WorldWideScience

Sample records for longitudinal flows application

  1. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Roy, Victor [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  2. Measurement of flow fluctuations in single longitudinal mode pulsed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... Page 1 ... Keywords. Dye lasers; single longitudinal mode; flow fluctuations. PACS Nos 42.55.Mv; 42.60.Mi; 42.60.By. 1. Introduction. Narrow-band dye lasers offer ... stabilized tunable laser source plays an important role for many applications as mentioned above [1]. For tight wavelength control, the ...

  3. Flowing together : a longitudinal study of collective efficacy and collective flow among workgroups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salanova, Marisa; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Alma M.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Cifre, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the Channel Model of Flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975, 1990) at the collective level (workgroups) by including collective efficacy beliefs as a predictor of collective flow based on the Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997, 2001). A two-wave longitudinal lab study

  4. Longitudinal vortex control - Techniques and applications (The 32nd Lanchester Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of vortex control applications and current techniques for the control of longitudinal vortices produced by bodies, leading edges, tips and intersections. Vortex control has up till now been performed by many approaches in an empirical fashion, assisted by the essentially inviscid nature of much of longitudinal vortex behavior. Attention is given to Reynolds number sensitivities, vortex breakdown and interactions, vortex control on highly swept wings, and vortex control in juncture flows.

  5. The combined effects of wall longitudinal heat conduction and inlet fluid flow maldistribution in crossflow plate-fin heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganayakulu, C. [Aeronautical Development Agency, Bangalore (India); Seetharamu, K.N. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Southern Malaysia (KCP), Tronoh (Malaysia)

    2000-05-01

    An analysis of a crossflow plate-fin compact heat exchanger, accounting for the combined effect of two-dimensional longitudinal heat conduction through the exchanger wall and nonuniform inlet fluid flow distribution on both hot and cold fluid sides is carried out using a finite element method. Using the fluid flow maldistribution models, the exchanger effectiveness and its deterioration due to the combined effects of longitudinal heat conduction and flow nonuniformity are calculated for various design and operating conditions of the exchanger. It was found that the performance deteriorations are quite significant in some typical applications due to the combined effects of wall longitudinal heat conduction and inlet fluid flow nonuniformity on crossflow plate-fin heat exchanger. (orig.)

  6. Application of multidimensional IRT models to longitudinal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Marvelde, J.M.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Van Landeghem, Georges; Van Damme, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The application of multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models to longitudinal educational surveys where students are repeatedly measured is discussed and exemplified. A marginal maximum likelihood (MML) method to estimate the parameters of a multidimensional generalized partial credit model

  7. Statistical methods for longitudinal data with agricultural applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantharama Ankinakatte, Smitha

    The PhD study focuses on modeling two kings of longitudinal data arising in agricultural applications: continuous time series data and discrete longitudinal data. Firstly, two statistical methods, neural networks and generalized additive models, are applied to predict masistis using multivariate...... algorithm. This was found to compare favourably with the algorithm implemented in the well-known Beagle software. Finally, an R package to apply APFA models developed as part of the PhD project is described...

  8. Modelling, simulation and applications of longitudinal train dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Wu, Qing; Sun, Yan Quan

    2017-10-01

    Significant developments in longitudinal train simulation and an overview of the approaches to train models and modelling vehicle force inputs are firstly presented. The most important modelling task, that of the wagon connection, consisting of energy absorption devices such as draft gears and buffers, draw gear stiffness, coupler slack and structural stiffness is then presented. Detailed attention is given to the modelling approaches for friction wedge damped and polymer draft gears. A significant issue in longitudinal train dynamics is the modelling and calculation of the input forces - the co-dimensional problem. The need to push traction performances higher has led to research and improvement in the accuracy of traction modelling which is discussed. A co-simulation method that combines longitudinal train simulation, locomotive traction control and locomotive vehicle dynamics is presented. The modelling of other forces, braking propulsion resistance, curve drag and grade forces are also discussed. As extensions to conventional longitudinal train dynamics, lateral forces and coupler impacts are examined in regards to interaction with wagon lateral and vertical dynamics. Various applications of longitudinal train dynamics are then presented. As an alternative to the tradition single wagon mass approach to longitudinal train dynamics, an example incorporating fully detailed wagon dynamics is presented for a crash analysis problem. Further applications of starting traction, air braking, distributed power, energy analysis and tippler operation are also presented.

  9. Turbulent heat transfer to longitudinal flow through a triangular array of circular rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfann, J.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature distribution and heat transfer to longitudinal turbulent, fully developed flow through triangular arrays of smooth circular rods are analysed for liquids with Prandtl number approximately 1 and << 1. Nusselt number is plotted versus pitch and turbulence for constant heat flow and for constant temperature on the rod surface, and the optimum pitch is determined. The influence of Prandtl number is analysed. (Auth.)

  10. Determination of flow times and longitudinal dispersion coefficients in the Main river using 3HHO as tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.J.; Mundschenk, H.

    1989-01-01

    Single discharges from nuclear power plants as well as discrete labeling with tritiated water are used to determine flow times, flow velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients in German rivers as shown here, for example, for the Main river. (orig.)

  11. Longitudinal optical monitoring of blood flow in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. M.; Chung, S. H.; Leproux, A.; Baker, W. B.; Busch, D. R.; DeMichele, A. M.; Tchou, J.; Tromberg, B. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    We measure tissue blood flow markers in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and investigate their correlation to pathologic complete response in a pilot longitudinal patient study (n  =  4). Tumor blood flow is quantified optically by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and tissue optical properties, blood oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration are derived from concurrent diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). The study represents the first longitudinal DCS measurement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in humans over the entire course of treatment; it therefore offers a first correlation between DCS flow indices and pathologic complete response. The use of absolute optical properties measured by DOSI facilitates significant improvement of DCS blood flow calculation, which typically assumes optical properties based on literature values. Additionally, the combination of the DCS blood flow index and the tissue oxygen saturation from DOSI permits investigation of tissue oxygen metabolism. Pilot results from four patients suggest that lower blood flow in the lesion-bearing breast is correlated with pathologic complete response. Both absolute lesion blood flow and lesion flow relative to the contralateral breast exhibit potential for characterization of pathological response. This initial demonstration of the combined optical approach for chemotherapy monitoring provides incentive for more comprehensive studies in the future and can help power those investigations.

  12. Longitudinal multiplicity fluctuations and flow decorrelations in Pb+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Derendarz, Dominik; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study of decorrelations of flow harmonics vn is done for Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 and 5.02 TeV. The decorrelation of vn between η1 and η2 is found to follow a linear dependence on the pseudorapidity separation |η1−η2| for v2−5, and shows a small but a measurable variation with the collision energy. Furthermore, the higher order moments of flow decorrelations are measured. The first measurement of non-linear mode-mixing effects between lower and higher order flow harmonics as a function of pseudorapidity is also presented. These results will help to constrain initial conditions along longitudinal direction and also help to understand the longitudinal evolution of the fireball.

  13. SELECTIVE MODAL ANALYSIS OF POWER FLOW OSCILLATION IN LARGE SCALE LONGITUDINAL POWER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirindi -

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel selective modal analysis for the determination of low frequency power flow oscillation behaviour based on eigenvalues with corresponding damping ratio, cumulative damping index, and participation factors is proposed. The power system being investigated consists of three large longitudinally interconnected areas with some weak tie lines. Different modes, such as exciter modes, inter area modes, and local modes of the dominant poles are fully studied to find out the significant level of system damping and other factors producing power flow instability. The nature of the energy exchange between area is determined and strategic power flow stability improvement is developed and tested.

  14. Longitudinal Modes along Thin Piezoelectric Waveguides for Liquid Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0 and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4 symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment.

  15. Granular flows: fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Paul W.

    DEM allows the prediction of complex industrial and geophysical particle flows. The importance of particle shape is demonstrated through a series of simple examples. Shape controls resistance to shear, the magnitude of collision stress, dilation and the angle of repose. We use a periodic flow of a bed of particles to demonstrate the different states of granular matter, the generation of dilute granular flow when granular temperature is high and the flow dependent nature of the granular thermodynamic boundary conditions. A series of industrial case studies examines how DEM can be used to understand and improve processes such as separation, mixing, grinding, excavation, hopper discharge, metering and conveyor interchange. Finally, an example of landslide motion over real topography is presented.

  16. Vortical flows in technical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Egon; Krause, Egon

    2006-01-01

    Two examples of flows dominated by vortical structures are discussed: In the first interaction and decay of vortex structures in in-cylinder flows of automotive engines are described. Numerical studies revealed clearly identifiable vortex rings, generated during the intake stroke. The influence of compressibility on the vortex formation was studied by using Mach-Zehnder interferometry in a specially designed test stand of a towed one-cylinder engine, and with numerical solutions of the Navier...

  17. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  18. Flow Sharing Systems for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T. O.; Hansen, M. R.; Conrad, Finn

    2002-01-01

    This contribution reports about some analytical and simulation/experimental studies carried out on different flow control systems for mobile applications with respect to their ability to do flow sharing. All systems have two parallel actuators and are considered regarding functionality...

  19. Longitudinal Plasmoid in High-Speed Vortex Gas Flow Created by Capacity HF Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    interferometer with high space resolution, PIV method, FTIR spectrometer, optical spectrometer, pressure sensors with high time resolution, IR pyrometer and...of strong LP-vortex interaction. Intensive acoustic waves are created by CHFD in swirl flow in this regime. 38. Study of control of a longitudinal...quartz tube, 4- HF ball electrode, 5- Tesla’s transformer, 6- microwave interferometer, 7- video camera, 8-optical pyrometer , 9-pressure sensor, 10

  20. Duality based optical flow algorithms with applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakêt, Lars Lau

    We consider the popular TV-L1 optical flow formulation, and the so-called duality based algorithm for minimizing the TV-L1 energy. The original formulation is extended to allow for vector valued images, and minimization results are given. In addition we consider different definitions of total...... variation regularization, and related formulations of the optical flow problem that may be used with a duality based algorithm. We present a highly optimized algorithmic setup to estimate optical flows, and give five novel applications. The first application is registration of medical images, where X......-ray images of different hands, taken using different imaging devices are registered using a TV-L1 optical flow algorithm. We propose to regularize the input images, using sparsity enhancing regularization of the image gradient to improve registration results. The second application is registration of 2D...

  1. Performance evaluation of cryogenic counter-flow heat exchangers with longitudinal conduction, heat in-leak and property variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Q. F.; Zhuang, M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Y Zhang, Q.; Sheng, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Counter-flow plate-fin heat exchangers are commonly utilized in cryogenic applications due to their high effectiveness and compact size. For cryogenic heat exchangers in helium liquefaction/refrigeration systems, conventional design theory is no longer applicable and they are usually sensitive to longitudinal heat conduction, heat in-leak from surroundings and variable fluid properties. Governing equations based on distributed parameter method are developed to evaluate performance deterioration caused by these effects. The numerical model could also be applied in many other recuperators with different structures and, hence, available experimental data are used to validate it. For a specific case of the multi-stream heat exchanger in the EAST helium refrigerator, quantitative effects of these heat losses are further discussed, in comparison with design results obtained by the common commercial software. The numerical model could be useful to evaluate and rate the heat exchanger performance under the actual cryogenic environment.

  2. Flutter instability of cantilevered carbon nanotubes caused by magnetic fluid flow subjected to a longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Jeon, Soo; Kwon, Hyock-Ju

    2018-04-01

    CNT (Carbon nanotube)-based fluidic systems hold a great potential for emerging medical applications such as drug delivery for cancer therapy. CNTs can be used to deliver anticancer drugs into a target site under a magnetic field guidance. One of the critical issues in designing such systems is how to avoid the vibration induced by the fluid flow, which is undesirable and may even promote the structural instability. The main objective of the present research is to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model to investigate the flutter instability of a cantilevered CNT induced by a magnetic fluid flow under a longitudinal magnetic field. The CNT is assumed to be embedded in a viscoelastic matrix to consider the effect of biological medium around it. To obtain a dynamical model for the system, the Navier-Stokes theory of magnetic-fluid flow is coupled to the Euler-Bernoulli beam model for CNT. The small size effects of the magnetic fluid and CNT are considered through the small scale parameters including Knudsen number (Kn) and the nonlocal parameter. Then, the extended Galerkin's method is applied to solve the FSI governing equations, and to derive the stability diagrams of the system. Results show how the magnetic properties of the fluid flow have an effect on improving the stability of the cantilevered CNT by increasing the flutter velocity.

  3. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A.J.; Robinson, J.D.; Rigsby, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for a bounded plasma flow in a longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burinskaya, T. M.; Shevelev, M. M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz MHD instability in a plane three-layer plasma is investigated. A general dispersion relation for the case of arbitrarily orientated magnetic fields and flow velocities in the layers is derived, and its solutions for a bounded plasma flow in a longitudinal magnetic field are studied numerically. Analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for different ion acoustic velocities shows that perturbations with wavelengths on the order of or longer than the flow thickness can grow in an arbitrary direction even at a zero temperature. Oscillations excited at small angles with respect to the magnetic field exist in a limited range of wavenumbers even without allowance for the finite width of the transition region between the flow and the ambient plasma. It is shown that, in a low-temperature plasma, solutions resulting in kink-like deformations of the plasma flow grow at a higher rate than those resulting in quasi-symmetric (sausage-like) deformations. The transverse structure of oscillatory-damped eigenmodes in a low-temperature plasma is analyzed. The results obtained are used to explain mechanisms for the excitation of ultra-low-frequency long-wavelength oscillations propagating along the magnetic field in the plasma sheet boundary layer of the Earth’s magnetotail penetrated by fast plasma flows.

  5. Joint Models for Longitudinal and Time-to-Event Data With Applications in R

    CERN Document Server

    Rizopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In longitudinal studies it is often of interest to investigate how a marker that is repeatedly measured in time is associated with a time to an event of interest, e.g., prostate cancer studies where longitudinal PSA level measurements are collected in conjunction with the time-to-recurrence. Joint Models for Longitudinal and Time-to-Event Data: With Applications in R provides a full treatment of random effects joint models for longitudinal and time-to-event outcomes that can be utilized to analyze such data. The content is primarily explanatory, focusing on applications of joint modeling, but

  6. Determination of flow times and longitudinal dispersion in the Rhine using 3HHO as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.J.; Mundschenk, H.

    1993-01-01

    Flow times and longitudinal dispersion in the Rhine river under natural conditions are determined by use of single emissions of tritiated waste water from nuclear power plants during normal operation. The influence of the discharge of the Rhine on the most relevant parameters is investigated thoroughly. In a case of accidental release of radioactive material, these data would be the basis of a prognosis by which the behaviour of the contaminated river section along the course can be described and the radiological consequences within the so-called critical impact area estimated. (orig.) [de

  7. Spatial characteristics of secondary flow in a turbulent boundary layer over longitudinal surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over spanwise heterogeneous surface roughness are performed to investigate the characteristics of secondary flow. The longitudinal surface roughness, which features lateral change in bed elevation, is described by immersed boundary method. The Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness is varied in the range of Reθ = 300-900. As the TBLs over the roughness elements spatially develop in the streamwise direction, a secondary flow emerges in a form of counter-rotating vortex pair. As the spanwise spacing between the roughness elements and roughness width vary, it is shown that the size of the secondary flow is determined by the valley width between the roughness elements. In addition, the strength of the secondary flow is mostly affected by the spanwise distance between the cores of the secondary flow. Analysis of the Reynolds-averaged turbulent kinetic energy transport equation reveals that the energy redistribution terms in the TBLs over-the ridge type roughness play an important role to derive low-momentum pathways with upward motion over the roughness crest, contrary to the previous observation with the strip-type roughness. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2017R1D1A1A09000537) and the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2017R1A5A1015311).

  8. Effect of rotation on the formation of longitudinal vortices in mixed convection flow over a flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Han [Ta-Hwa Institute of Technology, Department of Automation Engineering, Hsinchu (Taiwan); Chen, Chin-Tai [Ta-Hwa Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of rotation on the formation of longitudinal vortices in mixed convection flow over a flat plate. The criterion on the position of marking the onset of longitudinal vortices is defined in this paper. The onset position characterized by the Goertler number G{sub {delta}} depends on the Grashof number, the rotation number Ro, the Prandtl number Pr and the wave number. The results show that negative rotation stabilizes the boundary layer flow on the surface. On the contrary, positive rotation destabilizes the flow. The numerical data are compared with the experimental results. (orig.)

  9. Applications, benefits and challenges of flow chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Heintz, Søren; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2013-01-01

    , environmental and manufacturing perspective. A potential solution to resolve these issues is to use flow chemistry in such processes, preferably with applications of micro-and mini-sized equipment. In addition, Process Analytical Technology (PAT) may be implemented in a very efficient way in such equipment due...

  10. Pre-equilibrium Longitudinal Flow in the IP-Glasma Framework for Pb+Pb Collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Scott; Shen, Chun; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we debut a new implementation of IP-Glasma and quantify the pre-equilibrium longitudinal flow in the IP-Glasma framework. The saturation physics based IP-Glasma model naturally provides a non-zero initial longitudinal flow through its pre-equilibrium Yang-Mills evolution. A hybrid IP-Glasma+MUSIC+UrQMD frame-work is employed to test this new implementation against experimental data and to make further predictions about hadronic flow observables in Pb+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. Finally, the non-zero pre-equilibrium longitudinal flow of the IP-Glasma model is quantified, and its origin is briefly discussed.

  11. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  12. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  13. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  14. Applications of flow cytometry in food microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Valerin, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    A compilation of data about cytometry and its applications is performed to analyze the impact on food microbiology. The technique of flow cytometry is described and the use in various fields of microbiology is analyzed. Flow cytometry future could be implemented in many clinical laboratories and food, considering the cost / benefit test to be done, because at the moment it has a high cost. The existence of new fluorochromes and monoclonal antibodies enable that many intracellular and extracellular cell parameters are detected in the future. The technique can be developed in the country in few years considering that the technique has improved the sensitivity and specificity of many tests [es

  15. Thermal freeze-out and longitudinally non-uniform collective expansion flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng Sheng Qin; LianShouLiu

    2002-01-01

    The non-uniform longitudinal flow model (NUFM) proposed recently is extended to include also the transverse flow. The resulting longitudinally non-uniform collective expansion model (NUCEM) is applied to the calculation of rapidity distribution of kaons, lambdas and protons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at CERN-SPS energies. The model results are compared with the 200 A GeV/c S-S and 158 A GeV/c Pb-Pb collision data. The central dips observed in experiments are reproduced in a natural way. It is found that the depth of the central dip depends on the magnitude of the parameter e and the mass of produced particles, i.e. the non-uniformity of the longitudinal flow which is described by the parameter e determines the depth of the central dip for produced particles. Comparing with one-dimensional non-uniform longitudinal flow model, the rapidity distribution of lighter strange particle kaon also shows a dip due to the effect of transverse flow

  16. Longitudinal heterogeneity of flow and heat fluxes in a large lowland river: A study of the San Joaquin River, CA, USA during a large-scale flow experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E. N.; Dunne, T.; Dozier, J.

    2011-12-01

    Systematic downstream variation of channel characteristics, scaled by flow affects the transport and distribution of heat throughout a large river. As water moves through a river channel, streamflow and velocity may fluctuate by orders of magnitude primarily due to channel geometry, slope and resistance to flow, and the time scales of those fluctuations range from days to decades (Constantz et al., 1994; Lundquist and Cayan, 2002; McKerchar and Henderson, 2003). It is well understood that the heat budget of a river is primarily governed by surface exchanges, with the most significant surface flux coming from net shortwave radiation. The absorption of radiation at a given point in a river is determined by the wavelength-dependent index of refraction, expressed by the angle of refraction and the optical depth as a function of physical depth and the absorption coefficient (Dozier, 1980). Few studies consider the influence of hydrologic alteration to the optical properties governing net radiative heat transfer in a large lowland river, yet it is the most significant component of the heat budget and definitive to a river's thermal regime. We seek a physically based model without calibration to incorporate scale-dependent physical processes governing heat and flow dynamics in large rivers, how they change across the longitudinal profile, and how they change under different flow regimes. Longitudinal flow and heat flux analyses require synoptic flow time series from multiple sites along rivers, and few hydrometric networks meet this requirement (Larned et al, 2011). We model the energy budget in a regulated 240-km mainstem reach of the San Joaquin River California, USA equipped with multiple gaging stations from Friant Dam to its confluence with the Merced River during a large-scale flow experiment. We use detailed hydroclimatic observations distributed across the longitudinal gradient creating a non-replicable field experiment of heat fluxes across a range of flow regime

  17. Skewness and flatness factors of the longitudinal velocity derivative in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenidi, Lyazid; Antonia, Robert A.; Talluru, Murali K.; Abe, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Hot-wire measurements are carried out in turbulent boundary layers over smooth and rough walls in order the assess the behavior of the skewness (S ) and flatness (F ) factors of the longitudinal velocity derivative as y , the distance from the wall, increases. The measurements are complemented by direct numerical simulations of a smooth wall turbulent channel flow. It is observed that, as the distance to the wall increases, S and F vary significantly before approaching a constant in the outer layer of the boundary layer. Further, S and F exhibit a nontrivial dependence on the Taylor microscale Reynolds number (Reλ). For example, in the region below about 0.2 δ (δ is the boundary layer thickness) where Reλ varies significantly, S and F strongly vary with Reλ and can be multivalued at a given Reλ. In the outer region, between 0.3 δ and 0.6 δ , S , F , and Reλ remain approximately constant. The channel flow direct numerical simulation data for S and F exhibit a similar behavior. These results point to the ambiguity that can arise when assessing the Reλ dependence of S and F in wall shear flows. In particular, the multivaluedness of S and F can lead to erroneous conclusions if y /δ is known only poorly, as is the case for the atmospheric shear layer (ASL). If the laboratory turbulent boundary layer is considered an adequate surrogate to the neutral ASL, then the behavior of S and F in the ASL is expected to be similar to that reported here.

  18. Electromagnetic application device for flow rate/flow speed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Senji.

    1994-01-01

    Electric current and magnetic field are at first generated in a direction perpendicular to a flow channel of a fluid, and forces generated by electromagnetic interaction of the current and the magnetic field are combined and exerted on the fluid, to control the flow rate and the flow speed thereby decreasing flowing pressure loss. In addition, an electric current generation means and a magnetic field generation means integrated together are disposed to a structural component constituting the flow channel, and they are combined to attain the aimed effect. The current generating means forms a potential difference by supplying electric power to a pair of electrodes as a cathode and an anode by using structures disposed along the channel, to generate an electric field or electric current in a direction perpendicular to the flow channel. The magnetic field generating means forms a counter current (reciprocal current) by using structures disposed along the flow channel, to generate synthesized or emphasized magnetic field. The fluid can be applied with a force in the direction of the flowing direction by the electromagnetic interaction of the electric current and the magnetic field, thereby capable of propelling the fluid. Accordingly, the flowrate/flowing speed can be controlled inside of the flow channel and flowing pressure loss can be decreased. (N.H.)

  19. Subchannel and bundle friction factors and flow split parameters for laminar transition and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire wrap spaced hexagonal arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, J.T.; Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.E.; Rohsenow, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Correlations are presented for subchannel and bundle friction factors and flowsplit parameters for laminar, transition and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire wrap spaced hexagonal arrays. These results are obtained from pressure drop models of flow in individual subchannels. For turbulent flow, an existing pressure drop model for flow in edge subchannels is extended, and the resulting edge subchannel friction factor is identified. Using the expressions for flowsplit parameters and the equal pressure drops assumption, the interior subchannel and bundle friction factors are obtained. For laminar flow, models are developed for pressure drops of individual subchannels. From these models, expressions for the subchannel friction factors are identified and expressions for the flowsplit parameters are derived

  20. Determination of flow times, flow velocities and longitudinal dispersion in the Middle and Lower Rhine River using 3HHO as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, J.; Mundschenk, H.

    1994-01-01

    Flow times, flow velocities and parameters describing the longitudinal dispersion in the Middle and Lower Rhine river under natural conditions were determined by use of intermittent emissions of tritated wastewater from nuclear power plants during normal operation situated on the Upper Rhine. In cases of accidental releases of radioactive materials, these data would be the basis of prognoses by which the dispersion behaviour of contaminated sections along the course of river Rhine can be described and radiological consequences within the socalled critical impact areas estimated. (orig.) [de

  1. Application of neutron radiography to visualization of multiphase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, N.; Fujii, T.; Nishizaki, K.; Asano, H.; Ono, A.; Sonoda, K.; Akagawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Visualizations by real-time neutron radiography are demonstrated of various flow patterns of nitrogen gas-water two-phase flow in a stainless-steel tube, water inverted annular flow in a stainless-steel tube, flashing flow in an aluminium nozzle and fluidized bed in aluminium tube and vessels. Photographs every 1/60 s are presented by an image processing method to show the dynamic behaviours of the various flow patterns. It is shown that this visualization method can be applied efficiently to multiphase flow researches and will be applicable to multiphase flows in industrial machines. (author)

  2. Longitudinal and transverse flows of protons in 2-8 AxGeV Au-Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.H.

    2003-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse flows extracted from the rapidity and azimuthal distributions of protons produced in Au-Au collisions in the energy range from 2 to 8 AxGeV at the Brookhaven Alternating-Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) are investigated by a simple model. The elliptic and directed flow characteristics extracted from the azimuthal distribution at the AGS energies are described by a simple formula. The Monte Carlo calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of the E895 Collaboration. (author)

  3. Flow Control for Supersonic Inlet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    1221-1233, May 2013 3. Loth, E., Titchener, N., Babinsky, H., Povinelli , L., “Canonical NSBLI Flows Relevant to External Compression Inlets”, AIAA J...Tennessee, Jan. 9-12, 2012 7. Loth, E.L., Titchener, N., Babinsky, H., Povinelli , L.A., “A Canonical Normal SBLI Flow Relevant to External

  4. medplot: a web application for dynamic summary and analysis of longitudinal medical data based on R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Črt Ahlin

    Full Text Available In biomedical studies the patients are often evaluated numerous times and a large number of variables are recorded at each time-point. Data entry and manipulation of longitudinal data can be performed using spreadsheet programs, which usually include some data plotting and analysis capabilities and are straightforward to use, but are not designed for the analyses of complex longitudinal data. Specialized statistical software offers more flexibility and capabilities, but first time users with biomedical background often find its use difficult. We developed medplot, an interactive web application that simplifies the exploration and analysis of longitudinal data. The application can be used to summarize, visualize and analyze data by researchers that are not familiar with statistical programs and whose knowledge of statistics is limited. The summary tools produce publication-ready tables and graphs. The analysis tools include features that are seldom available in spreadsheet software, such as correction for multiple testing, repeated measurement analyses and flexible non-linear modeling of the association of the numerical variables with the outcome. medplot is freely available and open source, it has an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI, it is accessible via the Internet and can be used within a web browser, without the need for installing and maintaining programs locally on the user's computer. This paper describes the application and gives detailed examples describing how to use the application on real data from a clinical study including patients with early Lyme borreliosis.

  5. Spaceflight Flow Cytometry: Design Challenges and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri; Kao, Shih-Hsin; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2004-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require analytical technology capable of providing both autonomous medical care to the crew and investigative capabilities to researchers. While several promising candidate technologies exist for further development, flow cytometry is an attractive technology as it offers both crew health and a wide array of biochemistry and immunology assays. While flow cytometry has been widely used for cellular analysis in both clinical and research settings, the requirements for proper operation in spaceflight impose constraints on any instrument designs. The challenges of designing a spaceflight-ready flow cytometer are discussed, as well as some preliminary results using a prototype system.

  6. Optimized simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing of intense ion beam pulses for warm dense matter applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Roy, Prabir K.; Seidl, Peter A.; Yu, Simon S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Barnard, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Intense, space-charge-dominated ion beam pulses for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications must undergo simultaneous transverse and longitudinal bunch compression in order to meet the requisite beam intensities desired at the target. The longitudinal compression of an ion bunch is achieved by imposing an initial axial velocity tilt on the drifting beam and subsequently neutralizing its space-charge and current in a drift region filled with high-density plasma. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has measured a sixty-fold longitudinal current compression of an intense ion beam with pulse duration of a few nanoseconds, in agreement with simulations and theory. A strong solenoid is modeled near the end of the drift region in order to transversely focus the beam to a sub-millimeter spot size coincident with the longitudinal focal plane. The charge and current neutralization provided by the background plasma is critical in determining the total achievable transverse and longitudinal compression of the beam pulse. Numerical simulations show that the current density of an NDCX ion beam can be compressed over a few meters by factors greater than 10 5 with peak beam density in excess of 10 14 cm -3 . The peak beam density sets a lower bound on the local plasma density required near the focal plane for optimal beam compression, since the simulations show stagnation of the compression when n beam >n plasma . Beam-plasma interactions can also have a deleterious effect on the compression physics and lead to the formation of nonlinear wave excitations in the plasma. Simulations that optimize designs for the simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing of an NDCX ion beam for future warm dense matter experiments are discussed

  7. The application of neural networks to flow regime identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.; Yapo, T.C.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of a Kohonen map for the identification of two-phase flow regimes where a mixture of gas and fluid flows through a horizontal tube. Depending on the relative flow velocities of the gas and the liquid phase, four distinct flow regimes can be identified: Wavy flow, plug flow, slug flow and annular flow. A schematic of these flow regimes is presented. The objective identification of two-phase flow regimes constitutes an important and challenging problem for the design of safe and reliable nuclear power plants. Previous attempts to classify these flow regimes are reviewed by Franca and Lahey. The authors describe how a Kohonen map can be applied to distinguish between flow regimes based on the Fourier power spectra and wavelet transforms of pressure drop fluctuations. The Fourier power spectra allowed the Kohonen map to identify the flow regimes successfully. In contrast, the Kohonen maps based on a wavelet transform could only distinguish between wavy and annular flows. An analysis of typical two-phase pressure drop data for an air/water mixture in a horizontal pipe is presented. Use of the wavelet transform and the Kohonen feature map are discussed

  8. Application of advanced diagnostics to airblast injector flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcvey, John B.; Kennedy, Jan B.; Russell, Sid

    1987-01-01

    This effort is concerned with the application of both conventional laser velocimetry and phase Doppler anemometry to the flow produced by an airblast nozzle. The emphasis is placed on the acquisition of data using actual engine injector/swirler components at (noncombusting) conditions simulating those encountered in the engine. The objective of the effort was to test the applicability of the instrumentation to real injector flows, to develop information on the behavior of injectors at high flow, and to provide data useful in the development of physical models of injector flows.

  9. Determination of flow times and longitudinal dispersion in the upper Rhine using 3HHO as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundschenk, H.; Krause, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Flow times and longitudinal dispersion in the Rhine river under natural conditions are determined by use of single emissions of tritiated waste water from nuclear power plants within normal operation. The influence of the discharge of the Rhine on the most relevant parameters is investigated thoroughly. In a case of accidental release of radioactive material, these data would be the basis of a prognosis by which the behaviour of the contaminated river section along the course can be described and the radiological consequences within the so-called critical impact area estimated. (orig.) [de

  10. Cerebral blood flow in presymptomatic MAPT and GRN mutation carriers: A longitudinal arterial spin labeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise G.P. Dopper, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation: We demonstrated longitudinal alterations in CBF in presymptomatic FTD independent of grey matter atrophy, with the strongest decrease in individuals that developed symptoms during follow-up. Therefore, ASL could have the potential to serve as a sensitive biomarker of disease progression in the presymptomatic stage of FTD in future clinical trials.

  11. Flow time, flow velocity and longitudinal dispersion in Moselle and Weser rivers; Fliesszeit, Fliessgeschwindigkeit und Longitudinale Dispersion in Mosel und Weser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, W.J.; Krinitzky, T.; Cremer, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Gewaesserkunde (BfG), Koblenz (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1980, the Federal Institute of Hydrology has performed dispersion investigations with tritium as a tracer on Federal Waterways. The aim was to establish dispersion prognoses, i.e. forecasts of the longitudinal dispersion of concentrations of noxious substances in the water column. Characteristic parameters like discharge-relevant flow velocities, dispersion and elimination constants of emittent sites and selected river sections will be determined. They will serve as basis for a mathematical model permitting to forecast discharge-relevant flow velocities, expected impact times, concentration maxima and the duration of critical concentration increases. In the following, the results obtained at the Moselle river and the investigations carried out on the Weser river will be shortly described. (orig.)

  12. The application of team flow theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, van den J.J.J.; Davis, O.C.; Walrave, B.; Harmat, L.; Orsted Andersen, F.; Ullen, F.; Wright, J.; Sadlo, G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the noted potential for ‘team flow’ to enhance a team’s effectiveness, productivity, performance, and capabilities, studies on the construct are scarce. Most research on flow has been conducted either at the individual level, which generally constitutes the experience of complete absorption

  13. Document flow segmentation for business applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Hani; Belaïd, Abdel

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a document flow supervised segmentation approach applied to real world heterogeneous documents. Our algorithm treats the flow of documents as couples of consecutive pages and studies the relationship that exists between them. At first, sets of features are extracted from the pages where we propose an approach to model the couple of pages into a single feature vector representation. This representation will be provided to a binary classifier which classifies the relationship as either segmentation or continuity. In case of segmentation, we consider that we have a complete document and the analysis of the flow continues by starting a new document. In case of continuity, the couple of pages are assimilated to the same document and the analysis continues on the flow. If there is an uncertainty on whether the relationship between the couple of pages should be classified as a continuity or segmentation, a rejection is decided and the pages analyzed until this point are considered as a "fragment". The first classification already provides good results approaching 90% on certain documents, which is high at this level of the system.

  14. Studying and modelling variable density turbulent flows for industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabard, J.P.; Simonin, O.; Caruso, A.; Delalondre, C.; Dalsecco, S.; Mechitoua, N.

    1996-07-01

    Industrial applications are presented in the various fields of interest for EDF. A first example deals with transferred electric arcs couplings flow and thermal transfer in the arc and in the bath of metal and is related with applications of electricity. The second one is the combustion modelling in burners of fossil power plants. The last one comes from the nuclear power plants and concerns the stratified flows in a nuclear reactor building. (K.A.). 18 refs.

  15. Studying and modelling variable density turbulent flows for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabard, J.P.; Simonin, O.; Caruso, A.; Delalondre, C.; Dalsecco, S.; Mechitoua, N.

    1996-07-01

    Industrial applications are presented in the various fields of interest for EDF. A first example deals with transferred electric arcs couplings flow and thermal transfer in the arc and in the bath of metal and is related with applications of electricity. The second one is the combustion modelling in burners of fossil power plants. The last one comes from the nuclear power plants and concerns the stratified flows in a nuclear reactor building. (K.A.)

  16. Gaseous slip flow analysis of a micromachined flow sensor for ultra small flow applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Jaesung; Wereley, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The velocity slip of a fluid at a wall is one of the most typical phenomena in microscale gas flows. This paper presents a flow analysis considering the velocity slip in a capacitive micro gas flow sensor based on pressure difference measurements along a microchannel. The tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) measurements of a particular channel wall in planar microchannels will be presented while the previous micro gas flow studies have been based on the same TMACs on both wal...

  17. The use and applicability of flow models to quantify intermine flow in the Western Witbank coalfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havenga, A.; Usher, B.; Hodgson, E.; van Tonder, G. [University of Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa). Inst. of Groundwater Studies

    2005-11-15

    After the closure of collieries, they naturally start to fill up with water. As a result, hydraulic gradients develop between them and different hydraulic pressures are exerted onto peripheral areas or compartments within mines. This results in water flow between mines, or onto the surface. This flow is referred to as intermine flow. The collieries in the Witbank Coalfield have geometries such that there are several areas where this intermine flow is possible. Since the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry has declared intermine flow as one of its greatest concerns for granting closure to South African mines, much research into this phenomenon is required. The challenges in determining intermine flow are numerous, and attention has focused on identification of areas where these flows can take place. The quantification of these flows is problematic due to the uncertainties in exact geometric configurations and the variation in site-specific hydraulic properties of the coal and overlying lithological layers. During this study, use has been made of numerical flow modelling and several analytic solutions to test the applicability of the flow models as well as to predict groundwater flow directions, filling times of voids and flow volumes. The numerical modelling methodology entailed a downscaling approach starting with a broad regional model covering the entire area, followed by modelling the interactions between interconnected mines, and finally looking in detail at the major areas of interaction.

  18. Helical structure of longitudinal vortices embedded in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Okulov, Valery

    2009-01-01

    Embedded vortices in turbulent wall-bounded flow over a flat plate, generated by a passive rectangular vane-type vortex generator with variable angle \\beta to the incoming flow in a low-Reynolds number flow (Re = 2600 based on the inlet grid mesh size L = 0:039 m and free stream velocity U....... This is important for flow control, since one thereby can determine the axial velocity induced by the helical vortex as well as the swirl redistributing the axial velocity component for a given device angle \\beta. This also simplifies theoretical studies, e.g. to understand and predict the stability of the vortex...

  19. Sediment transport over sills at longitudinal training dams with unaligned main flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jammers, S.M.M.; Paarlberg, AJ; Mosselman, E.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal training dams (LTDs) are  constructed in the River Waal in the  Netherlands. They are aligned parallel to the  river shore and divide the river into a main and  side channel. The existing groynes are  removed yielding more discharge capacity at  high

  20. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  1. Relationship between white matter lesions and regional cerebral blood flow changes during longitudinal follow up in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Takuya; Kimura, Noriyuki; Aso, Yasuhiro; Takemaru, Makoto; Kimura, Yuki; Ishibashi, Masato; Matsubara, Etsuro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between baseline white matter lesions (WML) and changes in regional cerebral blood flow during longitudinal follow up of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A total of 38 patients with AD were included in the study (16 men, 22 women; mean age 77.8 years). All patients were evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography at baseline with an approximately 2-year follow up. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence of WML on magnetic resonance imaging. Single-photon emission computed tomography data were analyzed using a voxel-by-voxel group analysis with Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and region of interest analysis using FineSRT. Changes in Mini-Mental State Examination scores and regional cerebral blood flow were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination scores in AD patients with WML significantly decreased from 19.4 ± 4.8 to 15.5 ± 6.5 (P = 0.003). Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and FineSRT analysis showed more severe and widespread regional cerebral blood flow reduction, mainly in the frontal and mesial temporal regions in AD patients with WML compared with those without WML. Baseline WML could predict a rapid progression of cognitive and brain functional impairment during longitudinal follow up in AD. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 836-842. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Longitudinal decorrelation measures of flow magnitude and event-plane angles in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    BoŻek, Piotr; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the forward-backward correlations of harmonic flow in Pb +Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, applying standard multibin measures as well as new measures proposed here. We illustrate the methods with hydrodynamic model simulations based on event-by-event initial conditions from the wounded quark model with asymmetric rapidity emission profiles. Within the model, we examine independently the event-plane angle and the flow magnitude decorrelations. We find a specific hierarchy between various flow decorrelation measures and confirm certain factorization relations. We find qualitative agreement of the model and the data from the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations.

  3. A longitudinal analysis of salivary flow in control subjects and older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, E M; Borrell, L N; Taylor, G W; Ship, J A

    2001-02-01

    Many diabetics complain of xerostomia, a condition that can affect oral health, nutritional status, and diet selection. This study's purposes were (1) to investigate the effect on salivary flow of type 2 diabetes and change in glycemic control in a group of older adults over time and (2) to compare flow rates with subjective complaints of xerostomia. A total of 39 older adults, 24 with type 2 diabetes and 15 who were nondiabetic (controls), aged 54-90 years, participated in a 1-year follow-up study. Diabetic status was determined by means of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and 2-hour glucose tolerance tests. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c > 9%. Unstimulated whole, unstimulated parotid, and stimulated parotid saliva flow rates were measured for all subjects by a single examiner at baseline and 1 year later. Each subject completed a standardized xerostomia questionnaire at every visit. Age, sex, and duration of diabetes did not adversely affect salivary flow rates. Subjects with poorly controlled diabetes had significantly lower stimulated parotid saliva flow rates at both visits. There were no significant changes in flow rates over time on the basis of diabetic status or glycemic control. Subjects with diabetes reported significantly more complaints of thirst but not of xerostomia at 1 year. These results suggest that older adults with poorly controlled diabetes may have impaired salivary flow in comparison with subjects with better controlled diabetes and nondiabetic subjects, yet they may not have concomitant xerostomic complaints. There were no significant changes in salivary flow rates or glycemic control over the 1-year period.

  4. Studies on longitudinal fluctuations of anisotropy flow event planes in PbPb and pPb collisions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080008

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of anisotropy flow phenomena have assumed a global flow phase angle (or event plane angle) that is boost invariant in pseudorapidity ($\\eta$). It was realized in recent years that this assumption may not be valid in presence of initial-state fluctuations, especially along the longitudinal direction. The effect of eta-dependent event plane fluctuations would break the factorization relation of Fourier coefficients from two-particle azimuthal correlations into a product of single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics as a function of $\\eta$. First study of factorization breakdown effect in $\\eta$ is carried out using the CMS detector, which covers a wide $\\eta$ range of 10 units. A novel method is employed to suppress nonflow correlations at small pseudorapidity gaps of two particles. Significant eta-dependent factorization breakdown is observed in both PbPb and high-multiplicity pPb collisions. The measurements are presented for various orders of flow harmonics as a function of centrality or event...

  5. Modelling of a cross flow evaporator for CSP application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Franco, Alessandro; Pelagotti, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    ) applications. Heat transfer and pressure drop prediction methods are an important tool for design and modelling of diabatic, two-phase, shell-side flow over a horizontal plain tubes bundle for a vertical up-flow evaporator. With the objective of developing a model for a specific type of cross flow evaporator...... the available correlations for the definition of two-phase flow heat transfer, void fraction and pressure drop in connection with the operation of steam generators, focuses attention on a comparison of the results obtained using several different models resulting by different combination of correlations......Heat exchangers consisting of bundles of horizontal plain tubes with boiling on the shell side are widely used in industrial and energy systems applications. A recent particular specific interest for the use of this special heat exchanger is in connection with Concentrated Solar Power (CSP...

  6. Gaseous slip flow analysis of a micromachined flow sensor for ultra small flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaesung; Wereley, Steven T.

    2007-02-01

    The velocity slip of a fluid at a wall is one of the most typical phenomena in microscale gas flows. This paper presents a flow analysis considering the velocity slip in a capacitive micro gas flow sensor based on pressure difference measurements along a microchannel. The tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) measurements of a particular channel wall in planar microchannels will be presented while the previous micro gas flow studies have been based on the same TMACs on both walls. The sensors consist of a pair of capacitive pressure sensors, inlet/outlet and a microchannel. The main microchannel is 128.0 µm wide, 4.64 µm deep and 5680 µm long, and operated under nearly atmospheric conditions where the outlet Knudsen number is 0.0137. The sensor was fabricated using silicon wet etching, ultrasonic drilling, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and anodic bonding. The capacitance change of the sensor and the mass flow rate of nitrogen were measured as the inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio was varied from 1.00 to 1.24. The measured maximum mass flow rate was 3.86 × 10-10 kg s-1 (0.019 sccm) at the highest pressure ratio tested. As the pressure difference increased, both the capacitance of the differential pressure sensor and the flow rate through the main microchannel increased. The laminar friction constant f sdot Re, an important consideration in sensor design, varied from the incompressible no-slip case and the mass sensitivity and resolution of this sensor were discussed. Using the current slip flow formulae, a microchannel with much smaller mass flow rates can be designed at the same pressure ratios.

  7. Energy flow theory of nonlinear dynamical systems with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    This monograph develops a generalised energy flow theory to investigate non-linear dynamical systems governed by ordinary differential equations in phase space and often met in various science and engineering fields. Important nonlinear phenomena such as, stabilities, periodical orbits, bifurcations and chaos are tack-led and the corresponding energy flow behaviors are revealed using the proposed energy flow approach. As examples, the common interested nonlinear dynamical systems, such as, Duffing’s oscillator, Van der Pol’s equation, Lorenz attractor, Rössler one and SD oscillator, etc, are discussed. This monograph lights a new energy flow research direction for nonlinear dynamics. A generalised Matlab code with User Manuel is provided for readers to conduct the energy flow analysis of their nonlinear dynamical systems. Throughout the monograph the author continuously returns to some examples in each chapter to illustrate the applications of the discussed theory and approaches. The book can be used as ...

  8. Complex analysis with applications to flows and fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braga da Costa Campos, Luis Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Complex Analysis with Applications to Flows and Fields presents the theory of functions of a complex variable, from the complex plane to the calculus of residues to power series to conformal mapping. The book explores numerous physical and engineering applications concerning potential flows, the gravity field, electro- and magnetostatics, steady heat conduction, and other problems. It provides the mathematical results to sufficiently justify the solution of these problems, eliminating the need to consult external references.The book is conveniently divided into four parts. In each part, the ma

  9. A liquid crystal polymer membrane MEMS sensor for flow rate and flow direction sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottapalli, A G P; Tan, C W; Olfatnia, M; Miao, J M; Barbastathis, G; Triantafyllou, M

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the design, fabrication and experimental results of a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) membrane-based pressure sensor for flow rate and flow direction sensing applications. Elaborate experimental testing results demonstrating the sensors' performance as an airflow sensor have been illustrated and validated with theory. MEMS sensors using LCP as a membrane structural material show higher sensitivity and reliability over silicon counterparts. The developed device is highly robust for harsh environment applications such as atmospheric wind flow monitoring and underwater flow sensing. A simple, low-cost and repeatable fabrication scheme has been developed employing low temperatures. The main features of the sensor developed in this work are a LCP membrane with integrated thin film gold piezoresistors deposited on it. The sensor developed demonstrates a good sensitivity of 3.695 mV (ms −1 ) −1 , large operating range (0.1 to >10 ms −1 ) and good accuracy in measuring airflow with an average error of only 3.6% full-scale in comparison with theory. Various feasible applications of the developed sensor have been demonstrated with experimental results. The sensor was tested for two other applications—in clinical diagnosis for breath rate, breath velocity monitoring, and in underwater applications for object detection by sensing near-field spatial flow pressure

  10. Flow parameter determination in pneumatic dilute phase flow applications; Foerderparameterbestimmung in pneumatischen Duennstrom-Transportanwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, A.; Zangl, H.; Brasseur, G. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Messsignalverarbeitung

    2007-07-01

    This paper investigates possible approaches towards the development of a flowmeter that allows the determination of the material velocity and the material concentration in pneumatically conveyed bulk solids. These two flow parameters yield the mass flow of material through the conveyor pipe. Measurement methods and sensor principles that satisfy requirements for the flowmeter have been realized as prototype-sensors and were tested in practical dilute phase conveying applications. In particular, the development and the application of optical principles, of a sensor based on spatial filtering, and a capacitive cross-correlation sensor are addressed in the present work. (orig.)

  11. Longitudinal changes of ocular blood flow using laser speckle flowgraphy during normal pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Sato

    Full Text Available Innovative laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG enables noninvasive evaluation of retinal microcirculation and the usefulness has been reported in the field of ophthalmology. LSFG has allowed us to measure the real time changes of retinal blood flow without pupillary dilatations and contrast media. Herein, we investigated the change of retinal blood flow in normal pregnant women during gestation using LSFG.A prospective cohort study was conducted in 53 pregnant women who visited our institution between January, 2013 and July, 2014. Finally, a total of 41 participants without any obstetric complications were available for evaluation. Retinal blood flow was measured with LSFG in a total of 4 times during pregnancy (T1. 11-13 weeks, T2. 19-21 weeks, T3. 28-30 weeks, T4. 34-36 weeks and mean blur rate (MBR, blowout score (BOS, flow acceleration index (FAI, and resistive index (RI are analyzed from these measurements. Relations between LSFG parameters and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP are determined throughout pregnancy.MBR showed no significant changes throughout pregnancy. BOS showed a tendency to increase in the 3rd trimester. FAI values showed a slight increase from the 1st to 2nd trimester while a significant decrease was noted in the 3rd trimester. RI exhibited no changes between the 1st and 2nd trimesters, values decreased significantly after the 3rd trimester. MAP was positively correlated with BOS, and negatively correlated with FAI and RI.The present study clearly demonstrated that profiles of LSFG parameters demonstrated a decrease of resistance in retinal blood vessels. These changes in indices provide a highly sensitive reflection of physiological changes in vascular resistance due to pregnancy. Thus, LSFG may be useful, as a non-invasive, diagnostic tool to detect pregnancy related disorders such as preeclampsia.

  12. Patterns in stream longitudinal profiles and implications for hyporheic exchange flow at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin K. Anderson; Steven M. Wondzell; Michael N. Gooseff; Roy. Haggerty

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to identify measurable characteristics of stream channel morphology that vary predictably throughout stream networks and that influence patterns of hyporheic exchange flow in mountain streams. In this paper we characterize stream longitudinal profiles according to channel unit spacing and the concavity of the water surface profile. We demonstrate that...

  13. Lattice Boltzmann methods for complex micro-flows: applicability and limitations for practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, K, E-mail: suga@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    The extensive evaluation studies of the lattice Boltzmann method for micro-scale flows ({mu}-flow LBM) by the author's group are summarized. For the two-dimensional test cases, force-driven Poiseuille flows, Couette flows, a combined nanochannel flow, and flows in a nanochannel with a square- or triangular cylinder are discussed. The three-dimensional (3D) test cases are nano-mesh flows and a flow between 3D bumpy walls. The reference data for the complex test flow geometries are from the molecular dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid by the author's group. The focused flows are mainly in the slip and a part of the transitional flow regimes at Kn < 1. The evaluated schemes of the {mu}-flow LBMs are the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook and the multiple-relaxation time LBMs with several boundary conditions and discrete velocity models. The effects of the discrete velocity models, the wall boundary conditions, the near-wall correction models of the molecular mean free path and the regularization process are discussed to confirm the applicability and the limitations of the {mu}-flow LBMs for complex flow geometries. (invited review)

  14. Lattice Boltzmann methods for complex micro-flows: applicability and limitations for practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K

    2013-01-01

    The extensive evaluation studies of the lattice Boltzmann method for micro-scale flows (μ-flow LBM) by the author's group are summarized. For the two-dimensional test cases, force-driven Poiseuille flows, Couette flows, a combined nanochannel flow, and flows in a nanochannel with a square- or triangular cylinder are discussed. The three-dimensional (3D) test cases are nano-mesh flows and a flow between 3D bumpy walls. The reference data for the complex test flow geometries are from the molecular dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid by the author's group. The focused flows are mainly in the slip and a part of the transitional flow regimes at Kn < 1. The evaluated schemes of the μ-flow LBMs are the lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook and the multiple-relaxation time LBMs with several boundary conditions and discrete velocity models. The effects of the discrete velocity models, the wall boundary conditions, the near-wall correction models of the molecular mean free path and the regularization process are discussed to confirm the applicability and the limitations of the μ-flow LBMs for complex flow geometries. (invited review)

  15. Methods for compressible multiphase flows and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Choe, Y.; Kim, H.; Min, D.; Kim, C.

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an efficient and robust numerical framework to deal with multiphase real-fluid flows and their broad spectrum of engineering applications. A homogeneous mixture model incorporated with a real-fluid equation of state and a phase change model is considered to calculate complex multiphase problems. As robust and accurate numerical methods to handle multiphase shocks and phase interfaces over a wide range of flow speeds, the AUSMPW+_N and RoeM_N schemes with a system preconditioning method are presented. These methods are assessed by extensive validation problems with various types of equation of state and phase change models. Representative realistic multiphase phenomena, including the flow inside a thermal vapor compressor, pressurization in a cryogenic tank, and unsteady cavitating flow around a wedge, are then investigated as application problems. With appropriate physical modeling followed by robust and accurate numerical treatments, compressible multiphase flow physics such as phase changes, shock discontinuities, and their interactions are well captured, confirming the suitability of the proposed numerical framework to wide engineering applications.

  16. Flow cytometric applications of tumor biology: prospects and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumor biology is presented using our recent data. Age-distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumors and cultured cells after exposure to x rays, alpha particles, or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation

  17. Flow cytometric applications to tumour biology: prospects and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumour biology is presented. DNA distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumours and cultured cells after exposure to X-rays, alpha particles or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed, however, to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation. (author)

  18. Mathematical annuity models application in cash flow analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematical annuity models application in cash flow analysis. ... We also compare the cost efficiency between Amortisation and Sinking fund loan repayment as prevalent in financial institutions. Keywords: Annuity, Amortisation, Sinking Fund, Present and Future Value Annuity, Maturity date and Redemption value.

  19. Friction factors referring to laminar flow through pipe bundles with longitudinal webs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, G

    1983-09-01

    Pipe bundles with continuous webs or ribs between adjacent pipes, as well as between outer pipes and channel walls, are much more vibrational proof than web-free systems. In addition, the change-over from a multiple-connected web-free cross-section to a set of singly-connected cross-sections facilitates the calculation of friction factors. The investigation is concerned with isothermal steady fully-developed laminar flow of Newtonian fluids. In particularly, pipe bundles with squares and hexagonal arrays in respective channels are treated. Friction factors for the subchannels are taken from a former paper of the author.

