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Sample records for long-term parenteral nutrition

  1. Iron Deficiency in Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Yi L; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Kelly, Darlene G; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    Iron is not routinely added to parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations in the United States because of the risk of anaphylaxis and concerns about incompatibilities. Studies have shown that iron dextran in non-lipid-containing PN solutions is safe. Data are limited on iron status, prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and efficacy of intravenous iron infusion in long-term home PN (HPN). We aimed to determine the incidence of IDA and to examine the effectiveness of parenteral iron replacement in patients receiving HPN. Medical records of patients receiving HPN at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2010 were reviewed. Diagnoses, time to IDA development, and hemoglobin, ferritin, and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values were extracted. Response of iron indices to intravenous iron replacement was investigated. Of 185 patients (122 women), 60 (32.4%) were iron deficient. Five patients were iron deficient, and 18 had unknown iron status before HPN. Of 93 patients who had sufficient iron storage, 37 had IDA development after a mean of 27.2 months (range, 2-149 months) of therapy. Iron was replaced by adding maintenance iron dextran to PN or by therapeutic iron infusion. Patients with both replacement methods had significant improvement in iron status. With intravenous iron replacement, mean ferritin increased from 10.9 to 107.6 mcg/L (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Plasma Aluminum Concentrations in Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Kosar, Christina; Campbell, Alison; Avitzur, Yaron; Wales, Paul W; Steinberg, Karen; Harrison, Debra; Chambers, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    Patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) are at increased risk of aluminium (Al) toxicity because of bypass of the gastrointestinal tract during PN infusion. Complications of Al toxicity include metabolic bone disease (MBD), Al-associated encephalopathy in adults, and impaired neurological development in preterm infants. Unlike the United States, there are no regulations regarding Al content of large- and small-volume parenterals in Canada. We, therefore, aimed to present our data on plasma Al concentration and Al intake from our cohort of pediatric patients receiving long-term PN. Plasma Al concentration was retrospectively gathered from the patient charts of all 27 patients with intestinal failure (IF) receiving long-term PN at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, and compared with age- and sex-matched controls recruited for comparison. In addition, Al concentration was measured in PN samples collected from 10 randomly selected patients with IF and used to determine their Al intake. The plasma Al concentration of patients with IF receiving long-term PN was significantly higher than that of control participants (1195 ± 710 vs 142 ± 63 nmol/L; P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in children on long-term parenteral nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pifarre, Paloma; Roca, Isabel [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital de la Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Irastorza, Inaki; Hill, Susan [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, London (United Kingdom); Simo, Marc [Instituto Universitario Dexeus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Barcelona (Spain); Biassoni, Lorenzo; Gordon, Isky [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Pulmonary emboli (PE) are one of the major complications associated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) remains the most used test for the diagnosis of PE and follow-up of patients on TPN. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the high prevalence of undiagnosed PE in children on TPN. The medical and imaging files of 64 patients on TPN who underwent V/Q examinations covering the period of 1986-2004 were reviewed. Children were aged between 3.18 months and 21.6 years. TPN was started at birth (range 0-15 years). All children had a normal chest radiograph and no symptoms at the time of the V/Q scan. A comparative analysis between the prevalence of PE and risk factors number of days per week with lipophilic content of the TPN, bowel inflammation and thrombophilic factors (protein C and S) was performed. Of the 64 patients, 25 (39%) had an abnormal V/Q scan. A total of 29 PE episodes were diagnosed in all patients. Two children had three episodes of PE. The median age at PE diagnosis was 4.6 years. In 17 patients (68%) diagnosis was achieved on the first V/Q scan performed. PE was bilateral in 56% and unilateral in 44%. PE was the main cause of 2 out 15 recorded deaths. All risk factors were associated with an increase in PE prevalence by statistical analysis. PE is underdiagnosed in children on long-term TPN. Lung V/Q scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of PE in children with a low pretest probability. (orig.)

  4. Iodine Supplementation for Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A

    2016-04-01

    Patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) are among a group at risk of developing iodine deficiency. Supplementation with iodine in this population has been debated in a number of studies, resulting in variable clinical practices. The Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition recommends a dose of 1 mcg/kg/d of parenteral iodine for patients receiving PN. At our institution, PN trace elements do not include iodine, although this is not the case internationally. Our study sought to assess iodine levels and thyroid function in a cohort of PN-dependent pediatric patients. A retrospective analysis studied 32 pediatric patients with a variety of medical diagnoses who received PN as a primary means of nutrition for 6 months or longer. Patients received variable proportions of their total caloric intake as PN, which ranged from 14%-100%. Iodine and thyroid function levels were obtained by serum sampling. No patient in our cohort of 32 demonstrated thyroid dysfunction or developed iodine deficiency. The length of time on PN and the percentage of total nutrition intake as PN were not associated with iodine levels (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Nutrition-related risk indexes and long-term mortality in noncritically ill inpatients who receive total parenteral nutrition (prospective multicenter study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Ma Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Rubio, Miguel A; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Petrina, Estrella; Manjón, Laura; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, Ma José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Sánchez-Vilar, Olga; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition in hospitalized patients is associated with an increased risk of death, in both the short and the long term. The purpose of this study was to determine which nutrition-related risk index predicts long-term mortality better (three years) in patients who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This prospective, multicenter study involved noncritically ill patients who were prescribed TPN during hospitalization. Data were collected on Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), body mass index, albumin and prealbumin, as well as long-term mortality. Over the 1- and 3-year follow-up periods, 174 and 244 study subjects (28.8% and 40.3%) respectively, died. Based on the Cox proportional hazards survival model, the nutrition-related risk indexes most strongly associated with mortality were SGA and albumin (Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Long-term follow-up of patients on home parenteral nutrition in Europe: implications for intestinal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Joly, Francisca; Forbes, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions.......The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions....

  8. Trace Element Status (Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Iron, Manganese) in Patients with Long-Term Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Šenkyřík, Michal; Dastych, Milan; Novák, František; Wohl, Petr; Maňák, Jan; Kohout, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), selenium (Se) in blood plasma and manganese (Mn) in the whole blood in patients with long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in comparison to the control group. We examined 68 patients (16 men and 52 women) aged from 28 to 68 years on a long-term HPN lasting from 4 to 96 months. The short bowel syndrome was an indication for HPN. The daily doses of Zn, Cu, Fe, Se and Mn in the last 3 months were determined. No significant differences in blood plasma were found for Zn, Cu and Fe in patients with HPN and in the control group (p > 0.05). The concentration of Mn in whole blood was significantly increased in HPN patients (p < 0.0001), while Se concentration in these patients was significantly decreased (p < 0.005). The concentration of Mn in the whole blood of 16 patients with cholestasis was significantly increased compared to the patients without cholestasis (p < 0.001). The Cu concentration was increased with no statistical significance. In long-term HPN, the status of trace elements in the patients has to be continually monitored and the daily substitution doses of these elements have to be flexibly adjusted. Dosing schedule needs to be adjusted especially in cases of cholestatic hepatopathy. A discussion about the optimal daily dose of Mn in patients on HPN is appropriate. For clinical practice, the availability of a substitution mixture of trace elements lacking Mn would be advantageous. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Low-fat, high-carbohydrate parenteral nutrition (PN) may potentially reverse liver disease in long-term PN-dependent infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Husby, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) is a complication of long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). Removal of lipids may reverse PNAC but compromises the energy to ensure infant growth. The purpose of this study was to test whether a low-fat, high-carbohydrate PN regimen......, which prevents and reverses PNAC in adults, could do the same in infants. This regimen could potentially avoid the problem of diminished energy input after removing nutritional lipids. METHODS: Infants developing PNAC over a 2-year period were started on a low-fat PN regimen with calories primarily from...

  10. Verbal and visual memory improve after choline supplementation in long-term total parenteral nutrition: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, A L; Sohel, M; Brown, M; Jenden, D J; Ahn, C; Roch, M; Brawley, T L

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that choline deficiency, manifested in low plasma-free choline concentration and hepatic injury, may develop in patients who require long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Preliminary studies have suggested lecithin or choline supplementation might lead to improved visual memory in the elderly and reverse abnormal neuropsychological development in children. We sought to determine if choline-supplemented TPN would lead to improvement in neuropsychological test scores in a group of adult, choline-deficient outpatients receiving TPN. Eleven subjects (8 males, 3 females) who received nightly TPN for more than 80% of their nutritional needs for at least 12 weeks before entry in the study were enrolled. Exclusion criteria included active drug abuse, mental retardation, cerebral vascular accident, head trauma, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, (prothrombin time [PT] >2x control), or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Patients were randomly assigned to receive their usual TPN regimen (n = 6, aged 34.0 +/- 12.6 years) over a 12-hour nightly infusion or their usual TPN regimen plus choline chloride (2 g) (n = 5, aged 37.3 +/- 7.3 years). The following neuropsychological tests were administered at baseline and after 24 weeks of choline supplementation (or placebo): Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R, intellectual functioning), Weschler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R, two subtests, verbal and visual memory), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (visuospatial functioning and perceptual organization), Controlled Oral Word Association Test (verbal fluency), Grooved Pegboard (manual dexterity and motor speed), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT, rote verbal learning ability), and Trail Making Parts A & B (visual scanning, psychomotor speed and set shifting). Scores were reported in terms of standard scores including z scores and percentile ranks. Mean absolute changes in raw scores were compared between groups

  11. Home parenteral nutrition in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalousova, J.; Rouskova, B.; Styblova, J.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition delivered at home presents a major improvement in the quality of life of children dependent on long term parenteral nutrition. Indications, technical conditions, logistics, complications, prognosis of home parenteral nutrition as well as some health-care issues to be addressed by pediatric practitioner are summarized. (author)

  12. High signal in the adenohypophysis on T1-weighted images presumably due to manganese deposits in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Diniz, R.L.F.C.; Reis, M. Jr.; Neugroschl, C.; Soehsten, S. von [Department of Radiology 2, University Hospital of Strasbourg (France); Reimund, J.M.; Baumann, R. [Department of Hepatogastroenterology, University Hospital of Strasbourg (France); Warter, J.M. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Strasbourg (France)

    1998-12-01

    Hypermanganesaemia is reported in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. Deposition of manganese, giving high signal on T1-weighted images, may involve the basal ganglia. MRI in nine patients (mean age 51 years, range 31-75 years) on long-term parenteral nutrition (mean duration 30 months, range 6-126 months), demonstrated high signal in the anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted sagittal and coronal images. The gland appeared normal on T2-weighted images. Signal intensity in the basal ganglia on T1-weighted images was increased in all patients. Endocrine assessment showed no significant abnormality. Neurological examination showed a mild parkinsonian movement disorder in one patient. Hypermanganaesemia was present in all nine (1.3-2.8 {mu}mol/l, mean 1.87 {mu}mol/l). The high signal in the anterior pituitary gland was probably related to deposition of paramagnetic substances, especially manganese. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs.

  13. High signal in the adenohypophysis on T1-weighted images presumably due to manganese deposits in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Diniz, R.L.F.C.; Reis, M. Jr.; Neugroschl, C.; Soehsten, S. von; Reimund, J.M.; Baumann, R.; Warter, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Hypermanganesaemia is reported in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. Deposition of manganese, giving high signal on T1-weighted images, may involve the basal ganglia. MRI in nine patients (mean age 51 years, range 31-75 years) on long-term parenteral nutrition (mean duration 30 months, range 6-126 months), demonstrated high signal in the anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted sagittal and coronal images. The gland appeared normal on T2-weighted images. Signal intensity in the basal ganglia on T1-weighted images was increased in all patients. Endocrine assessment showed no significant abnormality. Neurological examination showed a mild parkinsonian movement disorder in one patient. Hypermanganaesemia was present in all nine (1.3-2.8 μmol/l, mean 1.87 μmol/l). The high signal in the anterior pituitary gland was probably related to deposition of paramagnetic substances, especially manganese. (orig.)

  14. Parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility; however, it may also be associated with a number of potentially life-threatening complications. A recent NCEPOD report (2010) identified a number of inadequacies in the overall provision and management of parenteral nutrition and recommendations were made with the aim of improving clinical practice in the future. This paper focuses on the practical aspects relating to parenteral nutrition for adults, including important concepts, such as patient selection, as well as general management. We also explore the various pitfalls and potential complications and how these may be minimised.

  15. Reduction of Parenteral Nutrition and Hydration Support and Safety With Long-Term Teduglutide Treatment in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome-Associated Intestinal Failure: STEPS-3 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidner, Douglas L; Fujioka, Ken; Boullata, Joseph I; Iyer, Kishore; Lee, Hak-Myung; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2018-05-15

    Patients with intestinal failure associated with short bowel syndrome (SBS-IF) require parenteral support (PS) to maintain fluid balance or nutrition. Teduglutide (TED) reduced PS requirements in patients with SBS-IF in the randomized, placebo (PBO)-controlled STEPS study (NCT00798967) and its 2-year, open-label extension, STEPS-2 (NCT00930644). STEPS-3 (NCT01560403), a 1-year, open-label extension study in patients with SBS-IF who completed STEPS-2, further monitored the safety and efficacy of TED (0.05 mg/kg/day). Baseline was the start of TED treatment, in either STEPS or STEPS-2. At the end of STEPS-3, patients treated with TED in both STEPS and STEPS-2 (TED-TED) received TED for ≤42 months, and patients treated with TED only in STEPS-2 (no TED treatment [NT]/PBO-TED) received TED for ≤36 months. Fourteen patients enrolled (TED-TED, n = 5; NT/PBO-TED, n = 9) and 13 completed STEPS-3. At the last dosing visit, mean (SD) PS was reduced from baseline by 9.8 (14.4 [50%]) and 3.9 (2.8 [48%]) L/week in TED-TED and NT/PBO-TED, respectively. Mean (SD) PS infusions decreased by 3.0 (4.6) and 2.1 (2.2) days per week from baseline in TED-TED and NT/PBO-TED, respectively. Two patients achieved PS independence; 2 additional patients who achieved independence in STEPS-2 maintained enteral autonomy throughout STEPS-3. All patients reported ≥1 treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE); 3 patients had TEAEs that were reported as treatment related. No patient had a treatment-related treatment-emergent serious AE. Long-term TED treatment yielded a safety profile consistent with previous studies, sustained efficacy, and a further decline in PS requirements. © 2018 The Authors. Nutrition in Clinical Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  17. Total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000177.htm Total parenteral nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  18. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  19. No Clinical or Biochemical Evidence for Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency in Home Patients Who Depend on Long-Term Mixed Olive Oil- and Soybean Oil-Based Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Fisk, H.L.; Calder, P.C.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients depend on lipid emulsions as part of their parenteral nutrition regimen to provide essential fatty acids (EFAs). Mixed-oil sources are used in modern lipid emulsions to decrease the amount of proinflammatory EFAs, mainly linoleic acid, which is

  20. Combined enteral and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerman, Jan

    2012-03-01

    To review and discuss the evidence and arguments to combine enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition in the ICU, in particular with reference to the Early Parenteral Nutrition Completing Enteral Nutrition in Adult Critically Ill Patients (EPaNIC) study. The EPaNIC study shows an advantage in terms of discharges alive from the ICU when parenteral nutrition is delayed to day 8 as compared with combining enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition from day 3 of ICU stay. The difference between the guidelines from the European Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Europe and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition/Society of Critical Care Medicine in North America concerning the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition during the initial week of ICU stay was reviewed. The EPaNIC study clearly demonstrates that early parenteral nutrition in the ICU is not in the best interests of most patients. Exactly at what time point the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition should be considered is still an open question.

