously reported that transgenic (Tg) mice and rabbits that carry multiple copies and overexpress FcRn have augmented humoral immune responses. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a critical molecule in the signaling cascade in the immune response. NFκB induces human FcRn expression and our previous in silico analysis suggested NFκB binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine (b) FcRn α-chain gene (FCGRT). Here, we report the identification of three NFκB transcription binding sites in the promoter region of this gene using luciferase reporter gene technology, electromobility shift assay and supershift analysis. Stimulation of primary bovine endothelial cells with the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mediates its effect via NFκB, resulted in rapid upregulation of the bFcRn expression and a control gene, bovine E-selectin. This rapid bFcRn gene induction was also observed in the spleen of bFcRn Tg mice treated with intraperitoneally injected LPS, analyzed by northern blot analysis. Finally, NFκB-mediated bFcRn upregulation was confirmed at the protein level in macrophages isolated from the bFcRn Tg mice using flow cytometry with a newly developed FcRn specific monoclonal antibody that does not cross-react with the mouse FcRn. We conclude that NFκB regulates bFcRn expression and thus optimizes its functions, e.g., in the professional antigen presenting cells, and contributes to the much augmented humoral immune response in the bFcRn Tg mice.

  10. Spinal sigma-1 receptor activation increases the production of D-serine in astrocytes which contributes to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) plays an important role in the development of mechanical allodynia (MA) via secondary activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Sig-1Rs have been shown to localize to astrocytes, and blockade of Sig-1Rs inhibits the pathologic activation of astrocytes in neuropathic mice. However, the mechanism by which Sig-1R activation in astrocytes modulates NMDA receptors in neurons is currently unknown. d-serine, synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (Srr) in astrocytes, is an endogenous co-agonist for the NMDA receptor glycine site and can control NMDA receptor activity. Here, we investigated the role of d-serine in the development of MA induced by spinal Sig-1R activation in chronic constriction injury (CCI) mice. The production of d-serine and Srr expression were both significantly increased in the spinal cord dorsal horn post-CCI surgery. Srr and d-serine were only localized to astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn, while d-serine was also localized to neurons in the deep dorsal horn. Moreover, we found that Srr exists in astrocytes that express Sig-1Rs. The CCI-induced increase in the levels of d-serine and Srr was attenuated by sustained intrathecal treatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. In behavioral experiments, degradation of endogenous d-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of Srr by LSOS, effectively reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia in CCI mice. Finally, BD-1047 administration inhibited the development of MA and this inhibition was reversed by intrathecal treatment with exogenous d-serine. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the activation of Sig-1Rs increases the expression of Srr and d-serine in astrocytes. The increased production of d-serine induced by CCI ultimately affects dorsal horn neurons that are involved in the development of MA in neuropathic

  11. Análisis interno de las subsidiarias costarricenses: Mecanismos que determinan su Contribución al Crecimiento (Internal analysis for the Costa Rican branches of multinational companies: Their growth contributing mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grettel Brenes Leiva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available La inversión directa extranjera (IED tiene un claro impacto en la mejora de los niveles de desarrollo y crecimiento económico de los países receptores. En los últimos veinte años, Costa Rica ha realizado una decidida apuesta por la atracción de IED que, además, ha contribuido al incremento del volumen y la calidad de las exportaciones del país. Las subsidiarias costa- rricenses, propiedad de las empresas multinacionales, constituyen el instrumento a través del cual esa inver- sión exterior se transforma en actividad productiva. El presente estudio, basado en una muestra de ciento dos subsidiarias costarricenses, permite ahondar en el conocimiento de las subsidiarias costarricenses dado que brinda información a nivel micro empresarial de estas unidades corporativas. A partir de los hallazgos encontrados, se presenta una caracterización de dichas subsidiarias y de los altos directos a su cargo. Adicional- mente, se analizan otros aspectos asociados al manejo de las relaciones subsidiaria-casa matriz, las capacidades distintivas que poseen en las diversas actividades que realizan y que las hacen ser atractivas para los inver- sionistas extranjeros, además, se examina el potencial que podrían tener para establecer encadenamientos productivos con empresas nacionales, y, por último, se investiga la gestión emprendedora que ellas realizan, manifestada a través de las iniciativas emprendedoras que impulsan.   Abstract The foreign direct investment (FDI has a clearimpact on improving the development and economicgrowth of the receiving countries. During the lasttwenty years Costa Rica bet decidedly on attractingFDI that has contributed to increase the volume andquality of the country’s exports. The Costa Rican foreignsubsidiaries have become the means in whichsaid foreign investment is transformed into productiveactivities. This research of 102 Costa Rican subsidiariesof multinational companies allows us to reach deeplyand unders

  12. Contribution to contract theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmstrom share the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for 2016, awarded to them by Sveriges Riksbank. They have been rewarded for their work in enhancing the design of contracts, i.e. arrangements connecting employers with employees or companies with clients, in other words, for their contribution to contract theory in the 1970s and 1980s. Their analysis of optimal contractual arrangements lays an intellectual foundation for designing policies and institutions in many areas, from bankruptcy legislation to political constitutions. Hart is an expert in contract theory, theory of the firm, corporate finance, and law and economics. His contribution to contract theory is exquisite when it comes to designing contracts which cover eventualities that cannot be precisely specified in advance.

