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Sample records for longitudinal relaxation measurements

  1. A method for longitudinal relaxation time measurement in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) plays a crucial role in the study of spin dynamics, signal optimization and data quantification. However, the measurement of chemical shift-specific T1 constants is hampered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity due to poorly shimmed external magnetic fields or intrinsic magnetic susceptibility heterogeneity in samples. In this study, we present a new protocol to determine chemical shift-specific T1 constants in inhomogeneous fields. Based on intermolecular double-quantum coherences, the new method can resolve overlapped peaks in inhomogeneous fields. The measurement results are in consistent with the measurements in homogeneous fields using the conventional method. Since spatial encoding technique is involved, the experimental time for the new method is very close to that for the conventional method. With the aid of T1 knowledge, some concealed information can be exploited by T1 weighting experiments.

  2. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sammy H. S.; Waudby, Christopher A.; Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John, E-mail: j.christodoulou@ucl.ac.uk [University College London and Birkbeck College, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of {sup 15}N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of {sup 1}H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on N{sub z} during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ∼1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies.Graphical Abstract.

  3. Quantitative Measurement of Longitudinal and Transverse Cross-Relaxation Rates: An Application to the Analysis of the Internal Dynamics of Ranalexin in Water and Trifluoroethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliavin, T. E.; Desvaux, H.; Aumelas, A.; Chavanieu, A.; Delsuc, M. A.

    1999-09-01

    We describe a quantitative processing method which gives access to the longitudinal and transverse cross-relaxation rates from off-resonance ROESY intensities. This method takes advantage of the dependence of the off-resonance ROESY experiments at any mixing time and any spin-lock angle θ on two relaxation matrices, the longitudinal and the transverse ones. This allows one to take into account multistep magnetization transfers even if the measurements are performed only at one or two mixing times. The ratio of the longitudinal to transverse cross-relaxation rates can then be used as a local indicator of the internal dynamics, without assuming a structure or a model of motion. After validation of this processing method by numerical simulations, it is applied to the analysis of the dynamics of the peptide ranalexin dissolved in pure water and in water/TFE.

  4. Magnetization Transfer Induced Biexponential Longitudinal Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantner, Andrew M.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation of brain water 1H magnetization in mammalian brain in vivo is typically analyzed on a per voxel basis using a monoexponential model, thereby assigning a single relaxation time constant to all 1H magnetization within a given voxel. This approach was tested by obtaining inversion recovery data from grey matter of rats at 64 exponentially-spaced recovery times. Using Bayesian probability for model selection, brain water data were best represented by a biexponential function characterized by fast and slow relaxation components. At 4.7 T, the amplitude fraction of the rapidly relaxing component is 3.4 ± 0.7 % with a rate constant of 44 ± 12 s-1 (mean ± SD; 174 voxels from 4 rats). The rate constant of the slow relaxing component is 0.66 ± 0.04 s-1. At 11.7 T, the corresponding values are 6.9 ± 0.9 %, 19 ± 5 s-1, and 0.48 ± 0.02 s-1 (151 voxels from 4 rats). Several putative mechanisms for biexponential relaxation behavior were evaluated, and magnetization transfer between bulk water protons and non-aqueous protons was determined to be the source of biexponential longitudinal relaxation. MR methods requiring accurate quantification of longitudinal relaxation may need to take this effect explicitly into account. PMID:18759367

  5. Measurement of 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in 15NH4+ spin systems to characterise rotational correlation times and chemical exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D. Flemming

    2017-06-01

    Many chemical and biological processes rely on the movement of monovalent cations and an understanding of such processes can therefore only be achieved by characterising the dynamics of the involved ions. It has recently been shown that 15N-ammonium can be used as a proxy for potassium to probe potassium binding in bio-molecules such as DNA quadruplexes and enzymes. Moreover, equations have been derived to describe the time-evolution of 15N-based spin density operator elements of 15NH4+ spin systems. Herein NMR pulse sequences are derived to select specific spin density matrix elements of the 15NH4+ spin system and to measure their longitudinal relaxation in order to characterise the rotational correlation time of the 15NH4+ ion as well as report on chemical exchange events of the 15NH4+ ion. Applications to 15NH4+ in acidic aqueous solutions are used to cross-validate the developed pulse sequence while measurements of spin-relaxation rates of 15NH4+ bound to a 41 kDa domain of the bacterial Hsp70 homologue DnaK are presented to show the general applicability of the derived pulse sequence. The rotational correlation time obtained for 15N-ammonium bound to DnaK is similar to the correlation time that describes the rotation about the threefold axis of a methyl group. The methodology presented here provides, together with the previous theoretical framework, an important step towards characterising the motional properties of cations in macromolecular systems.

  6. A rapid inversion technique for the measurement of longitudinal relaxation times of brain metabolites: application to lactate in high-grade gliomas at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landheer, Karl; Sahgal, Arjun; Myrehaug, Sten; Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H; Graham, Simon J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a time-efficient inversion technique to measure the T1 relaxation time of the methyl group of lactate (Lac) in the presence of contaminating lipids and to measure T1 at 3 T in a cohort of primary high-grade gliomas. Three numerically optimized inversion times (TIs) were chosen to minimize the expected error in T1 estimates for a given input total scan duration (set to be 30 min). A two-cycle spectral editing scheme was used to suppress contaminating lipids. The T1 values were then estimated from least-squares fitting of signal measurements versus TI. Lac T1 was estimated as 2000 ± 280 ms. After correcting for T1 (and T2 from literature values), the mean absolute Lac concentration was estimated as 4.3 ± 2.6 mm. The technique developed agrees with the results obtained by standard inversion recovery and can be used to provide rapid T1 estimates of other spectral components as required. Lac T1 exhibits similar variations to other major metabolites observable by MRS in high-grade gliomas. The T1 estimate provided here will be useful for future MRS studies wishing to report relaxation-corrected estimates of Lac concentration as an objective tumor biomarker. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. General Solution to Gradient Induced Transverse and Longitudinal Relaxation of Spins Undergoing Restricted Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Liu, J -G; Zhang, Y; Ye, Q; Swank, C; 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.053411

    2012-01-01

    We develop an approach, by calculating the autocorrelation function of spins, to derive the magnetic field gradient induced transverse ($T_2$) relaxation of spins undergoing restricted diffusion. This approach is an extension to the method adopted by McGregor. McGregor's approach solves the problem only in the fast diffusion limit; however, our approach yields a single analytical solution suitable in all diffusion regimes, including the intermediate regime. This establishes a direct connection between the well-known Torrey's slow diffusion result and the fast diffusion result. We also perform free induction decay measurements on spin-exchange optically polarized $^3$He gas with different diffusion constants. The transverse relaxation profiles are compared with the theory and satisfactory agreement has been found throughout all diffusion regimes. In addition to the transverse relaxation, this approach is also applicable to solving the longitudinal relaxation ($T_1$) regardless of the diffusion limits. It turns...

  8. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4 +

    OpenAIRE

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4 +, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exc...

  9. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian Ananta; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L

    2014-11-21

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)(-1) were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.

  10. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  11. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  12. In Vitro Longitudinal Relaxivity Profile of Gd(ABE-DTTA, an Investigational Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akos Varga-Szemes

    Full Text Available MRI contrast agents (CA whose contrast enhancement remains relatively high even at the higher end of the magnetic field strength range would be desirable. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate such a desired magnetic field dependency of the longitudinal relaxivity for an experimental MRI CA, Gd(ABE-DTTA.The relaxivity of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA was measured by Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD in the range of 0.0002 to 1T. Two MRI and five NMR instruments were used to cover the range between 1.5 to 20T. Parallel measurement of a Gd-DTPA sample was performed throughout as reference. All measurements were carried out at 37°C and pH 7.4.The relaxivity values of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA measured at 1.5, 3, and 7T, within the presently clinically relevant magnetic field range, were 15.3, 11.8, 12.4 s-1mM-1 and 18.1, 16.7, and 13.5 s-1mM-1, respectively. The control 4 mM Gd-DTPA relaxivities at the same magnetic fields were 3.6, 3.3, and 3.0 s-1mM-1, respectively.The longitudinal relaxivity of Gd(ABE-DTTA measured within the presently clinically relevant field range is three to five times higher than that of most commercially available agents. Thus, Gd(ABE-DTTA could be a practical choice at any field strength currently used in clinical imaging including those at the higher end.

  13. Group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand (GEM-CRL): Including longitudinal relaxation rates in the analysis of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Sebastian; Patel, Mitul K.; Errey, James C.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Jones, Jonathan A.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2010-03-01

    In the application of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments to the study of protein-ligand interactions, the relaxation of the ligand is one of the major influences on the experimentally observed STD factors, making interpretation of these difficult when attempting to define a group epitope map (GEM). In this paper, we describe a simplification of the relaxation matrix that may be applied under specified experimental conditions, which results in a simplified equation reflecting the directly transferred magnetisation rate from the protein onto the ligand, defined as the summation over the whole protein of the protein-ligand cross-relaxation multiplied by with the fractional saturation of the protein protons. In this, the relaxation of the ligand is accounted for implicitly by inclusion of the experimentally determined longitudinal relaxation rates. The conditions under which this "group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand" (GEM-CRL) can be applied were tested on a theoretical model system, which demonstrated only minor deviations from that predicted by the full relaxation matrix calculations (CORCEMA-ST) [7]. Furthermore, CORCEMA-ST calculations of two protein-saccharide complexes (Jacalin and TreR) with known crystal structures were performed and compared with experimental GEM-CRL data. It could be shown that the GEM-CRL methodology is superior to the classical group epitope mapping approach currently used for defining ligand-protein proximities. GEM-CRL is also useful for the interpretation of CORCEMA-ST results, because the transferred magnetisation rate provides an additional parameter for the comparison between measured and calculated values. The independence of this parameter from the above mentioned factors can thereby enhance the value of CORCEMA-ST calculations.

  14. Effects of relaxed static longitudinal stability on a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, D. C., Jr.; Wilhite, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of relaxing longitudinal stability requirements on single stage to orbit space vehicles is studied. A comparison of the mass and performance characteristics of two vehicles, one designed for positive levels of longitudinal stability and the other designed with relaxed stability requirements in a computer aided design process is presented. Both vehicles, required to meet the same mission characteristics are described. Wind tunnel tests, conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 4.63 to verify estimated aerodynamic characteristics, are discussed.

  15. Ultrafast NMR T1 relaxation measurements: probing molecular properties in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pieter E S; Donovan, Kevin J; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-09-16

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties, such as size, as well as on dynamic ones, such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently, a number of single-shot-inversion-recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here, we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real-time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4+, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole–dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the 15N–1H and 1H–1H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to 15N-ammonium bound to a 41 kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1 ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest. PMID:25128779

  17. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: application to (15)N relaxations in (15)NH4(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Hansen, D Flemming

    2014-09-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal (15)N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, (15)NH4(+), are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular (15)N-(1)H and (1)H-(1)H dipole-dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole-dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the (15)N-(1)H and (1)H-(1)H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to (15)N-ammonium bound to a 41kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest.

  18. Longitudinal spin relaxation of donor-bound electrons in direct band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linpeng, Xiayu; Karin, Todd; Durnev, M. V.; Barbour, Russell; Glazov, M. M.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Watkins, S. P.; Seto, Satoru; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-09-01

    We measure the donor-bound electron longitudinal spin-relaxation time (T1) as a function of magnetic field (B ) in three high-purity direct band-gap semiconductors: GaAs, InP, and CdTe, observing a maximum T1 of 1.4, 0.4, and 1.2 ms, respectively. In GaAs and InP at low magnetic field, up to ˜2 T, the spin-relaxation mechanism is strongly density and temperature dependent and is attributed to the random precession of the electron spin in hyperfine fields caused by the lattice nuclear spins. In all three semiconductors at high magnetic field, we observe a power-law dependence T1∝B-ν with 3 ≲ν ≲4 . Our theory predicts that the direct spin-phonon interaction is important in all three materials in this regime in contrast to quantum dot structures. In addition, the "admixture" mechanism caused by Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling combined with single-phonon processes has a comparable contribution in GaAs. We find excellent agreement between high-field theory and experiment for GaAs and CdTe with no free parameters, however a significant discrepancy exists for InP.

  19. Investigation of microenvironmental factors influencing the longitudinal relaxation times of drugs and other compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzik-Jurasz, A.S.K.; Leach, M.O.; Rowland, Ian John

    2004-01-01

    demonstrated that in the presence of competitive binding of other ligands for common binding sites on albumin, the 19F longitudinal relaxation time of 5-fluorouracil can increase by up to 340% from its value in the absence of the competing ligand. The relevance of the findings to in vivo studies is discussed...

  20. Anomalous longitudinal relaxation of nuclear spins in CaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropf, Chahan M. [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104, Freiburg (Germany); Kohlrautz, Jonas; Haase, Juergen [University of Leipzig, Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, Linnestr. 5, 04103, Leipzig (Germany); Fine, Boris V. [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Novaya Str., Skolkovo, Moscow Region, 143025 (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We consider the effect of non-secular resonances for interacting nuclear spins in solids which were predicted theoretically to exist in the presence of strong static and strong radio-frequency magnetic fields. These resonances imply corrections to the standard secular approximation for the nuclear spin-spin interaction in solids, which, in turn, should lead to an anomalous longitudinal relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this article, we investigate the feasibility of the experimental observation of this anomalous longitudinal relaxation in calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and conclude that such an observation is realistic. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Comparison of longitudinal metabolite relaxation times in different regions of the human brain at 1.5 and 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethofer, Thomas; Mader, Irina; Seeger, Uwe; Helms, Gunther; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang; Ludolph, Albert; Klose, Uwe

    2003-12-01

    In vivo longitudinal relaxation times of N-acetyl compounds (NA), choline-containing substances (Cho), creatine (Cr), myo-inositol (mI), and tissue water were measured at 1.5 and 3 T using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with short echo time (TE). T(1) values were determined in six different brain regions: the occipital gray matter (GM), occipital white matter (WM), motor cortex, frontoparietal WM, thalamus, and cerebellum. The T(1) relaxation times of water protons were 26-38% longer at 3 T than at 1.5 T. Significantly longer metabolite T(1) values at 3 T (11-36%) were found for NA, Cho, and Cr in the motor cortex, frontoparietal WM, and thalamus. The amounts of GM, WM, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the voxel were determined by segmentation of a 3D image data set. No influence of tissue composition on metabolite T(1) values was found, while the longitudinal relaxation times of water protons were strongly correlated with the relative GM content. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR.

  3. Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    P. N., Singh, P. P., and Bhattacharya, B., “Determination of Activation Energy of Relaxation Events in Composite Solid Propellants by Dynamic...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 August 2016 – 29 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic...ERC 14. ABSTRACT A method for determining the stress relaxation master curve of solid rocket propellants was developed. The propellant was tested in

  4. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  5. Longitudinal relaxation in dipole-coupled homonuclear three-spin systems: Distinct correlations and odd spectral densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2015-12-01

    A system of three dipole-coupled spins exhibits a surprisingly intricate relaxation behavior. Following Hubbard's pioneering 1958 study, many authors have investigated different aspects of this problem. Nevertheless, on revisiting this classic relaxation problem, we obtain several new results, some of which are at variance with conventional wisdom. Most notably from a fundamental point of view, we find that the odd-valued spectral density function influences longitudinal relaxation. We also show that the effective longitudinal relaxation rate for a non-isochronous three-spin system can exhibit an unusual inverted dispersion step. To clarify these and other issues, we present a comprehensive theoretical treatment of longitudinal relaxation in a three-spin system of arbitrary geometry and with arbitrary rotational dynamics. By using the Liouville-space formulation of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory and a basis of irreducible spherical tensor operators, we show that the number of relaxation components in the different cases can be deduced from symmetry arguments. For the isochronous case, we present the relaxation matrix in analytical form, whereas, for the non-isochronous case, we employ a computationally efficient approach based on the stochastic Liouville equation.

  6. Longitudinal relaxation in dipole-coupled homonuclear three-spin systems: Distinct correlations and odd spectral densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil, E-mail: bertil.halle@bpc.lu.se [Department of Chemistry, Division of Biophysical Chemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    A system of three dipole-coupled spins exhibits a surprisingly intricate relaxation behavior. Following Hubbard’s pioneering 1958 study, many authors have investigated different aspects of this problem. Nevertheless, on revisiting this classic relaxation problem, we obtain several new results, some of which are at variance with conventional wisdom. Most notably from a fundamental point of view, we find that the odd-valued spectral density function influences longitudinal relaxation. We also show that the effective longitudinal relaxation rate for a non-isochronous three-spin system can exhibit an unusual inverted dispersion step. To clarify these and other issues, we present a comprehensive theoretical treatment of longitudinal relaxation in a three-spin system of arbitrary geometry and with arbitrary rotational dynamics. By using the Liouville-space formulation of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory and a basis of irreducible spherical tensor operators, we show that the number of relaxation components in the different cases can be deduced from symmetry arguments. For the isochronous case, we present the relaxation matrix in analytical form, whereas, for the non-isochronous case, we employ a computationally efficient approach based on the stochastic Liouville equation.

  7. A theoretical and numerical consideration of the longitudinal and transverse relaxations in the rotating frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kenya

    2013-11-01

    We previously derived a simple equation for solving time-dependent Bloch equations by a matrix operation. The purpose of this study was to present a theoretical and numerical consideration of the longitudinal (R1ρ=1/T1ρ) and transverse relaxation rates in the rotating frame (R2ρ=1/T2ρ), based on this method. First, we derived an equation describing the time evolution of the magnetization vector (M(t)) by expanding the matrix exponential into the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors using diagonalization. Second, we obtained the longitudinal magnetization vector in the rotating frame (M1ρ(t)) by taking the inner product of M(t) and the eigenvector with the smallest eigenvalue in modulus, and then we obtained the transverse magnetization vector in the rotating frame (M2ρ(t)) by subtracting M1ρ(t) from M(t). For comparison, we also computed the spin-locked magnetization vector. We derived the exact solutions for R1ρ and R2ρ from the eigenvalues, and compared them with those obtained numerically from M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t), respectively. There was excellent agreement between them. From the exact solutions for R1ρ and R2ρ, R2ρ was found to be given by R2ρ=(2R2+R1)/2-R1ρ/2, where R1 and R2 denote the conventional longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, respectively. We also derived M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t) for bulk water protons, in which the effect of chemical exchange was taken into account using a 2-pool chemical exchange model, and we compared the R1ρ and R2ρ values obtained from the eigenvalues and those obtained numerically from M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t). There was also excellent agreement between them. In conclusion, this study will be useful for better understanding of the longitudinal and transverse relaxations in the rotating frame and for analyzing the contrast mechanisms in T1ρ- and T2ρ-weighted MRI.

  8. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  9. RS trigger based relaxation oscillator for temperature measurement circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Zhi-ge; ZOU Xue-cheng; JIAN Wen-xiang; LEI Jian-ming

    2008-01-01

    Resistance-to-time converter is always used for digital temperature measurement. An reset-set (RS) trigger based, relaxation oscillator based temperature measurement circuit, which is used to convert the change of thermistor sensor into a frequency signal for later processing, has been presented in this article. The RS trigger, which is composed of two inverters designed with distinct logical transition threshold voltages by changing the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor gains, has the same function as the Schmitt trigger in the relaxation oscillator. The advantage of the RS trigger based Schmitt trigger is that it reduces the dependence to supply voltage, chip temperature, and process variation. This temperature measurement circuit has been applied in a clinical thermometer chip that can measure temperature to an accuracy of better than 0.05℃ down to 1.1 V battery voltage. It is fabricated in 0.5double metal single poly complementary MOS (CMOS) process.

  10. Two-dimensional assignment with merged measurements using Langrangrian relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Mark; Maskell, Simon; Philpott, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Closely spaced targets can result in merged measurements, which complicate data association. Such merged measurements violate any assumption that each measurement relates to a single target. As a result, it is not possible to use the auction algorithm in its simplest form (or other two-dimensional assignment algorithms) to solve the two-dimensional target-to-measurement assignment problem. We propose an approach that uses the auction algorithm together with Lagrangian relaxation to incorporate the additional constraints resulting from the presence of merged measurements. We conclude with some simulated results displaying the concepts introduced, and discuss the application of this research within a particle filter context.

  11. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R.M.; Jones, R M; Pasini, M; Posocco, P A; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36 ± 0.04π ns keV/u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rig...

  12. An analytical model which determines the apparent T1 for Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery - Analysis of the longitudinal relaxation under the influence of discontinuous balanced (classical MOLLI) and spoiled gradient echo readouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Thomas; Reiter, Theresa; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf

    2017-08-09

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shifts more and more into the focus of clinical research. Especially determination of relaxation times without/and with contrast agents becomes the foundation of tissue characterization, e.g. in cardiac MRI for myocardial fibrosis. Techniques which assess longitudinal relaxation times rely on repetitive application of readout modules, which are interrupted by free relaxation periods, e.g. the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery = MOLLI sequence. These discontinuous sequences reveal an apparent relaxation time, and, by techniques extrapolated from continuous readout sequences, a putative real T1 is determined. What is missing is a rigorous analysis of the dependence of the apparent relaxation time on its real partner, readout sequence parameters and biological parameters as heart rate. This is provided in this paper for the discontinuous balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) and spoiled gradient echo readouts. It turns out that the apparent longitudinal relaxation rate is the time average of the relaxation rates during the readout module, and free relaxation period. Knowing the heart rate our results vice versa allow to determine the real T1 from its measured apparent partner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Sufficient dimension reduction for longitudinally measured predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Forzani, Liliana; Bura, Efstathia

    2012-09-28

    We propose a method to combine several predictors (markers) that are measured repeatedly over time into a composite marker score without assuming a model and only requiring a mild condition on the predictor distribution. Assuming that the first and second moments of the predictors can be decomposed into a time and a marker component via a Kronecker product structure that accommodates the longitudinal nature of the predictors, we develop first-moment sufficient dimension reduction techniques to replace the original markers with linear transformations that contain sufficient information for the regression of the predictors on the outcome. These linear combinations can then be combined into a score that has better predictive performance than a score built under a general model that ignores the longitudinal structure of the data. Our methods can be applied to either continuous or categorical outcome measures. In simulations, we focus on binary outcomes and show that our method outperforms existing alternatives by using the AUC, the area under the receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) curve, as a summary measure of the discriminatory ability of a single continuous diagnostic marker for binary disease outcomes.

  14. Observation of the relaxivity and thickness of surface phase in porous rock with the combination of PFG NMR and relaxation measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立志; 杜有如; 叶朝辉

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation of fluids in porous media is affected by the solid-liquid interface. Quantitative determination of the surface relaxivity is significantly important for both investigation and application of relaxation mechanisms in porous media. A method to estimate the surface relaxivity with the combination of relaxation and diffusion measurements is proposed. According to this method, a criterion for testing the current diffusion and relaxation theory for porous media is available.

  15. An optimized method for (15)N R(1) relaxation rate measurements in non-deuterated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairí, Margarida; Dyachenko, Andrey; González, M Teresa; Feliz, Miguel; Pons, Miquel; Giralt, Ernest

    2015-06-01

    (15)N longitudinal relaxation rates are extensively used for the characterization of protein dynamics; however, their accurate measurement is hindered by systematic errors. (15)N CSA/(1)H-(15)N dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CC) and amide proton exchange saturation transfer from water protons are the two main sources of systematic errors in the determination of (15)N R1 rates through (1)H-(15)N HSQC-based experiments. CC is usually suppressed through a train of 180° proton pulses applied during the variable (15)N relaxation period (T), which can perturb water magnetization. Thus CC cancellation is required in such a way as to minimize water saturation effects. Here we examined the level of water saturation during the T period caused by various types of inversion proton pulses to suppress CC: (I) amide-selective IBURP-2; (II) cosine-modulated IBURP-2; (III) Watergate-like blocks; and (IV) non-selective hard. We additionally demonstrate the effect of uncontrolled saturation of aliphatic protons on (15)N R1 rates. In this paper we present an optimized pulse sequence that takes into account the crucial effect of controlling also the saturation of the aliphatic protons during (15)N R1 measurements in non-deuterated proteins. We show that using cosine-modulated IBURP-2 pulses spaced 40 ms to cancel CC in this optimized pulse program is the method of choice to minimize systematic errors coming from water and aliphatic protons saturation effects.

  16. Experimental measurement and theoretical assessment of fast lanthanide electronic relaxation in solution with four series of isostructural complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Alexander M; Fries, Pascal H; Harvey, Peter; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David

    2013-02-07

    The rates of longitudinal relaxation for ligand nuclei in four isostructural series of lanthanide(III) complexes have been measured by solution state NMR at 295 K at five magnetic fields in the range 4.7-16.5 T. The electronic relaxation time T(le) is a function of both the lanthanide ion and the local ligand field. It needs to be considered when relaxation probes for magnetic resonance applications are devised because it affects the nuclear relaxation, especially over the field range 0.5 to 4.7 T. Analysis of the data, based on Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory describing the paramagnetic enhancement of the nuclear relaxation rate has allowed reliable estimates of electronic relaxation times, T(1e), to be obtained using global minimization methods. Values were found in the range 0.10-0.63 ps, consistent with fluctuations in the transient ligand field induced by solvent collision. A refined theoretical model for lanthanide electronic relaxation beyond the Redfield approximation is introduced, which accounts for the magnitude of the ligand field coefficients of order 2, 4, and 6 and their relative contributions to the rate 1/T(le). Despite the considerable variation of these contributions with the nature of the lanthanide ion and its fluctuating ligand field, the theory explains the modest change of measured T(le) values and their remarkable statistical ordering across the lanthanide series. Both experiment and theory indicate that complexes of terbium and dysprosium should most efficiently promote paramagnetic enhancement of the rate of nuclear relaxation.

  17. Global longitudinal strain: a useful everyday measurement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A King

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Herceptin (Trastuzumab is a widely used and effective drug for the treatment of Her2+ breast cancer but its cardiotoxic side effects require regular monitoring by echocardiography. A 10% reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction can lead to suspension of treatment and therefore has significant implications for patient prognosis in terms of cardiac and cancer outcomes. Assessment of LV function by conventional 2D biplane method of discs (2DEF has limitations in accuracy and reproducibility. Global longitudinal strain (GLS is becoming more widely available and user friendly. It has been shown to demonstrate myocardial damage earlier in treatment than 2DEF, allowing the option of pharmacological intervention at a pre-clinical stage and preventing the interruption of Herceptin. This study compares the reproducibility of GLS with that of 2DEF in a routine clinical environment. Fifty echocardiograms performed on female patients undergoing Herceptin treatment were used to measure both 2DEF and GLS within the recommended standard appointment time of 40 min. The data were re-measured (blind by the same operator a minimum of 14 days later to determine intra-operator variation. These data were also measured by a second operator (blind, to assess inter-operator variation. Analysis by direct comparison, intra-class correlation (ICC, coefficient of variation (CV and Bland–Altman plots demonstrated that GLS is a more reproducible measurement than 2DEF. This is important to prevent clinical decisions being erroneously based on variation in operator measurement. The investigation also shows that with advances in machine software this is a practical addition to routine assessment rather than merely a research tool.

  18. A nonlinear BOLD model accounting for refractory effect by applying the longitudinal relaxation in NMR to the linear BOLD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwan-Jin

    2009-09-01

    A mathematical model to regress the nonlinear blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has been developed by incorporating the refractory effect into the linear BOLD model of the biphasic gamma variate function. The refractory effect was modeled as a relaxation of two separate BOLD capacities corresponding to the biphasic components of the BOLD signal in analogy with longitudinal relaxation of magnetization in NMR. When tested with the published fMRI data of finger tapping, the nonlinear BOLD model with the refractory effect reproduced the nonlinear BOLD effects such as reduced poststimulus undershoot and saddle pattern in a prolonged stimulation as well as the reduced BOLD signal for repetitive stimulation.

  19. A Reference Optical System of Laser Doppler Longitudinal Displacement Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存满; 赵洋; 李达成

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new reference optical system is put forward to achieve longitudinal displacement measurement. An optical grating is used for frequency mixing and getting high SNR signals in the measurement. Conditions and methods for getting Doppler beat signals are presented.The experiments indicate that this optical syetem can be used to measure the longitudinal displacement with high accuracy.

  20. Longitudinal T1 relaxation rate (R1) captures changes in short-term Mn exposure in welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mechelle M; Flynn, Michael R; Lee, Eun-Young; Van Buren, Scott; Van Buren, Eric; Du, Guangwei; Fry, Rebecca C; Herring, Amy H; Kong, Lan; Mailman, Richard B; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated recently that the T1 relaxation rate (R1) captured short-term Mn exposure in welders with chronic, relatively low exposure levels in a cross-sectional study. In the current study, we used a longitudinal design to examine whether R1 values reflect the short-term dynamics of Mn exposure. Twenty-nine welders were evaluated at baseline and 12 months. Occupational questionnaires estimated short-term welding exposure using welding hours in the 90days prior to each study visit (HrsW90). In addition, blood Mn levels, the pallidal index (PI; globus pallidus T1-weighted intensity (T1WI)/frontal white matter T1WI), and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs) were determined as Mn biomarkers at each visit. Associations between changes in estimated welding exposure and changes in purported Mn biomarkers were assessed by Spearman's correlations with adjustment for age and baseline R1, HrsW90, and blood Mn values. Changes in welding hours (HrsW90: the short-term welding exposure estimate), was associated significantly with changes in R1 values in the putamen (r=0.541, p=0.005), caudate (R=0.453, p=0.023), globus pallidus (R=0.430, p=0.032), amygdala (R=0.461, p=0.020), and hippocampus (R=0.447, p=0.025), but not with changes in blood Mn levels or the PI. Changes in R1 values correlated with changes in the short-term welding exposure estimate, but not with more traditional measures of Mn exposure (blood Mn levels or PI). These results suggest that R1 may serve as a useful marker to capture the short-term dynamics in Mn brain accumulation related to welding exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. NMR T1 relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF4 and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, P. M.; Voice, A. M.; Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal relaxation (T1) measurements of 19F, 7Li, and 1H in propylene carbonate/LiBF4 liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T1 values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T2) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T1 minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T1 from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  2. The estimate and measurement of longitudinal wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisen, Ming

    1996-08-01

    Quasi-longitudinal waves are one type of structural waves, which are important at high frequencies. This paper studies the estimate theory and measurement technique of quasi-longitudinal waves, analyzes the bias error due to the effect of bending waves. In a two-dimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity vector is the sum of the effective intensity vector and the intensity variation vector. Its axial component is proportional to two imaginary parts of cross spectral densities and in the measurement, it is measured by a pair of two-transducer arrays. In a onedimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity variation is zero, the intensity is proportional to only one imaginary part of a cross spectral density and it can be measured using a two-transducer array. If bending and quasi-longitudinal waves coexist and the contribution from bending waves cannot be eliminated or reduced to a certain extent, the measured quasi-longitudinal wave intensity will contain a large error. The results measured on the three-beam structure show that quasi-longitudinal wave intensity can be accurately measured using the intensity technique when bending waves are negligible in comparison with quasi-longitudinal waves.

  3. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  4. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suntrup, Donald J., E-mail: suntrup@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  5. Relaxation of a qubit measured by a driven Duffing oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Serban, I; Wilhelm, F K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relaxation of a superconducting qubit for the case when its detector, the Josephson bifurcation amplifier, remains latched in one of its two (meta)stable states of forced vibrations. The qubit relaxation rates are different in different states. They can display strong dependence on the qubit frequency and resonant enhancement, which is due to {\\em quasienergy resonances}. Coupling to the driven oscillator changes the effective temperature of the qubit.

  6. Measurement of interfacial area from NMR time dependent diffusion and relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, M

    2017-09-07

    The interfacial area between two immiscible phases in porous media is an important parameter for describing and predicting 2 phase flow. Although present in several models, experimental investigations are sparse due to the lack of appropriate measurement techniques. We propose two NMR techniques for the measurement of oil-water interfacial area: (i) a time dependent NMR diffusion technique applicable in static conditions, similar to those used for the measurement of the solid specific surface of a porous media, and (ii) a fast relaxation technique applicable in dynamic conditions while flowing, based on an interfacial relaxation mechanism induced by the inclusion of paramagnetic salts in the water phase. For dodecane relaxing on doped water, we found an oil interfacial relaxivity of 1.8μm/s, large enough to permit the measurement of specific interfacial surface as small as 1000cm(2)/cm(3). We demonstrate both NMR techniques in drainage followed by imbibition, in a model porous media with a narrow pore size distribution. While flowing, we observe that the interfacial area is larger in imbibition than in drainage, implying a different organization of the oil phase. In a carbonate sample with a wide pore size distribution, we evidence the gradual invasion of the smallest pores as the oil-water pressure difference is increased. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Longitudinal proton relaxation rates in rabbit tissues after intravenous injection of free and chelated Mn2+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiller, M.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.; Wolf, G.L.

    1988-11-01

    The factors that determine the field-dependent increase in 1/T1 of tissue water protons were investigated for MnCl2 and Mn2+ (PDTA) (1,3-propylenediamine-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) introduced intravenously into rabbits. Mn2+ was used in preference to other paramagnetic ions in part because of the distinct NMRD profiles (magnetic field dependence of 1/T1) of free Mn2+ ions, their small chelate complexes, and their macromolecular conjugates, and in part because the relatively low toxicity of Mn2+ is favorable for animal studies. Tissue content of Mn2+ was determined in all samples by inductively coupled plasma analyses the state of Mn2+ in excised tissues was determined from the form of the 1/T1 NMRD profile of water protons; and distribution of contrast agent within tissue and access of water on a T1 time scale were determined by double-exponential analyses of proton relaxation behavior in intact doped tissue, as well as by the change of single-exponential relaxation rates and proton signal intensity upon gentle disruption of the tissue. MnCl2 is found in all tissues, except fat and skeletal muscle, but liver is most avid at low dose, and Mn2+ accumulates in spleen after high doses. Chelation targets Mn2+ to liver and kidney, saturating the liver chemically at relatively low dose. We suggest that pronounced increase in tissue relaxivity results from irrotationally bound Mn2+, ostensibly associated with the polar head groups of cell membranes. Compartmentalization of contrast agent and restricted diffusion of tissue water influences the maximum relaxation rates attainable, so that there is an optimal dose of these contrast agents which is rather low.

  8. Longitudinal proton relaxation rates in rabbit tissues after intravenous injection of free and chelated Mn2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, M; Brown, R D; Koenig, S H; Wolf, G L

    1988-11-01

    The factors that determine the field-dependent increase in 1/T1 of tissue water protons were investigated for MnCl2 and Mn2+ (PDTA) (1,3-propylenediamine-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) introduced intravenously into rabbits. Mn2+ was used in preference to other paramagnetic ions in part because of the distinct NMRD profiles (magnetic field dependence of 1/T1) of free Mn2+ ions, their small chelate complexes, and their macromolecular conjugates, and in part because the relatively low toxicity of Mn2+ is favorable for animal studies. Tissue content of Mn2+ was determined in all samples by inductively coupled plasma analyses the state of Mn2+ in excised tissues was determined from the form of the 1/T1 NMRD profile of water protons; and distribution of contrast agent within tissue and access of water on a T1 time scale were determined by double-exponential analyses of proton relaxation behavior in intact doped tissue, as well as by the change of single-exponential relaxation rates and proton signal intensity upon gentle disruption of the tissue. MnCl2 is found in all tissues, except fat and skeletal muscle, but liver is most avid at low dose, and Mn2+ accumulates in spleen after high doses. Chelation targets Mn2+ to liver and kidney, saturating the liver chemically at relatively low dose. We suggest that pronounced increase in tissue relaxivity results from irrotationally bound Mn2+, ostensibly associated with the polar head groups of cell membranes. Compartmentalization of contrast agent and restricted diffusion of tissue water influences the maximum relaxation rates attainable, so that there is an optimal dose of these contrast agents which is rather low.

  9. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Longitudinal relaxation of mechanically clamped KH2PO4 type crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Levitskii

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a modified proton ordering model of the KH2PO4 family ferroelectric crystals, taking into account a linear over the strain ϵ6 contribution into the proton system energy, we obtain an expression for longitudinal dynamic dielectric permittivity of a mechanically clamped crystal using the four-particle cluster approximation and the dynamic Glauber approach. At a proper choice of the model parameters, we obtain a good quantitative description of available experimental data for these crystals.

  11. Analysis of repeated outcome measures from longitudinal studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanjia WANG; Naihua DUAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ In many clinical studies repeated measurements of an outcome are collected over time.For example,in an 8-week study of treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder,the severity of the disorder may be measured weekly using the Yale-Brown-Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder-Scale (YBOCS).For each study participant who completes the study,there will be nine repeated measures of YBOCS (a baseline assessment plus eight assessments during the course of treatment).Such a study in which participants are followed and measured repeatedly over time is called a longitudinal study and the resulting data are called longitudinal data.

  12. Measurement of Longitudinal Electron Diffusion in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, Jim; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our results, which are consistent with previous measurements in the region between 100 to 350 V/cm [1] , are systematically higher than the prediction of Atrazhev-Timoshkin[2], and represent the world's best measurement in the region between 350 to 2000 V/cm. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  13. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  14. Methods of Measuring Stress Relaxation in Composite Tape Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    additional analysis done in SOLIDWORKS . For the first method of analysis, PolyWorks is used to cut out the unnecessary portions of the raw scan data. Then...each tape spring is exported as a ‘.stl’ file. This file is imported as a surface into a SOLIDWORKS part file. The SOLIDWORKS parts are combined into...analyzed using MATLAB, PolyWorks, and SOLIDWORKS . These data provide a greater insight into the stress relaxation of tape springs when deformed

  15. The effects of music relaxation and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures among individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ilana Kremer; Naomi Ziv; Zahi Arnon; Boaz Bloch; Limor Vadas; Iris Haimov

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of music and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures in individuals with Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Thirteen PTSD patients, who had no other major psychiatric, sleep, or neurological disorders, participated in the study. The study comprised one 7-day, running-in, no-treatment period, followed by two 7-day experimental periods. The treatments were either music relaxation or muscle relaxation techni...

  16. Exploring Intensive Longitudinal Measures of Student Engagement in Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie, Curtis R.; Bodily, Robert; Manwaring, Kristine C.; Graham, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study we used an intensive longitudinal approach to measure student engagement in a blended educational technology course, collecting both self-report and observational data. The self-report measure included a simple survey of Likert-scale and open-ended questions given repeatedly during the semester. Observational data were…

  17. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  18. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  19. Measurement error in longitudinal film badge data

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, J L

    2002-01-01

    Initial logistic regressions turned up some surprising contradictory results which led to a re-sampling of Sellafield mortality controls without the date of employment matching factor. It is suggested that over matching is the cause of the contradictory results. Comparisons of the two measurements of radiation exposure suggest a strongly linear relationship with non-Normal errors. A method has been developed using the technique of Regression Calibration to deal with these in a case-control study context, and applied to this Sellafield study. The classical measurement error model is that of a simple linear regression with unobservable variables. Information about the covariates is available only through error-prone measurements, usually with an additive structure. Ignoring errors has been shown to result in biased regression coefficients, reduced power of hypothesis tests and increased variability of parameter estimates. Radiation is known to be a causal factor for certain types of leukaemia. This link is main...

  20. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemen, L. [Univ Cincinnati (United States)

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  1. Borehole camera technology for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock: mechanism and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Hong-wen; Li Yuan-hai; Liang Jun-qi; Yu De-cheng [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics & Deep Underground Engineering

    2009-05-15

    A panoramic borehole camera technology (BCT) and digital image processing method was developed by constructing a system composed of hardware and software. The technology was used for measuring the relaxation zone of surrounding rock with the borehole camera. The hardware consists of a mini CCD camera and a high-pressure sealed magnetic compass that is used for camera positioning. The software includes real-time image monitoring and a processing program that includes the procedure for analysis of the relaxation zone. The roundness of cracks in the boreholes is taken as the index for identifying the relaxation zone. The system was used to measure the relaxation zone of a deep roadway in the Qiwu coal mine of Shandong province. The distribution of the relaxation zone around the roadway was obtained. The results show that the thickness of the broken rock zone varies with the measuring position within a cross section of the roadway. The reliability of the measuring method was tested and verified by comparing the data from BCT with those measured by an ultrasonic method; the difference is less than 3.5%. The system provides a new method for the measurement of the relaxation zone when engineering deep underground. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Measurement error in longitudinal film badge data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, J.L

    2002-04-01

    The classical measurement error model is that of a simple linear regression with unobservable variables. Information about the covariates is available only through error-prone measurements, usually with an additive structure. Ignoring errors has been shown to result in biased regression coefficients, reduced power of hypothesis tests and increased variability of parameter estimates. Radiation is known to be a causal factor for certain types of leukaemia. This link is mainly substantiated by the Atomic Bomb Survivor study, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients study, and studies of various other patients irradiated for therapeutic purposes. The carcinogenic relationship is believed to be a linear or quadratic function of dose but the risk estimates differ widely for the different studies. Previous cohort studies of the Sellafield workforce have used the cumulative annual exposure data for their risk estimates. The current 1:4 matched case-control study also uses the individual worker's film badge data, the majority of which has been unavailable in computerised form. The results from the 1:4 matched (on dates of birth and employment, sex and industrial status) case-control study are compared and contrasted with those for a 1:4 nested (within the worker cohort and matched on the same factors) case-control study using annual doses. The data consist of 186 cases and 744 controls from the work forces of four BNFL sites: Springfields, Sellafield, Capenhurst and Chapelcross. Initial logistic regressions turned up some surprising contradictory results which led to a re-sampling of Sellafield mortality controls without the date of employment matching factor. It is suggested that over matching is the cause of the contradictory results. Comparisons of the two measurements of radiation exposure suggest a strongly linear relationship with non-Normal errors. A method has been developed using the technique of Regression Calibration to deal with these in a case-control study

  3. TOMOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF LONGITUDINAL EMITTANCE GROWTH DUE TO STRIPPING FOILS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; AHRENS, L.; THIEBERGER, P.