  20. Longitudinal pressure-driven flows between superhydrophobic grooved surfaces: Large effective slip in the narrow-channel limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2017-07-01

    The gross amplification of the fluid velocity in pressure-driven flows due to the introduction of superhydrophobic walls is commonly quantified by an effective slip length. The canonical duct-flow geometry involves a periodic structure of longitudinal shear-free stripes at either one or both of the bounding walls, corresponding to flat-meniscus gas bubbles trapped within a periodic array of grooves. This grating configuration is characterized by two geometric parameters, namely the ratio κ of channel width to microstructure period and the areal fraction Δ of the shear-free stripes. For wide channels, κ ≫1 , this geometry is known to possess an approximate solution where the dimensionless slip length λ , normalized by the duct semiwidth, is small, indicating a weak superhydrophobic effect. We here address the other extreme of narrow channels, κ ≪1 , identifying large O (κ-2) values of λ for the symmetric configuration, where both bounding walls are superhydrophobic. This velocity enhancement is associated with an unconventional Poiseuille-like flow profile where the parabolic velocity variation takes place in a direction parallel (rather than perpendicular) to the boundaries. Use of matched asymptotic expansions and conformal-mapping techniques provides λ up to O (κ-1) , establishing the approximationλ ˜κ-2Δ/33 +κ-1Δ/2π ln4 +⋯, which is in excellent agreement with a semianalytic solution of the dual equations governing the respective coefficients of a Fourier-series representation of the fluid velocity. No similar singularity occurs in the corresponding asymmetric configuration, involving a single superhydrophobic wall; in that geometry, a Hele-Shaw approximation shows that λ =O (1 ) .

  1. Bridging Inter-flow and Intra-flow Network Coding for Video Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Krigslund, Jeppe; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    transmission approach to decide how much and when to send redundancy in the network, and a minimalistic feedback mechanism to guarantee delivery of generations of the different flows. Given the delay constraints of video applications, we proposed a simple yet effective coding mechanism, Block Coding On The Fly...

  2. sedFlow – a tool for simulating fractional bedload transport and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. U. M. Heimann

    2015-01-01

    floods. The model is intended for temporal scales from the individual event (several hours to few days up to longer-term evolution of stream channels (several years. The envisaged spatial scale covers complete catchments at a spatial discretisation of several tens of metres to a few hundreds of metres. sedFlow can deal with the effects of streambeds that slope uphill in a downstream direction and uses recently proposed and tested approaches for quantifying macro-roughness effects in steep channels. sedFlow offers different options for bedload transport equations, flow-resistance relationships and other elements which can be selected to fit the current application in a particular catchment. Local grain-size distributions are dynamically adjusted according to the transport dynamics of each grain-size fraction. sedFlow features fast calculations and straightforward pre- and postprocessing of simulation data. The high simulation speed allows for simulations of several years, which can be used, e.g., to assess the long-term impact of river engineering works or climate change effects. In combination with the straightforward pre- and postprocessing, the fast calculations facilitate efficient workflows for the simulation of individual flood events, because the modeller gets the immediate results as direct feedback to the selected parameter inputs. The model is provided together with its complete source code free of charge under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL (www.wsl.ch/sedFlow. Examples of the application of sedFlow are given in a companion article by Heimann et al. (2015.

  3. An experimental study of turbulent two-phase flow in hydraulic jumps and application of a triple decomposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Felder, Stefan; Chanson, Hubert

    2014-07-01

    Intense turbulence develops in the two-phase flow region of hydraulic jump, with a broad range of turbulent length and time scales. Detailed air-water flow measurements using intrusive phase-detection probes enabled turbulence characterisation of the bubbly flow, although the phenomenon is not a truly random process because of the existence of low-frequency, pseudo-periodic fluctuating motion in the jump roller. This paper presents new measurements of turbulent properties in hydraulic jumps, including turbulence intensity, longitudinal and transverse integral length and time scales. The results characterised very high turbulent levels and reflected a combination of both fast and slow turbulent components. The respective contributions of the fast and slow motions were quantified using a triple decomposition technique. The decomposition of air-water detection signal revealed "true" turbulent characteristics linked with the fast, microscopic velocity turbulence of hydraulic jumps. The high-frequency turbulence intensities were between 0.5 and 1.5 close to the jump toe, and maximum integral turbulent length scales were found next to the bottom. Both decreased in the flow direction with longitudinal turbulence dissipation. The results highlighted the considerable influence of hydrodynamic instabilities of the flow on the turbulence characterisation. The successful application of triple decomposition technique provided the means for the true turbulence properties of hydraulic jumps.

  4. Some applications of magnetic resonance imaging in fluid mechanics: Complex flows and complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, Daniel; Rodts, Stephane; Groenink, Maarten; Rafai, Salima; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, Noushine; Coussot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The review deals with applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study flow. We first briefly discuss the principles of flow measurement by MRI and give examples of some applications, such as multiphase flows, the MRI rheology of complex fluid flows, and blood flows in the human

  5. Monitoring of multiphase flows for superconducting accelerators and others applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Yu. P.; Kakorin, I. D.; Kovrizhnykh, A. M.; Miklayev, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is a review on implementation of measuring systems for two-phase helium, hydrogen, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and oil-formation/salty water flows. Two types of such systems are presented. The first type is based on two-phase flow-meters combining void fraction radio-frequency (RF) sensors and narrowing devices. They can be applied for superconducting accelerators cooled with two-phase helium, refueling hydrogen system for space ships and some applications in oil production industry. The second one is based on combination of a gamma-densitometer and a narrowing device. These systems can be used to monitor large two-phase LNG and oil-formation water flows. An electronics system based on a modular industrial computer is described as well. The metrological characteristics for different flow-meters are presented and the obtained results are discussed. It is also shown that the experience gained allows separationless flow-meter for three-phase oil-gas-formation water flows to be produced.

  6. The longitudinal relationship of work stress with peak expiratory flow: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Karrasch, Stefan; Lunau, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is associated with reduced lung function and with the development of respiratory disease. Among the major potential sources of stress in adulthood are working conditions. We aimed to examine the relationship of work stress with lung function. We drew on 4-year prospective data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The analyzed sample comprised 2627 workers aged 50 years or older who were anamnestically free of respiratory disease. Work stress at baseline was operationalized by abbreviated instruments measuring the well-established effort-reward imbalance model (seven items) and the control component of the job-demand control (two items). Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Continuous and categorized (i.e., by the tertile) work stress variables were employed in multivariable linear regression models to predict PEF change. Work stress did not show statistically significant associations with PEF change. For instance, the unstandardized regression coefficient for PEF decline according to high versus low effort-reward imbalance was -1.41 (95% confidence interval = -3.75, 0.94). Our study is the first to examine prospective relationships between work stress and PEF. Overall, we did not observe meaningful associations. Future studies should consider a broader spectrum of spirometric parameters and should expand research to younger and possibly less-selected working populations (i.e., aged <50 years).

  7. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow and intelligences in normal elderly people living in retirement house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Kazunori; Arimoto, Satao

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the number of the neuron in the brain gradually reduced with advancing age, but speed of decline of brain functions differs among individuals. We have reported that social environmental factors had significant influences to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mental function. In this paper, we report 2.5 years longitudinal study concerning with CBF and intelligences in twenty normal elderly people, mean age of 76 years old at the first measurement, living in retirement house. 1) Mean CBF measured by Xe 133 inhalation method did not alter significantly during the observation period. 2) Performance intelligence evaluated by Kohs' block design test had reduced at the point of begining but no more reduction was observed during the period. 3) Verbal intelligence evaluated by Hasegawa's intelligence scale for aged which was within normal range at the begining, slightly (-7.5 %) but significantly (p < 0.05) reduced during the period. 4) Performance intelligence tended to reduce in subjects who showed reduction of CBF. There were no significant correlation between both intelligences and CBF. CBF could be maintained even in elderly people living in retirement house which has less social stimuli during relatively short observation period in so far as they maintain active daily life. The speed of reduction of performance intelligence may be getting slow after certain age and verbal intelligence gradually decreases perhaps by disuse of the mental function. (author)

  8. Geometric flows and (some of) their physical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bakas, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    The geometric evolution equations provide new ways to address a variety of non-linear problems in Riemannian geometry, and, at the same time, they enjoy numerous physical applications, most notably within the renormalization group analysis of non-linear sigma models and in general relativity. They are divided into classes of intrinsic and extrinsic curvature flows. Here, we review the main aspects of intrinsic geometric flows driven by the Ricci curvature, in various forms, and explain the intimate relation between Ricci and Calabi flows on Kahler manifolds using the notion of super-evolution. The integration of these flows on two-dimensional surfaces relies on the introduction of a novel class of infinite dimensional algebras with infinite growth. It is also explained in this context how Kac's K_2 simple Lie algebra can be used to construct metrics on S^2 with prescribed scalar curvature equal to the sum of any holomorphic function and its complex conjugate; applications of this special problem to general re...

  9. Flow, transport and diffusion in random geometries II: applications

    KAUST Repository

    Asinari, Pietro

    2015-01-07

    Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) is an efficient and flexible solution for the propagation of uncertainties in complex models, where an explicit parametrization of the input randomness is not available or too expensive. We present several applications of our MLMC algorithm for flow, transport and diffusion in random heterogeneous materials. The absolute permeability and effective diffusivity (or formation factor) of micro-scale porous media samples are computed and the uncertainty related to the sampling procedures is studied. The algorithm is then extended to the transport problems and multiphase flows for the estimation of dispersion and relative permeability curves. The impact of water drops on random stuctured surfaces, with microfluidics applications to self-cleaning materials, is also studied and simulated. Finally the estimation of new drag correlation laws for poly-dispersed dilute and dense suspensions is presented.

  10. Flow, transport and diffusion in random geometries II: applications

    KAUST Repository

    Asinari, Pietro; Ceglia, Diego; Icardi, Matteo; Prudhomme, Serge; Tempone, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) is an efficient and flexible solution for the propagation of uncertainties in complex models, where an explicit parametrization of the input randomness is not available or too expensive. We present several applications of our MLMC algorithm for flow, transport and diffusion in random heterogeneous materials. The absolute permeability and effective diffusivity (or formation factor) of micro-scale porous media samples are computed and the uncertainty related to the sampling procedures is studied. The algorithm is then extended to the transport problems and multiphase flows for the estimation of dispersion and relative permeability curves. The impact of water drops on random stuctured surfaces, with microfluidics applications to self-cleaning materials, is also studied and simulated. Finally the estimation of new drag correlation laws for poly-dispersed dilute and dense suspensions is presented.

  11. Micro-segmented flow applications in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The book is dedicated to the method and application potential of micro segmented flow. The recent state of development of this powerful technique is presented in 12 chapters by leading researchers from different countries. In the first section, the principles of generation and manipulation of micro-fluidic segments are explained. In the second section, the micro continuous-flow synthesis of different types of nanomaterials is shown as a typical example for the use of advantages of the technique in chemistry. In the third part, the particular importance of the technique in biotechnical applications is presented demonstrating the progress for miniaturized cell-free processes, for molecular biology and DNA-based diagnostis and sequencing as well as for the development of antibiotics and the evaluation of toxic effects in medicine and environment.

  12. Applications of Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models with Covariates to Longitudinal Test Data. Research Report. ETS RR-16-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    The multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) models with covariates proposed by Haberman and implemented in the "mirt" program provide a flexible way to analyze data based on item response theory. In this report, we discuss applications of the MIRT models with covariates to longitudinal test data to measure skill differences at the…

  13. Subchannel and bundle friction factors and flowsplit parameters for laminar, transition, and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire-wrap spaced hexagonal arrays. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, J.T.; Chiu, C.; Rohsenow, W.M.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Correlations are presented for subchannel and bundle friction factors and flowsplit parameters for laminar, transition and turbulent longitudinal flows in wire wrap spaced hexagonal arrays. These results are obtained from pressure drop models of flow in individual subchannels. For turbulent flow, an existing pressure drop model for flow in edge subchannels is extended, and the resulting edge subchannel friction factor is identified. Using the expressions for flowsplit parameters and the equal pressured drop assumption, the interior subchannel and bundle friction factors are obtained. For laminar flow, models are developed for pressure drops of individual subchannels. From these models, expressions for the subchannel friction factors are identified and expressions for the flowsplit parameters are derived.

  14. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  15. Application of PDF methods to compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, B. J.; Pope, S. B.

    1997-09-01

    A particle method applying the probability density function (PDF) approach to turbulent compressible flows is presented. The method is applied to several turbulent flows, including the compressible mixing layer, and good agreement is obtained with experimental data. The PDF equation is solved using a Lagrangian/Monte Carlo method. To accurately account for the effects of compressibility on the flow, the velocity PDF formulation is extended to include thermodynamic variables such as the pressure and the internal energy. The mean pressure, the determination of which has been the object of active research over the last few years, is obtained directly from the particle properties. It is therefore not necessary to link the PDF solver with a finite-volume type solver. The stochastic differential equations (SDE) which model the evolution of particle properties are based on existing second-order closures for compressible turbulence, limited in application to low turbulent Mach number flows. Tests are conducted in decaying isotropic turbulence to compare the performances of the PDF method with the Reynolds-stress closures from which it is derived, and in homogeneous shear flows, at which stage comparison with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data is conducted. The model is then applied to the plane compressible mixing layer, reproducing the well-known decrease in the spreading rate with increasing compressibility. It must be emphasized that the goal of this paper is not as much to assess the performance of models of compressibility effects, as it is to present an innovative and consistent PDF formulation designed for turbulent inhomogeneous compressible flows, with the aim of extending it further to deal with supersonic reacting flows.

  16. Self-flowing mortar for ferrocement in strengthening applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamir Sakir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferrocement technology is becoming more and more important nowadays for strengthening and retrofitting of concrete structures mainly due to its inherent strength properties. However, its labour intensive nature makes it undesirable for rapid strengthening works. In narrow spaces, strengthening with conventional ferrocement is very critical and also time consuming. Self-flowing mortar (SFM could be used with this technology to overcome these limitations. This article discusses the applicability of SFM in ferrocement technology. The aim of this study is to summarize available knowledge on SFM to make it feasible for optimization in different industrial applications.

  17. Topological Fluid Mechanics with Applications to Free Surfaces and Axisymmetric Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow.......Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow....

  18. Graphene field-effect transistor application for flow sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łuszczek Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microflow sensors offer great potential for applications in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip systems. However, thermal-based sensors, which are commonly used in modern flow sensing technology, are mainly made of materials with positive temperature coefficients (PTC and suffer from a self-heating effect and slow response time. Therefore, the design of novel devices and careful selection of materials are required to improve the overall flow sensor performance. In this work we propose graphene field-effect transistor (GFET to be used as microflow sensor. Temperature distribution in graphene channel was simulated and the analysis of heat convection was performed to establish the relation between the fluidic flow velocity and the temperature gradient. It was shown that the negative temperature coefficient (NTC of graphene could enable the self-protection of the device and should minimize sensing error from currentinduced heating. It was also argued that the planar design of the GFET sensor makes it suitable for the real application due to supposed mechanical stability of such a construction.

  19. Application of the Levenshtein Distance Metric for the Construction of Longitudinal Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Harold C.; van Wamelen, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of longitudinal data in education is becoming more prevalent given the nature of testing systems constructed for No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). However, constructing the longitudinal data files remains a significant challenge. Students move into new schools, but in many cases the unique identifiers (ID) that should remain constant…

  20. Geometrical features in longitudinal sputtering hollow cathode discharges for laser applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihailova, D.B.; Dijk, van J.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Karatodorov, S.; Zahariev, P.; Grozeva, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal sputtering hollow cathode discharge (HCD) used as active medium for lasing is studied by means of numerical modelling. Due to the longitudinal non-uniformities of the discharge, the laser operation could be strongly affected. The non-uniformity of the discharge is mainly influenced by

  1. Application of velocity filtering to optical-flow passive ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniv, Yair

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the velocity filtering method as applied to optical-flow passive ranging under real-world conditions is evaluated. The theory of the 3-D Fourier transform as applied to constant-speed moving points is reviewed, and the space-domain shift-and-add algorithm is derived from the general 3-D matched filtering formulation. The constant-speed algorithm is then modified to fit the actual speed encountered in the optical flow application, and the passband of that filter is found in terms of depth (sensor/object distance) so as to cover any given range of depths. Two algorithmic solutions for the problems associated with pixel interpolation and object expansion are developed, and experimental results are presented.

  2. Principles and Applications of Flow Injection Analysis in Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    In practical applications biosensors are often forced to operate under less than optimal conditions. Because of their construction, and the physical processes and chemical reactions involved in their operation, compromise conditions are frequently required to synchronize all events taking place....... Therefore, and in order to implement functions such as periodic calibration, conditioning and possible regeneration of the biosensor, and, very importantly, to yield the freedom to select the optimum detection means, it is advantageous to use these devices in a flow-through mode, particularly by employing...... the flow injection (FI) approach. The capacity of FI, as offering itself as a complementary facility to augment the performance of biosensors, and in many cases as an attractive alternative, is demonstrated by reference to selected examples, comprising assays based on enzymatic procedures with optical...

  3. The Application of Intensive Longitudinal Methods to Investigate Change: Stimulating the Field of Applied Family Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Katharine T

    2016-03-01

    The use of intensive longitudinal methods (ILM)-rapid in situ assessment at micro timescales-can be overlaid on RCTs and other study designs in applied family research. Particularly, when done as part of a multiple timescale design-in bursts over macro timescales-ILM can advance the study of the mechanisms and effects of family interventions and processes of family change. ILM confers measurement benefits in accurately assessing momentary and variable experiences and captures fine-grained dynamic pictures of time-ordered processes. Thus, ILM allows opportunities to investigate new research questions about intervention effects on within-subject (i.e., within-person, within-family) variability (i.e., dynamic constructs) and about the time-ordered change process that interventions induce in families and family members beginning with the first intervention session. This paper discusses the need and rationale for applying ILM to family intervention evaluation, new research questions that can be addressed with ILM, example research using ILM in the related fields of basic family research and the evaluation of individual-based interventions. Finally, the paper touches on practical challenges and considerations associated with ILM and points readers to resources for the application of ILM.

  4. On air-chemistry reduction for hypersonic external flow applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf; Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The existence of the slow manifold for the air-mixture system is shown. • The QSSA estimate of the slow manifold is fairly accurate. • For mid-temperature range the reduction mechanisms could be useful. - Abstract: In external hypersonic flows, viscous and compressibility effects generate very high temperatures leading to significant chemical reactions among air constituents. Therefore, hypersonic flow computations require coupled calculations of flow and chemistry. Accurate and efficient computations of air-chemistry kinetics are of much importance for many practical applications but calculations accounting for detailed chemical kinetics can be prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying chemical kinetics reduction schemes for hypersonic air-chemistry. We consider two chemical kinetics sets appropriate for three different temperature ranges: 2500 K to 4500 K; 4500 K to 9000 K; and above 9000 K. By demonstrating the existence of the so-called the slow manifold in each of the chemistry sets, we show that judicious chemical kinetics reduction leading to significant computational savings is possible without much loss in accuracy

  5. Subchannel friction factors for rod bundles: laminar flow predictions and their application to turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.P.

    1979-02-01

    For the calculation of friction factors the use of correlations validated for smooth circular tubes along with the duct hydraulic diameter is known to be inappropriate for certain non-circular geometries. In order to test the validity and range of application of such correlations to the subchannels of rod bundles a computer programme has been written for the prediction of subchannel laminar velocity distributions and friction coefficients for fully developed flow. The theoretical basis and development of the programme is described along with comparisons between predictions and existing solutions for some simple geometries. Using the computer programme a wide range of calculations have been carried out for flow sections representing edge, corner and internal subchannels of rod bundles with particular emphasis on those of in-line pin bundle geometries. Where comparison can be made the predicted laminar coefficients are in excellent agreement with existing solutions. Although the approach adopted here could be used as the basis of a model for the subchannel axial friction factor, careful account should be taken of enhanced turbulent momentum transfer in situations where the flow is not unidirectional. (UK)

  6. Unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Jeppe

    1999-09-01

    The present report describes numerical investigation of two-dimensional unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability. The report is divided in two parts. Part A describes the purely aerodynamic part, while Part B includes the aeroelastic part. In Part A a transition prediction algorithm based on a simplified version of the e{sup n} method is proposed. Laminar Boundary Layer instability data are stored in a database from which stability characteristics can be extracted by interpolation. Input to the database are laminar integral boundary layer parameters. These are computed from an integral boundary layer formulation coupled to a Navier-Stokes flow solver. Five different airfoils are considered at fixed angle of attack, and the flow is computed assuming both fully turbulent and transitional flow and compared with experimental data. Results indicate that using a transition model the drag prediction is improved considerably. Also the lift is slightly improved. At high angles of attack transition will affect leading edge separation which again will affect the overall vortex shedding. If the transition point is not properly predicted this will affect the whole hysteresis curve. The transition model developed in the present work showed more stable predictions compared to the empirical transition model. In Part B a simple three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) structural dynamics model is developed and coupled to the aerodynamics models from Part A. A 2nd order accurate time integration scheme is used to solve the equations of motion. Two airfoils are investigated. The aeroelastic models predict stable conditions well at low angle of attack. But at high angles of attack, and where unstable behaviour is expected, only the Navier-Stokes solver predict correct aeroelastic response. The semi-empirical dynamic stall model does not predict vortex shedding and moment correctly leading to an erroneous aerodynamic damping. (au) 5 tabs.; 55 ills., 52 refs.

  7. Optimal power flow application issues in the Pool paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, G.; Bompard, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the application of the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) to competitive markets. Since the OPF is a central decision-making tool its application to the more decentralized decision-making in the competitive electricity markets requires considerable care. There are some intrinsic challenges associated with the effective OPF application in the competitive environment due to the inherent characteristics of the OPF formulation. Two such characteristics are the flatness of the optimum surface and the consequent continuum associated with the optimum. In addition to these OPF structural characteristics, the level of authority vested in the central decision-making entity has major ramifications. These factors have wide ranging economic impacts, whose implications are very pronounced due to the fact that, unlike in the old vertically integrated utility environment, various market players are affected differently. The effects include price volatility, financial health of various players and the integrity of the market itself. We apply appropriate metrics to evaluate market efficiency and how the various players fare. We study the impacts of OPF applications in the Pool paradigm, with both supply and demand side explicitly modeled, and provide extensive numerical results on systems based on IEEE 30-bus and 118-bus networks. The results show the variability of nodal prices and the skew possible in different 'optimal' allocations among competing suppliers. Such variability in the results may lead to serious disputes among the players and the central decision-making authority. Directions for future research are discussed. (author)

  8. Application of pattern mixture models to address missing data in longitudinal data analysis using SPSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Heesook; Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue A

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal studies are used in nursing research to examine changes over time in health indicators. Traditional approaches to longitudinal analysis of means, such as analysis of variance with repeated measures, are limited to analyzing complete cases. This limitation can lead to biased results due to withdrawal or data omission bias or to imputation of missing data, which can lead to bias toward the null if data are not missing completely at random. Pattern mixture models are useful to evaluate the informativeness of missing data and to adjust linear mixed model (LMM) analyses if missing data are informative. The aim of this study was to provide an example of statistical procedures for applying a pattern mixture model to evaluate the informativeness of missing data and conduct analyses of data with informative missingness in longitudinal studies using SPSS. The data set from the Patients' and Families' Psychological Response to Home Automated External Defibrillator Trial was used as an example to examine informativeness of missing data with pattern mixture models and to use a missing data pattern in analysis of longitudinal data. Prevention of withdrawal bias, omitted data bias, and bias toward the null in longitudinal LMMs requires the assessment of the informativeness of the occurrence of missing data. Missing data patterns can be incorporated as fixed effects into LMMs to evaluate the contribution of the presence of informative missingness to and control for the effects of missingness on outcomes. Pattern mixture models are a useful method to address the presence and effect of informative missingness in longitudinal studies.

  9. Effects of multidisciplinary teamwork on lead times and patient flow in the emergency department: a longitudinal interventional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntlin Athlin, Asa; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Farrohknia, Nasim

    2013-11-01

    Long waiting times for emergency care are claimed to be caused by overcrowded emergency departments and non-effective working routines. Teamwork has been suggested as a promising solution to these issues. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of teamwork in a Swedish emergency department on lead times and patient flow. The study was set in an emergency department of a university hospital where teamwork, a multi-professional team responsible for the whole care process for a group of patients, was introduced. The study has a longitudinal non-randomized intervention study design. Data were collected for five two-week periods during a period of 1.5 years. The first part of the data collection used an ABAB design whereby standard procedure (A) was altered weekly with teamwork (B). Then, three follow-ups were conducted. At last follow-up, teamwork was permanently implemented. The outcome measures were: number of patients handled within teamwork time, time to physician, total visit time and number of patients handled within the 4-hour target. A total of 1,838 patient visits were studied. The effect on lead times was only evident at the last follow-up. Findings showed that the number of patients handled within teamwork time was almost equal between the different study periods. At the last follow-up, the median time to physician was significantly decreased by 11 minutes (p = 0.0005) compared to the control phase and the total visit time was significantly shorter at last follow-up compared to control phase (p = Teamwork seems to contribute to the quality improvement of emergency care in terms of small but significant decreases in lead times. However, although efficient work processes such as teamwork are necessary to ensure safe patient care, it is likely not sufficient for bringing about larger decreases in lead times or for meeting the 4-hour target in the emergency department.

  10. Applied longitudinal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Ware, James H

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . [this book] should be on the shelf of everyone interested in . . . longitudinal data analysis.""-Journal of the American Statistical Association   Features newly developed topics and applications of the analysis of longitudinal data Applied Longitudinal Analysis, Second Edition presents modern methods for analyzing data from longitudinal studies and now features the latest state-of-the-art techniques. The book emphasizes practical, rather than theoretical, aspects of methods for the analysis of diverse types of lo

  11. Arrival-Time Detection and Ultrasonic Flow-Meter Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatzen, Morten; Soendergaard, Peter; Latino, Carl; Voss, Frands; Andersen, Niels Lervad; Brokate, Martin; Bounaim, Aicha

    2006-01-01

    The Danfoss problem on ultrasonic flow measurement has been separated into three parts each handled by a subgroup of the authors listed above. The first subgroup deals with a presentation of modelling equations describing the physics of ultrasonic flow meters employing reciprocal ultrasonic transducer systems. The mathematical model presented allows the electrical output signal to be determined corresponding to any time-dependent electrical input signal. The transducers modelled consist of a piezoceramic material layer and a passive acoustic matching layer. The second subgroup analyzes the possibility of coding the input signal so as to simplify arrival-time detection by re.nding the coded input sequence in the received signal. The narrow-band nature of the transducers makes this problem non-trivial but suggestions for improvement are proposed. The analysis given is based on traditional autoand cross-correlation techniques. The third subgroup attempts to improve existing correlation methods in determining arrival-time detection of signals. A mathematical formulation of the problem is given and the application to a set of real signals provided by Danfoss A/S is performed with good results

  12. An application of actinide elements for a redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamana, Hajimu; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2000-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of U, Np, Pu and Am were discussed from the viewpoint of cell active materials. From the thermodynamic properties and the kinetics of electrode reactions, it is found that neptunium in the aqueous system can be utilized as an active material of the redox flow battery for the electric power storage. A new neptunium redox battery is proposed in the present article: the galvanic cell is expressed by (-)|Np 3+ , Np 4+ |NpO 2 + , NpO 2 2+ |(+). The neptunium battery is expected to have more excellent charge and discharge performance than the current vanadium battery, whereas the thermodynamic one of the former is comparable to the latter. For the development of a uranium redox battery, the application of the redox reactions in the non-aqueous solvents is essential. (author)

  13. Dynamic mobility applications policy analysis : policy and institutional issues for intelligent network flow optimization (INFLO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The report documents policy considerations for the Intelligent Network Flow Optimization (INFLO) connected vehicle applications : bundle. INFLO aims to optimize network flow on freeways and arterials by informing motorists of existing and impen...

  14. Analysis of Applicability of Flow Averaging Pitot Tubes in the Areas of Flow Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochwała Sławomir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The issues connected with the complex design of various facilities, including up-to-date boiler equipment as well as the ways of organizing the space around them, are the reasons why there is often a lack of room for mounting a flowmeter in accordance with the recommendations of manufacturers. In most cases the problem is associated with ensuring sufficient lengths of straight pipe leading into and out of a flowmeter. When this condition cannot be fulfilled, the uncertainty of measurement increases above the value guaranteed by the manufacturer of the flowmeter. This sort of operation problem has encouraged the authors of this paper to undertake research aimed at the analysis of applicability of averaging Pitot tubes in the areas of flow disturbance.

  15. Application of the annular dispersed flow model to two-phase critical flow calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivandaev, A.I.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1977-01-01

    The application of the annular dispersed flow model with an effective monodisperse core to the calculation of vapour-liquid mixture maximum rates through long pipes is discussed. An effect of the main dominant parameters such as evaporation intensity, diameter of drops picked out from the film surface and initial drop diameter at the pipe inlet on the outlet critical condition formation process has been investigated. The corresponding model constants have been determined. The calculated and experimental values of critical rates and pressure profiles along the channel have been found to be in a satisfactory agreement in the studied range of parameters. The observed non-conformity of the calculated and experimental values of critical pressures and vapour contents can be due to inadequate accuracy of the experimental techniques

  16. Mathematical modeling of swirled flows in industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekterev, A. A.; Gavrilov, A. A.; Sentyabov, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    Swirled flows are widely used in technological devices. Swirling flows are characterized by a wide range of flow regimes. 3D mathematical modeling of flows is widely used in research and design. For correct mathematical modeling of such a flow, it is necessary to use turbulence models, which take into account important features of the flow. Based on the experience of computational modeling of a wide class of problems with swirling flows, recommendations on the use of turbulence models for calculating the applied problems are proposed.

  17. Installation of a flow cytometry facility and some applications in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M.; Kellington, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Flow cytometry has enormous potential in many areas of experimental pathology. Details of the installation and commissioning of a flow cytometer at the Harwell Laboratory are described. Following an explanation of the principles of flow cytometry, several applications to specific problems in radiobiology are discussed. Also included are results of some preliminary studies with the Harwell flow cytometer on samples such as blood, bone marrow, macrophages and cell cultures, and a discussion of future applications. (author)

  18. Poisson Growth Mixture Modeling of Intensive Longitudinal Data: An Application to Smoking Cessation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyko, Mariya P.; Li, Yuelin; Rindskopf, David

    2012-01-01

    Intensive longitudinal data (ILD) have become increasingly common in the social and behavioral sciences; count variables, such as the number of daily smoked cigarettes, are frequently used outcomes in many ILD studies. We demonstrate a generalized extension of growth mixture modeling (GMM) to Poisson-distributed ILD for identifying qualitatively…

  19. Modelling variable dropout in randomised controlled trials with longitudinal outcomes: application to the MAGNETIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Powell, Colin; Williamson, Paula Ruth

    2016-04-28

    Clinical trials with longitudinally measured outcomes are often plagued by missing data due to patients withdrawing or dropping out from the trial before completing the measurement schedule. The reasons for dropout are sometimes clearly known and recorded during the trial, but in many instances these reasons are unknown or unclear. Often such reasons for dropout are non-ignorable. However, the standard methods for analysing longitudinal outcome data assume that missingness is non-informative and ignore the reasons for dropout, which could result in a biased comparison between the treatment groups. In this article, as a post hoc analysis, we explore the impact of informative dropout due to competing reasons on the evaluation of treatment effect in the MAGNETIC trial, the largest randomised placebo-controlled study to date comparing the addition of nebulised magnesium sulphate to standard treatment in acute severe asthma in children. We jointly model longitudinal outcome and informative dropout process to incorporate the information regarding the reasons for dropout by treatment group. The effect of nebulised magnesium sulphate compared with standard treatment is evaluated more accurately using a joint longitudinal-competing risk model by taking account of such complexities. The corresponding estimates indicate that the rate of dropout due to good prognosis is about twice as high in the magnesium group compared with standard treatment. We emphasise the importance of identifying reasons for dropout and undertaking an appropriate statistical analysis accounting for such dropout. The joint modelling approach accounting for competing reasons for dropout is proposed as a general approach for evaluating the sensitivity of conclusions to assumptions regarding missing data in clinical trials with longitudinal outcomes. EudraCT number 2007-006227-12 . Registration date 18 Mar 2008.

  20. Homogenization of complex flows in porous media and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutridurga-Ramaiah, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    Our work is a contribution to the understanding of transport of solutes in a porous medium. It has applications in groundwater contaminant transport, CO 2 sequestration, underground storage of nuclear waste, oil reservoir simulations. We derive expressions for the effective Taylor dispersion taking into account convection, diffusion, heterogeneous geometry of the porous medium and reaction phenomena. Microscopic phenomena at the pore scale are up-scaled to obtain effective behaviour at the observation scale. Method of two-scale convergence with drift from the theory of homogenization is employed as an up-scaling technique. In the first part of our work, we consider reactions of mass exchange type, adsorption/desorption, at the fluid-solid interface of the porous medium. Starting with coupled convection-diffusion equations for bulk and surface concentrations of a single solute, coupled via adsorption isotherms, at a microscopic scale we derive effective equations at the macroscopic scale. We consider the microscopic system with highly oscillating coefficients in a strong convection regime i.e., large Peclet regime. The presence of strong convection in the microscopic model leads to the induction of a large drift in the concentration profiles. Both linear and nonlinear adsorption isotherms are considered and the results are compared. In the second part of our work we generalize our results on single component flow to multicomponent flow in a linear setting. In the latter case, the effective parameters are obtained using Factorization principle and two-scale convergence with drift. The behaviour of effective parameters with respect to Peclet number and Damkohler number are numerically studied. Freefem++ is used to perform numerical tests in two dimensions. (author)

  1. The application of low frequency longitudinal guided wave mode for the inspection of multi-hole steel floral pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z H; Xie, X D; Wu, B; Li, Y H; He, C F

    2012-01-01

    Shed-pipe grouting technology, an effective advanced supporting method, is often used in the excavation of soft strata. Steel floral pipes are one of the key load-carrying components of shed-pipe grouting supporting structures. Guided waves are a very attractive methodology to inspect multi-hole steel floral pipes as they offer long range inspection capability, mode and frequency tuning, and cost effectiveness. In this contribution, preliminary experiments are described for the inspection of steel floral pipes using a low frequency longitudinal guided wave mode, L(0,2). The relation between the number of grouting holes and the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first end-reflected signal was obtained. The effect of the grouting holes in steel floral pipes on the propagation velocity of the L(0,2) mode at 30 kHz was analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the typical grouting holes in steel floral pipe have no significant effect on the propagation of this mode. As a result, low frequency longitudinal guided wave modes have potential for the non-destructive long range inspection of multi-hole steel floral pipes. Furthermore, the propagation velocity of the investigated L(0,2) mode at 30 kHz decreases linearly with the increase of the number of grouting holes in a steel floral pipe. It is also noticeable that the effect of the grouting holes cumulates along with the increase in the number of grouting holes and subsequent increase in reflection times of longitudinal guided waves in the steel floral pipe. The application potential of the low frequency longitudinal guided wave technique for the inspection of embedded steel floral pipes is discussed.

  2. New heavy crude oil flow improver increases delivery : application scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, J.; Johnston, R.; Lauzon, P. [ConocoPhillips Specialty Products Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Flow improvers or drag reducing agents have been used for over 25 years as a method to increase fluid flow in hydrocarbon pipelines. The technology is effective in refined projects, light and medium crude oils. This paper presented a new development in flow improver technology that allows treatment of heavy crude oil slates. It discussed case studies of flow improver treatment of heavy oils in various pipeline system as well as factors that affect commercial success. tabs., figs.

  3. Application of longitudinal magnification effect to magnification stereoscopic angiography. A new method of cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K.; Rossmann, K.; Duda, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of stereoscopic cerebral angiography was developed which employs 2X radiographic magnification. In order to obtain the same depth perception in the object as with conventional contact stereoscopic angiography, one can make the x-ray exposures at two focal spot positions which are separated by only 1 inch, whereas the contact technique requires a separation of 4 inches. The smaller distance is possible because, with 2X magnification, the transverse detail in the object is magnified by a factor of two, but the longitudinal detail, which is related to the stereo effect, is magnified by a factor of four, due to the longitudinal magnification effect. The small focal spot separation results in advantages such as improved stereoscopic image detail, better image quality, and low radiation exposure to the patient

  4. Application of longitudinal magnification effect to magnification stereoscopic angiography. A new method of cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, K.; Rossmann, K.; Duda, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of stereoscopic cerebral angiography was developed which employs 2X radiographic magnification. In order to obtain the same depth perception in the object as with conventional contact stereoscopic angiography, one can make the x-ray exposures at two focal spot positions which are separated by only 1 inch, whereas the contact technique requires a separation of 4 inches. The smaller distance is possible because, with 2X magnification, the transverse detail in the object is magnified by a factor of two, but the longitudinal detail, which is related to the stereo effect, is magnified by a factor of four, due to the longitudinal magnification effect. The small focal spot separation results in advantages such as improved stereoscopic image detail, better image quality, and low radiation exposure to the patient.

  5. Application of Depth-Averaged Velocity Profile for Estimation of Longitudinal Dispersion in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available River bed profiles and depth-averaged velocities are used as basic data in empirical and analytical equations for estimating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient which has always been a topic of great interest for researchers. The simple model proposed by Maghrebi is capable of predicting the normalized isovel contours in the cross section of rivers and channels as well as the depth-averaged velocity profiles. The required data in Maghrebi’s model are bed profile, shear stress, and roughness distributions. Comparison of depth-averaged velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients observed in the field data and those predicted by Maghrebi’s model revealed that Maghrebi’s model had an acceptable accuracy in predicting depth-averaged velocity.

  6. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Based Assessment of Tract Alterations: An Application to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobri Baldaranov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a technical biomarker for cerebral microstructural alterations in neurodegenerative diseases is under investigation. In this study, a framework for the longitudinal analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI-based mapping was applied to the assessment of predefined white matter tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as an example for a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease.Methods: DTI was performed every 3 months in six patients with ALS (mean (M = 7.7; range 3 to 15 scans and in six controls (M = 3; range 2–5 scans with the identical scanning protocol, resulting in a total of 65 longitudinal DTI datasets. Fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axonal diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD, and the ratio AD/RD were studied to analyze alterations within the corticospinal tract (CST which is a prominently affected tract structure in ALS and the tract correlating with Braak’s neuropathological stage 1. A correlation analysis was performed between progression rates based on DTI metrics and the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALS-FRS-R.Results: Patients with ALS showed an FA and AD/RD decline along the CST, while DTI metrics of controls did not change in longitudinal DTI scans. The FA and AD/RD decrease progression correlated significantly with ALS-FRS-R decrease progression.Conclusion: On the basis of the longitudinal assessment, DTI-based metrics can be considered as a possible noninvasive follow-up marker for disease progression in neurodegeneration. This finding was demonstrated here for ALS as a fast progressing neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Based Assessment of Tract Alterations: An Application to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldaranov, Dobri; Khomenko, Andrei; Kobor, Ines; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Gorges, Martin; Kassubek, Jan; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective : The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a technical biomarker for cerebral microstructural alterations in neurodegenerative diseases is under investigation. In this study, a framework for the longitudinal analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based mapping was applied to the assessment of predefined white matter tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as an example for a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease. Methods : DTI was performed every 3 months in six patients with ALS (mean (M) = 7.7; range 3 to 15 scans) and in six controls ( M = 3; range 2-5 scans) with the identical scanning protocol, resulting in a total of 65 longitudinal DTI datasets. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axonal diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and the ratio AD/RD were studied to analyze alterations within the corticospinal tract (CST) which is a prominently affected tract structure in ALS and the tract correlating with Braak's neuropathological stage 1. A correlation analysis was performed between progression rates based on DTI metrics and the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALS-FRS-R). Results : Patients with ALS showed an FA and AD/RD decline along the CST, while DTI metrics of controls did not change in longitudinal DTI scans. The FA and AD/RD decrease progression correlated significantly with ALS-FRS-R decrease progression. Conclusion : On the basis of the longitudinal assessment, DTI-based metrics can be considered as a possible noninvasive follow-up marker for disease progression in neurodegeneration. This finding was demonstrated here for ALS as a fast progressing neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Benefits of prescribed flows for salmon smolt survival enhancement vary longitudinally in a highly managed river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courter, Ian; Garrison, Thomas; Kock, Tobias J.; Perry, Russell W.; Child, David; Hubble, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The influence of streamflow on survival of emigrating juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. (smolts) is a major concern for water managers throughout the northeast Pacific Rim. However, few studies have quantified flow effects on smolt survival, and available information does not indicate a consistent flow–survival relationship within the typical range of flows under management control. In the Yakima Basin, Washington, the potential effects of streamflow alterations on smolt survival have been debated for over 20 years. Using a series of controlled flow releases from upper basin reservoirs and radiotelemetry, we quantified the relationship between flow and yearling Chinook salmon smolt survival in the 208 km reach between Roza Dam and the Yakima River mouth. A multistate mark–recapture model accounted for weekly variation in flow conditions experienced by tagged fish in four discrete river segments. Smolt survival was significantly associated with streamflow in the Roza Reach [river kilometre (rkm) 208–189] and marginally associated with streamflow in the Sunnyside Reach (rkm 169–77). However, smolt survival was not significantly associated with flow in the Naches and Prosser Reaches (rkm 189–169 and rkm 77–3). This discrepancy indicates potential differences in underlying flow-related survival mechanisms, such as predation or passage impediments. Our results clarify trade-offs between flow augmentation for fisheries enhancement and other beneficial uses, and our study design provides a framework for resolving uncertainties about streamflow effects on migratory fish survival in other river systems. 

  9. Large eddy simulations of flow and mixing in jets and swirl flows: application to a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schluter, J.U.

    2000-07-01

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are an accepted tool in turbulence research. Most LES investigations deal with low Reynolds-number flows and have a high spatial discretization, which results in high computational costs. To make LES applicable to industrial purposes, the possibilities of LES to deliver results with low computational costs on high Reynolds-number flows have to be investigated. As an example, the cold flow through the Siemens V64.3A.HR gas turbine burner shall be examined. It is a gas turbine burner of swirl type, where the fuel is injected on the surface of vanes perpendicular to the main air flow. The flow regime of an industrial gas turbine is governed by several flow phenomena. The most important are the fuel injection in form of a jet in cross flow (JICF) and the swirl flow issuing into a combustion chamber. In order to prove the ability of LES to deal with these flow phenomena, two numerical investigations were made in order to reproduce the results of experimental studies. The first one deals with JICF. It will be shown that the reproduction of three different JICF is possible with LES on meshes with a low number of mesh points. The results are used to investigate the flow physics of the JICF, especially the merging of two adjacent JICFs. The second fundamental investigation deals with swirl flows. Here, the accuracy of an axisymmetric assumption is examined in detail by comparing it to full 3D LES computations and experimental data. Having demonstrated the ability of LES and the flow solver to deal with such complex flows with low computational efforts, the LES approach is used to examine some details of the burner. First, the investigation of the fuel injection on a vane reveals that the vane flow tends to separate. Furthermore the tendency of the fuel jets to merge is shown. Second, the swirl flow in the combustion chamber is computed. For this investigation the vanes are removed from the burner and swirl is imposed as a boundary condition. As

  10. Core flow control system for field applications; Sistema de controle de core-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granzotto, Desiree G.; Adachi, Vanessa Y.; Bannwart, Antonio C.; Moura, Luiz F.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Sassim, Natache S.D.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudo do Petroleo (CEPETRO); Carvalho, Carlos H.M. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The significant heavy oil reserves worldwide and the presently high crude oil prices make it essential the development of technologies for heavy oil production and transportation. Heavy oils, with their inherent features of high viscosity (100- 10,000 cP) and density (below 20 deg API) require specific techniques to make it viable their flow in pipes at high flow rates. One of the simplest methods, which do not require use of heat or diluents, is provided by oil-water annular flow (core-flow). Among the still unsolved issues regarding core-flow is the two-phase flow control in order to avoid abrupt increases in the pressure drop due to the possible occurrence of bad water-lubricated points, and thus obtain a safe operation of the line at the lowest possible water-oil ratio. This work presents results of core flow tests which allow designing a control system for the inlet pressure of the line, by actuating on the water flow rate at a fixed oil flow rate. With the circuit model and the specified controller, simulations can be done to assess its performance. The experiments were run at core-flow circuit of LABPETRO-UNICAMP. (author)

  11. Derivatives and Global Capital Flows: Applications to Asia

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Kregel

    1998-01-01

    There are four factors involved in the current financial crisis in Asia that have caused surprise. Since the Latin American debt crisis was thought to have been aggravated by the dominance of syndicated private bank lending, borrowers were encouraged to increase private direct investment flows. The stability of capital flows to Asia was used as an example. Yet, the Asian crisis appears to have been precipitated by the reversal of short-term private bank lending. Second, the flows of capital t...

  12. 'TIME': A Web Application for Obtaining Insights into Microbial Ecology Using Longitudinal Microbiome Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksi, Krishanu D; Kuntal, Bhusan K; Mande, Sharmila S

    2018-01-01

    Realization of the importance of microbiome studies, coupled with the decreasing sequencing cost, has led to the exponential growth of microbiome data. A number of these microbiome studies have focused on understanding changes in the microbial community over time. Such longitudinal microbiome studies have the potential to offer unique insights pertaining to the microbial social networks as well as their responses to perturbations. In this communication, we introduce a web based framework called 'TIME' (Temporal Insights into Microbial Ecology'), developed specifically to obtain meaningful insights from microbiome time series data. The TIME web-server is designed to accept a wide range of popular formats as input with options to preprocess and filter the data. Multiple samples, defined by a series of longitudinal time points along with their metadata information, can be compared in order to interactively visualize the temporal variations. In addition to standard microbiome data analytics, the web server implements popular time series analysis methods like Dynamic time warping, Granger causality and Dickey Fuller test to generate interactive layouts for facilitating easy biological inferences. Apart from this, a new metric for comparing metagenomic time series data has been introduced to effectively visualize the similarities/differences in the trends of the resident microbial groups. Augmenting the visualizations with the stationarity information pertaining to the microbial groups is utilized to predict the microbial competition as well as community structure. Additionally, the 'causality graph analysis' module incorporated in TIME allows predicting taxa that might have a higher influence on community structure in different conditions. TIME also allows users to easily identify potential taxonomic markers from a longitudinal microbiome analysis. We illustrate the utility of the web-server features on a few published time series microbiome data and demonstrate the

  13. ‘TIME’: A Web Application for Obtaining Insights into Microbial Ecology Using Longitudinal Microbiome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishanu D. Baksi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Realization of the importance of microbiome studies, coupled with the decreasing sequencing cost, has led to the exponential growth of microbiome data. A number of these microbiome studies have focused on understanding changes in the microbial community over time. Such longitudinal microbiome studies have the potential to offer unique insights pertaining to the microbial social networks as well as their responses to perturbations. In this communication, we introduce a web based framework called ‘TIME’ (Temporal Insights into Microbial Ecology’, developed specifically to obtain meaningful insights from microbiome time series data. The TIME web-server is designed to accept a wide range of popular formats as input with options to preprocess and filter the data. Multiple samples, defined by a series of longitudinal time points along with their metadata information, can be compared in order to interactively visualize the temporal variations. In addition to standard microbiome data analytics, the web server implements popular time series analysis methods like Dynamic time warping, Granger causality and Dickey Fuller test to generate interactive layouts for facilitating easy biological inferences. Apart from this, a new metric for comparing metagenomic time series data has been introduced to effectively visualize the similarities/differences in the trends of the resident microbial groups. Augmenting the visualizations with the stationarity information pertaining to the microbial groups is utilized to predict the microbial competition as well as community structure. Additionally, the ‘causality graph analysis’ module incorporated in TIME allows predicting taxa that might have a higher influence on community structure in different conditions. TIME also allows users to easily identify potential taxonomic markers from a longitudinal microbiome analysis. We illustrate the utility of the web-server features on a few published time series microbiome

  14. High definition graphics application in fluid flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, G.; Merritt, F.; Buning, P.; Watson, V.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Ames is using high spatial/color-resolution computer graphics to interactively visualize flow fields generated by supercomputer solutions for the flow about such vehicles as the Space Shuttle. The scientist's viewing position in three-dimensional space can be interactively changed while the fluid flow is either frozen or moving in time. Animated sequences can then be made for workstation viewing with the aid of specialized software that allows easy editing and automatic tweening of the sequences. Attention is presently given to the software generating the three-dimensional flow field displays, as well as that for creating the animation sequences

  15. RELAPS choked flow model and application to a large scale flow test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Trapp, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The RELAP5 code was used to simulate a large scale choked flow test. The fluid system used in the test was modeled in RELAP5 using a uniform, but coarse, nodalization. The choked mass discharge rate was calculated using the RELAP5 choked flow model. The calulations were in good agreement with the test data, and the flow was calculated to be near thermal equilibrium

  16. A review on numerical models for granular flow inside hoppers and its applications in PBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yushi; Guo Qiuju; Zhang Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Granular flow is the shearing motion of a collection of discrete solid particles which are commonly seen and widely utilized in various industrial applications. One of the essential applications of dense slow granular flow in engineering is the pebble flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactor (PBR). A number of numerical models have been established for researching the basic physical mechanisms and properties of granular flow. For the purpose of generating an appropriate model for high temperature reactor-pebblebed modules (HTR-PM) in the future, numerical models on granular flow in hoppers and some of their previous applications on PBRs are reviewed. In this paper, basic transport and contact mechanisms of granular flow are firstly introduced, then kinetic theory from gas molecules and plastic theory from metal mechanics approaches give descriptions of the macroscopic behavior of rapid flow and quasistatic flow regimes, respectively, subsequently kinematic continuum method and discrete element method (DEM) are presented to describe the bulk features of dense slow flow in hoppers. Since various kinematic models, DEM models and their modified versions for dense slow granular flow in hoppers have been experimentally verified and applied in prediction of pebble flow in PBRs, a promising model for HTR-PM is expected with further work to generate pebble flow profile in the future. (author)

  17. Numerical Evaluation of Averaging BDFT(bidirectional flow tube) Flow Meter on Applicability in the Fouling Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. P.; Jeong, J. H.; Yuna, B. J.; Jerng, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    The results show that the averaging BDFT is a promising flow meter for the accurate measurement of flow rates in the fouling condition of the NPPs. A new instrumentation, an averaging BDFT, was proposed to measure the accurate flow rate under corrosion environment. In this study, to validate the applicability of the averaging BDFT on the fouling conditions, flow analyses using the CFD code were performed. Analyses results show that this averaging BDFT does not lose the measuring performance even under the corrosion environment. Therefore, it is expected that the averaging BDFT can replace the type flow meters for the feedwater pipe of steam generator of NPPs. Most of the NPPs adopt pressure difference type flow meters such as venturi and orifice meters for the measurement of feedwater flow rates to calculate reactor thermal power. However, corrosion products in the feedwater deposits on the flow meter as operating time goes. These effects lead to severe errors in the flow indication and then determination of reactor thermal power. The averaging BDFT has a potentiality to minimize this problem. Therefore, it is expected that the averaging BDFT can replace the type venturi meters for the feedwater pipe of steam generator of NPPs. The present work compares the amplification factor, K, based on CFD calculation against the K obtained from experiments in order to confirm whether a CFD code can be applicable to the evaluation of characteristic for the averaging BDFT. In addition to this, the simulations to take into account of fouling effect are also carried out by rough wall option

  18. Review of retention strategies in longitudinal studies and application to follow-up of ICU survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Catherine M; Matté, Andrea L; Needham, Dale; Herridge, Margaret S

    2007-12-01

    To review the literature on retention strategies in follow-up studies and their relevance to critical care and to comment on the Toronto experience with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) follow-up studies. Literature review and two cohort studies in a tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada. ARDS and SARS patients. Review articles from the social sciences and medicine are summarized and our own experience with two longitudinal studies is drawn upon to elucidate strategies that can be successfully used to attenuate participant drop-out from longitudinal studies. Three key areas for retention of subjects are identified from the literature: (a) respect for patients: respect for their ideas and their time commitment to the research project; (b) tracking: collect information on many patient contacts at the initiation of the study and outline tracking procedures for subjects lost to follow-up; and (c) study personnel: interpersonal skills must be reinforced, flexible working hours mandated, and support offered. Our 5-year ARDS and 1-year SARS study retention rates were 86% and 91%, respectively, using these methods. Strategies to reduce patient attrition are time consuming but necessary to preserve internal and external validity. When the follow-up system is working effectively, researchers can acquire the necessary data to advance knowledge in their field and patients are satisfied that they have an important role to play in the research project.

  19. Flow and oscillations in collapsible tubes: Physiological applications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pressure changes associated with fluid flow in the tube may be enough to generate large area changes. Collapsible ... As a very simple model, consider a single, uniform pipe containing viscous fluid flowing steadily at volume ..... (1986). For each mode the instability occurs through a Hopf bifurcation, which is supercritical.