  1. MRI in children receiving total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaghebeur, G.; Taylor, W.J.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Fell, J.M.E.; Reynolds, A.P.; Milla, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cranial MRI was obtained in 13 of a group of 57 children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition, who were being investigated for hypermanganasaemia. Increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images has been reported in adult patients on long-term parenteral nutrition and with encephalopathy following chronic manganese exposure in arc welding. It has been postulated that these changes are due to deposition of the paramagnetic trace element manganese. In excess manganese is hepato- and neurotoxic and we present the correlation of whole blood manganese levels with imaging findings. The age range of our patients was 6 months to 10 years, and the duration of therapy 3 months to 10 years. In 7 children we found characteristic increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, with no abnormality on T2-weighted images. All patients had elevated whole blood manganese levels, suggesting that the basis for this abnormality is indeed deposition of manganese within the tissues. (orig.). With 3 figs

  2. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichvarova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  3. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  4. Parenteral nutrition in radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glants, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Basing on the results of experiments on mice and rats and their clinical use in oncological patients treatment recommendations are given on use of parenteral nutrition in treatment of radiation disease

  5. Clinical significance of changes of serum TBA, CG, HA levels in neonate with parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Weiliang; Zhou Jiongying; Zhang Xiaoyi; Lv Weihua; Ma Yunbao; He Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum levels of TBA, CG, HA in neonate with parenteral nutrition. Methods: Serum total bile acid (TBA, with biochemistry) and CG, HA (with RIA) contents were measured in 52 neonates (full-term 32, preterm 20) with parenteral nutrition and 28 neonates (full-term 16, preterm 12) without parenteral nutrition (as controls). Results: Before parenteral nutrition,the serum TBA, CG and HA levels in full-term neonates were not significantly different from those in the controls (P>0.05). After parenteral nutrition,serum levels were significantly higher than those before parenteral nutrition (P<0.01). The levels in pre-term neonates were significantly higher after parenteral nutrition than those in full-term neonates (P<0.05). Conclusion: Long term parenteral nutrition might be harmful to hepatic and gall bladder function in neonates especially in premature ones. (authors)

  6. IODINE CONTENT OF ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Devina L; Young, Lorraine S; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2017-07-01

    Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis, and iodine deficiency may result in thyroid disorders including goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long-term enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The recommended daily allowance for iodine intake is 150 μg for nonpregnant adults. However, there is no current consensus among scientific societies regarding the quantity of iodine to be added in adult EN and PN formulations. The objective of this study was to determine the iodine content of U.S. adult enteral and parenteral nutrition solutions. This study also aimed to determine whether adult patients in the United States who are receiving long-term artificial nutrition may be at risk for iodine deficiency. Ten enteral nutrition solutions and 4 parenteral nutrition solutions were evaluated. The iodine contents of these solutions were measured spectrophotometrically and compared to the labeled contents. Measured and labeled EN iodine contents were similar (range 131-176 μg/L and 106-160 μg/L, respectively). In contrast, PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled amounts of iodine, averaging 27 μg/L. Typical fluid requirements are 30 to 40 mL/kg/day for adults receiving either total EN (TEN) or total PN (TPN). Adults on long-term TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. However, patients on long-term TPN would require on average 5.6 L PN/day to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. Thus, U.S. patients requiring long-term TPN may be at risk for iodine deficiency. EN = enteral nutrition; PN = parenteral nutrition; TEN = total enteral nutrition; TPN = total parenteral nutrition; UIC = urinary iodine concentration.

  7. Parenteral Nutrition in Liver Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Chiarla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit a very large number of experiments have assessed the impact of various substrates on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, a limited number of clinical studies have evaluated artificial nutrition in liver resection patients. This is a peculiar topic because many patients do not need artificial nutrition, while several patients need it because of malnutrition and/or prolonged inability to feeding caused by complications. The optimal nutritional regimen to support liver regeneration, within other postoperative problems or complications, is not yet exactly defined. This short review addresses relevant aspects and potential developments in the issue of postoperative parenteral nutrition after liver resection.

  8. Uso de cateteres venosos totalmente implantados para nutrição parenteral: cuidados, tempo de permanência e ocorrência de complicações infecciosas Long-term central venous catheter for total parenteral nutrition: catheter care, permanence period, and incidence of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Rosário Del Lama de Unamuno

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Cateteres venosos totalmente implantados são utilizados em pacientes com síndrome do intestino curto, para realizar o suporte nutricional parenteral, o qual mantém estes pacientes vivos, pois fornece-lhes nutrientes que são absorvidos pela via digestiva. No entanto, estes cateteres não são isentos de complicações. As infecções relacionadas aos cateteres venosos são as complicações mais temidas e sua incidência varia de 3% a 20%, aumentando em pacientes mais graves. O objetivo do presente estudo é descrever as complicações infecciosas em pacientes recebendo nutrição parenteral por meio de cateteres venosos totalmente implantados. Tais cateteres são utilizados pela Divisão de Nutrição Clínica do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, para realizar o suporte nutricional parenteral em pacientes submetidos a ressecções extensas de intestino delgado. Foram avaliadas as complicações infecciosas ocorridas com 21 cateteres, implantados em 16 pacientes. O tempo de permanência dos cateteres foi de 768±664,3 dias (mediana 529 dias e a taxa de infecção foi de 0,029 infecções/paciente/ano, resultados que se comparam às taxas de infecção observadas em países desenvolvidos. Concluiu-se que os cuidados observados no manuseio destes cateteres foram de fundamental importância para diminuir a incidência de infecção nestes pacientes.Long-term venous catheters are used for the total parenteral nutrition infusion, which is essential for feeding short-bowel syndrome patients. However, complications are likely to occur. The incidence of catheter related infections ranges from 3 to 20% in hospitalized patients. The Divisão de Nutrição Clínica do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Brazil, has been providing nutrition support to short-bowel syndrome patients, using totally implantable venous catheters. This is a

  9. Parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkchubasche AG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arlet G Kurkchubasche,1 Thomas J Herron,2 Marion F Winkler31Department of Surgery and Pediatrics, 2Department of Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 3Department of Surgery/Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Intestinal failure is a consequence of extensive surgical resection resulting in anatomic loss and/or functional impairment in motility or absorptive capacity. The condition is clinically characterized by the inability to maintain fluid, energy, protein, electrolyte, or micronutrient balance when on a conventionally accepted, normal diet. Parenteral nutrition (PN is the cornerstone of management until intestinal adaptation returns the patient to a PN-independent state. Intestinal length, residual anatomic segments and motility determine the need for and duration of parenteral support. The goals of therapy are to provide sufficient nutrients to enable normal growth and development in children, and support a healthy functional status in adults. This review addresses indications for PN, the formulation of the PN solution, patient monitoring, and considerations for prevention of PN-associated complications. With the ultimate goal of achieving enteral autonomy, the important role of diet, pharmacologic interventions, and surgery is discussed.Keywords: intestinal failure, short-bowel syndrome, parenteral nutrition, home nutrition support, intestinal rehabilitation

  10. Ceramide in lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition: an innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groener, Johanna E.; Serlie, Mireille J.; Poppema, Aldi; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease is a prevalent and severe complication of long term parenteral nutrition. We present here for the first time data on the presence of ceramide, a bioactive compound involved in a variety of metabolic processes, in different lipid emulsions used in

  11. Home parenteral nutrition in treatment of severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.G.; Ivey, M.; Young, J.

    1979-01-01

    Ten patients with radiation enteritis unresponsive to conventional medical and surgical therapy were put on long-term parenteral nutrition at home. Six of the patients are alive at home; four patients died, two from recurrent cancer. Some of the patients have been able to resume oral intake, but none have been able to discontinue parenteral nutrition. Fistulas healed or had a marked decrease in output. Two patients in our series were given prednisone and sulfasalazine without significant benefit, in contrast to previously reported clinical improvement of radiation enteritis with this therapy

  12. Parenteral nutrition in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Jan; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-04-01

    Feeding guidelines have recommended early, full nutritional support in critically ill patients to prevent hypercatabolism and muscle weakness. Early enteral nutrition was suggested to be superior to early parenteral nutrition. When enteral nutrition fails to meet nutritional target, it was recommended to administer supplemental parenteral nutrition, albeit with a varying starting point. Sufficient amounts of amino acids were recommended, with addition of glutamine in subgroups. Recently, several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded important new insights. This review summarizes recent evidence with regard to the indication, timing, and dosing of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients. One large RCT revealed no difference between early enteral nutrition and early parenteral nutrition. Two large multicenter RCTs showed harm by early supplementation of insufficient enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition, which could be explained by feeding-induced suppression of autophagy. Several RCTs found either no benefit or harm with a higher amino acid or caloric intake, as well as harm by administration of glutamine. Although unanswered questions remain, current evidence supports accepting low macronutrient intake during the acute phase of critical illness and does not support use of early parenteral nutrition. The timing when parenteral nutrition can be initiated safely and effectively is unclear.

  13. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A., Van Gossum; Cabre, E.; Hebuterne, X.

    2009-01-01

    . There is a lack of data supporting specific nutrients in these conditions. Parenteral nutrition is mandatory in case of intestinal failure, at least in the acute period. In patients with short bowel, specific attention should be paid to water and electrolyte supplementation. Currently, the use of growth hormone......-based recommendations for the indications, application and type of parenteral formula to be used in acute and chronic phases of illness. Parenteral nutrition is not recommended as a primary treatment in CD and UC. The use of parenteral nutrition is however reliable when oral/enteral feeding is not possible...

  14. Nutritional deficit and Long Term Potentiation alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrosino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we examined the ability of prenatally malnourished offspring to produce and maintain long-term potentiation (LTP of the perforant path/dentate granule cell synapse in freely moving rats at 15,30, and 90 days of age. Population spike amplitude (PSA was calculated from dentate field potential recordings prior to and at 15, 30, 60 min. and 3, 5, 18 and 24 h following tetanization of the perforant pathway. All animals of both malnourished and well-nourished diet groups at 15 days of age showed potentiation of PSA measures but the measures obtained from 15-day-old prenatally malnourished animals were significantly less than that of age-matched, well-nourished controls. At 30 days of age, remarkable effect of tetanization was likely observed from PSA measures for this age group followed much the same pattern. At 90 days of age, PSA measures obtained from malnourished animals decreased from pretetanization levels immediately following tetanization. At this age, however, at three hours time recordings, this measure growing up to a level which did not differ significantly from that of the control group. These results indicate that the width of tetanization induced enhancement of dentate granule cell response in preweanling rats (15-day-old animals is signifacantly affected fromgestational protein malnutrition and this trend is kept in animals tested at 30 and 90 days of age. The fact, however, that considerable limitation in LTP generation was gained from prenatally malnourished animals at 90 days of age, implying that dietary rehabilitation starting at birth is an intervention strategy not capable to imbrove the effects of the gestational stress.

  15. Parenteral nutrition in the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2015-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition may be considered when oral intake and/or enteral nutrition are not sufficient to maintain nutritional status and the patient is likely to die sooner from starvation than from the cancer. A detailed assessment should be made prior to the decision about whether parenteral nutrition should be started. A follow up plan should be documented with objective and patient centred treatment goals as well as specific time points for evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estmann, Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    to diagnosis and clinical course. METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part...

  17. Total parenteral nutrition - Problems in compatibility and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroder, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Adding calcium, trace elements and vitamins could turn parenteral nutrition into a dangerous product, which could harm the patient. This article focuses on the major pharmaceutical problems of parenteral. nutrition when adding nutritional compounds Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  18. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J.; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral

  19. Nutrition in children with long-term health conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, A

    2015-01-01

    Long-term health conditions (LTHCs) in children may affect nutrition and growth by means of multiple mechanisms. Both undernutrition and overweight/obesity are risk factors. Direct effects of the condition that may cause undernutrition include increased resting energy expenditure, excess losses through malabsorption, difficulty ingesting food, and decreased appetite. Indirect effects of LTHCs may be mediated by learnt or adaptive behaviours, secondary anorexia, inappropriate diets, or conditi...

  20. Ready-to-use parenteral amiodarone : A feasibility study towards a long-term stable product formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Maartje S.; Luinstra, Marianne; Moes, Jan Reindert; Chan, Tiffany C. Y.; Minovic, Isidor; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Woerdenbag, Herman J.

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of preparing a long-term stable ready-to-use parenteral amiodarone formulation using cyclodextrins as dissolution enhancer. Methods A preformulation study was performed with different molar ratios of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-BCD) or

  1. Long-term nutritional impact of sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, M; Hould, F S; Lescelleur, O; Marceau, S; Lebel, S; Julien, F; Simard, S; Biertho, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has become a predominant bariatric procedure throughout the world. However, the long-term nutritional impact of this procedure is unknown. To describe the nutritional deficiencies before and after SG and to analyze the influence of baseline weight on nutritional status. University-affiliated tertiary care center. All patients who underwent SG as a standalone procedure between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. Patients were given multivitamin supplementation. Data were obtained from our prospectively maintained electronic database and are reported as mean ± standard deviation and percentage. Bivariate analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence of selected variables on outcomes. The mean age of the 537 patients was 48.0 ± 11.3 years, with an initial body mass index of 48.1 ± 8.7 kg/m 2 . Excess weight loss and total weight loss were 56.2% and 28.0% at 1 year and 43.0% and 21.1% at 5 years, respectively (Pvitamin B12 in 30.3% and 16.4% (Pvitamin D 63.2% and 24.3% (Pvitamin A insufficiency peaked from 7.9% preoperatively to 28.7% at 3 months (Pvitamin B12 and vitamin D. Nutritional deficiencies are common in patients with morbid obesity before and after surgery. Preoperative supplementation and long-term nutritional follow-up are required to prevent nutritional deficiencies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stawny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient’s energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them.