  13. Contributions to statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, P C

    1965-01-01

    Contributions to Statistics focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in statistics. The book is presented to Professor P. C. Mahalanobis on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The selection first offers information on the recovery of ancillary information and combinatorial properties of partially balanced designs and association schemes. Discussions focus on combinatorial applications of the algebra of association matrices, sample size analogy, association matrices and the algebra of association schemes, and conceptual statistical experiments. The book then examines latt

  14. Mechanisms of early visual processing in the medulla of the locust optic lobe: how self-inhibition, spatial-pooling, and signal rectification contribute to the properties of transient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, D

    1991-10-01

    In the arthropod medulla, which is the second ganglion on the afferent visual pathway, a column of about 40 cells represents each point in space (i.e. compound eye facet). Some stages of visual processing underlying the responses of one class of cells in the locust medulla have been identified. These transient cells give very similar responses to intensity increments and decrements, and also to pulses and steps; there is no spontaneous activity and a stimulus causes one or two spikes to fire at fixed latencies. Movement, however, produces a prolonged spike discharge by successive excitation of subunits within the receptive field. One of the main features of the transient cells' responses is a self-inhibition which attenuates responses to successive stimuli at one point. This inhibition is restricted to the outputs of single receptor (rhabdom), it decays after about 100 ms, and is polarity sensitive so that stimuli of one polarity (e.g. dimming) do not inhibit responses to stimuli of the opposite polarity (e.g. brightening). The inhibition effectively alters the contrast threshold of the cells, because after adaptation with stimuli of one contrast, a modest (less than 20%) increase in contrast is sufficient to elicit an unadapted response. Transient cells are not directionally selective and there are no local spatio-temporal interactions of the kind necessary for directional selectivity. But, by analogy with the directional veto in directionally selective cells in the rabbit retina (Barlow & Levick, 1965), self-inhibition is suggested as a mechanism of non-directional motion detection. After the inhibition, there is some spatial pooling of signals which is followed by rectification. The transient cells' spiking outputs could abstract a refined subset of visual information which may encode the presence, but not the direction, amplitude, or polarity of moving object borders.

  15. Mechanical properties of dental restorative materials: relative contribution of laboratory tests Propriedades mecânicas dos materiais dentários restauradores: contribuição relativa dos ensaios laboratoriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Wang

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of dental products that are launched on the market becomes the correct selection of these materials a difficult task. Although the mechanical properties do not necessarily represent their actual clinical performance, they are used to guide the effects of changes in their composition or processing on these properties. Also, these tests might help somehow the clinician to choose once comparisons between former formulations and new ones, as well as, with the leading brand, are highlighted by manufactures. This paper presents a review of the most important laboratory tests. In this manner, the knowledge of these tests will provide a critical opinion related to the properties of different dental materials.Uma grande variedade de produtos odontológicos que são lançados no mercado faz da seleção do material uma difícil tarefa. Apesar das propriedades mecânicas não representarem necessariamente o seu real desempenho clínico, os testes são utilizados para orientar os efeitos das alterações das composições do material ou a evolução das suas propriedades. Além disso, estas propriedades podem ajudar o clínico de alguma forma na seleção correta, uma vez que a comparação entre as formulações anteriores e as mais recentes, assim como as líderes de mercado são mais destacadas pelos fabricantes. Este artigo apresenta uma revisão dos testes laboratoriais mais importantes. Desta forma, o conhecimento destes ensaios fornecerá uma opinião crítica relacionada às propriedades dos diferentes materiais dentários.

  16. Biogas from landfills embankments: the Brazilian contribution for the management of urban solid residues and the greenhouse effect mitigation through the mechanisms for clean development; Biogas de aterros: a contribuicao do Brasil na gestao de residuos solidos urbanos e na mitigacao do efeito estufa atraves dos mecanismos de desenvolvimento limpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Gleide B.M.; Guimaraes, Hoji Y' a Henda da R.; Andrade, Euridice S. Mamede de; Teixeira, Gisele Pereira; Freitas, Marcos A.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2008-07-01

    This paper studies the clean development mechanism (CDM) for sanitary sewage in Brazil, as instruments for flexibilization and mitigation of the effects of climate changes coming from the global heating. This research presents the assessments of the CDM projects for sanitary sewage in Brazil, considering the Project Conception Documents (PCD) approved until November 2007. The paper presents some methodologies for studying of energy generation potential from the biogas originated in sanitary sewage. The paper also contributes to projects of carbon credit commercialization, and relevance of the CDM instrument for the adequate management expansion of the residence solid residues as well, and advances in the implantation of sanitary embankments in Brazil.