  20. Numerical Study of Thermal and Flow Characteristics of Plate-Fin Heat Sink with Longitudinal Vortex Generator Installed on the Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Tso Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applied the commercial software ANSYS CFD (FLUENT, for simulating the transient flow field and investigating the influence of each parameter of longitudinal vortex generators (LVGs on the thermal flux of a plate-fin heat sink. Vortex generator was set in front of plate-fin heat sink and under the channel, which was in common-flow-down (CFD and common-flow-up (CFU conditions, which have the result of vortex generator of delta winglet pair (DWP. In this study the parameters were varied, such as the minimum transverse distance between winglet pair, the attack angle of the vortex generator, fins number, the fin height, and the distance between the vortex generator and plate-fin. The coolant fluid flew into the fin-to-fin channel and pushed the vortex from different geometry toward the bottom. This phenomenon took off the heat from the plate to enhance the heat transfer. The numerical results indicated that the LVGs located close to the plate-fin heat sink are zero with the attack angle being 30°, presenting optimal overall conditions.

  1. Visualization of Flow Field: Application of PLIF Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bo Peng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to apply planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF technology to flow field visualization. This experiment was carried out in a one-meter wind tunnel to study the wake flow field around a circular cylinder. This experiment studied the method of injecting tracer into the flow field; the frequency of the vortex in the wake field and the vortex speed are quantitatively analyzed. This paper gives the correspondence between the speed of the flow field and the frequency of the laser, which could be used as a rough reference standard for future wind tunnel visualization experiments. The result shows that PLIF diagnostic technology has great potential in visualization of flow field.

  2. Investigation of co-flow jet flow control and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Alexis M.

    This thesis investigates the performance of co-flow jet (CFJ) flow control and its applications using experimental testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. For a stationary airfoil and wing, CFJ increases the lift coefficient (CL), reduces the drag and may produce thrust at a low angle of attack (AoA). The maximum lift coefficient is substantially increased for a 2D CFJ airfoil and reaches a value of 4.8 at Cmicro = 0.30. The power consumption of the CFJ pump, measured by the power coefficient (Pc), is influenced by a variety of parameters, including the momentum coefficient (C micro ), the AoA, the injection slot location, and the internal cavity configuration. A low Cmicro of 0.04 produces a rather small Pc in the range of 0.01--0.02 while a higher Cmicro rapidly increases the Pc. Due to the stronger leading edge suction effect, increasing the AoA decreases the Pc. That is until the flow is near separation, within about 2°--3° of the stall AoA. An injection slot location within 2%--5% chord from the leading edge very effectively reduces the power coefficient. An internal cavity design with no separation is crucial to minimize the CFJ power consumption. Overall, the CFJ effectiveness is enhanced with an increasing Mach number as long as the flow remains subsonic, typically with free stream Mach number less than 0.4. Two pitching airfoil oscillations with dynamic stall are studied in this thesis, namely the mild dynamic stall and the deep dynamic stall. At Mach 0.3, the CFJ with a relatively low Cmicro of 0.08 removes the mild dynamic stall. Thereby, the time-averaged lift is increased by 32% and the time-averaged drag is decreased by 80%. The resulting time-averaged aerodynamic (L/D)ave, which does not take the pumping power into account, reaches 118.3. When C micro is increased, the time-averaged drag becomes negative, which demonstrates the feasibility of a CFJ to propel helicopter blades using its pump as the only source of power. The deep

  3. Landscape Characteristics and Variations in Longitudinal Stream Flow Contribution in two Headwater Semi-Arid Mountain Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, B.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding what role particular catchment attributes (slope, aspect, landcover, and contributing area) play in the contribution of stream flow is important for land management decisions, especially in the semi-arid western areas of the United States. Our study site is paired small catchments (approximately 9 and 11 km2) in the headwaters of the Weber drainage basin in Northern Utah. These catchments are surrounded by Wasatch formation with loamy textured soils. One catchment is predominantly underlain by quartzite while the other catchment is mostly underlain by limestone. We measured lateral flow gains every 200 to 400 meters using salt dilution gauging techniques throughout the ~5 km long streams. These measurements were taken synoptically 3 times during the seasonal discharge recession (summer 2005). The flows ranged spatially from 4 L s-1 to 55 L s-1 and varied temporally by as much as 50% when comparing the same reaches. Using GIS software, landscape analysis of slope, aspect, contributing area, topographic convergence, riparian and hillslope area, and landcover was performed for each of the delineated stream reach contributing areas. The results were tested for correlations between lateral flow gains measured in the field and different landscape characteristics. Each of the synoptic events was compared with each other to explore effects of seasonal recession on the relationships between flow gain and landscape characteristics.

  4. Application of turbulence modeling to predict surface heat transfer in stagnation flow region of circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Yeh, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical calculations for the turbulent flow field and for the effect of free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow are presented. The emphasis is on the modeling of turbulence and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow. The free stream is steady and incompressible with a Reynolds number of the order of 10 to the 5th power and turbulence intensity of less than 5 percent. For this analysis, the flow field is divided into three regions: (1) a uniform free-stream region where the turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic; (2) an external viscid flow region where the turbulence is distorted by the variation of the mean flow velocity; and, (3) an anisotropic turbulent boundary layer region over the cylinder surface. The turbulence modeling techniques used are the kappa-epsilon two-equation model in the external flow region and the time-averaged turbulence transport equation in the boundary layer region. The turbulence double correlations, the mean velocity, and the mean temperature within the boundary layer are solved numerically from the transport equations. The surface heat transfer rate is calculated as functions of the free-stream turbulence longitudinal microlength scale, the turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds number.

  5. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotoh, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Kubo, K.; Takashima, S.; Moriyama, S.T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugiyama, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Authors have been developing a cryogenic pressure swing adsorption system for hydrogen isotope separation. In the problem of its design and operation, it is necessary to predict the concentration profiles developing in packed beds of adsorbent pellets. The profiling is affected by the longitudinal dispersion of gas flowing in packed beds, in addition to the mass transfer resistance in porous media of adsorbent pellets. In this work, an equation is derived for estimating the packed-bed dispersion coefficient of hydrogen isotopes, by analyzing the breakthrough curves of trace D{sub 2} or HD replacing H{sub 2} adsorbed in synthetic zeolite particles packed columns at the liquefied nitrogen temperature 77.4 K. Since specialized for hydrogen isotopes, this equation can be considered to estimate the dispersion coefficients more reliable for the cryogenic hydrogen isotope adsorption process, than the existing equations. (authors)

  6. Application of tailings flow analyses to field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Catastrophic failures of tailings impoundments, in which liquefied tailings flow over substantial distances, pose severe hazards to the health and safety of people in downstream areas, and have a potential for economic and environmental devastation. The purpose of this study, an extension of prior investigations, was to develop procedures to measure Bingham flow parameters for mine tailings. In addition, the analytical procedures developed by Lucia (1981) and Jeyapalan (1980) for predicting the consequences of tailings flow failures were evaluated and applied to the Tenmile Tailings Pond at Climax, Colorado. Revisions in the simplified equilibrium procedure, developed by Lucia (1981), make it more compatible with infinite slope solutions. Jeyapalan's model was evaluated using a simple rheological analogy, and it appears there are some numerical difficulties with the operation of the computer program TFLOW used to model the displacements and velocities of flow slides. Comparable flow distances can be determined using either model if the flow volume used in the simplified equilibrium procedure is estimated properly. When both analytical procedures were applied to the Tenmile Pond, it was concluded there was no potential for a flow slide at the site

  7. Application of the electrodiffusion method for near-wall flow diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihon J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrodiffusion method is presented as a measuring technique suitable for the flow measurement done in close proximity of the wall, thus in the region difficultly accessible by standard anemometric techniques (e.g. PIV, LDA. The experimental results obtained in different flow configurations (backward-facing step flow, wavy film flow, turbulent channel flow, rising Taylor bubbles document application capabilities of this technique, e.g. for mapping of wall shear stresses, delimitation of stable flow-recirculation zones, detection of short-time reversal of the near-wall flow, investigation of the near-wall turbulence, or detection of moving fluid particles. A new technology of sensor fabrication based on photolithography is introduced and possible applications of microsensors in microfluidic devices discussed.

  8. Development and Application of PIV in Supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Z.; Liu, H.; Chen, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents PIV measurements obtained in Mach 4.0 flowfields performed in the SJTU Hypersonic wind tunnel (HWT). In order to certificate this technique, PIV experiments were conducted to the empty test section to provide uniform flow data for comparison with analysis data. Dynamical properties of particle tracers were investigated to measure the particle response across an oblique shock wave. The flow over a sharp cone at Ma = 4.0 were tested in comparasion with the CFD and schlieren visualization. It is shown that shock wave angles measured with PIV are in good agreement with theory and schlieren visualization, in addition the overall flow is consistent with the CFD results.

  9. An analytical longitudinal dielectric function of primitive electrolyte solutions and its application in predicting thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the longitudinal dielectric function ϵ_l(k) of primitive electrolyte solutions is discussed. Starting from a modified mean spherical approximation, an analytical dielectric function in terms of two parameters is established. These two parameters can be related to the first two decay parameters k_1_,_2 of the dielectric response modes of the bulk system, and can be determined using constraints of k_1_,_2 from statistical theories. Furthermore, a combination of this dielectric function and the molecular Debye-Hückel theory[J. Chem. Phys. 135(2011)104104] leads to a self-consistent mean filed description of electrolyte solutions. Our theory reveals a relationship between the microscopic structure parameters of electrolyte solutions and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties, which is applied to concentrated electrolyte solutions.

  10. Relationship between vibrations of tubular elements of power equipment and dynamic characteristics of longitudinal two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokin, B.S.; Gol'dberg, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical results of statistical nature of forces exciting vibrations of tubular elements, which are flown around with two-phase flows, are given. Relationships for the calculation of a mean-square amplitude and vibration frequency of a tubular element flown around with a two-phase mixture have been obtained. The relationships are confirmed experimentally

  11. Applications of thermoelectric modules on heat flow detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leephakpreeda, Thananchai

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents quantitative analysis and practical scenarios of implementation of the thermoelectric module for heat flow detection. Mathematical models of the thermoelectric effects are derived to describe the heat flow from/to the detected media. It is observed that the amount of the heat flow through the thermoelectric module proportionally induces the conduction heat owing to the temperature difference between the hot side and the cold side of the thermoelectric module. In turn, the Seebeck effect takes place in the thermoelectric module where the temperature difference is converted to the electric voltage. Hence, the heat flow from/to the detected media can be observed from both the amount and the polarity of the voltage across the thermoelectric module. Two experiments are demonstrated for viability of the proposed technique by the measurements of the heat flux through the building wall and thermal radiation from the outdoor environment during daytime. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Flow and clogging mechanisms in porous media with applications to dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinet, P.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze both theoretically and experimentally two mechanisms that are statistical improbable and one mechanism that is negligible from the geometrical point of view. The first mechanism is related with the formation of arches between the grains of a porous matrix. The second mechanism is associated with the presence of preferential paths. The third and last mechanism is the leakage of an infinitely thin fracture in an earth dam. For each case the macroscopic flow was dramatically perturbed. This work is based on a mesoscale, also called mesoscopic, description of the flow of a particle-fluid mixture through a porous matrix. The practical advantage of mesoscale experiments is obvious. However, the limited size of the experimental cell makes the extrapolation of the results to a macroscopic description more difficult. Non-cohesive particles of mm-size were introduced at the top of a Hele-Shaw cell that contained cylindrical obstacles. An image analysis of the video frames, showed that a flow of the Darcy type still exists for the particles at mesoscale. The settling velocity is measured for different degrees of uniformity for the porous matrix. A maximum value of the settling velocity is identified with the formation of 'trains' of particles that settle faster than single particles. Longitudinal and transversal velocities were measured and corrected from the settling velocity. The result is that there is no longitudinal dispersion for the particles. One pore filled before the next pore is invaded. Particles that are transported through a porous medium can be trapped in many different ways. The final outcome is usually the formation of clusters. Experiments show a subtle mechanism of trapping particles. The formation of arches between the grains of the porous matrix induces the formation of subclusters that finally agglomerate into large clusters. The growing rate of such clusters is mainly proportional to the number of subclusters

  13. Application of the load flow and random flow models for the analysis of power transmission networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, Enrico; Piccinelli, Roberta; Delfanti, Maurizio; Olivieri, Valeria; Pozzi, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the classical load flow model and the random flow model are considered for analyzing the performance of power transmission networks. The analysis concerns both the system performance and the importance of the different system elements; this latter is computed by power flow and random walk betweenness centrality measures. A network system from the literature is analyzed, representing a simple electrical power transmission network. The results obtained highlight the differences between the LF “global approach” to flow dispatch and the RF local approach of randomized node-to-node load transfer. Furthermore, computationally the LF model is less consuming than the RF model but problems of convergence may arise in the LF calculation.

  14. Fast X-ray imaging of two-phase flows: Application to cavitating flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlifa, Ilyass

    2014-01-01

    A promising method based on fast X-ray imaging has been developed to investigate the dynamics and the structure of complex two-phase flows. It has been applied in this work on cavitating flows created inside a Venturi-type test section and helped therefore to better understand flows inside cavitation pockets. Seeding particles were injected into the flow to trace the liquid phase. Thanks to the characteristics of the beam provided by the APS synchrotron (Advance Photon Source, USA), high definition X-ray images of the flow containing simultaneously information for both liquid and vapour were obtained. Velocity fields of both phases were thus calculated using image cross-correlation algorithms. Local volume fractions of vapour have also been obtained using local intensities of the images. Beforehand however, image processing is required to separate phases for velocity measurements. Validation methods of all applied treatments were developed, they allowed to characterise the measurement accuracy. This experimental technique helped us to have more insight into the dynamic of cavitating flows and especially demonstrates the presence of significant slip velocities between phases. (author)

  15. Application of Shark Skin Flow Control Techniques to Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jackson Alexander

    Due to millions of years of evolution, sharks have evolved to become quick and efficient ocean apex predators. Shark skin is made up of millions of microscopic scales, or denticles, that are approximately 0.2 mm in size. Scales located on the shark's body where separation control is paramount (such as behind the gills or the trailing edge of the pectoral fin) are capable of bristling. These scales are hypothesized to act as a flow control mechanism capable of being passively actuated by reversed flow. It is believed that shark scales are strategically sized to interact with the lower 5% of a boundary layer, where reversed flow occurs at the onset of boundary layer separation. Previous research has shown shark skin to be capable of controlling separation in water. This thesis aims to investigate the same passive flow control techniques in air. To investigate this phenomenon, several sets of microflaps were designed and manufactured with a 3D printer. The microflaps were designed in both 2D (rectangular) and 3D (mirroring shark scale geometry) variants. These microflaps were placed in a low-speed wind tunnel in the lower 5% of the boundary layer. Solid fences and a flat plate diffuser with suction were placed in the tunnel to create different separated flow regions. A hot film probe was used to measure velocity magnitude in the streamwise plane of the separated regions. The results showed that low-speed airflow is capable of bristling objects in the boundary layer. When placed in a region of reverse flow, the microflaps were passively actuated. Microflaps fluctuated between bristled and flat states in reverse flow regions located close to the reattachment zone.

  16. Development and application of streakline visualization in hypervelocity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, P.; Hornung, H.G. [Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A method for visualizing streaklines in hypervelocity flows has been developed. The method uses the high temperatures produced in hypervelocity flows to ablate small amounts of sodium deposited onto a wire stretched across the flow and to broaden the lines in the sodium spectrum. By using a dye laser, tuned to a wavelength close to one of the sodium D-lines, as the light source in shadowgraph or Schlieren visualization, streaklines seeded with sodium become visible through absorption and/or enhanced refractivity. The technique has been used to investigate the stability of the shear layer produced by the curved bow shock on a cylindrically blunted wedge. The results suggest that the shear layer is unstable, exhibiting structures with a wavelength that is comparable to half the nose radius of the body. (orig.)

  17. CIME course on Ricci Flow and Geometric Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mantegazza, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Presenting some impressive recent achievements in differential geometry and topology, this volume focuses on results obtained using techniques based on Ricci flow. These ideas are at the core of the study of differentiable manifolds. Several very important open problems and conjectures come from this area and the techniques described herein are used to face and solve some of them. The book's four chapters are based on lectures given by leading researchers in the field of geometric analysis and low-dimensional geometry/topology, respectively offering an introduction to: the differentiable sphere theorem (G. Besson), the geometrization of 3-manifolds (M. Boileau), the singularities of 3-dimensional Ricci flows (C. Sinestrari), and Kahler-Ricci flow (G. Tian). The lectures will be particularly valuable to young researchers interested in differential manifolds.

  18. Is residual memory variance a valid method for quantifying cognitive reserve? A longitudinal application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Brickman, Adam M.; Narkhede, Atul; Griffith, Erica Y.; Guzman, Vanessa A.; Schupf, Nicole; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve describes the mismatch between brain integrity and cognitive performance. Older adults with high cognitive reserve are more resilient to age-related brain pathology. Traditionally, cognitive reserve is indexed indirectly via static proxy variables (e.g., years of education). More recently, cross-sectional studies have suggested that reserve can be expressed as residual variance in episodic memory performance that remains after accounting for demographic factors and brain pathology (whole brain, hippocampal, and white matter hyperintensity volumes). The present study extends these methods to a longitudinal framework in a community-based cohort of 244 older adults who underwent two comprehensive neuropsychological and structural magnetic resonance imaging sessions over 4.6 years. On average, residual memory variance decreased over time, consistent with the idea that cognitive reserve is depleted over time. Individual differences in change in residual memory variance predicted incident dementia, independent of baseline residual memory variance. Multiple-group latent difference score models revealed tighter coupling between brain and language changes among individuals with decreasing residual memory variance. These results suggest that changes in residual memory variance may capture a dynamic aspect of cognitive reserve and could be a useful way to summarize individual cognitive responses to brain changes. Change in residual memory variance among initially non-demented older adults was a better predictor of incident dementia than residual memory variance measured at one time-point. PMID:26348002

  19. Is residual memory variance a valid method for quantifying cognitive reserve? A longitudinal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Manly, Jennifer J; Brickman, Adam M; Narkhede, Atul; Griffith, Erica Y; Guzman, Vanessa A; Schupf, Nicole; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive reserve describes the mismatch between brain integrity and cognitive performance. Older adults with high cognitive reserve are more resilient to age-related brain pathology. Traditionally, cognitive reserve is indexed indirectly via static proxy variables (e.g., years of education). More recently, cross-sectional studies have suggested that reserve can be expressed as residual variance in episodic memory performance that remains after accounting for demographic factors and brain pathology (whole brain, hippocampal, and white matter hyperintensity volumes). The present study extends these methods to a longitudinal framework in a community-based cohort of 244 older adults who underwent two comprehensive neuropsychological and structural magnetic resonance imaging sessions over 4.6 years. On average, residual memory variance decreased over time, consistent with the idea that cognitive reserve is depleted over time. Individual differences in change in residual memory variance predicted incident dementia, independent of baseline residual memory variance. Multiple-group latent difference score models revealed tighter coupling between brain and language changes among individuals with decreasing residual memory variance. These results suggest that changes in residual memory variance may capture a dynamic aspect of cognitive reserve and could be a useful way to summarize individual cognitive responses to brain changes. Change in residual memory variance among initially non-demented older adults was a better predictor of incident dementia than residual memory variance measured at one time-point. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Transformation techniques for cross-sectional and longitudinal endocrine data: application to salivary cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert; Plessow, Franziska

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine time series often lack normality and homoscedasticity most likely due to the non-linear dynamics of their natural determinants and the immanent characteristics of the biochemical analysis tools, respectively. As a consequence, data transformation (e.g., log-transformation) is frequently applied to enable general linear model-based analyses. However, to date, data transformation techniques substantially vary across studies and the question of which is the optimum power transformation remains to be addressed. The present report aims to provide a common solution for the analysis of endocrine time series by systematically comparing different power transformations with regard to their impact on data normality and homoscedasticity. For this, a variety of power transformations of the Box-Cox family were applied to salivary cortisol data of 309 healthy participants sampled in temporal proximity to a psychosocial stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test). Whereas our analyses show that un- as well as log-transformed data are inferior in terms of meeting normality and homoscedasticity, they also provide optimum transformations for both, cross-sectional cortisol samples reflecting the distributional concentration equilibrium and longitudinal cortisol time series comprising systematically altered hormone distributions that result from simultaneously elicited pulsatile change and continuous elimination processes. Considering these dynamics of endocrine oscillations, data transformation prior to testing GLMs seems mandatory to minimize biased results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Flow through collapsible tubes at low Reynolds numbers. Applicability of the waterfall model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, C K; Scott, J B; Wang, C Y

    1980-07-01

    The applicability of the waterfall model was tested using the Starling resistor and different viscosities of fluids to vary the Reynolds number. The waterfall model proved adequate to describe flow in the Starling resistor model only at very low Reynolds numbers (Reynolds number less than 1). Blood flow characterized by such low Reynolds numbers occurs only in the microvasculature. Thus, it is inappropriate to apply the waterfall model indiscriminately to flow through large collapsible veins.

  2. Analytical applications of a recycled flow nuclear magnetic resonance system: quantitative analysis of slowly relaxing nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, D.A. Jr.; Lee, R.W.K.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of a recycled flow system for the efficient quantitative analysis of NMR spectra is demonstrated. Requisite conditions are first established for the quantitative flow experiment and then applied to a variety of compounds. An application of the technique to determination of the average polymer chain length for a silicone polymer by quantitative flow 29 Si NMR is also presented. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  3. A continuum theory for two-phase flows of particulate solids: application to Poiseuille flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsorno, Davide; Varsakelis, Christos; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2015-11-01

    In the first part of this talk, we present a novel two-phase continuum model for incompressible fluid-saturated granular flows. The model accounts for both compaction and shear-induced dilatancy and accommodates correlations for the granular rheology in a thermodynamically consistent way. In the second part of this talk, we exercise this two-phase model in the numerical simulation of a fully-developed Poiseuille flow of a dense suspension. The numerical predictions are shown to compare favorably against experimental measurements and confirm that the model can capture the important characteristics of the flow field, such as segregation and formation of plug zones. Finally, results from parametric studies with respect to the initial concentration, the magnitude of the external forcing and the width of the channel are presented and the role of these physical parameters is quantified. Financial Support has been provided by SEDITRANS, an Initial Training Network of the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme

  4. Application of HPCN to direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, RWCP; Veldman, AEP; van Waveren, GM; Hertzberger, B; Sloot, P

    1997-01-01

    This poster shows how HPCN can be used as a path-finding tool for turbulence research. The parallelization of direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow using the data-parallel model and Fortran 95 constructs is treated, both on a shared memory and a distributed memory computer.

  5. Application of multiphase flow methods to horizontal underbalanced drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S. P.; Gregory, G. A.; Munro, N.; Muqeem, M.

    1998-12-31

    Ways in which multiphase flow pressure loss calculations can be used in the design and optimization of underbalanced drilling operations are demonstrated. Existing pressure loss calculation methods are evaluated using detailed field measurements for three oil wells and one gas well drilled underbalanced with coiled tubing. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs.

  6. A new modified-serpentine flow field for application in high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singdeo, Debanand; Dey, Tapobrata; Gaikwad, Shrihari

    2017-01-01

    field design is proposed and its usefulness for the fuel cell applications are evaluated in a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The proposed geometry retains some of the features of serpentine flow field such as multiple bends, while modifications are made in its in-plane flow path...

  7. Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    October 2008 - December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows...influence cavity hysteresis behavior. These observations are used to guide improved supercavitating -vehicle analyses including numerical predictions...experiments, and modeling 15. SUBJECT TERMS supercavitation , computational fluid dynamics, multiphase flow 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  8. Development of a FBG vortex flow sensor for high-temperature applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Schiferli, W.; Nieuwland, R.A.; Franzen, A.; Boer, J.J. den; Jansen, T.H.

    2011-01-01

    A robust fibre optic flow sensor has been developed to measure liquid or gas flows at ambient temperatures up to 300°C and pressures up to 100 bar. While such environmental conditions are typical in pressurized steam systems in the oil and gas industry (downhole and surface), wider applications are

  9. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossow, Molly; Gratton, Enrico; Mantulin, William M.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles--such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  10. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Molly; Mantulin, William M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-04-01

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles-such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  11. An Introduction to Generalized Estimating Equations and an Application to Assess Selectivity Effects in a Longitudinal Study on Very Old Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisletta, Paolo; Spini, Dario

    2004-01-01

    Correlated data are very common in the social sciences. Most common applications include longitudinal and hierarchically organized (or clustered) data. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are a convenient and general approach to the analysis of several kinds of correlated data. The main advantage of GEE resides in the unbiased estimation of…

  12. Heat transfer characteristics and entropy generation for wing-shaped-tubes with longitudinal external fins in cross-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E. Sayed; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A. [Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    A numerical study is conducted to clarify heat transfer characteristics, effectiveness and entropy generation for a bundle of wingshaped-tubes attached to Longitudinal fins (LF) at downstream side. The air-side Re{sub a} ranged from 1.8 x 10{sup 3} to 9.7 x 10{sup 3} . The fin height (h{sub f}) and fin thickness (δ) have been changed as: (2 mm <= hf <= 12 mm) and (1.5 mm <= δ <= 3.5 mm). The analysis of entropy generation is based on the principle of minimizing the rate of total entropy generation that includes the generation of entropy due to heat transfer and friction losses. The temperature field around the wing-shaped-tubes with (LF) is predicted using commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Correlations of Nu{sub a}, St{sub a}, and Bejan number (Be), as well as the irreversibility distribution ratio (Φ) in terms of Re{sub a} and design parameters for the studied bundle are presented. Results indicated that, installing fins with heights from 2 to 12 mm results in an increase in Nu{sub a} from 11 to 36% comparing with that of wing-shaped tubes without fins (NOF). The highest and lowest values of effectiveness(ε) at every value of the considered Re{sub a} range are occurred at hf = 6 mm and (NOF), espectively. The wing-shaped-tubes heat exchanger with hf = 6 mm has the highest values of (ε), efficiency index (η) and area goodness factor (G{sub a}) and also the lowest values of Φ and hence the best performance comparing with other arrangements. The minimum values of Φ are occurred at hf = 6 mm. (Be) decreases with increasing Re{sub a} for all studied hf. The heat transfer irreversibility predominates for (1800 <= Re{sub a} <= 4200) while the opposite is true for (6950 < Re{sub a} <= 9700). δ has negligible effect on Nu{sub a} and heat transfer irreversibility. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those, previously, obtained for similar available studies showed good agreements.

  13. Heat transfer characteristics and entropy generation for wing-shaped-tubes with longitudinal external fins in cross-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E. Sayed; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to clarify heat transfer characteristics, effectiveness and entropy generation for a bundle of wingshaped-tubes attached to Longitudinal fins (LF) at downstream side. The air-side Re a ranged from 1.8 x 10 3 to 9.7 x 10 3 . The fin height (h f ) and fin thickness (δ) have been changed as: (2 mm <= hf <= 12 mm) and (1.5 mm <= δ <= 3.5 mm). The analysis of entropy generation is based on the principle of minimizing the rate of total entropy generation that includes the generation of entropy due to heat transfer and friction losses. The temperature field around the wing-shaped-tubes with (LF) is predicted using commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Correlations of Nu a , St a , and Bejan number (Be), as well as the irreversibility distribution ratio (Φ) in terms of Re a and design parameters for the studied bundle are presented. Results indicated that, installing fins with heights from 2 to 12 mm results in an increase in Nu a from 11 to 36% comparing with that of wing-shaped tubes without fins (NOF). The highest and lowest values of effectiveness(ε) at every value of the considered Re a range are occurred at hf = 6 mm and (NOF), espectively. The wing-shaped-tubes heat exchanger with hf = 6 mm has the highest values of (ε), efficiency index (η) and area goodness factor (G a ) and also the lowest values of Φ and hence the best performance comparing with other arrangements. The minimum values of Φ are occurred at hf = 6 mm. (Be) decreases with increasing Re a for all studied hf. The heat transfer irreversibility predominates for (1800 <= Re a <= 4200) while the opposite is true for (6950 < Re a <= 9700). δ has negligible effect on Nu a and heat transfer irreversibility. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those, previously, obtained for similar available studies showed good agreements.

  14. A Two-Step Approach for Analysis of Nonignorable Missing Outcomes in Longitudinal Regression: an Application to Upstate KIDS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danping; Yeung, Edwina H; McLain, Alexander C; Xie, Yunlong; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2017-09-01

    Imperfect follow-up in longitudinal studies commonly leads to missing outcome data that can potentially bias the inference when the missingness is nonignorable; that is, the propensity of missingness depends on missing values in the data. In the Upstate KIDS Study, we seek to determine if the missingness of child development outcomes is nonignorable, and how a simple model assuming ignorable missingness would compare with more complicated models for a nonignorable mechanism. To correct for nonignorable missingness, the shared random effects model (SREM) jointly models the outcome and the missing mechanism. However, the computational complexity and lack of software packages has limited its practical applications. This paper proposes a novel two-step approach to handle nonignorable missing outcomes in generalized linear mixed models. We first analyse the missing mechanism with a generalized linear mixed model and predict values of the random effects; then, the outcome model is fitted adjusting for the predicted random effects to account for heterogeneity in the missingness propensity. Extensive simulation studies suggest that the proposed method is a reliable approximation to SREM, with a much faster computation. The nonignorability of missing data in the Upstate KIDS Study is estimated to be mild to moderate, and the analyses using the two-step approach or SREM are similar to the model assuming ignorable missingness. The two-step approach is a computationally straightforward method that can be conducted as sensitivity analyses in longitudinal studies to examine violations to the ignorable missingness assumption and the implications relative to health outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Application of artificial radioactive tracers for groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, M.S.; Aly, A.I.M.; Swailem, F.M.; Nada, A.A.; Awad, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, the groundwater velocity was estimated by applying radioactive tracer techniques: the single well and the multiple well methods. In the first single well method, radioactive iodine-131 was injected in the well and the radioactivity was monitored with time. The groundwater flow was estimated as a function of the concentration dilution factor of the tracer taking into consideration the permeability of the filter screen and the aquifer. The second method (the multiple well technique) is based on direct measuring of the period of time the tracer needs to disperse from the injection well to one of receptor well arranged in a circle around the injection. The latter method was found to be more accurate and reliable and has also the advantage of determining the groundwater velocity and direction of flow as well. The limitations of the single well technique are discussed and a detailed comparison between single and multi-well techniques is given

  16. Application of system reliability analytical method, GO-FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Michiyuki

    1999-01-01

    The Ship Research Institute proceed a developmental study on GO-FLOW method with various advancing functionalities for the system reliability analysis method occupying main parts of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). Here was attempted to intend to upgrade functionality of the GO-FLOW method, to develop an analytical function integrated with dynamic behavior analytical function, physical behavior and probable subject transfer, and to prepare a main accident sequence picking-out function. In 1997 fiscal year, in dynamic event-tree analytical system, an analytical function was developed by adding dependency between headings. In simulation analytical function of the accident sequence, main accident sequence of MRX for improved ship propulsion reactor became possible to be covered perfectly. And, input data for analysis was prepared with a function capable easily to set by an analysis operator. (G.K.)

  17. Application of mathematical model for simulation of groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Filho, Carlos Alberto de; Branco, Otavio Eurico de Aquino; Loureiro, Celso de Oliveira

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of the present research work is the groundwater flow characterization of the aquifer system of the Engenho Nogueira Creek watershed basin, particularly within the limits of the Pampulha Campus of the Federal University of Minas Gerais and nearby. In order to reach the aforementioned goal, a numerical model was implemented for simulation the groundwater flow, using the MODFLOW code. The local hydrogeology consists of a porous granular aquifer placed above and hydraulically connected to a fractured aquifer, constituting a unique aquifer system, mixed and phreatic type, heterogeneous and anisotropic. The local hydrogeological system is strongly influenced by a complex drain system and by the Engenho Nogueira Creek. After calibration, it was possible to predict the average phreatic depth measured in the observation wells for the period in study with a standard deviation of 1.65 m and a correlation coefficient of 0.94. (author)

  18. Advances in transitional flow modeling applications to helicopter rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive description of numerical methods and validation processes for predicting transitional flows based on the Langtry–Menter local correlation-based transition model, integrated with both one-equation Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) and two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models. A comparative study is presented to combine the respective merits of the two coupling methods in the context of predicting the boundary-layer transition phenomenon from fundamental benchmark flows to realistic helicopter rotors. The book will of interest to industrial practitioners working in aerodynamic design and the analysis of fixed-wing or rotary wing aircraft, while also offering advanced reading material for graduate students in the research areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), turbulence modeling and related fields.

  19. Application of the parallel BDDC preconditioner to the Stokes flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šístek, Jakub; Sousedík, Bedřich; Burda, P.; Mandel, J.; Novotný, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2011), s. 429-435 ISSN 0045-7930 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100760702; GA ČR GA106/08/0403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : BDDC * domain decomprosition * iterative substructuring * Stokes flow Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.810, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045793011000053

  20. 76 FR 58252 - Applications for New Awards; Statewide, Longitudinal Data Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern... the fourteenth calendar day before the application deadline date falls on a Federal holiday, the next business day following the Federal holiday), you mail or fax a written statement to the Department...

  1. Application of analytical procedure on system reliability, GO-FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Michiyuki

    2000-01-01

    In the Ship Research Institute, research and development of GO-FLOW procedure with various advanced functions as a system reliability analysis method occupying main part of the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) were promoted. In this study, as an important evaluation technique on executing PSA with lower than level 3, by intending fundamental upgrading of the GO-FLOW procedure, a safety assessment system using the GO-FLOW as well as an analytical function coupling of dynamic behavior analytical function and physical behavior of the system with stochastic phenomenon change were developed. In 1998 fiscal year, preparation and verification of various functions such as dependence addition between the headings, rearrangement in order of time, positioning of same heading to plural positions, calculation of forming frequency with elapsing time were carried out. And, on a simulation analysis function of accident sequence, confirmation on analysis covering all of main accident sequence in the reactor for improved marine reactor, MRX was carried out. In addition, a function near automatically producible on input data for analysis was also prepared. As a result, the conventional analysis not always easy understanding on analytical results except an expert of PSA was solved, and understanding of the accident phenomenon, verification of validity on analysis, feedback to analysis, and feedback to design could be easily carried out. (G.K.)

  2. Digital video image processing applications to two phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscos, Y.; Bismes, F.; Hebrard, P.; Lavergne, G.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid spraying is common in various fields (combustion, cooling of hot surfaces, spray drying,...). For two phase flows modeling, it is necessary to test elementary laws (vaporizing drops, equation of motion of drops or bubbles, heat transfer..). For example, the knowledge of the laws related to the behavior of vaporizing liquid drop in a hot airstream and impinging drops on a hot surface is important for two phase flow modeling. In order to test these different laws in elementary cases, the authors developed different measurement techniques, associating video and microcomputers. The test section (built in perpex or glass) is illuminated with a thin sheet of light generated by a 15mW He-Ne laser and appropriate optical arrangement. Drops, bubbles or liquid film are observed at right angle by a video camera synchronised with a microcomputer either directly or with an optical device (lens, telescope, microscope) providing sufficient magnification. Digitizing the video picture in real time associated with an appropriate numerical treatment allows to obtain, in a non interfering way, a lot of informations relative to the pulverisation and the vaporization as function of space and time (drop size distribution; Sauter mean diameter as function of main flow parameters: air velocity, surface tension, temperature; isoconcentration curves, size evolution relative to vaporizing drops, film thickness evolution spreading on a hot surface...)

  3. Designs, formats and applications of lateral flow assay: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sajid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript provides a brief overview of latest research involving the use of lateral flow assay for qualitative and quantitative analysis in different areas. The excellent features and versatility of detection formats make these strips an ideal choice for point of care applications. We outline and critically discuss detection formats, molecular recognition probes, labels, and detection systems used in lateral flow assay. Applications in different fields along with selected examples from the literature have been included to show analytical performance of these devices. At the end, we summarize accomplishments, weaknesses and future challenges in the area of lateral flow strips.

  4. Self-organizing hybrid Cartesian grid generation and application to external and internal flow problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deister, F.; Hirschel, E.H. [Univ. Stuttgart, IAG, Stuttgart (Germany); Waymel, F.; Monnoyer, F. [Univ. de Valenciennes, LME, Valenciennes (France)

    2003-07-01

    An automatic adaptive hybrid Cartesian grid generation and simulation system is presented together with applications. The primary computational grid is an octree Cartesian grid. A quasi-prismatic grid may be added for resolving the boundary layer region of viscous flow around the solid body. For external flow simulations the flow solver TAU from the ''deutsche zentrum fuer luft- und raumfahrt (DLR)'' is integrated in the simulation system. Coarse grids are generated automatically, which are required by the multilevel method. As an application to an internal problem the thermal and dynamic modeling of a subway station is presented. (orig.)

  5. GO-FLOW methodology. Basic concept and integrated analysis framework for its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    GO-FLOW methodology is a success oriented system analysis technique, and is capable of evaluating a large system with complex operational sequences. Recently an integrated analysis framework of the GO-FLOW has been developed for the safety evaluation of elevator systems by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Japanese Government. This paper describes (a) an Overview of the GO-FLOW methodology, (b) Procedure of treating a phased mission problem, (c) Common cause failure analysis, (d) Uncertainty analysis, and (e) Integrated analysis framework. The GO-FLOW methodology is a valuable and useful tool for system reliability analysis and has a wide range of applications. (author)

  6. Inflow measurements from blade-mounted flow sensors: Flow analysis, application and aeroelastic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Mølgaard

    -mounted flow sensor, BMFS, e.g. a five-hole pitot tube, which has been used in several research experiments over the last 30 years. The BMFS measured flow velocity is, however, located inside the induction zone and thereby influenced by the aerodynamic properties, the control strategy and the operational......The power and load performance of wind turbines are both crucial for the development and expansion of wind energy. The power and loads are highly dependent on the inflow conditions, which can be measured using different types of sensors mounted on nearby met masts, on the nacelle, at the spinner...... or at the blade. Each combination of sensor type and mounting position has advantages and shortcomings. To characterise the inflow that results in high and low fatigue loads, information about the temporal and spatial variations within the rotor area is required. This information can be obtained from a blade...

  7. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann computation of creeping fluid flow in roll-coating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Isac; Kesana, Balashanker; Perumal, D. Arumuga

    2018-04-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has advanced as a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods used to solve complex fluid systems and heat transfer problems. It has ever-increasingly attracted the interest of researchers in computational physics to solve challenging problems of industrial and academic importance. In this current study, LBM is applied to simulate the creeping fluid flow phenomena commonly encountered in manufacturing technologies. In particular, we apply this novel method to simulate the fluid flow phenomena associated with the "meniscus roll coating" application. This prevalent industrial problem encountered in polymer processing and thin film coating applications is modelled as standard lid-driven cavity problem to which creeping flow analysis is applied. This incompressible viscous flow problem is studied in various speed ratios, the ratio of upper to lower lid speed in two different configurations of lid movement - parallel and anti-parallel wall motion. The flow exhibits interesting patterns which will help in design of roll coaters.

  9. Application of double-layered skin phantoms for optical flow imaging during laser tattoo treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-il; Song, Woosub; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    The feasible application of double-layered skin phantoms was evaluated to identify artificial blood flow with a Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) system for laser tattoo treatments. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used to fabricate the artificial phantoms with flow channels embedded. A double-integrating sphere system with an inverse adding-doubling method quantified both the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients for epidermis and dermis phantoms. Both OCT and caliper measurements confirmed the double-layered phantom structure (epidermis = 136 ± 17 µm vs. dermis = 3.0 ± 0.1 mm). The DOCT method demonstrated that high flow rates were associated with high image contrast, visualizing the position and the shape of the flow channel. Application of the channel-embedded skin phantoms in conjunction with DOCT can be a reliable technique to assess dynamic variations in the blood flow during and after laser tattoo treatments.

  10. Heat transfer and fluid flow in biological processes advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Sid

    2015-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes covers emerging areas in fluid flow and heat transfer relevant to biosystems and medical technology. This book uses an interdisciplinary approach to provide a comprehensive prospective on biofluid mechanics and heat transfer advances and includes reviews of the most recent methods in modeling of flows in biological media, such as CFD. Written by internationally recognized researchers in the field, each chapter provides a strong introductory section that is useful to both readers currently in the field and readers interested in learning more about these areas. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes is an indispensable reference for professors, graduate students, professionals, and clinical researchers in the fields of biology, biomedical engineering, chemistry and medicine working on applications of fluid flow, heat transfer, and transport phenomena in biomedical technology. Provides a wide range of biological and clinical applications of fluid...

  11. The use of vitamins as tracer dyes for laser-induced fluorescence in liquid flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zähringer, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Tracers commonly used in experimental flow studies are mostly nocuous to the environment and human health. Particularly, in large flow installations, this can become a problem. In this study, a solution of this problem is presented, based on using water-soluble vitamins. Five of them are examined here for their applicability in flow studies. Vitamins B2 and B6 turned out to be the most promising candidates, and the dependency of their fluorescence intensity on parameters like concentration, laser energy, temperature, and pH are determined for two commonly used laser excitation wavelengths (532, 355 nm). Two examples of application in a static mixer and a spray flow are shown and demonstrate the applicability of the vitamin tracers.

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in psychiatry: Application to clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, K.F.; Weinberger, D.R.; Morihisa, J.M.; Zec, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    In the following sections, the authors describe aspects of the xenon-133 inhalation technique as it has been modified in their lab, as well as a number of considerations and prerequisites for setting up such a facility. The authors also discuss the processes by which they technically and clinically validated the methods used. Several case studies follow along with descriptions of the approaches they are taking in investigating psychiatric illnesses with rCBF. Since the concept of a relation between brain functional activity, metabolism, and blood flow has a long history, both in theory and in practice, they first briefly review some of this history and some of the principles involved

  13. Fabrication of microfluidic architectures for optimal flow rate and concentration measurement for lab on chip application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    Optimum flow in micro channel for sensing purpose is challenging. In this study, The optimizations of the fluid sample flows are made through the design and characterization of the novel microfluidics' architectures to achieve the optimal flow rate in the micro channels. The biocompatibility of the Polydimetylsiloxane (Sylgard 184 silicon elastomer) polymer used to fabricate the device offers avenue for the device to be implemented as the universal fluidic delivery system for bio-molecules sensing in various bio-medical applications. The study uses the following methodological approaches, designing a novel microfluidics' architectures by integrating the devices on a single 4 inches silicon substrate, fabricating the designed microfluidic devices using low-cost solution soft lithography technique, characterizing and validating the flow throughput of urine samples in the micro channels by generating pressure gradients through the devices' inlets. The characterization on the urine samples flow in the micro channels have witnessed the constant flow throughout the devices.

  14. Applications of flow visualization to the development of an innovative boom system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.F.V.; Wolek, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new oil retention boom system design was developed using a flow visualization technique. Hydrogen bubbles were generated on a fine wire cathode and placed in a stream of moving water with a strong light source to visualize the flow. Observations were made of the flow patterns around some basic shapes and booms modelled as cylinders with and without a skirt. The most effective system design had two booms with skirts in parallel with a submerged airfoil designed to cause the oil to separate and recirculate. Oil was allowed to flow above the airfoil into the recirculation region between the two floating booms. The new system is expected to outperform the conventional boom system only when flow velocity is high. Its most successful application would be in situations where flow is perpendicular to the length of the boom. 1 ref., 6 figs

  15. Evaluation of electrolytes for redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, M.H.; Dryfe, R.A.W.; Roberts, E.P.L.

    2007-01-01

    A number of redox systems have been investigated in this work with the aim of identifying electrolytes suitable for testing redox flow battery cell designs. The criteria for the selection of suitable systems were fast electrochemical kinetics and minimal cross-contamination of active electrolytes. Possible electrolyte systems were initially selected based on cyclic voltammetry data. Selected systems were then compared by charge/discharge experiments using a simple H-type cell. The all-vanadium electrolyte system has been developed as a commercial system and was used as the starting point in this study. The performance of the all-vanadium system was significantly better than an all-chromium system which has recently been reported. Some metal-organic and organic redox systems have been reported as possible systems for redox flow batteries, with cyclic voltammetry data suggesting that they could offer near reversible kinetics. However, Ru(acac) 3 in acetonitrile could only be charged efficiently to 9.5% of theoretical charge, after which irreversible side reactions occurred and [Fe(bpy) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 2 in acetonitrile was found to exhibit poor charge/discharge performance

  16. Effects of Chaos in Peristaltic Flows: Towards Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeley, Paul W.; Blake, John R.; Smith, David J.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2006-11-01

    One in seven couples in the Western World will have problems conceiving naturally and with the cost of state provided fertility treatment in the United Kingdom being over USD 3Million per annum and a round of treatment paid for privately costing around USD 6000, the desire to understand the mechanisms of infertility is leading to a renewed interest in collaborations between mathematicians and reproductive biologists. Hydrosalpinx is a condition in which the oviduct becomes blocked, fluid filled and dilated. Many women with this condition are infertile and the primary method of treatment is in vitro fertilisation, however, it is found that despite the embryo being implanted into the uterus, the hydrosalpinx adversely affects the implantation rate. We shall consider a mathematical model for peristaltic flow with an emphasis towards modelling the fluid flow in the oviducts and the uterus of humans. We shall consider the effects of chaotic behavior on the system and demonstrate that under certain initial conditions trapping regions can be formed and discuss our results with a view towards understanding the effects of hydrosalpinx.

  17. Application of a vortex shedding flowmeter to the wide range measurement of high temperature gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-01-01

    A single flowmeter was required for helium gas measurement in a Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor loss of coolant simulator. Volumetric flow accuracy of +-1.0% of reading was required over the Reynolds Number range 6 x 10 3 to 1 x 10 6 at flowing pressures from 0.2 to 9 MPa (29 to 1305 psia) at 350 0 C (660 0 F) flowing temperature. Because of its inherent accuracy and rangeability, a vortex shedding flowmeter was selected and specially modified to provide for a remoted thermal sensor. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between signal attenuation and sensor remoting geometry, as well as the relationship between gas flow parameters and remoted thermal sensor signal for both compressed air and helium gas. Based upon the results of these experiments, the sensor remoting geometry was optimized for this application. The resultant volumetric flow rangeability was 155:1. The associated temperature increase at the sensor position was 9 0 C above ambient (25 0 F) at a flowing temperature of 350 0 C. The volumetric flow accuracy was measured over the entire 155:1 flow range at parametric values of flowing density. A volumetric flow accuracy of +- % of reading was demonstrated

  18. Flow Cytometric Applicability of Fluorescent Vitality Probes on Phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peperzak, L.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The applicability of six fluorescent probes (four esterase probes: acetoxymethyl ester of Calcein [Calcein-AM], 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate [CMFDA], fluorescein diacetate [FDA], and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate [H(2)DCFDA]; and two membrane probes: bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)

  19. Misty Mountain clustering: application to fast unsupervised flow cytometry gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sealfon Stuart C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many important clustering questions in computational biology for which no satisfactory method exists. Automated clustering algorithms, when applied to large, multidimensional datasets, such as flow cytometry data, prove unsatisfactory in terms of speed, problems with local minima or cluster shape bias. Model-based approaches are restricted by the assumptions of the fitting functions. Furthermore, model based clustering requires serial clustering for all cluster numbers within a user defined interval. The final cluster number is then selected by various criteria. These supervised serial clustering methods are time consuming and frequently different criteria result in different optimal cluster numbers. Various unsupervised heuristic approaches that have been developed such as affinity propagation are too expensive to be applied to datasets on the order of 106 points that are often generated by high throughput experiments. Results To circumvent these limitations, we developed a new, unsupervised density contour clustering algorithm, called Misty Mountain, that is based on percolation theory and that efficiently analyzes large data sets. The approach can be envisioned as a progressive top-down removal of clouds covering a data histogram relief map to identify clusters by the appearance of statistically distinct peaks and ridges. This is a parallel clustering method that finds every cluster after analyzing only once the cross sections of the histogram. The overall run time for the composite steps of the algorithm increases linearly by the number of data points. The clustering of 106 data points in 2D data space takes place within about 15 seconds on a standard laptop PC. Comparison of the performance of this algorithm with other state of the art automated flow cytometry gating methods indicate that Misty Mountain provides substantial improvements in both run time and in the accuracy of cluster assignment. Conclusions

  20. Radioactive tracer applications in the study of flow reactors. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyn, J.; Hovorka, J.

    1975-01-01

    Response curves of gas streaming through the jet fluidized bed of a granular material in a rotary-jet pilot reactor were measured for a number of gas flow rates. A mathematical model of the gas residence time distribution was designed. Good agreement of the mathematical model with the experiments permits determining the ratio of streaming through the fluidized bed in form of bubbles of a different size. The measured values were evaluated as the distribution density of the gas residence time (age) at the outlet, the distribution function of the internal gas age in the device, and the so-called intensity function. The gas was labelled by a rapid injection of the radioactive 85 Kr and the response was studied by specially connected Geiger-Mueller counters placed inside the device, immediately above the granular material bed. (author)

  1. Application of magnetohydrodynamic actuation to continuous flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jonathan; Karamata, Boris; Lillis, Brian; Gleeson, James P; Alderman, John; Collins, John K; Lane, William; Mathewson, Alan; Berney, Helen

    2002-11-01

    Continuous flow microreactors with an annular microchannel for cyclical chemical reactions were fabricated by either bulk micromachining in silicon or by rapid prototyping using EPON SU-8. Fluid propulsion in these unusual microchannels was achieved using AC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) actuation. This integrated micropumping mechanism obviates the use of moving parts by acting locally on the electrolyte, exploiting its inherent conductive nature. Both silicon and SU-8 microreactors were capable of MHD actuation, attaining fluid velocities of the order of 300 microm s(-1) when using a 500 mM KCl electrolyte. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a thermocycling process, was chosen as an illustrative example of a cyclical chemistry. Accordingly, temperature zones were provided to enable a thermal cycle during each revolution. With this approach, fluid velocity determines cycle duration. Here, we report device fabrication and performance, a model to accurately describe fluid circulation by MHD actuation, and compatibility issues relating to this approach to chemistry.

  2. An introduction to modeling longitudinal data with generalized additive models: applications to single-case designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kristynn J; Shadish, William R; Steiner, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Single-case designs (SCDs) are short time series that assess intervention effects by measuring units repeatedly over time in both the presence and absence of treatment. This article introduces a statistical technique for analyzing SCD data that has not been much used in psychological and educational research: generalized additive models (GAMs). In parametric regression, the researcher must choose a functional form to impose on the data, for example, that trend over time is linear. GAMs reverse this process by letting the data inform the choice of functional form. In this article we review the problem that trend poses in SCDs, discuss how current SCD analytic methods approach trend, describe GAMs as a possible solution, suggest a GAM model testing procedure for examining the presence of trend in SCDs, present a small simulation to show the statistical properties of GAMs, and illustrate the procedure on 3 examples of different lengths. Results suggest that GAMs may be very useful both as a form of sensitivity analysis for checking the plausibility of assumptions about trend and as a primary data analysis strategy for testing treatment effects. We conclude with a discussion of some problems with GAMs and some future directions for research on the application of GAMs to SCDs. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A Short Introduction to Arterial Spin Labeling and its Application to Flow Territory Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T; Helle, M; Jansen, O

    2015-10-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging method for the assessment of perfusion in various diseases of the brain. In ASL, the magnetization of arterial blood water spins is manipulated in a complete non-invasive way before flowing into the tissue of interest. This allows absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow, thereby, presenting an alternative to contrast-enhanced methods based on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, its potential application for flow territory mapping can provide additional information of the individual configuration of intracerebral blood flow. This article gives a brief overview of the basic ASL methodology and its approaches to image individual perfusion territories. Additionally, the utilization of ASL in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases is presented to provide examples of potential applications of (territorial) ASL in clinical routine.

  4. Bluff body flow and vortex—its application to wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Some interesting phenomena of vortex flows we have found in past experimental research are described. For a given flow configuration, multiple flow patterns can exist and a sudden change from one flow pattern to another can occur. We observed the alternate switching of the flow patterns with irregular periods around a bluff body. The change of vortex flow pattern around a bluff body with geometrical parameters or stratification is not always continuous but often shows a sudden change in the whole flow pattern. Based on our research on vortex flows, an innovative application of the vortex flow to a shrouded wind turbine is made in which the power output of a wind turbine is remarkably enhanced. Unlike the majority of conventional aerodynamic machinery, which tends to minimize vortex shedding, the vortex formation of our ‘brimmed’ shroud plays an important role in capturing and concentrating wind energy. Furthermore, aerodynamic noise is reduced in this design. The blade tip vortex is weakened by a counter-rotating vortex generated along the inner side of the shroud as they travel downstream, making the shrouded wind turbine much quieter than conventional turbines. (paper)

  5. Bluff body flow and vortex—its application to wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohya, Yuji, E-mail: ohya@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Some interesting phenomena of vortex flows we have found in past experimental research are described. For a given flow configuration, multiple flow patterns can exist and a sudden change from one flow pattern to another can occur. We observed the alternate switching of the flow patterns with irregular periods around a bluff body. The change of vortex flow pattern around a bluff body with geometrical parameters or stratification is not always continuous but often shows a sudden change in the whole flow pattern. Based on our research on vortex flows, an innovative application of the vortex flow to a shrouded wind turbine is made in which the power output of a wind turbine is remarkably enhanced. Unlike the majority of conventional aerodynamic machinery, which tends to minimize vortex shedding, the vortex formation of our ‘brimmed’ shroud plays an important role in capturing and concentrating wind energy. Furthermore, aerodynamic noise is reduced in this design. The blade tip vortex is weakened by a counter-rotating vortex generated along the inner side of the shroud as they travel downstream, making the shrouded wind turbine much quieter than conventional turbines. (paper)

  6. Analysis of Capillary Coating Die Flow in an Optical Fiber Coating Applicator

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoungjin Kim

    2011-01-01

    Viscous heating becomes significant in the high speed resin coating process of glass fibers for optical fiber manufacturing. This study focuses on the coating resin flows inside the capillary coating die of optical fiber coating applicator and they are numerically simulated to examine the effects of viscous heating and subsequent temperature increase in coating resin. Resin flows are driven by fast moving glass fiber and the pressurization at the coating die inlet, while ...