  3. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawny, M.; Olijarczyk, R.; Jaroszkiewicz, E.; Jelińska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient's energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them. PMID:24453847

  4. Gamma irradiated micro system for long-term parenteral contraception: An alternative to synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthli, S; Vavia, P

    2008-11-15

    An injectable system of levonorgestrel (LNG) was developed using biodegradable polymer of natural origin. The parenteral system was optimized for particle size and higher drug loading. The microparticulate system was characterised by scanning electron microscopy, encapsulation efficiency, moisture content, IR, DSC, XRD, residual solvent content, sterility testing, test of abnormal toxicity and test for pyrogens. The microparticles were sterilised by gamma irradiation (2.5Mrad). The system was injected intramuscularly in rabbits and the blood levels of LNG were determined using radioimmunoassay technique. An optimized drug to polymer ratio of 0.3-1.0 (w/w ratio) gave improved drug loading of about 52%. In vivo studies in rabbits showed that the drug was released in a sustained manner for a period of 1 month. The AUC(0-t) was found to be 9363.6+/-2340pg/mLday(-1) with MRT calculated to be about 16 days and Kel of 0.01day(-1). LNG levels were maintained between 200 and 400pg/mL. In vivo release exhibited an initial burst effect which was not observed in the in vitro dissolution. This promising "Progestin-only" long-term contraceptive with improved user compliance is an alternative to the synthetic expensive polymeric carriers.

  5. Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Wouters, Pieter J; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Debaveye, Yves; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Desmet, Lars; Casaer, Michael P; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Hanot, Jan; Joffe, Ari; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2016-03-24

    Recent trials have questioned the benefit of early parenteral nutrition in adults. The effect of early parenteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in critically ill children is unclear. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving 1440 critically ill children to investigate whether withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week (i.e., providing late parenteral nutrition) in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) is clinically superior to providing early parenteral nutrition. Fluid loading was similar in the two groups. The two primary end points were new infection acquired during the ICU stay and the adjusted duration of ICU dependency, as assessed by the number of days in the ICU and as time to discharge alive from ICU. For the 723 patients receiving early parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was initiated within 24 hours after ICU admission, whereas for the 717 patients receiving late parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was not provided until the morning of the 8th day in the ICU. In both groups, enteral nutrition was attempted early and intravenous micronutrients were provided. Although mortality was similar in the two groups, the percentage of patients with a new infection was 10.7% in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 18.5% in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition (adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.66). The mean (±SE) duration of ICU stay was 6.5±0.4 days in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 9.2±0.8 days in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition; there was also a higher likelihood of an earlier live discharge from the ICU at any time in the late-parenteral-nutrition group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.37). Late parenteral nutrition was associated with a shorter duration of mechanical ventilatory support than was early parenteral nutrition (P=0.001), as well as a smaller proportion of patients

  6. Impact of Early Parenteral Nutrition on Metabolism and Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gunst, Jan; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Casaer, Michaël P.; Hermans, Greet; Wouters, Pieter J.; Dubois, Jasperina; Claes, Kathleen; Schetz, Miet; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2013-01-01

    A poor nutritional state and a caloric deficit associate with increased morbidity and mortality, but a recent multicenter, randomized controlled trial found that early parenteral nutrition to supplement insufficient enteral nutrition increases morbidity in the intensive care unit, including prolonging the duration of renal replacement therapy, compared with withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week. Whether early versus late parenteral nutrition impacts the incidence and recovery of AKI is ...

  7. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [de

  8. Complications and Monitoring – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Compared to enteral or hypocaloric oral nutrition, the use of PN (parenteral nutrition is not associated with increased mortality, overall frequency of complications, or longer length of hospital stay (LOS. The risk of PN complications (e.g. refeeding-syndrome, hyperglycaemia, bone demineralisation, catheter infections can be minimised by carefully monitoring patients and the use of nutrition support teams particularly during long-term PN. Occuring complications are e.g. the refeeding-syndrome in patients suffering from severe malnutrition with the initiation of refeeding or metabolic, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycaemia, osteomalacia and osteoporosis, and hepatic complications including fatty liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis, cholecystitis, and cholelithiasis. Efficient monitoring in all types of PN can result in reduced PN-associated complications and reduced costs. Water and electrolyte balance, blood sugar, and cardiovascular function should regularly be monitored during PN. Regular checks of serum electrolytes and triglycerides as well as additional monitoring measures are necessary in patients with altered renal function, electrolyte-free substrate intake, lipid infusions, and in intensive care patients. The metabolic monitoring of patients under long-term PN should be carried out according to standardised procedures. Monitoring metabolic determinants of bone metabolism is particularly important in patients receiving long-term PN. Markers of intermediary, electrolyte and trace element metabolism require regular checks.

  9. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, Pparenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff, S. C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious. Long-term (>7–10 days parenteral nutrition (PN requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days, a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  11. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, K W; Schregel, W; Stanga, Z; Bischoff, S C; Brass, P; Hartl, W; Muehlebach, S; Pscheidl, E; Thul, P; Volk, O

    2009-11-18

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7-10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7-10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  12. Nutritional requirements and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Provision of appropriate nutritional requirements soon after birth is critical for normal development and growth of preterm infants. Preterm infants are often not able to tolerate volumes of oral feeds that will provide adequate daily requirements for growth within the first week or two of life, therefore parenteral nutrition is often ...

  13. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  14. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Prescribing: The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Peggi; Boullata, Joseph I; Ayers, Phil; Gervasio, Jane; Malone, Ainsley; Raymond, Erica; Holcombe, Beverly; Kraft, Michael; Sacks, Gordon; Seres, David

    2015-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provision is complex, as it is a high-alert medication and prone to a variety of potential errors. With changes in clinical practice models and recent federal rulings, the number of PN prescribers may be increasing. Safe prescribing of this therapy requires that competency for prescribers from all disciplines be demonstrated using a standardized process. A standardized model for PN prescribing competency is proposed based on a competency framework, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines. This framework will guide institutions and agencies in developing and maintaining competency for safe PN prescription by their staff. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Amino acid composition in parenteral nutrition: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarandi, Shadi S.; Zhao, Vivian M.; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Complete parenteral nutrition solutions contain mixed amino acid products providing all nine essential amino acids and a varying composition of nonessential amino acids. Relatively little rigorous comparative efficacy research on altered parenteral nutrition amino acid composition has been published in recent years. Recent findings Limited data from randomized, double-blind, adequately powered clinical trials to define optimal doses of total or individual amino acids in parenteral nutrition are available. An exception is the growing number of studies on the efficacy of glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition or given as a single parenteral agent. Parenteral glutamine appears to confer benefit in selected patients; however, additional data to define optimal glutamine dosing and the patient subgroups who may most benefit from this amino acid are needed. Although some promising studies have been published, little data are available in the current era of nutrition support on the clinical efficacy of altered doses of arginine, branched chain amino acids, cysteine, or taurine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Summary Despite routine use of parenteral nutrition, surprisingly little clinical efficacy data are available to guide total or specific amino acid dosing in adult and pediatric patients requiring this therapy. This warrants increased attention by the research community and funding agencies to better define optimal amino acid administration strategies in patient subgroups requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:21076291

  19. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using 15 N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats

  20. Neonatology/Paediatrics – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusch, C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are special challenges in implementing parenteral nutrition (PN in paediatric patients, which arises from the wide range of patients, ranging from extremely premature infants up to teenagers weighing up to and over 100 kg, and their varying substrate requirements. Age and maturity-related changes of the metabolism and fluid and nutrient requirements must be taken into consideration along with the clinical situation during which PN is applied. The indication, the procedure as well as the intake of fluid and substrates are very different to that known in PN-practice in adult patients, e.g. the fluid, nutrient and energy needs of premature infants and newborns per kg body weight are markedly higher than of older paediatric and adult patients. Premature infants <35 weeks of pregnancy and most sick term infants usually require full or partial PN. In neonates the actual amount of PN administered must be calculated (not estimated. Enteral nutrition should be gradually introduced and should replace PN as quickly as possible in order to minimise any side-effects from exposure to PN. Inadequate substrate intake in early infancy can cause long-term detrimental effects in terms of metabolic programming of the risk of illness in later life. If energy and nutrient demands in children and adolescents cannot be met through enteral nutrition, partial or total PN should be considered within 7 days or less depending on the nutritional state and clinical conditions.

  1. Home parenteral nutrition in children: the Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazyk, J; Lyszkowska, M; Kierkus, J; Bogucki, K; Ratyńska, A; Tondys, B; Socha, J

    1999-02-01

    Home parenteral nutrition has become routine for management of intestinal failure in patients. In Poland the main obstacle to widespread use of home parenteral nutrition is the lack of interest of commercial companies in delivering feedings and ancillaries to patients. Twenty-five home parenteral nutrition patients aged from 4 months to more than 13 years were reviewed. The mother or both parents were trained in home parenteral nutrition techniques for 4 to 6 weeks and compounded the nutrients themselves at home. The mean duration of home parenteral nutrition was 10,117 patient days. Hospital stays of patients receiving parenteral feedings were significantly shorter than the duration of administration of home parenteral nutrition (p rate of catheter occlusion decreased within the observation period, and in 1997 not one case of occlusion was observed. In 1997 only three catheters were removed during 7.8 patient years, and the overall incidence of catheter-related complications was 0.38 per patient year. The overall occurrence of septicemia was one case in 516 days and of catheter infection was one in 459 days. In 1997 a catheter was infected on average of once every 1419 days. There was significant improvement in the z score for weight during therapy. The average monthly cost of nutrients and ancillary items was approximately $1200 (4200 Polish zlotys [PLN]). These costs are 1.6 to 3 times lower than those recorded in other studies. Home parenteral nutrition in children with nutrients mixed by caregivers in the home setting is a safe and appropriate method of treatment that can be used in countries where home parenteral nutrition solutions are not manufactured or where commercial home parenteral nutrition is not economically feasible.

  2. [Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization seem inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements on blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals... for Specific Drug Products § 201.323 Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total...

  4. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients; Parenteralna vyziva u malnutricnych pacientov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichvarova, I. [OAIM, Narodny onkologicky ustav, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  5. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Lembo, Erminia; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Avola, Claudia Kesia; Angrisani, Luigi; Capaldo, Brunella

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as a highly effective therapy for obesity since it accomplishes sustained weight loss, reduction of obesity-related comorbidities and mortality, and improvement of quality of life. Overall, bariatric surgery is associated with a 42% reduction of the cardiovascular risk and 30% reduction of all-cause mortality. This review focuses on some nutritional consequences that can occur in bariatric patients that could potentially hinder the clinical benefits of this therapeutic option. All bariatric procedures, to variable degrees, alter the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract; this alteration makes these patients more susceptible to developing nutritional complications, namely, deficiencies of macro- and micro-nutrients, which could lead to disabling diseases such as anemia, osteoporosis, protein malnutrition. Of note is the evidence that most obese patients present a number of nutritional deficits already prior to surgery, the most important being vitamin D and iron deficiencies. This finding prompts the need for a complete nutritional assessment and, eventually, an adequate correction of pre-existing deficits before surgery. Another critical issue that follows bariatric surgery is post-operative weight regain, which is commonly associated with the relapse of obesity-related co-morbidities. Nu-tritional complications associated with bariatric surgery can be prevented by life-long nutritional monitoring with the administration of multi-vitamins and mineral supplements according to the patient’s needs. PMID:29204255

  6. Hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener Dik, Pablo H; Galletti, María F; Bacigalupo, Leticia T; Fernández Jonusas, Silvia; L Mariani, Gonzalo

    2018-06-01

    Aggressive parenteral nutrition is the standard of care among very-low-birth weight preterm infants. However, in recent studies, its impact on short-term outcomes, has been evaluated. The objective was to compare the prevalence of hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive or standard parenteral nutrition. Observational, retrospective study comparing a group of preterm infants weighing less than 1250 grams who received aggressive parenteral nutrition with a historical control group. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was estimated and its association with aggressive parenteral nutrition was searched adjusting by confounders. The mean phosphate level was estimated for the control group by linear regression and was compared to the value in the other group. Forty patients per group were included. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was higher in the group who received aggressive parenteral nutrition (87.5% versus 35%, p= 0.001). Aggressive parenteral nutrition was associated with hypercalcemia when adjusting by birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction, amino acid, and calorie intake (adjusted odds ratio: 21.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7-128). The mean calcium level was different between both groups (p= 0.002). Infants who received aggressive parenteral nutrition had more sepsis without reaching statistical significance and the mean phosphate level was lower than that estimated for the control group (p= 0.04). The prevalence of hypophosphatemia in this group was 90% (95% CI: 76-97%). Our data show an association between hypercalcemia/hypophosphatemia and aggressive parenteral nutrition. It is recommended to frequently monitor calcium and phosphate levels since they might be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Safety of home parenteral nutrition during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilla, Miriam; Ławiński, Michał; Cohen, Jonathan; Hadar, Eran; Kagan, Ilya; Perkewick, Marek; Singer, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of total parenteral nutrition which is lipid-based given throughout pregnancy to patients unable to obtain adequate nutrition by the oral route. In this study we examined the use of lipid-based home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 7 pregnant women, commenced either before or during pregnancy, and their intra-pregnant course as well as a 2-year follow-up of their offspring is described. HPN was formulated on an individual basis and protein administered in a dose of 0.8-1.1 g/kg during the three trimesters. Lipid emulsions included long chain triglycerides or olive-oil based formulae and all patients received trace elements. Data were collected during the course of pregnancy and at birth while infants were followed for a period of between 6 months and 2 years using medical records and questionnaires. In total, we studied 9 pregnancies (in 7 women). HPN was administered for a median of 9 months (range 3-9 months). The mean energy provided during the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester was 9297 ± 2797 kcal/week, 9148 ± 2629 kcal/week and 8564 ± 4059 kcal/week resp. The mean increase in weight during the pregnancy was 9 ± 5 Kg. The only complications noted during the pregnancy consisted of 3 episodes of catheter-related infections which were successfully treated by antibiotics. The infants were born after a mean of 38.00 ± 1.55 weeks of gestation, with a mean first minute Apgar score of 8.7 ± 1.8 which increased to 9.8 ± 0.4 after 10 min. The mean infant birth weight was 2.45 ± 0.37 kg. No complications were noted at birth apart from one infant who suffered from torticollis which resolved spontaneously. During follow up, a decrease in hemoglobin related to low iron levels was noted in 1 infant, 2 infants were noted to be allergic to pollen and one underwent a scrotal hernia reduction. No developmental problems have been observed, neither physiological nor psychomotor, over the 2-year follow-up period. The authors

  8. Management of Hyperglycemia During Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent complication of enteral and parenteral nutrition in hospitalized patients. Extensive evidence from observational studies indicates that the development of hyperglycemia during parenteral and enteral nutrition is associated with an increased risk of death and infectious complications. There are no specific guidelines recommending glycemic targets and effective strategies for the management of hyperglycemia during specialized nutritional support. Managing hyperglycemia in these patients should include optimization of carbohydrate content and administration of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy. The administration of continuous insulin infusion and insulin addition to nutrition bag are efficient approaches to control hyperglycemia during parenteral nutrition. Subcutaneous administration of long-acting insulin with scheduled or corrective doses of short-acting insulin is superior to the sliding scale insulin strategy in patients receiving enteral feedings. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate safe and effective therapeutic strategies for the management of hyperglycemia in patients receiving nutritional support. PMID:23065369

  9. Intrauterine nutrition: long-term consequences for vascular health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szostak-Wegierek D

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Szostak-WegierekDepartment of Human Nutrition, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that improper intrauterine nutrition may negatively influence vascular health in later life. Maternal malnutrition may result in intrauterine growth retardation and, in turn, metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, and also enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death in the offspring. Energy and/or protein restriction is the most critical determinant for fetal programming. However, it has also been proposed that intrauterine n-3 fatty acid deficiency may be linked to later higher blood pressure levels and reduced insulin sensitivity. Moreover, it has been shown that inadequate supply of micronutrients such as folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, iron, magnesium, zinc, and calcium may contribute to impaired vascular health in the progeny. In addition, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy that are linked to impaired placental blood flow and suboptimal fetal nutrition may also contribute to intrauterine growth retardation and aggravated cardiovascular risk in the offspring. On the other hand, maternal overnutrition, which often contributes to obesity and/or diabetes, may result in macrosomia and enhanced cardiometabolic risk in the offspring. Progeny of obese and/or diabetic mothers are relatively more prone to develop obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension. It was demonstrated that they may have permanently enhanced appetites. Their atheromatous lesions are usually more pronounced. It seems that, particularly, a maternal high-fat/junk food diet may be detrimental for vascular health in the offspring. Fetal exposure to excessive levels of saturated fatty and/or n-6 fatty acids, sucrose, fructose and salt, as well as a maternal high glycemic index diet, may also contribute to later enhanced cardiometabolic risk. Keywords: maternal

  10. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M.; Pironi, L.; Bozzetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) was introduced as a treatment modality in the early 1970s primarily for the treatment of chronic intestinal failure in patients with benign disease. The relatively low morbidity and mortality associated with HPN has encouraged its widespread use in western countries....... Thus there is huge clinical experience, but there are still few controlled clinical studies of treatment effects and management of complications. The purpose of these guidelines is to highlight areas of good practice and promote the use of standardized treatment protocols between centers...