  17. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  18. Study of the effect of the nature of aggregates on the mechanical behaviour of the concrete in hot and dry zones «Contribution of the curing» Etude de l’effet de la nature des granulats sur le comportement mécanique du béton en zones chaudes et arides «Contribution de la cure»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendjillali K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Laghouat est parmi les villes de l’Algérie riches en matériaux de différentes natures, tels que les roches calcaires massives et les matériaux alluvionnaires meubles siliceux et silico-calcaires. L’objectif premier de ce travail est d’établir une comparaison des performances mécaniques des bétons préparés avec de granulats de natures différentes. Nôtre second objectif est l’étude de l’influence de la cure sur la résistance à la compression et la résistance à la flexion des bétons étudiés. Les échantillons sont conservés sous un climat chaud et sec réel qui est le climat de Laghouat. Nous avons utilisé comme cure: le film plastique, la toile de jute mouillée et l’immersion dans l’eau. A travers ce travail expérimental, nous avons pu constater que les meilleures résistances à la compression sont obtenues dans les bétons à sable siliceux et celles à la flexion sont obtenues dans les bétons à granulats calcaires. La conservation du béton dans une ambiance aride sans protection augmente sa résistance mécanique à jeune âge, mais à long terme, cette dernière chute d’une façon significative. L’étude a mis en évidence la nécessité de l’emploi d’un super plastifiant et de l’application immédiate de la cure pour le bétonnage en climat chaud. Laghouat is among the cities of Algeria rich in materials of various natures, such as the massive limestone rocks and the natural river materials. The first objective of this work is to establish a comparison of the mechanical performances between concretes with aggregates of different natures. The second objective is to study the effect of curing on the compressive and the flexural strength of concretes. Samples are conserved under a real hot and dry climate which is the climate of Laghouat. We used as curing: plastic film, wet hessian and immersing in water. Through this work, we noticed that the best compressive strengths are obtained in concretes

  19. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of crack in amorphous silica: study by the molecular dynamics of crack in amorphous silica; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de rupture dans les amorphes: etude par dynamique moleculaire de la rupture de verre de silice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Brutzel, L

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the mechanism which occurs during the crack at the atomic scale in amorphous silica. The difficulties of the experimental observations at this length scale lead us to use numerical studies by molecular dynamics to access to the dynamical and the thermodynamical informations. We have carried out large simulations with 500000 atoms and studied the structure of the amorphous silica before to studying their behaviours under an imposed strain. The structure of this simulated amorphous silica settled in three length scales. In small length scale between 0 and 5 angstrom glass is composed of tetrahedra, this is close to the crystalline structure. In intermediate length scale between 3 and 10 angstrom tetrahedra are connected together and build rings of different sizes composed in majority between 5 and 7 tetrahedra. In bigger length scale between 15 and 60 angstrom, areas with high density of rings are surrounded by areas with low density of rings. These structural considerations play an important role in initiation and propagation of a crack. Indeed. in this length scale. crack propagates by growth and coalescence of some small cavities which appear in area with low density of rings behind the crack tip. The cavities dissipate the stress with carries away a delay to propagation of the crack. This phenomenons seems ductile and leads to non linear elastic behaviour near the crack tip. We have also shown that the addition of alkali in the amorphous silica changes the structure by creation of nano-porosities and leads to enhance the ductility during the crack propagation. (author)

  20. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  1. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Arlt, Volker M; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-02-05

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using (32)P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast, the

  2. Methanotrophs Contribute to Peatland Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation is potentially an important N input mechanism to peatland ecosystems, but the extent of this process may have been underestimated because of the methods traditionally used inhibit the activity of methanothrophs. We examined the linkage of methane (CH4) oxidation and N2 fixation using 15N2 technique. Dominant flark and hummock Sphagnum species were collected from twelve pristine peatlands in Siikajoki, Finland, which varied in age from 200 to 2,500 y due to the postglacial rebound. The mosses were incubated in a two-day field 15N2 and 13CH4 pulse labelling experiment and the incorporation of 15N2 and 13CH4 in biomass was measured with Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The rates of Sphagnum-associated N2 fixation (0.1-2.9 g N m-2 y-1) were up to 10 times the current N deposition rates. Methane-induced N2 fixation contributed to over 1/3 of moss-associated N2 fixation in younger stages, but was switched off in old successional stages, despite active CH4 oxidation in these stages. Both the N2 fixation rates and the methanotrophic contribution to N2 fixation during peatland succession were primarily constrained by phosphorus availability. Previously overlooked methanotrophic N contribution may explain rapid peat and N accumulation during fen stages of peatland development. Reference. Larmola T., Leppänen S.M., Tuittila E.-S, Aarva M., Merilä P., Fritze H., Tiirola M. (2014) Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111 (2): 734-739.

  3. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  4. Molecular Cabal Contributes to Stroke Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ In the neural train wreck that is stroke, the cutoff of oxygen kills brain cells through a buildup of acid, as well as by overexciting receptors on the surface of brain cells. Now, researchers exploring the detailed mechanism of this excitotoxicity and acidotoxicity have discovered how an insidious chain of molecular events contributes to its damage.

  5. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  6. 混凝土的收缩机理——建造更耐用、更持久的工程%Understanding Shrinkage Mechanisms-a Contribution to More Durable and Sustainable Constructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. H. Wittmann; 赵继增; 张鹏