    2005-05-16

    During beam acceleration in the Brookhaven accelerator complex, heavy ions are stripped of their electrons in several steps. Depending on the properties of the stripping foils, this process results in an increased energy spread and longitudinal emittance growth. A tomographic phase space reconstruction technique has been applied to measure the associated emittance growth for different stripping foil materials.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yichen, E-mail: yichen@bnl.gov [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsang, Thomas [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rao, Triveni [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev‐Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  5. How many longitudinal covariate measurements are needed for risk prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, Jaakko; Karvanen, Juha; Tolonen, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    In epidemiologic follow-up studies, many key covariates, such as smoking, use of medication, blood pressure, and cholesterol, are time varying. Because of practical and financial limitations, time-varying covariates cannot be measured continuously, but only at certain prespecified time points. We study how the number of these longitudinal measurements can be chosen cost-efficiently by evaluating the usefulness of the measurements for risk prediction. The usefulness is addressed by measuring the improvement in model discrimination between models using different amounts of longitudinal information. We use simulated follow-up data and the data from the Finnish East-West study, a follow-up study, with eight longitudinal covariate measurements carried out between 1959 and 1999. In a simulation study, we show how the variability and the hazard ratio of a time-varying covariate are connected to the importance of remeasurements. In the East-West study, it is seen that for older people, the risk predictions obtained using only every other measurement are almost equivalent to the predictions obtained using all eight measurements. Decisions about the study design have significant effects on the costs. The cost-efficiency can be improved by applying the measures of model discrimination to data from previous studies and simulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. On-chip measurements of Brownian relaxation vs. concentration of 40nm magnetic beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    are needed as the beads are magnetized by the field generated by the applied sensor bias current. We show that the Brownian relaxation frequency can be extracted from fitting the Cole-Cole model to measurements for bead concentrations of 64 mu g/ml or higher and that the measured dynamic magnetic response......We present on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on a logarithmic dilution series of 40 nm beads dispersed in water with bead concentrations between 16 mu g/ml and 4000 mu g/ml. The measurements are performed using a planar Hall effect bridge sensor at frequencies up to 1 MHz. No external fields...

  7. The strictest common relaxation of a family of risk measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend; Schumacher, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Operations which form new risk measures from a collection of given (often simpler) risk measures have been used extensively in the literature. Examples include convex combination, convolution, and the worst-case operator. Here we study the risk measure that is constructed from a family of given risk

  8. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems; Variacao dos tempos de relaxacao longitudinal de protons em sistemas membranares contendo anestesicos locais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A. [Universita degli Studi di Parma, Parma (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Biologica

    1997-12-31

    The study of local anesthetics`(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic`s hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured {sup 1}H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T{sub 1}) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T{sub 1} in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T{sub 1} values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author) 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  9. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  10. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    magnetic fields are needed. First, the method is demonstrated on Brownian relaxation measurements of beads with nominal sizes of 40, 80, 130, and 250 nm. The results are found to compare well to those obtained by an already established measurement technique in the frequency domain. Next, we demonstrate......We present and demonstrate a new method for on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on magnetic nanobeads in the time domain using magnetoresistive sensors. The beads are being magnetized by the sensor self-field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors and thus no external...... the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s...

  11. Micro-indentation relaxation measurements in polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, D. M.; Lu, Y.

    1997-07-01

    A micro-indenter consisting of a piezo-electric driven flat cylindrical punch has been used to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of polystyrene films as thin as 50 μm. The measured viscoelastic response was sensitive to the bonding of the polystyrene to an underlying silicon substrate for films which were thinner than one indenter diameter. The instrument therefore was shown to have practical use in measuring the dynamic mechanical response of polymer films, and the strength of bonding between disparate materials.

  12. An optimized method for {sup 15}N R{sub 1} relaxation rate measurements in non-deuterated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gairí, Margarida, E-mail: mgairi@rmn.ub.edu [University of Barcelona (CCiTUB), NMR Facility, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Dyachenko, Andrey [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) (Spain); González, M. Teresa; Feliz, Miguel [University of Barcelona (CCiTUB), NMR Facility, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Pons, Miquel [University of Barcelona, Biomolecular NMR Laboratory and Organic Chemistry Department (Spain); Giralt, Ernest, E-mail: ernest.giralt@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation rates are extensively used for the characterization of protein dynamics; however, their accurate measurement is hindered by systematic errors. {sup 15}N CSA/{sup 1}H–{sup 15}N dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CC) and amide proton exchange saturation transfer from water protons are the two main sources of systematic errors in the determination of {sup 15}N R{sub 1} rates through {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N HSQC-based experiments. CC is usually suppressed through a train of 180° proton pulses applied during the variable {sup 15}N relaxation period (T), which can perturb water magnetization. Thus CC cancellation is required in such a way as to minimize water saturation effects. Here we examined the level of water saturation during the T period caused by various types of inversion proton pulses to suppress CC: (I) amide-selective IBURP-2; (II) cosine-modulated IBURP-2; (III) Watergate-like blocks; and (IV) non-selective hard. We additionally demonstrate the effect of uncontrolled saturation of aliphatic protons on {sup 15}N R{sub 1} rates. In this paper we present an optimized pulse sequence that takes into account the crucial effect of controlling also the saturation of the aliphatic protons during {sup 15}N R{sub 1} measurements in non-deuterated proteins. We show that using cosine-modulated IBURP-2 pulses spaced 40 ms to cancel CC in this optimized pulse program is the method of choice to minimize systematic errors coming from water and aliphatic protons saturation effects.

  13. The effects of music relaxation and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanaru, Monica; Bloch, Boaz; Vadas, Limor; Arnon, Zahi; Ziv, Naomi; Kremer, Ilana; Haimov, Iris

    2012-07-26

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder with lifetime prevalence of 7.8%, is characterized by symptoms that develop following exposure to traumatic life events and that cause an immediate experience of intense fear, helplessness or horror. PTSD is marked by recurrent nightmares typified by the recall of intrusive experiences and by extended disturbance throughout sleep. Individuals with PTSD respond poorly to drug treatments for insomnia. The disadvantages of drug treatment for insomnia underline the importance of non-pharmacological alternatives. Thus, the present study had three aims: first, to compare the efficiency of two relaxation techniques (muscular relaxation and progressive music relaxation) in alleviating insomnia among individuals with PTSD using both objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine whether these two techniques have different effects on psychological indicators of PTSD, such as depression and anxiety; and finally, to examine how initial PTSD symptom severity and baseline emotional measures are related to the efficiency of these two relaxation methods. Thirteen PTSD patients with no other major psychiatric or neurological disorders participated in the study. The study comprised one seven-day running-in, no-treatment period, followed by two seven-day experimental periods. The treatments constituted either music relaxation or muscle relaxation techniques at desired bedtime. These treatments were randomly assigned. During each of these three experimental periods, subjects' sleep was continuously monitored with a wrist actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc.), and subjects were asked to fill out several questionnaires concerned with a wide spectrum of issues, such as sleep, depression, and anxiety. Analyses revealed a significant increase in objective and subjective sleep efficiency and a significant reduction in depression level following music relaxation. Moreover, following music relaxation, a highly

  14. The effects of music relaxation and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Haimov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, an anxiety disorder with lifetime prevalence of 7.8%, is characterized by symptoms that develop following exposure to traumatic life events and that cause an immediate experience of intense fear, helplessness or horror. PTSD is marked by recurrent nightmares typified by the recall of intrusive experiences and by extended disturbance throughout sleep. Individuals with PTSD respond poorly to drug treatments for insomnia. The disadvantages of drug treatment for insomnia underline the importance of non-pharmacological alternatives. Thus, the present study had three aims: first, to compare the efficiency of two relaxation techniques (muscular relaxation and progressive music relaxation in alleviating insomnia among individuals with PTSD using both objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine whether these two techniques have different effects on psychological indicators of PTSD, such as depression and anxiety; and finally, to examine how initial PTSD symptom severity and baseline emotional measures are related to the efficiency of these two relaxation methods. Thirteen PTSD patients with no other major psychiatric or neurological disorders participated in the study. The study comprised one seven-day running-in, no-treatment period, followed by two seven-day experimental periods. The treatments constituted either music relaxation or muscle relaxation techniques at desired bedtime. These treatments were randomly assigned. During each of these three experimental periods, subjects’ sleep was continuously monitored with a wrist actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., and subjects were asked to fill out several questionnaires concerned with a wide spectrum of issues, such as sleep, depression, and anxiety. Analyses revealed a significant increase in objective and subjective sleep efficiency and a significant reduction in depression level following music relaxation. Moreover, following music

  15. Longitudinal Impedance Measurements of the Components for the BEPCII

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Demin; Kang, Wen; Wang Jiu Qing; Zhou, Lijuan

    2005-01-01

    A longitudinal impedance measurement system was established for the BEPCII. The measurements, done in the frequency domain, are based on the coaxial wire method using HP/Agilent 8720ES network analyzer. The applications of the TRL calibration technique and absorbers were investigated to find a good approach for impedance measurements. The impedance, larger than 20 Ohm and below 6 GHz, can be measured using the TRL calibration technique in the experiment. And better measurement results were got using the reference pipes with the absorbers. So, this system satisfies the requirements of the BEPCII. This paper gives a review on this impedance measurements system for the BEPCII. The measurements results show that there are no serious impedance problems for BEPCII bellows and injection kickers, agreeing well with the numerical simulations. More improvements on this system are in progress.

  16. MR imaging of the stomach and relaxation measurement with intraluminal hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xenon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Atsuomi; Fujiwara, Hideaki [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Hattori, Mineyuki; Hiraga, Takashi; Iida, Hidehiro

    2001-04-01

    Using laser optical pumping, the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases can be strongly enhanced. The purpose of this study was to make a simple apparatus that can provide hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe gas, which can then be used in an attempt to obtain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We would also like to study the relaxation behavior of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe gas through the measurement of the relaxation time. First, we demonstrated that hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe gas can be applied to magnetic resonance imaging of the stomach, by using a rat as a model. This was performed under a 4.7 T magnet field using the following imaging parameters for the hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe gas: TR=50 ms, TE=15 ms, FOV=10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, matrix size 64 x 64, THK=2.54 cm. By using these parameters, we were able to obtain a hyperpolarized image of the stomach in rats for the first time. Next, we measured the relaxation times of the hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe gas enclosed in cavities such as the stomach of rats as well as in phantoms created by glass and gelatin bulbs. The cavity size dependency of the relaxation time was analyzed on the basis of the kinetic theory of gases. This analysis showed a linear relationship between the relaxation rate (1/T{sub 1}) and a square inverse of the cavity diameter (1/d{sup 2}). From this relationship, the wall effect on the {sup 129}Xe relaxation can be estimated in the novel parameter t{sub 1}, {sub wall}. This shows drastic dependency on the material of the wall, suggesting a potential use of the relaxation experiment as a diagnostic tool for organ surfaces in the future. (author)

  17. Measuring permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation by the beam-bending technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichit-Vadakan, Wilasa

    Recent interest in the permeability of cement paste, mortars, and concrete lies in the need to gain further understanding of mechanisms affecting the durability of these materials. Conventional techniques for measuring permeability are cumbersome and often take days to complete just one measurement. This thesis proposes a new technique for measuring the permeability. The advantage of this technique is that the results are obtained in a few minutes to a few hours; moreover, there is no problem with leaks or need for high pressures. The method is particularly well suited for examining the changes in permeability and viscoelastic properties of young cement paste samples. When a saturated rod of a porous material is instantaneously deflected under three-point bending, two types of relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body to restore ambient pressure, and viscoelastic relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability and Young's modulus from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the stress relaxation function of the sample. The exact viscoelastic solution is developed and the total relaxation is shown to be very closely approximated as the product of the hydrodynamic and stress relaxation functions. The analytical results are verified on porous VycorRTM glass saturated in various solvents, including normal alcohols, water, and glycerol. The results show excellent agreement with the theory. Consistent with observations of previous workers, the permeability is found to be influenced by the size of the solvent molecule; by assuming that the pore surfaces are covered with a monolayer of immobile solvent, the observed variation can be explained. The evolution of the permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation function are reported for Type III Portland cement paste with

  18. Longitudinal measurement invariance of psychosocial measures in physical activity research: An application to adolescent data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Scott C; Norman, Greg J; Merz, Erin L; Sallis, James F; Patrick, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The current study served as a practical and substantive guide to establishing longitudinal measurement invariance of psychosocial measures commonly used in adolescent physical activity (PA) research. Psychosocial data on an initial sample of 878 adolescents (ages 11 - 15) recruited through primary care providers were provided at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. The target measures included family support, peer support, decisional balance (pros, cons), self-efficacy, and behavioral strategies. Five of the six psychosocial measures exhibited strict longitudinal measurement invariance, with the 6th measure (self-efficacy) exhibiting strong longitudinal measurement invariance. These findings support the equivalence of these measures across time, and provide the foundation to substantively interpret group differences and associations involving these measures and PA.

  19. First measurements results of the LHC longitudinal density monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff , A; Bravin, E; Boccardi, A; Bozyigit, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Roncarolo, F; Welsch, C P; Fisher, A S

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, for example to check the injection quality and to characterize the development of ghost bunches before and during the physics periods. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. The LDM is able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. The LDM operated during the 2010 lead ion run and during 2011 with protons. Measurements from both runs are presented in this contribution along with an analysis of the LDM performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  20. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (phi). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique gives absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y), not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y). The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure

  1. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (phi). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique gives absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y), not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y). The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE RELAXATION TIME OF INTERMOLECULAR MULTIPLE QUANTUM COHERENCES IN NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG SHAO-KUAN; CHEN ZHONG; CHEN ZHI-WEI; ZHONG JIAN-HUI

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional NMR method is presented for measuring the transverse relaxation time, T2,n, of intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (IMQCs) of coherence order n in highly polarized spin systems. The pulse sequence proposed in this paper effectively suppresses the effects of radiation damping, molecular diffusion, inhomogeneity of magnetic field, and variations of dipolar correlation distance, all of which may affect quantitation of T2,n. This pulse sequence can be used to measure not only IMQC transverse relaxation time T2,n(n > 1) quickly and directly, but also the conventional transverse relaxation time. Experimental results demonstrate that the quantitative relationship between T2,n(n≥1) and T2 is T2,n≈T2/n. These results will be helpful for understanding the fundamental properties and mechanisms of IMQCs.

  3. Impaired left ventricular global longitudinal strain in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: insights from the RELAX trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Adam D; McNulty, Steven; Alenezi, Fawaz; Ersboll, Mads; Vader, Justin M; Oh, Jae K; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M; Lewis, Gregory; Semigran, Marc J; Anstrom, Kevin J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Velazquez, Eric J

    2017-07-01

    While abnormal left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been described in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), its prevalence and clinical significance are poorly understood. Patients enrolled in the RELAX trial of sildenafil in HFpEF (LV ejection fraction ≥50%) in whom two-dimensional, speckle-tracking LV GLS was possible (n = 187) were analysed. The distribution of LV GLS and its associations with clinical characteristics, LV structure and function, biomarkers, exercise capacity and quality of life were assessed. Baseline median LV GLS was -14.6% (25th and 75th percentile, -17.0% and -11.9%, respectively) and abnormal (≥ - 16%) in 122/187 (65%) patients. Patients in the tertile with the best LV GLS had lower N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) [median 505 pg/mL (161, 1065) vs. 875 pg/mL (488, 1802), P = 0.008) and lower collagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) levels [median 6.7 µg/L (5.1, 8.1) vs. 8.1 µg/L (6.5, 10.5), P = 0.001] compared with the tertile with the worst LV GLS. There was also a modest linear relationship with LV GLS and log-transformed NT-proBNP and PIIINP (r = 0.29, P < 0.001 and r = 0.19, P = 0.009, respectively). We observed no linear association of LV GLS with Minnesota Living with Heart Failure scores, 6-min walk distance, peak oxygen consumption, or expiratory minute ventilation/carbon dioxide excretion slope. Impaired LV GLS is common among HFpEF patients, indicating the presence of covert systolic dysfunction despite normal LV ejection fraction. Impaired LV GLS was associated with biomarkers of wall stress and collagen synthesis and diastolic dysfunction but not with quality of life or exercise capacity, suggesting other processes may be more responsible for these aspects of the HFpEF syndrome. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sakaie

    Full Text Available To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF. Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO.40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD, transverse diffusivity (TD, mean diffusivity (MD and fractional anisotropy (FA. Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI.LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03. FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004. LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05 as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02.This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity.

  5. Longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change of anger and cynicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakulinen, Christian; Jokela, Markus; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Merjonen, Päivi; Raitakari, Olli T; Hintsanen, Mirka

    2014-06-01

    Anger and hostility are key concepts in behavioral medicine, but little is known about their stability over life course. A sample of 3,074 individuals from six age groups (aged 15-30 at the baseline) were selected from a population-based study to examine longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change in anger and cynicism from early to middle adulthood over 15 years. Cynicism, a facet of hostility, and anger were measured 4 times in 1992, 1997, 2001 and 2007. Final longitudinal measurement invariance models achieved partial strict measurement invariance, indicating good measurement consistency over time. Rank-order stability of anger and cynicism was found to be moderate. Mean levels of anger and cynicism decreased over time, but in anger the decline was faster among women. The variance of anger and cynicism also increased over time, but in cynicism the rate of change was higher among men. Altogether, anger and cynicism show measurement invariance and moderate stability from early adulthood to middle adulthood.

  6. Supernova energy measurement with longitudinal gravitational memory effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kodwani, Darsh; Yang, I-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the gravitational memory effect when a spherically symmetric shell of energy passes through a spacetime region. In particular, this effect includes a longitudinal component, such that two radially separated geodesics pick up a relative velocity proportional to their separation. Such a measurement will allow us to obtain the total energy released by a supernova explosion in the form of neutrinos. We study the possibility to measure such an effect by space-based interferometers such as LISA and BBO, and also by astrophysical interferometers such as pulsar scintillometry.

  7. Measuring medial longitudinal arch deformation during gait. A reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencke, Jesper; Christiansen, Ditte; Jensen, Anne Kathrine Bendrup;

    2012-01-01

    during gait and to compare this method with a static measure and a 2D dynamic method. Fifty-two feet (26 healthy male participants) were tested twice 4-9 days apart in a biomechanical gait analysis laboratory using a 3D three-marker foot model, a 2D video-based model for the measurement of MLAD during...... and showed that ND obtained during quiet standing could not predict the MLAD during gait. The 3D method, or alternatively the 2D method, may be used in clinical settings as reliable methods for easy estimation of the foot longitudinal stability....

  8. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  9. Activation Energy Measurement of Oxygen Ordering in a Nb-Ti Alloy by Anelastic Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemeyer T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals with bcc structure are able to dissolve large amounts of interstitial element atoms in the form of oxygen. These atoms diffuse through the lattice by jumping into octahedral sites with equivalent symmetry, causing strong alterations in the anelastic behavior. This paper reports on a study of Snoek relaxation in Nb-Ti alloys with oxygen in solid solution, based on internal friction as a function of temperature. The internal friction measurements were taken in a torsion pendulum operating at temperatures in the range of 350 to 650 K, with frequencies varying from 6 to 36 Hz. The results show relaxation spectra in which thermally activated relaxation peaks produced by the stress-induced ordering of oxygen atoms around niobium atoms of the metallic matrix were identified.

  10. Measuring the longitudinal bunch profile at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, A E; Bettoni, S; Braun†, H H; Corsini, R; Döbert, S; Egger, D; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Shaker, H; Soby, L; Skowronski, P K; Tecker, F; Velasco, M

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is being built and commissioned by an international collaboration in order to test the feasibility of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration scheme. The monitoring and control of the bunch length throughout the CTF3 complex is important since this affects the efficiency and the stability of the final RF power production process. Bunch length diagnostics therefore form an essential component of the beam instrumentation at CTF3. This paper presents longitudinal profile measurements based on Streak camera and non-destructive RF power and microwave spectrometry techniques.

  11. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  12. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdu, Angela, E-mail: angela.hajdu@net.sote.hu [Laboratory of Nanochemistry, Department of Biophysics and Radiation Biology, Semmelweis University, Nagyvarad Sq 4, H-1089 Budapest (Hungary); Tombacz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, Aradi Vt. Sq 1, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Banyai, Istvan, E-mail: banyai.istvan@science.unideb.hu [Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary); Babos, Magor, E-mail: babosmagor@yahoo.com [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged Ltd., Semmelweis St 6, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Palko, Andras, E-mail: palko@radio.szote.u-szeged.hu [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-09-15

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were done at different field strengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show characteristic differences between the tested carboxylated MFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer r1 and r2 relaxivities depend on the thickness of the protecting layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MFs have high r2/r1 ratios at each magnetic field.

  13. Relationship between the crystallization rates of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione, and their molecular mobility as measured by their enthalpy relaxation and (1)H NMR relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Y; Yoshioka, S; Kojima, S

    2000-03-01

    Isothermal crystallization of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione was studied at temperatures above and below their glass transition temperatures (T(g)). A sharp decrease in the crystallization rate with decreasing temperature was observed for phenobarbital and flopropione, such that no crystallization was observed at temperatures 20-30 degrees C lower than their T(g) within ordinary experimental time periods. In contrast, the crystallization rate of nifedipine decreased moderately with decreasing temperature, and considerable crystallization was observed at 40 degrees C below its T(g) within 4 months. The molecular mobility of these amorphous drugs was assessed by enthalpy relaxation and (1)H-NMR relaxation measurements. The enthalpy relaxation time of nifedipine was smaller than that of phenobarbital or flopropinone at the same T - T(g) values, suggesting higher molecular mobility of nifedipine. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) decreased markedly at temperature above T(g). The slope of the Arrhenius type plot of the T(1rho) for nifedipine protons changed at about 10 degrees C below the T(g), whereas the slope for phenobarbital protons became discontinuous at about 10 degrees C above the T(g). Even at temperatures below its T(g), the spin-spin relaxation process of nifedipine could be described by the sum of its Gaussian relaxation, which is characteristic of solid protons, and its Lorentzian relaxation, which is characteristic of protons with higher mobility. In contrast, no Lorentzian relaxation was observed for phenobarbital or flopropione at temperatures below their T(g). These results also suggest that nifedipine has higher molecular mobility than phenobarbital and flopropione at temperatures below T(g). The faster crystallization of nifedipine than that of phenobarbital or flopropione observed at temperatures below its T(g) may be partly ascribed to its higher molecular mobility at these temperatures.

  14. One-Shot Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in the Off-Resonance Rotating Frame of Reference with Applications to Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Ethan Jefferson

    1994-01-01

    Off-resonance spin locking makes use of the novel relaxation time T_{1rho} ^{rm off}, which may be useful in characterizing breast disease. Knowledge of T _{rm 1rho}^{rm off} is essential for optimization of spin -locking imaging methods. The purpose of this work was to develop an optimal imaging technique for in vivo measurement of T_{rm 1rho}^ {rm off}. Measurement of T _{1rho}^{rm off } using conventional methods requires long exam times which are not suitable for patients. Exam time may be shortened by utilizing a one-shot method developed by Look and Locker, making in vivo measurements possible. The imaging method consisted of a 180^circ inversion pulse followed by a series of small-angle alpha pulses to tip a portion of the longitudinal magnetization into the transverse plane for readout. During each relaxation interval (between alpha pulses), a spin-locking pulse was applied off-resonance to achieve T_ {1rho}^{rm off} relaxation. The value of T_{rm 1rho}^{rm off} was then determined using a three-parameter non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. Values of T_ {1rho}^{rm off} were measured for normal and pathologic breast tissues at several resonant offsets. These measurements revealed that image contrast can be manipulated by altering the resonant offset of the spin-locking pulse. Whereas T _1 relaxation times were nearly identical for normal and cancerous tissues, T_{1 rho}^{rm off} relaxation times differed significantly. These results may be useful in improving image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  16. Sound-tube measurements of the relaxation frequency of moist nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    At audible frequencies, the vibrational relaxation of nitrogen contributes significantly to the absorption of sound in still air. The accurate measurement of the humidity dependence of the relaxation frequency of nitrogen, as yet, has eluded careful measurement due to the difficulty in measuring small absorption at low frequencies. Recently, equipment has been constructed for measuring sound absorption in air as a function of humidity over the frequency range from 4 to 100 kHz. In the experiment described here, the temperature and humidity range of this equipment has been extended so that it can be used to study the relaxation absorption in nitrogen at temperatures from 311 K to 418 K. The results indicate that, over this temperature range, the frequency of maximum absorption in moist nitrogen, f, can be given by f/P = 260 x h, Hz/atm, where h is the percent mole fraction of water, and P is the pressure in atm. To the accuracy of the measurements reported here, f is independent of temperature over the range of temperatures at which the measurements were made.

  17. Multi-probe relaxation dispersion measurements increase sensitivity to protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, R Bryn; Oyen, David; Wright, Peter E

    2016-02-17

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion measurements are a valuable tool for the characterization of structural transitions on the micro-millisecond timescale. While the measurement of (15)N relaxation dispersion is now routine, the measurements with alternative nuclei remain limited. Here we report (15)N as well as (1)H R2 relaxation dispersion measurements of the N23PP/S148A "dynamic knockout" mutant of dihydrofolate reductase. The (1)H dispersion measurements are complementary to (15)N data as many additional residues are observed to have dispersive behavior for the (1)H nucleus. Simultaneous fitting of the dispersion profiles for the two nuclei increases the accuracy of exchange parameters determined for individual residues and clustered groups of residues. The different sensitivity of the two nuclei to changes in backbone torsional angles, ring currents, and hydrogen bonding effects provides important insights into the nature of the structural changes that take place during the exchange process. We observe clear evidence of direct and indirect hydrogen bond effects for the (15)N and (1)H chemical shift changes in the active-site, modulation of ring current shielding in the CD-loop and backbone torsional changes in a cluster of residues associated with the C-terminus. This work demonstrates the power of combined (1)H and (15)N probes for the study of backbone dynamics on the micro-millisecond timescale though the analysis of chemical shift changes.

  18. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA, have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA.

  19. Measurement of relaxation times by NMR-CT of electric superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Koji; Yoshitoshi, Motosada (Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto (Japan)); Narise, Shoji; Hirakawa, Kogi

    1984-08-01

    Relaxation curves of T/sub 1/ in various tissues of the brain in patients with cerebral tumor and in healthy controls were obtained by saturation-recovery and inversion-recovery methods, whereby T/sub 1/ values were calculated. The results obtained were in good agreement with in vitro measurement results of excised brain tissues. Prolongation of T/sub 1/ values was evidently observed with increasing the strength of static magnetic field.

  20. Measurement of the Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation Rate in a Dense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Goodwin, P. M.; Benage, J. F., Jr.

    2008-11-01

    Current theoretical approaches to temperature relaxation, which can be categorized as binary-collision and many-body approaches, disagree. Existing experimental evidence infers a lower relaxation rate compared to the binary-collision approach, but is insufficient to determine which approach is correct. We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature relaxation rate between ions and electrons in a dense, strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (Te 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps time-scale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with an ion-ion coupling parameter γii 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines).

  1. Affinity analysis for biomolecular interactions based on magneto-optical relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Konstanze; Nagel, Stefan; Heister, Elena; Weitschies, Werner

    2008-12-01

    Magneto-optical relaxation measurements of magnetically labelled biomolecules are a promising tool for immunometric analyses. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and its polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (anti-CEA) were utilized as a model system for affinity analysis of the interaction between antibody and antigen. For this purpose antibodies were coupled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Aggregation of these antibody sensors due to interactions with the CEA was observed subsequently by measuring the relaxation time of the birefringence of a transmitted laser beam that occurs in a pulsed magnetic field. A kinetic model of chain-like aggregation developed for these purposes enables the rapid and simple calculation of the kinetic parameters of the underlying protein interaction. From the known antigen concentration and the increase in particle size during the interaction we are able to estimate the unknown parameters with standard methods for the statistical description of stepwise polymerization. This novel affinity analysis was successfully applied for the antigen-antibody interaction described herein and can be applied to other biomolecular interactions. First efforts have been made to establish magneto-optical relaxation measurements in body fluids.

  2. Longitudinal and transverse exciton-spin relaxation in a single InAsP quantum dot embedded inside a standing InP nanowire using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasakura, H.; Hermannstädter, C.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Akopian, N.; Van Kouwen, M.P.; Motohisa, J.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kumano, H.; Kondo, K.; Tomioka, K.; Fukui, T.; Suemune, I.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of a single InAsP quantum dot embedded in a standing InP nanowire. Elongation of the transverse exciton-spin relaxation time of the exciton state with decreasing excitation power was observed by first-order photon correlation measurements. This behavior is

  3. Measuring Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching: A Longitudinal Study Using Two Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur-Gencturk, Yasemin; Lubienski, Sarah T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines growth in teacher knowledge as measured by two popular assessments--Learning Mathematics for Teaching (LMT) and Diagnostic Teacher Assessments in Mathematics and Science (DTAMS). Using data collected from 24 teachers, we compare the extent to which each assessment captured teacher learning during a K-8 mathematics…

  4. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, A., E-mail: a.sola@inrim.it; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Kikkawa, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Uchida, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Saitoh, E. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  5. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of shock-heated CO2 by laser-absorption measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrom, D. J.; Bershader, D.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vibrational relaxation characteristics of shock-heated CO2 using a tuned CO2 laser absorption technique. Absorption-coefficient histories were obtained for a single rotational state in each of the -10 0- and -02 0- levels over the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K, and for 21 rotational states of the -10 0- level at 1000 K. These histories have been combined with translational-rotational temperature histories based on interferometer measurements to calculate vibrational relaxation times for the bending mode. The results verify the mutual equilibrium of the bending and symmetric-stretch modes due to Fermi resonance. The bending mode relaxation times are approximately 10% shorter than predicted from interferometer results using the ratio of specific heats. Furthermore, relaxation times based on measurements of different rotational states at 1000 K show a variation with quantum number J, indicating a possible rotational nonequilibrium during the vibration relaxation process.

  6. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  7. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation - prospects for real time NMR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of a spin system is usually calculated using the density matrix. However, the usual formulation in terms of the density matrix predicts that the signal will decay to zero, and does not address the stochastic dynamics of individual spins. Spin fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments, and are observed as ``spin noise'' in the absence of any radio frequency (RF) excitation. Using stochastic calculus we develop a dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation whose origins lie in the component spin fluctuations. This entails consideration of random pure states for individual protons, and how these pure states are correctly combined when the density matrix is formulated. Both the lattice and the spins are treated quantum mechanically. Such treatment incorporates both the processes of spin-spin and (finite temperature) spin-lattice relaxation. Our results reveal the intimate connections between spin noise and conventional spin relaxation, in terms of a modified spin density (MSD), distinct from the density matrix, which is necessary to describe non-ensemble averaged properties of spin systems. With the prospect of ultra-fast digitization, the role of spin noise in real time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this presentation we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin noise measurement, with attention to real time properties.

  8. Measurement and calculation of PZT thin film longitudinal piezoelectric coefficients.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christman, J. A.; Kim, S.-H.; Kingon, A. I.; Maiwa, H.; Maria, J.-P.; Streiffer, S. K.

    1999-04-26

    The ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of 2000 {angstrom} thick chemical solution deposited Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x})O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films were investigated. Several Zr/Ti ratios were studied: 30/70, 50/50 and 65/35, which correspond to tetragonal, near-morphotropic, and rhombohedral symmetries. In all samples, a {l_brace}111{r_brace}-texture is predominant. Longitudinal piezoelectric coefficients and their dc field dependence were measured using the contact AFM method. The expected trend of a maximum piezoelectric coefficient at or near to the MPB was not observed. The composition dependence was small, with the maximum d{sub 33} occurring in the tetragonal material. To explain the results, crystallographic texture and film thickness effects are suggested. Using a modified phenomenological approach, derived electrostrictive coefficients, and experimental data, d{sub 33} values were calculated. Qualitative agreement was observed between the measured and calculated coefficients. Justifications of modifications to the calculations are discussed.

  9. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  10. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T.

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more ac...... performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins....

  11. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  12. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerberg, F W; Rizzi, G; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T; Strömberg, M; Strømme, M; Svedlindh, P; Hansen, M F

    2013-02-15

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more accurate determination of the hydrodynamic size of the magnetic nanobeads. Finally, the bridge sensor has successfully been used to measure the change in dynamic magnetic response when rolling circle amplified DNA molecules are bound to the magnetic nanobeads. The change is validated by measurements performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins.

  13. Electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements of mindfulness-based Triarchic body-pathway relaxation technique: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes S; Han, Yvonne M Y; Cheung, Mei-Chun

    2008-03-01

    The "Triarchic body-pathway relaxation technique" (TBRT) is a form of ancient Chinese mindfulness-based meditation professed to give rise to positive emotions and a specific state of consciousness in which deep relaxation and internalized attention coexist. The purpose of this study was to examine the EEG pattern generated during the practice of this mindfulness exercise, and compare it to music listening which has been shown to induce positive emotions. Nineteen college students (aged 19-22 years) participated in the study. Each participant listened to both the TBRT and music audiotapes while EEG was recorded. The order of presentation was counterbalanced to avoid order effect. Two EEG indicators were used: (1) alpha asymmetry index, an indicator for left-sided anterior activation, as measure of positive emotions, and (2) frontal midline theta activity, as a measure for internalized attention. Increased left-sided activation, a pattern associated with positive emotions, was found during both TBRT exercise and music conditions. However, only TBRT exercise was shown to exhibit greater frontal midline theta power, a pattern associated with internalized attention. These results provided evidence to support that the TBRT gives rise to positive emotional experience, accompanied by focused internalized attention.

  14. Public risk perception of relaxation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) measures in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, K; Perazzini, A; Ru, G; Van Wassenhove, W

    2011-01-01

    The so-called "TSE roadmap" was published by the European Commission on July 15, 2005. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) roadmap suggests relaxation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and other animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies measures in the short, medium, and long term. According to the TSE roadmap, "Any relaxation of BSE measures following the scientific assessment should be initiated by an open discussion with all stakeholders and supported by a strong communication strategy" ( European Commission 2005 , 5). Bearing this in mind, a social scientific project was designed to (1) involve different stakeholder groups, governmental risk managers, and their scientific advisors and (2) obtain their perception of the TSE roadmap and of its implications for precautionary consumer protection in five European Union (EU) Member States. This study describes the risk perception and risk management of TSE in Europe as exemplified by the TSE roadmap. The following query guided the international comparative study: How is TSE risk perceived by four interviewed stakeholder groups in five studied countries? The risk perceptions of TSE of risk managers from the ministries in charge in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, as well as their scientific advisors and stakeholder groups, were determined. The stakeholder groups were from three different areas involved with TSE, including farmers, consumers, and the meat/food industry. The issue to be addressed is roadmapping an adequate instrument for stakeholder involvement and for risk decision making.

  15. Longitudinal measurement of physical activity following kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontje, M L; de Greef, M H G; Krijnen, W P; Corpeleijn, E; Kok, T; Bakker, S J L; Stolk, R P; van der Schans, C P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal observational study was to (i) examine the change of daily physical activity in 28 adult kidney transplant recipients over the first 12 months following transplantation; and (ii) to examine the change in metabolic characteristics and renal function. Accelerometer-based daily physical activity and metabolic- and clinical characteristics were measured at six wk (T1), three months (T2), six months (T3) and 12 months (T4) following transplantation. Linear mixed effect analyses showed an increase in steps/d (T1 = 6326 ± 2906; T4 = 7562 ± 3785; F = 3.52; p = 0.02), but one yr after transplantation only 25% achieved the recommended 10 000 steps/d. There was no significant increase in minutes per day spent on moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (T1 = 80.4 ± 63.6; T4 = 93.2 ± 55.1; F = 1.71; p = 0.17). Body mass index increased over time (T1 = 25.4 ± 3.2; T4 = 27.2 ± 3.8; F = 12.62; p physical activity, the majority did not meet the recommended levels of physical activity after one yr. In addition to the weight gain, this may result in negative health consequences. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies to support kidney transplant recipients to comply with healthy lifestyle recommendations, including regular physical activity.

  16. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; Ilinova, E.; McFerran, J. J.; Jouin, J.; Debord, B.; Alharbi, M.; Thomas, P.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the measurement of ground-state atomic polarization relaxation time of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core-shape Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in an optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom’s dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with conventional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by atom-wall collisional from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  17. Longitudinal measurements of MRI-T2 in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: effects of age and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, R J; Arpan, I A; Forbes, S C; Lott, D J; Senesac, C R; Senesac, E; Deol, J; Triplett, W T; Baligand, C; Daniels, M J; Sweeney, H L; Walter, G A; Vandenborne, K

    2014-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by an increased muscle damage and progressive replacement of muscle by noncontractile tissue. Both of these pathological changes can lengthen the MRI transverse proton relaxation time (T2). The current study measured longitudinal changes in T2 and its distribution in the lower leg of 16 boys with DMD (5-13years, 15 ambulatory) and 15 healthy controls (5-13years). These muscles were chosen to allow extended longitudinal monitoring, due to their slow progression compared with proximal muscles in DMD. In the soleus muscle of boys with DMD, T2 and the percentage of pixels with an elevated T2 (⩾2SD above control mean T2) increased significantly over 1year and 2years, while the width of the T2 histogram increased over 2years. Changes in soleus T2 variables were significantly greater in 9-13years old compared with 5-8years old boys with DMD. Significant correlations between the change in all soleus T2 variables over 2years and the change in functional measures over 2years were found. MRI measurement of muscle T2 in boys with DMD is sensitive to disease progression and shows promise as a clinical outcome measure.

  18. A Longitudinal Study of Objectively Measured Built Environment as Determinant of Physical Activity in Young Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Nielsen, Merete S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This longitudinal study aimed to examine if a Moveability Index (MI), based on objectively measured built environment characteristics, was a determinant for objectively measured physical activity (PA) among young adults. METHOD: Data collected from 177 persons participating...

  19. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Torres-Díaz, I. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chiu-Lam, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hernández, M. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation. - Highlights: • Method to estimate the contributions of the relaxation mechanism to the magnetic response. • Method applies to cases where the Brownian and Néel peaks do not overlap. • The method applies for ferrofluids prepared with as–synthesized particles.

  20. Longitudinal transport measurements in an energy recovery accelerator with triple bend achromat arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Saveliev, Y. M.; Williams, P. H.; Wolski, A.

    2016-12-01

    Longitudinal properties of electron bunches (energy spread and bunch length) and their manipulation are of importance in free electron lasers (FELs), where magnetic bunch length compression is a common feature of beam transport. Recirculating accelerators and energy recovery linac accelerators (ERLs) have been used as FEL drivers for several decades and control of longitudinal beam transport is particularly important in their magnet lattices. We report on measurements of longitudinal transport properties in an ERL-FEL, the ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers in Combined Experiments) accelerator at Daresbury Laboratory. ALICE is an energy recovery research accelerator that drives an infrared free electron laser. By measuring the time of arrival of electron bunches, the canonical longitudinal transport quantities were measured in the beam transport and bunch compression sections of the lattice. ALICE includes a four-dipole bunch compression chicane providing fixed longitudinal transport, and triple bend achromat arcs including sextupole magnets where the first and second order longitudinal transport can be adjusted. The longitudinal transport properties in these lattice sections were measured and compared with the theoretical model of the lattice. A reasonable level of agreement has been found. The effect of sextupoles in second order, as well as first order, longitudinal correction is considered, with the measurements indicating the level of alignment of the beam to the center of the sextupole.

  1. Magnetic relaxation measurements of a high-T{sub c} oxide superconductor using microwave absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noujima, Masafumi; Shiiyama, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Chiken [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The pinning potential of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} with and without electron irradiation has been determined. Single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at room temperature in a high voltage electron microscope. Magnetic relaxation of the non-irradiated and irradiated crystals was measured with use of a microwave absorption method at T=79 K and magnetic fields, H = 0 - 0.13 T. The relaxation process was described in terms of the pinning potential and its anisotropy to get the following conclusions. (1) The pinning potential of the irradiated crystal is 2.2 times higher than that of the virgin crystal. (2) Isolated point defects, such as vacancies and interstitials provide good pinning centers. (3) The point defects produced by the electron irradiation make the pinning potential anisotropic. (author)

  2. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  3. Highly biocompatible TiO₂:Gd³⁺ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-05

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) of size ∼25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r(1) relaxivity which is ∼2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r(1) values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd(3+) ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml(-1). The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a

  4. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  5. Longitudinal measurement of physical activity following kidney transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, M.L.; Greef, M.H. de; Krijnen, W.P.; Corpeleijn, E.; Kok, T.; Bakker, S.J.; Stolk, R.P.; Schans, C.P. van der

    2014-01-01

    purpose of this longitudinal observational study was to (i) examine the change of daily physical activity in 28 adult kidney transplant recipients over the first 12 months following transplantation; and (ii) to examine the change in metabolic characteristics and renal function. Accelerometer-based d

  6. On Fitting Nonlinear Latent Curve Models to Multiple Variables Measured Longitudinally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blozis, Shelley A.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows how nonlinear latent curve models may be fitted for simultaneous analysis of multiple variables measured longitudinally using Mx statistical software. Longitudinal studies often involve observation of several variables across time with interest in the associations between change characteristics of different variables measured…

  7. Consequences of recent loophole-free experiments on a relaxation of measurement independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilo, Alejandro A.

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments using innovative optical detectors and techniques have strongly increased the capacity of testing the violation of the Bell's inequalities in Nature. Most of them have used the Eberhard's inequality (EI) to close the "detection" loophole. Closing the "locality" loophole has been attempted by spacelike separated detections and fast changes of the bases of observation, driven by random number generators of new design. Also, pulsed pumping and time-resolved data recording to close the "time-coincidence" loophole, and sophisticated statistical methods to close the "memory" loophole, have been used. In this paper, the meaning of the EI is reviewed. A simple hidden variables theory based on a relaxation of the condition of "measurement independence," which was devised long ago for the Clauser-Horne-Shimony and Holt inequality, is adapted to the EI case. It is used here to evaluate the significance of the results of the recent experiments, which are briefly described. A table summarizes the main results.

  8. Post-rifting relaxation processes in the Afar region (Ethiopia) from GPS measurements and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, L.; Calais, E.; Wright, T.; Hamling, I.; Lewi, E.; Nooner, S.; Buck, R.; Ebinger, C.

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated deformation after major dike intrusion events such the 1975-1985 Krafla events in Iceland and the 1978 Asal-Ghoubbet events in Afar have been interpreted as the result of stress relaxation in a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle and/or continued magma injection. Separating these contributions, estimating mantle viscosity and quantifying the interaction with long-term stretching has however proven difficult in the absence of geodetic measurements early on after the main dike intrusion. In September 2005, a 60km-long dike intrusion took place at the Dabbahu rift, Afar, Ethiopia, at the boundary between the Nubian and Arabian (Danakil) plates. Since this major event, 8 new intrusions have affected the central and southern parts of the 2005 dike. In order to measure post-diking deformation, we installed 19 continuous stations in the near-field of the 2005 intrusion and 20 survey sites in the mid- and far-field. Time series from continuous GPS stations outside of volcanoes show a combination of discrete diking events and quasi-constant velocity displacements. Continuous GPS stations on volcanoes show non-linear behaviour related to the feeding of shallow magma chambers. Survey GPS sites in the far-field (up to 150km from the rift) show current extension rates twice as fast as the secular divergence rate between Nubia and Arabia. We present the GPS results and, with some constraints from seismicity, propose a preliminary model that accounts for the combination of dike intrusions and viscoelastic stress relaxation in the upper mantle below Afar.