  11. Organisation, regulations, preparation and logistics of parenteral nutrition in hospitals and homes; the role of the nutrition support team – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kester, L.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available PN (parenteral nutrition should be standardised to ensure quality and to reduce complications, and it should be carried out in consultation with a specialised nutrition support team whenever possible. Interdisciplinary nutrition support teams should be established in all hospitals because effectiveness and efficiency in the implementation of PN are increased. The tasks of the team include improvements of quality of care as well as enhancing the benefit to cost ratio. Therapeutic decisions must be taken by attending physicians, who should collaborate with the nutrition support team. “All-in-One” bags are generally preferred for PN in hospitals and may be industrially manufactured, industrially manufactured with the necessity to add micronutrients, or be prepared “on-demand” within or outside the hospital according to a standardised or individual composition and under consideration of sterile and aseptic conditions. A standardised procedure should be established for introduction and advancement of enteral or oral nutrition. Home PN may be indicated if the expected duration of when PN exceeds 4 weeks. Home PN is a well established method for providing long-term PN, which should be indicated by the attending physician and be reviewed by the nutrition support team. The care of home PN patients should be standardised whenever possible. The indication for home PN should be regularly reviewed during the course of PN.

  12. Nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Runa; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have difficulties with keeping their weight. The aim of this investigation was to study nutritional status in hospitalised Nordic COPD patients and to investigate the association between nutritional status and long-term mortality in...

  13. Comparison Between Premixed and Compounded Parenteral Nutrition Solutions in Hospitalized Patients Requiring Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Colleen; Allard, Johane; Raman, Maitreyi

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) may be provided through compounded or premixed solutions. To determine the proportion of stable custom-compounded PN prescriptions that would fit within a 20% deviance of an existing premixed PN solution. A retrospective study design was used. Inpatients who received PN in non-critical care units in the preceding year were screened for eligibility. Results are reported descriptively as means (95% confidence intervals) and proportions. We reviewed 97 PN prescriptions that met inclusion criteria. Stable hospital PN prescriptions compared with the reference premixed prescription provided 1838 (1777-1898) vs 1843 (1781-1905) kcal/d, P = .43; dextrose, 266 (254-277) vs 225 (216-234) g/d, P magnesium, 5.4 (4.8-5.4) vs 7.6 (7.4-7.9) mmol/L. Calories and protein were remarkably similar, but dextrose, lipid, and electrolytes differed between hospital PN and the reference premixed prescription. We believe that there may be a role for premixed solutions in quaternary centers in stable non-critically ill patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Ethical and legal points of view in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothaermel, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition is a part of medical treatment and is influenced by ethical and legal considerations. Patients, who cannot be sufficiently fed via the gastrointestinal tract, have the fundamental right to receive PN (parenteral nutrition even so patients who are unable to give their consent. General objectives in nutrition support are to supply adequate nutrition with regards to the prevention of malnutrition and its consequences (increased morbidity and mortality, and thereby promoting improved outcome and/or quality of life for the patient considering always the patient’s needs and wishes. The requests of the patient to renounce PN should be respected where a signed living will is helpful. During the course of a terminal illness the nutrition has to be adapted individually according to the needs and wishes of a patient in the corresponding phase. Capability of consent should be checked in each individual case and for each measure on an individual basis. Consent should only be accepted if the patient is capable of recognizing the nature, meaning and importance of the intervention as well as the consequences of relinquishment of such an intervention, and is capable to make a self-determined decision. If the patient is not capable of consenting, the patient’s living will is the most important document when determining their assumed will and legally binding. Otherwise a guardian appointed by the patient, or the representative appointed by the court (if the patient has made no provisions can make the decision.

  15. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druml, W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial EN (enteral nutrition should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD, peritoneal dialysis (PD or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT, or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully. In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  16. Ethical and legal points of view in parenteral nutrition - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaermel, S; Bischoff, S C; Bockenheimer-Lucius, G; Frewer, A; Wehkamp, K H; Zuercher, G

    2009-11-18

    Adequate nutrition is a part of medical treatment and is influenced by ethical and legal considerations. Patients, who cannot be sufficiently fed via the gastrointestinal tract, have the fundamental right to receive PN (parenteral nutrition) even so patients who are unable to give their consent. General objectives in nutrition support are to supply adequate nutrition with regards to the prevention of malnutrition and its consequences (increased morbidity and mortality), and thereby promoting improved outcome and/or quality of life for the patient considering always the patient's needs and wishes. The requests of the patient to renounce PN should be respected where a signed living will is helpful. During the course of a terminal illness the nutrition has to be adapted individually according to the needs and wishes of a patient in the corresponding phase. Capability of consent should be checked in each individual case and for each measure on an individual basis. Consent should only be accepted if the patient is capable of recognizing the nature, meaning and importance of the intervention as well as the consequences of relinquishment of such an intervention, and is capable to make a self-determined decision. If the patient is not capable of consenting, the patient's living will is the most important document when determining their assumed will and legally binding. Otherwise a guardian appointed by the patient, or the representative appointed by the court (if the patient has made no provisions) can make the decision.

  17. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) Complication Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest pain; coughing; shortness of breath; loss of consciousness. Air siphoned into catheter due to IV tubing ... with the use of long term central venous access devices for HPN. To protect your access, always ...

  19. Perinatal nutrition programs neuroimmune function long-term: mechanisms and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Spencer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Our early life nutritional environment can influence several aspects of physiology, including our propensity to become obese. There is now evidence to suggest perinatal diet can also independently influence development of our innate immune system. This review will address three not-necessarily-exclusive mechanisms by which perinatal nutrition can program neuroimmune function long-term: by predisposing the individual to obesity, by altering the gut microbiota, and by inducing epigenetic modifications that alter gene transcription throughout life.

  20. Nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Runa; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often have difficulties with keeping their weight. The aim of this investigation was to study nutritional status in hospitalised Nordic COPD patients and to investigate the association between nutritional status and long-term mortality in...... years. Further studies are needed in order to show whether identifying and treating weight loss and depletion of fat-free mass (FFM) is a way forward in improving the prognosis for hospitalised COPD patients. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep...

  1. Parenteral nutrition in childhood and consequences for dentition and gingivae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak-Kowalczyk, D; Danko, M; Banaś, E; Gozdowski, D; Popińska, K; Krasuska-Sławińska, E; Książyk, J

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of dentition in children under parenteral nutrition, risk factors for caries, and dental developmental abnormalities. The study involved 63 patients (aged 2.25-16.6 years), i.e. 32 subjects receiving parenteral nutrition for a mean period of 5.6±2.94 years, and 31 healthy control subjects. Oral hygiene (OHI-S, PL-I), gingival (GI), and dentition status (caries, DMFT/dmft, enamel defects, shape alterations), frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption were evaluated. Medical records provided information on parenteral meals per week, age parenteral nutrition started, birth body mass, Apgar score, weight deficiency, and antibiotic therapy until aged 1 year. The Mann-Whitney test, chi-squared test, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient were used (p≤0.05). Dental developmental abnormalities occurred more often in PN subjects (71.87% vs. 25.80%). The prevalence of caries in PN (56.25% vs. 90.32%) and dmft (2.00±3.30 vs. 4.21±3.33) and DMFT (2.47±4.08 vs. 3.33±3.50) were lower. Positive caries Spearman's rank correlation coefficients: frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption, and GI. Negative correlation coefficients: low birth body mass, antibiotic therapy, and low body mass in the first year of life. Positive dental developmental abnormality Spearman's coefficients: low birth body mass, Apgar score parenteral nutrition duration, low body mass and antibiotic therapy in the first year of life. Beta- lactam, aminoglycoside, glycopeptide and nitroimidazole treatments were related to enamel hypoplasia. Parenteral nutrition in childhood is related to the risk of dental developmental abnormalities, promoted by malnutrition and antibiotic therapy in infancy. Limiting the number of meals and cariogenic snacks, and most probably administration of antibiotics, decreases the risk of caries.

  2. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland-Cunz, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80% for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy.

  3. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition: does one size fits all ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary lipids significantly contribute to preserve the efficiency of human metabolism and restore it during disease. Therefore, in the absence of absolute contraindications, it would not appear reasonable to exclude lipid emulsions when prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN). The metabolic role of lipids has been elucidated, ...

  4. Complications relating to enteral and parenteral nutrition in trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the incidence of complications in patients receiving enteral and parenteral nutrition (PN), and review how the early initiation of enteral feeding and early achievement of caloric goal would affect the incidence of complications. Design: The design was a retrospective audit of ...

  5. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  6. Long-term student outcomes of the Integrated Nutrition and Physical Activity Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Jini; Romaniello, Catherine; Crane, Lori; Scarbro, Sharon; Belansky, Elaine; Marshall, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    To examine the long-term effects of the Integrated Nutrition and Physical Activity Program (INPAP), a school-based nutrition education program. Quasi-experimental design comparing intervention and comparison cohorts at 3-6 years after delivery of the INPAP intervention on nutrition- and physical activity-related outcomes. This study was conducted in 1 school district in a low-income rural county of ∼15,000 residents in south-central Colorado. In second grade, intervention and comparison cohorts included 173 (fall 2000) and 190 (fall 1999) students, respectively. Approximately 60% of these students completed assessments in eighth grade. INPAP is an experiential school-based nutrition education program, grounded in social cognitive theory and Piaget's cognitive development theory and adapted for use in a rural setting. Nutrition and physical activity knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviors, body mass index. Wilcoxon signed rank test, chi-square test for proportions, and t test for means. Long-term effects were observed in nutrition-related knowledge and attitudes but not self-efficacy or behavior change. The effects that did occur were attenuated over time. This study found that INPAP implemented in elementary school had limited lasting effects by the end of middle school, a time when students have increased autonomy to make food choices. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories

  8. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Advertising and Sponsorship Learn More ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers: EN Data Across the Healthcare Continuum Learn More The ASPEN Adult Nutrition Support Core Curriculum, 3rd Edition Has Arrived! The ...

  9. Temporal Trends in the Use of Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Wunsch, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice guidelines recommend enteral over parenteral nutrition in critical illness and do not recommend early initiation. Few data are available on parenteral nutrition use or timing of initiation in the ICU or how this use may have changed over time. Methods: We used the Project IMPACT database to evaluate temporal trends in parenteral nutrition use (total and partial parenteral nutrition and lipid supplementation) and timing of initiation in adult ICU admissions from 2001 to 2008. We used χ2 tests and analysis of variance to examine characteristics of patients receiving parenteral nutrition and multilevel multivariate logistic regression models to assess parenteral nutrition use over time, in all patients and in specific subgroups. Results: Of 337,442 patients, 20,913 (6.2%) received parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for patient characteristics, the use of parenteral nutrition decreased modestly over time (adjusted probability, 7.2% in 2001-2002 vs 5.5% in 2007-2008, P nutrition use increased simultaneously (adjusted probability, 11.5% in 2001-2002 vs 15.3% in 2007-2008, P parenteral nutrition declined most rapidly in emergent surgical patients, patients with moderate illness severity, patients in the surgical ICU, and patients admitted to an academic facility (P ≤ .01 for all interactions with year). When used, parenteral nutrition was initiated a median of 2 days (interquartile range, 1-3), after ICU admission and > 90% of patients had parenteral nutrition initiated within 7 days; timing of initiation of parenteral nutrition did not change from 2001 to 2008. Conclusions: Use of parenteral nutrition in US ICUs declined from 2001 through 2008 in all patients and in all examined subgroups, with the majority of parenteral nutrition initiated within the first 7 days in ICU; enteral nutrition use coincidently increased over the same time period. PMID:24233390

  10. Long-Term Trends in Hematological and Nutritional Status After Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Bae, You-Jin; Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Chin, Hyung-Min

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated long-term trends in hematological and nutritional parameters after gastrectomy for gastric cancer and evaluated the influence of the reconstruction type on these trends. The medical records of 558 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy with standard lymph node dissection for stage I gastric cancer between January 2006 and December 2013 were reviewed. The hematological and nutritional parameters evaluated included hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B 12 , total protein, albumin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and calcium. The patients were followed up for 6 months postoperatively and then annually until death, cancer recurrence, or follow-up loss. In the long term, ferritin and triglyceride gradually decreased after gastrectomy, while the other parameters decreased slightly or were stable. In the comparisons according to reconstruction type, the Roux-en-Y group had the lowest levels of hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B12, total protein, albumin, and total cholesterol beginning 6 months postoperatively compared with the Billroth I and II groups. However, only ferritin and vitamin B 12 had significant differences in the 5-year cumulative incidences of deficiency/reduction according to the reconstruction type, whereas albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and calcium did not. Although malabsorption and malnutrition are common in patients after a gastrectomy, most nutritional parameters were stable or decreased slightly in the long-term and were not markedly influenced by the reconstruction type or extent of gastrectomy. Therefore, for more accurate nutritional assessment after gastrectomy, multidirectional monitoring should be considered rather than simply measuring biochemical parameters.