  7. Modeling of Multisize Bubbly Flow and Application to the Simulation of Boiling Flows with the Neptune_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Morel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modeling of boiling multisize bubbly flows and its application to the simulation of the DEBORA experiment. We follow the method proposed originally by Kamp, assuming a given mathematical expression for the bubble diameter pdf. The original model is completed by the addition of some new terms for vapor compressibility and phase change. The liquid-to-interface heat transfer term, which essentially determines the bubbles condensation rate in the DEBORA experiment, is also modeled with care. First numerical results realized with the Neptune_CFD code are presented and discussed.

  8. The applicability of a weight loss grading system in cancer cachexia: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnildhaug, Ola Magne; Blum, David; Wilcock, Andrew; Fayers, Peter; Strasser, Florian; Baracos, Vickie E; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Kaasa, Stein; Laird, Barry; Solheim, Tora S

    2017-10-01

    A body mass index (BMI) adjusted weight loss grading system (WLGS) is related to survival in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of the WLGS by confirming its prognostic validity, evaluating its relationship to cachexia domains, and exploring its ability to predict cachexia progression. An international, prospective observational study of patients with incurable cancer was conducted. For each patient, weight loss grade was scored 0-4. Weight loss grade 0 represents a high BMI with limited weight loss, progressing through to weight loss grade 4 representing low BMI and a high degree of weight loss. Survival analyses were used to confirm prognostic validity. Analyses of variance were used to evaluate the relationship between the WLGS and cachexia domains [anorexia, dietary intake, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and physical and emotional functioning]. Cox regression was used to evaluate if the addition of cachexia domains to the WLGS improved prognostic accuracy. Predictive ability of cachexia progression was assessed by estimating proportion of patients progressing to a more advanced weight loss grade. One thousand four hundred six patients were analysed (median age 66 years; 50% female, 63% KPS ≤ 70). The overall effect of the WLGS on survival was significant as expressed by change in -2 log likelihood (P cachexia domains significantly deteriorated with increasing weight loss grade, and deterioration was greatest for dietary intake, with a difference corresponding to 0.87 standard deviations between weight loss grades 0 and 4. The addition of KPS, anorexia, and physical and emotional functioning improved the prognostic accuracy of the WLGS. Likelihood of cachexia progression was greater in patients with weight loss grade 2 (39%) than that with weight loss grade 0 (19%) or 1 (22%). The WLGS is related to survival, cachexia domains, and the likelihood of progression. Adding certain cachexia domains to the WLGS

  9. FLOW CYTOMETRIC APPLICABILITY OF FLUORESCENT VITALITY PROBES ON PHYTOPLANKTON1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peperzak, Louis; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2011-06-01

    The applicability of six fluorescent probes (four esterase probes: acetoxymethyl ester of Calcein [Calcein-AM], 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate [CMFDA], fluorescein diacetate [FDA], and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate [H 2 DCFDA]; and two membrane probes: bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol [DiBAC 4 (3)] and SYTOX-Green) as vitality stains was tested on live and killed cells of 40 phytoplankton strains in exponential and stationary growth phases, belonging to 12 classes and consisting of four cold-water, 26 temperate, and four warm-water species. The combined live/dead ratios of all six probes indicated significant differences between the 12 plankton classes (P live/dead ratios of FDA and CMFDA were not significantly different from each other, and both performed better than Calcein-AM and H 2 DCFDA (P live/dead ratios) among all six probes belonged to nine genera from six classes of phytoplankton. In conclusion, FDA, CMFDA, DIBAC 4 (3), and SYTOX-Green represent a wide choice of vitality probes in the study of phytoplankton ecology, applicable in many species from different algal classes, originating from different regions and at different stages of growth. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  10. A Solution Adaptive Structured/Unstructured Overset Grid Flow Solver with Applications to Helicopter Rotor Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method that solves both the three dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and the Euler equations using overset structured and solution adaptive unstructured grids with applications to helicopter rotor flowfields. The overset structured grids use an implicit finite-difference method to solve the thin-layer Navier-Stokes/Euler equations while the unstructured grid uses an explicit finite-volume method to solve the Euler equations. Solutions on a helicopter rotor in hover show the ability to accurately convect the rotor wake. However, isotropic subdivision of the tetrahedral mesh rapidly increases the overall problem size.

  11. Applications of Continuous-Flow Photochemistry in Organic Synthesis, Material Science, and Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambié, Dario; Bottecchia, Cecilia; Straathof, Natan J W; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-09-14

    Continuous-flow photochemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention from researchers in academia and industry as this technology provides reduced reaction times, higher selectivities, straightforward scalability, and the possibility to safely use hazardous intermediates and gaseous reactants. In this review, an up-to-date overview is given of photochemical transformations in continuous-flow reactors, including applications in organic synthesis, material science, and water treatment. In addition, the advantages of continuous-flow photochemistry are pointed out and a thorough comparison with batch processing is presented.

  12. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  13. Measurement of longitudinal flow decorrelations in Pb+Pb collisions at √{s_{ {NN}}}=2.76 and 5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Bergsten, L. J.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casha, A. F.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. 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V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakamiya, K.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2018-02-01

    Measurements of longitudinal flow correlations are presented for charged particles in the pseudorapidity range |η |ATLAS detector at the LHC. It is found that the correlation between the harmonic flow coefficients v_n measured in two separated η intervals does not factorise into the product of single-particle coefficients, and this breaking of factorisation, or flow decorrelation, increases linearly with the η separation between the intervals. The flow decorrelation is stronger at 2.76 TeV than at 5.02 TeV. Higher-order moments of the correlations are also measured, and the corresponding linear coefficients for the k{ {th}}-moment of the v_n are found to be proportional to k for v_3, but not for v_2. The decorrelation effect is separated into contributions from the magnitude of v_n and the event-plane orientation, each as a function of η . These two contributions are found to be comparable. The longitudinal flow correlations are also measured between v_n of different order in n. The decorrelations of v_2 and v_3 are found to be independent of each other, while the decorrelations of v_4 and v_5 are found to be driven by the nonlinear contribution from v_2^2 and v_2v_3, respectively.

  14. Domain decomposition techniques for boundary elements application to fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Brebbia, C A; Skerget, L

    2007-01-01

    The sub-domain techniques in the BEM are nowadays finding its place in the toolbox of numerical modellers, especially when dealing with complex 3D problems. We see their main application in conjunction with the classical BEM approach, which is based on a single domain, when part of the domain needs to be solved using a single domain approach, the classical BEM, and part needs to be solved using a domain approach, BEM subdomain technique. This has usually been done in the past by coupling the BEM with the FEM, however, it is much more efficient to use a combination of the BEM and a BEM sub-domain technique. The advantage arises from the simplicity of coupling the single domain and multi-domain solutions, and from the fact that only one formulation needs to be developed, rather than two separate formulations based on different techniques. There are still possibilities for improving the BEM sub-domain techniques. However, considering the increased interest and research in this approach we believe that BEM sub-do...

  15. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L., E-mail: dlk15@cornell.edu [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, 120 Olin Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853-5201 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  16. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  17. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit

    2015-11-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  18. Applicability of Kinematic and Diffusive models for mud-flows: a steady state analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cristo, Cristiana; Iervolino, Michele; Vacca, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    The paper investigates the applicability of Kinematic and Diffusive Wave models for mud-flows with a power-law shear-thinning rheology. In analogy with a well-known approach for turbulent clear-water flows, the study compares the steady flow depth profiles predicted by approximated models with those of the Full Dynamic Wave one. For all the models and assuming an infinitely wide channel, the analytical solution of the flow depth profiles, in terms of hypergeometric functions, is derived. The accuracy of the approximated models is assessed by computing the average, along the channel length, of the errors, for several values of the Froude and kinematic wave numbers. Assuming the threshold value of the error equal to 5%, the applicability conditions of the two approximations have been individuated for several values of the power-law exponent, showing a crucial role of the rheology. The comparison with the clear-water results indicates that applicability criteria for clear-water flows do not apply to shear-thinning fluids, potentially leading to an incorrect use of approximated models if the rheology is not properly accounted for.

  19. Encyclopedia of two-phase heat transfer and flow II special topics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the two–set series is to present a very detailed and up–to–date reference for researchers and practicing engineers in the fields of mechanical, refrigeration, chemical, nuclear and electronics engineering on the important topic of two-phase heat transfer and two-phase flow. The scope of the first set of 4 volumes presents the fundamentals of the two-phase flows and heat transfer mechanisms, and describes in detail the most important prediction methods, while the scope of the second set of 4 volumes presents numerous special topics and numerous applications, also including numerical simulation methods. Practicing engineers will find extensive coverage to applications involving: multi-microchannel evaporator cold plates for electronics cooling, boiling on enhanced tubes and tube bundles, flow pattern based methods for predicting boiling and condensation inside horizontal tubes, pressure drop methods for singularies (U-bends and contractions), boiling in multiport tubes, and boiling and condens...

  20. Application of laminar flow control to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Y. S.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept of the application of hybrid laminar flow to modern commercial transport aircraft was successfully flight tested on a Boeing 757 aircraft. In this limited demonstration, in which only part of the upper surface of the swept wing was designed for the attainment of laminar flow, significant local drag reduction was measured. This paper addresses the potential application of this technology to laminarize the external surface of large, modern turbofan engine nacelles which may comprise as much as 5-10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control (HLFC) pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  1. Finite element methods in incompressible, adiabatic, and compressible flows from fundamental concepts to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Mutsuto

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the finite element method in fluid flows. It is targeted at researchers, from those just starting out up to practitioners with some experience. Part I is devoted to the beginners who are already familiar with elementary calculus. Precise concepts of the finite element method remitted in the field of analysis of fluid flow are stated, starting with spring structures, which are most suitable to show the concepts of superposition/assembling. Pipeline system and potential flow sections show the linear problem. The advection–diffusion section presents the time-dependent problem; mixed interpolation is explained using creeping flows, and elementary computer programs by FORTRAN are included. Part II provides information on recent computational methods and their applications to practical problems. Theories of Streamline-Upwind/Petrov–Galerkin (SUPG) formulation, characteristic formulation, and Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) formulation and others are presented with practical results so...

  2. Applicability of higher-order TVD method to low mach number compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Mikio

    1995-01-01

    Steep gradients of fluid density are the influential factor of spurious oscillation in numerical solutions of low Mach number (M<<1) compressible flows. The total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme is a promising remedy to overcome this problem and obtain accurate solutions. TVD schemes for high-speed flows are, however, not compatible with commonly used methods in low Mach number flows using pressure-based formulation. In the present study a higher-order TVD scheme is constructed on a modified form of each individual scalar equation of primitive variables. It is thus clarified that the concept of TVD is applicable to low Mach number flows within the framework of the existing numerical method. Results of test problems of the moving interface of two-component gases with the density ratio ≥ 4, demonstrate the accurate and robust (wiggle-free) profile of the scheme. (author)

  3. Material flow enhancement in production assembly lines under application of zoned order picking systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Živanić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduced research work relates to the possibility of material flow enhancement in production systems, with the apostrophe on material order picking in production assembly lines. The paper presents basic rules and the results related to formed computer models of zoned order picking systems under the application of developed bound cavities method.

  4. Application of Heterogeneous Copper Catalyst in a Continuous Flow Process: Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glin´ski, Marek; Ulkowska, Urszula; Iwanek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, the synthesis of a supported solid catalyst (Cu/SiO2) and its application in the dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol performed under flow conditions was studied. The experiment was planned for a group of two or three students for two 6 h long sessions. The copper catalyst was synthesized using incipient wetness…

  5. The application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent for conducting Appel reactions in flow microreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley A. Roper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein we describe the application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent to the Appel reaction in flow-chemistry processing, to generate various brominated products with high purity and in excellent yields, and with no requirement for further off-line purification.

  6. The application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent for conducting Appel reactions in flow microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Kimberley A; Lange, Heiko; Polyzos, Anastasios; Berry, Malcolm B; Baxendale, Ian R; Ley, Steven V

    2011-01-01

    Herein we describe the application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent to the Appel reaction in flow-chemistry processing, to generate various brominated products with high purity and in excellent yields, and with no requirement for further off-line purification.

  7. Application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Parks, Steven J.; Chan, William M.; Renze, Kevin J.

    1992-01-01

    Several issues relating to the application of Chimera overlapped grids to complex geometries and flowfields are discussed. These include the addition of geometric components with different grid topologies, gridding for intersecting pieces of geometry, and turbulence modeling in grid overlap regions. Sample results are presented for transonic flow about the Space Shuttle launch vehicle. Comparisons with wind tunnel and flight measured pressures are shown.

  8. A new fractional derivative without singular kernel: Application to the modelling of the steady heat flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a new fractional derivative without singular kernel. We consider the potential application for modeling the steady heat-conduction problem. The analytical solution of the fractional-order heat flow is also obtained by means of the Laplace transform.

  9. LINCOM wind flow model: Application to complex terrain with thermal stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkerley, F.; Moreno, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2001-01-01

    LINCOM is a fast linearised and spectral wind flow model for use over hilly terrain. It is designed to rapidly generate mean wind field predictions which provide input to atmospheric dispersion models and wind engineering applications. The thermal module, LINCOM-T, has recently been improved to p...

  10. Confined dense particle-gas flow, application to nuclear fuel relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we investigate particle-gas two-phase flows in the jamming regime where the flow stops in finite time. In this regime, which occurs quite often in nature and industrial applications, the flow is stochastic and needs therefore to be characterized by the jamming probability as well as the flow rate and its fluctuations that depend on the confining geometry, granular microstructure and gas properties. We developed a numerical approach based on the coupling of the Non Smooth Contact Dynamics for the solid phase and a mesoscopic method for the gas phase. We find that the flow rate as a function of the opening is well fit by a power law in agreement with reported experimental data. The presence of a gas affects only the mean flow rate, the flow statistics being sensibly the same as in the absence of the gas. We apply our quantitative statistical results in order to estimate the relocation rate of fragmented nuclear fuel inside its cladding tube as a result of a local balloon caused by an accident (loss-of-coolant accident). (author)

  11. Modeling and design of optimal flow perfusion bioreactors for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Bastida, L Araida; Thirunavukkarasu, Sundaramoorthy; Griffiths, Sarah; Cartmell, Sarah H; Naire, Shailesh

    2012-04-01

    Perfusion bioreactors have been used in different tissue engineering applications because of their consistent distribution of nutrients and flow-induced shear stress within the tissue-engineering scaffold. A widely used configuration uses a scaffold with a circular cross-section enclosed within a cylindrical chamber and inlet and outlet pipes which are connected to the chamber on either side through which media is continuously circulated. However, fluid-flow experiments and simulations have shown that the majority of the flow perfuses through the center. This pattern creates stagnant zones in the peripheral regions as well as in those of high flow rate near the inlet and outlet. This non-uniformity of flow and shear stress, owing to a circular design, results in limited cell proliferation and differentiation in these areas. The focus of this communication is to design an optimized perfusion system using computational fluid dynamics as a mathematical tool to overcome the time-consuming trial and error experimental method. We compared the flow within a circular and a rectangular bioreactor system. Flow simulations within the rectangular bioreactor are shown to overcome the limitations in the circular design. This communication challenges the circular cross-section bioreactor configuration paradigm and provides proof of the advantages of the new design over the existing one. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Transverse and longitudinal event-by-event flow fluctuations of $v_1$−$v_4$ in 5.02 TeV Pb+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Mingliang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Multi-particle flow correlations in Pb+Pb collisions provide unique insight into the nature of event-by-event fluctuations of the initial eccentricity as well as final state dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal directions. This talk presents a detailed study of transverse flow fluctuations using 4 and 6-particle cumulants $v_n\\{4\\}$ and $v_n\\{6\\}$ for $n=1,2,3$ and 4. This includes several new results: the first measurement of a negative dipolar flow $v_1\\{4\\}$; a high-precision measurement of $v_4\\{4\\}$, changing sign around 20-25$\\%$ centrality; observation of an intriguing sign-change pattern of $v_2\\{4\\}$ and $v_2\\{6\\}$ in ultra-central collisions; a detailed study of the cumulant ratio $v_n\\{6\\}/v_n\\{4\\}$ which shows significant deviation of $v_2$ and $v_3$ from both Bessel-Gaussian and elliptic-power distributions. The three-subevent cumulant method is used to show that these results are unlikely to be due to non-flow effects. The talk also presents a detailed study of the longitudinal dynamics o...

  13. CSF flow image using phase-contrast cine MR technique : preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Choi, Hye Young; Baek, Seung Yeon; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of 2-D Cine PC (phase contrast) technique in visualizing the pattern and the site of abnormal CSF flow and to assess the effect of a third ventriculostomy in patients with hydrocephalus. The study group consisted of three normal controls and 13 patients with hydrocephalus, as shown on CT or MRI, and two patients who had undergone their third ventriculostomy. The technique was EKG-gated 2-D Cine PC MRI with velocity encoding 5cm/sec, TR 80msec, TE 12.3-15msec, and flip angle 15-60 degrees. Image quality was analyzed for variable sequences, and CSF flow was observed along the CSF flow pathway. We analyzed continuity and intensity of the CSF flow signal, and obstruction site and flow velocity degree were then defined. Systolic high and diastolic low signal intensity along the CSF flow-pathway, with normal asynchronicity and continuation, were clearly seen in normal controls. In three patients, there was obstruction at the ventricular level while others were either normal or showed a normal pattern with a weak signal. 'Normal' was defined as noncommunicating hydrocephalus and the latter as communicating hydrocephalus. In the two patients who had undergone ventriculostomy, a signal was in one case detected at the site of the third operation. A 2-D Cine PC CSF flow study enables us to see CSF flow signals noninvasively and to detect the site of obstruction of a CSF flow-pathway. It can therefore it can be useful for determining the application of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and assessing the effect of a third ventriculostomy

  14. Modeling of hyaluronan clearance with application to estimation of lymph flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rössler, Andreas; Goswami, Nandu; Fink, Martin; Batzel, Jerry J

    2011-01-01

    One of the important factors in blood pressure regulation is the maintenance of the level of blood volume, which depends on several factors including the rate of lymph flow. Lymph flow can be measured directly using cannulation of lymphatic vessels, which is not clinically feasible, or indirectly by the tracer appearance rate, which is the rate at which macromolecules appear into the blood from the peritoneal cavity. However, indirect lymph flow measurements do not always provide consistent results. Through its contribution to osmotic pressure and resistance to flow, the macromolecule hyaluronan takes part in the regulation of tissue hydration and the maintenance of water and protein homeostasis. It arrives in blood plasma through lymph flow. Lymphatic hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan) concentration is several times higher than that in plasma, suggesting that the lymphatic route may account for the majority of HA found in plasma. Furthermore, circulating levels of HA reflect the dynamic state between delivery to—and removal from—the bloodstream. To develop an accurate estimation of the fluid volume distribution and dynamics, the rate of lymph flow needs to be taken into account and hyaluronan could be used as a marker in estimating this flow. To examine the HA distribution and system fluid dynamics, a six-compartment model, which could reflect both the steady-state relationships and qualitative characteristics of the dynamics, was developed. This was then applied to estimate fluid shifts from the interstitial space via the lymphatic system to the plasma during different physiological stresses (orthostatic stress and the stress of ultrafiltration during dialysis). Sensitivity analysis shows that during ultrafiltration, lymph flow is a key parameter influencing the total HA level, thus suggesting that the model may find applications in addressing the problem of estimating lymph flow. Since the fluid balance between interstitium and plasma is maintained by lymph

  15. A programmable and portable NMES device for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Paul P; Corley, Gavin J; O'Keeffe, Derek T; Conway, Richard; Olaighin, Gearóid

    2009-04-01

    The Duo-STIM, a new, programmable and portable neuromuscular stimulation system for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications is presented. The system consists of a programmer unit and a portable, programmable stimulator unit. The portable stimulator features fully programmable, sensor-controlled, constant-voltage, dual-channel stimulation and accommodates a range of customized stimulation profiles. Trapezoidal and free-form adaptive stimulation intensity envelope algorithms are provided for drop foot correction applications, while time dependent and activity dependent algorithms are provided for blood flow assist applications. A variety of sensor types can be used with the portable unit, including force sensitive resistor-based foot switches and MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope devices. The paper provides a detailed description of the hardware and block-level system design for both units. The programming and operating procedures for the system are also presented. Finally, functional bench test results for the system are presented.

  16. Longitudinal and dynamic measurement invariance of the FACIT-Fatigue scale: an application of the measurement model of derivatives to ECOG-ACRIN study E2805.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Ryne; Cella, David; Zhao, Fengmin; Manola, Judith; DiPaola, Robert S; Wagner, Lynne I; Haas, Naomi B

    2018-03-05

    While quality of life measures may be used to assess meaningful change and group differences, their scaling and validation often rely on a single occasion of measurement. Using the 13-item FACIT-Fatigue questionnaire at three timepoints, this study tests whether individual items change together in ways consistent with a general fatigue factor. The measurement model of derivatives (MMOD) is a novel method for measurement evaluation that directly assesses whether a given factor structure accurately describes how individual test items change over time. MMOD transforms item-level longitudinal data into a set of orthogonal change scores, each one representing either a within-person longitudinal mean or a different type of longitudinal change. These change scores are then factor analyzed and tested for invariance. This approach is applied to the FACIT-Fatigue scale in a sample of patients with renal cell carcinoma treated on 'ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (ECOG-ACRIN) study 2805. Analyses revealed strong evidence of unidimensionality, and apparent factorial invariance using traditional techniques. MMOD revealed a small but statistically significant difference in factor structure ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), where factor loadings were weaker and more variable for measuring longitudinal change. The differences in factor structure were not large enough to substantially affect scale usage in this application, but they do reveal some variability across items in the FACIT-Fatigue in their ability to detect change. Future applications should consider differential sensitivity of individual items in multi-item scales, and perhaps even capitalize upon these differences by selecting items that are more sensitive to change.

  17. A bespoke mobile application for the longitudinal assessment of depression and mood during pregnancy: protocol of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano Belisario, Jose Salvador; Doherty, Kevin; O'Donoghue, John; Ramchandani, Paul; Majeed, Azeem; Doherty, Gavin; Morrison, Cecily; Car, Josip

    2017-05-29

    Depression is a common mental health disorder during pregnancy, with important consequences for mothers and their children. Despite this, it goes undiagnosed and untreated in many women attending antenatal care. Smartphones could help support the prompt identification of antenatal depression in this setting. In addition, these devices enable the implementation of ecological momentary assessment techniques, which could be used to assess how mood is experienced during pregnancy. With this study, we will assess the feasibility of using a bespoke mobile application (app) running on participants' own handsets for the longitudinal (6 months) monitoring of antenatal mood and screening of depression. We will use a randomised controlled study design to compare two types of assessment strategies: retrospective + momentary (consisting of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale plus five momentary and two contextual questions), and retrospective (consisting of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale only). We will assess the impact that these strategies have on participant adherence to a prespecified sampling protocol, dropout rates and timeliness of data completion. We will evaluate differences in acceptance of the technology through a short quantitative survey and open-ended questions. We will also assess the potential effect that momentary assessments could have on retrospective data. We will attempt to identify any patterns in app usage through the analysis of log data. This study has been reviewed and approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee South East Coast-Surrey on 15 April 2016 as a notice of substantial amendment to the original submission (9 July 2015) under the Research Ethics Committee (REC) reference 15/LO/0977. This study is being sponsored by Imperial College London under the reference number 15IC2687 and has been included in the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio under the Central Portfolio Management System number 19280. The

  18. Lessons learned in the verification, validation and application of a coupled heat and fluid flow code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of the authors recent studies in the verification, validation and application of a coupled heat and fluid flow code. Verification has been done against eight analytic and semi-analytic solutions. These solutions include those involving thermal buoyancy flow and fracture flow. Comprehensive field validation studies over a period of four years are discussed. The studies are divided into three stages: (1) history matching, (2) double-blind prediction and confirmation, (3) design optimization. At each stage, parameter sensitivity studies are performed. To study the applications of mathematical models, a problem proposed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) is solved using this verified and validated numerical model as well as two simpler models. One of the simpler models is a semi-analytic method assuming the uncoupling of the heat and fluid flow processes. The other is a graphical method based on a large number of approximations. Variations are added to the basic IEA problem to point out the limits of ranges of applications of each model. A number of lessons are learned from the above investigations. These are listed and discussed

  19. Traffic Flow Prediction Using MI Algorithm and Considering Noisy and Data Loss Conditions: An Application to Minnesota Traffic Flow Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hadi Hosseini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Traffic flow forecasting is useful for controlling traffic flow, traffic lights, and travel times. This study uses a multi-layer perceptron neural network and the mutual information (MI technique to forecast traffic flow and compares the prediction results with conventional traffic flow forecasting methods. The MI method is used to calculate the interdependency of historical traffic data and future traffic flow. In numerical case studies, the proposed traffic flow forecasting method was tested against data loss, changes in weather conditions, traffic congestion, and accidents. The outcomes were highly acceptable for all cases and showed the robustness of the proposed flow forecasting method.

  20. Application of recently developed elliptic blending based models to separated flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, F.; Revell, A.; Craft, T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The study focuses on elliptic blending near-wall models. ► Models are compared on 2- and 3-dimensional separating flows. ► Conclusions are ambiguous on 2-d flows. ► Predictive superiority of Reynolds stress models over eddy viscosity model appear on 3-d flows. - Abstract: This paper considers the application of four Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) models to a range of progressively complex test cases, exhibiting both 2-d and 3-d flow separation. Two Eddy Viscosity Models (EVM) and two Reynolds Stress Transport Models (RSM) are employed, of which two (one in each category) are based on elliptic blending formulations. By both reviewing the conclusions of previous studies, and from the present calculations, this study aims at gaining more insight into the importance of two modelling features for these flows: the usage of turbulence anisotropy resolving schemes, and the near-wall limiting behaviour. In general the anisotropy and near wall treatment offered by both elliptic blending models is observed to offer some improvement over other models tested, although this is not always the case for the 2-d flows, where (as ever) a single “best candidate” model does not emerge.

  1. Applications of Low Density Flow Techniques and Catalytic Recombination at the Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    The talk presents a brief background on defInitions of catalysis and effects associated with chemically nonequilibrium and low-density flows of aerospace interest. Applications of catalytic recombination on surfaces in dissociated flow are given, including aero heating on reentry spacecraft thermal protection surfaces and reflection of plume flow on pressure distributions associated with the space station. Examples include aero heating predictions for the X-38 test vehicle, the inlet of a proposed gas-sampling probe used in high enthalpy test facilities, and a parabolic body at angle of attack. The effect of accommodation coefficients on thruster induced pressure distributions is also included. Examples of tools used include simple aero heating formulas based on boundary layer solutions, an engineering approximation that uses axisymmetric viscous shock layer flow to simulate full three dimensional flow, full computational fluid dynamics, and direct simulation Monte-Carlo calculations. Methods of determining catalytic recombination rates in arc jet flow are discus ed. An area of catalysis not fully understood is the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with gas phase or nano-size metal particles. The Johnson Space Center is making SWNTs using both a laser ablation technique and an electric arc vaporization technique.

  2. An application of multilevel flow modelling method for nuclear plant state identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Businaro, T.; Di Lorenzo, A.; Meo, G.B.; Rabbani, M.I.; Rubino, E.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of advanced digital techniques it has been rendered possible, necessity of which has long since been recognised, to develop a computer based man-machine interface and hance an expert system based on knowledge based decision making for operator support in the control rooms of nuclear plants. The Multilevel Flow Modelling method developed at RISO Laboratories, Denmark, has been applied in the present experiment to model Italian PEC reactor and to verify applicability of this method in plant state identification. In MFM method functional structure of a process plant is described in terms of a set of interrelated mass and energy flow structures on different levels of physical aggregation

  3. Contactless Inductive Flow Tomography: Brief History and Recent Developments in Its Application to Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ratajczak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT aims at reconstructing the velocity field of electrically conducting fluids, with special focus on applications in metallurgy and crystal growth technologies. The method relies on the induction of secondary magnetic fields if the moving fluid is exposed to a primary magnetic field. The theoretical foundation of the method is delineated, and some early experiments on the reconstruction of the three-dimensional flow in a cylinder are sketched. Then, the recent efforts to apply CIFT to various model problems in connection with the continuous casting of steel are summarized.

  4. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  5. VISUALIZATION METHODS OF VORTICAL FLOWS IN COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with conceptions and methods for visual representation of research numerical results in the problems of fluid mechanics and gas. The three-dimensional nature of unsteady flow being simulated creates significant difficulties for the visual representation of results. It complicates control and understanding of numerical data, and exchange and processing of obtained information about the flow field. Approaches to vortical flows visualization with the usage of gradients of primary and secondary scalar and vector fields are discussed. An overview of visualization techniques for vortical flows using different definitions of the vortex and its identification criteria is given. Visualization examples for some solutions of gas dynamics problems related to calculations of jets and cavity flows are presented. Ideas of the vortical structure of the free non-isothermal jet and the formation of coherent vortex structures in the mixing layer are developed. Analysis of formation patterns for spatial flows inside large-scale vortical structures within the enclosed space of the cubic lid-driven cavity is performed. The singular points of the vortex flow in a cubic lid-driven cavity are found based on the results of numerical simulation; their type and location are identified depending on the Reynolds number. Calculations are performed with fine meshes and modern approaches to the simulation of vortical flows (direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation. Paradigm of graphical programming and COVISE virtual environment are used for the visual representation of computational results. Application that implements the visualization of the problem is represented as a network which links are modules and each of them is designed to solve a case-specific problem. Interaction between modules is carried out by the input and output ports (data receipt and data transfer giving the possibility to use various input and output devices.

  6. High order methods for incompressible fluid flow: Application to moving boundary problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoentegaard, Tormod

    2008-04-15

    Fluid flows with moving boundaries are encountered in a large number of real life situations, with two such types being fluid-structure interaction and free-surface flows. Fluid-structure phenomena are for instance apparent in many hydrodynamic applications; wave effects on offshore structures, sloshing and fluid induced vibrations, and aeroelasticity; flutter and dynamic response. Free-surface flows can be considered as a special case of a fluid-fluid interaction where one of the fluids are practically inviscid, such as air. This type of flows arise in many disciplines such as marine hydrodynamics, chemical engineering, material processing, and geophysics. The driving forces for free-surface flows may be of large scale such as gravity or inertial forces, or forces due to surface tension which operate on a much smaller scale. Free-surface flows with surface tension as a driving mechanism include the flow of bubbles and droplets, and the evolution of capillary waves. In this work we consider incompressible fluid flow, which are governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. There are several challenges when simulating moving boundary problems numerically, and these include - Spatial discretization - Temporal discretization - Imposition of boundary conditions - Solution strategy for the linear equations. These are some of the issues which will be addressed in this introduction. We will first formulate the problem in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework, and introduce the weak formulation of the problem. Next, we discuss the spatial and temporal discretization before we move to the imposition of surface tension boundary conditions. In the final section we discuss the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  7. Progress in lattice Boltzmann methods for magnetohydrodynamic flows relevant to fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, M.J.; Premnath, K.N.; Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to simulating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is presented. The dynamics of the flow are simulated using a so-called multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE), in which a source term is included for the Lorentz force. The evolution of the magnetic induction is represented by introducing a vector distribution function and then solving an appropriate lattice kinetic equation for this function. The solution of both distribution functions are obtained through a simple, explicit, and computationally efficient stream-and-collide procedure. The use of the MRT collision term enhances the numerical stability over that of a single relaxation time approach. To apply the methodology to solving practical problems, a new extrapolation-based method for imposing magnetic boundary conditions is introduced and a technique for simulating steady-state flows with low magnetic Prandtl number is developed. In order to resolve thin layers near the walls arising in the presence of high magnetic fields, a non-uniform gridding strategy is introduced through an interpolated-streaming step applied to both distribution functions. These advances are particularly important for applications in fusion engineering where liquid metal flows with low magnetic Prandtl numbers and high Hartmann numbers are introduced. A number of MHD benchmark problems, under various physical and geometrical conditions are presented, including 3-D MHD lid driven cavity flow, high Hartmann number flows and turbulent MHD flows, with good agreement with prior data. Due to the local nature of the method, the LBM also demonstrated excellent performance on parallel machines, with almost linear scaling up to 128 processors for a MHD flow problem

  8. Development of an Efficient Meso- scale Multi-phase Flow Solver in Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taehun [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2015-10-20

    The proposed research aims at formulating a predictive high-order Lattice Boltzmann Equation for multi-phase flows relevant to nuclear energy related application - namely, saturated and sub-cooled boiling in reactors, and liquid- liquid mixing and extraction for fuel cycle separation. An efficient flow solver will be developed based on the Finite Element based Lattice Boltzmann Method (FE- LBM), accounting for phase-change heat transfer and capable of treating multiple phases over length scales from the submicron to the meter. A thermal LBM will be developed in order to handle adjustable Prandtl number, arbitrary specific heat ratio, a wide range of temperature variations, better numerical stability during liquid-vapor phase change, and full thermo-hydrodynamic consistency. Two-phase FE-LBM will be extended to liquid–liquid–gas multi-phase flows for application to high-fidelity simulations building up from the meso-scale up to the equipment sub-component scale. While several relevant applications exist, the initial applications for demonstration of the efficient methods to be developed as part of this project include numerical investigations of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena in nuclear reactor fuel bundles, and liquid-liquid mixing and interfacial area generation for liquid-liquid separations. In addition, targeted experiments will be conducted for validation of this advanced multi-phase model.

  9. Joint modeling of multivariate longitudinal data and the dropout process in a competing risk setting: application to ICU data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes Emmanuelle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint modeling of longitudinal and survival data has been increasingly considered in clinical trials, notably in cancer and AIDS. In critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU, such models also appear to be of interest in the investigation of the effect of treatment on severity scores due to the likely association between the longitudinal score and the dropout process, either caused by deaths or live discharges from the ICU. However, in this competing risk setting, only cause-specific hazard sub-models for the multiple failure types data have been used. Methods We propose a joint model that consists of a linear mixed effects submodel for the longitudinal outcome, and a proportional subdistribution hazards submodel for the competing risks survival data, linked together by latent random effects. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo technique of Gibbs sampling to estimate the joint posterior distribution of the unknown parameters of the model. The proposed method is studied and compared to joint model with cause-specific hazards submodel in simulations and applied to a data set that consisted of repeated measurements of severity score and time of discharge and death for 1,401 ICU patients. Results Time by treatment interaction was observed on the evolution of the mean SOFA score when ignoring potentially informative dropouts due to ICU deaths and live discharges from the ICU. In contrast, this was no longer significant when modeling the cause-specific hazards of informative dropouts. Such a time by treatment interaction persisted together with an evidence of treatment effect on the hazard of death when modeling dropout processes through the use of the Fine and Gray model for sub-distribution hazards. Conclusions In the joint modeling of competing risks with longitudinal response, differences in the handling of competing risk outcomes appear to translate into the estimated difference in treatment effect on the

  10. Effect of extraluminal ATP application on vascular tone and blood flow in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Al-Khazraji, Baraa K; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2013-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contractions, the concentration of ATP increases in muscle interstitial fluid as measured by microdialysis probes. This increase is associated with the magnitude of blood flow, suggesting that interstitial ATP may be important for contraction-induced vasodilation. However...... studied. The rat gluteus maximus skeletal muscle model was used to study changes in local skeletal muscle hemodynamics. Superfused ATP at concentrations found during muscle contractions (1-10 µM) increased blood flow by up to 400%. In this model, the underlying mechanism was also examined by inhibition...... in interstitial ATP concentrations increases muscle blood flow, indicating that the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle interstitial [ATP] is important for exercise hyperemia. The vasodilator effect of ATP application is mediated by NO and prostanoid formation....

  11. Mathematical modeling of flow-injection techniques and their applications for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, N.N.; Ahmed, J.

    2006-01-01

    A classification of the existing mathematical models of flow-injection (FI) manifolds based on the main principles on which they are built, have been proposed. Numerous mathematical models of FI systems employing ideas from different scientific areas (e.g. mathematical statistics, chemical engineering, chromatography) have been developed so far. The models have been compared with respect to their predictive power, the complexity of their mathematical treatment, and the requirements for computation time when applied to single-line, multi-channel and conjugated two-line FI systems. It is concluded that the axially dispersed plug flow model deserves special attention because it offers an acceptable compromise between the conflicting requirements for maximal possible mathematical simplicity and maximal possible precision. Applicability of these existing flow-injection models to single-line, multi-channel and conjugated two-line systems for environmental monitoring have been discussed. (author)

  12. Electrification of particulate entrained fluid flows-Mechanisms, applications, and numerical methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gu, Zhaolin

    2015-10-01

    Particulates in natural and industrial flows have two basic forms: liquid (droplet) and solid (particle). Droplets would be charged in the presence of the applied electric field (e.g. electrospray). Similar to the droplet charging, particles can also be charged under the external electric field (e.g. electrostatic precipitator), while in the absence of external electric field, tribo-electrostatic charging is almost unavoidable in gas-solid two-phase flows due to the consecutive particle contacts (e.g. electrostatic in fluidized bed or wind-blown sand). The particle charging may be beneficial, or detrimental. Although electrostatics in particulate entrained fluid flow systems have been so widely used and concerned, the mechanisms of particulate charging are still lack of a thorough understanding. The motivation of this review is to explore a clear understanding of particulate charging and movement of charged particulate in two-phase flows, by summarizing the electrification mechanisms, physical models of particulate charging, and methods of charging/charged particulate entrained fluid flow simulations. Two effective methods can make droplets charged in industrial applications: corona charging and induction charging. The droplet charge to mass ratio by corona charging is more than induction discharge. The particle charging through collisions could be attributed to electron transfer, ion transfer, material transfer, and/or aqueous ion shift on particle surfaces. The charges on charged particulate surface can be measured, nevertheless, the charging process in nature or industry is difficult to monitor. The simulation method might build a bridge of investigating from the charging process to finally charged state on particulate surface in particulate entrained fluid flows. The methodology combining the interface tracking under the action of the applied electric with the fluid flow governing equations is applicable to the study of electrohydrodynamics problems. The charge

  13. High performance parallel computing of flows in complex geometries: II. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdain, N; Gicquel, L; Staffelbach, G; Vermorel, O; Duchaine, F; Boussuge, J-F; Poinsot, T

    2009-01-01

    Present regulations in terms of pollutant emissions, noise and economical constraints, require new approaches and designs in the fields of energy supply and transportation. It is now well established that the next breakthrough will come from a better understanding of unsteady flow effects and by considering the entire system and not only isolated components. However, these aspects are still not well taken into account by the numerical approaches or understood whatever the design stage considered. The main challenge is essentially due to the computational requirements inferred by such complex systems if it is to be simulated by use of supercomputers. This paper shows how new challenges can be addressed by using parallel computing platforms for distinct elements of a more complex systems as encountered in aeronautical applications. Based on numerical simulations performed with modern aerodynamic and reactive flow solvers, this work underlines the interest of high-performance computing for solving flow in complex industrial configurations such as aircrafts, combustion chambers and turbomachines. Performance indicators related to parallel computing efficiency are presented, showing that establishing fair criterions is a difficult task for complex industrial applications. Examples of numerical simulations performed in industrial systems are also described with a particular interest for the computational time and the potential design improvements obtained with high-fidelity and multi-physics computing methods. These simulations use either unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods or large eddy simulation and deal with turbulent unsteady flows, such as coupled flow phenomena (thermo-acoustic instabilities, buffet, etc). Some examples of the difficulties with grid generation and data analysis are also presented when dealing with these complex industrial applications.

  14. Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs

  15. Slip flow coefficient analysis in water hydraulics gear pump for environmental friendly application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, A A; Wasbari, F; Zakaria, M S; Ibrahim, M Q

    2013-01-01

    Water hydraulics is the sustainable option in developing fluid power systems with environmental friendly approach. Therefore, an investigation on water-based external gear pump application is being conducted, as a low cost solution in the shifting effort of using water, instead of traditional oil hydraulics in fluid power application. As the gear pump is affected by fluid viscosity, an evaluation has been conducted on the slip flow coefficient, in order to understand to what extent the spur gear pump can be used with water-based hydraulic fluid. In this paper, the results of a simulated study of variable-speed fixed displacement gear pump are presented. The slip flow coefficient varies from rotational speed of 250 RPM to 3500 RPM, and provides volumetric efficiency ranges from 9 % to 97% accordingly

  16. Characteristics of high gradient insulators for accelerator and high power flow applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.

    1997-07-01

    The high gradient insulator has been demonstrated to operate at levels comparable or better than special geometry or coated insulators. Some patented insulator configurations allow for sophisticated accelerator structures, high power flow interfaces, and microwave applications not previously possible. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques available at AlliedSignal FM and T made this development possible. Bipolar and high power flow applications are specially suited for present insulator designs. The insulator shows a beneficial effect when used under RF fields or RF structures. These insulators can be designed, to a first approximation, from simple electron flight path equations. With a recently developed model of surface flashover physics the authors completed a set of design calculations that include effects such as layer density and dielectric/metal thickness. Experimental data, obtained in the last few years of development, is presented and reviewed. Several insulator fabrication characteristics, indicating critical design parameters, are also presented

  17. THE APPLICATION OF LASERS IN MEASUREMENT OF FLUID FLOW THROUGH DRILLING BIT NOZZLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenko Drakulić

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Two optical methods based on laser and video technology and digital signal and image processing techniques - Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV and Particle image velocimetry (PIV were applied in highly accurate fluid flow measurement. Their application in jet velocity measurement of flows through drilling bit nozzles is presented. The role of nozzles in drilling technology together with procedures and tests performed on their optimization are reviewed. In addition, some experimental results for circular nozzle obtained both with LDV and PIV are elaborated. The experimental set-up and the testing procedure arc briefly discussed, as well as potential improvements in the design. Possible other applications of LDV and PIV in the domain of petroleum engineering are suggested (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. Modeling Learning in Doubly Multilevel Binary Longitudinal Data Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models: An Application to Measuring and Explaining Word Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Goodwin, Amanda P

    2016-04-01

    When word learning is supported by instruction in experimental studies for adolescents, word knowledge outcomes tend to be collected from complex data structure, such as multiple aspects of word knowledge, multilevel reader data, multilevel item data, longitudinal design, and multiple groups. This study illustrates how generalized linear mixed models can be used to measure and explain word learning for data having such complexity. Results from this application provide deeper understanding of word knowledge than could be attained from simpler models and show that word knowledge is multidimensional and depends on word characteristics and instructional contexts.

  19. Measurement of longitudinal flow decorrelations in Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 and 5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2018-02-15

    Measurements of longitudinal flow correlations are presented for charged particles in the pseudorapidity range vertical stroke η vertical stroke < 2.4 using 7 μb{sup -1} and 470 μb{sup -1} of Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 and 5.02 TeV, respectively, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It is found that the correlation between the harmonic flow coefficients v{sub n} measured in two separated η intervals does not factorise into the product of single-particle coefficients, and this breaking of factorisation, or flow decorrelation, increases linearly with the η separation between the intervals. The flow decorrelation is stronger at 2.76 TeV than at 5.02 TeV. Higher-order moments of the correlations are also measured, and the corresponding linear coefficients for the kth-moment of the v{sub n} are found to be proportional to k for v{sub 3}, but not for v{sub 2}. The decorrelation effect is separated into contributions from the magnitude of v{sub n} and the event-plane orientation, each as a function of η. These two contributions are found to be comparable. The longitudinal flow correlations are also measured between v{sub n} of different order in n. The decorrelations of v{sub 2} and v{sub 3} are found to be independent of each other, while the decorrelations of v{sub 4} and v{sub 5} are found to be driven by the nonlinear contribution from v{sub 2}{sup 2} and v{sub 2}v{sub 3}, respectively. (orig.)

  20. The application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent for conducting Ramirez gem-dibromoolefination reactions in flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Kimberley A; Berry, Malcolm B; Ley, Steven V

    2013-01-01

    The application of a monolithic form of triphenylphosphine to the Ramirez gem-dibromoolefination reaction using flow chemistry techniques is reported. A variety of gem-dibromides were synthesised in high purity and excellent yield following only removal of solvent and no further off-line purification. It is also possible to perform the Appel reaction using the same monolith and the relationship between the mechanisms of the two reactions is discussed.

  1. The application of a monolithic triphenylphosphine reagent for conducting Ramirez gem-dibromoolefination reactions in flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley A. Roper

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of a monolithic form of triphenylphosphine to the Ramirez gem-dibromoolefination reaction using flow chemistry techniques is reported. A variety of gem-dibromides were synthesised in high purity and excellent yield following only removal of solvent and no further off-line purification. It is also possible to perform the Appel reaction using the same monolith and the relationship between the mechanisms of the two reactions is discussed.

  2. SACFIR: SDN-Based Application-Aware Centralized Adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring Routing Protocol for WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Fan

    2017-12-13

    Smart reconfiguration of a dynamic networking environment is offered by the central control of Software-Defined Networking (SDN). Centralized SDN-based management architectures are capable of retrieving global topology intelligence and decoupling the forwarding plane from the control plane. Routing protocols developed for conventional Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) utilize limited iterative reconfiguration methods to optimize environmental reporting. However, the challenging networking scenarios of WSNs involve a performance overhead due to constant periodic iterative reconfigurations. In this paper, we propose the SDN-based Application-aware Centralized adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring (SACFIR) routing protocol with the centralized SDN iterative solver controller to maintain the load-balancing between flow reconfigurations and flow allocation cost. The proposed SACFIR's routing protocol offers a unique iterative path-selection algorithm, which initially computes suitable clustering based on residual resources at the control layer and then implements application-aware threshold-based multi-hop report transmissions on the forwarding plane. The operation of the SACFIR algorithm is centrally supervised by the SDN controller residing at the Base Station (BS). This paper extends SACFIR to SDN-based Application-aware Main-value Centralized adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring (SAMCFIR) to establish both proactive and reactive reporting. The SAMCFIR transmission phase enables sensor nodes to trigger direct transmissions for main-value reports, while in the case of SACFIR, all reports follow computed routes. Our SDN-enabled proposed models adjust the reconfiguration period according to the traffic burden on sensor nodes, which results in heterogeneity awareness, load-balancing and application-specific reconfigurations of WSNs. Extensive experimental simulation-based results show that SACFIR and SAMCFIR yield the maximum scalability, network lifetime and stability

  3. SACFIR: SDN-Based Application-Aware Centralized Adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring Routing Protocol for WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Smart reconfiguration of a dynamic networking environment is offered by the central control of Software-Defined Networking (SDN. Centralized SDN-based management architectures are capable of retrieving global topology intelligence and decoupling the forwarding plane from the control plane. Routing protocols developed for conventional Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs utilize limited iterative reconfiguration methods to optimize environmental reporting. However, the challenging networking scenarios of WSNs involve a performance overhead due to constant periodic iterative reconfigurations. In this paper, we propose the SDN-based Application-aware Centralized adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring (SACFIR routing protocol with the centralized SDN iterative solver controller to maintain the load-balancing between flow reconfigurations and flow allocation cost. The proposed SACFIR’s routing protocol offers a unique iterative path-selection algorithm, which initially computes suitable clustering based on residual resources at the control layer and then implements application-aware threshold-based multi-hop report transmissions on the forwarding plane. The operation of the SACFIR algorithm is centrally supervised by the SDN controller residing at the Base Station (BS. This paper extends SACFIR to SDN-based Application-aware Main-value Centralized adaptive Flow Iterative Reconfiguring (SAMCFIR to establish both proactive and reactive reporting. The SAMCFIR transmission phase enables sensor nodes to trigger direct transmissions for main-value reports, while in the case of SACFIR, all reports follow computed routes. Our SDN-enabled proposed models adjust the reconfiguration period according to the traffic burden on sensor nodes, which results in heterogeneity awareness, load-balancing and application-specific reconfigurations of WSNs. Extensive experimental simulation-based results show that SACFIR and SAMCFIR yield the maximum scalability, network lifetime

  4. An efficient multi-dimensional implementation of VSIAM3 and its applications to free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Kensuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakai, Mikio

    2017-12-01

    We propose an efficient multidimensional implementation of VSIAM3 (volume/surface integrated average-based multi-moment method). Although VSIAM3 is a highly capable fluid solver based on a multi-moment concept and has been used for a wide variety of fluid problems, VSIAM3 could not simulate some simple benchmark problems well (for instance, lid-driven cavity flows) due to relatively high numerical viscosity. In this paper, we resolve the issue by using the efficient multidimensional approach. The proposed VSIAM3 is shown to capture lid-driven cavity flows of the Reynolds number up to Re = 7500 with a Cartesian grid of 128 × 128, which was not capable for the original VSIAM3. We also tested the proposed framework in free surface flow problems (droplet collision and separation of We = 40 and droplet splashing on a superhydrophobic substrate). The numerical results by the proposed VSIAM3 showed reasonable agreements with these experiments. The proposed VSIAM3 could capture droplet collision and separation of We = 40 with a low numerical resolution (8 meshes for the initial diameter of droplets). We also simulated free surface flows including particles toward non-Newtonian flow applications. These numerical results have showed that the proposed VSIAM3 can robustly simulate interactions among air, particles (solid), and liquid.

  5. Application of Tank Model for Predicting Water Balance and Flow Discharge Components of Cisadane Upper Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Mulyana Arifjaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of hydrological tank model was well described into four compartments (tanks. The first tank (tank A comprised of one vertical (qA0 and two lateral (qA1 and qA2 water flow components and tank B comprised of one vertical (qB0 and one lateral (qB1 water flow components. Tank C comprised of one vertical (qC0 and one lateral (qC1 water flow components, whereas tank D comprised of one lateral water flow component (qD1.  These vertical water flows would also contribute to the depletion of water flow in the related tanks but would replenish tanks in the deeper layers. It was assumed that at all lateral water flow components would finally accumulate in one stream, summing-up of the lateral water flow, much or less, should be equal to the water discharge (Qo at specified time concerns. Tank A received precipitation (R and evapo-transpiration (ET which was its gradientof (R-ET over time would become the driving force for the changes of water stored in the soil profiles and thosewater flows leaving the soil layer.  Thus tank model could describe th vertical and horizontal water flow withinthe watershed. The research site was Cisadane Upper Catchment, located at Pasir Buncir Village of CaringinSub-District within the Regency of Bogor in West Java Province.  The elevations ranged 512 –2,235 m above sealevel, with a total drainage area of 1,811.5 ha and total length of main stream of 14,340.7 m.  The land cover wasdominated by  forest  with a total of 1,044.6 ha (57.67%,  upland agriculture with a total of 477.96 ha (26.38%,mixed garden with a total of 92.85 ha(5.13% and semitechnical irigated rice field with a total of 196.09 ha (10,8%.  The soil was classified as hydraquent (96.6% and distropept (3.4%.  Based on the calibration of tank model application in the study area, the resulting coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.72 with model efficiency (NSEof= 0.75, thus tank model could well illustrate the water flow distribution of

  6. Validation and application of an high-order spectral difference method for flow induced noise simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Parsani, Matteo

    2011-09-01

    The main goal of this paper is to develop an efficient numerical algorithm to compute the radiated far field noise provided by an unsteady flow field from bodies in arbitrary motion. The method computes a turbulent flow field in the near fields using a high-order spectral difference method coupled with large-eddy simulation approach. The unsteady equations are solved by advancing in time using a second-order backward difference formulae scheme. The nonlinear algebraic system arising from the time discretization is solved with the nonlinear lowerupper symmetric GaussSeidel algorithm. In the second step, the method calculates the far field sound pressure based on the acoustic source information provided by the first step simulation. The method is based on the Ffowcs WilliamsHawkings approach, which provides noise contributions for monopole, dipole and quadrupole acoustic sources. This paper will focus on the validation and assessment of this hybrid approach using different test cases. The test cases used are: a laminar flow over a two-dimensional (2D) open cavity at Re = 1.5 × 10 3 and M = 0.15 and a laminar flow past a 2D square cylinder at Re = 200 and M = 0.5. In order to show the application of the numerical method in industrial cases and to assess its capability for sound field simulation, a three-dimensional turbulent flow in a muffler at Re = 4.665 × 10 4 and M = 0.05 has been chosen as a third test case. The flow results show good agreement with numerical and experimental reference solutions. Comparison of the computed noise results with those of reference solutions also shows that the numerical approach predicts noise accurately. © 2011 IMACS.