  9. A new method for multi-exponential inversion of NMR relaxation measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhongdong; XIAO; Lizhi; LIU; Tangyan

    2004-01-01

    A new method for multi-exponential inversion to NMR T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions is suggested and tested. Inversion results are compared with MAP-II which is based on SVD algorithm and widely accepted in the industry. Inversed NMR relaxation spectra that have different pre-assigned relaxation times from echo trains with different SNR confirm that the new method with 16 to 64 equally spaced time constants in logarithm scale will ensure the relaxation distribution. Testing results show that the new inversion algorithm is a valuable tool for rock core NMR experimental analysis and NMR logging data process and interpretation.

  10. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  11. In vivo measurements of relaxation process in the human liver by MRI. The role of respiratory gating/triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1988-01-01

    In vivo estimation of relaxation processes in the liver by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful for characterization of various pathological conditions in the liver. However, such measurements may be significantly hampered by movement of the liver with the respiration. The effect...... of synchronization of data acquisition to the respiratory cycle on measured T1- and T2-relaxation curves was studied in normal subjects, patients with diffuse liver disease, and patients with focal liver pathology. Multi spin echo sequences with five different repetition times were used. The measurements were...... different, when respiratory synchronization was employed. The results indicate that respiratory synchronization is only necessary for estimation of relaxation processes in the liver with focal pathology....

  12. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  13. Dielectric relaxation of binary polar liquid mixture measured in benzene at 10 GHz frequency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; K Dutta; S Acharyya; S K Sit

    2008-03-01

    The dielectric relaxation times 's and dipole moments 's of the binary () polar liquid mixture of N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA) and acetone (Ac) dissolved in benzene (i) are estimated from the measured real ′ and imaginary ″ parts of complex high frequency conductivity * of the solution for different weight fractions 's of 0.0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 mole fractions of Ac and temperatures (25, 30, 35 and 40°C) respectively under 9.88 GHz electric field. 's are obtained from the ratio of slopes of ″ - and ′ - curves at → 0 as well as linear slope of ″ - ′ curves of the existing method (Murthy et al, 1989) in order to eliminate polar-polar interaction in the latter case. The calculated 's are in excellent agreement with the reported 's due to Gopalakrishna's method. 's are also estimated from slopes 's of total conductivity - curves at → 0 and the values agree well with the reported 's from G.K. method. The variation of 's and 's with of Ac reveals that solute-solute molecular association occurs within 0.0-0.3 of Ac beyond which solute-solvent molecular association is predicted. The theoretical dipole moments theo's are calculated from bond angles and bond moments to have exact 's only to show the presence of inductive, mesomeric and electromeric effects in the substituent polar groups. The thermodynamic energy parameters are estimated from ln () against 1/ linear curve from Eyring's rate theory to know the molecular dynamics of the system and to establish the fact that the mixture obeys the Debye-Smyth relaxation mechanism.

  14. First Measurement of Charged Current Cross Sections at HERA with Longitudinally Polarised Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Elsen, E; Erdmann, W; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Flucke, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Goyon, C; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kuckens, J; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Milstead, D; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Papadopoulou, T D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Reisert, B; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Wigmore, C; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2006-01-01

    Data taken with positrons of different longitudinal polarisation states in collision with unpolarised protons at HERA are used to measure the total cross sections of the charged current process, e^+ p \\to \\bar{\

  15. Model selection for marginal regression analysis of longitudinal data with missing observations and covariate measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chung-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hau

    2015-10-01

    Missing observations and covariate measurement error commonly arise in longitudinal data. However, existing methods for model selection in marginal regression analysis of longitudinal data fail to address the potential bias resulting from these issues. To tackle this problem, we propose a new model selection criterion, the Generalized Longitudinal Information Criterion, which is based on an approximately unbiased estimator for the expected quadratic error of a considered marginal model accounting for both data missingness and covariate measurement error. The simulation results reveal that the proposed method performs quite well in the presence of missing data and covariate measurement error. On the contrary, the naive procedures without taking care of such complexity in data may perform quite poorly. The proposed method is applied to data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging to assess the relationship of depression with health and social status in the elderly, accommodating measurement error in the covariate as well as missing observations.

  16. In Situ Measurement of Surface Functional Groups on Silica Nanoparticles Using Solvent Relaxation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Chen, Lan; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Renxiao; Ge, Guanglu

    2017-09-05

    In situ analysis and study on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs) is a key to obtain their important physicochemical properties for the subsequent applications. Of them, most works focus on the qualitative characterization whereas quantitative analysis and measurement on the NPs under their storage and usage conditions is still a challenge. In order to cope with this challenge, solvation relaxation-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology has been applied to measure the wet specific surface area and, therefore, determine the number of the bound water molecules on the surface of silica NPs in solution and the hydrophilic groups of various types grafted on the surface of the NPs. By changing the surface functional group on silica particles, the fine distinction for the solvent-particle interaction with different surface group can be quantitatively differentiated by measuring the number of water molecules absorbed on the surface. The results show that the number of the surface hydroxyl, amine, and carboxyl group per nm(2) is 4.0, 3.7, and 2.3, respectively, for the silica particles with a diameter of 203 nm. The method reported here is the first attempt to determine in situ the number of bound solvent molecules and any solvophilic groups grafted on nanoparticles.

  17. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse-relaxation-optimized pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2011-10-19

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse-relaxation-optimized (TRO) (15)N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE with conventional (15)N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects involving molecular particles with different size ranges. An initial application of the (15)N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25-60 °C.

  18. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse relaxation-optimized PFG-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR for characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse relaxation-optimized (TRO) 15N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE with conventional 15N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects with molecular particles of different size ranges. An initial application of the 15N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25–60°C. PMID:21919531

  19. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  20. All-electrical measurement of the triplet-singlet spin relaxation time in self-assembled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltrudis, K.; Al-Ashouri, A.; Beckel, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Geller, M.; Lorke, A.

    2017-08-01

    We have measured the spin relaxation time of an excited two-electron spin-triplet state into its singlet ground state in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. We use a time-resolved measurement scheme that combines transconductance spectroscopy with spin-to-charge conversion to address the |s ↑,p ↑ 〉 triplet state, where one electron is in the quantum dot s-shell and a second one in the p-shell. The evaluation of the state-selective tunneling times from the dots into a nearby two-dimensional electron gas allows us to determine the s- and p-shell occupation and extract the relaxation time from a rate equation model. A comparably long triplet-to-singlet spin relaxation time of 25 μs is found.

  1. An impedance-measurement setup optimized for measuring relaxations of glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Brian; Christensen, Tage; Larsen, Ebbe H; Olsen, Niels Boye; Pedersen, Ib H; Rasmussen, Torben; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2008-04-01

    An electronics system has been assembled to measure frequency-dependent response functions of glass-forming liquids in the extremely viscous state approaching the glass transition. We determine response functions such as dielectric permittivity and shear and bulk moduli by measuring electrical impedances of liquid-filled transducers, and this technique requires frequency generators capable of producing signals that are reproducible over the span of several days or even several weeks. To this end, we have constructed a frequency generator that produces low-frequency (1 mHz-100 Hz) sinusoidal signals with voltages that are reproducible within 10 ppm. Two factors that partly account for this precision are that signals originate from voltages stored in a look-up table and that only coil-less filters are used in this unit, which significantly reduces fluctuations of output caused by changes of temperatures of circuits. This generator also includes a special triggering facility that makes it possible to measure up to 512 voltages per cycle that are spaced apart at uniform phase intervals. Fourier transformations of such data yield precise determinations of complex amplitudes of voltages and currents applied to a transducer, which ultimately allows us to determine electrical impedances of transducers with a reproducibility error that is only a few parts per hundred thousand. This equipment is used in tandem with a commercial LCR meter and/or impedance analyzer that give(s) impedance measurements at higher frequencies, up to 1 MHz. The experimental setup allows measurements of the transducer impedance over nine decades of frequency within a single run.

  2. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  3. MR image analysis: Longitudinal cardiac motion influences left ventricular measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovic, Patrick [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: pberko17@hotmail.com; Hemmink, Maarten [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: maartenhemmink@gmail.com; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology (Belgium)], E-mail: paul.parizel@uza.be; Vrints, Christiaan J. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: chris.vrints@uza.be; Paelinck, Bernard P. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: Bernard.paelinck@uza.be

    2010-02-15

    Background: Software for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass using border detection in short-axis images only, is hampered by through-plane cardiac motion. Therefore we aimed to evaluate software that involves longitudinal cardiac motion. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients underwent 1.5-Tesla cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the entire heart in the long-axis and short-axis orientation with breath-hold steady-state free precession imaging. Offline analysis was performed using software that uses short-axis images (Medis MASS) and software that includes two-chamber and four-chamber images to involve longitudinal LV expansion and shortening (CAAS-MRV). Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was assessed by using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Compared with MASS software, CAAS-MRV resulted in significantly smaller end-diastolic (156 {+-} 48 ml versus 167 {+-} 52 ml, p = 0.001) and end-systolic LV volumes (79 {+-} 48 ml versus 94 {+-} 52 ml, p < 0.001). In addition, CAAS-MRV resulted in higher LV ejection fraction (52 {+-} 14% versus 46 {+-} 13%, p < 0.001) and calculated LV mass (154 {+-} 52 g versus 142 {+-} 52 g, p = 0.004). Intraobserver and interobserver limits of agreement were similar for both methods. Conclusion: MR analysis of LV volumes and mass involving long-axis LV motion is a highly reproducible method, resulting in smaller LV volumes, higher ejection fraction and calculated LV mass.

  4. Observation and modelling of ferromagnetic contact-induced spin relaxation in Hanle spin precession measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, L.; Spivak, D.; Krueger, N.; Peterson, T. A.; Erickson, M. J.; Bolon, B.; Geppert, C. C.; Leighton, C.; Crowell, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the nonlocal spin valve (NLSV) geometry, four-terminal electrical Hanle effect measurements have the potential to provide a particularly simple determination of the lifetime (τs) and diffusion length (λN) of spins injected into nonmagnetic (N) materials. Recent papers, however, have demonstrated that traditional models typically used to fit such data provide an inaccurate measurement of τs in ferromagnet (FM)/N metal devices with low interface resistance, particularly when the separation of the source and detector contacts is small. In the transparent limit, this shortcoming is due to the back diffusion and subsequent relaxation of spins within the FM contacts, which is not properly accounted for in standard models of the Hanle effect. Here we have used the separation dependence of the spin accumulation signal in NLSVs with multiple FM/N combinations, and interfaces in the diffusive limit, to determine λN in traditional spin valve measurements. We then compare these results to Hanle measurements as analyzed using models that either include or exclude spin sinking. We demonstrate that differences between the spin valve and Hanle measurements of λN can be quantitatively modelled provided that both the FM contact-induced isotropic spin sinking and the full three-dimensional geometry of the devices, which is particularly important at small contact separations, are accounted for. We find, however, that considerable difficulties persist, in particular due to the sensitivity of fitting to the contact interface resistance and the FM contact magnetization rotation, in precisely determining λN with the Hanle technique alone, particularly at small contact separations.

  5. A relaxed eddy accumulation system for measuring vertical fluxes of nitrous acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system combined with a nitrous acid (HONO analyzer was developed to measure atmospheric HONO vertical fluxes. The system consists of three major components: (1 a fast-response sonic anemometer measuring both vertical wind velocity and air temperature, (2 a fast-response controlling unit separating air motions into updraft and downdraft samplers by the sign of vertical wind velocity, and (3 a highly sensitive HONO analyzer based on aqueous long path absorption photometry that measures HONO concentrations in the updrafts and downdrafts. A dynamic velocity threshold (±0.5σw, where σw is a standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity was used for valve switching determined by the running means and standard deviations of the vertical wind velocity. Using measured temperature as a tracer and the average values from two field deployments, the flux proportionality coefficient, β, was determined to be 0.42 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the theoretical estimation. The REA system was deployed in two ground-based field studies. In the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study in Bakersfield, California in summer 2010, measured HONO fluxes appeared to be upward during the day and were close to zero at night. The upward HONO flux was highly correlated to the product of NO2 and solar radiation. During the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX 2009 at Blodgett Forest, California in July 2009, the overall HONO fluxes were small in magnitude and were close to zero. Causes for the different HONO fluxes in the two different environments are briefly discussed.

  6. Single-pulse and multipulse longitudinal phase space and temperature measurements of an intense ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J. E.; Seidl, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Vay, J. L.; Waldron, W. L.; Grote, D. P.; Welch, D. R.

    2012-07-01

    Longitudinal phase space and temperature measurements were conducted on a 2-3μs long, singly charged K+ ion bunch with an ion energy of ˜0.3MeV and current of 30 mA. The principal objective of these experiments was to measure the longitudinal beam dynamics and study the limits of axial compression. The differences between the measured beam energy, longitudinal beam dynamics, and the amplitude and time history of the Marx voltage waveform were all quantified. Longitudinal phase space measurements indicate a slight chromaticity (<1%) in the beam from head to tail. Record low longitudinal temperatures of Tz=2-4×10-2eV were measured for a beam bunch of this intensity with negligible effects from neutralizing the beam space charge with a background plasma. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved longitudinal distributions, and phase space of the beam at 430 cm.

  7. Disentangling distribution effects and nature of the dynamics in relaxation measurements: the RMR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappey, R. E-mail: sappey@physics.ucsd.edu; Vincent, E.; Ocio, M.; Hammann, J

    2000-11-01

    We discuss here the nature of the low-temperature magnetic relaxation in samples of magnetic nanoparticles. In addition to usual magnetic viscosity measurement, we have used the residual memory ratio (RMR) method. This procedure enables us to overcome the uncertainties usually associated with the energy barrier distribution, thus giving a more detailed insight on the nature of the observed dynamics. A custom-made apparatus coupling dilution refrigeration and SQUID magnetometry allowed measurements of very diluted samples at temperatures ranging between 60 mK and 7 K. Two types of particles have been studied: {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} of moderate anisotropy, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} of higher anisotropy where quantum effects are more likely to occur. In both cases, the data cannot simply be interpreted in terms of mere thermally activated dynamics of independent particles. The deviation from thermal activation seems to go opposite of what is expected from the possible effect of particle interactions. We therefore believe that it suggests the occurrence of quantum dynamics at very low temperatures.

  8. Solid-state NMR (31)P paramagnetic relaxation enhancement membrane protein immersion depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Hudson, Stephen M; Sahu, Indra D; Liu, Lishan; Lorigan, Gary A

    2014-04-24

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a widely used approach for measuring long-range distance constraints in biomolecular solution NMR spectroscopy. In this paper, we show that (31)P PRE solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be utilized to determine the immersion depth of spin-labeled membrane peptides and proteins. Changes in the (31)P NMR PRE times coupled with modeling studies can be used to describe the spin-label position/amino acid within the lipid bilayer and the corresponding helical tilt. This method provides valuable insight on protein-lipid interactions and membrane protein structural topology. Solid-state (31)P NMR data on the 23 amino acid α-helical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nAChR M2δ transmembrane domain model peptide followed predicted behavior of (31)P PRE rates of the phospholipid headgroup as the spin-label moves from the membrane surface toward the center of the membrane. Residue 11 showed the smallest changes in (31)P PRE (center of the membrane), while residue 22 shows the largest (31)P PRE change (near the membrane surface), when compared to the diamagnetic control M2δ sample. This PRE SS-NMR technique can be used as a molecular ruler to measure membrane immersion depth.

  9. Disentangling distribution effects and nature of the dynamics in relaxation measurements: the RMR method

    CERN Document Server

    Sappey, R; Ocio, M; Hammann, J

    2000-01-01

    We discuss here the nature of the low-temperature magnetic relaxation in samples of magnetic nanoparticles. In addition to usual magnetic viscosity measurement, we have used the residual memory ratio (RMR) method. This procedure enables us to overcome the uncertainties usually associated with the energy barrier distribution, thus giving a more detailed insight on the nature of the observed dynamics. A custom-made apparatus coupling dilution refrigeration and SQUID magnetometry allowed measurements of very diluted samples at temperatures ranging between 60 mK and 7 K. Two types of particles have been studied: gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 of moderate anisotropy, and CoFe sub 2 O sub 4 of higher anisotropy where quantum effects are more likely to occur. In both cases, the data cannot simply be interpreted in terms of mere thermally activated dynamics of independent particles. The deviation from thermal activation seems to go opposite of what is expected from the possible effect of particle interactions. We therefore b...

  10. Metastability exchange optical pumping in {sup 3}He gas up to 30 mT. Efficiency measurements and evidence of laser-induced nuclear relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batz, Marion

    2011-07-08

    Advances in metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) of {sup 3}He at high laser powers, with its various applications, but also at high gas pressures p{sub 3} and high magnetic field strengths B, have provided strong motivation for revisiting the understanding and for investigating the limitations of this powerful technique. For this purpose, we present systematic experimental and theoretical studies of efficiency and of relaxation mechanisms in B{<=}30 mT and p{sub 3}=0.63-2.45 mbar. {sup 3}He nuclear polarisation is measured by light absorption in longitudinal configuration where weak light beams at 1083 nm parallel to magnetic field and cell axis with opposite circular polarisations are used to probe the distribution of populations in the metastable state. This method is systematically tested to evaluate potential systematic biases and is shown to be reliable for the study of OP dynamics despite the redistribution of populations by OP light. Nuclear polarisation loss associated to the emission of polarised light by the plasma discharge used for MEOP is found to decrease above 10 mT, as expected, due to hyperfine decoupling in highly excited states. However, this does not lead to improved MEOP efficiency at high laser power. We find clear evidence of additional laser-induced relaxation instead. The strong OP-enhanced polarisation losses, currently limiting MEOP performances, are quantitatively investigated using an angular momentum budget approach and a recently developed comprehensive model that describes the combined effects of OP, ME and relaxation, validated by comparison to experimental results.

  11. Do sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation influence sleep bruxism? Report of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiente López, M.; van Selms, M.K.A.; van der Zaag, J.; Hamburger, H.L.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sleep hygiene measures combined with relaxation techniques in the management of sleep bruxism (SB) in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, randomised clinical trial design. Sixteen participants (mean ± s.d. age = 39·9 ± 10·8 years) were randomly as

  12. First measurements of H2O2 and organic peroxide surface fluces by the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valverde-Canossa, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Rappenglück, B.; Steinbrecher, R.; Klemm, O.; Schuster, G.; Moortgat, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    The relaxed eddy-accumulation (REA) technique was specially adapted to a high-performance liquid chromatographer (enzymatic method) and scrubbing coils to measure concentrations and fluxes of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides with a carbon chain C4, of which only methylhydroperoxide (MH

  13. Relaxation time: a proton NMR-based approach as a metric to measure reactivity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthi, Archini; Misra, Superb K.

    2017-08-01

    The toxicological impact of engineered nanoparticles in environmental or biological milieu is very difficult to predict and control because of the complexity of interactions of nanoparticles with the varied constituents in the suspended media. Nanoparticles are different from their bulk counterparts due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio per unit mass, which plays a vital role in bioavailability of these nanoparticles to its surroundings. This study explores how changes in the spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be used to gauge the availability of surface area and suspension stability of selected nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, and SiO2), in a range of simulated media. Spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be mathematically correlated to wetted surface area, which is well backed up by the data of hydrodynamic size measurements and suspension stability. We monitored the change in spin-spin relaxation time for all the nanoparticles, over a range of concentrations (2.5 -100 ppm) in deionized water and artificial seawater. Selective concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions were subjected for temporal studies over a period of 48 hrs to understand the concept of spin-spin nuclear relaxation time-based reactivity of nanoparticle suspension. The nanoparticles showed high degree of agglomeration, when suspended in artificial seawater. This was captured by a decrease in spin-spin nuclear relaxation time and also an increment in the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles.

  14. Solute induced relaxation in glassy polymers: Experimental measurements and nonequilibrium thermodynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minelli, Matteo; Doghieri, Ferruccio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali (DICAM), Centro Interdipartimentale per la Ricerca Industriale - Meccanica Avanzata e Materiali (CIRI-MAM), Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28 - (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Data for kinetics of mass uptake from vapor sorption experiments in thin glassy polymer samples are here interpreted in terms of relaxation times for volume dilation. To this result, both models from non-equilibrium thermodynamics and from mechanics of volume relaxation contribute. Different kind of sorption experiments have been considered in order to facilitate the direct comparison between kinetics of solute induced volume dilation and corresponding data from process driven by pressure or temperature jumps.

  15. Energy-dependent relaxation time in quaternary amorphous oxide semiconductors probed by gated Hall effect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socratous, Josephine; Watanabe, Shun; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Warwick, Christopher N.; Branquinho, Rita; Barquinha, Pedro; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of exploiting the properties of amorphous oxide semiconductors for device applications, the charge transport in these materials is still not clearly understood. The observation of a definite Hall voltage suggests that electron transport in the conduction band is free-electron-like. However, the temperature dependence of the Hall and field-effect mobilities cannot be explained using a simple bandlike model. Here, we perform gated Hall effect measurements in field-effect transistors, which allow us to make two independent estimates of the charge carrier concentration and determine the Hall factor providing information on the energy dependence of the relaxation time. We demonstrate that the Hall factor in a range of sputtered and solution-processed quaternary amorphous oxides, such as a-InGaZnO, is close to two, while in ternary oxides, such as InZnO, it is near unity. This suggests that quaternary elements like Ga act as strong ionized impurity scattering centers in these materials.

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research.

  17. Application of longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis at 50 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescolarde, L.; Doñate, T.; Casañas, R.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    More relevant information of the fluid changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be obtained with segmental bioimpedance measurements rather than whole-body measurement, who hidden information of body composition. Whole-body and segmental bioimpedance measurements were obtained using 5 configurations (whole-body or right-side (RS), longitudinal-leg (L-LEG), longitudinal-abdomen (L-AB), transversal-abdomen (T-AB), and transversal-leg (T-LEG)) in 20 patients: 15 males (56.5 ± 9.4 yr, 24.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) and 5 females (58.4 ± 7.1 yr, 28.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between whole-body, longitudinal-segmental (L-LEG and L-AB) and transversal-segmental (TAB and TLEG) bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, with clinical parameters of cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, nutrition and hydration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. Longitudinal bioimpedance parameters were normalized by the height of the patients. The Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlation between bioimpedance and clinical parameters. The statistical significance was considered with P bioimpedance measurements have higher correlation with clinical parameters than longitudinal measurements.

  18. A dual, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Osterwalder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange which holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales has been difficult to quantify. To advance and facilitate research about land–atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-intake, single analyzer Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM fluxes has proven difficult to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically −3 between updrafts and downdrafts. To address this we present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pair of gold cartridges for semi-continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. They are then analyzed sequentially on the same detector while another pair of gold cartridges takes over the sample collection. We also added a reference gas module for repeated quality-control measurements. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal mire during snow-melt. The observed emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m−2 h−1. We claim that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant development of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land–atmosphere GEM exchange.

  19. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerberg, Frederik W.; Dalslet, Bjarke T.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Johansson, Christer; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple `click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads.

  20. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple 'click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response...... with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated...... using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation...

  1. Low microwave-amplitude ESR spectroscopy: measuring spin-relaxation interactions of moderately immobilized spin labels in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Eva M K; Hult, Karl; Mouritsen, Ole G; Høyrup, Pernille

    2004-08-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful tool for determining protein structure, dynamics and interactions. We report here a method for determining interactions between spin labels and paramagnetic relaxation agents, which is performed under subsaturating conditions. The low microwave-field amplitude employed (h(1)spin-spin-relaxation time, T(2e), is measured by this method, and compared to classical progressive power saturation performed on a free spin label, (1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-Delta(3)-pyrroline-3-methyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), and a spin-labeled protein (Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase, TLL-I252C), employing the water-soluble relaxation agent chromium(III) oxalate (Crox) in concentrations between 0-10 mM. The low-amplitude theory showed excellent agreement with that of classical power saturation in quantifying Crox-induced relaxation enhancement. Low-amplitude measurements were then performed using a standard resonator, with Crox, on 11 spin-labeled TLL mutants displaying rotational correlation times in the motional narrowing regime. All spin-labeled proteins exhibited significant changes in T(2e). We postulate that this novel method is especially suitable for studying moderately immobilized spin labels, such as those positioned at exposed sites in a protein. This method should prove useful for research groups with access to any ESR instrumentation.

  2. Reproducibility of anthropometric measurements in children: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppik, Aire; Jürimäe, Toivo; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the reproducibility of a series of anthropometric measures performed twice during one week during a three year period in boys and girls. The subjects of this investigation were 39 children (21 boys and 18 girls), 9-10 year of age at the beginning of the study. Children were measured three times with one year interval. Children were classified by Tanner stage 1-2 during the first measurements, stage 1-3 during the second measurements and stage 1-4 during the third measurements. Body height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. All anthropometric parameters were measured according to the protocol recommended by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (Norton & Olds 1996). Nine skinfolds, 13 girths, eight lengths and eight breadths/lengths were measured. The reproducibility of body height (r = 0.995-0.999), body weight (r = 0.990-0.999) and BMI (r = 0.969-0.999) was very high in boys and girls. The intraclass correlations (ICC), technical errors (TE) and coefficients of variation (CV) were quite different depending on the measurement site of the skinfold thickness. It was surprising that the ICCs were highest and TEs and CVs were lowest during the second year of the measurement. The computed ICC was high, and TE and CV values were quite similar and relatively low in girth, length and breadth/length measurements. It was concluded that the reproducibility of girths, lengths and breadths/lengths in children is very high and the reproducibility of skinfolds is high. Specifically, the reproducibility is very high immediately before puberty in boys and girls.

  3. Dew Measurements along a Longitudinal Sand Dune Transect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.

    2000-01-01

    In a desert environment dew can serve as an important source of moisture for plants, biological crusts, insects and small animals. A measurement programme was carried out within a sand dune belt situated in the northwestern Negev desert, Israel, to measure daily amounts of dew deposition as well as

  4. On-chip measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters from 10 nm to 250 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of planar Hall effect magnetoresistive sensors for AC susceptibility measurements of magnetic beads with frequencies ranging from DC to 1 MHz. This wide frequency range allows for measuring Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters ranging from 10 nm to 250 nm...... to sedimentation, magnetic trapping, and signal per bead. Among the investigated beads, we conclude that the beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are best suited for future on-chip volume-based biosensing experiments using planar Hall effect sensors........ Brownian relaxation is measured for six different magnetic bead types and their hydrodynamic diameters are determined. The hydrodynamic diameters are found to be within 40% of the nominal bead diameters. We discuss the applicability of the different bead types for volume-based biosensing with respect...

  5. Measurement of Magnetization Curve and Magnetic Relaxation for 2H-NbSe2 Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ning; Liu Hai-lin; Yu Zhu-xing; Xiong Rui; Shi Jing

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of electronic transport properties: behaviors of magnetization curve and magnetic relaxation of a typical normal superconductor 2H-NbSe2 are investigated. The results show that TCand ΔTC of the samples are 7.2,0.18 K, indicating that superconducting energy gap at zero temperature is 1.1 meV. No fish tail shape is found in the magnetization curves at several temperatures. The relationship between remnant magnetic moment and time reveals that the magnetic flux creep of the sample agrees with the Kim-Anderson thermal activation model with the relaxation rate S=0.000 36 at T=6 K.

  6. Measurement of stress relaxation on strips of copper materials. Spannungsrelaxationsmessungen an Baendern aus Kupferwerkstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmenkamp, T.; Steinkamp, W. (Kabel- und Metallwerke Gutehoffnungshuette AG, Osnabrueck (Germany, F.R.). Zentralbereich Technik); Schleicher, K. (Stolberger Metallwerke GmbH und Co. KG, Stolberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-11-01

    The stress relaxation behaviour has been investigated for strips of copper alloys that are commonly used for electromechanical elements like contacts and springs. Among the materials examined, i.e. CuSnMg, CuMg0,7, CuSn6, CuFe2P, CuFe2Mg, CuNi18Zn20, CuNi9Sn2 as well as the age-hardenable alloys CuNi1,5Si0,3 and CuCrZr, the copper-chromium-zirconium alloy proves to have the best stress relaxation properties. (orig.).

  7. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Ravinder K.; Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the...

  8. A subharmonic detrending or data-smoothing approach for longitudinal road profile measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Commonly used figure-of-merits for longitudinal road profiles such as the International Roughness Index (IRI) and the Ride Number (RN) are based on statistical properties. Raw measured longitudinal road profile data may contain large trending components especially when the measurements are made...... without significantly corrupting the short wavelength content of the profile data. The method called sub-harmonic detrending works by fitting sub-harmonic sinusoids to the data followed by circular filtering in order to remove the trend. The method is also well suited for data-smoothing....

  9. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the proton structure functions F{sub L} and F{sub 2} have been extracted in the region 5 x 10{sup -4}

  10. Do sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation influence sleep bruxism? Report of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente López, M; van Selms, M K A; van der Zaag, J; Hamburger, H L; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sleep hygiene measures combined with relaxation techniques in the management of sleep bruxism (SB) in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, randomised clinical trial design. Sixteen participants (mean ± s.d. age = 39·9 ± 10·8 years) were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 8) or to the experimental treatment group (n = 8). Participants belonging to the latter group were instructed to perform sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation techniques for a 4-week period. Two polysomnographic recordings, including bilateral masseter electromyographic activity, were made: one prior to the treatment and the other after the treatment period. The number of bruxism episodes per hour, the number of burst per hour and the bruxism time index (i.e. the percentage of total sleep time spent bruxing) were established as outcome variables. No significant differences could be observed between the outcome measures obtained before and after the 4-week period, neither for the sleep bruxism variables nor for the sleep variables. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no effect of sleep hygiene measures together with progressive relaxation techniques on sleep bruxism or sleep over a 4-week observation period.

  11. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Satoshi; Kitaguchi, Ryoichi; Takeda, Ryoji; Yamada, Tsutomu; Takemura, Yasushi

    2016-09-10

    The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC) hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP) was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  12. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  13. On-chip measurement of the Brownian relaxation frequency of magnetic beads using magnetic tunneling junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, M.; Sogne, E.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of the Brownian relaxation frequency of 250 nm diameter magnetic beads using a lab-on-chip platform based on current lines for exciting the beads with alternating magnetic fields and highly sensitive magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors with a superparamagnetic free...

  14. Relaxation and Flow of Polymer Thin Films in Isothermal Temperature Jump Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, G.; Banach, M. J.; Vaia, R. A.

    2000-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of thin polymer films is of interest in fabrication of microelectronics, optoelectronics and for the coatings industry. It is known that polymer relaxation is effected by film thickness and by the particular substrate/polymer pair. Recently, we have used a spectroscopic ellipsometer to investigate the glass transition in thin films. In addition to information on modification of thermal transitions, the spectroscopic ellipsometer allows for direct observation of the isothermal dimensions of a thin polymer film as a function of time following a rapid temperature change. Recent results will be presented on the observation of time dependence in film-normal thickness and normalized, in-plane, lateral dimension (explained in talk) as well as simple fits to this relaxation behavior in terms of a normalized viscosity and relaxation time. Initial results support a highly asymmetric initial thermal expansion followed by close to isotropic relaxation and anisotropic flow. These features may elucidate models for chain orientation in thin polymer films. Beaucage, G.; Composto, R.; Stein, R.S. (1993). J. Poly. Sci., Polym. Phys. Ed., 31 319. Kovacs, A. J.; Hutchinson, J. M.; Aklonis, J. J. (1977) in "The Structure of Non-Crystalline Materials", Ed. P. H. Gaskell, Taylor and Francis, London. Banach, M. J.; Clarson, S. J.; Beaucage, G.; Kramer, E. J.; Benkoski, J.; Vaia, R. Submitted Macromolecules (1999). Beaucage, G.; Banach, M. J.; Vaia, R. A. Submitted Macromolecules (1999).

  15. Proton-decoupled CPMG: a better experiment for measuring (15)N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-04-01

    (15)N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality (15)N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as (15)N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150ms. This is much shorter than (15)N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample (15)N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) (15)N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of (15)N(ε) spins in arginine side chains. We

  16. Progress towards atomic vapor photonic microcells: Coherence and polarization relaxation measurements in coated and uncoated HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; McFerran, J. J.; Jouin, J.; Ilinova, E.; Thomas, P.; Benabid, F.

    2013-03-01

    We report a comparative study on dephasing mechanisms between inner core coated and uncoated sections of the same Kagome hypocycloid-shaped core hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) filled with rubidium vapor. The comparison is performed by measuring the atomic polarization relaxation and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) linewidth in Rb loaded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) inner wall coated and bare silica core Kagome HC-PCF. The measurements show a polarization relaxation time of 32μs in a PDMS coated Kagome HC-PCF and 24μs in uncoated Kagome HC-PCF. A minimum EIT linewidth of 6.2±0.8MHz is achieved in PDMS coated Kagome HC-PCF, and 8.3±0.9 MHz for the uncoated Kagome HC-PCF.

  17. Protein conformational exchange measured by 1H R1ρ relaxation dispersion of methyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Ulrich; Blissing, Annica T; Hennig, Janosch; Ahlner, Alexandra; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J; Akke, Mikael; Lundström, Patrik

    2013-09-01

    Activated dynamics plays a central role in protein function, where transitions between distinct conformations often underlie the switching between active and inactive states. The characteristic time scales of these transitions typically fall in the microsecond to millisecond range, which is amenable to investigations by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Processes at the faster end of this range are more challenging to study, because higher RF field strengths are required to achieve refocusing of the exchanging magnetization. Here we describe a rotating-frame relaxation dispersion experiment for (1)H spins in methyl (13)CHD2 groups, which improves the characterization of fast exchange processes. The influence of (1)H-(1)H rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effects (ROE) is shown to be negligible, based on a comparison of R 1ρ relaxation data acquired with tilt angles of 90° and 35°, in which the ROE is maximal and minimal, respectively, and on samples containing different (1)H densities surrounding the monitored methyl groups. The method was applied to ubiquitin and the apo form of calmodulin. We find that ubiquitin does not exhibit any (1)H relaxation dispersion of its methyl groups at 10 or 25 °C. By contrast, calmodulin shows significant conformational exchange of the methionine methyl groups in its C-terminal domain, as previously demonstrated by (1)H and (13)C CPMG experiments. The present R 1ρ experiment extends the relaxation dispersion profile towards higher refocusing frequencies, which improves the definition of the exchange correlation time, compared to previous results.

  18. New technique for single-scan T1 measurements using solid echoes. [for spin-lattice relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple technique for single-scan T1 measurements in solids is proposed and analyzed for single exponential spin-lattice relaxation. In this technique, the direct spin heating caused by the sampling process is significantly reduced in comparison with conventional techniques by utilizing the 'solid echo' to refocus the magnetization. The applicability of this technique to both the solid and liquid phases is demonstrated.

  19. Temporal trajectory and progression score estimation from voxelwise longitudinal imaging measures: Application to amyloid imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgel, Murat; Jedynak, Bruno; Wong, Dean F.; Resnick, Susan M.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical β-amyloid deposition begins in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) years before the onset of any clinical symptoms. It is therefore important to determine the temporal trajectories of amyloid deposition in these earliest stages in order to better understand their associations with progression to AD. A method for estimating the temporal trajectories of voxelwise amyloid as measured using longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is presented. The method involves the estimation of a score for each subject visit based on the PET data that reflects their amyloid progression. This amyloid progression score allows subjects with similar progressions to be aligned and analyzed together. The estimation of the progression scores and the amyloid trajectory parameters are performed using an expectation-maximization algorithm. The correlations among the voxel measures of amyloid are modeled to reflect the spatial nature of PET images. Simulation results show that model parameters are captured well at a variety of noise and spatial correlation levels. The method is applied to longitudinal amyloid imaging data considering each cerebral hemisphere separately. The results are consistent across the hemispheres and agree with a global index of brain amyloid known as mean cortical DVR. Unlike mean cortical DVR, which depends on a priori defined regions, the progression score extracted by the method is data-driven and does not make assumptions about regional longitudinal changes. Compared to regressing on age at each voxel, the longitudinal trajectory slopes estimated using the proposed method show better localized longitudinal changes. PMID:26221692

  20. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of parametric MR based lesion detection and

  1. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  2. Localized measurement of longitudinal and transverse flow velocities in colloidal suspensions using optical coherence tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, N.; Van Leeuwen, T.G.; Kalkman, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on localized measurement of the longitudinal and transverse flow velocities in a colloidal suspension using optical coherence tomography. We present a model for the path-length resolved autocorrelation function including diffusion and flow, which we experimentally verify. For flow that is

  3. Assessment of the time constant of relaxation: insights from simulations and hemodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mey, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Verdonck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use high-fidelity animal data and numerical simulations to gain more insight into the reliability of the estimated relaxation constant derived from left ventricular pressure decays, assuming a monoexponential model with either a fixed zero or free moving pressure asymptote. Comparison of the experimental data with the results of the simulations demonstrated a trade off between the fixed zero and the free moving asymptote approach. The latter method more closely fits the pressure curves and has the advantage of producing an extra coefficient with potential diagnostic information. On the other hand, this method suffers from larger standard errors on the estimated coefficients. The method with fixed zero asymptote produces values of the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) within a narrow confidence interval. However, if the pressure curve is actually decaying to a nonzero pressure asymptote, this method results in an inferior fit of the pressure curve and a biased estimation of tau.

  4. Factorial Invariance within Longitudinal Structural Equation Models: Measuring the Same Construct across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widaman, Keith F.; Ferrer, Emilio; Conger, Rand D.

    2009-01-01

    Charting change in behavior as a function of age and investigating longitudinal relations among constructs are primary goals of developmental research. Traditionally, researchers rely on a single measure (e.g., scale score) for a given construct for each person at each occasion of measurement, assuming that measure reflects the same construct at each occasion. With multiple indicators of a latent construct at each time of measurement, the researcher can evaluate whether factorial invariance holds. If factorial invariance constraints are satisfied, latent variable scores at each time of measurement are on the same metric and stronger conclusions are warranted. In this paper we discuss factorial invariance in longitudinal studies, contrasting analytic approaches and highlighting strengths of the multiple-indicator approach to modeling developmental processes. PMID:20369028

  5. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  6. Post-rifting relaxation processes in the Afar region (Ethiopia) from geodetic measurements and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, L.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Hamling, I. J.; Wright, T. J.; Lewi, E.; Nooner, S. L.; Buck, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2005, a 60km-long dike intrusion took place at the Dabbahu rift, Afar, Ethiopia, at the boundary between the Nubian and Danakil plates. Since this major event, 12 new intrusions have affected the central and southern parts of the 2005 dike. Time series from continuous GPS stations outside of volcanoes show a combination of discrete diking events and quasi constant velocity displacement at rates up to 10 times faster than the secular divergence rate between Nubia and Arabia. Survey GPS sites in the far-field show rates twice as fast as the secular Nubia/Arabia divergence. Similar observations after the 1975-1985 Krafla events in Iceland and the 1978 Asal-Ghoubbet events in Afar have been interpreted as the result of stress relaxation in a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle and/or continued magma injection. Nooner et al. (submitted) showed that horizontal GPS displacements are well explained by the relaxation, in a viscoelastic upper mantle, of the stresses imparted by the dike intrusions. The best fit is obtained for a 13.2km-thick crust overlying a mantle with a viscosity of 5.2x10^18Pa.s. We improve upon this approach with a model accounting for dike intrusions, viscoelastic stress relaxation in a power-law rheology upper mantle, laterally varying crustal thicknesses, and pressure changes in magma reservoirs. Preliminary results indicate that 3-dimensional velocity field from GPS and InSAR requires a combination of viscoelastic relaxation and magma transport at depth.

  7. Elastic properties of relaxed, activated, and rigor muscle fibers measured with microsecond resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, D. W.; Blangé, T; van der Graaf, H.; Treijtel, B W

    1988-01-01

    Tension responses due to small and rapid length changes (completed within 40 microseconds) were obtained from skinned single-fiber segments (4- to 7-mm length) of the iliofibularis muscle of the frog incubated in relaxing, rigor, and activating solution. The fibers were skinned by freeze-drying. The first 500 microseconds of the responses for all three conditions could be described with a linear model, in which the fiber is regarded as a rod composed of infinitesimally small identical segment...

  8. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  9. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  10. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, Katja; Wirth, W; Guermazi, A; Hitzl, W; Hunter, D J; Eckstein, F

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8% to 29.9% (SRM -0.82; p quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. • First longitudinal MRI-based measurements of change of meniscus position and size. • Quantitative longitudinal evaluation of meniscus change in knee osteoarthritis. • Improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis.

  11. Mesures de contraintes in-situ. Méthode de relaxation des carottes Measuring in-Situ Stresses. Relaxation Method with Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreau P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, on se propose de présenter les premiers résultats de l'étude de la méthode d'évaluation des contraintes par mesure de déformations différées d'une carotte après son extraction. Le travail correspondant a été réalisé dans le cadre du projet ARTEP Fracturation hydraulique . Les principes de cette méthode et les quelques éléments d'interprétation récemment publiés dans la littérature sont exposés dans un premier temps. Les résultats de deux campagnes de mesures sur deux puits de la SNEA-P (Soudron, novembre 1985 et Lanot, juillet 1986 sont ensuite présentés. Ces essais ont mis en évidence que les déformations différées d'une carotte dues au relachement des contraintes sont effectivement mesurables. Cependant, une interprétation quantitative de ces mesures nécessite une amélioration des conditions expérimentales (stabilisation thermique, stabilisation de l'état de saturation. This article describes the first results of research on a method of evaluating stresses by measuring the differred deformations of a core sample after it has been extracted. The corresponding research was done within the framework of an ARTEP project on Hydraulic Fracturing . The principles of this method and several interpretation aspects published recently in the literature are described in the first part. Then the results of two measurement campaigns using two SNEA-P wells (Soudron in November 1985 and Lanot in July 1986 are described. These tests revealed that the differed deformations of a core sample due to the relaxing of stresses can effectively be measured. However, a quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires an improvement to be made in the experimental conditions (thermal stabilization, stabilization of the state of saturation.