  11. Quality of Life and Nutrition Condition of Patients Improve Under Home Parenteral Nutrition: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Jutta; Seipt, Claudia; Markowski, Andrea; Luettig, Birgit; Schettler, Anika; Momma, Michael; Schneider, Andrea S

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage cancer and advanced chronic bowel disease are often malnourished, which has a negative effect on patients' outcome, well-being, and activity. It is inconclusive whether these patients benefit from home parenteral nutrition. This prospective exploratory study investigates its influence on nutrition state, muscle strength, mobility, and quality of life. Patients ≥18 years old with an indication for home parenteral nutrition were included and followed for 2-24 months. Nutrition parameters, activity, and quality of life were assessed. Forty-eight patients participated (mean age 11.5 years), and 85% were severely malnourished (subjective global assessment score, class C). Four weeks after parenteral nutrition, patients with tumors demonstrated a deterioration in phase angle (from 3.9 to 3.4) and extracellular mass:body cell mass ratio (from 1.6 to 2.1), while patients with bowel disease improved (from 3.4 to 4.0 and 2.1 to 1.6, respectively); grip strength remained constant in both groups (difference: 1.11 and -2.11, respectively). Activity improved in patients with bowel disease but stayed the same in the tumor group (P = .02 and P = .33, respectively). When the groups were pooled, emotional and social functioning domain scores (P parenteral nutrition. Both groups seem to benefit from home parenteral nutrition without harmful side effects. If the indication is determined early, the patients' disease course could perhaps be improved. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R. [Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Rostock Univ. (Germany)]|[Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen Univ. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Der Ernaehrungsstatus von Tumorpatienten ist haeufig bereits vor jeder antitumoroesen Therapie reduziert und kann sich durch die notwendige Radio(chemo)therapie weiter verschlechtern. Methode: Im Rahmen dieses Uebersichtsartikels werden die Moeglichkeiten und Risiken der enteralen und parenteralen Ernaehrung waehrend einer Radiotherapie besprochen. Die Indikationen der enteralen Ernaehrung werden anhand von eigenen Ergebnissen begruendet. Ergebnisse: Die Langzeiternaehrung wird am besten ueber einen enteralen Zugang durchgefuehrt. In einer prospektiven, nichtrandomisierten Studie konnten wir zeigen, dass eine enterale Ernaehrung mittels perkutaner endoskopisch kontrollierter Gastrostomie (PEG) nicht nur die anthropometrischen und biochemischen Parameter waehrend einer Radio(chemo)therapie verbessert, sondern auch die Lebensqualitaet. Eine weitere Moeglichkeit besteht in der

  13. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Introduction and methodology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauch, K. W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Parenteral Nutrition were prepared by the German Society for Nutritional Medicine (http://www.dgem.de/, in collaboration with other medical associations to provide guidance for quality assurance for parenteral nutrition (PN practice, and to promoting health and quality of life of patients concerned. A coordination team proposed topics, working group leaders who along with working group members performed systematic literatur searches and drafted recommendations in a nominal group process. Recommendations were discussed and agreed upon in a structured consensus conference process, followed by a Delphi consensus. The current English version of the guidelines was written and updated during the period between the last quarter of 2007 and the first quarter of 2009. The recommendations of the guidelines should be reviewed, and if necessary updated five years after publication.

  15. Management of Ready-to-Use Parenteral Nutrition in Newborns: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Karen Daniela Romero; Espitia, Olga Lucia Pinzón; Vergara, José Alejandro Daza

    2018-04-27

    Parenteral support has increased the possibility of neonatal recovery. However, complications associated with its use have been documented. One commercial method developed to decrease the complications of this type of support is the ready-to-use parenteral nutrition (PN), a 3-chamber bag that provides a complete nutrient mix. This systematic review seeks, through the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology, to establish the benefits in newborns. Seven databases and gray literature were used. The search was limited to publications from 2007-2017 and to articles written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria and studies with low quality evaluated with the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, which were without information about the study or analytical methods, were excluded. A total of 24,193 articles were obtained, which were initially evaluated by title and abstract according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 24,167 articles were discarded, obtaining 27 eligible for follow-up evaluation. After a detailed evaluation of the full text, 13 articles were selected. It was found that ready-to-use PN has the potential benefit to reduce the risks for infections, provide an adequate supply of nutrients, generate growth within the expected range, provide ease of use, decrease prescription errors, and potentially reduce costs. It is necessary to evaluate the short- and long-term impact of its use. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Features of liver tissue remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanen, Annika; Lohi, Jouko; Sorsa, Timo; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal failure is associated frequently with liver injury, which persists after weaning off parenteral nutrition. We compared features of liver remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Liver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 intestinal failure patients at a median age of 9.7 years (interquartile range: 4.6-18) and from age-matched control patients. Seven patients had been receiving parenteral nutrition for 53 months (22-160), and 18 patients had been weaned off parenteral nutrition 6.3 years (2.4-17) earlier, after having received parenteral nutrition for 10 months (3.3-34). Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was measured. Significant increases in immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1 were observed predominantly in portal areas and were similar to increases seen in patients currently receiving parenteral nutrition and in patients weaned off parenteral nutrition. Gene and protein expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen were interrelated. Gene expression of ACTA2, encoding alpha-smooth muscle actin, was increased only in patients who were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Comparable upregulation of interleukin-1 (α and ß), epidermal growth factor, integrin-ß6, and MMP9 gene expression was observed in both patient groups, irrespective of whether they were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Liver expression and serum levels of TIMP1 and MMP7 were increased only in the patients on parenteral nutrition currently but were not increased after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Intestinal failure is characterized by abnormal activation of hepatic myofibroblast and accumulation of collagen both during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Persistent transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines after weaning off

  17. Four-week parenteral nutrition using a third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)--a double-blind, randomised, multicentre study in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klek, Stanislaw; Chambrier, Cecile; Singer, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerance of a soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion in intestinal failure patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. 73 patients took part in a randomized, double-blind, multi-centre study. The study demonstrates that the lipid emulsion...

  18. Prognostic nutritional index predicts postoperative complications and long-term outcomes of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Deng, Jing-Yu; Ding, Xue-Wei; Ke, Bin; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Ru-Peng; Liang, Han

    2014-08-14

    To investigate the impact of prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on the postoperative complications and long-term outcomes in gastric cancer patients undergoing total gastrectomy. The data for 386 patients with gastric cancer were extracted and analyzed between January 2003 and December 2008 in our center. The patients were divided into two groups according to the cutoff value of the PNI: those with a PNI ≥ 46 and those with a PNI gastric cancer patients.

  19. Feeding tube-related complications and problems in patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Alivizatos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term complications and problems related to gastrostomy and jejunostomy feeding tubes used for home enteral nutrition support and the effect these have on health care use. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 31 patients having gastrostomy (27 patients and jejunostomy (4 feeding tubes inserted in our Department were retrospectively studied. All were discharged on long-term (>3 months enteral nutrition and followed up at regular intervals by a dedicated nurse. Any problem or complication associated with tube feeding as well as the intervention, if any, that occurred, was recorded. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for a mean of 17.5 months (4-78. The most frequent tube-related complications included inadvertent removal of the tube (broken tube, plugged tube; 45.1%, tube leakage (6.4%, dermatitis of the stoma (6.4%, and diarrhea (6.4%. There were 92 unscheduled health care contacts, with an average rate of such 2.9 contacts over the mean follow-up time of 17.5 months. Conclusion: In patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition, feeding tube-related complications and problems are frequent and result in significant health care use. Further studies are needed to address their optimal prevention modalities and management.

  20. Timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Lissette; Mehta, Nilesh M; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    To review the current literature evaluating clinical outcomes of early and delayed parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children. Nutritional management remains an important aspect of care among the critically ill, with enteral nutrition generally preferred. However, inability to advance enteral feeds to caloric goals and contraindications to enteral nutrition often leads to reliance on parenteral nutrition. The timing of parenteral nutrition initiation is varied among critically ill children, and derives from an assessment of nutritional status, energy requirements, and physiologic differences between adults and children, including higher nutrient needs and lower body reserves. A recent randomized control study among critically ill children suggests improved clinical outcomes with avoiding initiation of parenteral nutrition on day 1 of admission to the pediatric ICU. Although there is no consensus on the optimal timing of parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children, recent literature does not support the immediate initiation of parenteral nutrition on pediatric ICU admission. A common theme in the reviewed literature highlights the importance of accurate assessment of nutritional status and energy expenditure in deciding when to initiate parenteral nutrition. As with all medical interventions, the initiation of parenteral nutrition should be considered in light of the known benefits of judiciously provided nutritional support with the known risks of artificial, parenteral feeding.

  1. Long-term Postoperative Nutritional Status Affects Prognosis Even After Infectious Complications in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Jun; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo

    2018-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical impact of postoperative serum albumin level on severe postoperative complications (SPCs) and prognosis. Data for a total of 728 consecutive patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer between 2004 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. From these patients, a propensity score-matched analysis was performed based on 14 clinicopathological and surgical factors. Short-term decrease in postoperative serum albumin level was not associated with the occurrence of SPCs. Regarding long-term decrease in serum albumin level, a decrease of ≥0.5 g/dl at 3 months did not affect the long-term survival of patients without SPCs, but was related to a significantly poorer prognosis in patients with SPCs. By multivariate analysis, long-term decrease of serum albumin level was an independent prognostic factor in patients with SPCs. Long-term postoperative nutritional status as shown by a low level of albumin was related to prognosis in patients with SPCs. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between cognitive impairment and nutritional assessment on functional status in Calabrian long-term-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malara, Alba; Sgrò, Giovanni; Caruso, Chiara; Ceravolo, Francesco; Curinga, Giuseppe; Renda, Grazia Francesca; Spadea, Fausto; Garo, Michele; Rispoli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between dementia and nutritional state is very complex and not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction between cognitive impairment and nutritional state in a cohort of residential elderly in relationship with functional condition of patients and their load of assistance in long-term-care facilities of the National Association of Third Age Structures (ANASTE) Calabria. One hundred seventy-four subjects (122 female and 52 male) were admitted to the long-term-care ANASTE Calabria study. All patients underwent multidimensional geriatric assessment. Nutritional state was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), whereas cognitive performance was evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The functional state was assessed by Barthel Index (BI) and Activity Daily Living (ADL). The following nutritional biochemical parameters were also evaluated: albumin, cholesterol, iron, and hemoglobin. All patients were reassessed 180 days later. A severe cognitive impairment in MMSE performance was displayed in 49.7% patients, while 39.8% showed a moderate deficit; 6.9% had a slight deficit; and 3.4% evidenced no cognitive impairment. In MNA, 30% of patients exhibited an impairment of nutritional state; 56% were at risk of malnutrition; and 14% showed no nutritional problems. Malnutrition was present in 42% of patients with severe cognitive impairment, but only 4% of malnourished patients showed moderate cognitive deficit. The statistical analysis displayed a significant correlation between MNA and MMSE (Pnutritional state (P<0.005) as well as with the functional state (P<0.05) and mortality (P<0.01). The present study clearly shows that malnutrition may play an important role in the progression of cognitive loss.

  3. Parenteral nutrition including polyamine under experimental irradiation of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Lyashchenko, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    White rats-males were used in experiments. Irradiation dose of abdomen area is 13.5 Gy (1400 R). Parenteral nutrition using aminoacid preparation of polyamine affects favourably during radiation damage resulted from local irradiation of abdomen area. This was manifested in weakening of gastroenteric syndrom, reduction of 3.5 day death of animals and increase of their 30 day survival rate, intensification of recovery processes in small intestine, decrease of cell devastation in bone marrow

  4. Compatibility of 5-fluorouracil and total parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, T C; Clibon, U; Page, C P; Cruz, A B

    1982-01-01

    The physicochemical stability and availability of 0.1% 5-fluorouracil solutions in D5W and a typical total parenteral nutrition solution (hypertonic dextrose and crystalline amino acids) were studied in both glass and Viaflex delivery systems. Serial samples collected over a 48-hour period were assayed for 5-fluorouracil concentration using a high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Changes in the pH as well as precipitate formation were also investigated. There was no reduction in the amount of 5-fluorouracil at 48 hours in either the glass or plastic system, regardless of whether the drug was added to D5W or to the total parenteral nutrition solution. No pH changes or precipitates were observed. These findings indicate that 5-fluorouracil is compatible with and available from total parenteral solutions of hypertonic dextrose and amino acid in both plastic and glass containers. Use of such a system would allow for (1) a reduction in vascular access in patients receiving both treatments and (2) continued administration of nutritional support without the requirement for additional fluid volume.

  5. Intensive medicine - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreymann, G; Adolph, M; Druml, W; Jauch, K W

    2009-11-18

    In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN) should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5-7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day), carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy) and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy) as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  6. Intensive medicine – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreymann, G.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5–7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day, carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  7. Iodine in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Crill, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Methods for assessment of iodine nutrition in individuals include the urinary iodine concentration (UI), thyroid size and thyroid function tests. The UI measured in several

  8. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M.

    2017-01-01

    in treating IF with home parenteral nutrition (HPN), this study documents the HPN evolution and describes the demographics and outcome in one of the world's largest single-center cohorts. Methods: We included patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010. Data were extracted according to European...... Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism classifications from the Copenhagen IF database. Results: Over the decades, we observed an exponential increase in the number of HPN patients. The 508 patients with IF collectively received HPN for 1751 years. While receiving HPN, 211 patients with IF (42...

  9. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Gamze

    2011-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer.

  10. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    AKBULUT, GAMZE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer. PMID:22977559

  11. Hepatology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plauth, M.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN is indicated in alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH and in cirrhotic patients with moderate or severe malnutrition. PN should be started immediately when sufficientl oral or enteral feeding is not possible. ASH and cirrhosis patients who can be sufficiently fed either orally or enterally, but who have to abstain from food over a period of more than 12 hours (including nocturnal fasting should receive basal glucose infusion (2–3 g/kg/d. Total PN is required if such fasting periods last longer than 72 h. PN in patients with higher-grade hepatic encephalopathy (HE; particularly in HE IV° with malfunction of swallowing and cough reflexes, and unprotected airways. Cirrhotic patients or patients after liver transplantation should receive early postoperative PN after surgery if they cannot be sufficiently rally or enterally nourished. No recommendation can be made on donor or organ conditioning by parenteral administration of glutamine and arginine, aiming at minimising ischemia/reperfusion damage. In acute liver failure artificial nutrition should be considered irrespective of the nutritional state and should be commenced when oral nutrition cannot be restarted within 5 to 7 days. Whenever feasible, enteral nutrition should be administered via a nasoduodenal feeding tube.