    2008-01-01

    干燥收缩是混凝土的一个复杂性质,测定时存在一个长期的内部应力作用过程.通过两种主要的物理作用机理:吸附作用和分离压力作用,解释了混凝土的干燥收缩机理,并对基于两种机理建立的预测方法与试验结果进行了比较.主要包括:(1)水分在窄裂口处的直接观测;(2)不同材料的吸附曲线和吸附长度变化;(3)新拌混凝土和早期混凝土的毛细收缩;(4)防水处理混凝土的收缩机理;(5)离子浓度对收缩的影响.研究结果表明,吸附作用在水泥基材料的收缩作用中仅起到次要的作用.收缩是混凝土结构在干燥过程中产生裂缝的根源,而裂缝的存在又会降低腐蚀环境下混凝土结构的使用寿命.因此,更好地理解混凝土的收缩机理有助于今后建造更耐用、更持久的结构工程.%First of all it is outlined that shrinkage as measured on drying concrete is not a simple material property but the complex response of a given specimen to long lasting time-dependent internal stresses. Then the physical basis of two frequently cited approaches to explain the origin of hygral shrinkage is briefly described: capillary action and disjoining pressure. The predictions of the two concepts are compared with experimental findings. The following examples have been selected for a critical comparison: (1) direct observation of the interaction of water in a narrow gap, (2) sorption and length change isotherms of different materials, (3) capillary shrinkage of fresh and young concrete, (4) shrinkage of water repellent concrete, and (5) influence of ion concentration on shrinkage. From the presented results it can be concluded that capillary action plays a minor role in the process of shrinkage of cement-based materials. Shrinkage is at the origin of crack formation in drying concrete structures. Cracks reduce service life in aggressive environment. Better understanding real shrinkage mechanisms will help to build more

  7. Contributing to Functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    advocated in this paper, emerges in the specific dynamic interplay of actors, objectives, structures, practices and means. In this view, functionality is the result of creating, harnessing and inhabiting computer supported joint action spaces. The successful creation and further development of a computer......The objective of this paper is the design of computer supported joint action spaces. It is argued against a view of functionality as residing in computer applications. In such a view the creation of functionality is equivalent to the creation of computer applications. Functionality, in the view...... supported joint action space comprises a whole range of appropriate design contributions. The approach is illustrated by the example of the creation of the computer supported joint action space "exchange network of voluntary union educators". As part of the effort a group of participants created...

  8. Contributing from the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    /herself as a contributor to an investigated practice, as inextricably entangled with the conducts of life of the others in relation to the conditions in practice. Doing research in the kindergarten thus becomes a mutual and collective endeavor, to which pedagogues, parents, children, and the researcher contribute. Even...... empirical study, I focused on kindergarten children’s first-person perspectives on the electronic media technologies they deemed subjectively relevant for conducting everyday life in the practice of their kindergarten. The concept of the children’s perspectives opens possibilities for transcending...... the widespread, one-sided explanations of the relationship between a child and technology, which ascribe agency either to the child or to the technology. However, attempts to access these perspectives raises a number of epistemological and ethical-political challenges, most crucially regarding the concrete role...

  9. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  10. Goryachkin's agricultural mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinenova, Vera

    2016-03-01

    The paper contributes to the development of applied mechanics by establishing a new discipline, namely, agricultural mechanics by academician Vasilii Prohorovich Goryachkin (1868-1935) who was an apprentice of Nikolay Yegorovich Zhukovsky and a graduate of the Moscow University (current known as Moscow State University) and the Imperial Higher Technical School.

  11. Mechanics of Generalized Continua

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, Gerard A

    2010-01-01

    In their 1909 publication "Theorie des corps deformables", Eugene and Francois Cosserat made a historic contribution to materials science by establishing the fundamental principles of the mechanics of generalized continua. The chapters collected in this volume showcase the many areas of continuum mechanics that grew out of the foundational work of the Cosserat brothers. The included contributions provide a detailed survey of the most recent theoretical developments in the field of generalized continuum mechanics. The diverse topics covered include: the properties of Cosserat media, m

  12. Contributions to quantum probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2010-06-25

    Chapter 1: On the existence of quantum representations for two dichotomic measurements. Under which conditions do outcome probabilities of measurements possess a quantum-mechanical model? This kind of problem is solved here for the case of two dichotomic von Neumann measurements which can be applied repeatedly to a quantum system with trivial dynamics. The solution uses methods from the theory of operator algebras and the theory of moment problems. The ensuing conditions reveal surprisingly simple relations between certain quantum-mechanical probabilities. It also shown that generally, none of these relations holds in general probabilistic models. This result might facilitate further experimental discrimination between quantum mechanics and other general probabilistic theories. Chapter 2: Possibilistic Physics. I try to outline a framework for fundamental physics where the concept of probability gets replaced by the concept of possibility. Whereas a probabilistic theory assigns a state-dependent probability value to each outcome of each measurement, a possibilistic theory merely assigns one of the state-dependent labels ''possible to occur'' or ''impossible to occur'' to each outcome of each measurement. It is argued that Spekkens' combinatorial toy theory of quantum mechanics is inconsistent in a probabilistic framework, but can be regarded as possibilistic. Then, I introduce the concept of possibilistic local hidden variable models and derive a class of possibilistic Bell inequalities which are violated for the possibilistic Popescu-Rohrlich boxes. The chapter ends with a philosophical discussion on possibilistic vs. probabilistic. It can be argued that, due to better falsifiability properties, a possibilistic theory has higher predictive power than a probabilistic one. Chapter 3: The quantum region for von Neumann measurements with postselection. It is determined under which conditions a probability distribution on a

  13. Pathways and mechanisms in adolescence contribute to adult health inequalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Pernille; Krølner, Rikke; Rasmussen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    patterning of alcohol use is less consistent. Relational dimensions like lone parenthood and bullying are socially patterned and track over time, and there are indications of a socially differential vulnerability to the effects of these types of relational strain. Very little research has investigated...