  12. 1H metabolite relaxation times at 3.0 tesla: Measurements of T1 and T2 values in normal brain and determination of regional differences in transverse relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träber, Frank; Block, Wolfgang; Lamerichs, Rolf; Gieseke, Jürgen; Schild, Hans H

    2004-05-01

    To measure 1H relaxation times of cerebral metabolites at 3 T and to investigate regional variations within the brain. Investigations were performed on a 3.0-T clinical whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) system. T2 relaxation times of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), and choline compounds (Cho) were measured in six brain regions of 42 healthy subjects. T1 relaxation times of these metabolites and of myo-inositol (Ins) were determined in occipital white matter (WM), the frontal lobe, and the motor cortex of 10 subjects. T2 values of all metabolites were markedly reduced with respect to 1.5 T in all investigated regions. T2 of NAA was significantly (P motor cortex (247 +/- 13 msec) than in occipital WM (301 +/- 18 msec). T2 of the tCr methyl resonance showed a corresponding yet less pronounced decrease (162 +/- 16 msec vs. 178 +/- 9 msec, P = 0.021). Even lower T2 values for all metabolites were measured in the basal ganglia. Metabolite T1 relaxation times at 3.0 T were not significantly different from the values at 1.5 T. Transverse relaxation times of the investigated cerebral metabolites exhibit an inverse proportionality to magnetic field strength, and especially T2 of NAA shows distinct regional variations at 3 T. These can be attributed to differences in relative WM/gray matter (GM) contents and to local paramagnetism. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  14. Bayesian joint modeling of longitudinal measurements and time-to-event data using robust distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghfalaki, T; Ganjali, M; Hashemi, R

    2014-01-01

    Distributional assumptions of most of the existing methods for joint modeling of longitudinal measurements and time-to-event data cannot allow incorporation of outlier robustness. In this article, we develop and implement a joint modeling of longitudinal and time-to-event data using some powerful distributions for robust analyzing that are known as normal/independent distributions. These distributions include univariate and multivariate versions of the Student's t, the slash, and the contaminated normal distributions. The proposed model implements a linear mixed effects model under a normal/independent distribution assumption for both random effects and residuals of the longitudinal process. For the time-to-event process a parametric proportional hazard model with a Weibull baseline hazard is used. Also, a Bayesian approach using the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method is adopted for parameter estimation. Some simulation studies are performed to investigate the performance of the proposed method under presence and absence of outliers. Also, the proposed methods are applied for analyzing a real AIDS clinical trial, with the aim of comparing the efficiency and safety of two antiretroviral drugs, where CD4 count measurements are gathered as longitudinal outcomes. In these data, time to death or dropout is considered as the interesting time-to-event outcome variable. Different model structures are developed for analyzing these data sets, where model selection is performed by the deviance information criterion (DIC), expected Akaike information criterion (EAIC), and expected Bayesian information criterion (EBIC).

  15. Relax and refill: xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements favours embolism repair in stems and generates artificially low PLC values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), with recorded values being higher at midday than on the following morning, have been interpreted as evidence for the occurrence of cycles of xylem conduits' embolism and repair. Recent reports have suggested that diurnal PLC changes might arise as a consequence of an experimental artefact, that is, air entry into xylem conduits upon cutting stems, even if under water, while under substantial tension generated by transpiration. Rehydration procedures prior to hydraulic measurements have been recommended to avoid this artefact. In the present study, we show that xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements might favour xylem refilling and embolism repair, thus leading to PLC values erroneously lower than those actually experienced by transpiring plants. When xylem tension relaxation procedures were performed on stems where refilling mechanisms had been previously inhibited by mechanical (girdling) or chemical (orthovanadate) treatment, PLC values measured in stems cut under native tension were the same as those measured after sample rehydration/relaxation. Our data call for renewed attention to the procedures of sample collection in the field and transport to the laboratory, and suggest that girdling might be a recommendable treatment prior to sample collection for PLC measurements.

  16. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 Artemia cysts between 10 and 500 MHz. At lower Larmor frequencies, below 1 MHz, the relaxation rates of water in brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  17. Measurement of the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    First measurements are presented of the diffractive cross section {sigma}{sub ep{yields}}{sub eXY} at centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s) of 225 and 252 GeV, together with a precise new measurement at {radical}(s) of 319 GeV, using data taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007. Together with previous H1 data at {radical}(s) of 301 GeV, the measurements are used to extract the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} in the range of photon virtualities 4.0{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}44.0 GeV{sup 2} and fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss 5.10{sup -4}{<=}x{sub P}{<=}3.10{sup -3}. The measured F{sub L}{sup D} is compared with leading twist predictions based on diffractive parton densities extracted in NLO QCD fits to previous measurements of diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering and with a model which additionally includes a higher twist contribution derived from a colour dipole approach. The ratio of the diffractive cross section induced by longitudinally polarised photons to that for transversely polarised photons is extracted and compared with the analogous quantity for inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. (orig.)

  18. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  19. On the suitability of longitudinal profile measurements using Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation for high current proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, Joanna; Vieille-Grosjean, Mélissa; Kittelmann, Irena Dolenc; Thomas, Cyrille

    2014-01-01

    The use of Smith-Purcell radiation to measure electrons longitudinal profiles has been demonstrated at several facilities in the picosecond and sub-picosecond range. There is a strong interest for the development of non intercepting longitudinal profile diagnostics for high current proton beams. We present here results of simulations on the expected yield of longitudinal profile monitors using Smith-Purcell radiation for such proton beams.

  20. NMR RELAXIVITY AND IMAGING OF NEUTRAL MACROMOLECULAR POLYESTER GADOLINIUM (Ⅲ) COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-chao Yu; Hong-bing Hu; Mai-li Liu; Han-zhen Yuan; Chao-hui Ye; Ren-xi Zhuo

    1999-01-01

    Five neutral macromolecular polyester gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes with pendant hydrophobic alkyl and aromatic functional groups were prepared. The longitudinal relaxation rates of these complexes were measured. One of these Gd (Ⅲ) complexes was chosen for the acute toxicity test and T1-weighted imaging measurement. Preliminary results showed that. compared with Gd-DTPA, the neutral macromolecular gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes provide higher T1 relaxivity enhancement and longer function duration.

  1. Molecular relaxation in supersonic free jets of N2 and CH4 from stimulated Raman spectroscopy and time-of-flight measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Abad, Laura; Bermejo, Dionisio; Herrero, Víctor J.; Santos, J.; Tanarro, Isabel

    1997-01-01

    The relaxation of the energy stored in the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of N2 and CH4 in the course of free jet expansions has been experimentally studied. Rotational temperatures along the expansion axis were obtained by means of stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and terminal flow velocities and translational temperatures were determined from supersonic beam time-of-flight measurements. From these measurements low-temperature cross sections for rotational relaxation have been...

  2. Measurement of elastic constants by simultaneously sensing longitudinal and shear waves as an overlapped signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Song, Dong Gi; Jhang, Kyoung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Measurement of elastic constants is crucial for engineering aspects of predicting the behavior of materials under load as well as structural health monitoring of material degradation. Ultrasonic velocity measurement for material properties has been broadly used as a nondestructive evaluation method for material characterization. In particular, pulse-echo method has been extensively utilized as it is not only simple but also effective when only one side of the inspected objects is accessible. However, the conventional technique in this approach measures longitudinal and shear waves individually to obtain their velocities. This produces a set of two data for each measurement. This paper proposes a simultaneous sensing system of longitudinal waves and shear waves for elastic constant measurement. The proposed system senses both these waves simultaneously as a single overlapped signal, which is then analyzed to calculate both the ultrasonic velocities for obtaining elastic constants. Therefore, this system requires just half the number of data to obtain elastic constants compared to the conventional individual measurement. The results of the proposed simultaneous measurement had smaller standard deviations than those in the individual measurement. These results validate that the proposed approach improves the efficiency and reliability of ultrasonic elastic constant measurement by reducing the complexity of the measurement system, its operating procedures, and the number of data.

  3. Measurement of the Beam Longitudinal Profile in a Storage Ring by Non-Linear Laser Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of un trapped particles, and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets ("ghost bunches").

  4. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  5. Measuring {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik [Linkoeping University, Molecular Biotechnology/IFM (Sweden); Lin Hong [Hospital for Sick Children, Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-07-15

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of {sup 13}C enrichment (30-40%) at C{sup {beta}} side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little {sup 13}C label at positions one bond removed ({approx}5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1-{sup 13}C]-glucose/NaH{sup 12}CO{sub 3} or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples.

  6. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of total water content and myelin water fraction in brain at 3T using a T2 relaxation based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Sandra M; Kolind, Shannon H; MacKay, Alex L

    2017-04-01

    This work demonstrates the in vivo application of a T2 relaxation based total water content (TWC) measurement technique at 3T in healthy human brain, and evaluates accuracy using simulations that model brain tissue. The benefit of using T2 relaxation is that it provides simultaneous measurements of myelin water fraction, which correlates to myelin content. T2 relaxation data was collected from 10 healthy human subjects with a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) sequence, along with inversion recovery for T1 mapping. Voxel-wise T2 distributions were calculated by fitting the T2 relaxation data with a non-negative least squares algorithm incorporating B1(+) inhomogeneity corrections. TWC was the sum of the signals in the T2 distribution, corrected for T1 relaxation and receiver coil inhomogeneity, relative to either an external water standard or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Simulations were performed to determine theoretical errors in TWC. TWC values measured in healthy human brain relative to both external and CSF standards agreed with literature values. Simulations demonstrated that TWC could be measured to within 3-4% accuracy. In vivo TWC measurement using T2 relaxation at 3T works well and provides a valuable tool for studying neurological diseases with both myelin and water changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Localized T2 measurements using an OSIRIS-CPMG method. Application to measurements of blood oxygenation and transverse relaxation free of diffusion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F; Poulet, P; Namer, I J; Steibel, J; Chambron, J

    1994-12-01

    This work presents a new method allowing localized T2 measurements, based upon the OSIRIS scheme. A train of 180 degrees pulses is applied after the OSIRIS preparation cycle, recording directly the transverse magnetization decay. The method was verified for two nuclei, 1H and 19F, with phantoms and in vivo on rats. The accuracy of the T2 values is discussed, as well as possible applications of the OSIRIS-CPMG method to proton transverse spin relaxation measurements, free of diffusion effects, and to non-invasive in vivo blood oxygenation measurements, through the use of an emulsion of perfluorooctylbromide, a blood substitute containing fluorine.

  9. Noise measurements of the lowest frequency longitudinal mode of an aluminum cylinder at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Annual report 1 Nov 75--31 Dec 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.S.; Gretz, D.; Richard, J.P.; Rydbeck, G.; Weber, J.

    1976-08-01

    The lowest frequency longitudinal mode of an aluminum cylinder has been studied over the temperature range 60 K -- 78 K. Lead zirconate titanate crystals were bonded to the cylinder for observation of the thermal fluctuations and relaxation phenomena. Large amounts of excess noise were observed whenever the cylinder was not in thermal equilibrium. The cylinder appeared to have attained thermal equilibrium after its temperature had been maintained near liquid nitrogen temperatures for several weeks. Noise temperatures within a factor 2 of the temperature measured by a platinum resistance thermometer were observed when the mean temperature of the cylinder was drifting less than 0.01 Kelvin per day. The very large fluctuations in noise temperature are not understood and warrant further investigation. (auth)

  10. Simplex-TSDC spectroscopy: An efficient tool to measure the relaxation time of the isothermal transient depolarization current in organic dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchenane-Mehor, Halima, E-mail: halima_mehor_2000@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire CaSiCCE, Département de Génie Electrique, ENSET-Oran, B.P. 1523, El M’Naouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Laboratoire de Microphysique et de Nanophysique (LaMiN), Département de Physique-Chimie, ENSET-Oran, B.P. 1523 EL M’Naouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Soufi, Manil M.; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Benzohra, Mohamed [Laboratoire LECAP-AMME, EA 4528, Université de Rouen, Faculté des Sciences, Avenue de l' Université BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2013-03-01

    The temporal technique analysis by a simplex optimization method of isothermal transient depolarization current measurements (Simplex-TSDC) is presented for the study of the glass transition domain of different polymers. The advantage of the present method compared to the classical TSDC is that it gives direct results comparable to the experiment and allows a good estimate of the relaxation time close to the glass transition temperature in dielectric thin films. The present method also allows a direct determination of two relaxation times corresponding to a fast and a slow dynamics; and then confirms the heterogeneous character of the molecular relaxation dynamics.

  11. Modelling of the measured longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of single ceramic fibres with annular electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pientschke, Christoph; Steinhausen, Ralf; Kern, Sabine; Beige, Horst

    2011-05-01

    A method for the measurement of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33 of single ceramic fibres with diameters 100-500 µm was recently developed. The voltage was applied using annular electrodes and the resulting displacement was measured by a capacitive method. In this paper, a number of calculations regarding the field distribution and the resulting piezoelectric displacement are presented for a typical lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic. Provided that the fibres are ideally poled in the longitudinal direction, they can be modelled using the finite element method taking into account linear constitutive equations. The deviation of the measured and the actual d33 was modelled for a broad range of heights and diameters of the fibres and different electrode dimensions. The electric field distribution was analysed for typical examples and the influence of the mechanical stress on the measured d33 was studied. For sufficiently long and thin fibres the field distribution of the electric field is quite uniform and the d33 can be measured with high accuracy. Moreover, it was shown that for such fibres the measured piezoelectric coefficient d33 is determined by no other material parameter of the ceramics. The found trends of preferable geometries for the measurement can apparently be transferred to other piezoceramics.

  12. Child personality measures as contemporaneous and longitudinal predictors of social behaviour in pre-school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Zupančič

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Predictive relations from personality measures to children's social behaviour in pre-school were examined for 3 year old children (at Time 1; T1 who were reassessed one year later (at Time 2; T2. At both times, mothers and fathers separately rated children's personality characteristics using the Inventory of Child Individual Differences (Halverson et al., 2003, while the pre-school teachers assessed the same children on the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation Scale (LaFreniere et al., 2001. Three general predictive models were examined, contemporaneous (at T1 and T2, longitudinal, and cumulative. Mother- and father-rated child personality was contemporaneously predictive of children's social behaviour as assessed by their pre-school teachers. The most consistent predictions across the spouses and at both times of measurement were obtained for child externalizing behaviour. More disagreeable and emotionally stable children, as opposed to their less disagreeable and more in stable counterparts, were concurrently observed to exhibit more externalizing tendencies during the time spent in pre-school. Maternal reports were longitudinally predictive of children's social competence and internalizing behaviour and the father reports predicted internalizing and externalizing behaviour one year later. Neuroticism at age 3 was consistently linked to internalizing tendencies at age 4 across parents both longitudinally and cumulatively. Father-rated Disagreeableness at age 3 was predictive of externalizing behaviour one year later in both longitudinal and cumulative models, while the contemporaneous information on child Disagreeableness and Neuroticism (reversed at T2, independent of the respective child traits at T1, significantly improved the cumulative predictions of externalizing behaviour from maternal reports. In general, child personality scores derived from maternal data sets were more powerful predictors of children's social behaviour across

  13. Bayesian Nonparametric Regression Analysis of Data with Random Effects Covariates from Longitudinal Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Duchwan

    2010-09-28

    We consider nonparametric regression analysis in a generalized linear model (GLM) framework for data with covariates that are the subject-specific random effects of longitudinal measurements. The usual assumption that the effects of the longitudinal covariate processes are linear in the GLM may be unrealistic and if this happens it can cast doubt on the inference of observed covariate effects. Allowing the regression functions to be unknown, we propose to apply Bayesian nonparametric methods including cubic smoothing splines or P-splines for the possible nonlinearity and use an additive model in this complex setting. To improve computational efficiency, we propose the use of data-augmentation schemes. The approach allows flexible covariance structures for the random effects and within-subject measurement errors of the longitudinal processes. The posterior model space is explored through a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. The proposed methods are illustrated and compared to other approaches, the "naive" approach and the regression calibration, via simulations and by an application that investigates the relationship between obesity in adulthood and childhood growth curves. © 2010, The International Biometric Society.

  14. Bayesian nonparametric regression analysis of data with random effects covariates from longitudinal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Duchwan; Li, Erning; Mallick, Bani K

    2011-06-01

    We consider nonparametric regression analysis in a generalized linear model (GLM) framework for data with covariates that are the subject-specific random effects of longitudinal measurements. The usual assumption that the effects of the longitudinal covariate processes are linear in the GLM may be unrealistic and if this happens it can cast doubt on the inference of observed covariate effects. Allowing the regression functions to be unknown, we propose to apply Bayesian nonparametric methods including cubic smoothing splines or P-splines for the possible nonlinearity and use an additive model in this complex setting. To improve computational efficiency, we propose the use of data-augmentation schemes. The approach allows flexible covariance structures for the random effects and within-subject measurement errors of the longitudinal processes. The posterior model space is explored through a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. The proposed methods are illustrated and compared to other approaches, the "naive" approach and the regression calibration, via simulations and by an application that investigates the relationship between obesity in adulthood and childhood growth curves.

  15. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloecker, Katja [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); BHS Linz, Department of Orthopaedics, Linz (Austria); Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Guermazi, A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), Boston, MA (United States); Hitzl, W. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg, Research Office, Salzburg (Austria); Hunter, D.J. [University of Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8 % to 29.9 % (SRM -0.82; p < 0.001). Change in medial meniscus extrusion in a central image (SRM 0.18) and in the central five slices (SRM 0.22) did not reach significance, but change in extrusion across the entire meniscus (SRM 0.32; p = 0.03) and in the relative area of meniscus extrusion (SRM 0.56; p < 0.001) did. There was a reduction in medial meniscus volume (10 %; p < 0.001), width (7 %; p < 0.001), and height (2 %; p = 0.08); meniscus substance loss was strongest in the posterior (SRM -0.51; p = 0.001) and weakest in the anterior horn (SRM -0.15; p = 0.31). This pilot study reports, for the first time, longitudinal change in quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. (orig.)

  16. A temperature relaxation method for the measurement of the specific heat of solids at room temperature in student laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, E.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.; Valiente, H.

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described which employs a relaxation method for the measurement of the specific heat at constant pressure of solids at room temperature. The experiment employs measurements of the cooling (or heating) rate of a sample whose temperature differs from that of the surroundings due to light heating. This rate depends on the temperature difference, the specific heat of the sample and the heat transfer coefficient. The sample is suspended adiabatically in a reservoir in which a vacuum can be made. The influence of heat dissipation by convection on the results is discussed for the first time for this kind of experiment. The theoretical aspects related to the described technique involve concepts from several branches of physics that makes the experiment of interest and suitable for students at undergraduate and graduate levels of physics, material sciences and engineering.

  17. Dielectric α-relaxation and ionic conductivity in propylene glycol and its oligomers measured at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, Riccardo; Roland, C. Michael

    2003-12-01

    Structural dynamics and volume were measured as a function of both temperature and pressure for a propylene glycol and its oligomers (PPG), and the results compared with previous data on higher molecular weight polypropylene glycols. PPG is of special interest because the terminal groups form hydrogen bonds; thus, by studying different molecular weights, the manner in which hydrogen bonding influences the dynamics in the supercooled regime can be systematically investigated. The fragility (Tg-normalized temperature dependence) of the dimer and trimer of PPG increases with pressure, similar to results for other H-bonded liquids, but different from van der Waals glass formers. This behavior is believed to be due to the effect of pressure in decreasing the extent of hydrogen bonding. From the combined temperature and volume dependences of the relaxation times, the relative degree to which thermal energy and volume govern the dynamics was quantified. With decreasing molecular weight, the relative contribution of thermal energy to the dynamics was found to strongly increase, reflecting the role of hydrogen bonding. By comparing the ionic conductivity and the dielectric relaxation times, a decoupling between rotational and translational motions was observed. Interestingly, this decoupling was independent of both pressure and molecular weight, indicating that hydrogen bonds have a negligible effect on the phenomenon.

  18. Reference ranges for 2-dimensional sonographic lung measurements in healthy fetuses: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Ingrid Schwach Werneck; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bussamra, Luiz Cláudio Silva; Deter, Russell L; Belfort, Michael A; Lee, Wesley; Ruano, Rodrigo

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish reference ranges for 2-dimensional sonographic measurements of fetal lungs from longitudinal data. A total of 214 fetal lung measurements were longitudinally evaluated in 62 healthy fetuses between 20 and 36 weeks' menstrual age. Both right and left lung areas were measured in the heart 4-chamber view using lung area tracing and axis diameter methods. Multilevel modeling was used to evaluate the expected values and variability with respect to menstrual age and to generate reference ranges for the lung area, lung-to-head ratio, quantitative lung index, and observed-to-expected lung-to-head ratio for both lungs. The expected values varied with menstrual age for all parameters. Variance was menstrual age dependent for all parameters except the longest diameter area measurements and their lung-to-head ratios. Models are presented for expected 2-dimensional sonographic lung size parameters and their variance as a function of menstrual age. These data have been used to generate age-specific reference ranges for both measurements and indices. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Concordance correlation coefficients estimated by generalized estimating equations and variance components for longitudinal repeated measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Miao-Yu

    2017-04-15

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a commonly accepted measure of agreement between two observers for continuous responses. This paper proposes a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach allowing dependency between repeated measurements over time to assess intra-agreement for each observer and inter- and total agreement among multiple observers simultaneously. Furthermore, the indices of intra-, inter-, and total agreement through variance components (VC) from an extended three-way linear mixed model (LMM) are also developed with consideration of the correlation structure of longitudinal repeated measurements. Simulation studies are conducted to compare the performance of the GEE and VC approaches for repeated measurements from longitudinal data. An application of optometric conformity study is used for illustration. In conclusion, the GEE approach allowing flexibility in model assumptions and correlation structures of repeated measurements gives satisfactory results with small mean square errors and nominal 95% coverage rates for large data sets, and when the assumption of the relationship between variances and covariances for the extended three-way LMM holds, the VC approach performs outstandingly well for all sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Estimation of Hot Electron Relaxation Time in GaN Using Hot Electron Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sansaptak; Lu, Jing; Nidhi; Raman, Ajay; Hurni, Christophe; Gupta, Geetak; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report for the first time an estimation of hot electron relaxation time in GaN using electrical measurements. Hot electron transistors (HETs) with GaN as the base layer and different base-emitter barrier-height configurations and base thicknesses were fabricated. Common-base measurements were performed to extract the differential transfer ratio, and an exponential decay of the transfer ratio with increasing base thickness was observed. A hot electron mean free path was extracted from the corresponding exponential fitting and a relaxation time was computed, which, for low energy injection, matched well with theoretically predicted relaxation times based on longitudinal optical (LO) phonon scattering.

  1. Measuring flow-mediated dilation through transverse and longitudinal imaging: comparison and validation of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroz, Marianne J; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-11-07

    Three-dimensional ultrasound images (3DUS), having two spatial and one temporal dimension, were taken of the brachial artery during baseline conditions, in the transverse and longitudinal planes. The transverse images were analyzed by three different techniques used to quantify flow-mediated dilation (FMD): (1) measuring vessel area manually (TIMA), (2) measuring vessel area semi-automatically (TISA) and (3) measuring vessel diameter (TID). The inter- and intra-observer variability and transducer repositioning variability of each method were compared to each other and to the variability of measurements taken using the traditional method of measuring vessel FMD through measuring vessel diameter on longitudinal images (LID). The percent coefficient-of-variation describing the inter-observer variability (COV(inter)) was similar for the methods, indicating that each method was equally reproducible by the different observers. The percent coefficient-of-variation describing the intra-observer variability (COV(intra)) and the smallest detectable percent change in diameter (Δd(intra)) for each method indicated that TID was the most precise at measuring vessel diameter, and could measure the smallest changes in diameter between successive measurements (COV(intra) = 0.31%, Δd(intra) = 0.87%). LID performed the poorest (COV(intra) = 0.57%, Δd(intra) = 1.59%). The percent coefficient-of-variation describing transducer repositioning (COV(rep)) and the smallest detectable percent change in FMD over time (ΔFMD) for each method indicated that TIMA was the most reproducible method (COV(rep) = 2.35%, ΔFMD = 6.52%) closely followed by TISA. TID performed the poorest (COV(rep) = 5.37%, ΔFMD = 14.89%). TIMA and TISA were found not to be statistically different so we suggest TISA as the method of choice to maximize reproducibility between measurements over time, as it is faster and simpler to perform. In each experiment it was clear that transverse imaging introduced equal or less

  2. In-situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements of relaxation in Fe/MgO/Fe epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, D. S.; Ali, M.; Hickey, B. J.; Tanner, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The relaxation of Fe/MgO/Fe tunnel junctions grown epitaxially on (001) MgO substrates has been measured by in-situ grazing incidence in-plane X-ray diffraction during the thermal annealing cycle. We find that the Fe layers are fully relaxed and that there are no irreversible changes during annealing. The MgO tunnel barrier is initially strained towards the Fe but on annealing, relaxes and expands towards the bulk MgO value. The strain dispersion is reduced in the MgO by about 40% above 480 K post-annealing. There is no significant change in the "twist" mosaic. Our results indicate that the final annealing stage of device fabrication, crucial to attainment of high TMR, induces substantial strain relaxation at the MgO barrier/lower Fe electrode interface.

  3. Evaluation of sandstone surface relaxivity using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Sandor, Magdalena; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a common technique used to assess the pore size of fluid-filled porous materials in a wide variety of fields. However, the NMR signal itself only provides a relative distribution of pore size. To calculate an absolute pore size distribution from the NMR data, the material's surface relaxivity needs to be known. Here, a method is presented using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to evaluate surface relaxivity in sandstones. NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation was measured on a set of sandstone samples and the surface relaxivity was calculated from the pore size distribution determined with MICP measurements. Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that the LIBS data can predict with good accuracy the longitudinal (R(2)∼0.84) and transverse (R(2)∼0.79) surface relaxivity. Analysis of the regression coefficients shows significant influence from several elements. Some of these are elements previously established to have an effect on surface relaxivity, such as iron and manganese, while others are not commonly associated with surface relaxivity, such as cobalt and titanium. Furthermore, LIBS provides advantages compared to current methods to calibrate surface relaxivity in terms of speed, portability, and sample size requirements. While this paper focuses on geological samples, the method could potentially be expanded to other types of porous materials.

  4. Muon spin relaxation investigation of tetranuclear iron(III) Fe_4(OCH_3)_6(dpm)_6 molecular cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Procissi, D.; P. Arosio; Orsini, F.; Marinone, M.; Cornia, A.; Lascialfari, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the spin dynamics of Fe_4(OCH_3)_6(dpm)_6 single molecule magnet by means of SQUID magnetization and muon relaxation (µ^(+)SR) measurements. In longitudinal field µ^+SR experiments performed at magnetic fields H=200, 1000 Oe, the muon asymmetry P(t) could be fitted by means of three components, the first constant, the second fast relaxing through a quasiexponential decay, and the third, the slowest relaxing, showing an exponential decay. The slowest muon relaxation rate ...

  5. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher Phillip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  6. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher P.

    2005-12-15

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  7. Energy measurement and longitudinal beam emittance reconstruction in L4T line

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, C; Garoby, R; Lallement, JB; Lombardi, A; Tang, J Y; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    LINAC4 is a new linear accelerator for H- ion which will replace proton Linac2 as injector for the CERN proton accelerator complex. LINAC4 accelerates H− ions from 45 keV to 160 MeV in a sequence of normal conducting structures. Then, H- ions with a kinetic energy of 160 MeV will be sent to the PS Booster. This note describes two energy measurement methods and a improved method that will be used for longitudinal emittance reconstruction with space charge by multi-particle tracking code and the expected results.

  8. Feasibility study on longitudinal phase-space measurements at GSI UNILAC using charged-particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosic, Timo

    2014-04-14

    Accelerator facilities require access to many beam parameters during operation. The field of beam instrumentation serves this crucial role in commissioning, setup and optimisation of the facility. An important information is contained in the phase-space distribution of the accelerated particles. In case of GSI (Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung) those are ions from protons to uranium. If established methods to access certain beam parameters do not exist, new approaches have to emerge. This is the case for the presented measurement setup which has been designed and realised by Forck et al. to support commissioning of the GSI high-current injector. It is aiming at an experimental method to access the longitudinal phase-space distribution at low energies of 1.4 AMeV. Established methods for higher energies and based on the measurement of the electric field distribution are not feasible at non-relativistic velocities. The presented method is based on a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement between two particle detectors. A modification allows, alternatively, the direct measurement of the kinetic energy using a mono-crystalline (MC) diamond detector. Currently, besides others, the focus of the optimisation of the injector is put on the longitudinal phase-space distribution. It allows for a systematic optimisation of the matching into the accelerator cavities and, thus, an improved transmission as well as lower emittance values. The new accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), a large-scale upgrade at GSI, requires an improved beam quality at the existing injector. In this work the experimental setup is investigated for its feasibility to measure the longitudinal phase-space distribution. To this end, the phase and momentum of the single ions along the beam axis have to be determined with high precision. Finally, the longitudinal phase-space distribution is identified with the measured ensemble. The setup is presented in detail

  9. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hop, G.E.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Slager, R.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Saatkamp, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such addit

  10. Longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in addition to diagnosis of heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, N.; Nescolarde, L.; Domingo, M.; Gastelurrutia, P.; Bayés-Genis, A.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterised by signs of systemic and pulmonary fluid retention, shortness of breath and/or fatigue. There is a lack of reliable indicators of disease state. Benefits and applicability of non-invasive bioimpedance measurement in the hydration state of soft tissues have been validated, fundamentally, in dialysis patients. Four impedance configurations (2 longitudinal and 2 transversal) were analyzed in 48 HF patients (M=28, F=20) classified according to a clinical disease severity score (CDSS) derived from the Framingham criteria: CDSS2 (G2: M = 5, F = 6). The aim of this study is to analyze longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, in addition to clinical diagnosis parameters of heart failure, including: clinical disease severity score (CDSS) and a biomarker concentrations (NT-proBNP). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. The CDSS, NTproBNP and impedance parameters between groups (G1 and G2) were compared by mean of Mann Withney U-test. The statistical significance was considered with P measured was analyzed using RXc graph.

  11. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on DNAPL Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media Through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Time Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, R. C.; Geesey, G.; White, T.; Oram, L.; Seymour, J.; Codd, S.; Straley, C.; Bryar, T.

    2003-12-01

    This research leads to a better understanding of how physical and biological properties of porous media influence water and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) distributions under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Knowing how environmental properties affect DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport needed for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. We investigate the capability and limitations of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. For in-situ subsurface environmental applications, low-field proton NMR measurements are preferred to conventional high-field techniques commonly used to obtain chemical shift data, because low field measurements are much less degraded by magnetic susceptibility variations between rock grains and pore fluids that significantly interfere with high-field NMR measurements. The research scope includes discriminating DNAPLs in water-wet or solvent-wet environments and the impact of biological processes on their transport mechanisms in porous media. Knowledge of the in situ flow properties and pore distributions of organic contaminants are critical to understanding where and when these fluids will enter subsurface aquifers. Experiments determined that commonly found subsurface DNAPLs containing hydrogen, such as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene, are detectable and distinguished from water in soils. Related experiments concern the effects of bacterial accumulation in saturated and unsaturated porous media on water and DNAPL pore-size distributions. These include synthetic bio-film matrix as a surrogate bio-film and sand, biological agents to grow biofilms, and multiple pore sizes to determine if bio-films prefer certain pore-size ranges. NMR microscopy focused on imaging a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor. This system

  12. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  13. Measurement of the longitudinal phase space at the photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen

    CERN Document Server

    Lipka, D; Bähr, J; Flöttmann, K; Richter, D; Stephan, F; Zhao, Q

    2002-01-01

    The photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ) has been developed with the aim to deliver low emittance electron beams and study its characteristics for future applications at free electron lasers and linear accelerators. The energy of the electron beam varies in the range between 4 and 5 MeV. One of the important properties of the delivered beam is the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. Measurements of the momentum distributions show a small energy spread. The principle of the measurement of the bunch length will be discussed, time resolutions will be shown and preliminary results will be given. The design to measure the correlation between momentum and time distribution of the electron bunch will be shown with calculated resolutions.

  14. Interpreting equilibrium-conductivity and conductivity-relaxation measurements to establish thermodynamic and transport properties for multiple charged defect conducting ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W Grover; Kee, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A model-based interpretation of measured equilibrium conductivity and conductivity relaxation is developed to establish thermodynamic, transport, and kinetics parameters for multiple charged defect conducting (MCDC) ceramic materials. The present study focuses on 10% yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY10). In principle, using the Nernst-Einstein relationship, equilibrium conductivity measurements are sufficient to establish thermodynamic and transport properties. However, in practice it is difficult to establish unique sets of properties using equilibrium conductivity alone. Combining equilibrium and conductivity-relaxation measurements serves to significantly improve the quantitative fidelity of the derived material properties. The models are developed using a Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) formulation, which enables the quantitative representation of conductivity relaxations caused by very large changes in oxygen partial pressure.

  15. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  16. Measuring adolescents’ exposure to victimization: The Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Helen L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Wertz, Jasmin; Gray, Rebecca; Newbury, Joanne; Ambler, Antony; Zavos, Helena; Danese, Andrea; Mill, Jonathan; Odgers, Candice L.; Pariante, Carmine; Wong, Chloe C.; Arseneault, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents mutlilevel findings on adolescents’ victimization exposure from a large longitudinal cohort of twins. Data were obtained from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, an epidemiological study of 2,232 children (1,116 twin pairs) followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). To assess adolescent victimization we combined best practices in survey research on victimization with optimal approaches to measuring life stress and traumatic experiences, and introduce a reliable system for coding severe victimization. One in three children experienced at least one type of severe victimization during adolescence (crime victimization, peer/sibling victimization, internet/mobile phone victimization, sexual victimization, family violence, maltreatment, or neglect), and most types of victimization were more prevalent amongst children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Exposure to multiple victimization types was common, as was re-victimization; over half of those physically maltreated in childhood were also exposed to severe physical violence in adolescence. Biometric twin analyses revealed that environmental factors had the greatest influence on most types of victimization, while severe physical maltreatment from caregivers during adolescence was predominantly influenced by heritable factors. The findings from this study showcase how distinct levels of victimization measurement can be harmonized in large-scale studies of health and development. PMID:26535933

  17. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models for multivariate longitudinal data: an illustration with health-related quality of life data from thirteen measurement occasions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.E. Verdam; F.J. Oort

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: - Application of Kronecker product to construct parsimonious structural equation models for multivariate longitudinal data. - A method for the investigation of measurement bias with Kronecker product restricted models. - Application of these methods to health-related quality of life data

  18. In vivo measurements of T1 relaxation times of 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    The T1 relaxation times were estimated for 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle. Five healthy volunteers were examined in a 1.5 Tesla wholebody imaging system using an inversion recovery pulse sequence. The calculated T1 relaxation times ranged from 5.517 sec for phosphocreatine to 3.603 sec...

  19. Heat-denatured lysozyme aggregation and gelation as revealed by combined dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and light scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliarelli, A; Sassi, P; Paolantoni, M; Onori, G; Cametti, C

    2012-09-06

    The dielectric behavior of native and heat-denatured lysozyme in ethanol-water solutions was examined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 2 GHz, using frequency-domain dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Because of the conformational changes on unfolding, dielectric methods provide information on the denaturation process of the protein and, at protein concentration high enough, on the subsequent aggregation and gelation. Moreover, the time evolution of the protein aggregation and gelation was monitored measuring, by means of dynamic light scattering methods, the diffusion coefficient of micro-sized polystyrene particles, deliberately added to the protein solution, which act as a probe of the viscosity of the microenvironment close to the particle surface. All together, our measurements indicate that heat-induced denaturation favors, at high concentrations, a protein aggregation process which evolves up to the full gelation of the system. These findings have a direct support from IR measurements of the absorbance of the amide I band that, because of the unfolding, indicate that proteins entangle each other, producing a network structure which evolves, in long time limit, in the gel.

  20. Reliability of anthropometric measures in a longitudinal cohort of patients initiating ART in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ag Aboubacrine Souleymane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthropometric measurements are a non invasive, inexpensive, and suitable method for evaluating the nutritional status in population studies with relatively large sample sizes. However, anthropometric techniques are prone to errors that could arise, for example, from the inadequate training of personnel. Despite these concerns, anthropometrical measurement error is seldom assessed in cohort studies. We describe the reliability and challenges associated with measurement of longitudinal anthropometric data in a cohort of West African HIV+ adults . Methods In a cohort of patients initiating antiretroviral treatment in Mali, we evaluated nutritional status using anthropometric measurements(weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference, waist circumference and triceps skinfold. Observers with no prior experience in the field of anthropometry were trained to perform anthropometrical measurements. To assess the intra- and inter-observer variability of the measurements taken in the course of the study, two sub-studies were carried out: one at the beginning and one at the end of the prospective study. Twelve patients were measured twice on two consecutive days by the same observer on both study occasions. The technical error of measurement (TEM (absolute and relative value, and the coefficient of reliability (R were calculated and compared across reliability studies. Results According to the R and relative TEM, inter-observer reliabilities were only acceptable for height and weight. In terms of intra-observer precision, while the first and second anthropometrists demonstrated better reliability than the third, only height and weight measurements were reliable. Looking at total TEM, we observed that while measurements remained stable between studies for height and weight, circumferences and skinfolds lost precision from one occasion to the next. Conclusions Height and weight were the most reliable measurements under the study

  1. Reactivity in rapidly collected hygiene and toilet spot check measurements: a cautionary note for longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Benjamin F; Khush, Ranjiv S; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford, John M

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Measurements of the longitudinal structure function and |$V_{cs}$| in the CCFR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, U K; Arroyo, C G; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Budd, H S; Conrad, J; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Lamm, M J; Lefmann, W C; Marsh, W; McFarland, K S; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Quintas, P Z; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino nucleon interactions in the CCFR detector are used to extract the structure functions, F_2, xF_3(nu), xF_3(nubar) and R(longitudinal) in the kinematic region 0.01measurements of R in the x<0.1 region provide a constraint on the level of the gluon distribution. The x and Q^2 dependence of R is compared with a QCD based fit to previous data. The CKM matrix element |V_cs| is extracted from a combined analysis of xF_3 and dimuon data.

  3. Multiple imputation for harmonizing longitudinal non-commensurate measures in individual participant data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Juned; Reiter, Jerome P; Brincks, Ahnalee; Gibbons, Robert D; Crespi, Catherine M; Brown, C Hendricks

    2015-11-20

    There are many advantages to individual participant data meta-analysis for combining data from multiple studies. These advantages include greater power to detect effects, increased sample heterogeneity, and the ability to perform more sophisticated analyses than meta-analyses that rely on published results. However, a fundamental challenge is that it is unlikely that variables of interest are measured the same way in all of the studies to be combined. We propose that this situation can be viewed as a missing data problem in which some outcomes are entirely missing within some trials and use multiple imputation to fill in missing measurements. We apply our method to five longitudinal adolescent depression trials where four studies used one depression measure and the fifth study used a different depression measure. None of the five studies contained both depression measures. We describe a multiple imputation approach for filling in missing depression measures that makes use of external calibration studies in which both depression measures were used. We discuss some practical issues in developing the imputation model including taking into account treatment group and study. We present diagnostics for checking the fit of the imputation model and investigate whether external information is appropriately incorporated into the imputed values.

  4. Anthropometric measurements and dental caries in children: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive.

  5. Anthropometric Measurements and Dental Caries in Children: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive. PMID:25593143

  6. Longitudinal association of anthropometric measures of adiposity with cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Heo, Moonseong; Van Horn, Linda V; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Getaneh, Asqual; Ard, Jamy; Vitolins, Mara Z; Waring, Molly E; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    Some studies suggest that anthropometric measures of abdominal obesity may be superior to body mass index (BMI) for the prediction of cardiometabolic risk factors; however, most studies have been cross-sectional. Our aim was to prospectively examine the association of change in BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference (WC), and waist circumference-to-height ratio (WCHtR) with change in markers of cardiometabolic risk in a population of postmenopausal women. We used a subsample of participants in the Women's Health Initiative aged 50 to 79 years at entry with available fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements obtained at multiple time points over 12.8 years of follow-up (n = 2672). The blood samples were used to measure blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides at baseline, and at years 1, 3, and 6. We conducted mixed-effects linear regression analyses to examine associations at baseline and longitudinal associations between change in anthropometric measures and change in cardiometabolic risk factors, adjusting for covariates. In longitudinal analyses, change in BMI, WC, and WCHtR robustly predicted change in cardiometabolic risk, whereas change in WHR did not. The strongest associations were seen for change in triglycerides, glucose, and HDL-C (inverse association). Increase in BMI, WC, and WCHtR strongly predicted increases in serum triglycerides and glucose, and reduced HDL-C. WC and WCHtR were superior to BMI in predicting serum glucose, HDL-C, and triglycerides. WCHtR was superior to WC only in predicting serum glucose. BMI, WC, and WCHtR were all superior to WHR.

  7. Measuring {sup 1}H{sup N} temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Vallurupalli, Pramodh [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada); Cordes, Matthew H. J. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Hansen, D. Flemming [University College London, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated 'invisible' protein states that exchange with a 'visible' ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5 Degree-Sign C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about -5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.

  8. sup 31 P spin-lattice relaxation time measurements in biological systems; Heart, liver, kidney and erythrocytes of rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Eiji; Maeda, Munehiro; Kuki, Satoru; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi (National Inst. for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) of phosphorus compounds in the perfused heart, liver, kidney and erythrocytes of rats were measured by the DESPOT (Driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T{sub 1}) method at 8.45 T. This method is a rapid and accurate technique for the measurement of T{sub 1} values. T{sub 1} values of phosphomonoesters (PME), 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiesters (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and three phosphates of ATP were ranged from 0.15 {plus minus} 0.02 sec (beta-ATP in the liver) to 8.5 {plus minus} 1.6 sec (PDE in the kidney). T{sub 1} value of beta-ATP in the liver was 1/4-1/5 of those in the mandibular gland, heart, erythrocytes and kidney. T{sub 1} values obtained from biological materials are useful for selecting the optimal pulse repetition times and pulse angles to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of {sup 13}P spectra, and for correcting distortions of signal intensities in the spectra. (author).