  12. Long-term effects of nutritional programming of the embryo and fetus: mechanisms and critical windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Michael E; Stephenson, Terence; Gardner, David S; Budge, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The maternal nutritional and metabolic environment is critical in determining not only reproduction, but also long-term health and viability. In the present review, the effects of maternal nutritional manipulation at defined stages of gestation coinciding with embryogenesis, maximal placental or fetal growth will be discussed. Long-term outcomes from these three developmental windows appear to be very different, with brain and cardiovascular function being most sensitive to influences in the embryonic period, the kidney during placental development and adipose tissue in the fetal phase. In view of the similarities in fetal development, number and maturity at birth, there are close similarities in these outcomes between findings from epidemiological studies in historical human cohorts and nutritional manipulation of large animals, such as sheep. One key nutrient that may modulate the long-term metabolic effects is the supply of glucose from the mother to the fetus, because this is sensitive to both global changes in food intake, maternal glucocorticoid status and an increase in the carbohydrate content of the diet. The extent to which these dietary-induced changes may reflect epigenetic changes remains to be established, especially when considering the very artificial diets used to induce these types of effects. In summary, the maintenance of a balanced and appropriate supply of glucose from the mother to the fetus may be pivotal in ensuring optimal embryonic, placental and fetal growth. Increased or decreased maternal plasma glucose alone, or in conjunction with other macro- or micronutrients, may result in offspring at increased risk of adult diseases.

  13. Nutrition and psychological well-being among long-term care residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muurinen, S; Savikko, N; Soini, H; Suominen, M; Pitkälä, K

    2015-02-01

    To examine the relationship between nutritional status of service housing and nursing home residents with dementia and their psychological well-being (PWB), and the associations of nutritional care and PWB. This cross-sectional nutrition study was carried out in 2011. The study included all older long-term care residents (N=4966) living in nursing homes and service housing units (N=61) in Helsinki. The response rate of was 72%. Of the respondents, only persons who had a diagnosis of dementia were included in this analysis (N=2379). The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) tool and a structured questionnaire were used in assessing the residents. Six dimensions of PWB were included in the questionnaire. Information was also retrieved from medical records. Of residents 9% were well-nourished and 28% malnourished according to the MNA. PWB was good in 50% (score ≥ 0.80) and poor in 10% (score snacks were associated with poor PWB. Mild cognitive impairment was more often associated with poor PWB, whereas moderate or severe impairment was more often associated with good PWB. Nutritional status and nutritional care of residents with dementia were significantly associated with their psychological well-being. The residents suffering from malnutrition had the poorest psychological well-being.

  14. [Staff accreditation in parenteral nutrition production in hospital pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrignaud, S; Le Pêcheur, V; Jouan, G; Valy, S; Clerc, M-A

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to provide staff accreditation methodology to harmonize and secure practices for parenteral nutrition bags preparation. The methodology used in the present study is inspired from project management and quality approach. Existing training supports were used to produce accreditation procedure and evaluation supports. We first defined abilities levels, from level 1, corresponding to accredited learning agent to level 3, corresponding to expert accredited agent. Elements assessed for accreditation are: clothing assessment either by practices audit or by microbiologic test, test bags preparation and handling assessment, bag production to assess aseptic filling for both manual or automatized method, practices audit, number of days of production, and non-conformity following. At Angers Hospital, in 2014, production staff is composed of 12 agents. Staff accreditation reveals that 2 agents achieve level 3, 8 agents achieve level 2 and 2 agents are level 1. We noted that non-conformity decreased as accreditation took place from 81 in 2009 to 0 in 2014. To date, there is no incident due to parenteral bag produced by Angers hospital for neonatal resuscitation children. Such a consistent study is essential to insure a secured nutrition parenteral production. This also provides a satisfying quality care for patients. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Nutrition quality control in the prescription and administration of parenteral nutrition therapy for hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Glaucia Midori; Horie, Lilian Mika; Castro, Melina Gouveia; Martins, Juliana R; Bittencourt, Amanda F; Logullo, Luciana; Teixeira da Silva, Maria de Lourdes; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-06-01

    Nutrition quality control in parenteral nutrition therapy (PNT) allows the identification of inadequate processes in parenteral nutrition (PN). The objective of this study was to assess the quality of PNT at a hospital with an established nutrition support team (NST). This observational, longitudinal, analytical, and prospective study examined 100 hospitalized PNT adult patients under the care of an NST for 21 days or until death/hospital discharge. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) 2007 guidelines for PNT prescription were followed. PNT indications were not in accordance with the A.S.P.E.N. 2007 guidelines in 15 patients. Among the remaining 85 patients, 48 (56.5%) did not receive adequate PNT (≥80% of the total volume prescribed). Non-NST medical orders, progression to and from enteral nutrition, changes in the central venous catheter, unknown causes, and operational errors (eg, medical prescription loss, PN nondelivery, pharmacy delays, inadequate PN bag temperature) were associated with PNT inadequacy (P nutrition therapy related to estimated energy expenditure and protein requirements and glycemia levels reached the expected targets; however, the central venous catheter infection rate was higher than 6 per 1000 catheters/d and did not meet the expected targets. Despite an established NST, there was a moderate level of PNT inadequacy in indications, administration, and monitoring. It is important to establish periodic meetings among different health professionals who prescribe and deliver PNT to define responsibilities and protocols. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. The parenteral nutritional regimen in pigs for basic studies in physiology of nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkowitz, R.; Harting, W.; Souffrant, W.B.; Junghans, P.; Boerner, P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental studies concerning a parenteral nutritional regimen were performed in pigs aiming at comparative metabolic investigations to evaluate clinically relevant problems within nutritional research. By means of the 15 N tracer technique the evaluation of the postoperative protein turnover was rendered possible by this animal model

  17. Preventive effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Dušica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis is well recognized phenomenon in the term and preterm infant receiving long-term parenteral nutrition. Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA use on cholestasis in newborns on prolonged TPN. Methods. A total of 56 infants were enrolled in this retrospective study: control group consisted of lower (1500 g birth weight infants (n=30, as well as the group of pediatric (n=11 and surgical patients (n=15 treated with UDCA. Blood chemistries were obtained two times weekly. Results. All of 56 newborns developed cholestasis but duration of parenteral nutrition (PN before onset of cholestasis was significantly longer in UDCA treated patients. Average duration of PN before the onset of cholestasis in control group of patients was 25 days in distinction from treated pediatric and surgical patients (39 and 34 days, respectively. The peak serum conjugated bilirubin (CB, AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase (AP levels were significantly lower in the treated groups. There was no significant difference among treated pediatric and surgical patients and between lower and higher birth weight infants considering the CB, ALT, AST and AP peak. Duration of cholestasis was significantly decreased in all treated groups. There was a significant difference in time needed to achieve complete enteral intake between pediatric and surgical patient group. Conclusion. Cholestasis developed significantly later in treated groups than in the controls. UDCA appears to be very successful in reducing the symptoms of cholestasis. The difference in efficacy of UDCA treatment between lower and higher birth weight infants could not be proven.

  18. Parenteral nutrition in the ICU setting: need for a shift in utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Hiesmayr, Michael; Pichard, Claude

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties to feed the patients adequately with enteral nutrition alone have drawn the attention of the clinicians toward the use of parenteral nutrition, although recommendations by the recent guidelines are conflicting. This review focuses on the intrinsic role of parenteral nutrition, its new indication, and modalities of use for the critically ill patients. A recent trial demonstrated that selecting either parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition for early nutrition has no impact on clinical outcomes. However, it must be acknowledged that the risk of relative overfeeding is greater when using parenteral nutrition and the risk of underfeeding is greater when using enteral nutrition because of gastrointestinal intolerance. Both overfeeding and underfeeding in the critically ill patients are associated with deleterious outcomes. Thus, early and adequate feeding according to the specific energy needs can be recommended as the optimal feeding strategy. Parenteral nutrition can be used to substitute or supplement enteral nutrition, if adequately prescribed. Testing for enteral nutrition tolerance during 2-3 days after ICU admission provides the perfect timing to start parenteral nutrition, if needed. In case of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, consider starting parenteral nutrition carefully to avoid overfeeding.

  19. Aluminum Exposure from Parenteral Nutrition: Early Bile Canaliculus Changes of the Hepatocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Hall

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonates on long-term parenteral nutrition (PN may develop parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD. Aluminum (Al is a known contaminant of infant PN, and we hypothesize that it substantially contributes to PNALD. In this study, we aim to assess the impact of Al on hepatocytes in a piglet model. Methods: We conducted a randomized control trial using a Yucatan piglet PN model. Piglets, aged 3–6 days, were placed into two groups. The high Al group (n = 8 received PN with 63 µg/kg/day of Al, while the low Al group (n = 7 received PN with 24 µg/kg/day of Al. Serum samples for total bile acids (TBA were collected over two weeks, and liver tissue was obtained at the end of the experiment. Bile canaliculus morphometry were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and ImageJ software analysis. Results: The canalicular space was smaller and the microvilli were shorter in the high Al group than in the low Al group. There was no difference in the TBA between the groups. Conclusions: Al causes structural changes in the hepatocytes despite unaltered serum bile acids. High Al in PN is associated with short microvilli, which could decrease the functional excretion area of the hepatocytes and impair bile flow.

  20. Validation of cold chain during distribution of parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aims to demonstrate the suitability of the process used to condition the extemporaneous mixtures of parenteral nutrition for distribution, considering the objective of preserving the cold chain during transport until it reaches the patient, necessary to ensure stability, effectiveness and safety of these mixtures. Method: concurrent validation, design and implementation of a protocol for evaluating the process of packaging and distribution of MNPE developed by a pharmaceutical laboratory. Running tests, according to predefined acceptance criteria. It is performed twice, in summer and on routes that require longer transfer time. Evaluation of conservation of temperature by monitoring the internal temperature values of each type of packaging, recorded by data loggers calibrated equipment. Results: the different tests meet the established criteria. The collected data ensure the maintenance of the cold chain for longer than the transfer time to the most distant points. Conclusions: this study establishes the suitability of the processes to maintaining the cold chain for transfer from the laboratory to the patient pharmacist. Whereas the breaking of cold chain can cause changes of compatibility and stability of parenteral nutrition and failures nutritional support, this study contributes to patient safety, one of the relevant dimensions of quality of care the health.

  1. Enteral versus parenteral nutrition in cancer patients: evidences and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The debate over the use of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) is an old but evergreen and hot topic. Since many years, studies comparing EN and PN have been a pivotal 'leitmotif' in the published literature on artificial nutrition (AN). Actually, there is a background misunderstanding in this debate; specifically, that EN and PN are competitors in the choice of the route for delivering nutrition support in cancer patients. Conversely, EN and PN have specific indications and contraindications. This review has the purpose to discuss the indications and complications as well as pros and cons of EN and PN in cancer patients, the crucial role of nutrition support in oncology patients during anticancer treatments and throughout the course of disease, and, finally, the role of AN in advanced cancer patients. In summary, we have no evidence-based data able to definitively indicate the optimal method for delivering AN in cancer patients. EN and PN have to be considered equally effective in maintaining or improving nutritional status in cancer patients. Besides, this review strongly supports the recommendation that a baseline nutritional assessment should be carried out by a healthcare professional expert in AN for all cancer patients at the time of diagnosis or anticancer treatment plan, taking the nutritional status, estimated duration of AN, AN-related potential benefits and possible complications into consideration on an individual basis. Moreover, the patient symptoms, performance status, estimated life expectancy, and mainly, will or preferences have to be evaluated and incorporated into the nutrition support plan before the definitive choice of the route for delivering nutrients is decided. Finally, applying a decision-making process tailored to patient needs-regardless of whether receiving or not anticancer treatment-allows to choose reasonably the optimal nutritional support strategy.

  2. Long-term consequences of nutrition and growth in early childhood and possible preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiencies and excesses during pregnancy, and faster infant weight gain in the first 2 years of life are associated with increased risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in adulthood. The first 1,000 days of life (from conception until the child reaches age 2 years) represent a vulnerable period for programming of NCD risk, and are an important target for prevention of adult disease. This paper takes a developmental perspective to identify periconception, pregnancy, and infancy nutritional stressors, and to discuss mechanisms through which they influence later disease risk with the goal of informing age-specific interventions. Low- and middle-income countries need to address the dual burden of under- and overnutrition by implementing interventions to promote growth and enhance survival and intellectual development without increasing chronic disease risk. In the absence of good evidence from long-term follow-up of early life interventions, current recommendations for early life prevention of adult disease presume that interventions designed to optimize pregnancy outcomes and promote healthy infant growth and development will also reduce chronic disease risk. These include an emphasis on optimizing maternal nutrition prior to pregnancy, micronutrient adequacy in the preconception period and during pregnancy, promotion of breastfeeding and high-quality complementary foods, and prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence. © 2014 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Improved maternal nutrition decreases children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    Improved maternal nutrition to decrease children’s long-term risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity The nutritional well-being of pregnant women affects not only their health and their fetuses' development but also children's long-term risk of developing NCDs or obesity, according...... to a new report from WHO/Europe. "Good maternal nutrition. The best start in life" was launched under the auspices of the Minister of Health of Latvia during a consultation on maternal nutrition, in Riga on 27–28 June 2016. While the importance of good nutrition in the early development of children has...... – affects not only her child's health as an infant but also the child's risk of obesity and related chronic diseases as an adult. In short, maternal nutrition can truly have an intergenerational impact. Fighting NCDs and obesity through measures to improve maternal nutrition: NCDs are the leading cause...