  14. The Geographic Distribution of Human Capital: Measurement of Contributing Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates how the geographic distribution of human capital evolves over time. With U.S. data, I decompose generation-to-generation changes in local human capital into three factors: the previous generation’s human capital, intergenerational transmission of skills from parents to their children, and migration of the children. I find evidence of regression to the mean of local skills at the state level and divergence at the commuting zone level. Labor market size, climate, local c...

  15. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  16. Contribution to postnonclassical psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any psychological paradigm needs a psychopathological system that helps professionals to describe and explain the behavioral expressions that deviate from “normal” (whether this term is used with the semantic property of statistical or ideal adaptations. In this work, I seek to present the system that I have been developing since 1998 among the psychologists at the Instituto Vegotsky de Lisboa (Vygotsky Institute of Lisbon, Portugal, to understand psychopathology with regard to the vygotskian approach. It was conceived and designed according to the work of Rita Mendes Leal and her contribution to socioemotional development theory, AR Luria’s systemic and dynamic theory of the human brain, the theory of Activity (dyatel’nost of AN Leont’ev, and the psychopathological German school of E Kraepelin, presented and disseminated in Portugal in the early twentieth century by Professor Sobral Cid. It is intended to be a proposal to colleagues who are interested in postnonclassical psychology and a request for arguments.

  17. EMSL Contribution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-12-01

    This Contribution Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSL’s workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSL’s long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2

  18. Radioinduced intestinal fibrosis: from molecular mechanisms to therapy applications. Contribution of the TGF--{beta}1, of the CTGF and of the transduction pathway of the Rho/ROCK signal; La fibrose intestinale radio-induite: des mecanismes moleculaires aux applications therapeutiques. Roles du TGF-{beta}1, du CTGF et de la voie de transduction du signal Rho/ROCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydont, V

    2006-12-15

    Delayed radiation enteritis is an intestinal fibrosis induced by accidental or therapeutic radiation for pelvic and abdominal cancer treatments. Studies of molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of fibrosis have showed the respective contribution of CTGF, low TGF-{beta}1 concentrations and Rho/ROCK pathway. Thus, based on the relationship between CTGF, TGF-{beta}1 and Rho pathway, 2 therapeutics strategies have been develop. First, a pravastatin curative gift leads to a fibro-lysis involving an inhibition of Rho and in cascade a reduction of CTGF expression and extracellular matrix deposition. The data suggest that reversal of established radiation fibrosis in the gut is possible. Second, a pravastatin prophylactic gift prevents the installation of a chronic fibrosis but does not protect the tumor. On the base of these results, the radiation therapy department of the Institut Gustave Roussy will soon initiate 2 clinical trials. (author)

  19. Phospholipid dysregulation contributes to ApoE4-associated cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Zhong, Minghao; Elder, Gregory A; Sano, Mary; Holtzman, David M; Gandy, Sam; Cardozo, Christopher; Haroutunian, Vahram; Robakis, Nikolaos K; Cai, Dongming

    2015-09-22

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for developing sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms underlying the pathogenic nature of ApoE4 are not well understood. In this study, we have found that ApoE proteins are critical determinants of brain phospholipid homeostasis and that the ApoE4 isoform is dysfunctional in this process. We have found that the levels of phosphoinositol biphosphate (PIP2) are reduced in postmortem human brain tissues of ApoE4 carriers, in the brains of ApoE4 knock-in (KI) mice, and in primary neurons expressing ApoE4 alleles compared with those levels in ApoE3 counterparts. These changes are secondary to increased expression of a PIP2-degrading enzyme, the phosphoinositol phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (synj1), in ApoE4 carriers. Genetic reduction of synj1 in ApoE4 KI mouse models restores PIP2 levels and, more important, rescues AD-related cognitive deficits in these mice. Further studies indicate that ApoE4 behaves similar to ApoE null conditions, which fails to degrade synj1 mRNA efficiently, unlike ApoE3 does. These data suggest a loss of function of ApoE4 genotype. Together, our data uncover a previously unidentified mechanism that links ApoE4-induced phospholipid changes to the pathogenic nature of ApoE4 in AD.

  20. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2016-06-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman-Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cutoff) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can be well described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field theories, require at least a perturbative treatment of inhomogeneity beyond a strict minisuperspace model. The new methods suggest a systematic extension of minisuperspace models by a canonical effective formulation of perturbative inhomogeneity.

  1. The microbial contribution to macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eBarberan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent explosion of research within the field of microbial ecology that has been fueled, in part, by methodological improvements that make it feasible to characterize microbial communities to an extent that was inconceivable only a few years ago. Furthermore, there is increasing recognition within the field of ecology that microorganisms play a critical role in the health of organisms and ecosystems. Despite these developments, an important gap still persists between the theoretical framework of macroecology and microbial ecology. We highlight two idiosyncrasies of microorganisms that are fundamental to understanding macroecological patterns and their mechanistic drivers. First, high dispersal rates provide novel opportunities to test the relative importance of niche, stochastic, and historical processes in structuring biological communities. Second, high speciation rates potentially lead to the convergence of ecological and evolutionary time scales. After reviewing these unique aspects, we discuss strategies for improving the conceptual integration of microbes into macroecology. As examples, we discuss the use of phylogenetic ecology as an integrative approach to explore patterns across the tree of life. Then we demonstrate how two general theories of biodiversity (i.e., the recently developed theory of stochastic geometry and the neutral theory can be adapted to microorganisms. We demonstrate how conceptual models that integrate evolutionary and ecological mechanisms can contribute to the unification of microbial ecology and macroecology.