  9. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  10. Multisite evaluations of a T2 -relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) MRI technique to measure brain oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiying; Dimitrov, Ivan; Andrews, Trevor; Crane, David E; Dariotis, Jacinda K; Desmond, John; Dumas, Julie; Gilbert, Guillaume; Kumar, Anand; Maclntosh, Bradley J; Tucholka, Alan; Yang, Shaolin; Xiao, Guanghua; Lu, Hanzhang

    2016-02-01

    Venous oxygenation (Yv ) is an important index of brain physiology and may be indicative of brain diseases. A T2 -relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) MRI technique was recently developed to measure Yv . A multisite evaluation of this technique would be an important step toward broader availability and potential clinical utilizations of Yv measures. TRUST MRI was performed on a total of 250 healthy subjects, 125 from the developer's site and 25 each from five other sites. All sites were equipped with a 3 Tesla (T) MRI of the same vendor. The estimated Yv and the standard error (SE) of the estimation εYv were compared across sites. The averaged Yv and εYv across six sites were 61.1% ± 1.4% and 1.3% ± 0.2%, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the estimated Yv was dependent on age (P = 0.009) but not on performance site. In contrast, the SE of the Yv estimation was site-dependent (P = 0.024) but was less than 1.5%. Further analysis revealed that εYv was positively associated with the amount of subject motion (P < 0.001) but negatively associated with blood signal intensity (P < 0.001). This work suggests that TRUST MRI can yield equivalent results of Yv estimation across different sites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Feasibility study on longitudinal phase-space measurements at GSI UNILAC using charged-particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosic, Timo

    2014-04-14

    Accelerator facilities require access to many beam parameters during operation. The field of beam instrumentation serves this crucial role in commissioning, setup and optimisation of the facility. An important information is contained in the phase-space distribution of the accelerated particles. In case of GSI (Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung) those are ions from protons to uranium. If established methods to access certain beam parameters do not exist, new approaches have to emerge. This is the case for the presented measurement setup which has been designed and realised by Forck et al. to support commissioning of the GSI high-current injector. It is aiming at an experimental method to access the longitudinal phase-space distribution at low energies of 1.4 AMeV. Established methods for higher energies and based on the measurement of the electric field distribution are not feasible at non-relativistic velocities. The presented method is based on a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement between two particle detectors. A modification allows, alternatively, the direct measurement of the kinetic energy using a mono-crystalline (MC) diamond detector. Currently, besides others, the focus of the optimisation of the injector is put on the longitudinal phase-space distribution. It allows for a systematic optimisation of the matching into the accelerator cavities and, thus, an improved transmission as well as lower emittance values. The new accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), a large-scale upgrade at GSI, requires an improved beam quality at the existing injector. In this work the experimental setup is investigated for its feasibility to measure the longitudinal phase-space distribution. To this end, the phase and momentum of the single ions along the beam axis have to be determined with high precision. Finally, the longitudinal phase-space distribution is identified with the measured ensemble. The setup is presented in detail

  12. BioRef II—Neutron reflectometry with relaxed resolution for fast, kinetic measurements at HZB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, M.; Steitz, R.; Kreuzer, M.; Strobl, M.; Rose, M.; Dahint, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an upgrade to the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer BioRef at the research reactor BER II of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB). Through the integration of an additional chopper into the existing setup, the available wavelength resolution is significantly extended. Now two distinct operation modes can be used: a high resolution mode with Δλ/λ ranging from 1% to 5%, which allows for the investigation of thick films up to 4000 Å, and a high flux mode with Δλ/λ = 7%-11%. In the high flux mode, reflectivity curves from 0.007 Å-1 to 0.2 Å-1 with three angular settings can be recorded in 7 min. For a single angular setting and its respective window in Q-space, a time resolution of even less than 4 min is reached. The different configurations are documented by respective measurements (a) on a Ni-Ti multilayer and (b) the swelling kinetics of a solid-supported phospholipid coating upon incubation in a polyelectrolyte solution.

  13. Measurements of the Separated Longitudinal Structure Function F_L from Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets at Low Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Tvaskis, V; Niculescu, I; Abbott, D; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Brash, E; Breuer, H; Chang, G; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Khayari, N El; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gaskell, D; Garrow, K; Gilman, R; Gueye, P; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Jackson, H; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Joo, K; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, J; Kinney, E; Klein, A; Kubarovsky, V; Liang, M; Liang, Y; Lolos, G; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; Mbianda, G; McGrath, E; Mckee, D; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Nozar, M; Ostapenko, T; Papandreou, Z; Potterveld, D; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Telfeyan, J; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B; Zhu, H

    2016-01-01

    Structure functions, as measured in lepton-nucleon scattering, have proven to be very useful in studying the quark dynamics within the nucleon. However, it is experimentally difficult to separately determine the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and consequently there are substantially less data available for the longitudinal structure function in particular. Here we present separated structure functions for hydrogen and deuterium at low four--momentum transfer squared, Q^2< 1 GeV^2, and compare these with parton distribution parameterizations and a k_T factorization approach. While differences are found, the parameterizations generally agree with the data even at the very low Q^2 scale of the data. The deuterium data show a smaller longitudinal structure function, and smaller ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross section R, than the proton. This suggests either an unexpected difference in R for the proton and neutron or a suppression of the gluonic distribution in nuclei.

  14. Study of the relaxation process during InGaAs/GaAs (001) growth from in situ real-time stress measurements

    OpenAIRE

    González Sagardoy, María Ujué; González Díez, Yolanda; González Sotos, Luisa

    2002-01-01

    Strain evolution during In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs (001) growth by molecular beam epitaxy has been monitored in real time. We have detected that three main relaxation stages, related to different mechanisms, take place during growth, and we have obtained the thickness range where those mechanisms are active. The in situ measured relaxation behavior in the plastic stages has been described by means of a simple equilibrium model that takes into account dislocations generation and interaction between the...

  15. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  16. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Nielsen, H; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow...

  17. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  18. Investigation of the longitudinal relaxation rate of blood after gadobenate dimeglumine administration: sequence optimization, dynamic acquisition, and clinical impact for contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Cristina; Anzidei, Michele; Napoli, Alessandro; Kirchin, Miles A; Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto; Tedoldi, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    To optimize the image acquisition parameters for improved steady-state (SS) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the carotid arteries with gadobenate dimeglumine. An inversion recovery fast low-angle shot (IR-FLASH) sequence for ultrafast determination of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 was first optimized on phantoms and tested against a routine variable repetition time (TR) spin echo sequence used as reference standard. Different combinations of flip angle (FA, between 6 and 14 degrees) and inversion time (between 134 and 9000 milliseconds) were evaluated to achieve the best trade off between speed and accuracy. The optimized sequence was thereafter used in vivo in 5 subjects to determine the time evolution of blood R1 at 1.5 T after administration of gadobenate dimeglumine at 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight. An optimal FA for angiographic measurement was thereafter derived from the Ernst equation based on experimental values of R1 previously determined in vivo. Finally, steady-state CE-MRA examinations were performed in 20 subjects to evaluate the improved contrast achieved after optimization of the FA for maximal blood signal enhancement. An ultrafast IR-FLASH sequence with a flip angle of 8 degrees and a properly defined set of inversion time values was shown to give in vitro R1 determinations that were in good agreement with those obtained using a routine, time consuming, variable-TR spin echo sequence. The use of this ultrafast IR-FLASH sequence in vivo allowed the blood signal behavior in the carotid arteries after gadobenate dimeglumine administration to be monitored. Using this sequence, the R1 decreased from 8.7±0.96 s⁻¹ at 30 seconds after injection to 3.8±0.24 s⁻¹ at 10 minutes after injection. Based on these data for R1, the optimal FA for SS CE-MRA was calculated to be 18 degrees for a gradient echo acquisition protocol with TR=7.5 milliseconds, when gadobenate dimeglumine is used. Significantly higher blood signal to noise

  19. Pulsed Mode Operation and Longitudinal Parameter Measurement of the Rossendorf SRF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Teichert, J; Buettig, H; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Xiang, R; Klemz, G; Kamps, T; Rudolph, J; Schenk, M; Will, I

    2011-01-01

    The Rossendorf SRF gun with a 3½ cell cavity has been operated since 2007. It has produced CW beam with the electron energy of 3 MeV and the average current up to 16 μA. The electron beam of the gun has been successfully injected into the ELBE superconducting linac since 2010. The Nb cavity has shown constant quality during the operation and for the Cs2Te photocathode life time of months could be obtained. Recently the gun started to run in the pulsed mode with higher gradient. The longitudinal Parameters have been measured in this mode. The dark current arose from the high gradient is studied. The main field emission source has been found to be the half cell. In this paper the new status of the SRF gun will be presented, and the latest results of the beam experiments will be discussed.

  20. Measurement of flow fluctuations in single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Rawat; N Kawade; G Sridhar; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2014-02-01

    A simple technique had been demonstrated for measuring flow-induced fluctuations in the single longitudinal mode (SLM) pulsed dye laser. Two prominent frequency components of 10.74 Hz and 48.83 Hz were present in the output of the Nd:YAG-pumped SLM dye laser. The flow-induced frequency component of 48.83 Hz was present due to the revolution per minute of the motor attached to the magnetically coupled gear pump. The time average bandwidth of 180 MHz has been obtained for this SLM dye laser. The effect of pump pulse energy on the bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was studied. The bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was increased to 285 MHz from 180 MHz, when the pump pulse energy was increased to 0.75 mJ from 0.15 mJ for a constant dye flow velocity of 0.5 m/s.

  1. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; Pasquale, S. De; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jungst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schonberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gottlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huttmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Yagues Molina, A. G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Brummer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e(-)p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centr

  2. The Five Cs Model of Positive Youth Development: A Longitudinal Analysis of Confirmatory Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Edmond P.; Li, Yibing; Kiely, Megan K.; Brittian, Aerika; Lerner, Jacqueline V.; Lerner, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of positive development across adolescence rests on having a valid and equivalent measure of this construct across the breadth of this period of life. Does the Positive Youth Development (PYD) construct based on the Five Cs model have satisfactory psychometric properties for such longitudinal measurement invariance? Using…

  3. Causal inference in longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Pin; Jo, Booil; Brown, C Hendricks

    2014-09-10

    We propose a principal stratification approach to assess causal effects in nonrandomized longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with a binary endpoint outcome and repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable. Our method is an extension of the principal stratification approach originally proposed for the longitudinal randomized study "Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial" to assess the treatment effect on the continuous Hamilton depression score adjusting for the heterogeneity of repeatedly measured binary compliance status. Our motivation for this work comes from a comparison of the effect of two glucose-lowering medications on a clinical cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we consider a causal inference problem assessing how well the two medications work relative to one another on two binary endpoint outcomes: cardiovascular disease-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Clinically, these glucose-lowering medications can have differential effects on the intermediate outcome, glucose level over time. Ultimately, we want to compare medication effects on the endpoint outcomes among individuals in the same glucose trajectory stratum while accounting for the heterogeneity in baseline covariates (i.e., to obtain 'principal effects' on the endpoint outcomes). The proposed method involves a three-step model estimation procedure. Step 1 identifies principal strata associated with the intermediate variable using hybrid growth mixture modeling analyses. Step 2 obtains the stratum membership using the pseudoclass technique and derives propensity scores for treatment assignment. Step 3 obtains the stratum-specific treatment effect on the endpoint outcome weighted by inverse propensity probabilities derived from Step 2.

  4. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Photodoping and relaxation of persistent photoconductivity in YBa2Cu3Ox studied by in-situ transport measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockinger, Christian; Markowitsch, Wilhelm; Lang, Wolfgang; Kula, Witold; Sobolewski, Roman

    1996-12-01

    We report on in-situ resistivity and Hall-effect studies of partially oxygen-depleted YBa2Cu3Ox thin films during white light illumination. The measurements were performed at various temperatures between the superconducting transition and room temperature. At all temperatures the resistivity and the Hall coefficient decreased as a function of the illumination time. The Hall number pH and the Hall mobility μH, calculated within a simple one-band model, showed an increase of pH during the illumination without a saturation. At low temperatures, μH behaved similarly to pH. At 200 K, however, μH became constant after several hours of illumination, while at 260 K and 290 K, we observed a short increase of μH followed by a long-term decrease. From the different time dependences of μH and pH, we conclude that two mechanisms contribute to the photodoping effect. Additionally, we observed that after termination of the illumination at 290 K the photodoped values of pH and μH relaxed with substantially different time constants.

  6. Compartmental relaxation and diffusion tensor imaging measurements in vivo in lambda-carrageenan-induced edema in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Reuben H; Does, Mark D

    2008-07-01

    Integrated diffusion tensor T(2) measurements were made on normal and edematous rat muscle, and the data were fitted with one- and two-compartment models, respectively. Edematous muscle exhibited a short-lived component (T(2) = 28 +/- 6 ms), with diffusion characteristics similar to that of normal muscle, and a long-lived component (T(2) = 96 +/- 27 ms), with greater mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and lower fractional anisotropy (FA). With this two-component description of diffusion and relaxation, values of ADC and FA estimated with a conventional pulsed-gradient spin-echo sequence will depend on the echo time, relative fraction of short-lived and long-lived water signals, and the intrinsic ADC and FA values within the tissue. On the basis of the relative differences in water diffusion properties between long-lived and short-lived water signals, as well as the similarities between the short-lived component and normal tissue, it is postulated that these two signal components largely reflect intracellular and extracellular water.

  7. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  8. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  9. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-10-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T(1)(-1)) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T(1)(-1) can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T(1)(-1) profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R(⊥), obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T(1)(-1) and R(⊥) profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz).

  10. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, H; Bosted, P; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal,; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKInnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Protopopescu; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stapanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  11. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    CERN Document Server

    Avakian, H; Burkert, V D; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; ElAlaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, R; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Pereira, S Anefalos; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  12. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  13. Energy Response and Longitudinal Shower Profiles Measured in CMS HCAL and Comparison With Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Laszlo, Andras; Pal, Andras; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Fenyvesi, Andras; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Sudhakar, Katta; Verma, Piyush; Hashemi, Majid; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Paktinat, S; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kosarev, Ivan; Ladygin, Vladimir; Mescheryakov, G; Moissenz, P; Petrosian, A; Sergeyev, S; Smirnov, Vitaly; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Ilyina, N; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Ulyanov, A; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Demianov, A; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Teplov, V; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Kalinin, Alexey; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; De Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Koylu, S; Kurt, Pelin; Onengüt, G; Ozkurt, Halil; Polatoz, A; Sogut, Kenan; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Esendemir, Akif; Gamsizkan, Halil; Güler, M; Ozkan, Cigdem; Sekmen, Sezen; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Yazgan, Efe; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Dindar, Kamile; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Senchishin, V; Hauptman, John M; Abdullin, Salavat; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Los, Serguei; O'Dell, Vivian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Arcidy, M; Hazen, Eric; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Machado, Emanuel; Rohlf, James; Varela, F; Wu, Shouxiang; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Skuja, Andris; Podrasky, V; Sanzeni, Christopher; Winn, Dave; Akgun, Ugur; Ayan, S; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gumus, Kazim; Kim, Heejong; Spezziga, Mario; Thomas, Ray; Baarmand, Marc M; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Kramer, Laird; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Cushman, Priscilla; Ma, Yousi; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Karmgard, Daniel John; Ruchti, Randy; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Tully, Christopher; Bodek, Arie; De Barbaro, Pawel; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T

    2007-01-01

    The response of the CMS combined electromagnetic and hadron calorimeter to beams of pions with momenta in the range 5-300 GeV/c has been measured in the H2 test beam at CERN. The raw response with the electromagnetic compartment calibrated to electrons and the hadron compartment calibrated to 300 GeV pions may be represented by sigma = (1.2) sqrt{E} oplus (0.095) E. The fraction of energy visible in the calorimeter ranges from 0.72 at 5 GeV to 0.95 at 300 GeV, indicating a substantial nonlinearity. The intrinsic electron to hadron ratios are fit as a function of energy and found to be in the range 1.3-2.7 for the electromagnetic compartment and 1.4-1.8 for the hadronic compartment. The fits are used to correct the non-linearity of the e pi response to 5% over the entire measured range resulting in a substantially improved resolution at low energy. Longitudinal shower profile have been measured in detail and compared to Geant4 models, LHEP-3.7 and QGSP-2.8. At energies below 30 GeV, the data, LHEP and QGSP are...

  14. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  15. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models for multivariate longitudinal data: an illustration with health-related quality of life data from thirteen measurement occasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Mathilde G E; Oort, Frans J

    2014-01-01

    Application of Kronecker product to construct parsimonious structural equation models for multivariate longitudinal data.A method for the investigation of measurement bias with Kronecker product restricted models.Application of these methods to health-related quality of life data from bone metastasis patients, collected at 13 consecutive measurement occasions.The use of curves to facilitate substantive interpretation of apparent measurement bias.Assessment of change in common factor means, after accounting for apparent measurement bias.Longitudinal measurement invariance is usually investigated with a longitudinal factor model (LFM). However, with multiple measurement occasions, the number of parameters to be estimated increases with a multiple of the number of measurement occasions. To guard against too low ratios of numbers of subjects and numbers of parameters, we can use Kronecker product restrictions to model the multivariate longitudinal structure of the data. These restrictions can be imposed on all parameter matrices, including measurement invariance restrictions on factor loadings and intercepts. The resulting models are parsimonious and have attractive interpretation, but require different methods for the investigation of measurement bias. Specifically, additional parameter matrices are introduced to accommodate possible violations of measurement invariance. These additional matrices consist of measurement bias parameters that are either fixed at zero or free to be estimated. In cases of measurement bias, it is also possible to model the bias over time, e.g., with linear or non-linear curves. Measurement bias detection with Kronecker product restricted models will be illustrated with multivariate longitudinal data from 682 bone metastasis patients whose health-related quality of life (HRQL) was measured at 13 consecutive weeks.

  16. Measurement of the longitudinal spin structure of the proton by COMPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzenev, A.; Compass Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive A and hadron double-spin asymmetries Apπ+, Apπ-, ApK+, ApK- measured at COMPASS (CERN SPS) in deep-inelastic scattering of a polarized muon beam off a polarized NH 3 solid target are presented. The results have been obtained with the full statistics collected in 2007 for the longitudinal target polarization. Proton asymmetries have been combined with published deuteron ones. An evaluation of the non-singlet spin-dependent structure function g1NS(x,Q) and its first moment, which confirms the validity of the Bjorken sum-rule, is presented. A LO evaluation of polarized quark densities is also presented. The use of the proton data allows to perform a full flavor separation and to extract individual helicity densities of u, d, u¯, d¯ and s quarks. All sea quark densities are found to be compatible with zero in the full range of the measurements.

  17. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a longitudinally polarized deuterium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physical Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2010-08-15

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of a real photon from a longitudinally polarized deuterium target are measured with respect to target polarization alone and with respect to target polarization combined with beam helicity and/or beam charge. The asymmetries appear in the distribution of the real photons in the azimuthal angle {phi} around the virtual photon direction, relative to the lepton scattering plane. The asymmetries arise from the deeply virtual Compton scattering process and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The results for the beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries from a tensor polarized deuterium target with vanishing vector polarization are shown to be compatible with those from an unpolarized deuterium target, which is expected for incoherent scattering dominant at larger momentum transfer. Furthermore, the results for the single target-spin asymmetry and for the double-spin asymmetry are found to be compatible with the corresponding asymmetries previously measured on a hydrogen target. For coherent scattering on the deuteron at small momentum transfer to the target, these findings imply that the tensor contribution to the cross section is small. Furthermore, the tensor asymmetry is found to be compatible with zero. (orig.)

  18. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, G.; Rusponi, S. [Ecole Polytechninque Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kavich, J.; Rizzini, A. Lodi [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (ICN-CSIC), E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Piamonteze, C.; Nolting, F. [Swiss Light Source (SLS), Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Tieg, C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), F-38043 Grenoble (France); Thiele, J.-U. [Seagate Technology, 47010 Kato Road, Fremont, California 94538 (United States); Gambardella, P. [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (ICN-CSIC), E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), E-08100 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni{sub 73}Fe{sub 18}Gd{sub 7}Co{sub 2}) at the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2}-edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/{radical}(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  19. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, G; Rusponi, S; Kavich, J; Rizzini, A Lodi; Piamonteze, C; Nolting, F; Tieg, C; Thiele, J-U; Gambardella, P

    2009-12-01

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni(73)Fe(18)Gd(7)Co(2)) at the L(3)/L(2)-edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/square root(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  20. Longitudinal measurement invariance of the metabolic syndrome: is the assessment of the metabolic syndrome stable over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Wright, Bruce R; Burns, G Leonard; Parks, Craig D; Strand, Paul S

    2011-02-01

    Without verification of longitudinal measurement invariance, researchers cannot be certain whether observed change in the metabolic syndrome reflects true change or changes in assessment or structure of the construct over time. This research tested longitudinal measurement invariance of a 1-factor model of the metabolic syndrome during the course of 6 years. Tests of longitudinal measurement invariance (configural, metric, and scalar) were conducted on 604 men and women who participated in the Spokane Heart Study from 1996 to 2006. Metabolic syndrome indicators included body mass index, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose. Sequential configural and metric invariance models demonstrated adequate model fit, but the scalar invariance model led to a decrement in fit. Therefore, the theoretical framework of the syndrome and the relationships between the syndrome construct and the indicators appear to be equivalent over time. However, observed values of the metabolic syndrome indicators may differ across time when there is a constant level of the syndrome. Because longitudinal invariance was not fully demonstrated, interpretation of change in the metabolic syndrome over time may be misleading because change may be partly attributable to measurement properties of the indicators. However, a cross-sectional 1-factor model of the metabolic syndrome is supported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Concurrent and Longitudinal Patterns and Trends in Performance on Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures in Kindergarten through Third Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missall, Kristen N.; Mercer, Sterett H.; Martinez, Rebecca S.; Casebeer, Dian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the research on the "Tests of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measurement" (TEN-CBM) tools by examining concurrent and predictive relations from kindergarten through third grade. Using a longitudinal sample of 535 students, this study included logistic regression, latent cluster, and latent transition…

  2. Concurrent and Longitudinal Patterns and Trends in Performance on Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures in Kindergarten through Third Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missall, Kristen N.; Mercer, Sterett H.; Martinez, Rebecca S.; Casebeer, Dian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the research on the "Tests of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measurement" (TEN-CBM) tools by examining concurrent and predictive relations from kindergarten through third grade. Using a longitudinal sample of 535 students, this study included logistic regression, latent cluster, and latent…

  3. The analysis of longitudinal quality of life measures with informative drop-out : A pattern mixture approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.J.; Buijs, C.; Stolk, R.P.; de Vries, E.G.E.; le Cessie, S.

    The analysis of longitudinal health-related quality of life measures (HRQOL) can be seriously hampered due to informative drop-out. Random effects models assume Missing At Random and do not take into account informative drop-out. We therefore aim to correct the bias due to informative drop-out.

  4. Improving the Rank Precision of Population Health Measures for Small Areas with Longitudinal and Joint Outcome Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Athens

    Full Text Available The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute has published the County Health Rankings since 2010. These rankings use population-based data to highlight health outcomes and the multiple determinants of these outcomes and to encourage in-depth health assessment for all United States counties. A significant methodological limitation, however, is the uncertainty of rank estimates, particularly for small counties. To address this challenge, we explore the use of longitudinal and pooled outcome data in hierarchical Bayesian models to generate county ranks with greater precision.In our models we used pooled outcome data for three measure groups: (1 Poor physical and poor mental health days; (2 percent of births with low birth weight and fair or poor health prevalence; and (3 age-specific mortality rates for nine age groups. We used the fixed and random effects components of these models to generate posterior samples of rates for each measure. We also used time-series data in longitudinal random effects models for age-specific mortality. Based on the posterior samples from these models, we estimate ranks and rank quartiles for each measure, as well as the probability of a county ranking in its assigned quartile. Rank quartile probabilities for univariate, joint outcome, and/or longitudinal models were compared to assess improvements in rank precision.The joint outcome model for poor physical and poor mental health days resulted in improved rank precision, as did the longitudinal model for age-specific mortality rates. Rank precision for low birth weight births and fair/poor health prevalence based on the univariate and joint outcome models were equivalent.Incorporating longitudinal or pooled outcome data may improve rank certainty, depending on characteristics of the measures selected. For measures with different determinants, joint modeling neither improved nor degraded rank precision. This approach suggests a simple way to use existing

  5. DEVICE FOR MEASURMENT OF RELAXATION TIME OF THE BLEACHED STATE OF OPTICAL MATERIALS BY THE «PUMP-PROBE» METHOD IN SUB-ΜS TIME DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Glazunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive shutters to control the duration of the light pulses is an important aspect in the miniature and microchip lasers. One of the key spectroscopic characteristics which determine the properties of the material, which can be used as a passive shutter is relaxation time of its bleached state.We describe a device for determination of relaxation time of the bleached state in optical materials by the «pump-probe» method in the sub-μs time domain. This device allows one to determine relaxation times for materials which absorb at the light wavelength of 1.5 μm, e.g., materials doped with cobalt ions Co2+. The results of test examinations of the device are described, and the relaxation time of the bleached state of Co2+ ions is measured for a novel material – transparent glass-ceramics with Co2+:Ga2 O3 nanophase – amounting to 190 ± 6 ns. 

  6. Longitudinal hemodynamic measurements in swine heart failure using a fully implantable telemetry system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny S Choy

    Full Text Available Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3, pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2 and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3. Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease

  7. Green Space and Child Weight Status: Does Outcome Measurement Matter? Evidence from an Australian Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taren Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether neighbourhood green space is beneficially associated with (i waist circumference (WC and (ii waist-to-height ratio (WtHR across childhood. Methods. Gender-stratified multilevel linear regressions were used to examine associations between green space and objective measures of weight status in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, a nationally representative source of data on 4,423 children aged 6 y to 13 y. WC and WtHR were measured objectively. Percentage green space within the local area of residence was calculated. Effect modification by age was explored, adjusting for socioeconomic confounding. Results. Compared to peers with 0–5% green space locally, boys and girls with >40% green space tended to have lower WC (βboys  −1.15, 95% CI −2.44, 0.14; βgirls  −0.21, 95% CI −1.47, 1.05 and WtHR (βboys  −0.82, 95% CI −1.65, 0.01; βgirls  −0.32, 95% CI −1.13, 0.49. Associations among boys were contingent upon age (p  valuesage∗green  space40% green space at 73.85 cm and 45.75% compared to those with 0–5% green space at 75.18 cm and 46.62%, respectively. Conclusions. Greener neighbourhoods appear beneficial to alternative child weight status measures, particularly among boys.

  8. Measurement of the longitudinal and circumferential muscular activity associated with peristalsis using a single fibre grating array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkwright, J. W.; Blenman, N. G.; Underhill, I. D.; Maunder, S. A.; Spencer, N. J.; Costa, M.; Brooks, S. J.; Szczesniak, M. M.; Dinning, P. G.

    2010-09-01

    Diagnostic catheters based on fibre Bragg gratings (FBG's) are proving to be highly effective for measurement of the muscular activity associated with peristalsis in the human gut. The primary muscular contractions that generate peristalsis are circumferential in nature; however, it has long been known that there is also a component of longitudinal contractility present, acting in harmony with the circumferential component to improve the overall efficiency of material movement. To date, there have been relatively few reports on the measurement or inference of longitudinal contractions in humans and all have been limited to detection at a single location only. This is due to the lack of a viable recording technique suitable for real-time in-vivo measurement of this type of activity over extended lengths of the gut. We report the detection of longitudinal motion in lengths of excised mammalian colon using an FBG technique that should be viable for similar detection in humans. The longitudinal sensors have been combined with our previously reported FBG pressure sensing elements to form a composite catheter that allows the relative phase between the two components to be detected. The catheter output has been validated using digital video mapping in an ex-vivo animal preparation using lengths of rabbit ileum.

  9. The magnetic flux leakage measurement by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Gwang Tae [Korea Industrial Testing Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Dae Rok; Han, Jung Hee; Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Physics, Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-15

    This paper is concerned with magnetic leakage flux measurement using by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field of the feromagnetic specimen. For detection sensitivity by the hall probe according to various depth of the subsurface defects, the specimen are prepared by six drilled holes of 0.5 mm φ from 1 mm depth to 4 mm depth in the carbon steel plate(10 x 35 x 265 mm). When the specimen applied by various frequency(2 - 9 Hz) of the AC through synthesizer and power amplifier in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage using lack-in amplifier and synthesizer are decreased linearly with defect depth at 2 Hz, but these signals are decreased suddenly with defect depth from the surface and obscured with increasing frequency. And, when the specimen applied range of 1 Amp. to 5 Amp. by DC power supply in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage through DVM decreased linearly with defect depth up to 2.5 mm depth and change slightly defect depth above 2.5 mm depth from the surface, but its signals appeared predominately.

  10. Standard practice for measuring the ultrasonic velocity in polyethylene tank walls using lateral longitudinal (LCR) waves

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for measuring the ultrasonic velocities in the outer wall of polyethylene storage tanks. An angle beam lateral longitudinal (LCR) wave is excited with wedges along a circumferential chord of the tank wall. A digital ultrasonic flaw detector is used with sending-receiving search units in through transmission mode. The observed velocity is temperature corrected and compared to the expected velocity for a new, unexposed sample of material which is the same as the material being evaluated. The difference between the observed and temperature corrected velocities determines the degree of UV exposure of the tank. 1.2 The practice is intended for application to the outer surfaces of the wall of polyethylene tanks. Degradation typically occurs in an outer layer approximately 3.2-mm (0.125-in.) thick. Since the technique does not interrogate the inside wall of the tank, wall thickness is not a consideration other than to be aware of possible guided (Lamb) wave effects or reflection...

  11. Longitudinal associations of phthalate exposures during childhood and body size measurements in young girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deierlein, Andrea L.; Wolff, Mary S.; Pajak, Ashley; Pinney, Susan M.; Windham, Gayle C.; Galvez, Maida P.; Silva, Manori J.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Biro, Frank M.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Phthalates are environmental chemicals that may play a role in the development of obesity. Few studies have investigated longitudinal associations between postnatal phthalate exposures and subsequent anthropometric measurements in children. Methods We collected data as part of The Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program at three US sites. 1,239 girls, ages 6–8 years, were enrolled in 2004–2007. We categorized baseline phthalate exposures, assessed from creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations of low molecular weight phthalate metabolites as low, body mass index (BMI), height, and waist circumference at ages 7 through 13 years. Results Low molecular weight phthalates were positively associated with gains in BMI and waist circumference. Predicted differences in BMI and waist circumference between girls with high versus low concentrations of low molecular weight phthalates increased from 0.56 (95% CI: −0.02, 1.1) to 1.2 (95%CI: 0.28, 2.1) kg/m2 and from 1.5 (95%CI: −0.38, 3.3) to 3.9 (95%CI: 1.3, 6.5) cm, respectively. High molecular weight phthalates were negatively associated with height but only among girls who were normal weight at baseline (BMI ≤85th percentile). Conclusion Phthalates, specifically low molecular weight phthalates, have small but detectable associations with girls’ anthropometric outcomes. Low molecular weight phthalates, showed stronger associations than other types of phthalates. PMID:27031039

  12. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  13. Measurement of Pion and Proton Longitudinal Shower Profiles up to 20 Nuclear Interaction Lengths with the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, H; Carli, T; Henriques-Correia, A M

    2006-01-01

    The response of pions and protons in the energy range of 20 to 180 GeV produced at CERN's SPS H8 test beam line in the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile hadron calorimeter has been measured. The testbeam configuration allowed to measure the longitudinal shower development for pions and protons up to 20 nuclear interaction lengths. It is found that pions penetrate deeper in the calorimeter than protons. However, protons induce showers that are laterally to the direction of the impinging particle wider. Including the measured total energy response, the pion to proton energy ratio and the resolution, all observations are consistent with a higher electromagnetic energy fraction in pion induced showers. The data are compared with Geant4 simulations using several hadronic physics lists. The measured longitudinal shower profiles are described by an analytical shower parameterisation within an accuracy of 5-10 %.

  14. Measurement of carbonyl chemical shifts of excited protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy: comparison between uniformly and selectively {sup 13}C labeled samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Hansen, D. Flemming; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for quantifying chemical shifts of excited protein states. For many applications of the technique that involve the measurement of relaxation rates of carbon magnetization it is necessary to prepare samples with isolated {sup 13}C spins so that experiments do not suffer from magnetization transfer between coupled carbon spins that would otherwise occur during the CPMG pulse train. In the case of {sup 13}CO experiments however the large separation between {sup 13}CO and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts offers hope that robust {sup 13}CO dispersion profiles can be recorded on uniformly {sup 13}C labeled samples, leading to the extraction of accurate {sup 13}CO chemical shifts of the invisible, excited state. Here we compare such chemical shifts recorded on samples that are selectively labeled, prepared using [1-{sup 13}C]-pyruvate and NaH{sup 13}CO{sub 3,} or uniformly labeled, generated from {sup 13}C-glucose. Very similar {sup 13}CO chemical shifts are obtained from analysis of CPMG experiments recorded on both samples, and comparison with chemical shifts measured using a second approach establishes that the shifts measured from relaxation dispersion are very accurate.

  15. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Koichi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kawano, Keiichi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. {yields} The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. {yields} The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D {sup 15}N NMR relaxation experiments. {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOEs of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S{sup 2}), the effective correlation time for internal motion ({tau}{sub e}), the {sup 15}N exchange broadening contributions (R{sub ex}) for each residue, and the overall correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S{sup 2} value was increased from 0.88 {+-} 0.01 to 0.92 {+-} 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S{sup 2} values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  16. Structural Technology Evaluation and Analysis Program (STEAP) Delivery Order 0042: Development of the Equivalent Overload Model, Demonstration of the Failure of Superposition, and Relaxation/Redistribution Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Measured by XRD and Computed by Finite Element Method. Outlet Face. 100 MPa=14.5 ksi .............................. 55 Figure 43. Relaxation of...Stress Measurements, 4% CX, Entry Plane, Variable Cycles .................. 84 Figure 69. Comparison of Residual Stress Measurements with CM and XRD ...00 08 5 0. 00 10 5 0. 00 12 5 0. 00 14 5 0. 00 16 5 0. 00 18 5 0. 00 21 5 EIFS, in. PD F, fr ac tio n AA2024-T351N=19 0=R 5.0=R 1.E-13 1.E-12 1.E-11 1

  17. First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.; /Oxford U.; Kimmitt, M.F.; /Essex U.; Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

  18. Size-effects on energy relaxation and excited-species desorption in krypton clusters: Fluorescence lifetime measurements with 10 eV laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Museur, L.; Castex, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements of KrN clusters (N¯=2-2000) have been carried out using intense 10 eV laser excitation near 3P2 metastable atomic energy level. Two principal groups of electronically excited dimers Kr2* have been found in desorption: dimers, loosely bound near the (3P2+1S0) dissociation limit, ejected from cooled clusters and dimers undergoing vibrational relaxation from hot clusters. The desorption is principally terminated when N¯⩾50 at./cluster. The relaxation kinetics seems to converge to the properties of a solid state for 102⩽N¯⩽103 at./cluster. A variation of the Kr2*(1u/0u-) radiative lifetime, from 264 ns (in gas phase) to 440 ns (N¯=102), has been found. An equilibrium cluster temperature of 57 K has been calculated from this τ(N) dependence.

  19. Measuring student engagement in science classrooms: An investigation of the contextual factors and longitudinal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Justina Judy

    This dissertation includes three separate but related studies that examine the different dimensions of student experiences in science using data from two different datasets: the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and a dataset constructed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). This mixed-dataset approach provides a unique perspective on student engagement and the contexts in which it exists. Engagement is operationalized across the three studies using aspects of flow theory to evaluate how the challenges in science classes are experienced at the student level. The data provides information on a student's skill-level and efficacy during the challenge, as well as their interest level and persistence. The data additionally track how situations contribute to optimal learning moments, along with longitudinal attitudes and behaviors towards science. In the first part of this study, the construct of optimal moments is explored using in the moment data from the ESM dataset. Several different measures of engagement are tested and validated to uncover relationships between various affective states and optimal learning experiences with a focus on science classrooms. Additional analyses include investigating the links between in the moment engagement (situational), and cross-situational (stable) measures of engagement in science. The second part of this dissertation analyzes the ESM data in greater depth by examining how engagement varies across students and their contextual environment. The contextual characteristics associated with higher engagement levels are evaluated to see if these conditions hold across different types of students. Chapter three more thoroughly analyzes what contributes to students persisting through challenging learning moments, and the variation in levels of effort put forth when facing difficulty while learning in science. In chapter four, this dissertation explores additional outcomes associated with student engagement in science

  20. Differences in physical aging measured by walking speed: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela

    2016-01-28

    Physical functioning and mobility of older populations are of increasing interest when populations are aging. Lower body functioning such as walking is a fundamental part of many actions in daily life. Limitations in mobility threaten independent living as well as quality of life in old age. In this study we examine differences in physical aging and convert those differences into the everyday measure of single years of age. We use the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, which was collected biennially between 2002 and 2012. Data on physical performance, health as well as information on economics and demographics of participants were collected. Lower body performance was assessed with two timed walks at normal pace each of 8 ft (2.4 m) of survey participants aged at least 60 years. We employed growth curve models to study differences in physical aging and followed the characteristic-based age approach to illustrate those differences in single years of age. First, we examined walking speed of about 11,700 English individuals, and identified differences in aging trajectories by sex and other characteristics (e.g. education, occupation, regional wealth). Interestingly, higher educated and non-manual workers outperformed their counterparts for both men and women. Moreover, we transformed the differences between subpopulations into single years of age to demonstrate the magnitude of those gaps, which appear particularly high at early older ages. This paper expands research on aging and physical performance. In conclusion, higher education provides an advantage in walking of up to 15 years for men and 10 years for women. Thus, enhancements in higher education have the potential to ensure better mobility and independent living in old age for a longer period.

  1. Assessment of a relaxed eddy accumulation for measurements of fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds: Study over arable crops and a mature beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallagher, M.W.; Clayborough, R.; Beswick, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system, based on the design by Beverland et al. (Journal of Geophysics Research 101 (D17) 22, 807-22, 815), for the measurement of biogenic VOC species was evaluated by intercomparison with an eddy correlation CO2 flux system over a mature deciduous beech canopy...... obtained with correlation coefficients for the REA system ranging from 0.71 to 0.82, lending further confidence in the use of this technique, Daily averaged biogenic emissions from the wheat and barley canopies were significantly larger than expected, likely a result of harvesting. Fluxes measured over...

  2. Measurement of high-Q^2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Abt, I; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Allfrey, P D; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M A; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P M; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bindi, M; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Bonato, A; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brownson, E; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brzozowska, B; Brümmer, N; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; Cui, Y; D'Agostini, G; Dal Corso, F; Danielson, T; De Pasquale, S; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Dossanov, A; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Everett, A; Fazio, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fry, C; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gialas, I; Gil, M; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Goers, S; Gosau, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gregor, I; Grigorescu, G; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heath, G P; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hori, R; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Jakob, H P; Jiménez, M; Jones, T W; Jüngst, M; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kamaluddin, B; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O M; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, Robert; Koffeman, E; Kollar, D; Kooijman, P; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kowalski, H; Kulinski, P; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Lee, A; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Lim, H; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, C; Liu, X; Lobodzinska, E; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukasik, J; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S; Miglioranzi, S; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Morris, J D; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nicholass, D; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Noor, U; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Ota, O; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Rinaldi, L; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Ron, E; Rosin, M; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Samson, U; Santamarta, R; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schonberg, V; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Shimizu, S; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stadie, H; Staiano, A; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Stösslein, U; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Theedt, T; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Uribe-Estrada, C; Vlasov, N N; Vázquez, M; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Wang, M; Watt, G; Whitmore, J J; Whyte, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Wolfe, H; Wrona, K; Yagues-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhou, C; Zichichi, A; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A

    2006-01-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e^+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb^1 at sqrt(s) = 318 GeV, are given for both e^+p charged current and neutral current deep inelastic scattering for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. Single differential cross sections are presented for the kinematic region Q^2 > 200 GeV^2 . The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. A fit to the data yields sigma^CC (P_e = 1) = 7.4 +/- 3.9 (stat.) +/- 1.2 (syst.) pb, which is consistent within two standard deviations with the absence of right-handed charged currents in the Standard Model.

  3. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  4. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of single and double spin asymmetries for $W^{\\pm}$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson production in longitudinally polarized $p+p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 510$ GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for $W^{\\pm}$ were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the $W$ mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by recent polarized DIS measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range $0.05

  5. Natural relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  6. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal 700098 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  7. Experimental Measurements of Longitudinal and Transverse Dispersion in Miscible Fluids with a High Viscosity and Density Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkindi, A.; Bijeljic, B.; Muggeridge, A.

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion and advective dispersion may have a significant influence on the mixing between miscible fluids during displacement processes in porous media. This is particularly important when intimate mixing may result in important changes to the fluid behaviour. For example in oil recovery, mixing between injected and connate water will tend to reduce the efficiency of low salinity water injection. On the other hand recovery may be increased if injected gas mixes with high viscosity oil increasing its mobility. Most experimental data for longitudinal and transverse dispersion have been obtained using fluid pairs with very similar viscosities and densities. The traditional description (Perkins and Johnston, 1963) suggests that longitudinal dispersion decreases as mobility ratio increases. It also suggests that gravity will tend to reduce transverse dispersion. We provide experimental measurements of longitudinal (KL) and transverse (KT) dispersion at low Reynolds number as a function of Peclet number for the first contact miscible ethanol- glycerol fluid system flowing in a porous media formed from glass beads. These fluids have a high viscosity ratio of over 1000 and a significant density difference of 470 kg m-3. We show that both KL and KT are similar to values measured for a water-brine system but that KT is reduced when the less dense ethanol is flowing above the denser glycerol.

  8. Involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in nicotine-induced relaxation of the rat gastric fundus

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Nicotine-induced relaxation and release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI)-like immunoreactivity (LI) were measured in longitudinal muscle strips from the rat gastric fundus.Under non-cholinergic conditions (0.3 μM atropine), nicotine (3–300 μM) produced concentration-dependent relaxations of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (3 μM)-precontracted strips. Under non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) conditions (0.3 μM atropine+1 μM phentolamine+1 μM nadolol...

  9. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  10. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martola, J.; Wiberg Kristoffersen, M.; Aspelin, P. (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Stawiarz, L.; Fredrikson, S.; Hillert, J. (Div. of Neurology, Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Bergstroem, J. (Medical Statistics Unit, Dept. of Learning, Informatics, Management, and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Flodmark, O. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients.

  11. Selecting a linear mixed model for longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern model, and growth curve approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Rovine, Michael J; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2012-03-01

    With increasing popularity, growth curve modeling is more and more often considered as the 1st choice for analyzing longitudinal data. Although the growth curve approach is often a good choice, other modeling strategies may more directly answer questions of interest. It is common to see researchers fit growth curve models without considering alterative modeling strategies. In this article we compare 3 approaches for analyzing longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern models, and growth curve models. As all are members of the general linear mixed model family, they represent somewhat different assumptions about the way individuals change. These assumptions result in different patterns of covariation among the residuals around the fixed effects. In this article, we first indicate the kinds of data that are appropriately modeled by each and use real data examples to demonstrate possible problems associated with the blanket selection of the growth curve model. We then present a simulation that indicates the utility of Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion in the selection of a proper residual covariance structure. The results cast doubt on the popular practice of automatically using growth curve modeling for longitudinal data without comparing the fit of different models. Finally, we provide some practical advice for assessing mean changes in the presence of correlated data.