  4. Parenteral nutrition facilitates activation of coagulation but not of fibrinolysis during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Braxton, C. C.; Coyle, S. M.; Roth, M.; ten Cate, J. W.; Lowry, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and bacterial infections are common complications of parenteral nutrition. To test the hypothesis that infection facilitates activation of coagulation during parenteral nutrition, healthy subjects were intravenously injected with endotoxin (2 ng/kg) after they had received either 1

  5. Studies with a safflower oil emulsion in total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K. H.; Deitel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency and the provision of adequate amounts of energy are two major concerns in total parenteral nutrition. Since earlier preparations of fat emulsion used to supplement the usual regimen of hypertonic glucose and amino acids have widely varying clinical acceptability, a new product, a safflower oil emulsion available in two concentrations (Liposyn), was evaluated. In four clinical trials the emulsion was used as a supplement to total parenteral nutrition. In five surgical patients 500 ml of the 10% emulsion infused every third day prevented or corrected essential fatty acid deficiency; however, in some cases in infusion every other day may be necessary. In 40 patients in severe catabolic states the emulsion provided 30% to 50% of the energy required daily: 10 patients received the 10% emulsion for 14 to 42 days, 9 patients received each emulsion in turn for 7 days, and 21 patient received the 20% emulsion for 14 to 28 days. All the patients survived and tolerated the lipid well; no adverse clinical effects were attributable to the lipid infusions. Transient mild, apparently clinically insignificant abnormalities in the results of one or more liver function tests and eosinophilia were observed in some patients. Thus, the safflower oil emulsion, at both concentrations, was safe and effective as a source of 30% to 50% of the energy required daily by seriously ill patients. PMID:6799182

  6. Adult classical homocystinuria requiring parenteral nutrition: Pitfalls and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Christel; Bonafé, Luisa; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Rieger, Julie; Berger, Mette M

    2017-07-25

    Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency presents with a wide clinical spectrum. Treatment by the enteral route aims at reducing homocysteine levels by using vitamin B6, possibly methionine-restricted diet, betaine and/or folate and vitamin B 12 supplementation. Currently no nutritional guidelines exist regarding parenteral nutrition (PN) under acute conditions. Exhaustive literature search was performed, in order to identify the relevant studies describing the pathogenesis and nutritional intervention of adult classical homocystinuria requiring PN. Description of an illustrative case of an adult female with CBS deficiency and intestinal perforation, who required total PN due to contraindication to enteral nutrition. Nutritional management of decompensated classical homocystinuria is complex and currently no recommendation exists regarding PN composition. Amino acid profile and monitoring of total homocysteine concentration are the main tools enabling a precise assessment of the severity of metabolic alterations. In case of contraindication to enteral nutrition, compounded PN will be required, as described in this paper, to ensure adequate low amounts of methionine and others essential amino acids and avoid potentially fatal toxic hypermethioninemia. By reviewing the literature and reporting successful nutritional management of a decompensated CBS deficiency using tailored PN with limited methionine intake and n-3 PUFA addition, we would like to underscore the fact that standard PN solutions are not adapted for CBS deficient critical ill patients: new solutions are required. High methionine levels (>800 μmol/L) being potentially neurotoxic, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge of acute nutritional therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. The necessity of selenium substitution in total parenteral nutrition and artificial alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramm, H J; Kopf, A; Brätter, P

    1995-03-01

    For the trace element selenium, in contrast to zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and iodine, there is still no clear official recommendation with regard to routine substitution in artificial nutrition. An overview of the manifestations of selenium deficiency in humans during the period 1979-1995 shows that nutritive deficiencies are exclusively TPN-induced or the result of severe malnutrition. The pathology of TPN-induced selenium deficiency and the analytic assessment of selenium status are described. Patients undergoing long-term parenteral nutrition or suffering from an increased loss of intestinal secretions have to be characterized as being especially at risk for clinical selenium deficiency. The relationship of the serum selenium kinetics in pediatric and adult patients to the depletion of body compartments during the course of short-term and prolonged TPN is discussed. Because of the importance of the selenoproteins, the regularly occurring depletion during selenium-free TPN and the borderline supply of selenium in Germany the routine substitution of selenium in TPN is strongly recommended. The pharmaceutical industry should be encouraged to develop a trace element solution that includes selenium, so that the nutritive requirement of patients on TPN can be satisfied. Adequate intravenous dosage recommendations are based on maintenance of glutathione peroxidase homeostasis. The routine supplementation dosage may not meet the selenium requirements of intensive care patients under conditions of increased metabolic demands on their anti-oxidative system.

  8. Patients' experiences with home parenteral nutrition: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christina; Lucas, Beverley; Wood, Diana

    2018-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides nourishment and hydration as an intravenous infusion to patients with intestinal failure (IF). The aim of the study is to generate theory that explains the experiences of adult patients living with home parenteral nutrition (HPN) and complex medication regimens. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore the experiences of twelve patients receiving HPN. A semi-structured interview was conducted and recorded in each participant's home setting. Each interview was transcribed verbatim. The simultaneous process of data collection and analysis was followed reflecting the principles of the constant comparative approach. A total of 15 patients gave written consent, with 12 of them agreeing to be interviewed. All the participants had previously undergone surgery as a result of chronic ill health or sudden illness. Analysis revealed two core categories: stoma and HPN, and these were supported by the subcategories: maintaining stoma output, access to toilets, managing dietary changes, maintaining the HPN infusion routine, access to technical help to set up an HPN infusion, mobility with HPN equipment and general health changes. The strategy of living with loss was demonstrated by all the participants, and this was supported by the action strategies of maintaining daily activities and social interactions. This study generates new understanding and insight into the views and experiences of patients receiving HPN in the UK. The findings from these participants have been shown to resonate with the Kubler-Ross Model [1] of the five stages of grief. The theory of living with loss was generated by the use of a grounded theory methodology. This small scale exploratory study reveals opportunities for improvements in practice to be considered by the nutrition support team (NST) and other healthcare professionals involved in the patient's hospital stay prior to discharge on HPN. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  9. Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, S B; Clerihew, L; McGuire, W

    2007-07-18

    central venous catheter was associated with a decreased risk of cumulative nutritional deficit during the trial period: Mean difference in the percentage of the prescribed nutritional intake actually received: -7.1% (95% confidence interval -11.02, -3.2). In another trial, infants in the percutaneous central venous catheter group needed significantly fewer catheters/cannulae per infant during the trial period: Mean difference in the number of catheters/cannulae per infant: -3.2 (95% confidence interval -5.13, -1.27). Meta-analysis of data from all four trials did not find any evidence of an effect on the incidence of systemic infection: Typical relative risk: 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.70, 1.25); typical risk difference: -0.02 (95% confidence interval -0.12, 0.08). Data from one small study suggest that the use of a percutaneous central venous catheter to deliver parenteral nutrition in newborn infants improves nutrient input. The significance of this in relation to long-term growth and developmental outcomes is unclear. Another study suggested that the use of a percutaneous central venous catheter rather than a peripheral cannula decreases the number of catheters/cannulae needed to deliver the nutrition. No evidence was found to suggest that percutaneous central venous catheter use increased the risk of adverse events, particularly systemic infection.

  10. Parenteral nutrition in patients with inborn errors of metabolism - a therapeutic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, L; Szczepanik, M; Siwinska-Mrozek, Z; Borkowska-Klos, M; Cichy, W; Walkowiak, J

    2014-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is now a standard part of supportive treatment in pediatric departments. We describe four cases in which parenteral nutrition was extremely difficult due to coincidence with inborn errors of metabolism. The first two cases was fatty acid beta-oxidation disorders associated with necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital heart disease. Thus, limitations of intravenous lipid intake made it difficult to maintain a good nutritional status. The third case was phenylketonuria associated with a facial region tumour (rhabdomyosarcoma), in which parenteral nutrition was complicated because of a high phenylalanine content in the amino acid formulas for parenteral nutrition. The fourth patient was a child with late-diagnosed tyrosinemia type 1, complicated with encephalopathy - during intensive care treatment the patient needed nutritional support, including parenteral nutrition - we observed amino acid formula problems similar to those in the phenylketonuria patient. Parenteral nutrition in children with inborn errors of metabolism is a rare, but very important therapeutic problem. Total parenteral nutrition formulas are not prepared for this group of diseases.

  11. Epigenetic Matters: The Link between Early Nutrition, Microbiome, and Long-term Health Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Indrio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications are among the most important mechanisms by which environmental factors can influence early cellular differentiation and create new phenotypic traits during pregnancy and within the neonatal period without altering the deoxyribonucleic acid sequence. A number of antenatal and postnatal factors, such as maternal and neonatal nutrition, pollutant exposure, and the composition of microbiota, contribute to the establishment of epigenetic changes that can not only modulate the individual adaptation to the environment but also have an influence on lifelong health and disease by modifying inflammatory molecular pathways and the immune response. Postnatal intestinal colonization, in turn determined by maternal flora, mode of delivery, early skin-to-skin contact and neonatal diet, leads to specific epigenetic signatures that can affect the barrier properties of gut mucosa and their protective role against later insults, thus potentially predisposing to the development of late-onset inflammatory diseases. The aim of this review is to outline the epigenetic mechanisms of programming and development acting within early-life stages and to examine in detail the role of maternal and neonatal nutrition, microbiota composition, and other environmental factors in determining epigenetic changes and their short- and long-term effects.

  12. Epigenetic Matters: The Link between Early Nutrition, Microbiome, and Long-term Health Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrio, Flavia; Martini, Silvia; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Corvaglia, Luigi; Cristofori, Fernanda; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Neu, Josef; Rautava, Samuli; Russo Spena, Giovanna; Raimondi, Francesco; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are among the most important mechanisms by which environmental factors can influence early cellular differentiation and create new phenotypic traits during pregnancy and within the neonatal period without altering the deoxyribonucleic acid sequence. A number of antenatal and postnatal factors, such as maternal and neonatal nutrition, pollutant exposure, and the composition of microbiota, contribute to the establishment of epigenetic changes that can not only modulate the individual adaptation to the environment but also have an influence on lifelong health and disease by modifying inflammatory molecular pathways and the immune response. Postnatal intestinal colonization, in turn determined by maternal flora, mode of delivery, early skin-to-skin contact and neonatal diet, leads to specific epigenetic signatures that can affect the barrier properties of gut mucosa and their protective role against later insults, thus potentially predisposing to the development of late-onset inflammatory diseases. The aim of this review is to outline the epigenetic mechanisms of programming and development acting within early-life stages and to examine in detail the role of maternal and neonatal nutrition, microbiota composition, and other environmental factors in determining epigenetic changes and their short- and long-term effects. PMID:28879172

  13. Effect of Baseline Nutritional Status on Long-term Multivitamin Use and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, Susanne; Gaziano, J. Michael; Christen, William G.; Bubes, Vadim; Kotler, Gregory; Glynn, Robert J.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Buring, Julie E.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Long-term multivitamin use had no effect on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Physicians’ Health Study II. Baseline nutritional status may have modified the lack of effect. Objective To investigate effect modification by various baseline dietary factors on CVD risk in the Physicians’ Health Study II. Design, Setting, and Participants The Physicians’ Health Study II was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing multivitamin use (multivitamin [Centrum Silver] or placebo daily) among US male physicians. The Physicians’ Health Study II included 14 641 male physicians 50 years or older, 13 316 of whom (91.0%) completed a baseline 116-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and were included in the analyses. This study examined effect modification by baseline intake of key foods, individual nutrients, dietary patterns (Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score), and dietary supplement use. The study began in 1997, with continued treatment and follow-up through June 1, 2011. Interventions Multivitamin or placebo daily. Main Outcomes and Measures Major cardiovascular events, including nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and CVD mortality. Secondary outcomes included myocardial infarction, total stroke, CVD mortality, and total mortality individually. Results In total, 13 316 male physicians (mean [SD] age at randomization, 64.0 [9.0] years in those receiving the active multivitamin and 64.0 [9.1] years in those receiving the placebo) were observed for a mean (SD) follow-up of 11.4 (2.3) years. There was no consistent evidence of effect modification by various foods, nutrients, dietary patterns, or baseline supplement use on the effect of multivitamin use on CVD end points. Statistically significant interaction effects were observed between multivitamin use and vitamin B6 intake on myocardial infarction, between multivitamin use and vitamin D intake on CVD mortality

  14. Improvement in Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis With the Use of Omegaven in an Infant With Short Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Brian J; Reddix, Bruce A; Wolk, Robert A

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) and liver disease have been associated with soybean oil-based intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs). The benefit of fish oil-based IVFEs in the reversal of parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated liver damage includes allowing for longer PN duration without immediate need for bowel or liver transplantation. The present case involves an infant born with short bowel syndrome (SBS) requiring long-term PN with development of PNAC and subsequent administration of a fish oil-based IVFE. An infant born with SBS was initiated on PN and enteral feeds. After failed enteral progression, bowel lengthening by serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) resulted in postoperative ileus with delayed enteral feeding for 4 weeks. The administration of long-term PN led to development of PNAC, resulting in initiation of a fish oil-based IVFE. After 4 months, the cholestasis had resolved. Despite the STEP, at 16 months, the child required bowel tapering due to inability to advance enteral feeding. Fish oil-based IVFE was effectively used to reverse PNAC in a child with SBS. Despite early STEP, the patient was not able to tolerate enteral feedings and required bowel tapering. This case illustrates that early surgical intervention did not allow for improved feed tolerance. This resulted in a significant period without enteral nutrition, leading to development of cholestasis. The use of fish oil-based IVFE may permit a longer duration of PN administration without the development of cholestasis or liver disease, allowing for longer time for bowel adaptation prior to the need for surgical intervention. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. The long-term nutritional status in stroke patients and its predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquereau, Julie; Allart, Etienne; Romon, Monique; Rousseaux, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Malnutrition is common in the first few months after stroke and contributes to a poor overall outcome. We analyzed long-term weight changes and their predictive factors. A total of 71 first-ever stroke patients were included in the study and examined (1) their weight on admission to the acute stroke unit (usual weight [UW]), on admission to the rehabilitation unit, on discharge from the rehabilitation unit, and then 1 year or more after the stroke (median time: 2.5 years), (2) the presence of malnutrition after stroke, and (3) possible predictive factors, namely, sociodemographic factors, clinical characteristics (concerning the stroke, the patient's current neurologic status and the presence of diabetes mellitus and depression), and the present nutritional state (including eating difficulties, anorexia, and changes in food intake and food preferences). Body weight fell (4.0 kg) during the patients' stay in the stroke unit, increased moderately in the rehabilitation unit (2.0 kg), and returned to the UW by the long-term measurement. However, at the last observation, 40.1% of the patients weighed markedly less than their UW, 38.0% weighed markedly more, and 21.1% were relatively stable. Predictors of weight change were a change in preferences for sweet food products and a change in food intake. Malnutrition was frequent (47.9%) and associated with reduced food intake, residence in an institution, and diabetes mellitus. Malnutrition was highly prevalent, with an important role of change in food intake and food preferences, which could result from brain lesions and specific regimens. Living in an institution needs consideration, as its negative effects can be prevented. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety of parenteral nutrition in newborns: Results from a nationwide prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Berleur, Marie-Pierre; Brasseur, Yvette; Calvez, Sophie

    2018-04-01

    Limited or delayed availability of parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions, as well as difficulties in ordering are often identified as reasons for non-compliance with international guidelines in newborns. This study aims at assessing the modality of use and safety of premixed standardized PN solutions in a nationwide prospective cohort of newborns treated in clinical practice. Two premixed fixed formulations with respective osmolarity of 715 and 790 mOsm/L specifically designed for neonates were made available throughout the country for clinical use from birth onwards. Descriptive data and modality of use were prospectively collected in a case report form, whereas all related and unrelated adverse events were recorded on a separate adverse event form. A total of 14,167 infants were prospectively included and 16,640 parenteral nutrition periods were analyzed. Mean age was 33 weeks of gestation, and mean weight was 2086 g. The majority of infants (81%) started the parenteral nutrition the first day of life or the day after. The route of parenteral nutrition delivery was peripheral in 47% of the parenteral nutrition periods. During the whole study, a total of 72 adverse events occurring in 68 infants were reported. Of these adverse events, 59 (0.37% of the nutrition periods), among which 19 serious adverse events, were reported as related to the parenteral nutrition solutions. The events related to parenteral nutrition solutions were general disorders and administration site conditions (n = 42 including 9 cases of cutaneous necrosis), and nutrition and metabolism disorders (n = 17). There was no case of thrombophlebitis. Six of the 19 serious events related to the parenteral nutrition solutions (32%) were due to the misuse of the infusion bag. These data support the concept that ready-to-use parenteral nutrition formulations can safely provide parenteral nutrition from birth onwards. They further support that parenteral solutions with an osmolarity up to 800