  2. Hemispheric contributions to pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, E; Kasher, A; Soroker, N; Batori, G; Giora, R; Graves, D

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with right-hemisphere damage (RBD) and thirty-one patients with left-hemisphere damage (LBD) received a new pragmatics battery in Hebrew consisting of two parts: (1) comprehension and production of basic speech acts (BSAs), including tests of assertions, questions, requests, and commands, and (2) comprehension of implicatures, including implicatures of quantity, quality, relevance, and manner. Each test had a verbal and a nonverbal version. Patients also received Hebrew versions of the Western Aphasia Battery and of the Right Hemisphere Communication Battery. Both LBD and RBD patients were impaired relative to controls but did not differ from each other in their overall scores on BSAs and on Implicatures when scores were corrected by aphasia and neglect indices. There was a systematic localization of BSAs in the left hemisphere (LH) but not in the right hemisphere (RH). There was poor localization of Implicatures in either hemisphere. In LBD patients, BSAs were associated with language functions measured with the WAB, suggesting the radical possibility that the classic localization of language functions in aphasia is influenced by the localization of the BSAs required by aphasia language tests. Both BSAs and implicatures show greater functional independence from other pragmatic, language and cognitive functions in the RBD than in the LBD patients. Thus, the LH is more likely to contain an unmodular domain-nonspecific set of central cognitive mechanisms for applying means-ends rationality principles to intentional activity.

  3. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  4. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Scott K.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent exp...

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Contribute to Pathological Structural and Functional Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer; Correll, Robert N.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Berretta, Remus M.; Kubo, Hajime; Madesh, Muniswamy; Chen, Xiongwen; Gao, Erhe; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cellular and molecular basis for post myocardial infarction (MI) structural and functional remodeling is not well understood. Objective To determine if Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential (canonical) (TRPC) channels contributes to post-MI structural and functional remodeling. Methods and Results TRPC1/3/4/6 channel mRNA increased after MI in mice and was associated with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry. Cardiac myocyte specific expression of a dominant negative (dn: loss of function) TRPC4 channel increased basal myocyte contractility and reduced hypertrophy and cardiac structural and functional remodeling after MI while increasing survival. We used adenovirus-mediated expression of TRPC3/4/6 channels in cultured adult feline myocytes (AFMs) to define mechanistic aspects of these TRPC-related effects. TRPC3/4/6 over expression in AFMs induced calcineurin (Cn)-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) mediated hypertrophic signaling, which was reliant on caveolae targeting of TRPCs. TRPC3/4/6 expression in AFMs increased rested state contractions and increased spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ sparks mediated by enhanced phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. TRPC3/4/6 expression was associated with reduced contractility and response to catecholamines during steady state pacing, likely due to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak. Conclusions Ca2+ influx through TRPC channels expressed after MI activates pathological cardiac hypertrophy and reduces contractility reserve. Blocking post-MI TRPC activity improved post-MI cardiac structure and function. PMID:25047165

  6. dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of the Drosophila Imd pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aparicio

    Full Text Available The Drosophila humoral innate immune response fights infection by producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs through the microbe-specific activation of the Toll or the Imd signaling pathway. Upon systemic infection, the production of AMPs is both positively and negatively regulated to reach a balanced immune response required for survival. Here, we report the function of the dRYBP (drosophila Ring and YY1 Binding Protein protein, which contains a ubiquitin-binding domain, in the Imd pathway. We have found that dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of AMP production: upon systemic infection with Gram-negative bacteria, Diptericin expression is up-regulated in the absence of dRYBP and down-regulated in the presence of high levels of dRYBP. Epistatic analyses using gain and loss of function alleles of imd, Relish, or skpA and dRYBP suggest that dRYBP functions upstream or together with SKPA, a member of the SCF-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex, to repress the Imd signaling cascade. We propose that the role of dRYBP in the regulation of the Imd signaling pathway is to function as a ubiquitin adaptor protein together with SKPA to promote SCF-dependent proteasomal degradation of Relish. Beyond the identification of dRYBP as a novel component of Imd pathway regulation, our results also suggest that the evolutionarily conserved RYBP protein may be involved in the human innate immune response.

  7. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  8. Physiotherapy contributions to weaning and extubation of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiotherapy contributions to weaning and extubation of patients from mechanical ventilation. ... To determine the extent of South African physiotherapists' involvement in weaning and extubation of patients from MV and ... Article Metrics.

  9. Characterization of a novel loss-of-function mutation of PAX8 associated with congenital hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Palma, Tina; Zampella, Emilia; Filippone, Maria Grazia; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; de Vroede, Monique; Zannini, Mariastella

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a common endocrine disease that occurs in about 1:3000 newborns. In 80-85% of the cases, CH is presumably secondary to thyroid dysgenesis (TD), a defect in the organogenesis of the gland leading to an ectopic (30-45%), absent (agenesis, 35-40%) or hypop

  10. Identification of and Molecular Basis for SIRT6 Loss-of-Function Point Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Kugel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors have emerged as the most frequently dysregulated family of proteins in cancer. We have previously identified the histone deacetylase SIRT6 as a key tumor suppressor, yet whether point mutations are selected for in cancer remains unclear. In this manuscript, we characterized naturally occurring patient-derived SIRT6 mutations. Strikingly, all the mutations significantly affected either stability or catalytic activity of SIRT6, indicating that these mutations were selected for in these tumors. Further, the mutant proteins failed to rescue sirt6 knockout (SIRT6 KO cells, as measured by the levels of histone acetylation at glycolytic genes and their inability to rescue the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Notably, the main activity affected in the mutants was histone deacetylation rather than demyristoylation, pointing to the former as the main tumor-suppressive function for SIRT6. Our results identified cancer-associated point mutations in SIRT6, cementing its function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer.