  12. Measurements of the Neutron Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry A1n and Flavor Decomposition in the Valence Quark Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flay, David J. [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The current data for the nucleon-virtual photon longitudinal spin asymmetry A1 on the proton and neutron have shown that the ratio of the polarized-to-unpolarized down-quarkparton distribution functions,Dd=d, tends towards -1/2 at large x, in disagreement with the perturbative QCD prediction that Dd/d approaches 1 but more in line with constituent quark models. As a part of experiment E06-014 in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, double-spin asymmetries were measured in the scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of energies 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target in the deep inelastic scattering and resonance region, allowing for the extraction of the neutron asymmetry An1 and the ratios Dd/d and Du/u. We will discuss our analysis of the data and present results for A1 and g1/F1 on both 3He and the neutron, and the resulting quark ratios for the up and down quarks in the kinematic range of 0.2

  13. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function in diffraction at the H1 experiment and prospects for diffraction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salek, David

    2011-05-15

    A measurement of the longitudinal diffractive structure function F{sub L}{sup D} using the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The structure function is extracted from first measurements of the diffractive cross section ep{yields}eXY at centre of mass energies {radical}(s) of 225 and 252 GeV at high values of inelasticity y, together with a new measurement at {radical}(s) of 319 GeV, using data taken in 2006 and 2007. Previous H1 data at {radical}(s) of 301 GeV complete the kinematic coverage needed to extract F{sub L}{sup D} in the range of photon virtualities 2.5longitudinal momentum loss 10{sup -4}measured F{sub L}{sup D} is compared with leading twist predictions based on diffractive parton densities extracted in NLO QCD fits to previous diffractive DIS data and to a model which additionally includes a higher twist contribution derived from a colour dipole approach. The photoabsorption ratio for diffraction RD is extracted for Q{sup 2}>7 GeV{sup 2} and compared to the analogous quantity for inclusive DIS. (orig.)

  14. Load-relaxation properties of the human trunk in response to prolonged flexion: measuring and modeling the effect of flexion angle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Toosizadeh

    Full Text Available Experimental studies suggest that prolonged trunk flexion reduces passive support of the spine. To understand alterations of the synergy between active and passive tissues following such loadings, several studies have assessed the time-dependent behavior of passive tissues including those within spinal motion segments and muscles. Yet, there remain limitations regarding load-relaxation of the lumbar spine in response to flexion exposures and the influence of different flexion angles. Ten healthy participants were exposed for 16 min to each of five magnitudes of lumbar flexion specified relative to individual flexion-relaxation angles (i.e., 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100%, during which lumbar flexion angle and trunk moment were recorded. Outcome measures were initial trunk moment, moment drop, parameters of four viscoelastic models (i.e., Standard Linear Solid model, the Prony Series, Schapery's Theory, and the Modified Superposition Method, and changes in neutral zone and viscoelastic state following exposure. There were significant effects of flexion angle on initial moment, moment drop, changes in normalized neutral zone, and some parameters of the Standard Linear Solid model. Initial moment, moment drop, and changes in normalized neutral zone increased exponentially with flexion angle. Kelvin-solid models produced better predictions of temporal behaviors. Observed responses to trunk flexion suggest nonlinearity in viscoelastic properties, and which likely reflected viscoelastic behaviors of spinal (lumbar motion segments. Flexion-induced changes in viscous properties and neutral zone imply an increase in internal loads and perhaps increased risk of low back disorders. Kelvin-solid models, especially the Prony Series model appeared to be more effective at modeling load-relaxation of the trunk.

  15. Acoustic relaxation of some lead niobium tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Gaafar; Y A Azzam

    2015-02-01

    The longitudinal ultrasonic attenuation in Nb2O5 −(1−)TeO2, 0.1PbO−Nb2O5−(0.9−)TeO2 and 0.2PbO − Nb2O5− (0.8−)TeO2 tellurite glass systems was measured using the pulse echo technique at ultrasonic frequencies 2, 4, 6 and 8 MHz in the temperature range from 150 to 300 K. The absorption curves showed the presence of well-defined broad peaks at various temperatures depending upon the glass composition and operating frequency. The maximum peaks move to higher temperatures with the increase of operating frequency, indicating the presence of some kind of relaxation process. This process has been described as a thermally activated relaxation process, which happens when ultrasonic waves disturb the equilibrium of an atom vibrating in a double-well potential in the glass network structure. Results proved that the average activation energy of the process depends mainly on the modifier content. This dependence was analysed in terms of the loss of standard linear solid type, with low dispersion and a broad distribution of Arrhenius-type relaxation with temperature-independent relaxation strength. The experimental acoustic activation energy has been quantitatively analysed in terms of the number of loss centres (number of oxygen atoms that vibrate in the double-well potential).

  16. A generalized longitudinal mixture IRT model for measuring differential growth in learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadengye, Damazo T; Ceulemans, Eva; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-09-01

    This article describes a generalized longitudinal mixture item response theory (IRT) model that allows for detecting latent group differences in item response data obtained from electronic learning (e-learning) environments or other learning environments that result in large numbers of items. The described model can be viewed as a combination of a longitudinal Rasch model, a mixture Rasch model, and a random-item IRT model, and it includes some features of the explanatory IRT modeling framework. The model assumes the possible presence of latent classes in item response patterns, due to initial person-level differences before learning takes place, to latent class-specific learning trajectories, or to a combination of both. Moreover, it allows for differential item functioning over the classes. A Bayesian model estimation procedure is described, and the results of a simulation study are presented that indicate that the parameters are recovered well, particularly for conditions with large item sample sizes. The model is also illustrated with an empirical sample data set from a Web-based e-learning environment.

  17. Measurements and Analysis of Longitudinal HOM Driven Coupled Bunch Modes in PEP-II Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC

    2008-07-07

    The growth rates of the longitudinal higher-order impedance-driven beam modes have greatly increased since the initial PEP-II design and commissioning. This increase is attributed to the addition of 6 1.2MW RF stations with 8 accelerating cavities in the HER and 2 1.2MW RF stations with 4 accelerating cavities in the LER, which allowed operations at twice the design current and almost four times the luminosity. As a result, the damping requirements for the longitudinal feedback have greatly increased since the design, and the feedback filters and control schemes have evolved during PEP-II operations. In this paper, growth and damping rate data for the higher-order mode (HOM) driven coupled-bunch modes are presented from various PEP-II runs and are compared with historical estimates during commissioning. The effect of noise in the feedback processing channel is also studied. Both the stability and performance limits of the system are analyzed.

  18. Chain Dynamics, Relaxation Times, and Conductivities of Bithiophene--Acene Copolymers Measured Using High Frequency Saturation Transfer EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraind, Alicia M; Ryzhkov, Lev R; Tovar, John D

    2016-02-11

    We present a study to probe the formation of localized aromatic sextets and their effects on the charge transport properties in polymers with acene cores. Bithiophene-acene copolymers containing benzene, naphthalene, or anthracene as acene cores were synthesized using Yamamoto polymerization. Drop-casted polymer films were chemically doped and analyzed using high frequency saturation transfer EPR (HF ST-EPR), a method which has proven useful in the study of conducting polymers. The spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times were determined for these polymers at low temperatures (4 to 20 K) and used to obtain inter- and intrachain spin diffusion rates and conductivities. Similar interchain spin diffusion rates were seen across all polymer systems; however, anthracene containing polymer poly(hexylTTATT) was found to have the largest intrachain spin diffusion rate. The poly(hexylTTATT) intrachain spin diffusion rate may be artificially high if the anthracene ring restricts the diffusion of spin to the hexylated quaterthiophene segment in poly(hexylTTATT) whereas the spins diffuse through the acene cores in the benzene and naphthalene derivatives. Alternatively, as both the spin diffusion rates and conductivities vary unpredictably with temperature, it is possible that the π-electron localization previously seen in the anthracene core could be relieved at lower temperatures.

  19. In situ measurements of the critical thickness for strain relaxation in β-GaN/MgO structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Caro, M.; Mejía, Alfredo Campos; Rodríguez, A. G.; Navarro-Contreras, H.; Vidal, M. A.

    2009-02-01

    It is demonstrated by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) studies that the growth of cubic GaN on MgO occurs in a layer-by-layer mode under Ga-rich conditions, growth rates 0.25-0.30 ML/s and 700 °C substrate temperature. From streak-spacing analysis of the observed RHEED patterns, it is possible to infer that the GaN layer grows pseudomorphically on MgO up to 3 monolayers (ML). After that, a relaxation process begins and the layer-by-layer or 2-dimensional growth changes to a columnar or 3-dimensional growth, as evidenced by the transformation of the RHEED patterns, which change from streaky to spotty. The experimental critical thickness ( h c) value of 3 ML is close to the prediction of the Frank-van der Merwe classical model of 2.5 ML. Other models predict h c values 3-6 times the experimental value experimentally observed.

  20. Longitudinal Serum Creatinine Levels in Relation to Graft Loss Following Renal Transplantation: Robust Joint Modeling of Longitudinal Measurements and Survival Time Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younespour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major public health problem that may lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Renal transplantation has become the treatment modality of choice for the majority of patients with ESRD. It is therefore necessary to monitor the disease progression of patients who have undergone renal transplantation. In order to monitor the disease progression, the continuous assessment of kidney function over time is considered. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the etiological role of recipient characteristics in serum creatinine changes within the follow-up period and in relation to the graft failure risk, as well as to evaluate whether or not the serum creatinine level represents an indicator of graft failure following renal transplantation. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted at the department of nephrology, Baqiyatallah Hospital, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, between April 2005 and December 2008. The study involved 413 renal transplantation patients. The primary outcomes were the determination of the serum creatinine levels at each attendance and the time to graft failure. Robust joint modeling of the longitudinal measurements (serum creatinine level and time-to-event data (time to graft failure were used for the analysis in the presence of outliers in the serum creatinine levels. The data analysis was implemented in WinBUGS 1.4.3. Results There was a positive association between the serum creatinine level and graft failure (HR = 5.13, P < 0.001. A one unit increase in the serum creatinine level suggests an increased risk of graft failure of up to 5.13 times. The serum creatinine level significantly decreased over time (95% CI: (-1.58, -1.08. The recipient’s age was negatively associated with the serum creatinine level (95% CI: (-0.02, -0.001. Conclusions Graft failure is more likely to occur in patients with higher serum creatinine levels.

  1. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  2. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of water in frozen biological tissues. Cross-relaxation effects between protein and bound water protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escanyé, J. M.; Canet, D.; Robert, J.

    Water proton longitudinal relaxation has been investigated in frozen mouse tissues including tumors. The nonfreezable water which gives rise to a relatively sharp NMR signal at this temperature (263 K) is identified as water bound to macromolecules. Measurements have been carried out by the nonselective inversion-recovery method at 90 and 6 MHz. Partially selective inversion has been achieved at 90 MHz by the DANTE sequence. The experimental data are analyzed by means of Solomon-type equations. This analysis provides the cross-relaxation term from which the dipolar contribution to water relaxation rate, arising from interactions with macromolecular protons, is calculated. This contribution seems to be dominant. The number of water protons interacting with a given macromolecular proton is found to be of the order of 10. The data at both frequencies can be consistently interpreted in terms of water diffusion, with a characteristic time of about 10 -9 sec. These conclusions are valid for all the tissues investigated here, their relaxation parameters exhibiting only slight differences.

  3. Conformational exchange of aromatic side chains characterized by L-optimized TROSY-selected {sup 13}C CPMG relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Ulrich; Respondek, Michal; Akke, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.akke@bpc.lu.se [Center for Molecular Protein Science, Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Protein dynamics on the millisecond time scale commonly reflect conformational transitions between distinct functional states. NMR relaxation dispersion experiments have provided important insights into biologically relevant dynamics with site-specific resolution, primarily targeting the protein backbone and methyl-bearing side chains. Aromatic side chains represent attractive probes of protein dynamics because they are over-represented in protein binding interfaces, play critical roles in enzyme catalysis, and form an important part of the core. Here we introduce a method to characterize millisecond conformational exchange of aromatic side chains in selectively {sup 13}C labeled proteins by means of longitudinal- and transverse-relaxation optimized CPMG relaxation dispersion. By monitoring {sup 13}C relaxation in a spin-state selective manner, significant sensitivity enhancement can be achieved in terms of both signal intensity and the relative exchange contribution to transverse relaxation. Further signal enhancement results from optimizing the longitudinal relaxation recovery of the covalently attached {sup 1}H spins. We validated the L-TROSY-CPMG experiment by measuring fast folding-unfolding kinetics of the small protein CspB under native conditions. The determined unfolding rate matches perfectly with previous results from stopped-flow kinetics. The CPMG-derived chemical shift differences between the folded and unfolded states are in excellent agreement with those obtained by urea-dependent chemical shift analysis. The present method enables characterization of conformational exchange involving aromatic side chains and should serve as a valuable complement to methods developed for other types of protein side chains.

  4. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  5. Relaxation phenomena of binary polar liquid mixture in C6H6 from conductivity of solution measured at 10 GHz electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Sit, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation times τ jk 's and dipole moments µ jk 's of the binary ( jk) polar mixtures of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) and pyridine dissolved in benzene ( i) are estimated using linear slope of σ jk ″ - σ ijk ' curves as well as ratio of slopes of σ ijk ″ - w jk and σ ijk ″ - w jk curves at w jk → 0 for different mole fractions τ jk 's of pyridine and experimental temperatures under 9.875 GHz electric field. The measured µ jk 's and τ jk 's agree well with the reported values validating the proposed methods. The solute-solute (dimer) molecular associations are inferred from the plot of τ jk - x j and µ jk - x j curves for x j = 0.0 to 0.5 of pyridine and thereafter solute-solvent (monomer) molecular association occurs. The theoretical µtheo's are calculated to predict solute-solute and solute-solvent molecular association. The µ jk - T curves are drawn to show elongation of bond angles and bond moments with temperatures. The thermodynamic energy parameters are calculated from Eyring's rate theory equations to know the molecular dynamics as well as to ascertain Debye-Smyth relaxation mechanism of the systems.

  6. Dielectric relaxation of amides and tetrahydrofuran polar mixture in C6H6 from conductivity measurement under 9.90 GHz electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Sit, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies of binary ( jk) polar mixtures of tetrahydrofuran with N-methyl acetamide, N, N-dimethyl acetamide, N-methyl formamide and N, N-dimethyl formamide dissolved in benzene(i) for different weight fractions ( w j k 's) of the polar solutes and mole fractions ( x j 's) of tetrahydrofuran at 25 ∘C are attempted by measuring the conductivity of the solution under 9.90 GHz electric field using Debye theory. The estimated relaxation time ( τ j k 's) and dipole moment ( μ j k 's) agree well with the reported values signifying the validity of the proposed methods. Structural and associational aspects are predicted from the plot of τ j k and μ j k against x j of tetrahydrofuran to arrive at solute-solute (dimer) molecular association upto x j =0.3 of tetrahydrofuran and thereafter solute-solvent (monomer) molecular association upto x j =1.0 for all systems except tetrahydrofuran + N, N-dimethyl acetamide.

  7. Softening temperature of lyophilized bovine serum albumin and gamma-globulin as measured by spin-spin relaxation time of protein protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, S; Aso, Y; Kojima, S

    1997-04-01

    We investigated the usefulness of the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of protein protons as a probe for evaluating the molecular flexibility of freeze-dried protein formulations. It is proposed that the microscopic softening temperature determined from changes in the T2 of protein protons (Ts(T2)) is an important characteristic of freeze-dried protein formulations, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of which is generally difficult to determine by differential scanning calorimetry. We determined the molecular flexibility of lyophilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine gamma-globulin (BGG) by measuring the T2 of protein and water protons as well as the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the latter as a function of temperature. The flexibility of freeze-dried BSA and BGG cakes markedly varied at temperatures above and below the Ts(T2), affecting the stability of the proteins. The denaturation and subsequent aggregation of lyophilized BSA and BGG cakes with a relatively high water content was enhanced in the softened state at temperatures above the Ts(T2). Lyophilized cakes with an extremely low water content were significantly denatured, even in the unsoftened state at temperatures below the Ts(T2), probably due to the thermodynamically unstable structures of protein molecules generated by a loss of structural water.

  8. Dielectric relaxation of amides and tetrahydrofuran polar mixture in C$_{6}$H$_{6}$ from conductivity measurement under 9.90 GHz electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SAHOO; S K SIT

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies of binary ($jk$) polar mixtures of tetrahydrofuran with $N$-methyl acetamide, $N,N$-dimethyl acetamide, $N$-methyl formamide and $N,N$-dimethyl formamide dissolved in benzene(i) for different weight fractions ($w_{jk}$’s) of the polar solutes and mole fractions ($x_{j}$ ’s) of tetrahydrofuran at 25◦C are attempted by measuring the conductivity of the solution under 9.90 GHz electric field using Debye theory. The estimated relaxation time ($\\tau_{jk}$’s) and dipole moment ($\\mu_{jk}$’s) agree well with the reported values signifying the validity of the proposed methods. Structural and associational aspects are predicted from the plot of $\\tau_{jk}$ and $\\mu_{jk}$ against $x_{j}$ of tetrahydrofuran to arrive at solute–solute (dimer) molecular association upto $x_{j} = 0.3$ of tetrahydrofuran and thereafter solute–solvent (monomer) molecular association upto $x_{j} = 1.0$ for all systems except tetrahydrofuran + $N,N$-dimethyl acetamide.

  9. In vivo measurement of a new source of contrast, the dipolar relaxation time, T1D , using a modified inhomogeneous magnetization transfer (ihMT) sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Gopal; Girard, Olivier M; Prevost, Valentin H; Grant, Aaron K; Duhamel, Guillaume; Alsop, David C

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes a technique that can be used in vivo to measure the dipolar relaxation time, T1D , of macromolecular protons contributing to magnetization transfer (MT) in tissues and to produce quantitative T1D maps. The technique builds upon the inhomogeneous MT (ihMT) technique that is particularly sensitive to tissue components with long T1D . A standard ihMT experiment was altered to introduce a variable time for switching between positive and negative offset frequencies for RF saturation. A model for the dependence of ihMT was developed and used to fit data acquired in vivo. Application of the method to images from brains of healthy volunteers produced values of T1D  = (5.9 ± 1.2) ms in gray matter and T1D  = (6.2 ± 0.4) ms in white matter regions and provided maps of the T1D parameter. The model and experiments described provide access to a new relaxation characteristic of tissue with potentially unique diagnostic information. Magn Reson Med 78:1362-1372, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Daily Associations Between Drinking and Sex Among College Students: A Longitudinal Measurement Burst Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Megan E; Maggs, Jennifer L; Lefkowitz, Eva S

    2015-06-01

    Daily links between alcohol use and sexual behaviors were examined in a longitudinal study of college students. Hierarchical linear models predicted sexual behaviors by characteristics of persons (N=731; Level 3), semesters (N=4,345, Level 2), and days (N=56,372, Level 1). On a given day, consuming more drinks and binge drinking were associated with greater odds of kissing, touching, oral sex, and penetrative sex. Consistent with alcohol myopia and expectancy theories, associations between binge drinking and sexual behaviors were stronger for students not in romantic relationships, for students with stronger alcohol-sex expectancies, and for oral and penetrative sex. Findings suggest that within-day links between alcohol use and sexual behaviors are evident across college, with variations based on individual and relationship factors.

  11. Beam Measurements of the Longitudinal impedance of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090034; Petrache, Costel

    One of the main challenges of future physics projects based on particle accelerators is the need for high intensity beams. However, collective effects are a major limitation which can deteriorate the beam quality or limit the maximum intensity due to losses. The CERN SPS, which is the last injector for the LHC, is currently unable to deliver the beams required for future projects due to longitudinal instabilities. The numerous devices in the machine (accelerating RF cavities, injection and extraction magnets, vacuum flanges. etc.) lead to variations in the geometry and material of the chamber through which the beam is travelling. The electromagnetic interaction within the beam (space charge) and of the beam with its environment are described by a coupling impedance which affects the motion of the particles and leads to instabilities for high beam intensities. Consequently, the critical impedance sources should be identified and solutions assessed. To have a reliable impedance model of an accelerator, the...

  12. Longitudinal changes in estimated and measured GFR in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ian H; Sun, Wanjie; Cleary, Patricia A; Lachin, John M; Molitch, Mark E; Zinman, Bernard; Steffes, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    Estimation of GFR from serum concentrations of creatinine and cystatin C has been refined using cross-sectional data from large numbers of people. However, the ability of the improved estimating equations to identify changes in GFR within individuals over time has not been rigorously evaluated, particularly within the normal range of GFR. In cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of 1441 participants in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study with type 1 diabetes, we compared GFR estimated from creatinine (eGFR(Cr)), cystatin C (eGFR(Cys)), or both (eGFR(Cr+Cys)) with iothalamate GFR (iGFR), including changes in each over time. Mean (SD) iGFR was 122.7 (21.0) ml/min per 1.73 m(2). In cross-sectional analyses, eGFR(Cr+Cys) estimated iGFR with the highest correlation (r=0.48 versus 0.39-0.42), precision, and accuracy. In longitudinal analyses, change in eGFR(Cr+Cys) best estimated change in iGFR; however, differences between estimates were small, and no estimate accurately classified change in iGFR. Over a median 23 years of follow-up, mean rate of change in eGFR was similar across estimates of eGFR(Cr), eGFR(Cys), and eGFR(Cr+Cys) (-1.37, -1.11, and -1.29 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year, respectively). Associations of BP and hemoglobin A1c with change in eGFR were strongest for eGFR(Cys) and eGFR(Cr+Cys). Together, these results suggest that the addition of cystatin C to creatinine to estimate GFR may improve identification of the causes and consequences of GFR loss in type 1 diabetes, but may not meaningfully improve the tracking of GFR in clinical care.

  13. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Sawiak

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala. Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Perumal, Sunthara Rajan; Rudiger, Skye R; Matthews, Loren; Mitchell, Nadia L; McLaughlan, Clive J; Bawden, C Simon; Palmer, David N; Kuchel, Timothy; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala). Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Measurements of longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions for neutral pions in the forward-rapidity region with the LHCf detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W.C.; Zhou, Q.D.

    2016-01-01

    The transverse and longitudinal momentum distributions for inclusive neutral pions in the very forward rapidity region have been measured with the Large Hadron Collider forward detector in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 2.76 and 7 TeV and in proton-lead collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s_\\text{NN}}=$ 5.02 TeV at the LHC. Such momentum distributions in proton-proton collisions are compatible with the hypotheses of limiting fragmentation and Feynman scaling. A sizable suppression of the production of neutral pions, after taking into account ultraperipheral collisions, is found in the transverse and longitudinal momentum distributions obtained in proton-lead collisions. This leads to a strong nuclear modification factor value of about 0.1-0.3. The experimental measurements presented in this paper provide a benchmark for the hadronic interaction Monte Carlo simulations codes that are used for the simulation of air showers.

  16. Internal Friction Due to Localized Relaxation around Y-ions in Single Crystal Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Michihiro; Kirimoto, Kenta; Nobugai, Kohji; Wigmore, J. Keith; Miyasato, Tatsuro

    2001-09-01

    The internal friction in single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) doped with 9.5 mol% Y2O3 was measured for longitudinal sound waves in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 800 Hz using a vibrating reed technique. In the temperature range from 300 K to 700 K, observations of internal friction reveal two closely overlapping absorption peaks, confirming the existence of two relaxation modes in YSZ@. One of the peaks is due to diffusion relaxation, which is known to be responsible for long-range transport of O-ions. The second peak shows clearly the existence of localized relaxation, which is attributed to bound oxygen vacancies within the local structure which is formed around an Y-ion due to symmetry breaking. The absorption peak caused by the localized relaxation exhibits anisotropy resulting from the asymmetric local structure, and the strength of this peak changes with temperature reflecting the number of bound oxygen vacancies.

  17. Dispersion Properties of NMR Relaxation for Crude Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ranhong; Xiao Lizhi

    2007-01-01

    Special requirements for design of tools used for wireline NMR logging and NMR logging while drilling and for interpretation model are demanded due to the dispersion properties of NMR relaxation for crude oil.NMR longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) of the dead oil samples with different viscosities were measured by NMR spectrometers with a Larmor frequency of 2 MHz and 23 MHz at five different temperatures respectively.The results showed that T1 was obviously dependent on the Larmor frequency of NMR spectrometer.The degree of T1 dispersion became stronger with the increasing crude oil viscosity,Larmor frequency and the viscosity/temperature ratio.T2 was independent of NMR spectrometer measuring frequency.It is suggested that the resonance frequency should be selected lower than 2 MHz when measuring T1 in logging while-drilling and that T1 dispersion should be corrected when Larmor frequency is higher than 2 MHz.

  18. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  19. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current cross-sections with longitudinally polarised positrons with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Trevor P.

    2012-07-15

    The cross sections for neutral current (NC) deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are measured at high momentum transfer squared (Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2}) at the ZEUS detector at HERA. The HERA accelerator provides e{sup {+-}}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, which allows the weak contribution to the NC process to be studied at high Q{sup 2}. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007. The single differential NC cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the reduced cross section {sigma} are measured. The structure function xF{sub 3} is determined by combining the e{sup +}p NC reduced cross sections with the previously measured e{sup -}p measurements. The interference structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}Z} is extracted at Q{sup 2}=1500 GeV{sup 2}. The cross-section asymmetry between the positive and negative polarisation of the positron beam is measured and the parity violation effects of the electroweak interaction are observed. The predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics agree well with the measurements. (orig.)

  20. Effect of healthy aging on left ventricular relaxation and diastolic suction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Bhella, Paul S; Shibata, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Naoki; Palmer, M Dean; Boyd, Kara; Levine, Benjamin D

    2012-08-01

    Doppler ultrasound measures of left ventricular (LV) active relaxation and diastolic suction are slowed with healthy aging. It is unclear to what extent these changes are related to alterations in intrinsic LV properties and/or cardiovascular loading conditions. Seventy carefully screened individuals (38 female, 32 male) aged 21-77 were recruited into four age groups (young: relaxation, including isovolumic relaxation time and the time constant of isovolumic pressure decay increased progressively, whereas peak early mitral annular longitudinal velocity decreased with advancing age (P relaxation and diastolic suction were not attenuated significantly when PCWP was increased in older subjects or reduced in the younger subjects. There is an early slowing of LV relaxation and diastolic suction beginning in early middle age, with the greatest reduction observed in seniors. Because age-related differences in LV dynamic diastolic filling parameters were not diminished significantly with significant changes in LV loading conditions, a decline in ventricular relaxation is likely responsible for the alterations in LV diastolic filling with senescence.

  1. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  2. Dependence of transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of biologic tissues on the interpulse delay time in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, Sumie; Kurita, Daisaku; Haida, Munetaka; Tanigaki, Toshimori; Kutsuzawa, Tomoko; Ohta, Yasuyo [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Fukuzaki, Minoru

    1997-05-01

    To determine the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) of biological tissues in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method has been recommended to avoid the effect of external magnetic field inhomogeneity on T{sub 2} values. However, a dependence of T{sub 2} on the interpulse delay time (IPDT) in the CPMG measurements has been shown for biological tissues. The present study examined the dependence of the T{sub 2} on IPDT for muscle, lung (passively collapsed or degassed), and brain tissues. It was found that the CPMG T{sub 2} of the lung was strongly dependent upon the IPDT, in contrast to muscle and brain tissues. The IPDT dependence of the CPMG T{sub 2} for lung tissue, which was lessened by degassing, was affected by the magnetic field inhomogeneity due to air-tissue interfaces, but not by the spin-locking effect, since the T{sub 2} measured by the Carr-Purcell-Freeman-Hill (CPFH) method did not show this dependence. These results should aid in the evaluation of T{sub 2} values for biological tissues measured under various conditions and by different techniques. (author)

  3. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz...

  4. Quantification of magnetization transfer rate and native T1 relaxation time of the brain: correlation with magnetization transfer ratio measurements in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampekios, Spyros; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Papadaki, Eufrosini; Maris, Thomas; Uffman, Kai; Spilioti, Martha; Plaitakis, Andreas; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform quantitative measurements of the magnetization transfer rate (Kfor) and native T1 relaxation time (T1free) in the brain tissue of normal individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by means of multiple gradient echo acquisitions, and to correlate these measurements with the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging was performed in five normal volunteers and 12 patients with relapsing-remitting MS on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The T1 relaxation time under magnetization transfer irradiation (T1sat) was calculated by means of fitting the signal intensity over the flip angle in several 3D spoiled gradient echo acquisitions (3 degrees , 15 degrees , 30 degrees , and 60 degrees ), while a single acquisition without MT irradiation (flip angle of 3 degrees ) was utilized to calculate the MTR. The Kfor and T1free constants were quantified on a pixel-by-pixel basis and parametric maps were reconstructed. We performed 226 measurements of Kfor, T1free, and the MTR on normal white matter (NWM) of healthy volunteers (n=50), and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and pathological brain areas of MS patients (n=120 and 56, respectively). Correlation coefficients between Kfor-MTR, T1free-MTR, and T1free-Kfor were calculated. Lesions were classified, according to their characteristics on T1-weighted images, into isointense (compared to white matter), mildly hypointense (showing signal intensity lower than white matter and higher than gray matter), and severely hypointense (revealing signal intensity lower than gray matter). "Dirty" white matter (DWM) corresponded to areas with diffused high signal, as identified on T2-weighted images. Strong correlation coefficients were obtained between MTR and Kfor for all lesions studied (r2=0.9, pKfor and T1free measurements (r2=0.98, pKfor and T1free were found for the rest of the subgroups, except for the NAWM, in which a moderate

  5. Quantification of magnetization transfer rate and native T1 relaxation time of the brain: correlation with magnetization transfer ratio measurements in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampekios, Spyros; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Papadaki, Eufrosini; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion (Greece); Maris, Thomas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion (Greece); Uffman, Kai [University Hospital of Essen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Essen (Germany); Spilioti, Martha; Plaitakis, Andreas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Neurology, Heraklion (Greece)

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to perform quantitative measurements of the magnetization transfer rate (Kfor) and native T1 relaxation time (T1free) in the brain tissue of normal individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by means of multiple gradient echo acquisitions, and to correlate these measurements with the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging was performed in five normal volunteers and 12 patients with relapsing-remitting MS on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The T1 relaxation time under magnetization transfer irradiation (T1sat) was calculated by means of fitting the signal intensity over the flip angle in several 3D spoiled gradient echo acquisitions (3 , 15 , 30 , and 60 ), while a single acquisition without MT irradiation (flip angle of 3 ) was utilized to calculate the MTR. The Kfor and T1free constants were quantified on a pixel-by-pixel basis and parametric maps were reconstructed. We performed 226 measurements of Kfor, T1free, and the MTR on normal white matter (NWM) of healthy volunteers (n=50), and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and pathological brain areas of MS patients (n=120 and 56, respectively). Correlation coefficients between Kfor-MTR, T1free-MTR, and T1free-Kfor were calculated. Lesions were classified, according to their characteristics on T1-weighted images, into isointense (compared to white matter), mildly hypointense (showing signal intensity lower than white matter and higher than gray matter), and severely hypointense (revealing signal intensity lower than gray matter). ''Dirty'' white matter (DWM) corresponded to areas with diffused high signal, as identified on T2-weighted images. Strong correlation coefficients were obtained between MTR and Kfor for all lesions studied (r{sup 2}=0.9, p<0.0001), for mildly hypointense plaques (r{sup 2}=0.82, p<0.0001), and for DWM (r{sup 2}=0.78, p=0.0007). In contrast, comparison between MTR and T1free values

  6. Synthesis of Nonionic Oligomeric Manganese(Ⅱ) Complexes and Investigation of Their Toxicity and Τ1-Relaxation Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Kai-chao; LI Ying-xia; ZHOU Jin-lan; DING Shang-wu; YE Chao-hui

    2005-01-01

    Six nonionic oligomeric manganese(Ⅱ) complexes with oligomeric phosphate-polyglycol-EDTA ester ligands were synthesized and characterized. The longitudinal relaxivities of these complexes were measured. One of these complexes, which showed the highest relaxivity, was chosen to be used in the acute toxicity test and the Τ1-weighted imaging experiment. It has been found that compared to Gd-DTPA, this nonionic oligomeric Mn(Ⅱ) complex exhibits no acute toxicity, generates highly enhanced MRI signals and increases the intention time in the rat liver tissue.

  7. Serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement in acute heart failure : insights from the RELAX-AHF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felker, G. Michael; Mentz, Robert J.; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pang, Peter S.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Prescott, Margaret F.; Hua, Tsushung A.; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Severin, Thomas; Metra, Marco

    2015-01-01

    AimsTroponin elevation is common in acute heart failure (AHF) and may be useful for prognostication; however, available data are mixed and many previous studies used older, less sensitive assays. We examined the association between serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT)

  8. Measurement of the Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Anti-Lambda Hyperons in Polarised Muon DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chapiro, A; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Das, S; DasGupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Díaz, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Görtz, S; Grabmüller, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Heinsius, F H; Hermann, M; Hermann, R; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Höppner, C; D'Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iven, B; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K C; Konopka, R; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kuznetsov, O; Kowalik, K; Krämer, M; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Maximov, A N; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J; Negrini, S; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Reggiani, D; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schmitt, L; Schröder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Venugopal, G; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhao, J; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2009-01-01

    The longitudinal polarisation transfer from muons to lambda and anti-lambda hyperons, D_LL, has been studied in deep inelastic scattering off an unpolarised isoscalar target at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The spin transfers to lambda and anti-lambda produced in the current fragmentation region exhibit different behaviours as a function of x and xF . The measured x and xF dependences of D^lambda_LL are compatible with zero, while D^anti-lambda_LL tends to increase with xF, reaching values of 0.4 - 0.5. The resulting average values are D^lambda_LL = -0.012 +- 0.047 +- 0.024 and D^anti-lambda_LL = 0.249 +- 0.056 +- 0.049. These results are discussed in the frame of recent model calculations.

  9. Are There Linguistic Markers of Suicidal Writing That Can Predict the Course of Treatment? A Repeated Measures Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancu, Mira; Jobes, David; Wagner, Barry M; Greene, Jeffrey A; Fratto, Timothy A

    2016-07-02

    The purpose of this pilot study was to predict resolution of suicidal ideation and risk over the course of therapy among suicidal outpatients (N = 144) using a novel method for analyzing Self- verses Relationally oriented qualitative written responses to the Suicide Status Form (SSF). A content analysis software program was used to extract word counts and a repeated measures longitudinal design was implemented to assess improvement over time. Patients with primarily Relationally focused word counts were more likely to have a quicker suicide risk resolution than those with more Self-focused word counts (6-7 sessions versus 17-18 sessions). Implications of these data are discussed, including the potential for enhancing treatment outcomes using this method with individuals entering treatment.

  10. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brennan, J. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  11. Measurement of high-Q (2) charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ota, O.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e (+) p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a ce

  12. Timed Up & Go as a measure for longitudinal change in mobility after stroke - Postural Stroke Study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Carina U; Danielsson, Anna; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Hansson, Per-Olof

    2014-05-09

    A frequently used clinical test to assess mobility after stroke is the Timed Up & Go. Knowledge regarding whether or not the Timed Up & Go is able to detect change over time in patients with stroke, whether improvements in mobility exist after the first three months and whether or not longitudinal change in mobility after stroke depend on the patients' age, is limited or unclear. The objectives were to investigate the distribution-based responsiveness of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) during the first three months after a first event of stroke, to measure the longitudinal change in TUG time during the first year after stroke and to establish whether recovery in TUG time differs between different age groups. Ninety-one patients with first-ever stroke were assessed using the Timed Up & Go at the 1st week and at 3, 6 and 12 months after stroke. The non-parametric sign-test, the parametric t-test and a mixed model approach to linear regression for repeated measurements (Proc mixed) were used for the statistical analyses. The median TUG time was reduced from 17 to 12 seconds (p time between 3 and 12 months after stroke, while patients time). The Timed Up & Go demonstrates ability to detect change in mobility over time in patients with stroke. A significant improvement in TUG time from the 1st week to 3 months after stroke was found, as expected, but thereafter no statistically significant change was detected. After 3 months, patients ≥80 years tended to deteriorate in terms of TUG time, while the younger patients did not.

  13. Timed Up & Go as a measure for longitudinal change in mobility after stroke – Postural Stroke Study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A frequently used clinical test to assess mobility after stroke is the Timed Up & Go. Knowledge regarding whether or not the Timed Up & Go is able to detect change over time in patients with stroke, whether improvements in mobility exist after the first three months and whether or not longitudinal change in mobility after stroke depend on the patients’ age, is limited or unclear. The objectives were to investigate the distribution-based responsiveness of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) during the first three months after a first event of stroke, to measure the longitudinal change in TUG time during the first year after stroke and to establish whether recovery in TUG time differs between different age groups. Methods Ninety-one patients with first-ever stroke were assessed using the Timed Up & Go at the 1st week and at 3, 6 and 12 months after stroke. The non-parametric sign-test, the parametric t-test and a mixed model approach to linear regression for repeated measurements (Proc mixed) were used for the statistical analyses. Results The median TUG time was reduced from 17 to 12 seconds (p time between 3 and 12 months after stroke, while patients time). Conclusion The Timed Up & Go demonstrates ability to detect change in mobility over time in patients with stroke. A significant improvement in TUG time from the 1st week to 3 months after stroke was found, as expected, but thereafter no statistically significant change was detected. After 3 months, patients ≥80 years tended to deteriorate in terms of TUG time, while the younger patients did not. PMID:24885868

  14. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: is it time to relax BSE-related measures in the context of international trade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D; Adkin, A

    2011-04-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has presented serious challenges to both the World Organisation for Animal Health and national governments, in defining and implementing appropriate national control measures, and in agreeing trade rules that permit safe trade in cattle and bovine products. Precautionary trade rules were initially necessary, based upon the science of sheep scrapie, but research into BSE later enabled BSE-specific trade rules to be developed. As a result, current rules on trade are underpinned by a sound body of knowledge on BSE. Declining epidemics in most affected countries confirm the appropriateness of current precautions. Nevertheless, risk is primarily dependent on the prevalence of infection with BSE. In the face of low prevalence scenarios, certain precautionary measures in the Terrestrial Animal Health Code may now be considered excessive. A thorough review is therefore deemed appropriate.

  15. The Self-Diffusion Coefficient of Bulk Fluid Molecules Probed by Transverse Relaxation Measurements in an Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Blokkdal, Espen Hagen

    2014-01-01

    The possibility for performing self-diffusion measurements by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments using the inherent magnetic field inhomogeneities as a gradient field were tested for six sample molecules, using a Maran Ultra NMR instrument with a 0.5 T permanent magnet. The method tested assumed that the magnetic field inhomogeneities could be approximated by a linear gradient, and the estimated parameter representing the magnetic field inhomogeneities in this model have been estima...

  16. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced.

  17. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Relaxation Techniques for Health Share: On This Page What’s the ... Bottom Line? How much do we know about relaxation techniques? A substantial amount of research has been done ...

  18. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere–atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moravek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere–atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere–atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany. Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast response ozone (O3 measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average −0.07 nmol m−2 s−1 and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well mixed conditions as it was expected.

  19. Variability in baseline laboratory measurements of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, R; Vigo, A; Fedeli, L M G; Chambless, L E; Bensenor, I; Schmidt, M I; Vidigal, P G; Castilhos, C D; Duncan, B B

    2016-08-01

    Multi-center epidemiological studies must ascertain that their measurements are accurate and reliable. For laboratory measurements, reliability can be assessed through investigation of reproducibility of measurements in the same individual. In this paper, we present results from the quality control analysis of the baseline laboratory measurements from the ELSA-Brasil study. The study enrolled 15,105 civil servants at 6 research centers in 3 regions of Brazil between 2008-2010, with multiple biochemical analytes being measured at a central laboratory. Quality control was ascertained through standard laboratory evaluation of intra- and inter-assay variability and test-retest analysis in a subset of randomly chosen participants. An additional sample of urine or blood was collected from these participants, and these samples were handled in the same manner as the original ones, locally and at the central laboratory. Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), estimated through a random effects model. Coefficients of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman plots were additionally used to assess measurement variability. Laboratory intra and inter-assay CVs varied from 0.86% to 7.77%. From test-retest analyses, the ICCs were high for the majority of the analytes. Notably lower ICCs were observed for serum sodium (ICC=0.50; 95%CI=0.31-0.65) and serum potassium (ICC=0.73; 95%CI=0.60-0.83), due to the small biological range of these analytes. The CVs ranged from 1 to 14%. The Bland-Altman plots confirmed these results. The quality control analyses showed that the collection, processing and measurement protocols utilized in the ELSA-Brasil produced reliable biochemical measurements.

  20. Compartmental Relaxation and DTI Measurements In Vivo in λ-Carrageenan Induced Edema in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Reuben H.; Does, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated diffusion tensor-T2 measurements were made on normal and edematous rat muscle, and the data were fitted with one- and two-compartment models, respectively. Edematous muscle exhibited a short-lived component (T2 = 28 ± 6 ms) with diffusion characteristics similar to that of normal muscle and a long-lived component (T2 = 96 ± 27 ms) with greater mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and lower fractional anisotropy (FA). With this two-component description of diffusion and relaxat...

  1. Longitudinal tire force estimation based on sliding mode observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hadri, A.; Cadiou, J.C.; M' Sirdi, N.K. [Versailles Univ., Paris (France). Lab. de Robotique; Beurier, G.; Delanne, Y. [Lab. Central des Ponts, Centre de Nantes (France)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an estimation method for vehicle longitudinal dynamics, particularly the tractive/braking force. The estimation can be used to detect a critical driving situation to improve security. It can be used also in several vehicle control systems. The main characteristics of the vehicle longitudinal dynamics were taken into account in the model used to design an observer and computer simulations. The state variables are the angular wheel velocity, vehicle velocity and the longitudinal tire force. The proposed differential equation of the tractive/braking force is derived using the concept of relaxation length. The observer designed is based on the sliding mode approach using only the angular wheel velocity measurement. The proposed method of estimation is verified through a one-wheel simulation model with a ''Magic formula'' tire model. Simulations results show an excellent reconstruction of the tire force. (orig.)

  2. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen-relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images non-radiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a micro-second-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. Owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter, when the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two co-located photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the non-radiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 µm to 2.3 µm and at the same time slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 µm to 0.41 µm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  3. Measurements of the neutral current e{sup {+-}}p cross sections using longitudinally polarised lepton beams at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A.