  7. Amenability of European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) to preservative treatment by the full-cell process in longitudinal, tangential, radial and triplex flow pathways on the base of wood drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usta, Ilker [Wood Products Industrial Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06532-Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-08-15

    This paper discusses the effects of wood drying upon treatability (as determined by preservative uptake and gain-in-weight retention) of European silver fir on the two moisture content (MC) levels which were designed to be above and below the fibre saturation point (FSP). The treatability behaviour was investigated for individual flow pathways: longitudinal (L, along the stem), tangential (T, along the growth rings) and radial (R, along the rays), and also for the triplex (t, cumulative of all three directions: all faces left open). As the FSP was observed 32.7%, MC of the experimental samples-for each flow path-nominated to around 50% and 9% by recommended kiln drying schedule using a conventional kiln. The samples were then treated with a 2.5% concentration of commercial Tanalith C of CCA (chromium/copper/arsenic) via a mild schedule of full-cell impregnation process using a model pressure treatment plant. Treatability of European silver fir was noticed in different behaviour in either flow paths before and after drying. According to the experimental results, MC regulate the preservative uptake (as the percentage of void volume filled with preservative, VVF%) along the grain (L) and VVF% was improved by kiln drying process effectively, however, it was seemed to be contradictory across the grain (in both T and R). In the cumulative form (t), treatability-in either above or below the FSP-was appeared to be slightly greater than that for L due to support of the longitudinal flow. Therefore, it could be suggested that wood material which is subjected to be used in constructional purposes has to be initially dried to below the FSP, and - for efficient preservative treatment - it has to be treated with all faces unsealed (free from any pre-coating and/or painting). This shall be more ideal which in turn influences the quality of treated wood allowing better performance in its service life. (author)

  8. Run-Time HW/SW Scheduling of Data Flow Applications on Reconfigurable Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Fakhreddine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient dynamic and run-time Hardware/Software scheduling approach. This scheduling heuristic consists in mapping online the different tasks of a highly dynamic application in such a way that the total execution time is minimized. We consider soft real-time data flow graph oriented applications for which the execution time is function of the input data nature. The target architecture is composed of two processors connected to a dynamically reconfigurable hardware accelerator. Our approach takes advantage of the reconfiguration property of the considered architecture to adapt the treatment to the system dynamics. We compare our heuristic with another similar approach. We present the results of our scheduling method on several image processing applications. Our experiments include simulation and synthesis results on a Virtex V-based platform. These results show a better performance against existing methods.

  9. Improved longitudinal gray and white matter atrophy assessment via application of a 4-dimensional hidden Markov random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Michael G; Bergsland, Niels; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-04-15

    SIENA and similar techniques have demonstrated the utility of performing "direct" measurements as opposed to post-hoc comparison of cross-sectional data for the measurement of whole brain (WB) atrophy over time. However, gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) atrophy are now widely recognized as important components of neurological disease progression, and are being actively evaluated as secondary endpoints in clinical trials. Direct measures of GM/WM change with advantages similar to SIENA have been lacking. We created a robust and easily-implemented method for direct longitudinal analysis of GM/WM atrophy, SIENAX multi-time-point (SIENAX-MTP). We built on the basic halfway-registration and mask composition components of SIENA to improve the raw output of FMRIB's FAST tissue segmentation tool. In addition, we created LFAST, a modified version of FAST incorporating a 4th dimension in its hidden Markov random field model in order to directly represent time. The method was validated by scan-rescan, simulation, comparison with SIENA, and two clinical effect size comparisons. All validation approaches demonstrated improved longitudinal precision with the proposed SIENAX-MTP method compared to SIENAX. For GM, simulation showed better correlation with experimental volume changes (r=0.992 vs. 0.941), scan-rescan showed lower standard deviations (3.8% vs. 8.4%), correlation with SIENA was more robust (r=0.70 vs. 0.53), and effect sizes were improved by up to 68%. Statistical power estimates indicated a potential drop of 55% in the number of subjects required to detect the same treatment effect with SIENAX-MTP vs. SIENAX. The proposed direct GM/WM method significantly improves on the standard SIENAX technique by trading a small amount of bias for a large reduction in variance, and may provide more precise data and additional statistical power in longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality control in the application of flow cytometric assays of genetic damage due to environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Jagoe, C.H.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.; Wentworth, R.W.; Dallas, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical technologies, such as flow cytometry, are increasingly adopted by environmental toxicologists to identify resource damage associated with exposure to xenobiotics. One application of flow cytometry allows the rapid determination of the DNA content of large numbers of individual cells, and can be used to detect aneuploidy or other genetic abnormalities. The laboratory has used this methodology in studies of genetic toxicology of fish, birds, arid mammals exposed to organic pollutants, metals and radionuclides, However, without appropriate quality controls, false positive results and other artifacts can arise from sample handling and preparations, inter and intra-individual variations, instrument noise and other sources. The authors describe the routine measures this laboratory employs to maintain quality control of genomic DNA analysis, including the control of staining conditions, machine standardization, pulse-width doublet discrimination, and, in particular, the use of internal controls and the use of time as a cytometric parameter. Neglect of these controls can produce erroneous results, leading to conclusions of genetic abnormalities when none are present. Conversely, attention to these controls, routinely used in clinical settings, facilitates the interpretation of flow cytometric data and allows the application of this sensitive indicator of genotoxic effects to a variety of environmental problems

  11. On the application of the method of turbulent flow to transient and quasi-stationary flow calculations in high temperature reactors with spherical fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, I.

    1980-12-01

    For the calculation of flows in high-temperature reactors and of their temperature behavior the equations of the method of turbulent flow in the primitive form are derived for inhomogeneous regions. This system of equations is appropriate for the investigation of transient and quasi-stationary phenomena in pebble beds. By modification of the flow function in parallel arranged reflector channels a parallel flow can be simulated. For simplification the flow in region with a smaller pressure loss is assumed to be a potential flow. For the numerical solution of the time-dependent convective parts of the system of equations a number of explicit and implicit difference methods are compared. If the method using UP-WIND differences is taken to be an interpolation method the introduction of an extension becomes possible, which together with preliminary integration of the fictional terms allows to apply larger time steps. The algebraic system of equations for numerical calculation of a steady flow field also is established by formation of UP-WIND differences for the convective terms. By mathematical verification of some examples the applicability of the mathematical model for flow problems in pebble beds with forced or natural convection is shown. (orig.) [de

  12. Go-flow: a reliability analysis methodology applicable to piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, T.; Kobayashi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Since the completion of the Reactor Safety Study, the use of probabilistic risk assessment technique has been becoming more widespread in the nuclear community. Several analytical methods are used for the reliability analysis of nuclear power plants. The GO methodology is one of these methods. Using the GO methodology, the authors performed a reliability analysis of the emergency decay heat removal system of the nuclear ship Mutsu, in order to examine its applicability to piping systems. By this analysis, the authors have found out some disadvantages of the GO methodology. In the GO methodology, the signal is on-to-off or off-to-on signal, therefore the GO finds out the time point at which the state of a system changes, and can not treat a system which state changes as off-on-off. Several computer runs are required to obtain the time dependent failure probability of a system. In order to overcome these disadvantages, the authors propose a new analytical methodology: GO-FLOW. In GO-FLOW, the modeling method (chart) and the calculation procedure are similar to those in the GO methodology, but the meaning of signal and time point, and the definitions of operators are essentially different. In the paper, the GO-FLOW methodology is explained and two examples of the analysis by GO-FLOW are given

  13. Angiographic CT with intravenous contrast agent application for monitoring of intracranial flow diverting stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saake, Marc; Struffert, Tobias; Goelitz, Philipp; Ott, Sabine; Doerfler, Arnd; Seifert, Frank; Ganslandt, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial flow diverting devices are increasingly used to treat cerebral aneurysms. A reliable, non-invasive follow-up modality would be desirable. Our aim was to compare intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (ia DSA) to angiographic computed tomography with intravenous contrast agent application (iv ACT) in the visualisation of flow diverting devices and aneurysm lumina. Follow-up monitoring by iv ACT (n = 36) and ia DSA (n = 25) in 14 patients treated with flow diverting devices for intracranial aneurysms was evaluated retrospectively. Images were evaluated by two neuroradiologists in anonymous consensus reading regarding the device deployment, wall apposition, neck coverage of the aneurysm, opacification of the vessel and device lumen, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion. Corresponding ia DSA and iv ACT images were scored identically in all patients regarding the stent deployment, wall apposition and neck coverage, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion and patency status of the device and parent artery. Opacification of the parent vessel lumen and perfused parts of the aneurysm was considered slightly inferior for iv ACT in comparison with ia DSA (seven of 36 cases), without impact on diagnosis. We demonstrated the feasibility and diagnostic value of iv ACT in follow-up imaging of intracranial flow diverting devices. Due to its high spatial resolution and non-invasive character, this novel technique might become a valuable imaging modality in these patients. (orig.)

  14. Solar oxidation and removal of arsenic--Key parameters for continuous flow applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, L W; O'Farrell, C

    2015-12-01

    Solar oxidation to remove arsenic from water has previously been investigated as a batch process. This research has investigated the kinetic parameters for the design of a continuous flow solar reactor to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater supplies. Continuous flow recirculated batch experiments were carried out under artificial UV light to investigate the effect of different parameters on arsenic removal efficiency. Inlet water arsenic concentrations of up to 1000 μg/L were reduced to below 10 μg/L requiring 12 mg/L iron after receiving 12 kJUV/L radiation. Citrate however was somewhat surprisingly found to promote a detrimental effect on the removal process in the continuous flow reactor studies which is contrary to results found in batch scale tests. The impact of other typical water groundwater quality parameters (phosphate and silica) on the process due to their competition with arsenic for photooxidation products revealed a much higher sensitivity to phosphate ions compared to silicate. Other results showed no benefit from the addition of TiO2 photocatalyst but enhanced arsenic removal at higher temperatures up to 40 °C. Overall, these results have indicated the kinetic envelope from which a continuous flow SORAS single pass system could be more confidently designed for a full-scale community groundwater application at a village level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Light Manipulation in Inhomogeneous Liquid Flow and Its Application in Biochemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Zuo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Light manipulation has always been the fundamental subject in the field of optics since centuries ago. Traditional optical devices are usually designed using glasses and other materials, such as semiconductors and metals. Optofluidics is the combination of microfluidics and optics, which brings a host of new advantages to conventional solid systems. The capabilities of light manipulation and biochemical sensing are inherent alongside the emergence of optofluidics. This new research area promotes advancements in optics, biology, and chemistry. The development of fast, accurate, low-cost, and small-sized biochemical micro-sensors is an urgent demand for real-time monitoring. However, the fluid flow in the on-chip sensor is usually non-uniformed, which is a new and emerging challenge for the accuracy of optical detection. It is significant to reveal the principle of light propagation in an inhomogeneous liquid flow and the interaction between biochemical samples and light in flowing liquids. In this review, we summarize the current state of optofluidic lab-on-a-chip techniques from the perspective of light modulation by the unique dynamic properties of fluid in heterogeneous media, such as diffusion, heat transfer, and centrifugation etc. Furthermore, this review introduces several novel photonic phenomena in an inhomogeneous liquid flow and demonstrates their application in biochemical sensing.

  16. Design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli, M.I.; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that produce electricity at high efficiency without combustion. Fuel cells are emerging as viable candidates as power sources in many applications, including road vehicles, small-scale power stations, and possibly even portable electronics. This paper addresses the design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC is a low-temperature fuel cell, in which a proton conductive polymer membrane is used as the electrolyte. In PEMFC, flow-field pattern is one important thing that effects the performance of PEMFC. This paper present three types of flow-field pattern that will be consider to be testing using CFD analysis and by experimental. The design look detail on to their shape and dimension to get the best pattern in term of more active electrode area compare to electrode area that will be used. Another advantage and disadvantage for these three type of flow-field patterns from literature also compared in this paper

  17. Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. (Electric Power Board of Serbia, Belgrade (YU)); Calovic, M.S. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (YU)); Ristanovic, P. (Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (YU))

    1990-11-01

    This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

  18. Applicability of Voce equation for tensile flow and work hardening behaviour of P92 ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B.K.; Christopher, J.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analysis of true stress (σ)-true plastic strain (ε) data indicated that tensile flow behaviour of P92 ferritic steel can be adequately described by Voce equation at strain rates ranging from 3.16 × 10 −5 to 1.26 × 10 −3  s −1 over a temperature range 300–923 K. The steel exhibited two-stage work hardening in the variations of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) with stress. At all the strain rates, the variations in σ-ε, θ-σ and work hardening parameters associated with Voce equation with temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes. At intermediate temperatures, the variations in σ-ε, θ-σ and work hardening parameters with temperature and strain rate exhibited anomalous behaviour due to the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel. The shift in θ-σ towards low stresses, and rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate suggested dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures. - Highlights: • Tensile flow and work hardening behaviour of P92 steel has been examined. • Applicability of Voce equation to P92 steel is demonstrated. • Three temperature regimes in flow and work hardening has been observed. • Good match between predicted and the experimental tensile properties has been shown

  19. A pathway to eliminate the gas flow dependency of a hydrocarbon sensor for automotive exhaust applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hagen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gas sensors will play an essential role in future combustion-based mobility to effectively reduce emissions and monitor the exhausts reliably. In particular, an application in automotive exhausts is challenging due to the high gas temperatures that come along with highly dynamic flow rates. Recently, a thermoelectric hydrocarbon sensor was developed by using materials which are well known in the exhausts and therefore provide the required stability. As a sensing mechanism, the temperature difference that is generated between a catalytically activated area during the exothermic oxidation of said hydrocarbons and an inert area of the sensor is measured by a special screen-printed thermopile structure. As a matter of principle, this thermovoltage significantly depends on the mass flow rate of the exhausts under certain conditions. The present contribution helps to understand this cross effect and proposes a possible setup for its avoidance. By installing the sensor in the correct position of a bypass solution, the gas flow around the sensor is almost free of turbulence. Now, the signal depends only on the hydrocarbon concentration and not on the gas flow. Such a setup may open up new possibilities of applying novel sensors in automotive exhausts for on-board-measurement (OBM purposes.

  20. Yield strengths of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon. [application of Bingham plastic model to lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H. J.; Arthur, D. W. G.; Schaber, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    Dimensions of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon and their topographic gradients obtained from remote measurements are used to calculate yield strengths with a view to explore the validity of the Bingham plastic model and determine whether there is a relation between yield strengths and silica contents. Other factors are considered such as the vagaries of natural phenomena that might contribute to erroneous interpretations and measurements. Comparison of yield strengths of Martian and lunar flows with terrestrial flows suggests that the Martian and lunar flows are more akin to terrestrial basalts than they are to terrestrial andesites, trachytes, and rhyolites.

  1. The Practical Application of Aqueous Geochemistry in Mapping Groundwater Flow Systems in Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, G.; Seok, E.; Gale, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    groundwater samples can plot to the left of the meteoric water line as a result of isotopic exchange between meteoric water and silicate rock in near-surface environments at low temperatures. These and other examples are considered in the practical application of aqueous geochemistry in helping to map flow systems in fractured-rock systems.

  2. Flow chemistry to control the synthesis of nano and microparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Lara, Pablo; Guerrero, Simón; Cabuil, Valérie; Abou-Hassan, Ali; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2014-03-01

    In this article we review the flow chemistry methodologies for the controlled synthesis of different kind of nano and microparticles for biomedical applications. Injection mechanism has emerged as new alternative for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to this strategy allows achieving superior levels of control of self-assemblies, leading to higher-ordered structures and rapid chemical reactions. Self-assembly events are strongly dependent on factors such as the local concentration of reagents, the mixing rates, and the shear forces, which can be finely tuned, as an example, in a microfluidic device. Injection methods have also proved to be optimal to elaborate microsystems comprising polymer solutions. Concretely, extrusion based methods can provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. We provide an update of synthesis of nano and microparticles such as core/shell, Janus, nanocrystals, liposomes, and biopolymeric microgels through flow chemistry, its potential bioapplications and future challenges in this field are discussed.

  3. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas

  4. Optimal Control of Partially Miscible Two-Phase Flow with Applications to Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz; Ulbrich, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by applications in subsurface CO2 sequestration, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. The objective is, e.g., to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, where the time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system and formulate the optimal control problem. For the discretization we use a variant of the BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method. The timestep-wise Lagrangian of the control problem is implemented as a functional in the PDE toolbox Sundance, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. The resulting MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT. Finally, we present some numerical results in a heterogeneous model reservoir.

  5. Influence and applicability of wire-mesh sensor to acquire two phase flow dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Taizo; Furuya, Masahiro; Arai, Takahiro; Shirakawa, Kenetsu

    2011-01-01

    Wire-mesh sensors (WMS) are able to measure void distributions and velocity profile at high speed. Immersing the wire-mesh affects the structure of two-phase flow. Experiments were performed for single rising air bubble in a vertical pipe of i.d. 50 mm and 224 mm at water velocities ranging from 0.05 to 0.52 m/s and 0.42 to 0.83 m/s. Distortion of a relatively large bubble with the wire-mesh was small in the water velocity over 0.25 m/s and confirmed by cross-correlation analysis as well. Bubble rising velocity acquired by WMS is in good agreement with that estimated high-speed camera in the experimental range. WMS has applicability to acquire two phase flow dynamics in the water velocity over 0.25 m/s. (author)

  6. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, M; Guo, Q; Zhou, L J; Wang, X; Wang, Z W

    2013-01-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ε and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ε model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump

  7. Application of reconstructive tomography to the measurement of density distribution in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Berggren, M.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of reconstructive tomography has been applied to the measurement of average density and density distribution in multiphase flows. The technique of reconstructive tomography provides a model independent method of obtaining flow field density information. The unique features of interest in application of a practical tomographic densitometer system are the limited number of data values and the correspondingly coarse reconstruction grid (0.5 by 0.5 cm). These features were studied both experimentally, through the use of prototype hardware on a 3-in. pipe, and analytically, through computer generation of simulated data. Prototypical data were taken on phantoms constructed of Plexiglas and laminated Plexiglas, wood, and polyurethane foam. Reconstructions obtained from prototype data were compared with reconstructions from the simulated data

  8. Application of Thinned-Skull Cranial Window to Mouse Cerebral Blood Flow Imaging Using Optical Microangiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities. PMID:25426632

  9. Bayesian inference for two-part mixed-effects model using skew distributions, with application to longitudinal semicontinuous alcohol data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dongyuan; Huang, Yangxin; Chen, Henian; Zhu, Yiliang; Dagne, Getachew A; Baldwin, Julie

    2017-08-01

    Semicontinuous data featured with an excessive proportion of zeros and right-skewed continuous positive values arise frequently in practice. One example would be the substance abuse/dependence symptoms data for which a substantial proportion of subjects investigated may report zero. Two-part mixed-effects models have been developed to analyze repeated measures of semicontinuous data from longitudinal studies. In this paper, we propose a flexible two-part mixed-effects model with skew distributions for correlated semicontinuous alcohol data under the framework of a Bayesian approach. The proposed model specification consists of two mixed-effects models linked by the correlated random effects: (i) a model on the occurrence of positive values using a generalized logistic mixed-effects model (Part I); and (ii) a model on the intensity of positive values using a linear mixed-effects model where the model errors follow skew distributions including skew- t and skew-normal distributions (Part II). The proposed method is illustrated with an alcohol abuse/dependence symptoms data from a longitudinal observational study, and the analytic results are reported by comparing potential models under different random-effects structures. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of the proposed models and method.

  10. An inverse method for identification of a distributed random excitation acting on a vibrating structure flow-induced vibration application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotin, L.; Granger, S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the prediction of wear problems due to flow-induced vibration in PWR components, an inverse method for identifying a distributed random excitation acting on a dynamical system has been developed at EDF. This method, whose applications go far beyond the flow-induced vibration field, has been implemented into the MEIDEE software. This method is presented. (author)

  11. Recycling Potentials of Critical Metals-Analyzing Secondary Flows from Selected Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Zimmermann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal mobilization in general, as well as the number of metals used in products to increase performance and provide sometimes unique functionalities, has increased steadily in the past decades. Materials, such as indium, gallium, platinum group metals (PGM, and rare earths (RE, are used ever more frequently in high-tech applications and their criticality as a function of economic importance and supply risks has been highlighted in various studies. Nevertheless, recycling rates are often below one percent. Against this background, secondary flows of critical metals from three different end-of-life products up to 2020 are modeled and losses along the products’ end-of-life (EOL chain are identified. Two established applications of PGM and RE–industrial catalysts and thermal barrier coatings–and CIGS photovoltaic cells as a relatively new product have been analyzed. In addition to a quantification of future EOL flows, the analysis showed that a relatively well working recycling system exists for PGM-bearing catalysts, while a complete loss of critical metals occurs for the other applications. The reasons include a lack of economic incentives, technologically caused material dissipation and other technological challenges.

  12. Review of material research and development for vanadium redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Menictas, Chris; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) is one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage systems deemed suitable for a wide range of renewable energy applications that are emerging rapidly to reduce the carbon footprint of electricity generation. Though the Generation 1 Vanadium redox flow battery (G1 VRB) has been successfully implemented in a number of field trials and demonstration projects around the world, it suffers from low energy density that limits its use to stationary applications. Extensive research is thus being carried out to improve its energy density and enhance its performance to enable mobile applications while simultaneously trying to minimize the cost by employing cost effective stack materials and effectively controlling the current operating procedures. The vast bulk of this research was conducted at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney during the period 1985–2005, with a large number of other research groups contributing to novel membrane and electrode material development since then. This paper presents a historical overview of materials research and development for the VRB at UNSW, highlighting some of the significant findings that have contributed to improving the battery's performance over the years. Relevant work in this field by other research groups in recent times has also been reviewed and discussed

  13. Airfoil optimization for unsteady flows with application to high-lift noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpfkeil, Markus Peer

    The use of steady-state aerodynamic optimization methods in the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) community is fairly well established. In particular, the use of adjoint methods has proven to be very beneficial because their cost is independent of the number of design variables. The application of numerical optimization to airframe-generated noise, however, has not received as much attention, but with the significant quieting of modern engines, airframe noise now competes with engine noise. Optimal control techniques for unsteady flows are needed in order to be able to reduce airframe-generated noise. In this thesis, a general framework is formulated to calculate the gradient of a cost function in a nonlinear unsteady flow environment via the discrete adjoint method. The unsteady optimization algorithm developed in this work utilizes a Newton-Krylov approach since the gradient-based optimizer uses the quasi-Newton method BFGS, Newton's method is applied to the nonlinear flow problem, GMRES is used to solve the resulting linear problem inexactly, and last but not least the linear adjoint problem is solved using Bi-CGSTAB. The flow is governed by the unsteady two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a one-equation turbulence model, which are discretized using structured grids and a finite difference approach. The effectiveness of the unsteady optimization algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to several problems of interest including shocktubes, pulses in converging-diverging nozzles, rotating cylinders, transonic buffeting, and an unsteady trailing-edge flow. In order to address radiated far-field noise, an acoustic wave propagation program based on the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) formulation is implemented and validated. The general framework is then used to derive the adjoint equations for a novel hybrid URANS/FW-H optimization algorithm in order to be able to optimize the shape of airfoils based on their calculated far

  14. Development of a Dual-PIV system for high-speed flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Lasserre, Jean J.; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    A new Dual-particle image velocimetry (Dual-PIV) system for application in supersonic flows was developed. The system was designed for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions with separation. This type of flow places demanding requirements on the system, from the large range of characteristic frequencies O(100 Hz-100 kHz) to spatial and temporal resolutions necessary for the measurement of turbulent quantities (Dolling in AIAA J 39(8):1517-1531, 2001; Dupont et al. in J Fluid Mech 559:255-277, 2006; Smits and Dussauge in Turbulent shear layers in supersonic flow, 2nd edn. Springer, New York, 2006). While classic PIV systems using high-resolution CCD sensors allow high spatial resolution, these systems cannot provide the required temporal resolution. Existing high-speed PIV systems provide temporal and CMOS sensor resolutions, and even laser pulse energies, that are not adapted to our needs. The only obvious solution allowing sufficiently high spatial resolution, access to high frequencies, and a high laser pulse energy is a multi-frame system: a Dual-PIV system, consisting of two synchronized PIV systems observing the same field of view, will give access to temporal characteristics of the flow. The key technology of our system is frequency-based image separation: two lasers of different wavelengths illuminate the field of view. The cross-pollution with laser light from the respective other branches was quantified during system validation. The overall system noise was quantified, and the prevailing error of only 2 % reflects the good spatial and temporal alignment. The quality of the measurement system is demonstrated with some results on a subsonic jet flow including the spatio-temporal inter-correlation functions between the systems. First measurements in a turbulent flat-plate boundary layer at Mach 2 show the same satisfactory data quality and are also presented and discussed.

  15. System identification by experimental data processing, application to turbulent transport of a tracer in pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, Manuel; Getto, Daniel; Berne, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    System identification is the first, and probably the most important step in detecting abnormal behavior, control system design or performance improving. Data analysis is performed for studying the plant behavior, sensitivity of operation procedures and several other goals. In all these cases, the observed data is the convolution of an input function, and the system's impulse response. Practical discrete time convolutions may be performed multiplying a matrix built from the impulse response by the input vector, but for deconvolution it is necessary to invert the matrix which is singular in a causal system. Another method for deconvolution is by means of Fourier Transforms. Actual readings are usually corrupted by noise and, besides, their transform shows high low frequencies components and high frequency ones mainly due to additive noise. Subjective decisions as cut-off frequency should be taken as well. This paper proposes a deconvolution method based on parameters fitting of suitable models, where they exist, and estimation of values where analytical forms are not available. It is based on the global, non linear fitting of them, with a maximum likelihood criteria. An application of the method is shown using data from two fluid flow experiments. The experimental test rigs basically consist in a long section of straight pipe in which fluid is flowing. A pulse of tracer is injected at the entrance and detected at various locations along the pipe. An attempt of deconvolution of signals from successive probes using a classical model describing the flow of tracer as a plug moving with the average fluid velocity, plus some axial dispersion. The parameters are for instance the velocity of the plug and a dispersion coefficient. After parameter fitting, the model is found to reproduce the experimental data well. The flow rates deduced from the adjusted travel times are in very good agreement with the actual values. In addition, the flow dispersion coefficient is obtained

  16. Two-Phase Flow Research on the ISS for Thermal Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    With the era of full utilization of the ISS now upon us, this presentation will discuss some of the highest-priority areas for two-phase flow systems with thermal control applications. These priorities are guided by recommendations of a 2011 NRC Decadal Survey report, Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration, Life and Physical Sciences for a New Era as well as an internal NASA exercise in response to the NRC report conducted in early 2012. Many of these proposals are already in various stages of development, while others are still conceptual.

  17. Reticulocyte maturity index by flow cytometry: its applicability in radioinduced bone marrow aplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Flow cytometric reticulocyte quantification was assayed in ten patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with previous conditioning chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI). A reticulocyte maturity index (RMI) was determined taking into account the RNA content. With de aim of testing the utility of RMI as an early predictor of functional recovery in marrow aplasia, other haematological indicators as neutrophils count were comparatively evaluated. Mean time elapsed between BMT and engraftment evidence by RMI was 17,6 days. In six patients the RMI was the earliest indicator of functional recovery. The applicability of this assay in the following of radioinduced bone marrow aplasia is discussed. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Application of the Green's function method for 2- and 3-dimensional steady transonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, K.

    1984-01-01

    A Time-Domain Green's function method for the nonlinear time-dependent three-dimensional aerodynamic potential equation is presented. The Green's theorem is being used to transform the partial differential equation into an integro-differential-delay equation. Finite-element and finite-difference methods are employed for the spatial and time discretizations to approximate the integral equation by a system of differential-delay equations. Solution may be obtained by solving for this nonlinear simultaneous system of equations in time. This paper discusses the application of the method to the Transonic Small Disturbance Equation and numerical results for lifting and nonlifting airfoils and wings in steady flows are presented.

  19. Flow cytometric of reticulocytes quantification: radio-induction medullary aplasia application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Perez, M.; Gisone, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometric reticulocyte quantification was assayed in ten patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with previous conditioning by chemotherapy and total body irradiation. A reticulocyte maturity index (RMI) was determined taking into account the RNA content. With the aim of testing the utility of RMI as an early predictor of functional recovery in marrow aplasia, other hematological indicators as neutrophils count were comparatively evaluated. Mean time elapsed between BMT and engraftment evidence by RMI was 17,6 days. In six patients the RMI was the earliest indicator of functional recovery. The applicability of this assay in the pursuit of radioinduced bone marrow aplasia is discussed. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Sammy H. S.; Waudby, Christopher A.; Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2015-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15 N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1 H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on N z during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ∼1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies.Graphical Abstract

  1. Applications of flow cytometry in plant pathology for genome size determination, detection and physiological status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Liesbet; Höfte, Monica; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Leus, Leen

    2011-10-01

    Flow cytometers are probably the most multipurpose laboratory devices available. They can analyse a vast and very diverse range of cell parameters. This technique has left its mark on cancer, human immunodeficiency virus and immunology research, and is indispensable in routine clinical diagnostics. Flow cytometry (FCM) is also a well-known tool for the detection and physiological status assessment of microorganisms in drinking water, marine environments, food and fermentation processes. However, flow cytometers are seldom used in plant pathology, despite FCM's major advantages as both a detection method and a research tool. Potential uses of FCM include the characterization of genome sizes of fungal and oomycete populations, multiplexed pathogen detection and the monitoring of the viability, culturability and gene expression of plant pathogens, and many others. This review provides an overview of the history, advantages and disadvantages of FCM, and focuses on the current applications and future possibilities of FCM in plant pathology. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  2. Dip Phenomenon in High-Curved Turbulent Flows and Application of Entropy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Termini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of velocity profile in turbulent open channels is a difficult task due to the significant effects of the secondary flow. The present paper investigates the mechanism of the velocity-dip phenomenon, whereby the location of the maximum velocity appears to be below the free surface. Previous studies conducted in straight channels relate the mechanism of the velocity-dip phenomenon to secondary flow induced by anisotropy of turbulence. This work focuses on high-curved channels where the secondary motion, which is also induced by the channel’s curvature, evolves along the bend. The width-to-depth ratio, B/h, is one of the most important parameters that are affecting the secondary motion entity. In particular, the present study aims to investigate the evolution of the velocity-dip along the bend for two values of the width-to-depth ratio and the applicability of the entropic model for the dip-phenomenon estimation. The results show that the velocity-dip is more accentuated for low values of the width-to-depth ratio, where the secondary motion plays a fundamental role in the distribution of the downstream flow velocity, although the velocity-dip is also present when the aspect ratio is higher than 10. Furthermore, the velocity profiles that were estimated by applying the entropic model are in good agreement with the measured ones, especially for B/h < 10.

  3. Applications of flow cytometry to toxicological mycotoxin effects in cultured mammalian cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-García, Ana; Manyes, Lara; Ruiz, María-José; Font, Guillermina

    2013-06-01

    This review gives an overview of flow cytometry applications to toxicological studies of several physiological target sites of mycotoxins on different mammalian cell lines. Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that may be present in food, feed, air and water. The increasing presence of mycotoxins in crops, their wide distribution in the food chain, and their potential for toxicity demonstrate the need for further knowledge. Flow cytometry has become a valuable tool in mycotoxin studies in recent years for the rapid analysis of single cells in a mixture. In toxicology, the power of these methods lies in the possibility of determining a wide range of cell parameters, providing valuable information to elucidate cell growth and viability, metabolic activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and membrane integrity mechanisms. There are studies using flow cytometry technique on Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium mycotoxins including information about cell type, assay conditions and functional parameters. Most of the studies collected in the literature are on deoxynivalenol and zearalenone mycotoxins. Cell cycle analysis and apoptosis are the processes more widely investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of in-series piezoelectric bimorph bending beam actuators for active flow control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wilfred K.; Clingman, Dan J.; Amitay, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric materials have long been used for active flow control purposes in aerospace applications to increase the effectiveness of aerodynamic surfaces on aircraft, wind turbines, and more. Piezoelectric actuators are an appropriate choice due to their low mass, small dimensions, simplistic design, and frequency response. This investigation involves the development of piezoceramic-based actuators with two bimorphs placed in series. Here, the main desired characteristic was the achievable displacement amplitude at specific driving voltages and frequencies. A parametric study was performed, in which actuators with varying dimensions were fabricated and tested. These devices were actuated with a sinusoidal waveform, resulting in an oscillating platform on which to mount active flow control devices, such as dynamic vortex generators. The main quantification method consisted of driving these devices with different voltages and frequencies to determine their free displacement, blocking force, and frequency response. It was found that resonance frequency increased with shorter and thicker actuators, while free displacement increased with longer and thinner actuators. Integration of the devices into active flow control test modules is noted. In addition to physical testing, a quasi-static analytical model was developed and compared with experimental data, which showed close correlation for both free displacement and blocking force.

  5. Paraffin dispersant application for cleaning subsea flow lines in the deep water Gulf of Mexico cottonwood development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, David; White, Jake; Pogoson, Oje [Baker Hughes Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Barros, Dalmo; Ramachandran, Kartik; Bonin, George; Waltrich, Paulo; Shecaira, Farid [PETROBRAS America, Houston, TX (United States); Ziglio, Claudio [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a paraffin dispersant (in seawater) application to clean paraffin deposition from a severely restricted 17.4-mile dual subsea flow line system in the Gulf of Mexico Cottonwood development. In principle, dispersant treatments are simple processes requiring effective dispersant packages and agitation to break-up and disperse deposition. Dispersants have been used onshore for treating wax deposition for decades. Implementation of a treatment in a long deep water production system, however, poses numerous challenges. The Cottonwood application was one of the first ever deep water dispersant applications. The application was designed in four separate phases: pre-treatment displacement for hydrate protection, dispersant treatment for paraffin deposition removal, pigging sequence for final flow line cleaning, and post-treatment displacement for hydrate protection. In addition, considerable job planning was performed to ensure the application was executed in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Two dynamically positioned marine vessels were used for pumping fluids and capturing returns. The application was extremely successful in restoring the deep water flow lines back to near pre-production state. Final pigging operations confirmed the flow lines were cleaned of all restrictions. Significant paraffin deposition was removed in the application. Approximately 900 bbls of paraffin sludge was recovered from the 4000 bbl internal volume flow line loop. Furthermore, the application was completed with zero discharge of fluids. The application provided significant value for the Cottonwood development. It allowed production from wells to be brought on-line at a higher capacity, thereby generating increased revenue. It also allowed resumption of routine pigging operations. As such, the Cottonwood dispersant application illustrates that with proper planning and execution, paraffin dispersant treatments can be highly effective solutions for cleaning

  6. Development of a multi-path ultrasonic flow meter for the application to feedwater flow measurement in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, J. C.; Ha, J. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Jang, W. H.; Park, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Park, M. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we propose a method to measure the feedwater flow using multi-path ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Since the UFM measures a path velocity at which the ultrasonic wave is propagated, the flow profile may be important to convey the path velocity to the velocity averaged over the entire cross section of the flowing medium. The conventional UFM has used the smooth-wall circular pipe model presented by Nikurades. However, this model covers a lower range which is less than 3.2 million while the Reynolds number of the feedwater flow in operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) is about 20 million. Therefore, we feedwater flow in operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) is about 20 million. Therefore, we proposed the non-linear correlation model that combines the ratio between the DP output and proposed the non-linear correlation model that combines the ratio between the DP output and UFM output. Experiments were performed using both computer simulation and newly constructed NPPs' test data. The uncertainty analysis result shows that the proposed method has reasonably lower uncertainty than conventional UFM

  7. Study on CFD approach for gas entrainment phenomenon. Evaluation of applicability of finite element flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yuzuru

    2005-07-01

    The report is concerned with the evaluation of applicability of numerical modelling methods for the prediction of gas entrainment in an upper plenum of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR). Special attention was paid to applicability of variational multiscale (VMS) modelling in the context of the Finite Element Method. Two flow problems, which were experimentally shown to induce gas entrainment, are solved by a VMS code (MISTRAL). First, computing a benchmark problem of a gas entrainment swirl flow in a cylindrical vessel has led to the following results; (1) the VMS solution is able to resolve the precise vortex core structure more accurately than the non-VMS solution computed by Smart-fem. The circumferential velocity obtained from VMS computation rises almost double in comparison with the non-VMS solution, though it still underestimates the experimental values. (2) the half-value radius of the negative region of the second invariant of velocity gradient matches well between the VMS solution and non-VMS solution. (3) the negative/positive boundary of the second invariant of velocity gradient obtained from the VMS solution is closer to the vortex core radius observed in the experiment than that of the non-VMS solution, though the vortex dip length computed from the VMS result is shorter than the experimental value. Second, computing a benchmark problem of open channel flow with a square pillar and downstream suction pipe has led to the following results; (4) 2Δx-type spatial oscillation was observed due to lack of mesh subdivisions. (5) the distributional profile of the second invariant of velocity gradient is similar to that of the first problem (swirl flow in a cylindrical vessel), characterized by a strong negative region surrounded by a weak positive region. As a possible future plan, it may be necessary to analyze more precisely the features of unsteady vortices obtained in the second benchmark problem and to identify the difference (if any) from the

  8. Demonstration of robust micromachined jet technology and its application to realistic flow control problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sung Pil [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    This paper describes the demonstration of successful fabrication and initial characterization of micromachined pressure sensors and micromachined jets (microjets) fabricated for use in macro flow control and other applications. In this work, the microfabrication technology was investigated to create a micromachined fluidic control system with a goal of application in practical fluids problems, such as UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)-scale aerodynamic control. Approaches of this work include : (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow ; and (2) a non-silicon alternative micromachining fabrication technology based on metallic substrates and lamination (in addition to traditional MEMS technologies) which will allow the realization of larger scale, more robust structures and larger array active areas for fluidic systems. As an initial study, an array of MEMS pressure sensors and an array of MEMS modulators for orifice-based control of microjets have been fabricated, and characterized. Both pressure sensors and modulators have been built using stainless steel as a substrate and a combination of lamination and traditional micromachining processes as fabrication technologies.

  9. NONINVASIVE METHODS ASSESSMENT BLOOD FLOW IN ANTERIOR SEGMENT AND CLINICAL APPLICATION PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Kiseleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review contains information on the anatomical and physiological features of the vessels of the conjunctiva, iris, ciliary body. There are data on the development and application of new non-invasive methods for the study of hemodynamics in the microvessels of anterior eye segment. To study the blood flow of the anterior segment of the eye, biomycroscopy, photography and videobiomicroscopy, television biomicroscopy of vessels, darkfield visualization, application fluorescence angiography, photoacoustic angiography, orthogonal polarization spectroscopy, laser Doppler flowmetry and OCT-angiography were used in recent years. These methods allow to determine the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of conjunctiva, iris, ciliary body microcirculation. They are highly informative for assess of various drugs effect on the vascular eye system. Investigation of hemodynamics in the eye microvessels is necessary for a fundamental approach to the study of the pathophysiology of systemic circulatory pathologies (with arterial hypertension, diabetes, etc. and changes in regional blood flow in organ of vision disease. Monitoring of anterior segment microcirculation in clinical practice makes possible to monitor the effectiveness of drug and surgical treatment.

  10. Demonstration of robust micromachined jet technology and its application to realistic flow control problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sung Pil

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the demonstration of successful fabrication and initial characterization of micromachined pressure sensors and micromachined jets (microjets) fabricated for use in macro flow control and other applications. In this work, the microfabrication technology was investigated to create a micromachined fluidic control system with a goal of application in practical fluids problems, such as UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)-scale aerodynamic control. Approaches of this work include : (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow ; and (2) a non-silicon alternative micromachining fabrication technology based on metallic substrates and lamination (in addition to traditional MEMS technologies) which will allow the realization of larger scale, more robust structures and larger array active areas for fluidic systems. As an initial study, an array of MEMS pressure sensors and an array of MEMS modulators for orifice-based control of microjets have been fabricated, and characterized. Both pressure sensors and modulators have been built using stainless steel as a substrate and a combination of lamination and traditional micromachining processes as fabrication technologies

  11. A study of tiron in aqueous solutions for redox flow battery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yan; Wen Yuehua; Cheng Jie; Cao Gaoping; Yang Yusheng

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of tiron in aqueous solutions and the influence of pH were investigated. A change of pH mainly produces the following results. In acidic solutions of pH below 4, the electrode reaction of tiron exhibits a simple process at a relatively high potential with a favorable quasi-reversibility. The tiron redox reaction exhibits fast electrode kinetics and a diffusion-controlled process. In solutions of pH above 4, the electrode reaction of tiron tends to be complicated. Thus, acidic aqueous solutions of pH below 4 are favorable for the tiron as active species of a redox flow battery (RFB). Constant-current electrolysis shows that a part of capacity is irreversible and the structure of tiron is changed for the first electrolysis, which may result from an ECE process for the tiron electro-oxidation. Thus, the tiron needs an activation process for the application of a RFB. Average coulombic and energy efficiencies of the tiron/Pb battery are 93 and 82%, respectively, showing that self-discharge is small during the short-term cycling. The preliminary exploration shows that the tiron is electrochemically promising for redox flow battery application.

  12. Adjustment of pipe flow explicit friction factor equations for application to tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltz, Christopher L.; Bowen, Mike D.; Von Olnhausen, Wayne A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The accurate determination of single phase friction losses or friction pressure drop in tube bundles is essential in the thermal-hydraulic analyses of components such as nuclear fuel assemblies, heat exchangers and steam generators. Such friction losses are normally calculated using a friction factor, f, along with the experimental observation that the friction pressure drop in a pipe is proportional to the dynamic pressure (1/2 ρV 2 ) of the flow: ΔP = 1/2 ρV 2 (fL/D). In this equation L is the pipe or tube bundle length and D is the hydraulic diameter of the pipe or tube bundle. The friction factor is normally calculated using one of a number of explicit friction factor equations. A significant amount of work has been accomplished in developing explicit friction factor equations. These explicit equations range from approximations, which were developed for ease of numerical evaluation, to those which are mathematically complex but yield very good fits to the test data. These explicit friction factor equations are based on a large experimental data base, nearly all of which comes from pipe flow geometry information, and have been historically applied to tube bundles. This paper presents an adjustment method which may be applied to various explicit friction factor equations developed for pipe flow to accurately predict the friction factor for tube bundles. The characteristic of the adjustment is based on experimental friction pressure loss data obtained by Framatome ANP through flow testing of a nuclear fuel assembly (tube bundle) at its Richland Test Facility (RTF). Through adjustment of previously developed explicit friction factor equations for pipe flow, the vast amount of historical development and experimentation in the area of single phase pipe flow friction loss may be incorporated into the evaluation of single phase friction losses within tube bundles. Comparisons of the application of one or more of the previously

  13. Bubble-free on-chip continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction: concept and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenming; Kang, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2011-06-07

    Bubble formation inside a microscale channel is a significant problem in general microfluidic experiments. The problem becomes especially crucial when performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a chip which is subject to repetitive temperature changes. In this paper, we propose a bubble-free sample injection scheme applicable for continuous-flow PCR inside a glass/PDMS hybrid microfluidic chip, and attempt to provide a theoretical basis concerning bubble formation and elimination. Highly viscous paraffin oil plugs are employed in both the anterior and posterior ends of a sample plug, completely encapsulating the sample and eliminating possible nucleation sites for bubbles. In this way, internal channel pressure is increased, and vaporization of the sample is prevented, suppressing bubble formation. Use of an oil plug in the posterior end of the sample plug aids in maintaining a stable flow of a sample at a constant rate inside a heated microchannel throughout the entire reaction, as compared to using an air plug. By adopting the proposed sample injection scheme, we demonstrate various practical applications. On-chip continuous-flow PCR is performed employing genomic DNA extracted from a clinical single hair root sample, and its D1S80 locus is successfully amplified. Also, chip reusability is assessed using a plasmid vector. A single chip is used up to 10 times repeatedly without being destroyed, maintaining almost equal intensities of the resulting amplicons after each run, ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of the proposed sample injection scheme. In addition, the use of a commercially-available and highly cost-effective hot plate as a potential candidate for the heating source is investigated.

  14. Application of flow-controllable accumulator and performance analysis in Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Byung-Ryul; Lee, Un-Chul

    1997-01-01

    The Korean Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plants 3 ampersand 4(YGN 3 ampersand 4) are the two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply systems, rated at 2,815 MW(thermal). They incorporate the safety injection system (SIS) consisting of the two high pressure (HPSI) pumps, two low pressure safety injection (LPSI) pumps, and four accumulators. The SIS is two headered arrangements, each to four cold legs injection (CLI) type which provides cooling to the core in the highly unlikely event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). In the current SIS, the LPSI pumps automatically start during a LOCA, and also provide the residual heat removal capability during the shutdown cooling. This paper presents the feasibility of the removal of the LPSI from the existing SIS with minor system changes, including the increase up to four in the HPSI pumps, direct vessel injection(DVI), and the flow-controllable accumulators. A double-ended rupture of one of the four cold legs in the YGN 3 ampersand 4 was simulated using RELAP5/MOD3.1 to determine the feasibility of the application of this new SIS design to the current nuclear power plants. As a result, the calculated reflooding peak cladding surface temperature(PCT) was comparable to that of original base calculation, and the downcomer and the core collapsed liquid level during reflooding were also comparable to those in the current safety system design. This large break, cold-leg LOCA analysis addresses the reflooding capability without credit for a LPSI pump system and the applicability of the new flow-controllable accumulator. Also this analysis confirms that the combination of new flow-controllable accumulators, DVI and the increased HPSI pumps maintain the peak cladding temperature below the prescribed limits. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. A scalable geometric multigrid solver for nonsymmetric elliptic systems with application to variable-density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily, M.; Jofre, L.; Mani, A.; Iaccarino, G.

    2018-03-01

    A geometric multigrid algorithm is introduced for solving nonsymmetric linear systems resulting from the discretization of the variable density Navier-Stokes equations on nonuniform structured rectilinear grids and high-Reynolds number flows. The restriction operation is defined such that the resulting system on the coarser grids is symmetric, thereby allowing for the use of efficient smoother algorithms. To achieve an optimal rate of convergence, the sequence of interpolation and restriction operations are determined through a dynamic procedure. A parallel partitioning strategy is introduced to minimize communication while maintaining the load balance between all processors. To test the proposed algorithm, we consider two cases: 1) homogeneous isotropic turbulence discretized on uniform grids and 2) turbulent duct flow discretized on stretched grids. Testing the algorithm on systems with up to a billion unknowns shows that the cost varies linearly with the number of unknowns. This O (N) behavior confirms the robustness of the proposed multigrid method regarding ill-conditioning of large systems characteristic of multiscale high-Reynolds number turbulent flows. The robustness of our method to density variations is established by considering cases where density varies sharply in space by a factor of up to 104, showing its applicability to two-phase flow problems. Strong and weak scalability studies are carried out, employing up to 30,000 processors, to examine the parallel performance of our implementation. Excellent scalability of our solver is shown for a granularity as low as 104 to 105 unknowns per processor. At its tested peak throughput, it solves approximately 4 billion unknowns per second employing over 16,000 processors with a parallel efficiency higher than 50%.

  16. The Design Method of Axial Flow Runners Focusing on Axial Flow Velocity Uniformization and Its Application to an Ultra-Small Axial Flow Hydraulic Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a portable and ultra-small axial flow hydraulic turbine that can generate electric power comparatively easily using the low head of open channels such as existing pipe conduits or small rivers. In addition, we proposed a simple design method for axial flow runners in combination with the conventional one-dimensional design method and the design method of axial flow velocity uniformization, with the support of three-dimensional flow analysis. Applying our design method to the runner of an ultra-small axial flow hydraulic turbine, the performance and internal flow of the designed runner were investigated using CFD analysis and experiment (performance test and PIV measurement. As a result, the runners designed with our design method were significantly improved in turbine efficiency compared to the original runner. Specifically, in the experiment, a new design of the runner achieved a turbine efficiency of 0.768. This reason was that the axial component of absolute velocity of the new design of the runner was relatively uniform at the runner outlet in comparison with that of the original runner, and as a result, the negative rotational flow was improved. Thus, the validity of our design method has been verified.

  17. Some developments and applications of LES of single phase turbulent flows for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic Ducros; Valerie Barthel; Ulrich Bieder; Alexandre Chatelain; Younes Benarafa; Olivier Cioni; Gauthier Fauchet; Philippe Emonot; Patrick Quemere; Bernard Menant; Nicolas Tauveron; Simone Vandroux; Christophe Calvin

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The turbulence modelling is an important issue concerning the predictive capability of the CFD codes applied to nuclear reactor safety (NRS), in particular for single-phase flows. Common features of these unsteady high Reynolds number turbulent flows are various regimes (laminar, transitional, fully turbulent) developing in arbitrary complex geometries involving a large extend of standard flow configurations (attached and detached boundary layers, mixing layers, jets in cavity, in cross flows, jet impingement) eventually submitted to buoyancy forces, to dilatation effects and leading to mixing of constituents and temperatures. NRS issues are most of the time related to the eventual knowledge of parietal quantities such as temperature (mean and fluctuating), leading to consider the wall region as a crucial one and to deal with coupled problems. All these features can lead to consider different approaches for turbulence modelling: more or less standard 'Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes equations' closures, Large Eddy Simulations, both of them considered with or without wall functions, with or without large implicit time stepping etc. The development and industrialization of LES as a target of providing 'reference simulations' for NRS are parts of the Trio-U project, developed at CEA for several years [1]. First, the paper presents the current status of LES implementation and some insights on the R and D effort concerning the turbulence modelling. The R and D strategy will be introduced as a result of both the extra-nuclear community know-how on LES and several years of applications of LES for nuclear issues at CEA. It will be shown that LES can be considered as a good candidate to deal with the previous mentioned issues. A large emphasis will be devoted to the R and D on approximate wall conditions, including first the checking of the consistency of standard and advanced wall conditions with LES approach, second specific works dealing

  18. Comprehensive applications of the gas flow proportional counters for radiological surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, D.A.R.; Raman, Anand; Ashokkumar, P.; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gas Flow Proportional Counters (GFPC) have been developed indigenously for various radiation protection applications. These detectors can be fabricated for 2 inches diameter filter paper sample counting applications to large area (∼1500 cm 2 ) detectors for surface contamination applications. Thin entrance windows allow non penetrating type of radiations like alpha and low energy beta particles, Efficiencies (for alpha and beta radiations) are comparable to conventional detectors used to measure these radiations. Poor gamma efficiency ( 2 /γ ratio, a high figure of merit and enables efficient gamma background rejection. These detectors are quite suitable for Indian environmental conditions. Three systems have been developed and successfully incorporated in to the radiation surveillance program at various nuclear facilities. The systems based on GFPC detectors include: a) Multiple sample gross alpha counting system; b) Laundry monitoring system; c) Alpha hand contamination monitoring system. The first of these enables simultaneous gross alpha counting of five air activity filter paper samples. The area of the detector surface is optimized to cover the 2 inches sized filter paper samples routinely used for the purpose. Five numbers of GFPC 's are arranged sequentially coupled to five individual amplifiers - micro controller modules to process the signal from the five counters. The laundry monitor which is micro controller based system consists of four large area multiwire GFPC detectors (700 cm 2 sensitive area) used to monitor alpha contamination of decontaminated laundry, Each detector uses a charge sensitive preamplifier coupled to I 2 C counter. The alpha hand monitoring system consists of four large area multiwire gas flow proportional detectors (330 cm 2 sensitive area each). A micro controller-based module is employed to initiate the counting process automatically when the hands are inserted in to the suitably designed window slots and provides audio and

  19. Application of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) Photodetectors for Transverse and Longitudinal Intra-Bunch Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, R J; Boland, M J; Lucas, T G; Rassool, R P

    2013-01-01

    The performance reach of modern accelerators is often governed by the ability to reliably measure and control the beam stability. In high-brightness lepton and high-energy hadron accelerators, the use of optical diagnostic techniques is becoming more widespread as the required bandwidth, resolution and high RF beam power level involved limit the use of traditional electro-magnetic RF pick-up based methods. This contribution discusses the use of fibre-coupled ultra-fast Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetectors (MSM-PD) as an alternative, dependablemeans to measure signals derived from electro-optical and synchrotron-light based diagnostics systems. It describes the beam studies performed at CERN’s CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) and the Australian Synchrotron to assess the feasibility of this technology as a robust, wide-band and sensitive technique for measuring transverse intra-bunch and bunch-by-bunch beam oscillations, longitudinal beam profiles, un-bunched beam population and beam-halo profiles. The amplifica...