  11. A loss-of-function mutation in Calmodulin2 gene affects pollen germination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, Michela; De Francesco, Alessandra; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara

    2010-10-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) is an ubiquitous calcium binding protein whose function is to translate the signals, perceived as calcium concentration variations, into the appropriate cellular responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 4 CAM isoforms which are highly similar, encoded by 7 genes, and one possible explanation proposed for the evolutionary conservation of the CAM gene family is that the different genes have acquired different functions so that they play possibly overlapping but non-identical roles. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant cam2-2, identified among the lines of the gene-trapping collection EXOTIC because of a distorted segregation of kanamycin resistance. Phenotypic analysis showed that in normal growth conditions cam2-2 plants were indistinguishable from the wild type while genetic analysis showed a reduced transmission of the cam2-2 allele through the male gametophyte and in vitro pollen germination revealed a reduced level of germination in comparison with the wild type. These results provide genetic evidence of the involvement of a CAM gene in pollen germination and support the theory of functional diversification of the CAM gene family.

  12. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M

    2016-01-01

    nuclear receptor (RORβ), in four affected family members. In addition, two de novo variants (c.218T>C/p.(Leu73Pro); c.1249_1251delACG/p.(Thr417del)) were identified in sporadic patients by trio-based exome sequencing. We also found two de novo deletions in patients with behavioral and cognitive impairment...... in various types of epilepsies in the past few years. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family with GGE consistent with the diagnosis of eyelid myoclonia with absences. We found a nonsense variant (c.196C>T/p.(Arg66*)) in RORB, which encodes the beta retinoid-related orphan...

  13. The contrived mutant p53 oncogene – beyond loss of functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaga eSabapathy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 are almost synonymous with cancer - be it susceptibility to the disease or response to treatment - and therefore, are a critical determinant of overall survival. As most of these mutations occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53, many of the clinical correlations with mutant p53 have been initially relegated to the loss of its transcription-dependent activities as a tumor suppressor. However, significant efforts over the last two decades have led to the vast knowledge on the potential functions of the mutated p53 protein, that have been attributed to the physical presence of the mutant protein rather than the loss of its wild-type functions. Beyond the inhibitory effects of mutant p53 on the remaining wild-type protein that leads to the dominant-negative effect in the heterozygous state, mutant p53’s presence has also been significantly attributed to novel gain-of-functions that lead to addiction of cancer cells to its presence for survival, as well as for their ability to invade and metastasize, elevating it to a contrived oncogene that drives the cancer cells forward. This review will summarize the functional consequences of the presence of mutant p53 protein on cellular and organismal physiology.

  14. Big screens with small RNAs : loss of function genetic screens to identify novel cancer genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullenders, J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis described the construction and screening of one of the first large scale RNAi libraries for use in human cells. Functional genetic screens with this library have led to the identification of novel cancer genes. These cancer genes function in several pathways including the p53 tumor suppr

  15. The loss of functional caspase-12 in Europe is a pre-neolithic event.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hervella, M.; Plantinga, T.S.; Alonso, S.; Ferwerda, B.; Izagirre, N.; Fontecha, L.; Fregel, R.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; de-la-Rúa, C.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caspase-12 (CASP12) modulates the susceptibility to sepsis. In humans, the "C" allele at CASP12 rs497116 has been associated with an increased risk of sepsis. Instead, the derived "T" allele encodes for an inactive caspase-12. Interestingly, Eurasians are practically fixed for the inacti

  16. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-01-01

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  17. Frequent somatic CDH1 loss-of-function mutations in plasmacytoid variant bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Iyer, Gopa; Lee, Byron H; Scott, Sasinya N; Mehra, Rohit; Bagrodia, Aditya; Jordan, Emmet J; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Ramirez, Ricardo; Cha, Eugene K; Desai, Neil B; Zabor, Emily C; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Gopalan, Anuradha; Chen, Ying-Bei; Fine, Samson W; Tickoo, Satish K; Gandhi, Anupama; Hreiki, Joseph; Viale, Agnès; Arcila, Maria E; Dalbagni, Guido; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bochner, Bernard H; Bajorin, Dean F; Berger, Michael F; Reuter, Victor E; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B

    2016-04-01

    Plasmacytoid bladder cancer is an aggressive histologic variant with a high risk of disease-specific mortality. Using whole-exome and targeted sequencing, we find that truncating somatic alterations in the CDH1 gene occur in 84% of plasmacytoid carcinomas and are specific to this histologic variant. Consistent with the aggressive clinical behavior of plasmacytoid carcinomas, which frequently recur locally, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of CDH1 in bladder cancer cells enhanced cell migration.