    2007-01-18

    This thesis presents inclusive e{sup {+-}}p single and double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering measured as functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} and the Bjorken variable x in interactions of longitudinally polarised leptons with unpolarised protons using the H1 detector at HERA II. An overview of the phenomenology of deep inelastic scattering is given and the experimental apparatus as well as the measurement and analysis procedures are described. The analysis is based on e{sup +}p data taken in 2003-04 and e{sup -}p data taken in 2005 at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=318 GeV, with integrated luminosities of 47.6 pb{sup -1} and 98.4 pb{sup -1} for the e{sup +}p and e{sup -}p samples, respectively. The cross sections are measured in the range of 200measurements are used to study polarisation e ects in neutral current interactions and to determine the structure function xF{sub 3}. The new HERA II data are combined together with previously published data from HERA I to determine the structure function xF{sub 3} with improved precision. Furthermore, this measurement is combined with the corresponding ZEUS measurement to provide the most accurate measurement of the interference structure function xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3}, which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low values of x. The data on polarised cross section asymmetries A{sup {+-}} are also combined with the ZEUS data. This leads to the first observation of parity violation in neutral current e{sup {+-}}p scattering at distances down to 10{sup -18} m. The data are well described by the Standard Model predictions. (orig.)

  4. Longitudinal Transient Elastography Measurements Used in Follow-up for Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verdievel, Hugo; Vande Velde, Saskia; De Bruyne, Ruth; De Looze, Danny; Verhelst, Xavier; Geerts, Anja; Robberecht, Eddy; Van Vlierberghe, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD) is diagnosed using a combination of criteria. Transient elastography (TE), an ultrasonographic method to evaluate liver stiffness, can differentiate patients with and without liver disease. This retrospective study (2007-2013) aimed to detect developing CFLD using consequent TE measurements. All cystic fibrosis patients with TE measurements between 2007 and 2013 (n = 150, median age 17 (9-24) y) were included, of which 118 had a median of three (range, 2-4) measurements with an interval of 1 (1-2) y. Twenty (14%) had CFLD at the first TE measurement; five (3%) developed CFLD during follow-up. The median TE value in CFLD was 14 kPa (8.7-32.2) compared with 5.3 (4.9-5.7) in cystic fibrosis patients without liver disease (CFnoLD; p = 0.0001). In CFnoLD, TE was correlated with age (p = 0.031). A TE result >6.8 kPa had a sensitivity of 91.5% and a specificity of 91.7% in predicting CFLD, according to the receiver operating characteristics analysis. It also has a positive predictive value of 88.6% and a negative predictive value of 86.9%, increasing to 91.7% and 98%, respectively, in patients at risk (<14 y) for developing CFLD. Patients with developing CFLD had progressively increasing consecutive TE measurements.

  5. An electrical load measurements dataset of United Kingdom households from a two-year longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; Stankovic, Lina; Stankovic, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Smart meter roll-outs provide easy access to granular meter measurements, enabling advanced energy services, ranging from demand response measures, tailored energy feedback and smart home/building automation. To design such services, train and validate models, access to data that resembles what is expected of smart meters, collected in a real-world setting, is necessary. The REFIT electrical load measurements dataset described in this paper includes whole house aggregate loads and nine individual appliance measurements at 8-second intervals per house, collected continuously over a period of two years from 20 houses. During monitoring, the occupants were conducting their usual routines. At the time of publishing, the dataset has the largest number of houses monitored in the United Kingdom at less than 1-minute intervals over a period greater than one year. The dataset comprises 1,194,958,790 readings, that represent over 250,000 monitored appliance uses. The data is accessible in an easy-to-use comma-separated format, is time-stamped and cleaned to remove invalid measurements, correctly label appliance data and fill in small gaps of missing data.

  6. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  7. Quantitative measurement of blaCMY-2 in a longitudinal observational study of dairy cattle treated with ceftiofur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Tim C; Singer, Randall S

    2012-11-01

    There is concern that a relationship exists between antibiotic use in livestock production and the emergence, spread, and persistence of antibiotic resistance. It is important to understand the impact that therapeutic doses of antibiotics for treatment of disease have on resistance because disease treatment typically involves higher doses of antibiotic over short time spans. Absolute quantities of the antibiotic resistance gene bla(CMY-2) were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the bacterial community DNA of fecal samples from dairy cattle that were given a 5-day course of ceftiofur and untreated cattle during a longitudinal, observational study. A hierarchical linear model that accounts for left-censored data and repeated measures was used to estimate group means of bla(CMY-2) from the qPCR data. Ceftiofur-treated animals had significantly higher mean quantities of bla(CMY-2) than untreated animals during treatment. On the first day post-treatment, mean quantities of bla(CMY-2) returned to pre-treatment levels and remained low in both groups for the remainder of the study. The use of qPCR to measure bla(CMY-2) quantities provided evidence that the burden of resistance in treated animals may have increased temporarily, a result that was not evident when using only cultivation-based methods of testing for resistance.

  8. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  9. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Nicholas; Baucom, Katherine; Bourne, Stacia

    2017-01-01

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal...

  10. A developmental approach to performance measures - results from a longitudinal case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Performance measurement systems (PMS) serve different functions. These are formal devices for control, and for the formulation and communication of strategy, and as such PMS primarily serve higher-level managers. But we can also aspire PMS to support operational managers, to motivate and enable thes

  11. A developmental approach to performance measures - results from a longitudinal case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Performance measurement systems (PMS) serve different functions. These are formal devices for control, and for the formulation and communication of strategy, and as such PMS primarily serve higher-level managers. But we can also aspire PMS to support operational managers, to motivate and enable

  12. Cross-national and longitudinal investigation of a short measure of workaholism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rantanen, Johanna; Feldt, Taru; Hakanen, Jari J.; Kokko, Katja; Huhtala, Mari; Pulkkinen, Lea; Schaufeli, Wilmar

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure of the 10-item version of the Dutch Work Addiction Scale (DUWAS). The DUWAS-10 is intended to measure workaholism with two correlated factors: working excessively (WE) and working compulsively (WC). The factor structure of the DUWAS-10 was examined

  13. Longitudinal Approaches to Stages of Change Measurement: Effects on Cognitive and Behavioral Physical Activity Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D.; Martin, Andrew J.; Martinez, Carissa; Marsh, Herbert W.; Jackson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The transition from school to further education and work is one of immense change that impacts physical activity attitudes and engagement in adulthood. The Stages of Change (SOC) model, which resides under the transtheoretical framework, has been proposed as one way to measure and evaluate physical activity uptake and maintenance. The current…

  14. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  15. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  16. Combating hooliganism in the Netherlands. An evaluation of measures to combat hooliganism with longitudinal registration data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, D.P.; Postma, M; Jansen, L.; Tolsma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Football hooliganism is an undesirable but widespread phenomenon. In this contribution, a range of measures to combat hooliganism in the Netherlands is evaluated. We use (logistic) multi-level models to analyze data on hooliganism from the Dutch Football Vandalism Information Office covering 3431

  17. Combating hooliganism in the Netherlands: An evaluation of measures to combat hooliganism with longitudinal registration data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, D.P.; Postma, M; Jansen, L.; Tolsma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Football hooliganism is an undesirable but widespread phenomenon. In this contribution, a range of measures to combat hooliganism in the Netherlands is evaluated. We use (logistic) multi-level models to analyze data on hooliganism from the Dutch Football Vandalism Information Office covering 3431

  18. Dew measurements along a longitudinal sand dune transect, Negev Desert, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A F; Heusinkveld, B G; Berkowicz, S M

    2000-03-01

    In a desert environment dew can serve as an important source of moisture for plants, biological crusts, insects and small animals. A measurement programme was carried out within a sand dune belt situated in the northwestern Negev desert, Israel, to measure daily amounts of dew deposition as well as micro-meteorological conditions during the dew formation and early-morning drying process. Dew quantities were measured by micro-lysimeters along a 200-m transect as well as by the eddy-correlation technique at a reference location. A simple physical model was constructed to simulate the dew deposition process as well as early-morning drying for the interdune area and the north- and south-facing dune slopes. Measurements carried out during September and October 1997 showed that the daily amounts of dew ranged between 0.1 mm/night and 0.3 mm/night within the interdune area. On the slopes, the amounts of dew were about 50% lower. Simulated results agreed well with the field data.

  19. Developing performance measurement systems as enabling formalization: A longitudinal field study of a logistics department.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Marc; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a developmental approach to performance-measurement systems (PMS). In particular, we look at characteristics of a development process that result in the PMS being perceived by employees as enabling of their work, rather than as primarily a control device for use by senior manag

  20. Longitudinal measurements of syrinx size in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Elmira; Bilston, Lynne E; Song, Xin; Bongers, Andre; Stoodley, Marcus A; Cheng, Shaokoon; Hemley, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Syringomyelia pathophysiology is commonly studied using rodent models. However, in vivo studies of posttraumatic syringomyelia have been limited by the size of animals and lack of reliable noninvasive evaluation techniques. Imaging the rat spinal cord is particularly challenging because the spinal cord diameter is approximately 1-3 mm, and pathological lesions within the spinal cord parenchyma are even smaller. The standard technique has been histological evaluation, but this has its limitations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether syrinx size could be reliably measured using a preclinical high-field MRI animal system in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia. METHODS The authors used an existing rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia, which was created using a controlled pneumatic compression device to produce the initial spinal cord injury, followed by a subarachnoid injection of kaolin to produce arachnoiditis. T2-weighted MRI was performed on each animal using a 9.4-T scanner at 7, 10, and 13 weeks after injury. Animals were killed and syrinx sizes were calculated from in vivo MRI and histological studies. RESULTS MRI measurements of syrinx volume and length were closely correlated to histological measurements across all time points (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient r = ± 0.93 and 0.79, respectively). CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that high-field T2-weighted MRI can be used to measure syrinx size, and data correlate well with syrinx size measured using histological methods. Preclinical MRI may be a valuable noninvasive technique for tracking syrinx formation and enlargement in animal models of syringomyelia.

  1. APPLICATION OF THE LONGITUDINAL CHROMATIC ABERRATION EFFECT FOR DISTANCES MEASUREMENT ON THE BASIS OF A SINGLE PHOTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Volkova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We propose a method for measuring the distances to the surfaces of photographed objects based on the effect of longitudinal chromatic aberration. According to this effect, the focal length of lens depends on the wavelength of refracted light, thus the defocus of image formed by lens depends not only on the distance from image plane to lens, but also on the wavelength of light the picture was taken for (red, green or blue color ranges. Method. The proposed method of distance measurement is based on comparison of image defocus for different wavelengths (e.g., red and blue. The comparison is performed in the spatial frequency domain and is based on analysis of image complex spectrograms (the Fourier spectrum calculated locally within a window scanning the image.The distance to each point of photographed surface is calculated in closed form by the analysis of local spatial spectrum with the use of Gaussian model of point spread function. Main Results. The working capacity of distance measurement technique is partially verified on the basis of image defocus imitation by different displacement of objective lens with respect to sensor matrix of camera. The presented analysis of chromatic parameters of traditionally applied optical materials also proves the physical realizability of proposed technique. A technology is also proposed for distance measuring based on really differing image defocus in different color channels applying a special calibration of electro-optical system. Practical Relevance. The proposed distance measurement technique could be practically useful in the cases where any active illumination of objects being photographed is prohibited. It is also worth to be applied in the inexpensive low-sized optical measuring devices like Kinect for Xbox-360.

  2. Longitudinal and Transverse Wire Measurements for the Evaluation of Impedance Reduction Measures on the MKE Extraction Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Kroyer, T; Gaxiola, E; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2007-01-01

    In 2003 significant heating of the MKE Extraction kicker magnets in CERN's SPS was confirmed by measurements with beam. The dissipated power was so high that it would seriously jeopardize the good functioning of the kicker by warming the ferrite above the Curie temperature. In an impedance reduction campaign the beam coupling impedance of the present kickers was assessed with wire measurements and possible cures were evaluated. For a reliable impedance determination refined measurement methods had to be used. Any kicker modification should not deteriorate kick field quality and high voltage capability. Shielding the ferrites with printed metallic strips turned out to be a promising solution. Technological issues of the metallic coatings are also discussed.

  3. Longitudinal ambulatory measurements of gait abnormality in dystrophin-deficient dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voit Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to measure the gait abnormalities in GRMD (Golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs during growth and disease progression using an ambulatory gait analyzer (3D-accelerometers as a possible tool to assess the effects of a therapeutic intervention. Methods Six healthy and twelve GRMD dogs were evaluated twice monthly, from the age of two to nine months. The evolution of each gait variable previously shown to be modified in control and dystrophin-deficient adults was assessed using two-ways variance analysis (age, clinical status with repeated measurements. A principal component analysis (PCA was applied to perfect multivariate data interpretation. Results Speed, stride length, total power and force significantly already decreased (p Conclusion The gait variables measured by the accelerometers were sensitive to early detect and follow the gait disorders and mirrored the heterogeneity of clinical presentations, giving sense to monitor gait in GRMD dogs during progression of the disease and pre-clinical therapeutic trials.

  4. Photon-Echo Relaxation Measurements with Two Dye-Lasers. Application to Pentacene-h14 and -d14 in p-Terphenyl-h14 Crystals at 1.5 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Jos B.W.; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1977-01-01

    Electronically controlled photon-echo relaxation measurements, using two nitrogen pumped dye-lasers, are reported for mixed crystals of pentacene-h14 and -d14 in p-terphenyl-h14 at 1.5 K. In dilute mixed crystals (ca. 10-8 M) the photon-echo lifetime is found to be exclusively determined by the fluo

  5. Dielectric relaxation studies in polyvinyl butyral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendru, P. C.; Kumar, Naresh; Arora, V. P.; Gupta, N. P.

    1982-10-01

    Dielectric measurements have been made in thick films (˜100 μm) of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) having degree of polymerization n=1600, in the frequency range 100 Hz-100 KHz and temperature range 300-373 K. The results indicated that PVB was in the amorphous phase and observed dielectric dispersion has been assigned as the β-relaxation process. The β relaxation is of Debye type with symmetrical distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric relaxation strength Δɛ and the distribution parameters β¯ increase with temperature. The results can be qualitatively explained by assuming the hindered rotation of the side groups involving hydroxyl/acetate groups.

  6. Anthropometric measures in relation to Basal Cell Carcinoma: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandeya Nirmala

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between anthropometric indices and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC is largely unknown. We aimed to examine the association between anthropometric measures and development of BCC and to demonstrate whether adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip ratio was associated with risk of BCC, independent of sun exposure. Methods Study participants were participants in a community-based skin cancer prevention trial in Nambour, a town in southeast Queensland (latitude 26°S. In 1992, height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured for all 1621 participants and weight was remeasured at the end of the trial in 1996. Prevalence proportion ratios were calculated using a log-binomial model to estimate the risk of BCC prior to or prevalent in 1992, while Poisson regression with robust error variances was used to estimate the relative risk of BCC during the follow-up period. Results At baseline, 94 participants had a current BCC, and 202 had a history of BCC. During the 5-year follow-up period, 179 participants developed one or more new BCCs. We found no significant association between any of the anthropometric measures or indices and risk of BCC after controlling for potential confounding factors including sun exposure. There was a suggestion that short-term weight gain may increase the risk of developing BCC for women only. Conclusion Adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio is not significantly associated with occurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

  7. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polewko-Klim, A., E-mail: anetapol@uwb.edu.pl; Uba, S.; Uba, L. [Institute of Informatics, University of Bialystok, Sosnowa 64, PL-15-887 Bialystok (Poland)

    2014-07-15

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  8. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewko-Klim, A; Uba, S; Uba, L

    2014-07-01

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  9. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  10. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Nicholas; Baucom, Katherine; Bourne, Stacia

    2017-01-01

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal...... patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce...... to improve the understanding and presentation of dyadic patterns of association described by standard RM-APIMs. The current article briefly reviews the conceptual foundations of RM-APIMs, demonstrates how change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and VFDs can aid interpretation of standard RM-APIMs, and provides a tutorial...

  11. OS044. Morphological differences in murine placenta detected by magneticresonance imaging measurements of T2 relaxation times in mouse models ofpreeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, G; Stait-Gardner, T; Surmon, L; Makris, A; Price, W S; Hennessy, A

    2012-07-01

    We have demonstrated that morphologically distinct regions of the murine placenta can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with image contrast arising from the variation in T2 relaxation times between regions and dependent upon blood flow. Previous studies of human placenta by other groups have shown a homogeneous tissue with correlation of relaxation times with gestational age and a trend for shorter relaxation times in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. The ability to detect morphological changes and alterations in blood flow in experimental models of preeclampsia would be a significant boost in understanding the relationship between abnormal placental implantation, reduced placental perfusion, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic molecules and other factors that may play a role in the syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphological changes or abnormalities can be detected by T2 mapping in the placenta of mice subject to two experimental models of preeclampsia (reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model and TNF-α induced model). Pregnant C57BL/6JArc mice were, on day 13.5 of gestation, either subject to a unilateral ligation of the right uterine artery (RUPP) (n=2) or given an infusion of TNF-α by subcutaneous insertion of a mini-osmotic pump primed to deliver 500ng/kg/day for 4days (n=2). Controls were normal pregnant (n=2), sham-operated (n=1) or saline infused animals(n=1). MRI images were acquired on anaesthetised mice on day 17.5 of gestation using a Bruker Avance 11.7 Tesla wide-bore spectrometer with micro-imaging probe capable of generating gradients of 0.45T/m. T2 measurements were acquired using an MSME sequence protocol (Bruker MSME-T2-map) with an in-plane resolution of 0.1-0.2mm. Matlab was used to generate R2 (i.e.,1/T2) maps from the acquired data with the T2 values being calculated from selected regions of interest from 2-6 individual placenta from each mouse. Differences

  12. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(-) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H. P.; Juengst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Molina, A. G. Yagues; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(-) p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma/dQ(2), d sigma/dx and d sigma/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q(2

  13. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(+) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(+)p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma=dQ(2), d sigma=dx and d sigma=dy and the reduced cross section (sigma) over tilde are m

  14. Influence of dopant ion on localized relaxation of an oxygen vacancy in stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, M.; Wigmore, J. K.; Nobugai, K.; Miyasato, T.

    2002-05-01

    It is well known that stabilized zirconia exhibits long-range transport of oxygen ions which gives rise to diffusion relaxation of oxygen vacancies. The internal friction and the change in sound velocity in single-crystal calcia-stabilized zirconia (CSZ) doped with 12 mol % CaO were measured for longitudinal sound waves in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 700 Hz using a vibrating reed technique. In the temperature range from 300 K to 700 K, the relaxation strength exhibits strong anisotropy with respect to the directions of the k vectors. As the frequency increases the internal friction peak and the change in sound velocity shift toward high temperature, and the relaxation strength remains constant. The results show that a smaller number of oxygen vacancies contribute to diffusion relaxation than to localized relaxation, which is attributed to hopping of bound oxygen vacancies within the local structure. Comparison of the results with those reported previously for yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) doped with 9.5 mol % Y2O3, suggests that oxygen vacancies are more strongly bound by the local structure in CSZ than in YSZ.

  15. Superparamagnetic relaxation in alpha-Fe particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Pedersen, Michael Stanley;

    1998-01-01

    The superparamagnetic relaxation time of carbon-supported alpha-Fe particles with an average size of 3.0 Mm has been studied over a large temperature range by the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy combined with AC and DC magnetization measurements. It is found that the relaxation time varies with tem...

  16. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts: A Multinational Longitudinal Study of Ultrasound Biometric Measurements and Estimated Fetal Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroli, Guillermo; Widmer, Mariana; Neerup Jensen, Lisa; Giordano, Daniel; Abdel Aleem, Hany; Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Benachi, Alexandra; Diemert, Anke; Tshefu Kitoto, Antoinette; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Tabor, Ann; Kriplani, Alka; Gonzalez Perez, Rogelio; Hecher, Kurt; Hanson, Mark A.; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin; Platt, Lawrence D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Against this background, WHO made it a high priority to provide the present fetal growth charts for estimated fetal weight (EFW) and common ultrasound biometric measurements intended for worldwide use. Methods and Findings We conducted a multinational prospective observational longitudinal study of fetal growth in low-risk singleton pregnancies of women of high or middle socioeconomic status and without known environmental constraints on fetal growth. Centers in ten countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Norway, and Thailand) recruited participants who had reliable information on last menstrual period and gestational age confirmed by crown–rump length measured at 8–13 wk of gestation. Participants had anthropometric and nutritional assessments and seven scheduled ultrasound examinations during pregnancy. Fifty-two participants withdrew consent, and 1,387 participated in the study. At study entry, median maternal age was 28 y (interquartile range [IQR] 25–31), median height was 162 cm (IQR 157–168), median weight was 61 kg (IQR 55–68), 58% of the women were nulliparous, and median daily caloric intake was 1,840 cal (IQR 1,487–2,222). The median pregnancy duration was 39 wk (IQR 38–40) although there were significant differences between countries, the largest difference being 12 d (95% CI 8–16). The median birthweight was 3,300 g (IQR 2,980–3,615). There were differences in birthweight between countries, e.g., India had significantly smaller neonates than the other countries, even after adjusting for gestational age. Thirty-one women had a miscarriage, and three fetuses had

  17. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts: A Multinational Longitudinal Study of Ultrasound Biometric Measurements and Estimated Fetal Weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvid Kiserud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Against this background, WHO made it a high priority to provide the present fetal growth charts for estimated fetal weight (EFW and common ultrasound biometric measurements intended for worldwide use.We conducted a multinational prospective observational longitudinal study of fetal growth in low-risk singleton pregnancies of women of high or middle socioeconomic status and without known environmental constraints on fetal growth. Centers in ten countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Norway, and Thailand recruited participants who had reliable information on last menstrual period and gestational age confirmed by crown-rump length measured at 8-13 wk of gestation. Participants had anthropometric and nutritional assessments and seven scheduled ultrasound examinations during pregnancy. Fifty-two participants withdrew consent, and 1,387 participated in the study. At study entry, median maternal age was 28 y (interquartile range [IQR] 25-31, median height was 162 cm (IQR 157-168, median weight was 61 kg (IQR 55-68, 58% of the women were nulliparous, and median daily caloric intake was 1,840 cal (IQR 1,487-2,222. The median pregnancy duration was 39 wk (IQR 38-40 although there were significant differences between countries, the largest difference being 12 d (95% CI 8-16. The median birthweight was 3,300 g (IQR 2,980-3,615. There were differences in birthweight between countries, e.g., India had significantly smaller neonates than the other countries, even after adjusting for gestational age. Thirty-one women had a miscarriage, and three fetuses had intrauterine death. The 8,203 sets of

  18. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts: A Multinational Longitudinal Study of Ultrasound Biometric Measurements and Estimated Fetal Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiserud, Torvid; Piaggio, Gilda; Carroli, Guillermo; Widmer, Mariana; Carvalho, José; Neerup Jensen, Lisa; Giordano, Daniel; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Abdel Aleem, Hany; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Benachi, Alexandra; Diemert, Anke; Tshefu Kitoto, Antoinette; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Tabor, Ann; Kriplani, Alka; Gonzalez Perez, Rogelio; Hecher, Kurt; Hanson, Mark A; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Platt, Lawrence D

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Against this background, WHO made it a high priority to provide the present fetal growth charts for estimated fetal weight (EFW) and common ultrasound biometric measurements intended for worldwide use. We conducted a multinational prospective observational longitudinal study of fetal growth in low-risk singleton pregnancies of women of high or middle socioeconomic status and without known environmental constraints on fetal growth. Centers in ten countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Norway, and Thailand) recruited participants who had reliable information on last menstrual period and gestational age confirmed by crown-rump length measured at 8-13 wk of gestation. Participants had anthropometric and nutritional assessments and seven scheduled ultrasound examinations during pregnancy. Fifty-two participants withdrew consent, and 1,387 participated in the study. At study entry, median maternal age was 28 y (interquartile range [IQR] 25-31), median height was 162 cm (IQR 157-168), median weight was 61 kg (IQR 55-68), 58% of the women were nulliparous, and median daily caloric intake was 1,840 cal (IQR 1,487-2,222). The median pregnancy duration was 39 wk (IQR 38-40) although there were significant differences between countries, the largest difference being 12 d (95% CI 8-16). The median birthweight was 3,300 g (IQR 2,980-3,615). There were differences in birthweight between countries, e.g., India had significantly smaller neonates than the other countries, even after adjusting for gestational age. Thirty-one women had a miscarriage, and three fetuses had intrauterine death. The 8,203 sets of ultrasound

  19. Longitudinal changes in heart rate-corrected measures of exercise performance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, Kavitha; Epstein, Michael L; Singh, Tajinder P

    2008-01-01

    Interpretation of change in exercise performance over time in children with repaired congenital heart disease is often hampered by poor effort that limits the maximum heart rate; this is often difficult to distinguish from chronotropic impairment, a common finding in these children. In an attempt to address this limitation, we sought to examine measures of exercise performance that are corrected for heart rate in healthy children and to determine if these change with somatic growth. We studied two serial graded exercise tests in 24 healthy children at an interval of >3 years. Paired comparisons revealed that maximum oxygen pulse (O(2) pulse), O(2) pulse at ventilatory anaerobic threshold, O(2) pulse at a heart rate of 140 beats per minute, and slope of the VO(2)-heart rate relationship all increased with age. However, when indexed to somatic growth, there was no change in the mean values of these parameters over time. We conclude that O(2 )pulse and slope of the VO(2)-heart rate relationship during exercise increase in proportion to somatic growth in children so that optimal oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles is ensured. This study provides the "normative" response of exercise parameters to growth, against which responses of children with repaired congenital heart disease may be compared.

  20. Pressure Dependent Wall Relaxation in Polarized $^3$He Gaseous Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C; Chu, P -H; Gao, H; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time (T$_1$) due to the cell wall was observed previously at both room temperature and low temperature in valved Rb-coated refillable $^3$He gaseous cells in \\cite{Zheng2}. The diffusion of $^3$He from measurement cell through a capillary tube to the valve and the subsequent depolarization on the surface of the valve was proposed to possibly explain such a pressure dependence at room temperature \\cite{Saam}. In this paper, we investigate this diffusion effect through measurements of T$_1$ with newly designed Rb-coated Pyrex glass cells at 295 K as well as finite element analysis (FEA) studies. Both the experimental results and FEA studies show that the diffusion effect is insufficient to explain the observed linear pressure-dependent behavior of T$_1$.

  1. Measurement of R = sigma_L / sigma_T and the Separated Longitudinal and Transverse Structure Functions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Y; Ahmidouch, A; Armstrong, C S; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Beck, D H; Blok, H P; Bochna, C W; Böglin, W; Bosted, P; Bouwhuis, M; Breuer, H; Brown, D S; Brüll, A; Carlini, R D; Cha, J; Chant, N S; Cochran, A; Cole, L; Danagulyan, S; Day, D B; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Fox, B; Gan, L; Gao, H; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Geesaman, D F; Gilman, R; Gueye, P L J; Harvey, M; Holt, R J; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E; Lorenzon, W; Lung, A; Mack, D J; Markowitz, P; Martin, J W; McIlhany, K; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Miller, M A; Milner, R G; Mitchell, J H; Mkrtchyan, H G; Müller, B A; Nathan, A; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; O'Neill, T G; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Piercey, R B; Potterveld, D; Ransome, R D; Reinhold, J; Rollinde, E; Rondon, Oscar A; Roos, P; Sarty, A J; Sawafta, R; Schulte, E C; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Tieulent, R; Tvaskis, V; Uzzle, A; Vulcan, W F; Wood, S A; Xiong, F; Yuan, L; Zeier, M; Zihlmann, B; Ziskin, V

    2004-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of longitudinal strength in the nucleon resonance region, presenting new results from inclusive electron-proton cross sections measured at Jefferson Lab Hall C in the four-momentum transfer range 0.2 < Q^2 < 5.5 GeV^2. The data have been used to accurately perform over 170 Rosenbluth-type longitudinal / transverse separations. The precision R = sigma_L / sigma_T data are presented here, along with the first separate values of the inelastic structure functions F_1 and F_L in this regime. The resonance longitudinal component is found to be significant. With the new data, quark-hadron duality is observed above Q^2 = 1 GeV^2 in the separated structure functions independently.

  2. Measurement of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the Separated Longitudinal and Transverse Structure Functions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongguang Liang; Michael Christy; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Arshak Asaturyan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; Douglas Beck; Henk Blok; C.W. Bochna; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Maurice Bouwhuis; Herbert Breuer; Daniel Brown; Antje Bruell; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; Nicholas Chant; Anthony Cochran; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; B. Fox; Liping Gan; Haiyan Gao; Kenneth Garrow; David Gaskell; Ashot Gasparian; Don Geesaman; Ronald Gilman; Paul Gueye; Mark Harvey; Roy Holt; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; J.W. Martin; Kevin McIlhany; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; M.A. Miller; Richard Milner; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Alan Nathan; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Thomas O' neill; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Rodney Piercey; David Potterveld; Ronald Ransome; Joerg Reinhold; E. Rollinde; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Philip Roos; Adam Sarty; Reyad Sawafta; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Steffen Strauch; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Raphael Tieulent; Vladas Tvaskis; Alicia Uzzle; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Feng Xiong; Lulin Yuan; Markus Zeier; Benedikt Zihlmann; Vitaliy Ziskin

    2004-10-01

    We report on a detailed study of longitudinal strength in the nucleon resonance region, presenting new results from inclusive electron-proton cross sections measured at Jefferson Lab Hall C in the four-momentum transfer range 0.2 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 GeV{sup 2}. The data have been used to accurately perform over 170 Rosenbluth-type longitudinal/transverse separations. The precision R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} data are presented here, along with the first separate values of the inelastic structure functions F{sub 1} and F{sub L} in this regime. The resonance longitudinal component is found to be significant. With the new data, quark-hadron duality is observed above Q{sup 2} = 1 GeV{sup 2} in the separated structure functions independently.

  3. Les principes distributifs des mesures d’insertion des jeunes à l’épreuve du longitudinal Youth integration measures and their criteria tested by a longitudinal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Lima

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La sélection des bénéficiaires des mesures d’action sociale relève d’un problème éthique qui fait l’objet d’une intense activité cognitive et normative de la part d’acteurs publics outillés par l’expertise. Or, l’examen historique des principes distributifs mobilisés dans les politiques d’insertion des jeunes donne à voir la reformulation des référentiels de l’action publique dans un cadre longitudinal ainsi que ses effets sur les présupposés éthiques des politiques. Le principe de discrimination positive consistant à redistribuer les chances d’insertion en faveur des jeunes les moins formés a été énoncé au sein d’une représentation instantanéiste de l’insertion des jeunes. Il perd de sa validité avec l’institutionnalisation des trajectoires. L’éthique de l’accompagnement du parcours qui devient dominante dans les années 1990 perd de vue les inégalités entre groupes de niveau de formation au profit d’une démarche d’organisation de carrières ascendantes permises par les mesures d’action sociale disponibles.Targeting social programs is an ethical problem for administrators. Therefore, they develop an intense cognitive and normative activity with the help of experts in economics. The history of how funds are allocated in support of youth integration policies shows the longitudinal reframing of public policy and its impact on ethical principles. The principle of affirmative action consisting in redistributing offers among less qualified youth has been formulated according to a static representation of youth integration. It loses its validity with the institutionalization of individual itineraries. The ethic of pathway support that became dominant in the 1990s lost sight of the inequality between groups levels of qualification no longer appeared relevant and gave way to the organization of upwardly mobile careers made possible by the social programs at hand.

  4. The effect of music relaxation versus progressive muscular relaxation on insomnia in older people and their relationship to personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Rotem, Tomer; Arnon, Zahi; Haimov, Iris

    2008-01-01

    A large percentage of older people suffer from chronic insomnia, affecting many aspects of life quality and well-being. Although insomnia is most often treated with medication, a growing number of studies demonstrate the efficiency of various relaxation techniques. The present study had three aims: first, to compare two relaxation techniques--music relaxation and progressive muscular relaxation--on various objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine the effect of these techniques on anxiety and depression; and finally, to explore possible relationships between the efficiency of both techniques and personality variables. Fifteen older adults took part in the study. Following one week of base-line measurements of sleep quality, participants followed one week of music relaxation and one week of progressive muscular relaxation before going to sleep. Order of relaxation techniques was controlled. Results show music relaxation was more efficient in improving sleep. Sleep efficiency was higher after music relaxation than after progressive muscular relaxation. Moreover, anxiety was lower after music relaxation. Progressive muscular relaxation was related to deterioration of sleep quality on subjective measures. Beyond differences between the relaxation techniques, extraverts seemed to benefit more from both music and progressive muscular relaxation. The advantage of non-pharmacological means to treat insomnia, and the importance of taking individual differences into account are discussed.

  5. A Robust System for Longitudinal Knee Joint Edema and Blood Flow Assessment Based on Vector Bioimpedance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersek, Sinan; Töreyin, Hakan; Inan, Omer T

    2016-06-01

    We present a robust vector bioimpedance measurement system for longitudinal knee joint health assessment, capable of acquiring high resolution static (slowly varying over the course of hours to days) and dynamic (rapidly varying on the order of milli-seconds) bioresistance and bioreactance signals. Occupying an area of 78×90 mm(2) and consuming 0.25 W when supplied with ±5 V, the front-end achieves a dynamic range of 345 Ω and noise floor of 0.018 mΩrms (resistive) and 0.055 mΩrms (reactive) within a bandwidth of 0.1-20 Hz. A microcontroller allows real-time calibration to minimize errors due to environmental variability (e.g., temperature) that can be experienced outside of lab environments, and enables data storage on a micro secure digital card. The acquired signals are then processed using customized physiology-driven algorithms to extract musculoskeletal (edema) and cardiovascular (local blood volume pulse) features from the knee joint. In a feasibility study, we found statistically significant differences between the injured and contralateral static knee impedance measures for two subjects with recent unilateral knee injury compared to seven controls. Specifically, the impedance was lower for the injured knees, supporting the physiological expectations for increased edema and damaged cell membranes. In a second feasibility study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the dynamic impedance measures with a cold-pressor test, with a 20 mΩ decrease in the pulsatile resistance associated with increased downstream peripheral vascular resistance. The proposed system will serve as a foundation for future efforts aimed at quantifying joint health status continuously during normal daily life.

  6. Longitudinal Inter-Comparison of Modeled and Measured West Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Runoff Losses (2004-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Overeem, I.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Hall, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Increased surface meltwater runoff, that exits the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) margin via supra-, en-, and sub-glacial drainage networks into fjords, pro-glacial lakes and rivers, accounts for half or more of total mass loss. Despite its importance, modeled meltwater runoff fluxes are poorly constrained, primarily due to a lack of direct in situ observations. Here, we present the first ever longitudinal (north-south) inter-comparison of a multi-year dataset (2004-2014) of discharge for four drainage basins - Watson, Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua, Naujat Kuat, and North Rivers - along West Greenland. These in situ hydrologic measurements are compared with modeled runoff output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model, and the performance of the model is examined. An analysis of the relationship between modeled and actual ice sheet runoff patterns is assessed, and provides insight into the model's ability to capture inter-annual and intra-annual variability, spatiotemporal patterns, and extreme melt events. This study's findings will inform future development and parameterization of ice sheet surface mass balance models.

  7. The analysis of longitudinal quality of life measures with informative drop-out: a pattern mixture approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Wendy J; Buijs, Ciska; Stolk, Ronald P; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; le Cessie, Saskia

    2010-02-01

    The analysis of longitudinal health-related quality of life measures (HRQOL) can be seriously hampered due to informative drop-out. Random effects models assume Missing At Random and do not take into account informative drop-out. We therefore aim to correct the bias due to informative drop-out. Analyses of data from a trial comparing standard-dose and high-dose chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer with respect to long-term impact on HRQOL will serve as illustration. The subscale Physical Function (PF) of the SF36 will be used. A pattern mixture approach is proposed to account for informative drop-out. Patterns are defined based on events related to HRQOL, such as death and relapse. The results of this pattern mixture approach are compared to the results of the commonly used random effects model. The findings of the pattern mixture approach are well interpretable, and different courses over time in different patterns are distinguished. In terms of estimated differences between standard dose and high dose, the results of both approaches are slightly different, but have no consequences for the clinical evaluation of both doses. Under the assumption that drop-out is at random within the patterns, the pattern mixture approach adjusts the estimates to a certain degree. This approach accounts in a relatively simple way for informative drop-out.

  8. Measurement of Longitudinal β-Amyloid Change with 18F-Florbetapir PET and Standardized Uptake Value Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Susan M.; Fero, Allison; Baker, Suzanne L.; Koeppe, Robert; Mintun, Mark; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Jagust, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The accurate measurement of β-amyloid (Aβ) change using amyloid PET imaging is important for Alzheimer disease research and clinical trials but poses several unique challenges. In particular, reference region measurement instability may lead to spurious changes in cortical regions of interest. To optimize our ability to measure 18F-florbetapir longitudinal change, we evaluated several candidate regions of interest and their influence on cortical florbetapir change over a 2-y period in participants from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Methods We examined the agreement in cortical florbetapir change detected using 6 candidate reference regions (cerebellar gray matter, whole cerebellum, brain stem/pons, eroded subcortical white matter [WM], and 2 additional combinations of these regions) in 520 ADNI subjects. We used concurrent cerebrospinal fluid Aβ1–42 measurements to identify subgroups of ADNI subjects expected to remain stable over follow-up (stable Aβ group; n = 14) and subjects expected to increase (increasing Aβ group; n = 91). We then evaluated reference regions according to whether cortical change was minimal in the stable Aβ group and cortical retention increased in the increasing Aβ group. Results There was poor agreement across reference regions in the amount of cortical change observed across all 520 ADNI subjects. Within the stable Aβ group, however, cortical florbetapir change was 1%–2% across all reference regions, indicating high consistency. In the increasing Aβ group, cortical increases were significant with all reference regions. Reference regions containing WM (as opposed to cerebellum or pons) enabled detection of cortical change that was more physiologically plausible and more likely to increase over time. Conclusion Reference region selection has an important influence on the detection of florbetapir change. Compared with cerebellum or pons alone, reference regions that included subcortical WM resulted in

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  10. Multiphasic stress relaxation response of freshly isolated and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells measured by quasi-in situ tensile test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Saito, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) undergo a phenotypic change from a contractile to a synthetic state under pathological conditions, such as atherogenesis and restenosis. Although the viscoelastic properties of SMCs are of particular interest because of their role in the development of these vascular diseases, the effects of phenotypic changes on their viscoelastic properties are unclear at this stage. We performed the stress relaxation test at constant strain (ε=30%) for the freshly isolated contractile SMCs (FSMCs) and the cultured synthetic SMCs (CSMCs) maintaining in situ cell shape and cytoskeletal integrity. We also investigated the effect of extracellular Ca2+ on their viscoelastic behaviors. FSMCs and CSMCs exhibited multiphasic stress relaxation, which consisted of rapid relaxation, occurring on a time scale of several seconds and several 10 seconds, and slow relaxation occurring on a time scale of 1000 seconds. The estimated elastic modulus of CSMCs was less than one-half that of FSMCs, that was associated with a decreased of amount of actin stress fibers (SFs) during the transition from contractile to synthetic phenotypes. FSMCs showed a conservation of tension with extracellular Ca2+ following rapid stress relaxation. In contrast, CSMCs showed a consecutive decrease in tension independent of Ca2+. This suggests that the decrease in tension in a long time scale may be involved in mechanical remodeling of SFs induced through a Rho-dependent pathway, which is Ca2+-independent and become predominant in the transition from contractile to synthetic phenotypes.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T1 and T2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially resolved

  12. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  13. Thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation of rice gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁玉琴; 赵思明; 熊善柏

    2008-01-01

    Rice gel was prepared by simulating the production processes of Chinese local rice noodles,and the properties of thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation during gelatinization were studied by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) measurement and dynamic rheometer.The results show that during gelatinization,the molecular chains of rice starch undergo the thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation.During the first heating and high temperature holding processes,the starch crystallites in the rice slurry melt,and the polymer chains stretch and interact,then viscoelastic gel forms.The cooling and low temperatures holding processes result in reinforced networks and decrease the viscoelasticity of the gel.During the second heating,the remaining starch crystallites further melt,the network is reinforced,and the viscoelasticity increases.The viscoelasticity,the molecular conformation and texture of the gel are adjusted by changing the temperature,and finally construct the gel with the textural characteristics of Chinese local rice noodle.

  14. Repeatability and Minimal Detectable Change in Longitudinal Median Nerve Excursion Measures During Upper Limb Neurodynamic Techniques in a Mixed Population: A Pilot Study Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Philippe; Lamontagne, Martin; Higgins, Johanne; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-07-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability and minimum detectable change in longitudinal median nerve excursion during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Seven participants with unilateral or bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and 11 healthy participants were randomly tested with two ULNTs (i.e., tensioner and slider). Each ULNT was performed three times each at 45° and 90° of shoulder abduction on two separate visits. Video sequences of median nerve excursion, recorded by a physical therapist using ultrasound imaging, were quantified using computer software. The generalizability theory, encompassing a G-Study and a D-study, measured the dependability coefficient (Φ) along with standard error of measurement (SEM) accuracy and allowed various testing protocols to be proposed. The highest reliability (Φ = 0.84) and lowest minimal measurement error (SEM = 0.58 mm) of the longitudinal median nerve excursion were reached during the ULNT-slider performed with 45° of shoulder abduction and when measures obtained from three different image sequences recorded during a single visit were averaged. It is recommended that longitudinal median nerve excursion measures computed from three separate image sequences recorded during a single visit be averaged in clinical practice. Ideally, adding a second visit (six image sequences) is also suggested in research protocols.

  15. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Riccardo; Filippone, B W

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms at temperatures below $600 \\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, ...

  16. Solid-state NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement immersion depth studies in phospholipid bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Shidong

    2010-11-01

    A new approach for determining the membrane immersion depth of a spin-labeled probe has been developed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A DOXYL spin label was placed at different sites of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PSPC) phospholipid bilayers as paramagnetic moieties and the resulting enhancements of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) times of 31P nuclei on the surface of the bilayers were measured by a standard inversion recovery pulse sequence. The 31P NMR spin-lattice relaxation times decrease steadily as the DOXYL spin label moves closer to the surface as well as the concentration of the spin-labeled lipids increase. The enhanced relaxation vs. the position and concentration of spin-labels indicate that PRE induced by the DOXYL spin label are significant to determine longer distances over the whole range of the membrane depths. When these data were combined with estimated correlation times τc, the r-6-weighted, time-averaged distances between the spin-labels and the 31P nuclei on the membrane surface were estimated. The application of using this solid-state NMR PRE approach coupled with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) may be a powerful method for measuring membrane protein immersion depth. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  18. Chain length effect on dynamical structure of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)–polar solvent mixtures in dilute solution of dioxane studied by microwave dielectric relaxation measurement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R J Sengwa; Sonu Sankhila

    2006-08-01

    Dielectric relaxation study of the binary mixtures of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) (Mw = 24000, 40000 and 360000 g mol-1) with ethyl alcohol (EA) and poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) (Mw = 200 and 400 g mol-1) in dilute solutions of dioxane were carried out at 10.1 GHz and 35°} C. The relaxation time of PVP–EA mixtures was interpreted by the consideration of a wait-and-switch model in the local structure of self-associated ethyl alcohol molecules and also the PVP chain length as a geometric constraint for the reorientational motion of ethyl alcohol molecules. The formation of complexes and effect of PVP chain length on the molecular dynamics, chain flexibility and stretching of PEG molecules in PVP–PEG mixtures were explored from the comparative values of dielectric relaxation time. Further, relaxation time values in dioxane and benzene solvent confirm the viscosity independent molecular dynamics in PVP–EA mixtures but the values vary significantly with the non-polar solvent environment.