  20. Log-gamma linear-mixed effects models for multiple outcomes with application to a longitudinal glaucoma study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Luo, Dandan; Li, Pengfei; Sharpsten, Lucie; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive disease due to damage in the optic nerve with associated functional losses. Although the relationship between structural and functional progression in glaucoma is well established, there is disagreement on how this association evolves over time. In addressing this issue, we propose a new class of non-Gaussian linear-mixed models to estimate the correlations among subject-specific effects in multivariate longitudinal studies with a skewed distribution of random effects, to be used in a study of glaucoma. This class provides an efficient estimation of subject-specific effects by modeling the skewed random effects through the log-gamma distribution. It also provides more reliable estimates of the correlations between the random effects. To validate the log-gamma assumption against the usual normality assumption of the random effects, we propose a lack-of-fit test using the profile likelihood function of the shape parameter. We apply this method to data from a prospective observation study, the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study, to present a statistically significant association between structural and functional change rates that leads to a better understanding of the progression of glaucoma over time. PMID:26075565

  1. FEM-based neural-network approach to nonlinear modeling with application to longitudinal vehicle dynamics control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkkuhl, J; Hunt, K J; Fritz, H

    1999-01-01

    An finite-element methods (FEM)-based neural-network approach to Nonlinear AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (NARX) modeling is presented. The method uses multilinear interpolation functions on C0 rectangular elements. The local and global structure of the resulting model is analyzed. It is shown that the model can be interpreted both as a local model network and a single layer feedforward neural network. The main aim is to use the model for nonlinear control design. The proposed FEM NARX description is easily accessible to feedback linearizing control techniques. Its use with a two-degrees of freedom nonlinear internal model controller is discussed. The approach is applied to modeling of the nonlinear longitudinal dynamics of an experimental lorry, using measured data. The modeling results are compared with local model network and multilayer perceptron approaches. A nonlinear speed controller was designed based on the identified FEM model. The controller was implemented in a test vehicle, and several experimental results are presented.

  2. The impact of covariance misspecification in multivariate Gaussian mixtures on estimation and inference: an application to longitudinal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggeseth, Brianna C; Jewell, Nicholas P

    2013-07-20

    Multivariate Gaussian mixtures are a class of models that provide a flexible parametric approach for the representation of heterogeneous multivariate outcomes. When the outcome is a vector of repeated measurements taken on the same subject, there is often inherent dependence between observations. However, a common covariance assumption is conditional independence-that is, given the mixture component label, the outcomes for subjects are independent. In this paper, we study, through asymptotic bias calculations and simulation, the impact of covariance misspecification in multivariate Gaussian mixtures. Although maximum likelihood estimators of regression and mixing probability parameters are not consistent under misspecification, they have little asymptotic bias when mixture components are well separated or if the assumed correlation is close to the truth even when the covariance is misspecified. We also present a robust standard error estimator and show that it outperforms conventional estimators in simulations and can indicate that the model is misspecified. Body mass index data from a national longitudinal study are used to demonstrate the effects of misspecification on potential inferences made in practice. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Flow and fracture of ices, with application to icy satellites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W. B.; Stern, L. A.; Pathare, A.; Golding, N.

    2013-12-01

    Exploration of the outer planets and their satellites by spacecraft over the past 4 decades has revealed that the prevailing low temperatures in the outer solar system have not produced "dead" cryoworlds of generic appearance. Rather, there is an extraordinary diversity in average densities, presence/absence and compositions of atmospheres and planetary rings, average albedos and their seasonal changes, near-surface compositions, and surface records of impact cratering and endogenic tectonic and igneous processes. One reason for this diversity is that the icy minerals present in abundance on many of these worlds are now or once were at significant fractions of their melting temperatures. Hence, a host of thermally activated processes related to endogenic activity (such as crystal defect migration, mass diffusion, surface transport, solid-solid changes of state, and partial melting) may occur that can enable inelastic flow on the surfaces and in the interiors of these bodies. Planetary manifestations include viscous crater relaxation in ice-rich terrain, cryovolcanism, the presence of a stable subsurface ocean, and the effects of solid-ice convection in deep interiors. We make the connection between theoretical mechanisms of deformation and planetary geology through laboratory experiment. Specifically, we develop quantitative constitutive flow laws (strain rate vs. stress) that describe the effects of relevant environmental variables (hydrostatic pressure, temperature, phase composition, chemical impurities). Our findings speak to topics including (1) the behavior of an outer ice I layer, its thickness, the depth to which a stagnant lid might extend, and possibility of wholesale overturn; (2) softening effects of dissolved species such as ammonia and perchlorate; (3) hardening effects of enclathration and of rock dust; and (4) effects of grain size on strength and factors affecting grain size. Other applications of lab data include dynamics of the deep interiors of

  4. Development of a flow structure interaction methodology applicable to a convertible car roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Jason J.

    2003-01-01

    The current research investigates the flow-induced deformation of a convertible roof of a vehicle using experimental and numerical methods. A computational methodology is developed that entails the coupling of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with an in-house structural code. A model two-dimensional problem is first studied. The CFD code and a Source Panel Method (SPM) code are used to predict the pressure acting on the surface of a rigid roof of a scale model. Good agreement is found between predicted pressure distribution and that obtained in a parallel wind-tunnel experimental programme. The validated computational modelling of the fluid flow is then used in a coupling strategy with a line-element structural model that incorporates initial slackness of the flexible roof material. The computed flow-structure interaction yields stable solutions, the aerodynamically loaded flexible roof settling into static equilibrium. The effects of slackness and material properties on deformation and convergence are investigated using the coupled code. The three-dimensional problem is addressed by extending the two-dimensional structural solver to represent a surface by a matrix of line elements with constant tension along their length. This has been successfully coupled with the three-dimensional CFD flow-solution technique. Computed deformations show good agreement with the results of wind tunnel experiments for the well prescribed geometry. In both two-and three-dimensional computations, the flow-structure interaction is found to yield a static deformation to within 1% difference in the displacement variable after three iterations between the fluid and structural codes. The same computational methodology is applied to a real-car application using a third-party structural solver. The methodology is shown to be robust even under conditions beyond those likely to be encountered. The full methodology could be used as a design tool. The present work

  5. Internato Longitudinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Marcos Piva Demarzo

    Full Text Available O internato médico tem gerado recorrente debate frente às transformações curriculares em andamento no País. A despeito das discussões, um modelo de internato consonante com essas mudanças ainda não foi consistentemente delineado. Neste ensaio, trazemos uma proposta de matriz estruturante para o internato médico. Propomos que o internato médico seja realizado durante os seis anos do curso, de forma longitudinal, tendo como eixo estruturante a clínica da Atenção Básica (AB. Esse modelo de "internato longitudinal" prevê a introdução progressiva na prática clínica, iniciando-se pela AB nos dois primeiros anos, acrescentando-se progressivamente os ambulatórios de especialidades, os estágios hospitalares e demais atividades práticas, alcançando-se, dessa forma, o rol de diversidade e complexidade previsto para o egresso da escola médica.

  6. A software application for energy flow simulation of a grid connected photovoltaic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, Ayman A.; Alsaad, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-01

    A computer software application was developed to simulate hourly energy flow of a grid connected photovoltaic system. This software application enables conducting an operational evaluation of a studied photovoltaic system in terms of energy exchange with the electrical grid. The system model consists of a photovoltaic array, a converter and an optional generic energy storage component that supports scheduled charging/discharging. In addition to system design parameters, the software uses hourly solar data and hourly load data to determine the amount of energy exchanged with electrical grid for each hour of the simulated year. The resulting information is useful in assessing the impact of the system on demand for electrical energy of a building that uses it. The software also aggregates these hourly results in daily, monthly and full year sums. The software finds the financial benefit of the system as the difference in grid electrical energy cost between two simultaneously considered cases. One is with load supplied only by the electrical grid, while the other is with the photovoltaic system present and contributing energy. The software supports the energy pricing scheme used in Jordan for domestic consumers, which is based on slices of monthly consumption. By projecting the yearly financial results on the system lifetime, the application weighs the financial benefit resulting from using the system against its cost, thus facilitating an economical evaluation.

  7. Experimental demonstration of OpenFlow-enabled media ecosystem architecture for high-end applications over metro and core networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntofon, Okung-Dike; Channegowda, Mayur P; Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Rashidi Fard, Mehdi; Nejabati, Reza; Hunter, David K; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2013-02-25

    In this paper, a novel Software-Defined Networking (SDN) architecture is proposed for high-end Ultra High Definition (UHD) media applications. UHD media applications require huge amounts of bandwidth that can only be met with high-capacity optical networks. In addition, there are requirements for control frameworks capable of delivering effective application performance with efficient network utilization. A novel SDN-based Controller that tightly integrates application-awareness with network control and management is proposed for such applications. An OpenFlow-enabled test-bed demonstrator is reported with performance evaluations of advanced online and offline media- and network-aware schedulers.

  8. Exposure-lag-response in Longitudinal Studies: Application of Distributed Lag Non-linear Models in an Occupational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neophytou, Andreas M; Picciotto, Sally; Brown, Daniel M; Gallagher, Lisa E; Checkoway, Harvey; Eisen, Ellen A; Costello, Sadie

    2018-02-13

    Prolonged exposures can have complex relationships with health outcomes, as timing, duration, and intensity of exposure are all potentially relevant. Summary measures such as cumulative exposure or average intensity of exposure may not fully capture these relationships. We applied penalized and unpenalized distributed lag non-linear models (DLNMs) with flexible exposure-response and lag-response functions in order to examine the association between crystalline silica exposure and mortality from lung cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in a cohort study of 2,342 California diatomaceous earth workers, followed 1942-2011. We also assessed associations using simple measures of cumulative exposure assuming linear exposure-response and constant lag-response. Measures of association from DLNMs were generally higher than from simpler models. Rate ratios from penalized DLNMs corresponding to average daily exposures of 0.4 mg/m3 during lag years 31-50 prior to the age of observed cases were 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92, 2.35) for lung cancer and 1.80 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.85) for non-malignant respiratory disease. Rate ratios from the simpler models for the same exposure scenario were 1.15 (95% CI: 0.89-1.48) and 1.23 (95% CI: 1.03-1.46) respectively. Longitudinal cohort studies of prolonged exposures and chronic health outcomes should explore methods allowing for flexibility and non-linearities in the exposure-lag-response. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  9. Counting the corners of a random walk and its application to traffic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We study a system with two types of interacting particles on a one-dimensional lattice. Particles of the first type, which we call ‘active’, are able to detect particles of the second type (called ‘passive’). By relating the problem to a discrete random walk in one dimension with a fixed number of steps we determine the fraction of active and detected particles for both open and periodic boundary conditions as well as for the case where passive particles interact with both or only one neighbors. In the random walk picture, where the two particles types stand for steps in opposite directions, passive particles are detected whenever the resulting path has a corner. For open boundary conditions, it turns out that a simple mean field approximation reproduces the exact result if the particles interact with one neighbor only. A practical application of this problem is heterogeneous traffic flow with communicating and non-communicating vehicles. In this context communicating vehicles can be thought of as active particles which can by front (and rear) sensors detect the vehicle ahead (and behind) although these vehicles do not actively share information. Therefore, we also present simulation results which show the validity of our analysis for real traffic flow. (paper)

  10. Modeling pressure drop of inclined flow through a heat exchanger for aero-engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlis, D.; Yakinthos, K.; Storm, P.; Goulas, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work further numerical predictions for the flow field through a specific type of a heat exchanger, which is planned to be used in the exhaust nozzle of aircraft engines. In order to model the flow field through the heat exchanger, a porous medium model is used based on a simple quadratic relation, which connects the pressure drop with the inlet air velocity in the external part of the heat exchanger. The aim of this work is to check the applicability of the quadratic law in a variety of velocity inlet conditions configured by different angles of attack. The check is performed with CFD and the results are compared with new available experimental data for these inlet conditions. A detailed qualitative analysis shows that although the quadratic law has been derived for a zero angle of attack, it performs very well for alternative non-zero angles. These observations are very helpful since this simple pressure drop law can be used for advanced computations where the whole system of the exhaust nozzle together with the heat exchangers can be modeled within a holistic approach

  11. Development of a new dynamic turbulent model, applications to two-dimensional and plane parallel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, Jean Philippe

    1999-01-01

    We developed a turbulent model based on asymptotic development of the Navier-Stokes equations within the hypothesis of non-local interactions at small scales. This model provides expressions of the turbulent Reynolds sub-grid stresses via estimates of the sub-grid velocities rather than velocities correlations as is usually done. The model involves the coupling of two dynamical equations: one for the resolved scales of motions, which depends upon the Reynolds stresses generated by the sub-grid motions, and one for the sub-grid scales of motions, which can be used to compute the sub-grid Reynolds stresses. The non-locality of interaction at sub-grid scales allows to model their evolution with a linear inhomogeneous equation where the forcing occurs via the energy cascade from resolved to sub-grid scales. This model was solved using a decomposition of sub-grid scales on Gabor's modes and implemented numerically in 2D with periodic boundary conditions. A particles method (PIC) was used to compute the sub-grid scales. The results were compared with results of direct simulations for several typical flows. The model was also applied to plane parallel flows. An analytical study of the equations allows a description of mean velocity profiles in agreement with experimental results and theoretical results based on the symmetries of the Navier-Stokes equation. Possible applications and improvements of the model are discussed in the conclusion. (author) [fr

  12. Femtosecond laser fabrication of fiber based optofluidic platform for flow cytometry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhatlioglu, Murat; Elbuken, Caglar; Ortac, Bulend; Solmaz, Mehmet E.

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturized optofluidic platforms play an important role in bio-analysis, detection and diagnostic applications. The advantages of such miniaturized devices are extremely low sample requirement, low cost development and rapid analysis capabilities. Fused silica is advantageous for optofluidic systems due to properties such as being chemically inert, mechanically stable, and optically transparent to a wide spectrum of light. As a three dimensional manufacturing method, femtosecond laser scanning followed by chemical etching shows great potential to fabricate glass based optofluidic chips. In this study, we demonstrate fabrication of all-fiber based, optofluidic flow cytometer in fused silica glass by femtosecond laser machining. 3D particle focusing was achieved through a straightforward planar chip design with two separately fabricated fused silica glass slides thermally bonded together. Bioparticles in a fluid stream encounter with optical interrogation region specifically designed to allocate 405nm single mode fiber laser source and two multi-mode collection fibers for forward scattering (FSC) and side scattering (SSC) signals detection. Detected signal data collected with oscilloscope and post processed with MATLAB script file. We were able to count number of events over 4000events/sec, and achieve size distribution for 5.95μm monodisperse polystyrene beads using FSC and SSC signals. Our platform shows promise for optical and fluidic miniaturization of flow cytometry systems.

  13. Application of FEM flow analysis to environmental engineering. FEM ryutai kaiseki no kankyo gijutsu eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, M; Ando, K; Shimada, S; Umetani, H [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1990-04-25

    In order to apply FEM (finite element method) flow analysis to environmental engineering, the two-dimensional analysis system was developed, and applied to the design of plant ventilation and improvement of an enviromental control equipment. Furthermore, the three-dimensional analysis system was developed to extend its application. Since in a large scale model, no enhancement of a processing capacity was expected even by a supercomputer because of longer I/O times between internal and external memories caused by a small internal memory space, the parallel processing system with multiple external memories was introduced to analyze such models. To achieve more efficient processing, multiple series of renumbering codes were also prepared to optimize the processing order of solvers, elements and nodes. As examples, the improvement of a thermal oxidizer and the ventilation design for a forging plant, and as an example of a three-dimensional large scale model, the flow analysis around a plant were presented. 8 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Sulfonated poly(tetramethydiphenyl ether ether ketone) membranes for vanadium redox flow battery application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Zhensheng; Bi, Cheng; Dai, Hua [PEMFC Key Materials and Technology Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng [PEMFC Key Materials and Technology Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(tetramethydiphenyl ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) with various degree of sulfonation is prepared and first used as ion exchange membrane for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) application. The vanadium ion permeability of SPEEK40 membrane is one order of magnitude lower than that of Nafion 115 membrane. The low cost SPEEK membranes exhibit a better performance than Nafion at the same operating condition. VRB single cells with SPEEK membranes show very high energy efficiency (>84%), comparable to that of the Nafion, but at much higher columbic efficiency (>97%). In the self-discharge test, the duration of the cell with the SPEEK membrane is two times longer than that with Nafion 115. The membrane keeps a stable performance after 80-cycles charge-discharge test. (author)

  15. Application of Fourier transform to MHD flow over an accelerated plate with partial-slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD flow over an accelerated plate is investigated with partial slip conditions. Generalized Fourier Transform is used to get the exact solution not only for uniform acceleration but also for variable acceleration. The numerical solution is obtained by using linear finite element method in space and One-Step-θ-scheme in time. The resulting discretized algebraic systems are solved by applying geometric-multigrid approach. Numerical solutions are compared with the obtained Fourier transform results. Many interesting results related with slippage and MHD effects are discussed in detail through graphical sketches and tables. Application of Dirac-Delta function is one of the main features of present work.

  16. Isometric embeddings of 2-spheres by embedding flow for applications in numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasiulek, Michael; Korzyński, Mikołaj

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method for solving Weyl's embedding problem which consists in finding a global isometric embedding of a positively curved and positive-definite spherical 2-metric into the Euclidean 3-space. The method is based on a construction introduced by Weingarten and was used in Nirenberg's proof of Weyl's conjecture. The target embedding results as the endpoint of an embedding flow in R 3 beginning at the unit sphere's embedding. We employ spectral methods to handle functions on the surface and to solve various (non)linear elliptic PDEs. The code requires no additional input or steering from the operator and its convergence is guaranteed by the Nirenberg arguments. Possible applications in 3 + 1 numerical relativity range from quasi-local mass and momentum measures to coarse-graining in inhomogeneous cosmological models. (paper)

  17. The Simulation Study of Horizontal Axis Water Turbine Using Flow Simulation Solidworks Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, H.; Budiana, EP; Tjahjana, DDDP; Hadi, S.

    2018-02-01

    The design of Horizontal Axis Water Turbine in pico hydro power plants involves many parameters. To simplify that, usually using computer simulation is applied. This research performs simulation process variation on turbine blade number, turbine blade curvature angle, turbine bucket angle and blocking system tilt angle. Those four variations were combined in order to obtain the best design of turbine. The study used Flow Simulation Solidworks application, and obtain data on turbine speed, pressure, force, and torque. However, this research focused on turbine torque value. The best design of turbine was obtained in the turbine with 6 blades, blade curvature angle of 65° and bucket angle of 10°, and blocking system tilt angle of 40°. In the best turbine, the produced torque value was 8.464 Nm.

  18. Application of positron emission tomography to particulate flow measurement in chemical engineering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemrose, C.R.; Fowles, P.; Hawkesworth, M.R.; O'Dwyer, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical engineering processes involve the motion of fluids or particulate solids in bulk, and a detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics is important to their efficient and reliable operation. Initial results on the application of PET to fluidized bed studies are reported. Because back-projection image reconstruction strategies are prohibitively inefficient for locating moving single labelled particles, a new technique has been developed based on the closest approach of photon trajectories to give the most probable position. Investigations involving a single particle moving in a known manner have been used to analyse the camera performance and a preliminary relationship between uncertainty and source location is described. To supplement the normal graphical presentation of results, a new animated colour display system has been developed and used to observe for the first time particle motion within a fluidized bed. (orig.)

  19. Some applications of the moving finite element method to fluid flow and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.A.; Williamson, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Moving Finite Element (MFE) method is applied to one-dimensional, nonlinear wave type partial differential equations which are characteristics of fluid dynamic and related flow phenomena problems. These equation systems tend to be difficult to solve because their transient solutions exhibit a spacial stiffness property, i.e., they represent physical phenomena of widely disparate length scales which must be resolved simultaneously. With the MFE method the node points automatically move (in theory) to optimal locations giving a much better approximation than can be obtained with fixed mesh methods (with a reasonable number of nodes) and with significantly reduced artificial viscosity or diffusion content. Three applications are considered. In order of increasing complexity they are: (1) a thermal quench problem, (2) an underwater explosion problem, and (3) a gas dynamics shock tube problem. The results are briefly shown

  20. Parallel Genetic Algorithms for calibrating Cellular Automata models: Application to lava flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, D.; Spataro, W.; Di Gregorio, S.; Calabria Univ., Cosenza; Crisci, G.M.; Rongo, R.; Calabria Univ., Cosenza

    2005-01-01

    Cellular Automata are highly nonlinear dynamical systems which are suitable far simulating natural phenomena whose behaviour may be specified in terms of local interactions. The Cellular Automata model SCIARA, developed far the simulation of lava flows, demonstrated to be able to reproduce the behaviour of Etnean events. However, in order to apply the model far the prediction of future scenarios, a thorough calibrating phase is required. This work presents the application of Genetic Algorithms, general-purpose search algorithms inspired to natural selection and genetics, far the parameters optimisation of the model SCIARA. Difficulties due to the elevated computational time suggested the adoption a Master-Slave Parallel Genetic Algorithm far the calibration of the model with respect to the 2001 Mt. Etna eruption. Results demonstrated the usefulness of the approach, both in terms of computing time and quality of performed simulations

  1. A Comparison of Wind Flow Models for Wind Resource Assessment in Wind Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Landry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of various coupled mesoscale-microscale wind flow modeling methodologies for wind energy applications. This is achieved by examining and comparing mean wind speeds from several wind flow modeling methodologies with observational measurements from several 50 m met towers distributed across the study area. At the mesoscale level, with a 5 km resolution, two scenarios are examined based on the Mesoscale Compressible Community Model (MC2 model: the Canadian Wind Energy Atlas (CWEA scenario, which is based on standard input data, and the CWEA High Definition (CWEAHD scenario where high resolution land cover input data is used. A downscaling of the obtained mesoscale wind climate to the microscale level is then performed, where two linear microscale models, i.e., MsMicro and the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP, are evaluated following three downscaling scenarios: CWEA-WAsP, CWEA-MsMicro and CWEAHD-MsMicro. Results show that, for the territory studied, with a modeling approach based on the MC2 and MsMicro models, also known as Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit (WEST, the use of high resolution land cover and topography data at the mesoscale level helps reduce modeling errors for both the mesoscale and microscale models, albeit only marginally. At the microscale level, results show that the MC2-WAsP modeling approach gave substantially better results than both MC2 and MsMicro modeling approaches due to tweaked meso-micro coupling.

  2. Application of flow-induced vibration predictive techniques to operating steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Tabatabai, M.; Morandin, G.; Kozluk, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical techniques for flow-induced vibration (FIV), such as those incorporated in available design tools, are routinely applied to process equipment at the initial design stage. Unfortunately, this does not always apply to the situation when problems, related to FIV, develop in crucial operating equipment, since design uses conservative methods, whereas in-service applications require more realistic assessments. Usually these problems appear in the form of severe through wall fret flaws or fatigue cracks that compromise the integrity of the tubes and possibly the complete unit. It is here where a somewhat different approach must be taken in the evaluation of tube response to FIV. Tube damage from fretting wear or fatigue crack growth must be estimated from actual in situ operating conditions. In this paper, an overview of the predictive methods used in the development and/or qualification of remedial measures for problems that occur in operating process equipment along with applications are described. The steps in the evaluation procedure, from the prediction of flow regimes, the development of the nonlinear computer models and associated fluid forcing functions through to the estimates of tube damage in operating heat exchangers and steam generators are presented. A probabilistic (i.e. Monte Carlo simulation) FIV approach that readily accommodates uncertainties associated with damage predictions is summarized. The efficacy of this approach comes from the fact that probabilistic methods facilitate the incorporation of field data, and that a large number of tubes and possible variations in geometry, process and support conditions, usually present in such equipment, can be addressed effectively. (author)

  3. The application of finite volume methods for modelling three-dimensional incompressible flow on an unstructured mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, R. D.; Webster, R.

    This paper demonstrates the application of a simple finite volume approach to a finite element mesh, combining the economy of the former with the geometrical flexibility of the latter. The procedure is used to model a three-dimensional flow on a mesh of linear eight-node brick (hexahedra). Simulations are performed for a wide range of flow problems, some in excess of 94,000 nodes. The resulting computer code ASTEC that incorporates these procedures is described.

  4. Performance evaluation of a commercially available heat flow calorimeter and applicability assessment for safeguarding special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, D.S.; Biddle, R.; Rudy, C.

    1998-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a commercially available heat-flow calorimeter will be presented. The heat-flow sensors within the calorimeter are based on thermopile technology with a vendor-quoted sensitivity of 150 microV/mW. The calorimeter is a full-twin design to compensate for ambient temperature fluctuations. The efficacy of temperature fluctuation compensations will also be detailed. Finally, an assessment of design applicability to special nuclear materials control and accountability and safeguarding will be presented

  5. High-frequency counter-flow plasma synthetic jet actuator and its application in suppression of supersonic flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Li, Jun; Jin, Di; Tang, Mengxiao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Lianghua

    2018-01-01

    We come up with a control strategy for suppression of supersonic flow separation based on high-frequency Counter-flow Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator (CPSJA). The main purpose of this investigation is to verify if its control authority can be enhanced by the jet/shock interaction. We use a blunt nose to generate a bow shock, a step on a flat plate to introduce a massive separation in a Mach 2 wind tunnel, and the CPSJA to generate Plasma Synthetic Jet (PSJ). In this study, pulsed capacitive discharge is provided for an array of CPSJAs, which makes the actuation (discharge) frequency f1 = 1 kHz, f2 = 2 kHz and f3 = 3 kHz. We use the high-speed schlieren imaging and fast response pressure transducers as well as a numerical simulation to investigate the quiescent PSJ properties, the interaction between the jet and bow shock, and its disturbance effect on the downstream separated region. The schlieren images show that PSJ is characterized by a succession of vortex rings; the jet strength weakens with the increase of frequency. A 4.5 mN jet thrust is found for all the frequencies. The simulation results show that jet/shock interaction produces vorticity in the vortex ring of the jet, enhancing turbulent mixing in PSJ so that a great deal of momentum is produced into the flow. We found the downstream flow is significantly disturbed by the enhanced actuation. Actuation with frequency of f2, f3 which is close to the natural frequency fn of the separation bubble suppresses the separation with the upstream laminar boundary layer being periodically attenuated, which has a better control effect than f1. The control effect is sensitive to the position where PSJ interacts with the shear layer, but the amount of energy deposited in one pulse is not crucial in a separation reduction in the experiment.

  6. Extension of CFD Codes Application to Two-Phase Flow Safety Problems - Phase 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.; Anglart, H.; Mahaffy, J.; Lucas, D.; Song, C.H.; Scheuerer, M.; Zigh, G.; Andreani, M.; Kasahara, F.; Heitsch, M.; Komen, E.; Moretti, F.; Morii, T.; Muehlbauer, P.; Smith, B.L.; Watanabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Writing Group 3 on the extension of CFD to two-phase flow safety problems was formed following recommendations made at the 'Exploratory Meeting of Experts to Define an Action Plan on the Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety Problems' held in Aix-en-Provence, in May 2002. Extension of CFD codes to two-phase flow is significant potentiality for the improvement of safety investigations, by giving some access to smaller scale flow processes which were not explicitly described by present tools. Using such tools as part of a safety demonstration may bring a better understanding of physical situations, more confidence in the results, and an estimation of safety margins. The increasing computer performance allows a more extensive use of 3D modelling of two-phase Thermal hydraulics with finer nodalization. However, models are not as mature as in single phase flow and a lot of work has still to be done on the physical modelling and numerical schemes in such two-phase CFD tools. The Writing Group listed and classified the NRS problems where extension of CFD to two-phase flow may bring real benefit, and classified different modelling approaches in a first report (Bestion et al., 2006). First ideas were reported about the specification and analysis of needs in terms of validation and verification. It was then suggested to focus further activity on a limited number of NRS issues with a high priority and a reasonable chance to be successful in a reasonable period of time. The WG3-step 2 was decided with the following objectives: - selection of a limited number of NRS issues having a high priority and for which two-phase CFD has a reasonable chance to be successful in a reasonable period of time; - identification of the remaining gaps in the existing approaches using two-phase CFD for each selected NRS issue; - review of the existing data base for validation of two-phase CFD application to the selected NRS problems

  7. Spatial clustering and longitudinal variation of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae in a river of the Amazon: the importance of the forest fringe and of obstructions to flow in frontier malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, F S M; Arruda, M E; Gurgel, H C; Honório, N A

    2011-12-01

    Deforestation has been linked to a rise in malaria prevalence. In this paper, we studied longitudinally 20 spots, including forested and deforested portions of a temporary river in a malarigenous frontier zone. Larval habitat parameters influencing distribution of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae were studied. We observed that larvae were clustered in forested-deforested transitions. For the first time in the literature, it was verified that parameters determining larval distribution varied from deforested to forested areas. The proximity to human dwellings was also a significant factor determining distribution, but larvae was most importantly associated with a previously undescribed parameter, the presence of small obstructions to river flow, such as tree trunks within the river channel, which caused pooling of water during the dry season ('microdams'). In deforested areas, the most important factor determining distribution of larvae was shade (reduced luminance). Larvae were absent in the entire studied area during the wet season and present in most sites during the dry season. During the wet-dry transition, larvae were found sooner in areas with microdams, than in other areas, suggesting that flow obstruction prolongs the breeding season of An. darlingi. Adult mosquito densities and malaria incidence were higher during the dry season. Our data correlate well with the published literature, including the distribution of malaria cases near the forest fringes, and has permitted the creation of a model of An. darlingi breeding, where preference for sites with reduced luminance, human presence and microdams would interact to determine larval distribution.

  8. Transport of veterinary antibiotics in overland flow following the application of slurry to arable land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Paul; Blackwell, Paul A; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2005-05-01

    The environment may be exposed to veterinary medicines administered to livestock due to the application of organic fertilisers to land. Slurry is often spread on to fields following the harvest of the previous crop. Despite recommendations to do so, the slurry may not be ploughed into the soil for some time. If precipitation occurs before incorporation then it is likely that the slurry and any antibiotic residues in the slurry will be transported towards surface waters in overland flow. This phenomenon has been investigated in a plot study and transport via 'tramlines' has been compared to that through crop stubble. Three veterinary antibiotics, from the tetracycline, sulphonamide and macrolide groups, were applied to the plots in pig slurry. Twenty four hours after the application the plots were irrigated. Following this the plots received natural rainfall. Sulphachloropyridazine was detected in runoff from the tramline plot at a peak concentration of 703.2 microgl(-1) and oxytetracycline at 71.7 microgl(-1). Peak concentrations from the plot that did not contain a tramline were lower at 415.5 and 32 microgl(-1), respectively. In contrast, tylosin was not detected at all. Mass losses of the compounds were also greater from the tramline plot due to greater runoff generation. These did not exceed 0.42% for sulphachloropyridazine and 0.07% for oxytetracycline however.

  9. Solution casting Nafion/polytetrafluoroethylene membrane for vanadium redox flow battery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Xiangguo; Sun, Cui; Dai, Jicui; Liu, Haiping; Su, Jing; Li, Faqiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nafion/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) blend membranes were prepared by solution casting method. ► The blend membranes were tested for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) application. ► The blend membranes show lower vanadium ion permeability than that of recast Nafion membrane. ► In VRB single cell test, the blend membrane shows superior performances than that of pure recast Nafion. -- Abstract: Solution casting method was adopted using Nafion and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) solution to prepare Nafion/PTFE blend membranes for vanadium redox flow battery application. The physicochemical properties of the membranes were characterized by using water uptake, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis (TA). The electrochemical properties of the membranes were examined by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and single cell test. Despite the high miscibility of PTFE with Nafion, the addition of hydrophobic PTFE reduces the water uptake, ion exchange capacity (IEC) and conductivity of blend membranes. But PTFE can increase the crystallinity, thermal stability of Nafion/PTFE membranes and reduce the vanadium permeability. The blend membrane with PTFE (30 wt%, N 0.7 P 0.3 ) was chosen and investigated for VRB single cell test. The energy efficiency of this VRB with N 0.7 P 0.3 membrane was 85.1% at current density of 50 mA cm −2 , which was superior to that of recast Nafion (r-Nafion) membrane (80.5%). Self-discharge test shows that the decay of open circuit potential of N 0.7 P 0.3 membrane is much lower than that of r-Nafion membrane. More than 50 cycles charge–discharge test proved that the N 0.7 P 0.3 membrane possesses high stability in long time running. Chemical stabilities of the chosen N 0.7 P 0.3 membrane are further proved by soaking the membrane for 3 weeks in highly oxidative V(V) solution. All results suggest that the addition of PTFE is a simple and effective way to

  10. A Mass Conservative Numerical Solution for Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media With Application to Unsaturated Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celia, Michael A.; Binning, Philip John

    1992-01-01

    that the algorithm produces solutions that are essentially mass conservative and oscillation free, even in the presence of steep infiltrating fronts. When the algorithm is applied to the case of air and water flow in unsaturated soils, numerical results confirm the conditions under which Richards's equation is valid....... Numerical results also demonstrate the potential importance of air phase advection when considering contaminant transport in unsaturated soils. Comparison to several other numerical algorithms shows that the modified Picard approach offers robust, mass conservative solutions to the general equations...

  11. Hydrodynamic parameters of micro porous media for steady and oscillatory flow: Application to cryocooler regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jeesung Jeff

    Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC) are a class of rugged and high-endurance refrigeration systems that operate without a moving part at their low temperature ends, and are capable of easily reaching 120°K. These devices can also be configured in multiple stages to reach temperatures below 10 °K. PTCs are particularly suitable for applications in space, missile guiding systems, cryosurgery, medicine preservation, superconducting electronics, magnetic resonance imaging, weather observation, and liquefaction of nitrogen. Although various designs of PTCs have been in use for a few decades, they represent a dynamic and developmental field. PTCs ruggedness comes at the price of relatively low efficiency, however, and thus far they have been primarily used in high-end applications. They have the potential of extensive use in consumer products, however, should sufficiently higher efficiencies be achieved. Intense research competition is underway worldwide, and newer designs are continuously introduced. Some of the fundamental processes that are responsible for their performance are at best not fully understood, however, and consequently systematic modeling of PTC systems is difficult. Among the challenges facing the PTC research community, besides improvement in terms of system efficiency, is the possible miniaturization (total fluid volume of few cubic centimeters (cc)) of these systems. The operating characteristics of a PTC are significantly different from the conventional refrigeration cycles. A PTC implements the theory of oscillatory compression and expansion of the gas within a closed volume to achieve desired refrigeration. Regenerators and pulse tubes are often viewed as the two most complex and essential components in cryocoolers. An important deficiency with respect to the state of art models dealing with PTCs is the essentially total lack of understanding about the directional hydrodynamic and thermal transport parameters associated with periodic flow in

  12. Unhappiness and dissatisfaction in doctors cannot be predicted by selectors from medical school application forms: A prospective, longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personal statements and referees' reports are widely used on medical school application forms, particularly in the UK, to assess the suitability of candidates for a career in medicine. However there are few studies which assess the validity of such information for predicting unhappiness or dissatisfaction with a career in medicine. Here we combine data from a long-term prospective study of medical student selection and training, with an experimental approach in which a large number of assessors used a paired comparison technique to predict outcome. Methods Data from a large-scale prospective study of students applying to UK medical schools in 1990 were used to identify 40 pairs of doctors, matched by sex, for whom personal statements and referees' reports were available, and who in a 2002/3 follow-up study, one pair member was very satisfied and the other very dissatisfied with medicine as a career. In 2005, 96 assessors, who were experienced medical school selectors, doctors, medical students or psychology students, used information from the doctors' original applications to judge which member of each pair of doctors was the happier, more satisfied doctor. Results None of the groups of assessors were significantly different from chance expectations in using applicants' personal statements and the referees' reports to predict actual future satisfaction or dissatisfaction, the distribution being similar to binomial expectations. However judgements of pairs of application forms from pairs of doctors showed a non-binomial distribution, indicating consensus among assessors as to which doctor would be the happy doctor (although the consensus was wrong in half the cases. Assessors taking longer to do the task concurred more. Consensus judgements seem mainly to be based on referees' predictions of academic achievement (even though academic achievement is not actually a valid predictor of happiness or satisfaction. Conclusion

  13. Are urine flow-volume nomograms developed on Caucasian men optimally applicable for Indian men? Need for appraisal of flow-volume relations in local population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank M Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Flow-volume nomograms and volume-corrected flow-rates (cQ are tools to correct uroflow rates (Q with varied voided volumes (VV of urine. We investigated the applicability of the available nomograms in our local population. Materials and Methods : Raw data of our previous study on variation in Q with voiding position (standing, sitting, and squatting in healthy adult men was reanalyzed. Additionally, the departmental urodynamic database of the last four years was searched for uroflow data of men with voiding symptoms (International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS > 7 and global quality of life score >2. These results were projected on the Liverpool and Siroky nomograms for men. The Q-VV relations were statistically analyzed using curve-estimation regression method to examine the current definition of corrected maximum flow rate (Qmax. Results : We found a cubic relation between Q and VV; based on this we developed novel equation for cQ [cQ=Q/(VV 1/3 ] and novel confidence-limit flow-volume nomograms. The imaginary 16 th percentile line of Liverpool nomogram, -1 standard-deviation line of Siroky nomogram and lower 68% confidence-limit line of our nomogram had sensitivity of 96.2%, 100% and 89.3%, and specificity of 75.3% 69.3% and 86.0%, respectively for Qmax-VV relations. Corresponding values for average flow rate (Qave-volume relations were 96.2%, 100% and 94.6%, and 75.2%, 50.4% and 86.0%, respectively. The area under curve of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for cQmax and cQave was 0.954 and 0.965, respectively, suggesting significantly higher discriminatory power than chance (P = 0.0001. Conclusion : Flow-volume nomograms developed on Caucasian population may not be optimally applicable to the Indian population. We introduce flow-volume nomograms and cQ, which have high sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Multi-dimensional modeling of gas-liquid two-phase flows. Application to the simulation of ascending bubble flows in vertical ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the 3-D modeling and numerical simulation of liquid/gas (water/vapor or water/air) two-phase flows in cooling circuits of nuclear power plants during normal and accidental situations. The development of a multidimensional dual-fluid model encounters two problems: the statistical effects of turbulence and the interface mass, momentum and energy transfers. The models developed in this study were introduced in the 3-D module of the CATHARE code developed by the CEA and the results were compared to experimental results available in the literature. The first chapter describes the equations of the local dual-fluid model for the 3-D description of two-phase flows. Closing relations adapted to dispersed flows with isothermal bubbles and without phase transformation are proposed and focus on the momentum transfer at the interfaces. The theoretical study of turbulence in the liquid phase of a bubble flow is modelled in chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with the voluminal interface area used in the interface mass, momentum and energy transfers, and chapters 4 and 5 concern the application of the developed models to concrete situations. Chapter 4 describes in details the 3-D module of the CATHARE code while chapter 5 gives a comparison of numerical results obtained using the CATHARE code with other experimental results obtained at EdF. (J.S.)

  15. Application of MODFLOW and geographic information system to groundwater flow simulation in North China Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiqin; Shao, Jingli; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Yongbo; Huo, Zhibin; Zhou, Xiaoyuan

    2008-10-01

    MODFLOW is a groundwater modeling program. It can be compiled and remedied according to the practical applications. Because of its structure and fixed data format, MODFLOW can be integrated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology for water resource management. The North China Plain (NCP), which is the politic, economic and cultural center of China, is facing with water resources shortage and water pollution. Groundwater is the main water resource for industrial, agricultural and domestic usage. It is necessary to evaluate the groundwater resources of the NCP as an entire aquifer system. With the development of computer and internet information technology it is also necessary to integrate the groundwater model with the GIS technology. Because the geological and hydrogeological data in the NCP was mainly in MAPGIS format, the powerful function of GIS of disposing of and analyzing spatial data and computer languages such as Visual C and Visual Basic were used to define the relationship between the original data and model data. After analyzing the geological and hydrogeological conditions of the NCP, the groundwater flow numerical simulation modeling was constructed with MODFLOW. On the basis of GIS, a dynamic evaluation system for groundwater resources under the internet circumstance was completed. During the process of constructing the groundwater model, a water budget was analyzed, which showed a negative budget in the NCP. The simulation period was from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2003. During this period, the total recharge of the groundwater system was 49,374 × 106 m3 and the total discharge was 56,530 × 106 m3 the budget deficit was -7,156 × 106 m3. In this integrated system, the original data including graphs and attribution data could be stored in the database. When the process of evaluating and predicting groundwater flow was started, these data were transformed into files that the core program of MODFLOW could read. The calculated water

  16. Exploring the potential of laser assisted flow deposition grown ZnO for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J., E-mail: joana.catarina@ua.pt [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Cerqueira, A.F.R.; Sousa, M.G.; Santos, N.F. [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pimentel, A.; Fortunato, E. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Cunha, A.F. da; Monteiro, T.; Costa, F.M. [Departamento de Física & I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a widely studied wide band gap semiconductor with applications in several fields, namely to enhance solar cells efficiency. Its ability to be grown in a wide variety of nanostructured morphologies, allowing the designing of the surface area architecture constitutes an important advantage over other semiconductors. Laser assisted flow deposition (LAFD) is a recently developed growth method, based on a vapour-solid mechanism, which proved to be a powerful approach in the production of ZnO micro/nanostructures with different morphologies as well as high crystallinity and optical quality. In the present work we report the use of the LAFD technique to grow functional ZnO nanostructures (nanoparticles and tetrapods) working as nano templates to improve the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) efficiency. The structural and morphological characterization of the as-grown ZnO crystals were performed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, respectively, and the optical quality was assessed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. DSSCs were produced using a combination of these nanostructures, which were subsequently sensitized with N719 dye. An efficiency of ∼3% was achieved under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions for a dye loading time of 1 h. - Highlights: • Laser assisted flow deposition proved to be an efficient technique to produce high quality ZnO. • Active layer formed by an interconnected network of tetrapods and a small amount of nanoparticles. • Efficiency of ∼3% obtained under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions.

  17. Augmented Lagrangian Method and Compressible Visco-plastic Flows: Applications to Shallow Dense Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresch, D.; Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Ionescu, I. R.; Vigneaux, P.

    In this paper we propose a well-balanced finite volume/augmented Lagrangian method for compressible visco-plastic models focusing on a compressible Bingham type system with applications to dense avalanches. For the sake of completeness we also present a method showing that such a system may be derived for a shallow flow of a rigid-viscoplastic incompressible fluid, namely for incompressible Bingham type fluid with free surface. When the fluid is relatively shallow and spreads slowly, lubrication-style asymptotic approximations can be used to build reduced models for the spreading dynamics, see for instance [N.J. Balmforth et al., J. Fluid Mech (2002)]. When the motion is a little bit quicker, shallow water theory for non-Newtonian flows may be applied, for instance assuming a Navier type boundary condition at the bottom. We start from the variational inequality for an incompressible Bingham fluid and derive a shallow water type system. In the case where Bingham number and viscosity are set to zero we obtain the classical Shallow Water or Saint-Venant equations obtained for instance in [J.F. Gerbeau, B. Perthame, DCDS (2001)]. For numerical purposes, we focus on the one-dimensional in space model: We study associated static solutions with sufficient conditions that relate the slope of the bottom with the Bingham number and domain dimensions. We also propose a well-balanced finite volume/augmented Lagrangian method. It combines well-balanced finite volume schemes for spatial discretization with the augmented Lagrangian method to treat the associated optimization problem. Finally, we present various numerical tests.

  18. Micro reactor and flow chemistry for industrial applications in drug discovery and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambarussi Baraldi, P.; Hessel, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, case studies focused on syntheses of active pharmaceutical ingredients, intermediates and lead compounds are reported employing micro reactors and continuous flow technology in areas such as medicinal chemistry, chemical development and manufacturing. The advantages of flow

  19. Application of a flow generated by IR laser and AC electric field in micropumping and micromixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M; Mizuno, A

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, it is described that measurement of fluid flow generated by simultaneous operation of an infrared (IR) laser and AC electric field in a microfabricated channel. When an IR laser (1026 nm) was focused under an intense AC electric field, a circulating flow was generated around the laser focus. The IR laser and the electric field generate two flow patterns of the electrohydrodynamicss. When the laser focus is placed at the center of the gap between electrodes, the flow pattern is parallel to the AC electric field toward electrodes from the centre. On the other hand, when the laser focus is placed close to one of the electrodes, one directional flow is generated. First flow pattern can be used as a micromixer and the second one as a micropump. Flow velocity profiles of the two flow patterns were measured as a function of the laser power, intensity of the AC electric field and AC frequency.

  20. Numerical method and calculation of two-phase swirling flows with rigid particles for technical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmetov Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Swirling flow with particle deposition effects at the lateral surface is numerically investigated. The flow field calculation results have been obtained as the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Various flow regimes with the formation of axial recirculation zones are presented. The convection-diffusion model is used for the determination of the flow particle concentration and the formation of typical sedimentation zones.

  1. Application of fast neutron radiography to three-dimensional visualization of steady two-phase flow in a rod bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Takenaka, N; Fujii, T; Mizubata, M; Yoshii, K

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional void fraction distribution of air-water two-phase flow in a 4x4 rod-bundle near a spacer was visualized by fast neutron radiography using a CT method. One-dimensional cross sectional averaged void fraction distribution was also calculated. The behaviors of low void fraction (thick water) two-phase flow in the rod bundle around the spacer were clearly visualized. It was shown that the void fraction distributions were visualized with a quality similar to those by thermal neutron radiography for low void fraction two-phase flow which is difficult to visualize by thermal neutron radiography. It is concluded that the fast neutron radiography is efficiently applicable to two-phase flow studies.

  2. Concept on groundwater flow and mass transport through heterogeneous porous media and application to in-situ test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Umeki, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    Generally, geological media is modelled as porous or fractured media depending on their characteristics. Since the channels of groundwater flow and the transport paths are determined by the heterogeneity of the geological media, quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity is an important issue for modelling flow and transport processes through them. Therefore, it becomes popular way to develop statistical identification approaches of the heterogeneous field by using data from in-situ test and conduct validation studies of flow and transport models through the field by comparing with observed data. In this report, the theories of the identification approach and the concept on groundwater flow and mass transport are explained briefly and the application to tracer tests conducted at Grimsel test site, Switzerland, are described. (author)

  3. Development and Application of a Rubric for Analysis of Novice Students' Laboratory Flow Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Bette; Rollnick, Marissa; Fakudze, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a scheme for the analysis of flow diagrams. The flow diagrams in question are a schematic representation of written instructions that require students to process the text of their practical manual. It was hoped that an analysis of the flow diagrams would provide insight into students'…

  4. Application of Parallel Time-Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Methods to Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flow Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    we however focus on the continuum regime, where we can use the governing equations like Euler equations or Navier Stokes equations. The flow chemistry can...assumption. Instead the flow is considered to be a mixture of ideal gases, and the flow chemistry accounts for production and destruction of all the species. A

  5. The effects of DDoS attacks on flow monitoring applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadre, R.; Sperotto, Anna; Pras, Aiko

    Flow-based monitoring has become a popular approach in many areas of network management. However, flow monitoring is, by design, susceptible to anomalies that generate a large number of flows, such as Distributed Denial-Of-Service attacks. This paper aims at getting a better understanding on how a

  6. Axial annular flow of power-law fluids - applicability of the limiting cases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Petr; David, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2007), s. 365-371 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/1033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Concentric annuli * Poiseuile flow * annular flow * power- law fluids * flow rate * pressure drop Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. Combined application of ultrasonic waves, magnetic fields and optical flow in the rehabilitation of patients and disabled people

    OpenAIRE

    Chukhraiev, N.; Vladimirov, A.; Vilcahuaman, L.; Zukow, W.; Samosyuk, N.; Chukhraieva, E.; Butskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYK NATIONAL MEDICAL ACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF PERU RADOM UNIVERSITY SCM «MEDICAL INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES» Chukhraiev N., Vladimirov А., Vilcahuamаn L., Zukow W., Samosyuk N., Chukhraieva E., Butskaya L. COMBINED APPLICATION OF ULTRASONIC WAVES, MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OPTICAL FLOW IN THE REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AND DISABLED PEOPLE Edited by Chukh...

  8. Optimisation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation for the characterisation of nanoparticles in coated polydisperse TiO2 with applications in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, J; Boix, A; Kerckhove, G; von Holst, C

    2016-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has various applications in consumer products and is also used as an additive in food and feeding stuffs. For the characterisation of this product, including the determination of nanoparticles, there is a strong need for the availability of corresponding methods of analysis. This paper presents an optimisation process for the characterisation of polydisperse-coated TiO 2 nanoparticles. As a first step, probe ultrasonication was optimised using a central composite design in which the amplitude and time were the selected variables to disperse, i.e., to break up agglomerates and/or aggregates of the material. The results showed that high amplitudes (60%) favoured a better dispersion and time was fixed in mid-values (5 min). In a next step, key factors of asymmetric flow field-flow fraction (AF4), namely cross-flow (CF), detector flow (DF), exponential decay of the cross-flow (CF exp ) and focus time (Ft), were studied through experimental design. Firstly, a full-factorial design was employed to establish the statistically significant factors (p < 0.05). Then, the information obtained from the full-factorial design was utilised by applying a central composite design to obtain the following optimum conditions of the system: CF, 1.6 ml min -1 ; DF, 0.4 ml min -1 ; Ft, 5 min; and CF exp , 0.6. Once the optimum conditions were obtained, the stability of the dispersed sample was measured for 24 h by analysing 10 replicates with AF4 in order to assess the performance of the optimised dispersion protocol. Finally, the recovery of the optimised method, particle shape and particle size distribution were estimated.

  9. A Two-Stage Estimation Method for Random Coefficient Differential Equation Models with Application to Longitudinal HIV Dynamic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yun; Wu, Hulin; Zhu, Li-Xing

    2011-07-01

    We propose a two-stage estimation method for random coefficient ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. A maximum pseudo-likelihood estimator (MPLE) is derived based on a mixed-effects modeling approach and its asymptotic properties for population parameters are established. The proposed method does not require repeatedly solving ODEs, and is computationally efficient although it does pay a price with the loss of some estimation efficiency. However, the method does offer an alternative approach when the exact likelihood approach fails due to model complexity and high-dimensional parameter space, and it can also serve as a method to obtain the starting estimates for more accurate estimation methods. In addition, the proposed method does not need to specify the initial values of state variables and preserves all the advantages of the mixed-effects modeling approach. The finite sample properties of the proposed estimator are studied via Monte Carlo simulations and the methodology is also illustrated with application to an AIDS clinical data set.

  10. The creep low application for numerical modeling of elastic-plastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyapin, Anatoly; Rudenko, Vladimir; Chekhunov, Evgeny; Shaburov, Michail

    1999-06-01

    The present paper demonstrates the applicability of Lomnitz logarithm creep law [1] in some approximated version for calculating the elastic-plastic flows. The model has been developed resulting from the intention to have appropriate calculation approximation for particle-velocity -vs-time histories observed in plate 6061-T6 Al samples of various thickness under shock loading and subsequent release and additional compression. The approximation is unique in the whole loading range, from very low to such that elastic precursor is swallowed up by plastic wave . The model is based on Lipkin and Asay [2] remark on scale similarity of the above mentioned particle velocity -vs-time histories for equal shock loading and on approximate equality of velocities that initial portions of release and recompression waves travel at. A Lomnitz creep law presents an ideal phenomenological tool providing both of the requirements be fulfilled at the same time. Its application to high rate processes of loading and release has required some law modification and a nontrivial review of the dislocation mechanism for stress relaxation. The agreement achieved with the experiment is illustrated in figures. The model is worked out and realized in the 1D user software MAG. 1. Lomnitz C. Joun. of Geology, 1956, vol. 64, p. 473-479. 2. Lipkin J., Asay J.R. J. Appl. Phys. ,1977, vol. 48, 1, p.182-189. 3. Johnson J., Barker L. J. Appl. Phys., 1969, vol. 40, 11, p. 4321-4334. 4. Asay J.R., Chhabildas L. M.: Metallurgia., 1984, p. 110-120.