  18. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  19. Identification and validation of loss of function variants in clinical contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lescai, Francesco; Marasco, Elena; Bacchelli, Chiara;

    2014-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate variant calling pipeline for exome sequencing data is becoming increasingly more important in translational medicine projects and clinical contexts. Within GOSgene, which facilitates genetic analysis as part of a joint effort of the University College London...... and 55.9% for INDELs. We confirm that GATK/Queue is a reliable pipeline in translational medicine and clinical context. We conclude that in our working environment, UnifiedGenotyper is the caller of choice, being an accurate method, with a high validation rate of error-prone calls like LoF variants. We...

  20. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frances J D; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Evans, Alan T; Goudie, David R; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Arseculeratne, Gehan; Munro, Colin S; Sergeant, Ann; O'Regan, Gráinne; Bale, Sherri J; Compton, John G; DiGiovanna, John J; Presland, Richard B; Fleckman, Philip; McLean, W H Irwin

    2006-03-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (OMIM 146700) is the most common inherited disorder of keratinization and one of the most frequent single-gene disorders in humans. The most widely cited incidence figure is 1 in 250 based on a survey of 6,051 healthy English schoolchildren. We have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations R501X and 2282del4 in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) as the cause of moderate or severe ichthyosis vulgaris in 15 kindreds. In addition, these mutations are semidominant; heterozygotes show a very mild phenotype with incomplete penetrance. The mutations show a combined allele frequency of approximately 4% in populations of European ancestry, explaining the high incidence of ichthyosis vulgaris. Profilaggrin is the major protein of keratohyalin granules in the epidermis. During terminal differentiation, it is cleaved into multiple filaggrin peptides that aggregate keratin filaments. The resultant matrix is cross-linked to form a major component of the cornified cell envelope. We find that loss or reduction of this major structural protein leads to varying degrees of impaired keratinization.

  1. Identification of and Molecular Basis for SIRT6 Loss-of-Function Point Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Sita; Feldman, Jessica L; Klein, Mark A; Silberman, Dafne M; Sebastián, Carlos; Mermel, Craig; Dobersch, Stephanie; Clark, Abbe R; Getz, Gad; Denu, John M; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-10-20

    Chromatin factors have emerged as the most frequently dysregulated family of proteins in cancer. We have previously identified the histone deacetylase SIRT6 as a key tumor suppressor, yet whether point mutations are selected for in cancer remains unclear. In this manuscript, we characterized naturally occurring patient-derived SIRT6 mutations. Strikingly, all the mutations significantly affected either stability or catalytic activity of SIRT6, indicating that these mutations were selected for in these tumors. Further, the mutant proteins failed to rescue sirt6 knockout (SIRT6 KO) cells, as measured by the levels of histone acetylation at glycolytic genes and their inability to rescue the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Notably, the main activity affected in the mutants was histone deacetylation rather than demyristoylation, pointing to the former as the main tumor-suppressive function for SIRT6. Our results identified cancer-associated point mutations in SIRT6, cementing its function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer.

  2. Long-term social dynamics drive loss of function in pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum Andersen, Sandra; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    social dynamics shown to drive evolutionary change in vitro. We provide evidence to show that long-term behavioral dynamics observed in a pathogen are driven by selection to outcompete neighboring conspecific cells through social interactions. We find that Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, causing lung......Laboratory experiments show that social interactions between bacterial cells can drive evolutionary change at the population level, but significant challenges limit attempts to assess the relevance of these findings to natural populations, where selection pressures are unknown. We have increasingly...... in the host environment. More generally, we provide an example of how sequence analysis can be used to generate testable hypotheses about selection driving long-term phenotypic changes of pathogenic bacteria in situ....

  3. The loss of functional caspase-12 in Europe is a pre-neolithic event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Hervella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caspase-12 (CASP12 modulates the susceptibility to sepsis. In humans, the "C" allele at CASP12 rs497116 has been associated with an increased risk of sepsis. Instead, the derived "T" allele encodes for an inactive caspase-12. Interestingly, Eurasians are practically fixed for the inactive variant, whereas in Sub-Saharan Africa the active variant is still common (~24%. This marked structure has been explained as a function of the selective advantage that the inactive caspase-12 confers by increasing resistance to infection. As regards to both when positive selection started acting and as to the speed with which fixation was achieved in Eurasia, estimates depend on the method and assumptions used, and can vary substantially. Using experimental evidence, we propose that, least in Eurasia, the increase in the frequency of the T allele might be related to the selective pressure exerted by the increase in zoonotic diseases transmission caused by the interplay between increased human population densities and a closer contact with animals during the Neolithic. METHODOLOG/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped CASP12 rs497116 in prehistoric individuals from 6 archaeological sites from the North of the Iberian Peninsula that date from Late Upper Paleolithic to Late Neolithic. DNA extraction was done from teeth lacking cavities or breakages using standard anti-contamination procedures, including processing of the samples in a positive pressure, ancient DNA-only chamber, quantitation of DNAs by qPCR, duplication, replication, genotyping of associated animals, or cloning of PCR products. Out of 50, 24 prehistoric individuals could finally be genotyped for rs497116. Only the inactive form of CASP12 was found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the loss of caspase-12 in Europe predates animal domestication and that consequently CASP12 loss is unlikely to be related to the impact of zoonotic infections transmitted by livestock.

  4. Long-term social dynamics drive