  19. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  20. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga, Luis; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  1. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, Luis, E-mail: luismoragajaramillo@gmail.com [Universidad Central de Chile, Toesca 1783, Santiago 8370178 (Chile); Henriquez, Ricardo, E-mail: rahc.78@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Bravo, Sergio, E-mail: bravo.castillo.sergio@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Solis, Basilio, E-mail: bsolis1984@gmail.com [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  2. In vivo DTI longitudinal measurements of acute sciatic nerve traction injury and the association with pathological and functional changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinchun [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, 151 Yanjiangxi Road, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Chen, Jingcong [Department of Radiology, The Center People Hospital of Huizhou, Huizhou 516001 (China); Hong, Goubin [Department of Radiology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519000 (China); Sun, Congpeng; Wu, Xiaomen [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, 151 Yanjiangxi Road, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Peng, Matthew Jianqiao, E-mail: PengJQshl@163.com [Department of Joint Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Orthopedic Implantation Key Lab of Guangdong Province, 151 Yanjiangxi Road, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Zeng, Guangqiao, E-mail: zgqiao@vip.163.com [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, 151 Yanjiangxi Road, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of longitudinally measuring acute traction injury to the sciatic nerve using 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to analyze the associations of the measurements [regarding fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), eigenvalue (λ{sub ||} and λ{sub ⊥})] with limb function and pathology. Materials and methods: Acute traction injuries to the sciatic nerve were created in the right hind limbs of 32 New Zealand white rabbits, the left hind limbs were chosen as sham operation nerves. MRI scans were performed at intervals from pre-operation through 8 weeks post-operation follow up. Scanning sequences included T2WI, STIR, and single shot spin echo DTI with single shot EPI acquisition (SE-DTI-SSEPI). Parameters of FA, ADC, axial diffusivity (λ{sub ||}) and radial diffusivity (λ{sub ⊥}) were then calculated from the DTI. The limb functions and pathologic changes were evaluated and compared. Results: Diffusion Tensor Tractography (DTT) only revealed the proximal portion of the injured nerves 1–3 days after traction injury but did not reveal the nerve of the distal and traction portions at all. Nerve fibers of the distal and traction portions were not revealed by DTT until after the 1st week. They were elongated gradually and recovered almost to the normal at 8th week. The value of FA and λ{sub ⊥}of the injured nerves, which varied in different portions, were significantly different between the traction injury nerves and the sham operation nerves, whereas the value of ADC and λ{sub ||} were not significantly different. The curve lines of FA value-time for the proximal, traction and distal portions of the injured nerve correlated well to the functional and pathological changes of the limb affected, while the DTI parameters did not change that much in the sham-operated nerves. Conclusions: DTI obtained on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner can demonstrate early abnormal changes

  3. Measurement of single-spin azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive electroproduction of pions and kaons on a longitudinally polarised deuterium target

    OpenAIRE

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V. V.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, H.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Baturin, V.; Baumgarten, C.

    2003-01-01

    Single-spin asymmetries have been measured for semi-inclusive electroproduction of $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$, $\\pi^0$ and $K^+$ mesons in deep-inelastic scattering off a longitudinally polarised deuterium target. The asymmetries appear in the distribution of the hadrons in the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ around the virtual photon direction, relative to the lepton scattering plane. The corresponding analysing powers in the $\\sin \\phi$ moment of the cross section are $0.012 \\pm 0.002 {(stat.)} \\pm 0.002 {(sy...

  4. Characterization of high-temperature performance of cesium vapor cells with anti-relaxation coating

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenhao; Peng, Xiang; Pustelny, Szymon; Wickenbrock, Arne; Guo, Hong; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Vapor cells with antirelaxation coating are widely used in modern atomic physics experiments due to the coating's ability to maintain the atoms' spin polarization during wall collisions. We characterize the performance of vapor cells with different coating materials by measuring longitudinal spin relaxation and vapor density at temperatures up to 95{\\deg}C. We found that the spin-projection-noise-limited sensitivity for atomic magnetometers with such cells improves with temperature, which demonstrates the potential of antirelaxation coated cells in applications of future high-sensitivity magnetometers.

  5. Characterization of high-temperature performance of cesium vapor cells with anti-relaxation coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Balabas, Mikhail; Peng, Xiang; Pustelny, Szymon; Wickenbrock, Arne; Guo, Hong; Budker, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    Vapor cells with antirelaxation coating are widely used in modern atomic physics experiments due to the coating's ability to maintain the atoms' spin polarization during wall collisions. We characterize the performance of vapor cells with different coating materials by measuring longitudinal spin relaxation and vapor density at temperatures up to 95 °C. We infer that the spin-projection-noise-limited sensitivity for atomic magnetometers with such cells improves with temperature, which demonstrates the potential of antirelaxation coated cells in applications of future high-sensitivity magnetometers.

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of neurochemicals in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study of metabolites, relaxation time, and behavioral analysis in TASTPM and wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Duncan; Davies, Karen; Williams, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Due to ongoing advances in our understanding of the underlying pathology of AD, many potential new targets for therapeutics are becoming available. Transgenic mouse models of AD have helped in furthering our understanding of AD and also provide a vehicle for preclinical testing of new, putative disease-modifying therapeutics, which may have potential for translation to use in clinical trials. To identify possible translational biomarkers, we have studied the longitudinal cerebral metabolic pattern of the TASTPM transgenic AD mouse, a double transgenic mouse overexpressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (hAPP695swe) and presenilin-1 (M146V) by (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, along with concurrent brain T1 /T2 mapping and behavioral testing. We found significant differences in creatine, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, and myo-inositol between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In the case of N-acetylaspartate and myo-inositol, there were similarities to differences detected in human AD. T1 /T2 values were shorter overall in TASTPM mice, indicating possible differences in water content between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In older TASTPM mice, exploratory behavior became more random, indicating a possible memory deficiency. The decrease in behavioral performance correlated in the transgenic group with higher expression of myo-inositol. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Resolution of Longitudinal Profile Measures using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation with the Number of Gratings and the Number of Pulses Used

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, Mélissa Vieille; Delerue, Nicolas; Taheri, Faissal Bakkali; Doucas, George; Konoplev, Ivan Vasilyevich; Reichold, Armin; Clarke, Christine Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The E-203 collaboration is testing a device on FACET at SLAC to measure the longitudinal profile of electron bunches using Smith-Purcell radiation. At FACET the electron bunches have an energy of 20~GeV and a duration of a few hundred femtoseconds. Smith-Purcell radiation is emitted when a charged particle passes close to the surface of a metallic grating. We have studied the stability of the measurement from pulse to pulse and the resolution of the measure depending on the number of gratings used.

  8. 实时脉冲光声法用于分子弛豫时间的测定%Real-time pulsed photoacoustics-molecular relaxation time measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Markushev Dragan; Rabasovic Mihailo; Lukic Mladena; Cojbasic Zarko; Todorovic Dragan

    2013-01-01

    脉冲光声光谱法一个重要的应用是确定气体分子的振动—平动弛豫时间τV-T.因激光光束的空间分布R(r)对光声测量有显著影响,我们发展了同时测定R(r)和τV-T的方法.本方法基于光声脉冲的实时信号和一种用于光声成像的数学运算法则.本文讨论了智能计算用于多原子气体分子的R(r)和τV-T同时和实时测定的可能性.进一步利用前馈多层神经网络的离线批训练法,结合一个理论光声信号对R(r)和τV-T进行了同时和实时分析.本方法可明显缩短确定上述参数所需时间.%Determination of the vibrational-to-translational relaxation time rv-T in gases is one of the applications of pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy.Because the spatial profile of the laser beam R (r)can significantly influence the accuracy of the photoacoustic measurements,we developed the method for simultaneous determination of the R(r)and τv T.It is based on the temporal shape of the photoacoustic pulse and utilizes a mathematical algorithm developed for photoacoustic tomography.The possibilities of computational intelligence application for simultaneous and real-time determination of R(r)and rv-T values of polyatomic molecules in gases by pulsed photoacoustic are also discussed.Feed forward multilayer perception networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to estimate simultaneously,and in real-time,R(r) (profile shape class) and τv T from a given (theoretical) photoacoustic signals.Proposed method significantly shortens the time required for the simultaneous determination of the afore mentioned quantities.

  9. Contribution of genes and unique environment to cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of subcortical volumes in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsman, Florian; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Kemner, Sanne M.; Schnack, Hugo G.; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Vonk, Ronald; Hillegers, Manon H. J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Nolen, Willem A.; Kahn, Rene S.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of genes and environment on the association between bipolar disorder (BD) and volumes of subcortical brain regions involved in emotion processing has rarely been studied. Furthermore, as far as we know, longitudinal twin studies of subcortical brain volume change in BD have not been ca

  10. Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) for quantitative analysis of conformational dynamics in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Chao, Fa-An; Masterson, Larry R; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Seelig, Burckhard; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    NMR relaxation methods probe biomolecular motions over a wide range of timescales. In particular, the rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) R(2) experiments are commonly used to characterize μs to ms dynamics, which play a critical role in enzyme folding and catalysis. In an effort to complement these approaches, we introduced the Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) method, where dispersion in rotating frame relaxation rate constants (longitudinal R(1ρ) and transverse R(2ρ)) is created by modulating the shape and duration of adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulses. Previously, we showed the ability of the HARD method to detect chemical exchange dynamics in the fast exchange regime (k(ex)∼10(4)-10(5) s(-1)). In this article, we show the sensitivity of the HARD method to slower exchange processes by measuring R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) relaxation rates for two soluble proteins (ubiquitin and 10C RNA ligase). One advantage of the HARD method is its nominal dependence on the applied radio frequency field, which can be leveraged to modulate the dispersion in the relaxation rate constants. In addition, we also include product operator simulations to define the dynamic range of adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) that is valid under all exchange regimes. We conclude from both experimental observations and simulations that this method is complementary to CPMG-based and rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) experiments to probe conformational exchange dynamics for biomolecules. Finally, this approach is germane to several NMR-active nuclei, where relaxation rates are frequency-offset independent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Indentation load relaxation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.P.; Stone, D.; Li, C.Y. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    Most of the models that are used to describe the nonelastic behavior of materials utilize stress-strain rate relations which can be obtained by a load relaxation test. The conventional load relaxation test, however, cannot be performed if the volume of the material to be tested is very small. For such applications the indentation type of test offers an attractive means of obtaining data necessary for materials characterization. In this work the feasibility of the indentation load relaxation test is studied. Experimental techniques are described together with results on Al, Cu and 316 SS. These results are compared to those of conventional uniaxial load relaxation tests, and the conversion of the load-indentation rate data into the stress-strain rate data is discussed.

  12. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease the effects of stress on your body.

  13. Suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in tilted magnetic fields within the geophysical range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Theo; Pustelny, Szymon; Fritzsche, Stephan; Schultze, Volkmar; Stolz, Ronny; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on the relaxation of spin coherence due to the spin-exchange mechanism arising in the electronic ground states of alkali-metal vapor atoms. As opposed to the well-explored formation of a stretched state in a longitudinal geometry (magnetic field parallel to the laser propagation direction) we employ adapted hyperfine-selective optical pumping in order to suppress spin-exchange relaxation. By comparing measurements of the intrinsic relaxation rate of the spin coherence in the ground state of cesium atoms with detailed density-matrix simulations we show that the relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions can be reduced substantially even in a tilted magnetic field of geomagnetic strength, the major application case of scalar magnetic surveying. This explains the observed striking improvement in sensitivity and further deepens the understanding of the light-narrowed Mx magnetometer, which was presented recently. Additionally, new avenues for investigating the dynamics in alkali-metal atoms governed by the spin-exchange interaction and interacting with arbitrary external fields open up.

  14. Characteristics of the secondary relaxation process in soft colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-11-01

    A universal secondary relaxation process, known as the Johari-Goldstein (J-G) β-relaxation process, appears in glass formers. It involves all parts of the molecule and is particularly important in glassy systems because of its very close relationship with the α-relaxation process. However, the absence of a J-G β-relaxation mode in colloidal glasses raises questions regarding its universality. In the present work, we study the microscopic relaxation processes in Laponite suspensions, a model soft glassy material, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments. α- and β-relaxation timescales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by DLS measurements for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. Our experimental results suggest that the β-relaxation process in Laponite suspensions involves all parts of the constituent Laponite particle. The ergodicity breaking time is also seen to be correlated with the characteristic time of the β-relaxation process for all Laponite concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. The width of the primary relaxation process is observed to be correlated with the secondary relaxation time. The secondary relaxation time is also very sensitive to the concentration of Laponite. We measure primitive relaxation timescales from the α-relaxation time and the stretching exponent (β) by applying the coupling model for highly correlated systems. The order of magnitude of the primitive relaxation time is very close to the secondary relaxation time. These observations indicate the presence of a J-G β-relaxation mode for soft colloidal suspensions of Laponite.

  15. Perturbations and quantum relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Kandhadai, Adithya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether small perturbations can cause relaxation to quantum equilibrium over very long timescales. We consider in particular a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, which can serve as a model of a field mode on expanding space. We assume an initial wave function with small perturbations to the ground state. We present evidence that the trajectories are highly confined so as to preclude relaxation to equilibrium even over very long timescales. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  16. Longitudinal development of muons in large air showers studies from the arrival time distributions measured at 900m above sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, F.; Tsuchimoto, I.; Enoki, T.; Suga, K.; Nishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival time distributions of muons with energies above 1.0GeV and 0.5GeV have been measured in the Akeno air-shower array to study the longitudinal development of muons in air showers with primary energies in the range 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power ev. The average rise times of muons with energies above 1.0GeV at large core distances are consistent with those expected from very high multiplicity models and, on the contrary, with those expected from the low multiplicity models at small core distances. This implies that the longitudinal development at atmospheric depth smaller than 500 cm square is very fast and that at larger atmospheric depths is rather slow.

  17. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary r...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses.......The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...

  18. Measuring Executive Dysfunction Longitudinally and in Relation to Genetic Burden, Brain Volumetrics, and Depression in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Kathryn V.; Snyder, Peter J.; Mills, James A.; Duff, Kevin; Westervelt, Holly J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Lourens, Spencer; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Executive dysfunction (ED) is a characteristic of Huntington disease (HD), but its severity and progression is less understood in the prodromal phase, e.g., before gross motor abnormalities. We examined planning and problem-solving abilities using the Towers Task in HD mutation-positive individuals without motor symptoms (n = 781) and controls (n = 212). Participants with greater disease progression (determined using mutation size and current age) performed more slowly and with less accuracy on the Towers Task. Performance accuracy was negatively related to striatal volume while both accuracy and working memory were negatively related to frontal white matter volume. Disease progression at baseline was not associated with longitudinal performance over 4 years. Whereas the baseline findings indicate that ED becomes more prevalent with greater disease progression in prodromal HD and can be quantified using the Towers task, the absence of notable longitudinal findings indicates that the Towers Task exhibits limited sensitivity to cognitive decline in this population. PMID:23246934

  19. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cudd, A B; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-08-28

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_{LL}, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy sqrt[s]=200  GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x>0.05.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bultmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sanchez, M Calderon de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cudd, A B; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L -X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We report a new high-precision measurement of the mid-rapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, $A_{LL}$, in polarized $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC $pp$ data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-$x$ region $x>0.05$.

  1. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations.

  2. Ultra-wide range field-dependent measurements of the relaxivity of Gd1−xEuxVO4 nanoparticle contrast agents using a mechanical sample-shuttling relaxometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ching-Yu; Abdesselem, Mouna; Bouzigues, Cedric; Chu, Minglee; Guiga, Angelo; Huang, Tai-Huang; Ferrage, Fabien; Gacoin, Thierry; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    The current trend for Magnetic Resonance Imaging points towards higher magnetic fields. Even though sensitivity and resolution are increased in stronger fields, T1 contrast is often reduced, and this represents a challenge for contrast agent design. Field-dependent measurements of relaxivity are thus important to characterize contrast agents. At present, the field-dependent curves of relaxivity are usually carried out in the field range of 0 T to 2 T, using fast field cycling relaxometers. Here, we employ a high-speed sample shuttling device to switch the magnetic fields experienced by the nuclei between virtually zero field, and the center of any commercial spectrometer. We apply this approach on rare-earth (mixed Gadolinium-Europium) vanadate nanoparticles, and obtain the dispersion curves from very low magnetic field up to 11.7 T. In contrast to the relaxivity profiles of Gd chelates, commonly used for clinical applications, which display a plateau and then a decrease for increasing magnetic fields, these nanoparticles provide maximum contrast enhancement for magnetic fields around 1–1.5 T. These field-dependent curves are fitted using the so-called Magnetic Particle (MP) model and the extracted parameters discussed as a function of particle size and composition. We finally comment on the new possibilities offered by this approach. PMID:28317892

  3. Measurement of Pion and Proton Response and Longitudinal Shower Profiles up to 20 Nuclear Interaction Lengths with the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adragna, P; Anderson, K; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, A; Batkova, L; Batusov, V; Beck, H P; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Biscarat, C; Blanchot, G; Bogush, A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, J; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Caprini, M; Caloba, L; Calvet, D; Carli, T; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castelo, J; Castillo, M V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cerqueira, A S; Clement, C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Corso-Radu, A; Cuenca, C; Damazio, D O; Davidek, T; De, K; Del Prete, T; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Djobava, T; Dobson, M; Dotti, A; Downing, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Eriksson, D; Errede, D; Errede, S; Farbin, A; Fassouliotis, D; Febbraro, R; Fenyuk, A; Ferdi, C; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Francis, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Garde, V; Gellerstedt, K; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gildemeister, O; Gilewsky, V; Giokaris, N; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gonzalez, V; Gorini, B; Grenier, P; Gris, P; Gruwe, M; Guarino, V; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Hakobyan, H; Haney, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Higon, E; Holmgren, S; Hurwitz, M; Huston, J; Iglesias, C; Isaev, A; Jen-La Plante, I; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Junk, T; Karyukhin, A; Kazarov, A; Khandanyan, H; Khramov, J; Khubua, J; Kolos, S; Korolkov, I; Krivkova, P; Kulchitsky, Y; Kurochkin, Yu; Kuzhir, P; LeCompte, T; Lefevre, R; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lembesi, M; Lesser, J; Li, J; Liablin, M; Lokajicek, M; Lomakin, Y; Lupi, A; Maidanchik, C; Maio, A; Makouski, M; Maliukov, S; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marroquim, F; Martin, F; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F; Miagkov, A; Miller, R; Minashvili, I; Miralles, L; Montarou, G; Mosidze, M; Myagkov, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nodulman, L; Nordkvist, B; Norniella, O; Novakova, J; Onofre, A; Oreglia, M; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Petersen, J; Pilcher, J; Pina, J; Pinhao, J; Podlyski, F; Portell Bueso, X; Poveda, J; Pribyl, L; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Ramstedt, M; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romanov, V; Rosnet, P; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Rumiantsev, V; Russakovich, N; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Satsunkevitch, I; Says, L P; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Seixas, J M; Sellden, B; Shalanda, N; Shevtsov, P; Shochet, M; Silva, J; Da Silva, P; Simaitis, V; Simonyan, M; Sissakian, A; Sjolin, J; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Soloviev, I; Solovyanov, O; Sosebee, M; Spano, F; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Starovoitov, P; Stavina, P; Suk, M; Sykora, I; Tang, F; Tas, P; Teuscher, R; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Torres, J; Tremblet, L; Tsiareshka, P; Tylmad, M; Underwood, D; Unel, G; Usai, G; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vartapetian, A; Vazeille, F; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Vivarelli, I; Volpi, M; White, A; Zaitsev, A; Zenine, A; Zenis, T

    2010-01-01

    The response of pions and protons in the energy range of 20 to 180 GeV produced at CERN's SPS H8 test beam line in the ATLAS iron-scintillator Tile hadron calorimeter has been measured. The test-beam configuration allowed to measure the longitudinal shower development for pions and protons up to 20 nuclear interaction lengths. It is found that pions penetrate deeper in the calorimeter than protons. However, protons induce showers that are wider laterally to the direction of the impinging particle. Including the measured total energy response, the pion to proton energy ratio and the resolution, all observations are consistent with a higher electromagnetic energy fraction in pion induced showers. The data are compared with GEANT4 simulations using several hadronic physics lists. The measured longitudinal shower profiles are described by an analytical shower parameterization within an accuracy of 5-10%. The amount of energy leaking out behind the calorimeter is determined and parameterised as a function of the b...

  4. Measurement of pion and proton response and longitudinal shower profiles up to 20 nuclear interaction lengths with the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adragna, P.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, A.; Batkova, L.; Batusov, V.; Beck, H. P.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Biscarat, C.; Blanchot, G.; Bogush, A.; Bohm, C.; Boldea, V.; Bosman, M.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Caprini, M.; Caloba, L.; Calvet, D.; Carli, T.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castelo, J.; Castillo, M. V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Clement, C.; Cobal, M.; Cogswell, F.; Constantinescu, S.; Costanzo, D.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cuenca, C.; Damazio, D. O.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Del Prete, T.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Djobava, T.; Dobson, M.; Dotti, A.; Downing, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Eriksson, D.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Farbin, A.; Fassouliotis, D.; Febbraro, R.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferdi, C.; Ferrer, A.; Flaminio, V.; Francis, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gameiro, S.; Garde, V.; Gellerstedt, K.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gildemeister, O.; Gilewsky, V.; Giokaris, N.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gorini, B.; Grenier, P.; Gris, P.; Gruwe, M.; Guarino, V.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Hakobyan, H.; Haney, M.; Hellman, S.; Henriques, A.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.; Hurwitz, M.; Huston, J.; Iglesias, C.; Isaev, A.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Junk, T.; Karyukhin, A.; Kazarov, A.; Khandanyan, H.; Khramov, J.; Khubua, J.; Kolos, S.; Korolkov, I.; Krivkova, P.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kurochkin, Yu.; Kuzhir, P.; Le Compte, T.; Lefevre, R.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lembesi, M.; Lesser, J.; Li, J.; Liablin, M.; Lokajicek, M.; Lomakin, Y.; Lupi, A.; Maidanchik, C.; Maio, A.; Makouski, M.; Maliukov, S.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Marroquim, F.; Martin, F.; Mazzoni, E.; Merritt, F.; Miagkov, A.; Miller, R.; Minashvili, I.; Miralles, L.; Montarou, G.; Mosidze, M.; Myagkov, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nodulman, L.; Nordkvist, B.; Norniella, O.; Novakova, J.; Onofre, A.; Oreglia, M.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Petersen, J.; Pilcher, J.; Pina, J.; Pinhão, J.; Podlyski, F.; Portell, X.; Poveda, J.; Pribyl, L.; Price, L. E.; Proudfoot, J.; Ramstedt, M.; Richards, R.; Roda, C.; Romanov, V.; Rosnet, P.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Rumiantsev, V.; Russakovich, N.; Saltó, O.; Salvachua, B.; Sanchis, E.; Sanders, H.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Satsunkevitch, I.; Says, L.-P.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Selldèn, B.; Shalanda, N.; Shevtsov, P.; Shochet, M.; Silva, J.; Da Silva, P.; Simaitis, V.; Simonyan, M.; Sissakian, A.; Sjölin, J.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Soloviev, I.; Solovyanov, O.; Sosebee, M.; Spanò, F.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Starovoitov, P.; Stavina, P.; Suk, M.; Sykora, I.; Tang, F.; Tas, P.; Teuscher, R.; Tokar, S.; Topilin, N.; Torres, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tylmad, M.; Underwood, D.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazeille, F.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Vivarelli, I.; Volpi, M.; White, A.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenine, A.; Zenis, T.

    2010-04-01

    The response of pions and protons in the energy range of 20-180 GeV, produced at CERN's SPS H8 test-beam line in the ATLAS iron-scintillator Tile hadron calorimeter, has been measured. The test-beam configuration allowed the measurement of the longitudinal shower development for pions and protons up to 20 nuclear interaction lengths. It was found that pions penetrate deeper in the calorimeter than protons. However, protons induce showers that are wider laterally to the direction of the impinging particle. Including the measured total energy response, the pion-to-proton energy ratio and the resolution, all observations are consistent with a higher electromagnetic energy fraction in pion-induced showers. The data are compared with GEANT4 simulations using several hadronic physics lists. The measured longitudinal shower profiles are described by an analytical shower parametrization within an accuracy of 5-10%. The amount of energy leaking out behind the calorimeter is determined and parametrized as a function of the beam energy and the calorimeter depth. This allows for a leakage correction of test-beam results in the standard projective geometry.

  5. High K+-Induced Relaxation by Nitric Oxide in Human Gastric Fundus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Choi, Woong; Sung, Rohyun; Kim, Hun Sik; Kim, Heon; Yoo, Ra Young; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Lee, Sang Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate high K+-induced relaxation in the human gastric fundus. Circular smooth muscle from the human gastric fundus greater curvature showed stretch-dependent high K+ (50 mM)-induced contractions. However, longitudinal smooth muscle produced stretch-dependent high K+-induced relaxation. We investigated several relaxation mechanisms to understand the reason for the discrepancy. Protein kinase inhibitors such as KT 5823 (1 µM) and KT 5720 (1 µM) which block protein kinases (PKG and PKA) had no effect on high K+-induced relaxation. K+ channel blockers except 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a voltage-dependent K+ channel (KV) blocker, did not affect high K+-induced relaxation. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine and 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo (4,3-A)quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and 4-AP inhibited relaxation and reversed relaxation to contraction. High K+-induced relaxation of the human gastric fundus was observed only in the longitudinal muscles from the greater curvature. These data suggest that the longitudinal muscle of the human gastric fundus greater curvature produced high K+-induced relaxation that was activated by the nitric oxide/sGC pathway through a KV channel-dependent mechanism. PMID:23118553

  6. Oral Health Longitudinal Evaluation of students from a public school after guidance and implementaion of preventitive measures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess longitudinally the DMFT, plaque and gingival rates of children and teenagers from a public school in São José dos Campos, Brazil, after performing a preventive and motivational program through the University Extension program of School of Dentistry of Institute of Science and Technology of São José dos Campos – UNESP. Materials and Methods: 300 students were randomly selected and divided into three groups, Group 1: 100 children from 2nd to 5th grade of elementary school, ...

  7. Multiscale dipole relaxation in dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    the cross coupling between the electric field fluctuations and dipole moment fluctuations can be ignored. The peak frequencies in the spectra of the autocorrelation functions are also derived. They depend on the wave vector squared which is a fingerprint of the underlying dipole diffusion mechanism....... For the longitudinal direction the simulation results show that the cross coupling between the electric field and the dipole moment is non-negligible compromising the theoretical predictions. The underlying mechanism for this coupling is not clear.......Dipole relaxation from thermally induced perturbations is investigated on different length scales for dielectric materials. From the continuum dynamical equations for the polarisation, expressions for the transverse and longitudinal dipole autocorrelation functions are derived in the limit where...

  8. Measurement of the cross section and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for di-jet production in polarized $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Anderson, D M; Aoyama, R; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Ashraf, M U; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Brown, D; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, X; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elsey, N; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Esumi, S; Evdokimov, O; Ewigleben, J; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Federicova, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, T; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Jowzaee, S; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulathunga, N; Kumar, L; Lacey, R; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, W; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, X; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, Y; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Luo, S; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, R; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Miller, Z W; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Nonaka, T; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Ray, R L; Reed, R; Rehbein, M J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roth, J D; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, A; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sugiura, T; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Taranenko, A; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y F; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J B; Zhang, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_{LL}$ for mid-rapidity di-jet production in polarized $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 200$ GeV. The di-jet cross section was measured and is shown to be consistent with next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD predictions. $A_{LL}$ results are presented for two distinct topologies, defined by the jet pseudorapidities, and are compared to predictions from several recent NLO global analyses. The measured asymmetries, the first such correlation measurements, support those analyses that find positive gluon polarization at the level of roughly 0.2 over the region of Bjorken-$x > 0.05$.

  9. Descriptive modeling of longitudinal outcome measures in traumatic brain injury: a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kozlowski, Allan J; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Kreider, Scott; Cuthbert, Jeffery P; Corrigan, John D; Heinemann, Allen W; Whiteneck, Gale

    2013-03-01

    Establishing accurate mathematical models of outcome measures is essential in understanding change throughout the rehabilitation process. The goal of this study is to identify the best-fitting descriptive models for a set of commonly adopted outcome measures found within the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database where the modeling is based on data submission through 2011 and the complete range of recorded time points since injury for each individual, where time points range from admission to rehabilitation to 20 years postinjury. The statistical methodology and the application of the methodology contained herein may be used to assist researchers and clinicians in (1) modeling the outcome measures considered, (2) modeling various portions of these outcomes by stratification and/or truncating time periods, (3) modeling longitudinal outcome measures not considered, and (4) establishing models as a necessary precursor in conducting individual growth curve analysis.

  10. Relaxation along a fictitious field (RAFF and Z-spectroscopy using alternating-phase irradiation (ZAPI in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo T Jokivarsi

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia alters the molecular dynamics and content of water in brain tissue, which is reflected in NMR relaxation, diffusion and magnetization transfer (MT parameters. In this study, the behavior of two new MRI contrasts, Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF and Z-spectroscopy using Alternating-Phase Irradiation (ZAPI, were quantified together with conventional relaxation parameters (T1, T2 and T1ρ and MT ratios in acute cerebral ischemia in rat. The right middle cerebral artery was permanently occluded and quantitative MRI data was acquired sequentially for the above parameters for up to 6 hours. The following conclusions were drawn: 1 Time-dependent changes in RAFF and T1ρ relaxation are not coupled to those in MT. 2 RAFF relaxation evolves more like transverse, rather than longitudinal relaxation. 3 MT measured with ZAPI is less sensitive to ischemia than conventional MT. 4 ZAPI data suggest alterations in the T2 distribution of macromolecules in acute cerebral ischemia. It was shown that both RAFF and ZAPI provide complementary MRI information from acute ischemic brain tissue. The presented multiparametric MRI data may aid in the assessment of brain tissue status early in ischemic stroke.

  11. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  12. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  13. Probing microsecond time scale dynamics in proteins by methyl (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion NMR measurements. Application to activation of the signaling protein NtrC(r).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A A

    2010-12-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microsecond to millisecond time scale dynamics of methyl groups in proteins, exploiting their high abundance and favorable relaxation properties. In our approach, protein samples are produced using [(1)H, (13)C]-d-glucose in ∼100% D(2)O, which yields CHD(2) methyl groups for alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, and methionine residues with high abundance, in an otherwise largely deuterated background. Methyl groups in such samples can be sequence-specifically assigned to near completion, using (13)C TOCSY NMR spectroscopy, as was recently demonstrated (Otten, R.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 2952-2960). In this Article, NMR pulse schemes are presented to measure (1)H CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles for CHD(2) methyl groups, in a vein similar to that of backbone relaxation experiments. Because of the high deuteration level of methyl-bearing side chains, artifacts arising from proton scalar coupling during the CPMG pulse train are negligible, with the exception of Ile-δ1 and Thr-γ2 methyl groups, and a pulse scheme is described to remove the artifacts for those residues. Strong (13)C scalar coupling effects, observed for several leucine residues, are removed by alternative biochemical and NMR approaches. The methodology is applied to the transcriptional activator NtrC(r), for which an inactive/active state transition was previously measured and the motions in the microsecond time range were estimated through a combination of backbone (15)N CPMG dispersion NMR spectroscopy and a collection of experiments to determine the exchange-free component to the transverse relaxation rate. Exchange contributions to the (1)H line width were detected for 21 methyl

  14. Changes in spectral measures and voice-onset time with age: a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, W; Debruyne, F

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we searched for changes in spectral features (during the sustained vowels [a] and [i]) and the voice onset time (VOT, of [pa] and [ka]) of the ageing voice. A longitudinal study (on 20 participants) and a cross-sectional study (on 265 participants) were conducted. The spectral parameters under consideration were: the difference in amplitude between the first and the second harmonic, the energy difference between the frequency band below 1 kHz and 2-4 kHz, and the energy difference between vowels [a] and [i]. A relatively stronger spectral level was found between 4 and 5 kHz in elderly men and women (60+) for [i] compared to young men and women (20-29 years). Significant differences in the longitudinal study were not identical to those of the cross-sectional study. After a time interval of 30 years, 20 men produced a relatively weaker 2- to 4-kHz part of the spectrum and the VOT became much longer. It was impossible to attribute the changes purely to the process of ageing. Situations and emotions also play an important role and contribute to the different findings of the two groups of participants under consideration.

  15. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics; Max-Planck-Inst., Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The reduced cross-section {sigma} is presented in the kinematic range 200measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. The results are used to determine a lower limit on the mass of a hypothetical right-handed W boson. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W.B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Gach, G.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Cracow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Tymieniecka, T. [Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Aggarwal, R.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India); Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A. [University Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bokhonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Gogota, O.; Kadenko, I.; Korol, I.; Kuprash, O.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Salii, A.; Tomalak, O.; Viazlo, O.; Volynets, O.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhmak, N.; Zolko, M. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); Kiev National University, Kiev (Ukraine); Bachynska, O.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Borras, K.; Bot, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fang, S.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I.I.; Klein, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e {sup +} p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ {sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The reduced cross-section {sigma} is presented in the kinematic range 200measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. The results are used to determine a lower limit on the mass of a hypothetical right-handed W boson. (orig.)

  17. Solvent dynamical behavior in an organogel phase as studied by NMR relaxation and diffusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemloul, Mehdi; Steiner, Emilie; Robert, Anthony; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Allix, Florent; Jamart-Grégoire, Brigitte; Canet, Daniel

    2011-03-24

    An organogelation process depends on the gelator-solvent pair. This study deals with the solvent dynamics once the gelation process is completed. The first approach used is relaxometry, i.e., the measurement of toluene proton longitudinal relaxation time T(1) as a function of the proton NMR resonance frequency (here in the 5 kHz to 400 MHz range). Pure toluene exhibits an unexpected T(1) variation, which has been identified as paramagnetic relaxation resulting from an interaction of toluene with dissolved oxygen. In the gel phase, this contribution is retrieved with, in addition, a strong decay at low frequencies assigned to toluene molecules within the gel fibers. Comparison of dispersion curves of pure toluene and toluene in the gel phase leads to an estimate of the proportion of toluene embedded within the organogel (found around 40%). The second approach is based on carbon-13 T(1) and nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, the combination of these two parameters providing direct information about the reorientation of C-H bonds. It appears clearly that reorientation of toluene is the same in pure liquid and in the gel phase. The only noticeable changes in carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation times are due to the so-called chemical shift anisotropy (csa) mechanism and reflect slight modifications of the toluene electronic distribution in the gel phase. NMR diffusion measurements by the pulse gradient spin-echo (PGSE) method allow us to determine the diffusion coefficient of toluene inside the organogel. It is roughly two-thirds of the one in pure toluene, thus indicating that self-diffusion is the only dynamical parameter to be slightly affected when the solvent is inside the gel structure. The whole set of experimental observations leads to the conclusion that, once the gel is formed, the solvent becomes essentially passive, although an important fraction is located within the gel structure.

  18. Idiosyncratic reality claims, relaxation dispositions, and ABC relaxation theory: happiness, literal christianity, miraculous powers, metaphysics, and the paranormal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Karmin, Aaron D

    2002-12-01

    This study examined idiosyncratic reality claims, that is, irrational or paranormal beliefs often claimed to enhance relaxation and happiness and reduce stress. The Smith Idiosyncratic Reality Claims Inventory and the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory (which measures relaxation and stress dispositions, or enduring states of mind frequently associated with relaxation or stress) were given to 310 junior college student volunteers. Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation identified five idiosyncratic reality claim factors: belief in Literal Christianity; Magic; Space Aliens: After Death experiences; and Miraculous Powers of Meditation, Prayer, and Belief. No factor correlated with increased relaxation dispositions Peace, Energy, or Joy, or reduced dispositional somatic stress, worry, or negative emotion on the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory. It was concluded that idiosyncratic reality claims may not be associated with reported relaxation, happiness, or stress. In contrast, previous research strongly supported self-affirming beliefs with few paranormal assumptions display such an association.

  19. Longitudinal Phase Space Tomography with Space Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, S; Lindroos, M

    2000-01-01

    Tomography is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. In an extension in the domain of particle accelerators, one of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the non-linearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The method is a hybrid one which incorporates particle tracking. Hitherto, a very simple tracking algorithm has been employed because only a brief span of measured profile data is required to build a snapshot of phase space. This is one of the strengths of the method, as tracking for relatively few turns relaxes the precision to which input machine parameters need to be known. The recent addition of longitudinal space charge considerations as an optional refinement of the code is described. Simplicity suggested an approach based on the derivative of bunch shape with the properties of...

  20. Effects of in-pulse transverse relaxation in 3D ultrashort echo time sequences: analytical derivation, comparison to numerical simulation and experimental application at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Fabian; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2010-09-01

    The introduction of ultrashort-echo-time-(UTE)-sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners has opened up the field of MR characterization of materials or tissues with extremely fast signal decay. If the transverse relaxation time is in the range of the RF-pulse duration, approximation of the RF-pulse by an instantaneous rotation applied at the middle of the RF-pulse and immediately followed by free relaxation will lead to a distinctly underestimated echo signal. Thus, the regular Ernst equation is not adequate to correctly describe steady state signal under those conditions. The paper presents an analytically derived modified Ernst equation, which correctly describes in-pulse relaxation of transverse magnetization under typical conditions: The equation is valid for rectangular excitation pulses, usually applied in 3D UTE sequences. Longitudinal relaxation time of the specimen must be clearly longer than RF-pulse duration, which is fulfilled for tendons and bony structures as well as many solid materials. Under these conditions, the proposed modified Ernst equation enables adequate and relatively simple calculation of the magnetization of materials or tissues. Analytically derived data are compared to numerical results obtained by using an established Runge-Kutta-algorithm based on the Bloch equations. Validity of the new approach was also tested by systematical measurements of a solid polymeric material on a 3T whole-body MR scanner. Thus, the presented modified Ernst equation provides a suitable basis for T1 measurements, even in tissues with T2 values as short as the RF-pulse duration: independent of RF-pulse duration, the 'variable flip angle method' led to consistent results of longitudinal relaxation time T1, if the T2 relaxation time of the material of interest is known as well.

  1. Measurement of neutral current deep inelastic e{sup +}p scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarized positrons with ZEUS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wlasenko, Michal

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of neutral current deep inelastic scattering of protons colliding with longitudinally polarized positrons, performed with data recorded in years 2006 and 2007 with the ZEUS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L=113.3 pb{sup -1}, are presented. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx, d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential reduced cross section {sigma} were measured in the kinematic region of 185measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  2. Understanding and measuring parent use of food to soothe infant and toddler distress: A longitudinal study from 6 to 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Cynthia A; Moding, Kameron J

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined the development of parent use of food to soothe infant distress by examining this feeding practice longitudinally when infants were 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Two measures of feeding to soothe were obtained: parent self-report and observations of food to soothe during each laboratory visit. Demographic and maternal predictors of food to soothe were examined as well as the outcome, infant weight gain. The findings showed that the two measures of food to soothe were unrelated but did reveal similar and unique relations with predictor variables such as parent feeding style and maternal self-efficacy. Only observations of the use of food to soothe were related to infant weight gain. The findings indicate that the two measures of food to soothe may be complementary and that observations of this feeding practice may capture certain relations that are not obtained through the use of self-report.

  3. Dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Navjeet [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005 (India); Singh, Mohan, E-mail: mohansinghphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005 (India); Singh, Lakhwant [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005 (India); Awasthi, A.M. [Thermodynamics Laboratory, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore 452001 (India); Lochab, S.P. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The present article reports the effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica. • Dielectric and electrical relaxations have been analyzed in the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and Cole–Cole formalisms. • The frequency dependent electrical conductivity has been rationalized using Johnsher’s universal power law. • The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted using Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation function. - Abstract: In the present research, the dielectric relaxation of gamma irradiated muscovite mica was studied in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz–10 MHz and temperature range of 653–853 K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The dielectric constants (ϵ′ and ϵ′′) are found to be high for gamma irradiated muscovite mica as compared to the pristine sample. The frequency dependence of the imaginary part of complex electric modulus (M′′) and dc conductivity data conforms Arrhenius law with single value of activation energy for pristine sample and two values of activation energy for gamma irradiated mica sample. The experimentally assessed electric modulus and conductivity information have been interpreted by the Havriliak–Negami dielectric relaxation explanation. Using the Cole–Cole framework, an analysis of real and imaginary characters of the electric modulus for pristine and gamma irradiated sample was executed which reflects the non-Debye relaxation mechanism.

  4. Reconstruction of Longitudinal Profiles of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers from Fluorescence and Cherenkov Light Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, M; Engel, R; Schüssler, F; Ulrich, R

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method for the reconstruction of the longitudinal profile of extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In contrast to the typically considered shower size profile, this method employs directly the ionization energy deposit of the shower particles in the atmosphere. Due to universality of the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, both fluorescence and Cherenkov light can be used simultaneously as signal to infer the shower profile from the detected light. The method is based on an analytic least-square solution for the estimation of the shower profile from the observed light signal. Furthermore, the extrapolation of the observed part of the profile with a Gaisser-Hillas function is discussed and the total statistical uncertainty of shower parameters like total energy and shower maximum is calculated.

  5. A novel approach to probing in vivo metabolite relaxation: Linear quantification of spatially modulated magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Li, Ningzhi; An, Li; Shen, Jun

    2017-09-23

    Conventional sequences for metabolite transverse relaxation quantification all generally measure signal changes at different echo times (TEs). However, quantification results obtained via these conventional methods can be very different and are highly dependent on the type of sequence being applied. TE-dependent effects such as diffusion, macromolecule baseline, and J-coupling modulation contribute significantly to these differences. Here, we propose a novel technique-multiple flip angle pulse-driven ratio of longitudinal<