  11. New Class of Flow Batteries for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; West, William C.; Kindler, Andrew; Smart, Marshall C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sustainable energy generation technologies such as photovoltaic and wind farms require advanced energy storage systems on a massive scale to make the alternate (green) energy options practical. The daunting requirements of such large-scale energy systems such as long operating and cycle life, safety, and low cost are not adequately met by state-of-the-art energy storage technologies such as vanadium flow cells, lead-acid, and zinc-bromine batteries. Much attention is being paid to redox batteries specifically to the vanadium redox battery (VRB) due to their simplicity, low cost, and good life characteristics compared to other related battery technologies. NASA is currently seeking high-specific- energy and long-cycle-life rechargeable batteries in the 10-to-100-kW range to support future human exploration missions, such as planetary habitats, human rovers, etc. The flow batteries described above are excellent candidates for these applications, as well as other applications that propose to use regenerative fuel cells. A new flow cell technology is proposed based on coupling two novel electrodes in the form of solvated electron systems (SES) between an alkali (or alkaline earth) metal and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), separated by an ionically conducting separator. The cell reaction involves the formation of such SES with a PAH of high voltage in the cathode, while the alkali (or alkaline earth metal) is reduced from such an MPAH complex in the anode half-cell. During recharge, the reactions are reversed in both electrodes. In other words, the alkali (alkaline earth) metal ion simply shuttles from one M-PAH complex (SES) to another, which are separated by a metal-ion conducting solid or polymer electrolyte separator. As an example, the concept was demonstrated with Li-naphthalene//Li DDQ (DDQ is 2,3-Dichloro-5,6-dicyano- 1,4-benzoquinone) separated by lithium super ion conductor, either ceramic or polymer (solid polymer or gel polymer) electrolytes. The

  12. DEM GPU studies of industrial scale particle simulations for granular flow civil engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Wilke, Daniel N.; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The use of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for industrial civil engineering industrial applications is currently limited due to the computational demands when large numbers of particles are considered. The graphics processing unit (GPU) with its highly parallelized hardware architecture shows potential to enable solution of civil engineering problems using discrete granular approaches. We demonstrate in this study the pratical utility of a validated GPU-enabled DEM modeling environment to simulate industrial scale granular problems. As illustration, the flow discharge of storage silos using 8 and 17 million particles is considered. DEM simulations have been performed to investigate the influence of particle size (equivalent size for the 20/40-mesh gravel) and induced shear stress for two hopper shapes. The preliminary results indicate that the shape of the hopper significantly influences the discharge rates for the same material. Specifically, this work shows that GPU-enabled DEM modeling environments can model industrial scale problems on a single portable computer within a day for 30 seconds of process time.

  13. Optimal Sizing of Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Systems for Residential Applications Based on Battery Electrochemical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of solar photovoltaic (PV systems in residential areas contributes to the generation and usage of renewable energy. Despite its advantages, the PV system also creates problems caused by the intermittency of renewable energy. As suggested by researchers, such problems deteriorate the applicability of the PV system and have to be resolved by employing a battery energy storage system (BESS. With concern for the high investment cost, the choice of a cost-effective BESS with proper sizing is necessary. To this end, this paper proposes the employment of a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB, which possesses a long cycle life and high energy efficiency, for residential users with PV systems. It further proposes methods of computing the capital and maintenance cost of VRB systems and evaluating battery efficiency based on VRB electrochemical characteristics. Furthermore, by considering the cost and efficiency of VRB, the prevalent time-of-use electricity price, the solar feed-in tariff, the solar power profile and the user load pattern, an optimal sizing algorithm for VRB systems is proposed. Simulation studies are carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  14. Application of environmental isotopes to validate a model of regional groundwater flow and transport (Carrizo Aquifer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    It is asserted that models cannot be validated. This seems obvious if one identifies validation as the process of testing a model against absolute truth, and accepts that absolute truth is less a scientific than a philosophic or religious concept. What is here called model validation has a more modest goal - to develop confidence in the conceptual and mathematical models used to describe a groundwater system by illustrating that measured radiochemical properties of the groundwater match those predicted by the model. The system described is the Carrizo sand in the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. Each element of the modelling chain describing the movement of 14 C is confirmed independently and, thus, can be said to be validated. The groundwater ages, and the 14 C measurements and carbonate geochemical model underlying them, are confirmed by the noble gas measurements, while the flow and transport model is confirmed by the 14 C results. Agreement between the modelled and measured 234 U/ 238 U ratios supports the description of U transport used in the modelling, while the need to use an unexpectedly low K D value for U raises questions about the applicability of laboratory K D data to the Carrizo groundwater system. (author)

  15. A Dual Operational Refrigerator/Flow Cryostat with Wide Bore Medium Field Magnet for Application Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. A.; Bailey, W. O. S.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Beduz, C.; Yang, Y.; Chappell, S.; Twin, A.

    Since stand alone cryocooler systems have become more widely available, there has been increased commercial interest in superconductor applications in the temperature range intermediate to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. There are however few facilities that have large in-field bore size with variable temperatures. A large bore system can reduce costs associated with full scale demonstration magnets by testing smaller coils and qualify medium length (up to meters) conductors. A 5 T, wide bore, (170 mm) Nb3Sn Oxford Instrument magnet has been integrated into a custom built dual mode refrigerator/helium flow cryostat with 600A HTS current leads. In one mode the system can be used with zero field without cost of liquid helium relying for cooling on a Sumitomo GM cryocooler with 1.5W at 4.2K: (no He) this can be used either as the sole characterisation method, or as a preliminary check before more expensive and extensive measurements are taken. The first measurements using MgB2 wire from 10 to 20K were made using a transient current step of ∼5s duration, as opposed to a DC measurement. This has the advantage of not requiring thermal equilibrium to be achieved at nominal current. The feasibility of this technique for determining critical transport properties is discussed.

  16. A “twisted” microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-06-27

    This paper proposes a new “twisted” 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices.

  17. Application of macro material flow modeling to the decision making process for integrated waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, S.A.; Holter, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    Computer models have been used for almost a decade to model and analyze various aspects of solid waste management Commercially available models exist for estimating the capital and operating costs of landfills, waste-to-energy facilities and compost systems and for optimizing system performance along a single dimension (e.g. cost or transportation distance). An alternative to the use of currently available models is the more flexible macro material flow modeling approach in which a macro scale or regional level approach is taken. Waste materials are tracked through the complete integrated waste management cycle from generation through recycling and reuse, and finally to ultimate disposal. Such an approach has been applied by the authors to two different applications. The STELLA simulation language (for Macintosh computers) was used to model the solid waste management system of Puerto Rico. The model incorporated population projections for all 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico from 1990 to 2010, solid waste generation factors, remaining life for the existing landfills, and projected startup time for new facilities. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has used the SimScript simulation language (for Windows computers) to model the management of solid and hazardous wastes produced during cleanup and remediation activities at the Hanford Nuclear Site

  18. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamic Flow in Microfluidic Biochip for Single-Cell Trapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has become the interest of a wide range of biological and biomedical engineering research. It could provide precise information on individual cells, leading to important knowledge regarding human diseases. To perform single-cell analysis, it is crucial to isolate the individual cells before further manipulation is carried out. Recently, microfluidic biochips have been widely used for cell trapping and single cell analysis, such as mechanical and electrical detection. This work focuses on developing a finite element simulation model of single-cell trapping system for any types of cells or particles based on the hydrodynamic flow resistance (Rh manipulations in the main channel and trap channel to achieve successful trapping. Analysis is carried out using finite element ABAQUS-FEA™ software. A guideline to design and optimize single-cell trapping model is proposed and the example of a thorough optimization analysis is carried out using a yeast cell model. The results show the finite element model is able to trap a single cell inside the fluidic environment. Fluid’s velocity profile and streamline plots for successful and unsuccessful single yeast cell trapping are presented according to the hydrodynamic concept. The single-cell trapping model can be a significant important guideline in designing a new chip for biomedical applications.

  19. Application and analysis of debris-flow early warning system in Wenchuan earthquake-affected area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. L.; Zhang, S. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zhao, L. Q.; Jiang, Y. H.; Tang, D.; Leng, X. P.

    2016-02-01

    The activities of debris flow (DF) in the Wenchuan earthquake-affected area significantly increased after the earthquake on 12 May 2008. The safety of the lives and property of local people is threatened by DFs. A physics-based early warning system (EWS) for DF forecasting was developed and applied in this earthquake area. This paper introduces an application of the system in the Wenchuan earthquake-affected area and analyzes the prediction results via a comparison to the DF events triggered by the strong rainfall events reported by the local government. The prediction accuracy and efficiency was first compared with a contribution-factor-based system currently used by the weather bureau of Sichuan province. The storm on 17 August 2012 was used as a case study for this comparison. The comparison shows that the false negative rate and false positive rate of the new system is, respectively, 19 and 21 % lower than the system based on the contribution factors. Consequently, the prediction accuracy is obviously higher than the system based on the contribution factors with a higher operational efficiency. On the invitation of the weather bureau of Sichuan province, the authors upgraded their prediction system of DF by using this new system before the monsoon of Wenchuan earthquake-affected area in 2013. Two prediction cases on 9 July 2013 and 10 July 2014 were chosen to further demonstrate that the new EWS has high stability, efficiency, and prediction accuracy.

  20. Possibilities and Limitations of CFD Simulation for Flashing Flow Scenarios in Nuclear Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiang Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The flashing phenomenon is relevant to nuclear safety analysis, for example by a loss of coolant accident and safety release scenarios. It has been studied intensively by means of experiments and simulations with system codes, but computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation is still at the embryonic stage. Rapid increasing computer speed makes it possible to apply the CFD technology in such complex flow situations. Nevertheless, a thorough evaluation on the limitations and restrictions is still missing, which is however indispensable for reliable application, as well as further development. In the present work, the commonly-used two-fluid model with different mono-disperse assumptions is used to simulate various flashing scenarios. With the help of available experimental data, the results are evaluated, and the limitations are discussed. A poly-disperse method is found necessary for a reliable prediction of mean bubble size and phase distribution. The first attempts to trace the evolution of the bubble size distribution by means of poly-disperse simulations are made.

  1. DC electrical conductivity of silicon carbide ceramics and composites for flow channel insert applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Y.; Kondo, S.; Snead, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    High purity chemically vapor-deposited silicon carbide (SiC) and 2D continuous SiC fiber, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix composites with pyrocarbon interphases were examined. Specifically, temperature dependent (RT to 800 deg. C) electrical conductivity and the influence of neutron irradiation were measured. The influence of neutron irradiation on electrical properties appeared very strong for the SiC of this study, typically resulting in orders lower ambient conductivity and steeper temperature dependency of this conductivity. For the 2D composites, through-thickness (normal to the fiber axis') electrical conductivity was dominated by bypass conduction via interphase network at relatively low temperatures, whereas conduction through SiC constituents dominated at higher temperatures. Through-thickness electrical conductivity of neutron-irradiated 2D SiC composites with thin PyC interphase, currently envisioned for flow channel insert application, will likely in the order of 10 S/m at the appropriate operating temperature. Mechanisms of electrical conduction in the composites and irradiation-induced modification of electrical conductivity of the composites and their constituents are discussed.

  2. Ultrasonic applications for the enhancement of turbulence flow by using the PIV measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. H.; Choi, W. C.; Koo, J. H.; Song, M. G.; Ju, E. S.

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasonic applications for the enhancement of turbulence flow by using the PIV measurement were carried out according to the angle of the ultrasonic oscillator, materials of the reflector and each section when ultrasonic is reflected several times. Angles of the ultrasonic oscillator such as 30 deg., 45 .deg., 60 .deg., 90 .deg., 120 .deg., 135 .deg. and 150 .deg. were selected, and turbulent intensities were compared at Reynolds No. 2,000 and 4,000. Materials of the reflector such as wood, acryl, iron and glass were selected, and time mean velocity vector and turbulent intensity were compared at Reynolds No. 4,000. The zone which was observed was selected from first section to fourth section when ultrasonic was reflected several times. Every data such as time mean velocity vector and time mean turbulent intensity which was obtained by PIV measurement was examined, compared and discussed at Reynolds No. 2,000 and 4,000 to know the degree of turbulence enhancement in each case

  3. Review of recent applications of flow injection spectrophotometry to pharmaceutical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D.; Themelis, Demetrius G.

    2007-01-01

    Pharmaceutical analysis is one of the most important fields in analytical chemistry. The discovery of new drugs and the on-going update of international regulations for the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical formulations demand the continuous development of new analytical methods. Inevitably, automation plays an important role, especially when a lot of samples have to be analyzed in the minimum of time. The present study reviews the applications of flow injection (FI) spectrophotometry to the determination of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in their respective formulations. However, the topic covered in this study is important not only to pharmaceutical analytical scientists. The principles, figures of merit and 'chemistry' of the presented methods can be of interest to bio-analytical and clinical chemists as well for the analysis of biological samples, to environmental analysts that study the up-to-date demand of the determination of the fate of pharmaceuticals in the environment and even to toxicologists and forensic scientists. This review covers scientific contributions published later than 2000. A variety of FI procedures based on homogeneous (direct UV measurements, colour-forming reactions, metal-drug interactions) and heterogeneous (optical sensors and solid-phase reactors) systems are discussed. A third section covers on-line sample pretreatment (solid-phase extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, on-line digestion, etc.)

  4. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  5. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  6. Total Survey Error for Longitudinal Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynn, Peter; Lugtig, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the application of the total survey error paradigm to longitudinal surveys. Several aspects of survey error, and of the interactions between different types of error, are distinct in the longitudinal survey context. Furthermore, error trade-off decisions in survey design and

  7. Subclinical Markers of Cardiovascular Disease Among Police Officers: A Longitudinal Assessment of the Cortisol Awakening Response and Flow Mediated Artery Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violanti, John M; Fekedulegn, Desta; Andrew, Michael E; Charles, Luenda E; Gu, Ja K; Miller, Diane B

    2018-05-07

    To examine the association of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) with change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) in police officers over a seven-year period. Baseline CAR was obtained from four saliva samples taken fifteen minutes apart immediately after awakening. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the change in FMD% (FMD%Follow-up-FMD%Baseline) across tertiles of area under the cortisol curve with respect to increase (AUCI). Regression analysis was use to assess trend. Officers (n = 172; 81% men) had a mean ± SD age of 41 ± 7.6 years. Men in the lowest AUCI tertile (i.e., atypical waking cortisol pattern) had a significantly larger seven-year mean decline in FMD% (mean ± SE: -2.56 ± 0.64) compared to men in the highest tertile (-0.89 ± 0.69) (p = 0.0087). An awakening cortisol AUCI predicted worsening of FMD% approximately seven years later among male officers.

  8. Implementation of a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. An example application of PIV to wake-flows behind objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, A.; Hishida, K.; Ohki, Y.

    1996-10-01

    In the present work an introduction to PIV is given by way of an example. The selected flow configuration is that of wake-flow behind a bubble and its solid equivalent. By solid equivalent we mean a solid model with approximately the equivalent bubble breadth and volume. This two-component, two-phase flow aptly demonstrates the applicability of PIV to spatio-temporal flows. Use was additionally made of an Infrared Shadow Technique (IST) in order to capture the unlit image (shadow) of the bubble or solid within the flow field. By triggering both the laser and infrared light sources with the CCD camera, the shape of the object as well as the flow field was simultaneously recorded. Besides the 2D vector field, calculations of the vorticity, Reynolds stress and turbulent kinetic energy (tke) distributions were made. The results indicate that for counter-current flow (U avg ∼0.245m/s) of water in a square channel (100mm) with a single air bubble of roughly 10mm diameter (Re Db ∼10 4 ) one could conclude the following: 1) PIV can detect differences in the wake flow field behind a bubble and that behind an equivalently sized solid, 2) the wake flow field behind the bubble is spatio-temporal due to the oscillation of the bubble, 3) as the bubble tries to minimize the energy-loss associated with its inherent motion it does so by distributing the hydrodynamic tke uniformly in the wake-field whereas in the case of the solid, the energy is distributed in a confined region in the near-wake. The order of magnitude of the tke is however similar which strongly suggests leads us to believe that the energy dissipation mechanisms are different in the two cases. We also made a limited comparison of velocity data obtained via DPIV and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. (J.P.N.)

  9. Piecewise - Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P. R.

    2003-03-26

    This report summarizes the results of the project entitled, ''Piecewise-Parabolic Methods for Parallel Computation with Applications to Unstable Fluid Flow in 2 and 3 Dimensions'' This project covers a span of many years, beginning in early 1987. It has provided over that considerable period the core funding to my research activities in scientific computation at the University of Minnesota. It has supported numerical algorithm development, application of those algorithms to fundamental fluid dynamics problems in order to demonstrate their effectiveness, and the development of scientific visualization software and systems to extract scientific understanding from those applications.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Study of Bottom Rack Occlusion by Flow with Gravel-Sized Sediment. Application to Ephemeral Streams in Semi-Arid Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Castillo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall runoff collection in ephemeral streams is an objective in semi-arid zones. Rack intake systems are proposed to collect these flash floods with intensive sediment transport. The design parameters address the problem of clogging the spacing between bars. Experiments for two different void ratio racks are shown. Flows, longitudinal slopes in the rack, and water with three gravel-sized sediments were tested. Results such as effective void ratio due to the gravel deposition over the rack, the evolution of the flow rejected during each test, and the quantification of materials collected and deposited, are presented. The optimal longitudinal rack slope seems to be close to 30%. The effective void ratio is related to several hydraulic parameters calculated at the beginning of the rack. Some adjustments were proposed to predict the effective void ratio.

  11. Abnormal network flow detection based on application execution patterns from Web of Things (WoT) platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young; Jung, Hyunwoo; Lee, Hana

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a research work on a novel methodology of identifying abnormal behaviors at the underlying network monitor layer during runtime based on the execution patterns of Web of Things (WoT) applications. An execution pattern of a WoT application is a sequence of profiled time delays between the invocations of involved Web services, and it can be obtained from WoT platforms. We convert the execution pattern to a time sequence of network flows that are generated when the WoT applications are executed. We consider such time sequences as a whitelist. This whitelist reflects the valid application execution patterns. At the network monitor layer, our applied RETE algorithm examines whether any given runtime sequence of network flow instances does not conform to the whitelist. Through this approach, it is possible to interpret a sequence of network flows with regard to application logic. Given such contextual information, we believe that the administrators can detect and reason about any abnormal behaviors more effectively. Our empirical evaluation shows that our RETE-based algorithm outperforms the baseline algorithm in terms of memory usage.

  12. Flow MRI simulation in complex 3D geometries: Application to the cerebral venous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Alexandre; Salmon, Stéphanie; Baruthio, Joseph; Delbany, Maya; Durand, Emmanuel

    2018-02-05

    Develop and evaluate a complete tool to include 3D fluid flows in MRI simulation, leveraging from existing software. Simulation of MR spin flow motion is of high interest in the study of flow artifacts and angiography. However, at present, only a few simulators include this option and most are restricted to static tissue imaging. An extension of JEMRIS, one of the most advanced high performance open-source simulation platforms to date, was developed. The implementation of a Lagrangian description of the flow allows simulating any MR experiment, including both static tissues and complex flow data from computational fluid dynamics. Simulations of simple flow models are compared with real experiments on a physical flow phantom. A realistic simulation of 3D flow MRI on the cerebral venous network is also carried out. Simulations and real experiments are in good agreement. The generality of the framework is illustrated in 2D and 3D with some common flow artifacts (misregistration and inflow enhancement) and with the three main angiographic techniques: phase contrast velocimetry (PC), time-of-flight, and contrast-enhanced imaging MRA. The framework provides a versatile and reusable tool for the simulation of any MRI experiment including physiological fluids and arbitrarily complex flow motion. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Application of two-phase flow for cooling of hybrid microchannel PV cells: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeh-e-Sheyda, Peyvand; Rahimi, Masoud; Karimi, Ebrahim; Asadi, Masomeh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Showing cooling potential of gas–liquid two-phase flow in microchannels for PV cell. ► Introducing the concept of using slug flow in microchannels for cooling of PV cells. ► In single-phase flow, increasing the liquid flow rate enhances the PV power. ► Showing that in two-phase flow the output power related the fluid flow regime. ► By coupling PV and microchannel an increase up to 38% in output power was observed. - Abstract: This paper reports the experimental data from performance of two-phase flows in a small hybrid microchannel solar cell. Using air and water as two-phase fluid, the experiments were conducted at indoor condition in an array of rectangular microchannels with a hydraulic diameter of 0.667 mm. The gas superficial velocity ranges were between 0 and 3.27 m s −1 while liquid flow rate was 0.04 m s −1 . The performance analysis of the PV cell at slug and transitional slug/annular flow regimes are the focus of this study. The influence of two-phase working fluid on PV cell cooling was compared with single-phase. In addition, the great potential of slug flow for heat removal enhancement in PV/T panel was investigated. The obtained data showed the proposed hybrid system could substantially increases the output power of PV solar cells

  14. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  15. APPLICATION FEATURES OF SPATIAL CONDUCTOMETRY SENSORS IN MODELLING OF COOLANT FLOW MIXING IN NUCLEAR POWER UNIT EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Barinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coolant flow mixing processes with different temperatures and concentrations of diluted additives widely known in nuclear power units operation. In some cases these processes make essential impact on the resource and behavior of the nuclear unit during transient and emergency situations. The aim of the study was creation of measurement system and test facility to carry out basic tests and to embed spatial conductometry method in investigation practice of turbulent coolant flows. In the course of investigation measurement system with sensors and experimental facility was designed, several first tests were carried out. A special attention was dedicated to calibration and clarification of conductometry sensor application methodologies in studies of turbulent flow characteristics. Investigations involved method of electrically contrast tracer jet with concurrent flow in closed channel of round crosssection. The measurements include both averaged and unsteady realizations of measurement signal. Experimental data processing shows good agreement with other tests acquired from another measurement systems based on different physical principles. Calibration functions were acquired, methodical basis of spatial conductometry measurement system application was created. Gathered experience of spatial sensor application made it possible to formulate the principles of further investigation that involve large-scale models of nuclear unit equipment. Spatial wire-mesh sensors proved to be a perspective type of eddy resolving measurement devices.

  16. Computational issues and applications of line-elements to model subsurface flow governed by the modified Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Mark; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

    2011-09-01

    Two new approaches are presented for the accurate computation of the potential due to line elements that satisfy the modified Helmholtz equation with complex parameters. The first approach is based on fundamental solutions in elliptical coordinates and results in products of Mathieu functions. The second approach is based on the integration of modified Bessel functions. Both approaches allow evaluation of the potential at any distance from the element. The computational approaches are applied to model transient flow with the Laplace transform analytic element method. The Laplace domain solution is computed using a combination of point elements and the presented line elements. The time domain solution is obtained through a numerical inversion. Two applications are presented to transient flow fields, which could not be modeled with the Laplace transform analytic element method prior to this work. The first application concerns transient single-aquifer flow to wells near impermeable walls modeled with line-doublets. The second application concerns transient two-aquifer flow to a well near a stream modeled with line-sinks.

  17. Development and application of traffic flow information collecting and analysis system based on multi-type video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mujie; Shang, Wenjie; Ji, Xinkai; Hua, Mingzhuang; Cheng, Kuo

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, intelligent transportation system (ITS) has already become the new direction of transportation development. Traffic data, as a fundamental part of intelligent transportation system, is having a more and more crucial status. In recent years, video observation technology has been widely used in the field of traffic information collecting. Traffic flow information contained in video data has many advantages which is comprehensive and can be stored for a long time, but there are still many problems, such as low precision and high cost in the process of collecting information. This paper aiming at these problems, proposes a kind of traffic target detection method with broad applicability. Based on three different ways of getting video data, such as aerial photography, fixed camera and handheld camera, we develop a kind of intelligent analysis software which can be used to extract the macroscopic, microscopic traffic flow information in the video, and the information can be used for traffic analysis and transportation planning. For road intersections, the system uses frame difference method to extract traffic information, for freeway sections, the system uses optical flow method to track the vehicles. The system was applied in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, and the application shows that the system for extracting different types of traffic flow information has a high accuracy, it can meet the needs of traffic engineering observations and has a good application prospect.

  18. Betweenness centrality and its applications from modeling traffic flows to network community detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yihui

    network and we demonstrate that the changes can propagate globally, affecting traffic several hundreds of miles away. Because of its principled nature, this method can inform many applications related to human mobility driven flows in spatial networks, ranging from transportation, through urban planning to mitigation of the effects of catastrophic events. In the second part of the thesis we focus on network deconstruction and community detection problems, both intensely studied topics in network science, using a weighted betweenness centrality approach. We present an algorithm that solves both problems efficiently and accurately and demonstrate that on both benchmark networks and data networks.

  19. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  20. Application of neural networks to validation of feedwater flow rate in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, M.; Ipakchi, A.; Alexandro, F.J.; Colley, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Feedwater flow rate measurement in nuclear power plants requires periodic calibration. This is due to the fact that the venturi surface condition of the feedwater flow rate sensor changes because of a chemical reaction between the surface coating material and the feedwater. Fouling of the venturi surface, due to this chemical reaction and the deposits of foreign materials, has been observed shortly after a clean venturi is put in operation. A fouled venturi causes an incorrect measurement of feedwater flow rate, which in turn results in an inaccurate calculation of the generated power. This paper presents two methods for verifying incipient and continuing fouling of the venturi of the feedwater flow rate sensors. Both methods are based on the use of a set of dissimilar process variables dynamically related to the feedwater flow rate variable. The first method uses a neural network to generate estimates of the feedwater flow rate readings. Agreement, within a given tolerance, of the feedwater flow rate instrument reading, and the corresponding neural network output establishes that the feedwater flow rate instrument is operating properly. The second method is similar to the first method except that the neural network predicts the core power which is calculated from measurements on the primary loop, rather than the feedwater flow rates. This core power is referred to the primary core power in this paper. A comparison of the power calculated from the feedwater flow measurements in the secondary loop, with the calculated and neural network predicted primary core power provides information from which it can be determined whether fouling is beginning to occur. The two methods were tested using data from the feedwater flow meters in the two feedwater flow loops of the TMI-1 nuclear power plant

  1. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2017-02-21

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  2. Proximal thoracic aorta dimensions after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation: Longitudinal changes and relation to aortic valve insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Nowell M; Park, Soon J; Stulak, John M; Topilsky, Yan; Daly, Richard C; Joyce, Lyle D; Pereira, Naveen L; Schirger, John A; Edwards, Brooks S; Lin, Grace; Kushwaha, Sudhir S

    2016-04-01

    In this study we examined the impact of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) support on proximal thoracic aorta dimensions. Aortic root and ascending aorta diameter were measured from serial echocardiograms before and after CF-LVAD implantation in patients with ≥6 months of support, and correlated with the development of >mild aortic valve insufficiency (AI). Of 162 patients included, mean age was 58 ± 11 years and 128 (79%) were male. Seventy-nine (63%) were destination therapy patients. Mean aortic root and ascending aorta diameters at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and long-term follow-up (mean 2.0 ± 1.4 years) were 3.5 ± 0.4, 3.5 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.3, and 3.3 ± 0.2, 3.3 ± 0.3, 3.6 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 3.6 ± 0.3 cm, respectively. Only change in aortic root diameter from 1-month to 6-month follow-up reached statistical significance (p = 0.03). Nine (6%) patients had accelerated proximal thoracic aorta expansion (>0.5 cm/year), occurring predominantly in the first 6 months after implantation. These patients were older and more likely to have hypertension and baseline proximal thoracic aorta dilation. Forty-five (28%) patients developed >mild AI at long-term follow-up, including 7 of 9 (78%) of those with accelerated proximal thoracic aorta expansion. All 7 had aortic valves that remained closed throughout the cardiac cycle, and this, along with duration of CF-LVAD support and increase in aortic root diameter, were significantly associated with developing >mild AI. CF-LVAD patients have small increases in proximal thoracic aorta dimensions that predominantly occur within the first 6 months after implantation and then stabilize. Increasing aortic root diameter was associated with AI development. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Demonstration of Robust Micromachined Jet Technology and its Application to Realistic Flow Control Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Mark

    2000-01-01

    .... Our approaches include: (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow...

  4. Gyrokinetic simulations in general geometry and applications to collisional damping of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Hahm, T.S.; Lee, W.W.; Tang, W.M.; White, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle code using magnetic coordinates for general geometry has been developed and applied to the investigation of zonal flows dynamics in toroidal ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Full torus simulation results support the important conclusion that turbulence-driven zonal flows significantly reduce the turbulent transport. Linear collisionless simulations for damping of an initial poloidal flow perturbation exhibit an asymptotic residual flow. The collisional damping of this residual causes the dependence of ion thermal transport on the ion-ion collision frequency even in regimes where the instabilities are collisionless

  5. Flow Quality Analysis of Shape Morphing Structures for Hypersonic Ground Testing Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Background: Shape morphing, high temperature, ceramic structural materials are now becoming available and can revolutionize ground testing by providing dynamic flow...

  6. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow...... to steady state versus transient flow conditions and to the amount of hydraulic and solute data used is investigated. The flow parameters, transmissivity and leakage factor, are estimated simultaneously with the transport parameters: source strength, porosity, and longitudinal dispersivity. This paper...

  7. Predicting the diagenetic evolution of argillite repositories: application of flow-through reaction cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warr, L.; Clatter, N.; Liewig, N.

    2005-01-01

    In order to successfully predict the diagenetic evolution of argillite repositories we need to know i) which reactions occur under a defined set of conditions, ii) how these reactions modify the material properties of the argillite seal, and iii) how fast these chemical reactions take place. Based on the application of thermodynamics, and the construction of activity diagrams for low temperature mineral phases (e.g. Velde 1992), fair predictions of mineral stability can be made under a given set of physical and chemical conditions. Such predictions are strengthened by examining natural mineral reactions preserved in the geological record, in combination with results obtained from controlled laboratory experiments. Changes in the material behavior can also be reasonably assessed, as the basic physical and chemical properties of argillaceous rocks of varying mineralogy are well documented in the petrophysical and engineering literature (e.g. Bell, 1999). Probably the most difficult task, however, is to assess the rates of the chemical reactions involved. This difficulty reflects our poor knowledge of the reaction kinetics for these low-temperature, fine-grained mineral materials, and apparent differences between rates estimated from natural and experimental systems. A new approach to monitoring the reaction kinetics of fine-grained minerals in percolating solution has been developed using flow-through reaction (wet-cell) chambers. These devices can be routinely mounted onto the X-ray diffractometer for in-situ measurements of the sample. With the aid of a cap to maintain constant volume, the device can be subjected to diagenetic or hydrothermal conditions (<150 C). First results are here presented for the alteration of Callovo-Oxfordian shales in a reactive simple young fluid (strongly alkaline, pH ca. 13) at 90 C, designed to simulate the alteration of concrete at the repository site. (authors)

  8. Continuous-Flow Synthesis and Materials Interface Engineering of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots for Photovoltaic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    El-Ballouli, Ala’a O.

    2016-05-25

    Harnessing the Sun’s energy via the conversion of solar photons to electricity has emerged as a sustainable energy source to fulfill our future demands. In this regard, solution-processable, size-tunable PbS quantum dots (QDs) have been identified as a promising active materials for photovoltaics (PVs). Yet, there are still serious challenges that hinder the full exploitation of QD materials in PVs. This dissertation addresses two main challenges to aid these QDs in fulfilling their tremendous potential in PV applications. First, it is essential to establish a large-scale synthetic technique which maintains control over the reaction parameters to yield QDs with well-defined shape, size, and composition. Rigorous protocols for cost-effective production on a scale are still missing from literature. Particularly, previous reports of record-performance QD-PVs have been based on small-scale, manual, batch syntheses. One way to achieve a controlled large-scale synthesis is by reducing the reaction volume to ensure uniformity. Accordingly, we design a droplet-based continuous-flow synthesis of PbS QDs. Only upon separating the nucleation and growth phases, via a dual-temperature-stage reactor, it was possible to achieve high-quality QDs with high photoluminescence quantum yield (50%) in large-scale. The performance of these QDs in a PV device was comparable to batch-synthesized QDs, thus providing a promise in utilizing automated synthesis of QDs for PV applications. Second, it is crucial to study and control the charge transfer (CT) dynamics at QD interfaces in order to optimize their PV performance. Yet, the CT investigations based on PbS QDs are limited in literature. Here, we investigate the CT and charge separation (CS) at size-tunable PbS QDs and organic acceptor interfaces using a combination of femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopic techniques and steady-state measurements. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum

  9. Bayesian hierarchical modelling of continuous non-negative longitudinal data with a spike at zero: An application to a study of birds visiting gardens in winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Ben; Buckland, Stephen T; King, Ruth; Toms, Mike P

    2016-03-01

    The development of methods for dealing with continuous data with a spike at zero has lagged behind those for overdispersed or zero-inflated count data. We consider longitudinal ecological data corresponding to an annual average of 26 weekly maximum counts of birds, and are hence effectively continuous, bounded below by zero but also with a discrete mass at zero. We develop a Bayesian hierarchical Tweedie regression model that can directly accommodate the excess number of zeros common to this type of data, whilst accounting for both spatial and temporal correlation. Implementation of the model is conducted in a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework, using reversible jump MCMC to explore uncertainty across both parameter and model spaces. This regression modelling framework is very flexible and removes the need to make strong assumptions about mean-variance relationships a priori. It can also directly account for the spike at zero, whilst being easily applicable to other types of data and other model formulations. Whilst a correlative study such as this cannot prove causation, our results suggest that an increase in an avian predator may have led to an overall decrease in the number of one of its prey species visiting garden feeding stations in the United Kingdom. This may reflect a change in behaviour of house sparrows to avoid feeding stations frequented by sparrowhawks, or a reduction in house sparrow population size as a result of sparrowhawk increase. © 2015 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Application of support vector regression (SVR) for stream flow prediction on the Amazon basin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Toit, Melise

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available regression technique is used in this study to analyse historical stream flow occurrences and predict stream flow values for the Amazon basin. Up to twelve month predictions are made and the coefficient of determination and root-mean-square error are used...

  11. Application of effective discharge analysis to environmental flow decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, S. Kyle; Freeman, Mary C.; Covich, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Well-informed river management decisions rely on an explicit statement of objectives, repeatable analyses, and a transparent system for assessing trade-offs. These components may then be applied to compare alternative operational regimes for water resource infrastructure (e.g., diversions, locks, and dams). Intra- and inter-annual hydrologic variability further complicates these already complex environmental flow decisions. Effective discharge analysis (developed in studies of geomorphology) is a powerful tool for integrating temporal variability of flow magnitude and associated ecological consequences. Here, we adapt the effectiveness framework to include multiple elements of the natural flow regime (i.e., timing, duration, and rate-of-change) as well as two flow variables. We demonstrate this analytical approach using a case study of environmental flow management based on long-term (60 years) daily discharge records in the Middle Oconee River near Athens, GA, USA. Specifically, we apply an existing model for estimating young-of-year fish recruitment based on flow-dependent metrics to an effective discharge analysis that incorporates hydrologic variability and multiple focal taxa. We then compare three alternative methods of environmental flow provision. Percentage-based withdrawal schemes outcompete other environmental flow methods across all levels of water withdrawal and ecological outcomes.

  12. Probabilistic tectonic heat flow modelling for basin maturation: method and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wees, J.D.A.M.; van Bergen, F.; David, P.; Nepveu, M.; Beekman, W.W.W.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.; Bonte, D.D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Tectonic modeling is often neglected in the basin modeling workflow and heat flow is most times considered a user input. Such heat flows can, therefore, result in erroneous basin modeling outcomes, resulting in false overoptimistic identification of prospective areas or failure to identify

  13. Probabilistic tectonic heat flow modeling for basin maturation: Assessment method and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Bergen, F. van; David, P.; Nepveu, M.; Beekman, F.; Cloetingh, S.; Bonté, D.

    2009-01-01

    Tectonic modeling is often neglected in the basin modeling workflow and heat flow is most times considered a user input. Such heat flows can, therefore, result in erroneous basin modeling outcomes, resulting in false overoptimistic identification of prospective areas or failure to identify

  14. Changes in blood flow by local hypothermia and its application to cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong-Su; Higano, Shuichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Mamoru; Hoshino, Humihiko

    1984-01-01

    Protective effects of local hypothermia on radiation dermatitis and mucositis were shown. It was considered that the main factor influencing radioprotection was decrease of local blood flow. Our examinations showed that blood flow of the skin and oral mucosa decreased while that of the tumors did not so change. Adequate results were obtained in the combined treatment of radiation and chemotherapy. (author)

  15. Synthesis of Biochemical Applications on Flow-Based Microfluidic Biochips using Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers and are able to integrate the necessary functions for biochemical analysis on-chip. In this paper we are interested in flow-based biochips, in which the flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves. By combin...

  16. Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations with applications of reduced order modeling techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald; Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.; Ghommem, Mehdi; Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2014-01-01

    With the recent interest in shale gas, an understanding of the flow mechanisms at the pore scale and beyond is necessary, which has attracted a lot of interest from both industry and academia. One of the suggested algorithms to help understand flow

  17. Fractional Flow Theory Applicable to Non-Newtonian Behavior in EOR Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, W.R.; Venkatraman, A.; Johns, R.T.; Kibodeaux, K.R.; Lai, H.; Moradi Tehrani, N.

    2011-01-01

    The method of characteristics, or fractional-flow theory, is extremely useful in understanding complex Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes and in calibrating simulators. One limitation has been its restriction to Newtonian rheology except in rectilinear flow. Its inability to deal with

  18. Evaluation of synthetic rainfall application with respect to the flow volume at upstream Brantas watershed, East Java Province of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limantara Lily Montarcih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian Technical Implementation Unit (UPT of Synthetic Rainfall has modified climate by generating synthetic rainfall from 9th May until 4th June 2013. This unit has cooperated with the Department of Technological Study and Application (BPPT of Indonesia and Perum Jasa Tirta I and TNI AU Lanud Abdulrachman Saleh. This study intended to increase reservoirs water level in upstream Brantas watershed, one of them is Sutami reservoir. Successive grade evaluation of synthetic rainfall used the method of Double Ratio and Flow Discharge. The target area is upstream Brantas watershed that is represented by 12 rainfall stations and the control area is in the distance of ±30 km from the boundary of upstream Brantas watershed and is represented by 5 rainfall stations. Results show rainfall increasing by 152.05% according to the Double Ratio method and the increase of flow discharge from Sutami reservoir by 74.19% according to the Flow Discharge method.

  19. Application of a film flow model to predicting burnout under transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, D.C.; Kirby, G.J.

    1967-08-01

    The film flow model developed previously has been generalised to transient situations by assuming that only convection is changed by the transient; evaporation, deposition and entrainment are assumed to be unaffected. A computer code TRABUT computes the time behaviour of the mass velocity and the quality by the method of characteristics, and then integrates the film flow equations along the same characteristics until the point of burn-out or zero film flow is reached. The time delay between the onset of a transient and burn-out has been computed both for flux and flow transients. These computations have been compared with those made using the standard local conditions hypothesis. The film flow model gives shorter delays in almost all cases, but the difference would not be detectable with present experimental techniques. (author)

  20. APPLICATION OF FLOW SIMULATION FOR EVALUATION OF FILLING-ABILITY OF SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Shinji; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Sakihara, Kohei

    In this paper, MPS method was applied to fluid an alysis of self-compacting concrete. MPS method is one of the particle method, and it is suitable for the simulation of moving boundary or free surface problems and large deformation problems. The constitutive equation of self-compacting concrete is assumed as bingham model. In order to investigate flow Stoppage and flow speed of self-compacting concrete, numerical analysis examples of slump flow and L-flow test were performed. In addition, to evaluate verification of compactability of self-compacting concrete, numerical analys is examples of compaction at the part of CFT diaphragm were performed. As a result, it was found that the MPS method was suitable for the simulation of compaction of self-compacting concrete, and a just appraisal was obtained by setting shear strain rate of flow-limit πc and limitation point of segregation.

  1. Application of SARIMA model to forecasting monthly flows in Waterval River, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Kassahun Birhanu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of future river flow information is fundamental for development and management of a river system. In this study, Waterval River flow was forecasted by SARIMA model using GRETL statistical software. Mean monthly flows from 1960 to 2016 were used for modelling and forecasting. Different unit root and Mann–Kendall trend analysis proved the stationarity of the observed flow time series. Based on seasonally differenced correlogram characteristics, different SARIMA models were evaluated; their parameters were optimized, and diagnostic check up of forecasts was made using white noise and heteroscedasticity tests. Finally, based on minimum Akaike Information (AI and Hannan–Quinn (HQ criteria, SARIMA (3, 0, 2 x (3, 1, 312 model was selected for Waterval River flow forecasting. Comparison of forecast performance of SARIMA models with that of computational intelligent forecasting techniques was recommended for future study.

  2. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  3. Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations with applications of reduced order modeling techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald

    2014-01-01

    With the recent interest in shale gas, an understanding of the flow mechanisms at the pore scale and beyond is necessary, which has attracted a lot of interest from both industry and academia. One of the suggested algorithms to help understand flow in such reservoirs is the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The primary advantage of LBM is its ability to approximate complicated geometries with simple algorithmic modificatoins. In this work, we use LBM to simulate the flow in a porous medium. More specifically, we use LBM to simulate a Brinkman type flow. The Brinkman law allows us to integrate fast free-flow and slow-flow porous regions. However, due to the many scales involved and complex heterogeneities of the rock microstructure, the simulation times can be long, even with the speed advantage of using an explicit time stepping method. The problem is two-fold, the computational grid must be able to resolve all scales and the calculation requires a steady state solution implying a large number of timesteps. To help reduce the computational complexity and total simulation times, we use model reduction techniques to reduce the dimension of the system. In this approach, we are able to describe the dynamics of the flow by using a lower dimensional subspace. In this work, we utilize the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique, to compute the dominant modes of the flow and project the solution onto them (a lower dimensional subspace) to arrive at an approximation of the full system at a lowered computational cost. We present a few proof-of-concept examples of the flow field and the corresponding reduced model flow field.

  4. Compaction and flow of cohesive granular media assisted by vibrations: application to filling press molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathonnet, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project, the nuclear fuel production process by powder metallurgy, for Fast Neutron Reactors, is revisited in order to be simplified. In particular, we seek to remove the mechanical granulation step of the powder which gives a good flow behavior during the filling of press molds. The aim is to reach a spontaneous and quick powder flow through a hole in which the powder does not flow without external energy. Furthermore, the powder alternates between flow phases during the filling of press molds, and non-flow phases during the compaction and ejection of the pellet. We hence apply horizontal vibrations to ensure the flow of the powder through the press mold. The vibrations help the powder to flow and increase the production rates. However, they have the disadvantage to compact the powder and delay the future flows, during the non-flow phases. The art of filling the press mold assisted by vibrations is to master/control the ambivalent nature of the vibrations. The remarkable packing fraction evolution of actinides powders, during the non-flow phases, allows us to define a simple 1D stochastic model to understand the compaction kinetics. The comparison of the stochastic model with the empirical compaction laws found in the literature helps us to identify the physical meaning of fitting parameters proposed by the empirical models. Furthermore, we have also proposed a new compaction law with two-stretched exponentials. This new law not only reflects the compaction kinetics of actinides powders, but also of all the compaction data we found in the literature. (author) [fr

  5. Evaluation of heart tissue viability under redox-magnetohydrodynamics conditions: toward fine-tuning flow in biological microfluidics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Lih Tyng; Fritsch, Ingrid; Haswell, Stephen J; Greenman, John

    2012-07-01

    A microfluidic system containing a chamber for heart tissue biopsies, perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing glucose and antibiotic (KHGB) using peristaltic pumps and continuously stimulated, was used to evaluate tissue viability under redox-magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD) conditions. Redox-MHD possesses unique capabilities to control fluid flow using ionic current from oxidation and reduction processes at electrodes in a magnetic field, making it attractive to fine-tune fluid flow around tissues for "tissue-on-a-chip" applications. The manuscript describes a parallel setup to study two tissue samples simultaneously, and 6-min static incubation with Triton X100. Tissue viability was subsequently determined by assaying perfusate for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, where LDH serves as an injury marker. Incubation with KHGB containing 5 mM hexaammineruthenium(III) (ruhex) redox species with and without a pair of NdFeB magnets (∼ 0.39 T, placed parallel to the chamber) exhibited no additional tissue insult. MHD fluid flow, viewed by tracking microbeads with microscopy, occurred only when the magnet was present and stimulating electrodes were activated. Pulsating MHD flow with a frequency similar to the stimulating waveform was superimposed over thermal convection (from a hotplate) for Triton-KHGB, but fluid speed was up to twice as fast for ruhex-Triton-KHGB. A large transient ionic current, achieved when switching on the stimulating electrodes, generates MHD perturbations visible over varying peristaltic flow. The well-controlled flow methodology of redox-MHD is applicable to any tissue type, being useful in various drug uptake and toxicity studies, and can be combined equally with on- or off-device analysis modalities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Application of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to Turbulent Czochralski Convective Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, S; Cerisier, P; Azuma, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the general aspects of the convective flow instabilities in a simulated Czochralski system. We considered the influence of the buoyancy and crystal rotation. Velocity fields, obtained by an ultrasonic technique, the corresponding 2D Fourier spectra and a correlation function, have been used. Steady, quasi-periodic and turbulent flows, are successively recognized, as the Reynolds number was increased, for a fixed Rayleigh number. The orthogonal decomposition method was applied and the numbers of modes, involved in the dynamics of turbulent flows, calculated. As far as we know, this method has been used for the first time to study the Czochralski convective flows. This method provides also information on the most important modes and allows simple theoretical models to be established. The large rotation rates of the crystal were found to stabilize the flow, and conversely the temperature gradients destabilize the flow. Indeed, the increase of the rotation effects reduces the number of involved modes and oscillations, and conversely, as expected, the increase of the buoyancy effects induces more modes to be involved in the dynamics. Thus, the flow oscillations can be reduced either by increasing the crystal rotation rate to the adequate value, as shown in this study or by imposing a magnetic field

  7. Applications of Coupled Explicit–Implicit Solution of SWEs for Unsteady Flow in Yangtze River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Ding

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In engineering practice, the unsteady flows generated from the operation of hydropower station in the upstream region could significantly change the navigation system of waterways located in the middle-lower reaches of the river. In order to study the complex propagation, convergence and superposition characteristics of unsteady flows in a long channel with flow confluence, a numerical model based on the coupling of implicit and explicit solution algorithms of Shallow Water Equations (SWEs has been applied to two large rivers in the reach of Yangtze River, China, which covers the distance from Yibin to Chongqing located upstream side of the Three Gorges Dam. The accuracy of numerical model has been validated by both the steady and unsteady flows using the prototype hydrological data. It is found that the unsteady flows show much more complex water level and discharge behaviors than the steady ones. The studied unsteady flows arising from the water regulation of two upstream hydropower stations could influence the region as far as Zhutuo hydrologic station, which is close to the city of Chongqing. Meanwhile, the computed stage–discharge rating curves at all observation stations demonstrate multi-value loop patterns because of the presence of additional water surface gradient. The present numerical model proves to be robust for simulating complex flows in very long engineering rivers up to 400 km.

  8. Application of a finite element method to the calculation of compressible subsonic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    The accidental transients in nuclear reactors requires two-phase flow calculation in complicated geometries. In the present case, the flow has been limited to the study of an homogeneous bidimensional flow model. One obtains equations analogous to those for compressible gas. The two-phase nature leads to sudden variations of specific mass as a function of pressure and enthalpy. In practice, the flows are in a transport regime, this is why one has sought a stable discretization scheme for the hyperbolic system of Euler equations. In order to take into account the thermal phenomena, the natural variables were kept, flow rate, pressure enthalpy and the equations were used in their conservative form. A Galerkin method was used to solve the momentum conservation equation. The space to which the flow rates belong is submitted to a matching condition, the normal component of these vectors is continuous at the boundary between elements. The pressures, enthalpy specific mass, in contrast, are discontinuous between two elements. Correspondences must be established between these two type of discretization. The program set into operation uses a discretization of lowest order, and has been conceived for processing time steps conditioned only by the flow speed. It has been tested in two cases where the thermal phenomena are important: cool liquid introduced in vapor, and heating along a plate [fr

  9. Application of Potential Theory to Steady Flow Past Two Cylinders in Tandem Arrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The wake flow patterns associated with flow past a cylinder and a cylinder-pair in tandem configuration are revisited, compared, and evaluated with respect to the streamline patterns generated based on potential flow theory and superposition of various potential flow elements. The wakes, which are vortex shedding in the lee of the cylinder(s, are reproduced by placing pairs of equal but opposite circulation elements in the potential flow field. The strength of the circulation elements determines the size of the vortices produced. The streamline patterns of flow past a pair of unequal cylinders in tandem configuration provide an indirect means to establish the threshold condition for the wake transition from that of a single bluff body to alternating reattachment behavior. This threshold condition is found to be a function of the diameter ratio, d/D (diameters d and D, d≤D , spacing ratio, L/D (centre-to-centre distance, L, to cylinder diameter, D, and equivalent incident flow speed, U. A unique functional relationship f (L/D, d/D, U of this threshold condition is established.

  10. The time constrained multi-commodity network flow problem and its application to liner shipping network design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsten, Christian Vad; Pisinger, David; Røpke, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    -commodity network flow problem with transit time constraints which puts limits on the duration of the transit of the commodities through the network. It is shown that for the particular application it does not increase the solution time to include the transit time constraints and that including the transit time...... is essential to offer customers a competitive product. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francioso, L; De Pascali, C; Siciliano, P; Pescini, E; De Giorgi, M G

    2016-01-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0–100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa −1 for the best devices. (paper)

  12. Genealogy-based methods for inference of historical recombination and gene flow and their application in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Paul A; Song, Yun S; Brem, Rachel B

    2012-01-01

    Genetic exchange between isolated populations, or introgression between species, serves as a key source of novel genetic material on which natural selection can act. While detecting historical gene flow from DNA sequence data is of much interest, many existing methods can be limited by requirements for deep population genomic sampling. In this paper, we develop a scalable genealogy-based method to detect candidate signatures of gene flow into a given population when the source of the alleles is unknown. Our method does not require sequenced samples from the source population, provided that the alleles have not reached fixation in the sampled recipient population. The method utilizes recent advances in algorithms for the efficient reconstruction of ancestral recombination graphs, which encode genealogical histories of DNA sequence data at each site, and is capable of detecting the signatures of gene flow whose footprints are of length up to single genes. Further, we employ a theoretical framework based on coalescent theory to test for statistical significance of certain recombination patterns consistent with gene flow from divergent sources. Implementing these methods for application to whole-genome sequences of environmental yeast isolates, we illustrate the power of our approach to highlight loci with unusual recombination histories. By developing innovative theory and methods to analyze signatures of gene flow from population sequence data, our work establishes a foundation for the continued study of introgression and its evolutionary relevance.

  13. Application of neural networks to prediction of phase transport characteristics in high-pressure two-phase turbulent bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, A.-S.; Kuo, T.-C.; Ling, P.-H.

    2003-01-01

    The phase transport phenomenon of the high-pressure two-phase turbulent bubbly flow involves complicated interfacial interactions of the mass, momentum, and energy transfer processes between phases, revealing that an enormous effort is required in characterizing the liquid-gas flow behavior. Nonetheless, the instantaneous information of bubbly flow properties is often desired for many industrial applications. This investigation aims to demonstrate the successful use of neural networks in the real-time determination of two-phase flow properties at elevated pressures. Three back-propagation neural networks, trained with the simulation results of a comprehensive theoretical model, are established to predict the transport characteristics (specifically the distributions of void-fraction and axial liquid-gas velocities) of upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows at pressures covering 3.5-7.0 MPa. Comparisons of the predictions with the test target vectors indicate that the averaged root-mean-squared (RMS) error for each one of three back-propagation neural networks is within 4.59%. In addition, this study appraises the effects of different network parameters, including the number of hidden nodes, the type of transfer function, the number of training pairs, the learning rate-increasing ratio, the learning rate-decreasing ratio, and the momentum value, on the training quality of neural networks.

  14. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0-100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa-1 for the best devices.

  15. [Application of three heat pulse technique-based methods to determine the stem sap flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Fan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    It is of critical importance to acquire tree transpiration characters through sap flow methodology to understand tree water physiology, forest ecology and ecosystem water exchange. Tri-probe heat pulse sensors, which are widely utilized in soil thermal parameters and soil evaporation measurement, were applied to implement Salix matsudana sap flow density (Vs) measurements via heat-ratio method (HRM), T-Max method (T-Max) and single-probe heat pulse probe (SHPP) method, and comparative analysis was conducted with additional Grainer's thermal diffusion probes (TDP) measured results. The results showed that, it took about five weeks to reach a stable measurement stage after TPHP installation, Vs measured with three methods in the early stage after installation was 135%-220% higher than Vs in the stable measurement stage, and Vs estimated via HRM, T-Max and SHPP methods were significantly linearly correlated with Vs estimated via TDP method, with R2 of 0.93, 0.73 and 0.91, respectively, and R2 for Vs measured by SHPP and HRM reached 0.94. HRM had relatively higher precision in measuring low rates and reverse sap flow. SHPP method seemed to be very promising to measure sap flow for configuration simplicity and high measuring accuracy, whereas it couldn' t distinguish directions of flow. T-Max method had relatively higher error in sap flow measurement, and it couldn' t measure sap flow below 5 cm3 · cm(-2) · h(-1), thus this method could not be used alone, however it could measure thermal diffusivity for calculating sap flow when other methods were imposed. It was recommended to choose a proper method or a combination of several methods to measure stem sap flow, based on specific research purpose.

  16. Final Report. Hydrodynamics by high-energy-density plasma flow and hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves

  17. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics titles offer the essential background but generally include very sparse coverage of rotating flows-which is where this book comes in. Beginning with an accessible introduction to rotating flow, recognized expert Peter Childs takes you through fundamental equations, vorticity and vortices, rotating disc flow, flow around rotating cylinders and flow in rotating cavities, with an introduction to atmospheric and oceanic circul...

  18. Applications of Pitot-meter techniques in two-phase, steam/water, flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, W.; Manzano-Ruiz, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple technique, based on the interpretation of dynamic-pressure readings obtained with local and averaging Pitot-meters (APM) in tow-phase flow, is described and analyzed. The mean dynamic-pressure measurements obtained with an APM allow the calculation of the mass flux of the mixture if the steam quality is known and a combination of two slip-factor correlations is used. The local dynamic-pressure measurements with a multiple Pitot-probe technique provide information on the transition between the most commonly found flow patterns in horizontal piping, i.e. stratified, annular and annular-mist flow

  19. Estimation of left ventricular blood flow parameters: clinical application of patient-specific CFD simulations from 4D echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, David; Spühler, Jeannette H.; Günyeli, Elif; Weinkauf, Tino; Hoffman, Johan; Colarieti-Tosti, Massimiliano; Winter, Reidar; Larsson, Matilda

    2017-03-01

    Echocardiography is the most commonly used image modality in cardiology, assessing several aspects of cardiac viability. The importance of cardiac hemodynamics and 4D blood flow motion has recently been highlighted, however such assessment is still difficult using routine echo-imaging. Instead, combining imaging with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-simulations has proven valuable, but only a few models have been applied clinically. In the following, patient-specific CFD-simulations from transthoracic dobutamin stress echocardiography have been used to analyze the left ventricular 4D blood flow in three subjects: two with normal and one with reduced left ventricular function. At each stress level, 4D-images were acquired using a GE Vivid E9 (4VD, 1.7MHz/3.3MHz) and velocity fields simulated using a presented pathway involving endocardial segmentation, valve position identification, and solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. Flow components defined as direct flow, delayed ejection flow, retained inflow, and residual volume were calculated by particle tracing using 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration. Additionally, systolic and diastolic average velocity fields were generated. Results indicated no major changes in average velocity fields for any of the subjects. For the two subjects with normal left ventricular function, increased direct flow, decreased delayed ejection flow, constant retained inflow, and a considerable drop in residual volume was seen at increasing stress. Contrary, for the subject with reduced left ventricular function, the delayed ejection flow increased whilst the retained inflow decreased at increasing stress levels. This feasibility study represents one of the first clinical applications of an echo-based patient-specific CFD-model at elevated stress levels, and highlights the potential of using echo-based models to capture highly transient flow events, as well as the ability of using simulation tools to study clinically complex

  20. Advanced Wall Boiling Model with Wide Range Applicability for the Subcooled Boiling Flow and its Application into the CFD Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, B. J.; Song, C. H.; Splawski, A.; Lo, S.

    2010-01-01

    Subcooled boiling is one of the crucial phenomena for the design, operation and safety analysis of a nuclear power plant. It occurs due to the thermally nonequilibrium state in the two-phase heat transfer system. Many complicated phenomena such as a bubble generation, a bubble departure, a bubble growth, and a bubble condensation are created by this thermally nonequilibrium condition in the subcooled boiling flow. However, it has been revealed that most of the existing best estimate safety analysis codes have a weakness in the prediction of the subcooled boiling phenomena in which multi-dimensional flow behavior is dominant. In recent years, many investigators are trying to apply CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes for an accurate prediction of the subcooled boiling flow. In the CFD codes, evaporation heat flux from heated wall is one of the key parameters to be modeled for an accurate prediction of the subcooled boiling flow. The evaporate heat flux for the CFD codes is expressed typically as follows, q' e = πD 3 d /6 ρ g h fg fN' where, D d , f ,N' are bubble departure size, bubble departure frequency and active nucleation site density, respectively. In the most of the commercial CFD codes, Tolubinsky bubble departure size model, Kurul and Podowski active nucleation site density model and Ceumem-Lindenstjerna bubble departure frequency model are adopted as a basic wall boiling model. However, these models do not consider their dependency on the flow, pressure and fluid type. In this paper, an advanced wall boiling model was proposed in order to improve subcooled boiling model for the CFD codes

  1. New Alkali Metal Flow Battery for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This seedling task is to develop new lithium-based flow batteries that will provide several fold improvements in specific energy, cost, simplicity and lifetimes,...

  2. An Application of Alloy to Static Analysis for Secure Information Flow and Verification of Software Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffer, Alan B

    2008-01-01

    Within a multilevel secure (MLS) system, flaws in design and implementation can result in overt and covert channels, both of which may be exploited by malicious software to cause unauthorized information flows...

  3. Application of the level set method for multi-phase flow computation in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, X-Y.; Ni, M-J.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of multi-phase flow is essential to evaluate the feasibility of a liquid protection scheme for the power plant chamber. The level set method is one of the best methods for computing and analyzing the motion of interface among the multi-phase flow. This paper presents a general formula for the second-order projection method combined with the level set method to simulate unsteady incompressible multi-phase flow with/out phase change flow encountered in fusion science and engineering. The third-order ENO scheme and second-order semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson scheme is used to update the convective and diffusion term. The numerical results show this method can handle the complex deformation of the interface and the effect of liquid-vapor phase change will be included in the future work

  4. Calibrationless rotating Lorentz-force flowmeters for low flow rate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvasta, M. G.; Dudt, D.; Fisher, A. E.; Kolemen, E.

    2018-07-01

    A ‘weighted magnetic bearing’ has been developed to improve the performance of rotating Lorentz-force flowmeters (RLFFs). Experiments have shown that the new bearing reduces frictional losses within a double-sided, disc-style RLFF to negligible levels. Operating such an RLFF under ‘frictionless’ conditions provides two major benefits. First, the steady-state velocity of the RLFF magnets matches the average velocity of the flowing liquid at low flow rates. This enables an RLFF to make accurate volumetric flow measurements without any calibration or prior knowledge of the fluid properties. Second, due to minimized frictional losses, an RLFF is able to measure low flow rates that cannot be detected when conventional, high-friction bearings are used. This paper provides a brief background on RLFFs, gives a detailed description of weighted magnetic bearings, and compares experimental RLFF data to measurements taken with a commercially available flowmeter.

  5. The boundary data immersion method for compressible flows with application to aeroacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlanderer, Stefan C., E-mail: stefan.schlanderer@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty for Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Weymouth, Gabriel D., E-mail: G.D.Weymouth@soton.ac.uk [Faculty for Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom); Sandberg, Richard D., E-mail: richard.sandberg@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    This paper introduces a virtual boundary method for compressible viscous fluid flow that is capable of accurately representing moving bodies in flow and aeroacoustic simulations. The method is the compressible extension of the boundary data immersion method (BDIM, Maertens & Weymouth (2015), ). The BDIM equations for the compressible Navier–Stokes equations are derived and the accuracy of the method for the hydrodynamic representation of solid bodies is demonstrated with challenging test cases, including a fully turbulent boundary layer flow and a supersonic instability wave. In addition we show that the compressible BDIM is able to accurately represent noise radiation from moving bodies and flow induced noise generation without any penalty in allowable time step.

  6. Applications of continuous-flow photochemistry in organic synthesis, material science, and water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambié, D.; Bottecchia, C.; Straathof, N.J.W.; Hessel, V.; Noël, T.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-flow photochemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention from researchers in academia and industry as this technology provides reduced reaction times, higher selectivities, straightforward scalability, and the possibility to safely use hazardous intermediates and gaseous

  7. Further Development and Application of GEOFRAC-FLOW to a Geothermal Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, Herbert [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vecchiarelli, Alessandra [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    GEOFRAC is a three-dimensional, geology-based, geometric-mechanical, hierarchical, stochastic model of natural rock fracture systems. The main characteristics of GEOFRAC are its use of statistical input representing fracture patterns in the field in form of the fracture intensity P32 (fracture area per volume) and the best estimate fracture size E(A). This information can be obtained from boreholes or scanlines on the surface, on the one hand, and from window sampling of fracture traces on the other hand. In the context of this project, “Recovery Act - Decision Aids for Geothermal Systems”, GEOFRAC was further developed into GEOFRAC-FLOW as has been reported in the reports, “Decision Aids for Geothermal Systems - Fracture Pattern Modelling” and “Decision Aids for Geothermal Systems - Fracture Flow Modeling”. GEOFRAC-FLOW allows one to determine preferred, interconnected fracture paths and the flow through them.

  8. Application of the DTM to Nonlinear Cases Arising in Fluid Flows with Variable Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Rahimi, M; Hosseini, M.J

    2012-01-01

    This paper employs the differential transformation method to investigate two nonlinear ordinary differential systems for plane coquette flow having variable viscosity and thermal conductivity. The concept of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then differential transformation m...

  9. Coupled heat and water flow dynamics in dry soils : application to a multilayer waste cover

    OpenAIRE

    Gran Esforzado, Meritxell

    2015-01-01

    Unsaturated flow plays an important role in numerous environmental phenomena. It is complex in arid regions, where liquid water fluxes are small and vapor fluxes become relevant, so that heat, water and solute mass transport are needed to understand evaporation. This thesis aims at gaining insight evaporation and vapor flow mechanisms and the relevance of matric potential, temperature and osmotic gradients. These issues are especially relevant for soil salinization, whose mechanisms are po...

  10. Development and Application of Energetic Actuators for Shear and Vortex Dominated Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    flows, especially for supersonic and hypersonic flows, are still limited and continue to be an active area of research. As an example, the highly...6 microjets. (Foster 2011) 46 Additional studies were performed with a simplified REM design such that comparisons with CFD simulations...demonstrated in this study, combined with its compact size and ZNMF property makes SJA an option worth exploring, especially for supersonic and hypersonic

  11. The Application of Busywork Flow in Supply Chain Management of Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Firstly, I point out the problems in the fruit supply chain management. Then through field survey, we know that busywork flow plays a very important role in the fruit supply chain management. I establish the mathematical model, to derive that the supply chain management of corporate procurement and supply network is the optimal economic model. In terms of the performance of supply chain, I draw the following conclusions: (i) Busywork flow can achieve the supply chain management, and reduces l...

  12. Application of Stochastic Unsaturated Flow Theory, Numerical Simulations, and Comparisons to Field Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Mantoglou, Aristotelis

    1992-01-01

    unsaturated flow equation representing the mean system behavior is solved using a finite difference numerical solution technique. The effective parameters are evaluated from the stochastic theory formulas before entering them into the numerical solution for each iteration. The stochastic model is applied...... seems to offer a rational framework for modeling large-scale unsaturated flow and estimating areal averages of soil-hydrological processes in spatially variable soils....

  13. Quantification of cerebral blood flow and its clinical usefulness. Application of SPECT to psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uema, Takeshi; Kogure, Daisuke; Takano, Harumasa; Terada, Tomo [National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) was applied to psychiatric diseases with aid of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for analysis of data. To evaluate influence of aging on brain perfusion, noninvasive measurements of cerebral blood flow using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD were performed in 53 normal volunteers, aged 18 to 87 years old. Mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was 43.9{+-}5.0 ml/100 g/min and showed weak negative correlation with aging (r=-0.451). Perisylvian cerebral cortices and medial frontal areas including anterior cingulate gyri showed greater negative correlation than other areas. These findings suggest the necessity of age-matched control regional CBF (rCBF) data to investigate rCBF abnormality in patients. Four drug-naive schizophrenic patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and superior temporal areas and a left infero-posterior temporal area. Haloperidol administration induced flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left parietal areas, while flow increase in bilateral striatal and right hippocampal areas. Ten aged depressive patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left temporo-parietal areas. Even after remission patients showed flow decrease in the left frontal area as compared with normal subjects. Remission induced flow increase in the right frontal, right parietal, and right orbitofrontal areas compared with depression. These results suggest that CBF measurements using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD are useful for objective evaluation of regional abnormality in brain function in psychiatric diseases. (author)

  14. Application of PIV to the Measurement of High Speed Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, L.

    1999-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV, has been implemented for the investigation of high-speed jet flows at the NASA Langley Research Center. In this approach the velocity (displacement) is found as the location of a peak in the correlation map of particle images acquired in quick succession. In the study, the technique for the correct seeding of the flow field were developed and implemented and the operational parameters influencing the accuracy of the measurement have been optimized.

  15. A NEW METHOD FOR ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW ASSESSMENT BASED ON BASIN GEOLOGY. APPLICATION TO EBRO BASIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The determination of environmental flows is one of the commonest practical actions implemented on European rivers to promote their good ecological status. In Mediterranean rivers, groundwater inflows are a decisive factor in streamflow maintenance. This work examines the relationship between the lithological composition of the Ebro basin (Spain) and dry season flows in order to establish a model that can assist in the calculation of environmental flow rates.Due to the lack of information on the hydrogeological characteristics of the studied basin, the variable representing groundwater inflows has been estimated in a very simple way. The explanatory variable used in the proposed model is easy to calculate and is sufficiently powerful to take into account all the required characteristics.The model has a high coefficient of determination, indicating that it is accurate for the intended purpose. The advantage of this method compared to other methods is that it requires very little data and provides a simple estimate of environmental flow. It is also independent of the basin area and the river section order.The results of this research also contribute to knowledge of the variables that influence low flow periods and low flow rates on rivers in the Ebro basin.

  16. Application of the PROMETHEE technique to determine depression outlet location and flow direction in DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tien-Yin; Lin, Wen-Tzu; Lin, Chao-Yuan; Chou, Wen-Chieh; Huang, Pi-Hui

    2004-02-01

    With the fast growing progress of computer technologies, spatial information on watersheds such as flow direction, watershed boundaries and the drainage network can be automatically calculated or extracted from a digital elevation model (DEM). The stubborn problem that depressions exist in DEMs has been frequently encountered while extracting the spatial information of terrain. Several filling-up methods have been proposed for solving depressions. However, their suitability for large-scale flat areas is inadequate. This study proposes a depression watershed method coupled with the Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEEs) theory to determine the optimal outlet and calculate the flow direction in depressions. Three processing procedures are used to derive the depressionless flow direction: (1) calculating the incipient flow direction; (2) establishing the depression watershed by tracing the upstream drainage area and determining the depression outlet using PROMETHEE theory; (3) calculating the depressionless flow direction. The developed method was used to delineate the Shihmen Reservoir watershed located in Northern Taiwan. The results show that the depression watershed method can effectively solve the shortcomings such as depression outlet differentiating and looped flow direction between depressions. The suitability of the proposed approach was verified.

  17. Application of PSAT to Load Flow Analysis with STATCOM under Load Increase Scenario and Line Contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telang, Aparna S.; Bedekar, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    Load flow analysis is the initial and essential step for any power system computation. It is required for choosing better options for power system expansion to meet with ever increasing load demand. Implementation of Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) device like STATCOM, in the load flow, which is having fast and very flexible control, is one of the important tasks for power system researchers. This paper presents a simple and systematic approach for steady state power flow calculations with FACTS controller, static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) using command line usage of MATLAB tool-power system analysis toolbox (PSAT). The complexity of MATLAB language programming increases due to incorporation of STATCOM in an existing Newton-Raphson load flow algorithm. Thus, the main contribution of this paper is to show how command line usage of user friendly MATLAB tool, PSAT, can extensively be used for quicker and wider interpretation of the results of load flow with STATCOM. The novelty of this paper lies in the method of applying the load increase pattern, where the active and reactive loads have been changed simultaneously at all the load buses under consideration for creating stressed conditions for load flow analysis with STATCOM. The performance have been evaluated on many standard IEEE test systems and the results for standard IEEE-30 bus system, IEEE-57 bus system, and IEEE-118 bus system are presented.

  18. Analysis of transient and hysteresis behavior of cross-flow heat exchangers under variable fluid mass flow rate for data center cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Tianyi; Murray, Bruce; Sammakia, Bahgat

    2015-01-01

    Effective thermal management of data centers is an important aspect of reducing the energy required for the reliable operation of data processing and communications equipment. Liquid and hybrid (air/liquid) cooling approaches are becoming more widely used in today's large and complex data center facilities. Examples of these approaches include rear door heat exchangers, in-row and overhead coolers and direct liquid cooled servers. Heat exchangers are primary components of liquid and hybrid cooling systems, and the effectiveness of a heat exchanger strongly influences the thermal performance of a cooling system. Characterizing and modeling the dynamic behavior of heat exchangers is important for the design of cooling systems, especially for control strategies to improve energy efficiency. In this study, a dynamic thermal model is solved numerically in order to predict the transient response of an unmixed–unmixed crossflow heat exchanger, of the type that is widely used in data center cooling equipment. The transient response to step and ramp changes in the mass flow rate of both the hot and cold fluid is investigated. Five model parameters are varied over specific ranges to characterize the transient performance. The parameter range investigated is based on available heat exchanger data. The thermal response to the magnitude, time period and initial and final conditions of the transient input functions is studied in detail. Also, the hysteresis associated with the fluid mass flow rate variation is investigated. The modeling results and performance data are used to analyze specific dynamic performance of heat exchangers used in practical data center cooling applications. - Highlights: • The transient performance of a crossflow heat exchanger was modeled and studied. • This study provides design information for data center thermal management. • The time constant metric was used to study the impacts of many variable inputs. • The hysteresis behavior

  19. Application of FTLOADDS to Simulate Flow, Salinity, and Surface-Water Stage in the Southern Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John D.; Swain, Eric D.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; James, Dawn E.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan requires numerical modeling to achieve a sufficient understanding of coastal freshwater flows, nutrient sources, and the evaluation of management alternatives to restore the ecosystem of southern Florida. Numerical models include a regional water-management model to represent restoration changes to the hydrology of southern Florida and a hydrodynamic model to represent the southern and western offshore waters. The coastal interface between these two systems, however, has complex surface-water/ground-water and freshwater/saltwater interactions and requires a specialized modeling effort. The Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density Dependent System (FTLOADDS) code was developed to represent connected surface- and ground-water systems with variable-density flow. The first use of FTLOADDS is the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) application to the southeastern part of the Everglades/Florida Bay coastal region. The need to (1) expand the domain of the numerical modeling into most of Everglades National Park and the western coastal area, and (2) better represent the effect of water-delivery control structures, led to the application of the FTLOADDS code to the Tides and Inflows in the Mangroves of the Everglades (TIME) domain. This application allows the model to address a broader range of hydrologic issues and incorporate new code modifications. The surface-water hydrology is of primary interest to water managers, and is the main focus of this study. The coupling to ground water, however, was necessary to accurately represent leakage exchange between the surface water and ground water, which transfers substantial volumes of water and salt. Initial calibration and analysis of the TIME application produced simulated results that compare well statistically with field-measured values. A comparison of TIME simulation results to previous SICS results shows improved capabilities, particularly in the

  20. Joint model-based clustering of nonlinear longitudinal trajectories and associated time-to-event data analysis, linked by latent class membership: with application to AIDS clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangxin; Lu, Xiaosun; Chen, Jiaqing; Liang, Juan; Zangmeister, Miriam

    2017-10-27

    Longitudinal and time-to-event data are often observed together. Finite mixture models are currently used to analyze nonlinear heterogeneous longitudinal data, which, by releasing the homogeneity restriction of nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) models, can cluster individuals into one of the pre-specified classes with class membership probabilities. This clustering may have clinical significance, and be associated with clinically important time-to-event data. This article develops a joint modeling approach to a finite mixture of NLME models for longitudinal data and proportional hazard Cox model for time-to-event data, linked by individual latent class indicators, under a Bayesian framework. The proposed joint models and method are applied to a real AIDS clinical trial data set, followed by simulation studies to assess the performance of the proposed joint model and a naive two-step model, in which finite mixture model and Cox model are fitted separately.

  1. Study of interaction of a pair of longitudinal vortices with a horseshoe vortex around a wing. 2nd Report. Behavior of the interacting flow field controlled passively; Tsubasa mawari no bateikei uzu to tateuzu no kansho ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Judo seigyosareta nagareba no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Shizawa, T.; Honami, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-12-25

    This paper presents the behavior of a passively controlled horseshoe vortex at the root of NACA0024 wing which is established on a turbulent boundary layer, A pair of vortex generators of half delta wing is installed upstream of the wing. The flow field of the optimally controlled horseshoe vortex both in case of Common Flow Up (CFUC) and Common Flow Down Configuration (CFDC) is carefully investigated by an X-array hot-wire. In case of CFUC, the horseshoe vortex is not shifted from the wing, because the longitudinal vortex is restrained. The interacted vortex presents a circular profile, in a optimally controlled case. In case of CFDC, the interacted vortex that has strong vorticity by the pairing process is shifted away from the wing. Then, the high momentum fluid flow penetrates between the wing and the vortex. (author)

  2. Mechanism governing nanoparticle flow behaviour in porous media: insight for enhanced oil recovery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agi, Augustine; Junin, Radzuan; Gbadamosi, Afeez

    2018-06-01

    Nanotechnology has found its way to petroleum engineering, it is well-accepted path in the oil and gas industry to recover more oil trapped in the reservoir. But the addition of nanoparticles to a liquid can result in the simplest flow becoming complex. To understand the working mechanism, there is a need to study the flow behaviour of these particles. This review highlights the mechanism affecting the flow of nanoparticles in porous media as it relates to enhanced oil recovery. The discussion focuses on chemical-enhanced oil recovery, a review on laboratory experiment on wettability alteration, effect of interfacial tension and the stability of emulsion and foam is discussed. The flow behaviour of nanoparticles in porous media was discussed laying emphasis on the physical aspect of the flow, the microscopic rheological behaviour and the adsorption of the nanoparticles. It was observed that nanofluids exhibit Newtonian behaviour at low shear rate and non-Newtonian behaviour at high shear rate. Gravitational and capillary forces are responsible for the shift in wettability from oil-wet to water-wet. The dominant mechanisms of foam flow process were lamellae division and bubble to multiple bubble lamellae division. In a water-wet system, the dominant mechanism of flow process and residual oil mobilization are lamellae division and emulsification, respectively. Whereas in an oil-wet system, the generation of pre-spinning continuous gas foam was the dominant mechanism. The literature review on oil displacement test and field trials indicates that nanoparticles can recover additional oil. The challenges encountered have opened new frontier for research and are highlighted herein.

  3. Sensibility analysis of VORIS lava-flow simulations: application to Nyamulagira volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syavulisembo, A. M.; Havenith, H.-B.; Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Marti, J.

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and management of volcanic risk are important scientific, economic, and political issues, especially in densely populated areas threatened by volcanoes. The Virunga area in the Democratic Republic of Congo, with over 1 million inhabitants, has to cope permanently with the threat posed by the active Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo volcanoes. During the past century, Nyamulagira erupted at intervals of 1-4 years - mostly in the form of lava flows - at least 30 times. Its summit and flank eruptions lasted for periods of a few days up to more than two years, and produced lava flows sometimes reaching distances of over 20 km from the volcano, thereby affecting very large areas and having a serious impact on the region of Virunga. In order to identify a useful tool for lava flow hazard assessment at the Goma Volcano Observatory (GVO), we tested VORIS 2.0.1 (Felpeto et al., 2007), a freely available software (http://www.gvb-csic.es) based on a probabilistic model that considers topography as the main parameter controlling lava flow propagation. We tested different Digital Elevation Models (DEM) - SRTM1, SRTM3, and ASTER GDEM - to analyze the sensibility of the input parameters of VORIS 2.0.1 in simulation of recent historical lava-flow for which the pre-eruption topography is known. The results obtained show that VORIS 2.0.1 is a quick, easy-to-use tool for simulating lava-flow eruptions and replicates to a high degree of accuracy the eruptions tested. In practice, these results will be used by GVO to calibrate VORIS model for lava flow path forecasting during new eruptions, hence contributing to a better volcanic crisis management.

  4. Applications of artificial neutral network for the prediction of flow boiling curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guanghui; Jia Dounan; Fukuda, Kenji; Morita, Koji; Pidduck, Mark; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Akasaka, Ryo

    2002-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was applied successfully to predict flow boiling curves. The databases used in the analysis are from the 1960's, including 1,305 data points which cover these parameter ranges: pressure P=100-1,000 kPa, mass flow rate G=40-500 kg/m 2 ·s, inlet subcooling ΔT sub =0-35degC, wall superheat ΔT w =10-300degC and heat flux Q=20-8,000 kW/m 2 . The proposed methodology allows us to achieve accurate results, thus it is suitable for the processing of the boiling curve data. The effects of the main parameters on flow boiling curves were analyzed using the ANN. The heat flux increases with increasing inlet subcooling for all heat transfer modes. Mass flow rate has no significant effects on nucleate boiling curves. The transition boiling and film boiling heat fluxes will increase with an increase in the mass flow rate. Pressure plays a predominant role and improves heat transfer in all boiling regions except the film boiling region. There are slight differences between the steady and the transient boiling curves in all boiling regions except the nucleate region. The transient boiling curve lies below the corresponding steady boiling curve. (author)

  5. Energy Harvesting from Fluid Flow in Water Pipelines for Smart Metering Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D; Willmann, A; Göpfert, R; Becker, P; Folkmer, B; Manoli, Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a rotational, radial-flux energy harvester incorporating a three-phase generation principle is presented for converting energy from water flow in domestic water pipelines. The energy harvester together with a power management circuit and energy storage is used to power a smart metering system installed underground making it independent from external power supplies or depleting batteries. The design of the radial-flux energy harvester is adapted to the housing of a conventional mechanical water flow meter enabling the use of standard components such as housing and impeller. The energy harvester is able to generate up to 720 mW when using a flow rate of 20 l/min (fully opened water tab). A minimum flow rate of 3 l/min is required to get the harvester started. In this case a power output of 2 mW is achievable. By further design optimization of the mechanical structure including the impeller and magnetic circuit the threshold flow rate can be further reduced

  6. Energy Harvesting from Fluid Flow in Water Pipelines for Smart Metering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Göpfert, R.; Becker, P.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper a rotational, radial-flux energy harvester incorporating a three-phase generation principle is presented for converting energy from water flow in domestic water pipelines. The energy harvester together with a power management circuit and energy storage is used to power a smart metering system installed underground making it independent from external power supplies or depleting batteries. The design of the radial-flux energy harvester is adapted to the housing of a conventional mechanical water flow meter enabling the use of standard components such as housing and impeller. The energy harvester is able to generate up to 720 mW when using a flow rate of 20 l/min (fully opened water tab). A minimum flow rate of 3 l/min is required to get the harvester started. In this case a power output of 2 mW is achievable. By further design optimization of the mechanical structure including the impeller and magnetic circuit the threshold flow rate can be further reduced.

  7. Application of a 2D air flow model to soil vapor extraction and bioventing case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.H.; Merz, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is frequently the technology of choice to clean up hydrocarbon contamination in unsaturated soil. A two-dimensional air flow model provides a practical tool to evaluate pilot test data and estimate remediation rates for soil vapor extraction systems. The model predictions of soil vacuum versus distance are statistically compared to pilot test data for 65 SVE wells at 44 sites. For 17 of 21 sites where there was asphalt paving, the best agreement was obtained for boundary conditions with no barrier to air flow at the surface. The model predictions of air flow rates and stream lines around the well allow an estimate of the gasoline removal rates by both evaporation and bioremediation. The model can be used to quickly estimate the effective radius of influence, defined here as the maximum distance from the well where there is enough air flow to remove the contaminant present within the allowable time. The effective radius of influence is smaller than a radius of influence defined by soil vacuum only. For a case study, in situ bioremediation rates were estimated using the air flow model and compared to independent estimates based on changes in soil temperature. These estimate bioremediation rates for heavy fuel oil ranged from 2.5 to 11 mg oil degraded per kg soil per day, in agreement with values in the literature

  8. Triboelectric-based harvesting of gas flow energy and powerless sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghavi, Majid, E-mail: majid.taghavi@iit.it [Micro-BioRobotics Center, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Pontedera (Italy); Biorobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pontedera, Pisa (Italy); Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara [Micro-BioRobotics Center, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Pontedera (Italy); Beccai, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.beccai@iit.it [Micro-BioRobotics Center, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Pontedera (Italy); Mattoli, Virgilio, E-mail: virgilio.mattoli@iit.it [Micro-BioRobotics Center, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Pontedera (Italy)

    2014-12-30

    Highlights: • The mechanical energy of both pure and impure gases can be harvested by the introduced system. • The blown gas vibrates a non conductive sheet between two surfaces, generating the triboelectric charges. • The system is able to measure the flow rate of the blown gas. • The existence of dust in the blown air can be detected without external powering. • A self powered smoke detector is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, we propose an approach that can convert gas flow energy to electric energy by using the triboelectric effect, in a structure integrating at least two conductive parts (i.e. electrodes) and one non-conductive sheet. The gas flow induces vibration of the cited parts. Therefore, the frequent attaching and releasing between a non-conductive layer with at least one electrode generates electrostatic charges on the surfaces, and then an electron flow between the two electrodes. The effect of blown gas on the output signals is studied to evaluate the gas flow sensing. We also illustrate that the introduced system has an ability to detect micro particles driven by air into the system. Finally we show how we can use this approach for a self sustainable system demonstrating smoke detection and LED lightening.

  9. Triboelectric-based harvesting of gas flow energy and powerless sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghavi, Majid; Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical energy of both pure and impure gases can be harvested by the introduced system. • The blown gas vibrates a non conductive sheet between two surfaces, generating the triboelectric charges. • The system is able to measure the flow rate of the blown gas. • The existence of dust in the blown air can be detected without external powering. • A self powered smoke detector is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, we propose an approach that can convert gas flow energy to electric energy by using the triboelectric effect, in a structure integrating at least two conductive parts (i.e. electrodes) and one non-conductive sheet. The gas flow induces vibration of the cited parts. Therefore, the frequent attaching and releasing between a non-conductive layer with at least one electrode generates electrostatic charges on the surfaces, and then an electron flow between the two electrodes. The effect of blown gas on the output signals is studied to evaluate the gas flow sensing. We also illustrate that the introduced system has an ability to detect micro particles driven by air into the system. Finally we show how we can use this approach for a self sustainable system demonstrating smoke detection and LED lightening

  10. Estimation of flows cavitation by similarity test: application to the couple water/liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espanet, Laurent

    2000-01-01

    In many industrial flows, it is necessary to perform a similarity test to assess the cavitation intensity. The similarity laws must take into account the physical properties of the two fluids and especially the surface tension. To obtain such laws, a continuous description of the two-phase flow has been used. The non linear model of Cahn and Hilliard allows to obtain the equations of motion for these fluids, and non-dimensional conditions yield to the similarity laws. This method has been checked experimentally by achieving two different flows through a diaphragm. When respecting the similarity laws, the comparison of these flows allows to validate the transposition laws and to determine their associated tolerance. At last, the number of dusts and particles is an important parameter for cavitation inception threshold since it leads to the number of bubbles. Using the Laplace theory, it is shown that for each value of flow rate, it exists an upper bound value for the bubble density, which allows to establish a similarity law concerning this number of bubbles. (author) [fr

  11. Flow visualization IV; Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Techniques Avancees, Paris, France, Aug. 26-29, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veret, C.

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on optical techniques, speckle techniques, observation methods, image processing, boundary layers and separated flows, stratified flows and the mixing layer, vortices and wakes, jets, supersonic and hypersonic flows, the velocity field, two-phase flows, heat transfer, and engines. Specific attention is paid to applications including shear layer stability in axisymmetric backstep flows, visualization of the pulsating flow past aortic prostheses, and flow visualization by dye and by optical interferometry. Other topics include photochromic flow visualization in liquid-liquid two-phase flow, shear flow patterns analyzed by video systems, the visualization of longitudinal vortices in stagnation flows, and the development of the Karman vortex due to buoyant force in opposing flow

  12. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kh'yuitt, G.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction into the problem of two-phase flows is presented. Flow regimes arizing in two-phase flows are described, and classification of these regimes is given. Structures of vertical and horizontal two-phase flows and a method of their identification using regime maps are considered. The limits of this method application are discussed. The flooding phenomena and phenomena of direction change (flow reversal) of the flow and interrelation of these phenomena as well as transitions from slug regime to churn one and from churn one to annular one in vertical flows are described. Problems of phase transitions and equilibrium are discussed. Flow regimes in tubes where evaporating liquid is running, are described [ru

  13. Application of a Heat- and Steam-Generating Sheet Increases Peripheral Blood Flow and Induces Parasympathetic Predominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinao Nagashima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To promote the practical application of a Japanese traditional medical treatment, such as hot compresses, we developed a plaster-type warming device consisting of a heat- and steam-generating sheet (HSG sheet. First, we tested its effects when applied to the anterior abdominal wall or lumbar region of women complaining of a tendency towards constipation. Application of the sheet to either region produced a feeling of comfort in the abdomen, as assessed by a survey of the subjects. The significant increases in the total hemoglobin observed in these regions suggested an increase in peripheral blood flow, and significant increases in the HF component on ECG and in the amplitude of gastric motility suggested parasympathetic predominance. We concluded that application of the HSG sheet improves the peripheral hemodynamics and autonomic regulation, induces a feeling of comfort in the abdomen, and provides a beneficial environment for the improvement of gastrointestinal movements.

  14. Advanced ultrasound applications in the assessment of renal transplants: contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, and B-flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Tara A; Jha, Priyanka; Poder, Liina; Weinstein, Stefanie

    2018-04-09

    Ultrasound is routinely used as the first imaging exam for evaluation of renal transplants and can identify most major surgical complications and evaluate vascularity with color Doppler. Ultrasound is limited, however, in the detection of parenchymal disease processes and Doppler evaluation is also prone to technical errors. Multiple new ultrasound applications have been developed and are under ongoing investigation which could add additional diagnostic capability to the routine ultrasound exam with minimal additional time, cost, and patient risk. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can be used off-label in the transplant kidney, and can assist in detection of infection, trauma, and vascular complications. CEUS also can demonstrate perfusion of the transplant assessed quantitatively with generation of time-intensity curves. Future directions of CEUS include monitoring treatment response and microbubble targeted medication delivery. Elastography is an ultrasound application that can detect changes in tissue elasticity, which is useful to diagnose diffuse parenchymal disease, such as fibrosis, otherwise unrecognizable with ultrasound. Elastography has been successfully applied in other organs including the liver, thyroid, and breast; however, it is still under development for use in the transplant kidney. Unique properties of the transplant kidney including its heterogeneity, anatomic location, and other technical factors present challenges in the development of reference standard measurements. Lastly, B-flow imaging is a flow application derived from B-mode. This application can show the true lumen size of a vessel which is useful to depict vascular anatomy and bypasses some of the pitfalls of color Doppler such as demonstration of slow flow.

  15. A distributed predictive control approach for periodic flow-based networks: application to drinking water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Juan M.; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Puig, Vicenç

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes a distributed model predictive control approach designed to work in a cooperative manner for controlling flow-based networks showing periodic behaviours. Under this distributed approach, local controllers cooperate in order to enhance the performance of the whole flow network avoiding the use of a coordination layer. Alternatively, controllers use both the monolithic model of the network and the given global cost function to optimise the control inputs of the local controllers but taking into account the effect of their decisions over the remainder subsystems conforming the entire network. In this sense, a global (all-to-all) communication strategy is considered. Although the Pareto optimality cannot be reached due to the existence of non-sparse coupling constraints, the asymptotic convergence to a Nash equilibrium is guaranteed. The resultant strategy is tested and its effectiveness is shown when applied to a large-scale complex flow-based network: the Barcelona drinking water supply system.

  16. Application of Recurrence Analysis to the period doubling cascade of a confined buoyant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, D; Corticelli, M A; Fichera, A; Pagano, A

    2017-01-01

    Recurrence Analysis (RA) is a promising and flexible tool to identify the behaviour of nonlinear dynamical systems. The potentialities of such a technique are explored in the present work, for the study of transitions to chaos of buoyant flow in enclosures. The case of a hot cylindrical source centred in a square enclosure, is considered here, for which an extensive database of results has been collected in recent years. For a specific value of the system aspect ratio, a sequence of period doublings has been identified, leading to the onset of chaos. RA is applied here to analyse the different flow regimes along the route to chaos. The qualitative visual identification of patterns and the statistics given by the quantitative analysis suggest that this kind of tool is well suited to the study of transitional flows in thermo-fluid dynamics. (paper)

  17. Methodology and application of flow cytometry for investigation of human malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Brian T

    2011-03-31

    Historically, examinations of the inhibition of malaria parasite growth/invasion, whether using drugs or antibodies, have relied on the use of microscopy or radioactive hypoxanthine uptake. These are considered gold standards for measuring the effectiveness of antimalarial treatments, however, these methods have well known shortcomings. With the advent of flow cytometry coupled with the use of fluorescent DNA stains allowed for increased speed, reproducibility, and qualitative estimates of the effectiveness of antibodies and drugs to limit malaria parasite growth which addresses the challenges of traditional techniques. Because materials and machines available to research facilities are so varied, different methods have been developed to investigate malaria parasites by flow cytometry. This review is intended to serve as a reference guide for advanced users and importantly, as a primer for new users, to support expanded use and improvements to malaria flow cytometry, particularly in endemic countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Volume-heated boiling pool flow behavior and application to transition phase accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Jones, O.C. Jr.; Chen, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of two-phase flow fields in volume-heated boiling pools are reported. Photographic observations, together with pool-average void fraction measurements are presented. Flow regime transition criteria derived from the measurements are discussed. The churn-turbulent flow regime was the dominant regime for superficial vapor velocities up to nearly five times the Kutateladze dispersal velocity. Within this range of conditions, a churn-turbulent drift flux model provides a reasonable prediction of the pool-average void fraction data. The results of the experiment and analyses are extrapolated to transition phase conditions. It is shown that intense pool boil-up could occur where the pool-average void fraction would be greater than 0.6 for steel vaporization rates equivalent to power levels greater than one percent of nominal LMFBR power density

  19. Application of Data Smoothing Method in Signal Processing for Vortex Flow Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex flow meter is typical flow measure equipment. Its measurement output signals can easily be impaired by environmental conditions. In order to obtain an improved estimate of the time-averaged velocity from the vortex flow meter, a signal filter method is applied in this paper. The method is based on a simple Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter algorithm. According with the algorithm, a numerical program is developed in Python with the scientific library numerical Numpy. Two sample data sets are processed through the program. The results demonstrate that the processed data is available accepted compared with the original data. The improved data of the time-averaged velocity is obtained within smoothing curves. Finally the simple data smoothing program is useable and stable for this filter.

  20. A compressible two-phase model for dispersed particle flows with application from dense to dilute regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Thomas P., E-mail: thomas.p.mcgrath@navy.mil [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, 4013 Fowler Rd., Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States); St Clair, Jeffrey G. [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, 4013 Fowler Rd., Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, P.O. Box 116250, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Balachandar, S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, P.O. Box 116250, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    Multiphase flows are present in many important fields ranging from multiphase explosions to chemical processing. An important subset of multiphase flow applications involves dispersed materials, such as particles, droplets, and bubbles. This work presents an Eulerian–Eulerian model for multiphase flows containing dispersed particles surrounded by a continuous media such as air or water. Following a large body of multiphase literature, the driving force for particle acceleration is modeled as a direct function of both the continuous-phase pressure gradient and the gradient of intergranular stress existing within the particle phase. While the application of these two components of driving force is well accepted in much of the literature, other models exist in which the particle-phase pressure gradient itself drives particle motion. The multiphase model treats all phases as compressible and is derived to ensure adherence to the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. The governing equations are presented and discussed, and a characteristic analysis shows the model to be hyperbolic, with a degeneracy in the case that the intergranular stress, which is modeled as a configuration pressure, is zero. Finally, results from a two sample problems involving shock-induced particle dispersion are presented. The results agree well with experimental measurements, providing initial confidence in the proposed model.

  1. Application of flow network models of SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} to a nuclear power plant system thermal hydraulic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ji Bum [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Woon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In order to enhance the dynamic and interactive simulation capability of a system thermal hydraulic code for nuclear power plant, applicability of flow network models in SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} has been tested by modeling feedwater system and coupling to DSNP which is one of a system thermal hydraulic simulation code for a pressurized heavy water reactor. The feedwater system is selected since it is one of the most important balance of plant systems with a potential to greatly affect the behavior of nuclear steam supply system. The flow network model of this feedwater system consists of condenser, condensate pumps, low and high pressure heaters, deaerator, feedwater pumps, and control valves. This complicated flow network is modeled and coupled to DSNP and it is tested for several normal and abnormal transient conditions such turbine load maneuvering, turbine trip, and loss of class IV power. The results show reasonable behavior of the coupled code and also gives a good dynamic and interactive simulation capabilities for the several mild transient conditions. It has been found that coupling system thermal hydraulic code with a flow network code is a proper way of upgrading simulation capability of DSNP to mature nuclear plant analyzer (NPA). 5 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  2. Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-06-01

    This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

  3. A joint model for repeated events of different types and multiple longitudinal outcomes with application to a follow-up study of patients after kidney transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musoro, Jammbe Z.; Geskus, Ronald B.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the joint modeling strategy for the case of multiple longitudinal outcomes and repeated infections of different types over time, motivated by postkidney transplantation data. Our model comprises two parts linked by shared latent terms. On the one hand is a

  4. Valve selection handbook engineering fundamentals for selecting the right valve design for every industrial flow application

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Valves are the components in a fluid flow or pressure system that regulate either the flow or the pressure of the fluid. They are used extensively in the process industries, especially petrochemical. Though there are only four basic types of valves, there is an enormous number of different kinds of valves within each category, each one used for a specific purpose. No other book on the market analyzes the use, construction, and selection of valves in such a comprehensive manner.-Covers new environmentally-conscious equipment and practices, the most important hot-button issue in the p

  5. A potential flow 2-D vortex panel model: Applications to vertical axis straight blade tidal turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.B.; Zhang, L.; Zeng, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    A potential flow 2-D vortex panel model (VPM2D) for unsteady hydrodynamics calculation of the vertical axis straight blade variable pitch turbine was given for tidal streams energy conversion. Numerical results of predicted instantaneous blade forces and wake flow of the rotor showed good agreement with the test data. The model was also compared with the previous classic free vortex model (V-DART) and vortex method combined with finite element analysis (FEVDTM). It showed that the present model was much better than the former, less complex than the latter and suitable for designing and optimization of the vertical axis straight blade turbine

  6. Wind energy: an application of Bernoulli's theorem generalized to isentropic flow of ideal gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, R; Desideri, P

    2013-01-01

    By considering the extension of Bernoulli's theorem to the case of the isentropic flow of ideal gases we conceive a small-scale wind–energy system able to work in the presence of low wind velocities in any direction. The flow of air inside a hyperbolically shaped pipe is studied using elementary physics concepts. The results obtained show that wind velocity in the system increases for decreasing cross-sectional areas, allowing a lower cut-in wind speed and an increase in the annual energy production of the device. (paper)

  7. Clinical application of OCTA in observation of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Using optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTAto observe the changes and clinical significance of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy(DR.METHODS: Totally 47 eyes(28 patientswith diabetic retinopathy(DRwere enrolled in the DR group. According to the international clinical grading criteria of diabetic retinopathy, 30 eyes(19 patientswith non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as the NPDR group, and 17 eyes(11 patientswith proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as PDR group. A total of 46(27 subjectshealthy eyes with matched age were enrolled in the control group. All the subjects underwent the 3mm×3mm scanning of macular retina by optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTA, obtaining 4 levels of macular blood flow density map. The macular blood flow density at 3 levels, including superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer, were measured. RESULTS: The macular blood flow density of superfical retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer in DR group were 0.4963±0.0840, 0.4798±0.0801 and 0.5290±0.0528, respectively. Among them, the blood flow density of each layer were 0.5064±0.0843,0.4983±0.0766,0.5345±0.0529, respectively, for the NPDR group, and were 0.4786±0.0830, 0.4473±0.0778,0.5192±0.0526, respectively, for the PDR group. For the control group, the density of each layers were 0.5919±0.0704, 0.6301±0.0527, 0.5691±0.0169, respectively. The macular blood flow density was significantly different in the superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary layer between the control group and the NPDR group, as well as the PDR group and the DR group(total PP=0.029, but not in the superficial retina layer and choroid capillary layer(P=0.236, 0.268. CONCLUSION: Compared with the control group, the macular blood flow density of superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary

  8. Application of computational fluids dynamics in the flow on photovoltaic panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Leitão, K. Bittencourt; Rezende, André L. T.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is the numerical simulation of wind flow over solar photovoltaic panels. Nowadays there are 132 schools in Florida using solar energy in their buildings. Due to strong winds and hurricanes in that region is needed to determine the aerodynamic efforts from the flow of wind on photovoltaic panels to design with efficiency protectors and supporters to protect the panels. Thus this work proposes a 2D numerical simulation in steady state through the medium of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations. The turbulence closure model used is the SST k-w.

  9. Virtual reality aided visualization of fluid flow simulations with application in medical education and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Tijana; Mandic, Vesna; Filipovic, Nenad

    2013-12-01

    Medical education, training and preoperative diagnostics can be drastically improved with advanced technologies, such as virtual reality. The method proposed in this paper enables medical doctors and students to visualize and manipulate three-dimensional models created from CT or MRI scans, and also to analyze the results of fluid flow simulations. Simulation of fluid flow using the finite element method is performed, in order to compute the shear stress on the artery walls. The simulation of motion through the artery is also enabled. The virtual reality system proposed here could shorten the length of training programs and make the education process more effective. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Development and application of a fully implicit fluid dynamics code for multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Tadashi; Ogawa, Yumi

    1996-01-01

    Multiphase flow frequently occurs in a progression of accidents of nuclear reactor severe core damage. The CHAMPAGNE code has been developed to analyze thermohydraulic behavior of multiphase and multicomponent fluid, which requires for its characterization more than one set of velocities, temperatures, masses per unit volume, and so forth at each location in the calculation domain. Calculations of multiphase flow often show physical and numerical instability. The effect of numerical stabilization obtained by the upwind differencing and the fully implicit techniques gives one a convergent solution more easily than other techniques. Several results calculated by the CHAMPAGNE code are explained

  11. Static study of traditional and ring networks and the use of mass flow control in district heating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuosa, Maunu; Kontu, Kaisa; Mäkilä, Tapio; Lampinen, Markku; Lahdelma, Risto

    2013-01-01

    District heating (DH) systems are an inseparable part of the infrastructure in many countries. Today more attention is being paid to energy savings, efficiency improvements, and the replacement of fossil fuels by renewable energy. Research in the field of DH is focused on the supply of areas with low heat demand and low-energy buildings and on an increased share of heat being produced from renewable energy sources. New DH systems are expected to remain competitive in the future. In this study a new DH concept is proposed which is based on mass flow control. The DH system using mass flow control is meant for the concept of a ring network technology where mass flow rates in consumer substations are controlled by pumps with inverters to improve heat transfer. It will replace the traditional DH network and control in which water flow is throttled by control valves. The new control system will enable new temperature curves to be adopted for supply and return temperatures and more significant temperature cooling. First, a new topology and control method is presented. This ring network and the method used to control the flow rate of the primary supply water and its temperature are compared with the traditional technology. This method clearly shows the benefits of the DH applications under consideration. Second, these benefits are demonstrated by mathematical modelling. A simulation model is developed to study the area heating of six single-family houses and two apartment buildings. The static operation on the primary side of the networks is investigated for the most common outdoor temperatures. The numerical results are compared to those achieved with the traditional technology. The new flow rate is 46%, the pressure loss 25%, and the pumping power 12% of their former values in the pipes. The heat losses increase slightly with higher outdoor temperatures. The return temperature is lowest with the new technology. In the future the equipment that consumers will have will be

  12. Application of the Lion's integral to calculate heat transfer with the N2O4 turbulent flow in a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, V.Yu.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Nesterenko, V.B.

    1976-01-01

    When carrying out engineering calculation of heat transfer in the case of turbulent flow of non-equilibrium reacting gas in a tube, it is necessary to dispose of criterion dependence to calculate Nusselt number. As a rule, dependences obtained by empirical methods are not widely adopted. It is proposed that the integral of Lion type be used for the heat transfer calculation in the form of which an expression for Nusselt number has been written under the conditions of turbulent flow with a non-equilibrium chemical reaction. On calculating turbulent fluctuations Millionshchikov two-layer model is used. A simple approximation of source-discharge of the mass of mixture components is suggested for the sake of simplification of Lion integral. The proposed theoretical dependences for the heat transfer calculation when chemical reactions are available substantially extend the field of application of Lion integral and may be used designing equipment with a chemically reacting coolant

  13. Porous glass membranes for vanadium redox-flow battery application - Effect of pore size on the performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mögelin, H.; Yao, G.; Zhong, H.; dos Santos, A. R.; Barascu, A.; Meyer, R.; Krenkel, S.; Wassersleben, S.; Hickmann, T.; Enke, D.; Turek, T.; Kunz, U.

    2018-02-01

    The improvement of redox-flow batteries requires the development of chemically stable and highly conductive separators. Porous glass membranes can be an attractive alternative to the nowadays most common polymeric membranes. Flat porous glass membranes with a pore size in the range from 2 to 50 nm and a thickness of 300 and 500 μm have been used for that purpose. Maximum values for voltage efficiency of 85.1%, coulombic efficiency of 97.9% and energy efficiency of 76.3% at current densities in the range from 20 to 60 mA cm-2 have been achieved. Furthermore, a maximum power density of 95.2 mW cm-2 at a current density of 140 mA cm-2 was gained. These results can be related to small vanadium crossover, high conductivity and chemical stability, confirming the great potential of porous glass membranes for vanadium redox-flow applications.

  14. Measurement of cerebral blood flow by single photon emission tomography: principles and application to functional studies of the language areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh, Y.R.; Seylaz, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow by single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) is a new technique which is particularly suitable for routine studies of cerebro-vascular diseases. SPECT can be used to examine the deep structures of the brain and cerebellum. The functional areas of the brain, which have hitherto been only accessible by clinical-anatomical methods, can be imaged by this technique, based on the correlation between cerebral blood flow and metabolism. The demonstration of preferential activation of temporal and frontal zones in the left hemisphere by active speech stimulation confirms the general principles of hemispheric lateralization of cerebral functions. In addition to this role in studying the physiology of normal subjects, the technique has practical pathological applications. Knowledge of hemispheric lateralization of spoken language should be a pre-operative test for cerebral lesion when there is a risk that surgical intervention may produce irreversible neuropsychological lesions [fr

  15. Thermal Flow and Structure Stability Analyses of High Power Waterload for 2450 MHz microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, S. W.; Kim, H. J.; Wang, S. J.; Kim, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on analyzing the internal flow dynamics in the waterload by changing the inlet and outlet locations and adding guide pipeline to the inlet. The internal flow field simulation is done with CFX tool to compare the water flow velocity and temperature distributions in the waterload. The waterload absorbs RF power, converts it to thermal power, and increases the water temperature so that heat could be quickly removed by the water injection. And it is installed on the end of transmission line and is used to absorb reflected RF power. High power waterload with cone-shaped quartz is designed for 10-30 kW power handling at 2450 MHz microwave system. The thermal flow and structural stability analysis for the 2450 MHz waterload is done using ANSYS and the results are presented in this work. Relocation of the inlet and addition of the guide pipeline in the simulation shows a decrease in the localized maximum water temperature and increased water velocity around the heat source. It is also shown that the modified waterload is structurally more stable

  16. The Application of the Probabilistic Collocation Method to a Transonic Axial Flow Compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeven, G.J.A.; Bijl, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the Probabilistic Collocation method is used for uncertainty quantification of operational uncertainties in a transonic axial flow compressor (i.e. NASA Rotor 37). Compressor rotors are components of a gas turbine that are highly sensitive to operational and geometrical uncertainties.

  17. Calibration of a γ- Re θ transition model and its application in low-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YunTao; Zhang, YuLun; Meng, DeHong; Wang, GunXue; Li, Song

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer is very important for obtaining accurate aerodynamic characteristics with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) tools, because laminar-turbulent transition is directly related to complex flow phenomena in boundary layer and separated flow in space. Unfortunately, the transition effect isn't included in today's major CFD tools because of non-local calculations in transition modeling. In this paper, Menter's γ- Re θ transition model is calibrated and incorporated into a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code — Trisonic Platform (TRIP) developed in China Aerodynamic Research and Development Center (CARDC). Based on the experimental data of flat plate from the literature, the empirical correlations involved in the transition model are modified and calibrated numerically. Numerical simulation for low-speed flow of Trapezoidal Wing (Trap Wing) is performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data. It is indicated that the γ- Re θ transition model can accurately predict the location of separation-induced transition and natural transition in the flow region with moderate pressure gradient. The transition model effectively imporves the simulation accuracy of the boundary layer and aerodynamic characteristics.

  18. Strong enhancement of streaming current power by application of two phase flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Sherwood, John D.; Shui, Lingling; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the performance of a streaming-potential based microfluidic energy conversion system can be strongly en-hanced by the use of two phase flow. In single-phase systems, the internal conduction current induced by the streaming poten-tial limits the output power, while in a two-phase system

  19. Strong enhancement of straeming current power by application of two phase flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Sherwood, John D.; Shui, Lingling; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the performance of a streaming-potential based microfluidic energy conversion system can be strongly enhanced by the use of two phase flow. Injection of gas bubbles into a liquid-filled channel increases both the maximum output power and the energy conversion efficiency. In single-phase

  20. Modeling the emergency cardiac in-patient flow: An application of queueing theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, A.M.; van Rossum, A.C.; Visser, M.C.; Koole, G.M.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the bottlenecks in the emergency care chain of cardiac in-patient flow. The primary goal is to determine the optimal bed allocation over the care chain given a maximum number of refused admissions. Anothe