  17. Parenteral nutrition dysregulates bile salt homeostasis in a rat model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Schaap, Frank G; Hodin, Caroline M J M; Visschers, Ruben G J; Svavarsson, Björn I; Lenicek, Martin; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN), a lifesaving therapy in patients with intestinal failure, has been associated with hepatobiliary complications including steatosis, cholestasis and fibrosis, collectively known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). To date, the pathogenesis of PNALD is poorly understood and therapeutic options are limited. Impaired bile salt homeostasis has been proposed to contribute PNALD. The objective of this study was to establish a PNALD model in rats and to evaluate the effects of continuous parenteral nutrition (PN) on bile salt homeostasis. Rats received either PN via the jugular vein or received normal diet for 3, 7 or 14 days. Serum biochemistry, hepatic triglycerides, circulating bile salts and C4, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lipogenic and bile salt homeostatic gene expression in liver and ileum were assessed. PN increased hepatic triglycerides already after 3 days of administration, and resulted in conjugated bilirubin elevation after 7 or more days. This indicates PN-induced steatosis and impaired canalicular secretion of bilirubin, the latter which is in line with reduced hepatic expression of Mrp2 mRNA. There was no histological evidence for liver inflammation after PN administration, and circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, were comparable in all groups. Hepatic expression of Fxr mRNA was decreased after 7 days of PN, without apparent effect on expression of Fxr targets Bsep and Shp. Nonetheless, Cyp7a1 expression was reduced after 7 days of PN, indicative for lowered bile salt synthesis. Circulating levels of C4 (marker of bile salt synthesis) were also decreased after 3, 7 and 14 days of PN. Levels of circulating bile salts were not affected by PN. This study showed that PN in rats caused early mild steatosis and cholestasis, while hepatic and systemic inflammation were not present. The onset of these abnormalities was associated with alterations in bile salt synthesis and transport. This

  18. Impact of long-term HPN on daily life in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, Anke; Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Naber, Ton A.; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tas, Tirzah; Sauerwein, Hans; van Achterberg, Theo

    2005-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a therapy that changes life radically and often means lifelong dependence on parenteral feeding. The aim of this study was to gain insight into problems experienced by adult patients who were dependent on long-term HPN. A survey was performed on all patients at the

  19. Impact of long-term HPN on daily life in adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, A.; Huisman-de Waal, G.J.; Naber, A.H.J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Tas, T.; Sauerwein, H.P.; Achterberg, T. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a therapy that changes life radically and often means lifelong dependence on parenteral feeding. The aim of this study was to gain insight into problems experienced by adult patients who were dependent on long-term HPN. METHODS: A survey was

  20. Four years of North American registry home parenteral nutrition outcome data and their implications for patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.; Heaphey, L.; Fleming, C.R.; Lininger, L.; Steiger, E.

    1991-01-01

    The OASIS Registry started annual collection of longitudinal data on patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 1984. This report describes outcome profiles on 1594 HPN patients in seven disease categories. Analysis showed clinical outcome was principally a reflection of the underlying diagnosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, ischemic bowel disease, motility disorders, radiation enteritis, and congenital bowel dysfunction all had a fairly long-term clinical outcome, whereas those with active cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a short-term outcome. The long-term group had a 3-year survival rate of 65 to 80%, they averaged 2.6 complications requiring hospitalization per year, and 49% experienced complete rehabilitation. The short-term group had a mean survival of 6 months; they averaged 4.6 complications per year and about 15% experienced complete rehabilitation. The registry data also indicated HPN was used for 19,700 patients in 1987 with therapy growth averaging about 8% per year. This growth was chiefly from new cancer patients. The number of new patients with long-term disorders in whom HPN was initiated appeared rather constant. The authors conclude that these clinical outcome assessments justify HPN for long-term patients, but the utility and appropriateness of HPN for the cancer and AIDS patients remains uncertain and requires further study. Medical, social, and fiscal aspects of HPN management in long-term and short-term patients appear to involve quite separate considerations

  1. Nutritional requirements and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    result in reduced cell growth in different body systems including ... The goal of nutritional support in preterm infants is to achieve a postnatal growth rate .... Over the third trimester, other organs such as muscles, fat and bone develop and .... is usual cholestasis, followed by portal inflammation and bile duct proliferation.

  2. Kinetics of phytosterol metabolism in neonates receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem-Rao, T Hang; Tunc, Ilker; Mavis, Alisha M; Cao, Yumei; Polzin, Elizabeth M; Firary, Mary F; Wang, Xujing; Simpson, Pippa M; Patel, Shailendra B

    2015-08-01

    Phytosterols in soybean oil (SO) lipids likely contribute to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in infants. No characterization of phytosterol metabolism has been done in infants receiving SO lipids. In a prospective cohort study, 45 neonates (36 SO lipid vs. 9 control) underwent serial blood sample measurements of sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. Mathematical modeling was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters of phytosterol metabolism and phytosterol exposure. Compared to controls, SO lipid-exposed infants had significantly higher levels of sitosterol and campesterol (P Phytosterols in SO lipid accumulate rapidly in neonates. Very preterm infants receiving SO lipid have higher sitosterol exposure, and may have poorly developed mechanisms of eliminating phytosterols that may contribute to their vulnerability to PNALD.

  3. Trace Elements in Parenteral Nutrition: Considerations for the Prescribing Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jennifer; Mulesa, Leanne; Carrilero Rouillet, Mariana

    2017-04-28

    Trace elements (TEs) are an essential component of parenteral nutrition (PN). Over the last few decades, there has been increased experience with PN, and with this knowledge more information about the management of trace elements has become available. There is increasing awareness of the effects of deficiencies and toxicities of certain trace elements. Despite this heightened awareness, much is still unknown in terms of trace element monitoring, the accuracy of different assays, and current TE contamination of solutions. The supplementation of TEs is a complex and important part of the PN prescription. Understanding the role of different disease states and the need for reduced or increased doses is essential. Given the heterogeneity of the PN patients, supplementation should be individualized.

  4. Central venous catheter infections in home parenteral nutrition patients: Outcomes from Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vicki M; Guenter, Peggi; Corrigan, Mandy L; Kovacevich, Debra; Winkler, Marion F; Resnick, Helaine E; Norris, Tina L; Robinson, Lawrence; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-12-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a high-cost, complex nutrition support therapy that requires the use of central venous catheters. Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious risks of this therapy. Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care (Sustain registry) provides the most current and comprehensive data for studying CLABSI among a national cohort of HPN patients in the United States. This is the first Sustain registry report detailing longitudinal data on CLABSI among HPN patients. To describe CLABSI rates for HPN patients followed in the Sustain registry from 2011-2014. Descriptive, χ 2 , and t tests were used to analyze data from the Sustain registry. Of the 1,046 HPN patients from 29 sites across the United States, 112 (10.7%) experienced 194 CLABSI events during 223,493 days of HPN exposure, for an overall CLABSI rate of 0.87 episodes/1,000 parenteral nutrition-days. Although the majority of patients were female (59%), adult (87%), white (75%), and with private insurance or Medicare (69%), CLABSI episodes per 1,000 parenteral nutrition-days were higher for men (0.69 vs 0.38), children (1.17 vs 0.35), blacks (0.91 vs 0.41), and Medicaid recipients (1.0 vs 0.38 or 0.39). Patients with implanted ports or double-lumen catheters also had more CLABSIs than those with peripherally inserted or central catheters or single-lumen catheters. Staphylococci were the most commonly reported pathogens. These data support findings of smaller studies about CLABSI risk for children and by catheter type and identify new potential risk factors, including gender, race, and insurance type. Additional studies are needed to determine effective interventions that will reduce HPN-associated CLABSI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Review of the Parenteral Nutrition Supply Service in an Irish Neonatal Unit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2018-06-01

    Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU) patients have individual nutritional requirements often requiring Patient Specific Parenteral Nutrition (PSPN). From October 2015, the national PSPN compounding service availability changed from 7 days per week service to 5 days per week (i.e. no weekend and limited bank holiday ordering available). The aim of this study was to examine the introduction of a 5 day only PSPN supply on neonatal patient parenteral nutrition availability in a tertiary NICU.

  6. Reconciling divergent results of the latest parenteral nutrition studies in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Pierre; Pichard, Claude

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies on the optimal modalities to feed patients during the ICU stay show divergent results. The level and the timing of energy provision is a critical issue, associated with the clinical outcome. These results questioned the clinical relevance of the recent guidelines issued by American, Canadian and European academic societies. Four recent prospective randomized studies enrolled critically ill patients who received various nutritional regimens and tested the effect of nutritional support on outcome. The Tight Calorie balance Control Study (TICACOS) targeted on calorie administration according to measured energy expenditure and found increased ICU morbidity but improved hospital mortality. The large EpaNIC study compared 'early' with 'late' (parenteral nutrition) nutrition, mostly in patients after cardiac surgery, and found an increased morbidity associated with early parenteral nutrition. The supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) study randomized the patients after 3 days and targeted the calories administered by parenteral nutrition as a complement to unsuccessful enteral nutrition using indirect calorimetry. The SPN resulted in less nosocomial infections and shorter duration of mechanical ventilation. Finally, a recent Australian study enrolled patients unable to be early fed enterally to receive, or not, parenteral nutrition targeted at 1500 kcal. No complications were noted in the parenteral nutrition group. Lessons from all these studies are summarized and should help in designing better studies and guidelines. The critical analysis of recent prospective studies comparing various levels of calorie administration, enteral versus parenteral nutrition and enteral versus SPN confirms the recommendations to avoid underfeeding and overfeeding. Parenteral nutrition, required if enteral feeding is failing, and if adjusted up to a measured optimal level, may improve outcome. More studies on the optimal level of energy and protein administration to

  7. Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in cancer patients: An expert consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocón Bretón, María Julia; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Álvarez Hernández, Julia; Jiménez Fonseca, Paula; Cervera Peris, Mercedes; Sendrós Madroño, María José; Grande, Enrique; Camblor Álvarez, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    Malnutrition is a common medical problem in cancer patients with a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to address different issues related to nutritional management of cancer patients in clinical practice. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Endocrinology and Nutrition prepared a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients and grouped them into three blocks: nutritional support, parenteral nutrition (PN), and home PN (HPN). A literature review was made of articles published in Spanish, English and French until April 2017. This consensus emphasizes several key elements that help physicians standardize management of the nutritional status of cancer patients in clinical practice, and establishes common guidelines for indication, monitoring, nutritional requirements, and access routes to PN. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. PROTEIN NEEDS OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS RECEIVING PARENTERAL NUTRITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José; Hessel, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    assess whether the current protein intake recommendations may improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients receiving parenteral nutrition. longitudinal study with three evaluations made (during the first 72 hours, on the 7th and the 14th days of PN). The following tests were applied: albumin, C-reactive protein, prealbumin, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, lymphocytes, and glutathione peroxidase. The severity was determined by SOFA. The statistical analysis included the Spearman and Mann-Whitney tests, as well as ANOVA (analysis of variance). among the 53 patients evaluated, 20 (37.74%) died. The mean calorie was 24.68 ± 9.78 kcal/kg (beginning of PN), 26.49 ± 8.89 kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN), and 30.9 ± 12.19 kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). The mean protein was 1.19 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (first 72 hours of PN), 1.29 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN) and 1.49 ± 0.69 g/kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). Prealbumin, albumin, total cholesterol and HDL were below the reference values, while the CRP levels were high. Throughout the three evaluation times, there was no a significant improvement on the levels of laboratory examinations. A strong and negative correlation was found between SOFA and prealbumin (r = -0.64, p = 0.05). the protein offer, according to the traditional recommendations, was not enough to improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients undergoing parenteral nutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral parenteral nutrition: an option for patients with an indication for short-term parenteral nutrition La nutrición parenteral periférica, alternativa para los pacientes con indicación de nutrición parenteral durante poco tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. T. D. Correia; J. Guimarâes; L. Cirino de Mattos; K. C. Araújo Gurgel; E. B. Cabral

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine and describe our experience with the use of peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN). Methods: Patients with an indication for parenteral nutrition for less than 15 days received it via a peripheral vein via a short, 20 or 22 gauge French polyurethane catheter. Parenteral nutrition had a final osmolality of 993 mOsm/l and was administered by infusion pump. The nutritional status of patients was assessed by the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) tec...

  10. [Menus offered in long-term care homes: quality of meal service and nutritional analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Rejón, Ana Isabel; Ruiz López, María Dolores; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Puerta, Antonio; Zuñiga, Antonia; Artacho, Reyes

    2017-06-05

    Institutionalization is a risk factor for malnutrition. Low energy intake and/or nutrient deficiencies are considered to be the main causes. To evaluate the quality of meals and meal service as well as the nutritional value of the main menus (regular menu, menu for diabetics, and pureed menu) offered in three long-term care (LTC) homes located in the metropolitan area of Granada (Spain). Cross-sectional study. A validated "quality of meals and meal service" set of indicators was applied. The menus were assessed by weighed food records on 14 consecutive days. The results were compared with the dietary reference intakes (DRIs) and the recommended number of servings. Important deficiencies in the quality of meals and meal service have been reported. Average energy varies from 1,788 to 2,124 kcal/day in the regular menus, from 1,687 to 1,924 kcal/day in the menus for diabetics, and from 1,518 to 1,639 kcal/day in the pureed menus. Average protein varied from 71.4 to 75.4 g/day, from 72.6 to 76.1 g/day, and from 50.5 to 54.7 g/day, respectively. None of the menus complied with the recommendations for fiber, potassium, magnesium, iodine, vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, nor for vegetables, fruit, milk products, olive oil, legumes, or nuts. It is necessary to ensure the implementation of regular routines for controlling the quality of meals and meal service as well as the nutritional value of the menus offered in LTC homes.

  11. Gastroenterology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz, R. J.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis parenteral nutrition (PN is indicated when enteral nutrition is not possible or should be avoided for medical reasons. In Crohn's patients PN is indicated when there are signs/symptoms of ileus or subileus in the small intestine, scars or intestinal fistulae. PN requires no specific compounding for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In both diseases it should be composed of 55–60% carbohydrates, 25–30% lipids and 10–15% amino acids. PN helps in the correction of malnutrition, particularly the intake of energy, minerals, trace elements, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Enteral nutrition is clearly superior to PN in severe, acute pancreatitis. An intolerance to enteral nutrition results in an indication for total PN in complications such as pseudocysts, intestinal and pancreatic fistulae, and pancreatic abscesses or pancreatic ascites. If enteral nutrition is not possible, PN is recommended, at the earliest, 5 days after admission to the hospital. TPN should not be routinely administered in mild acute pancreatitis or nil by moth status <7 days, due to high costs and an increased risk of infection. The energy requirements are between 25 and 35 kcal/kg body weight/day. A standard solution including lipids (monitoring triglyceride levels! can be administered in acute pancreatitis. Glucose (max. 4–5 g/kg body weight/day and amino acids (about 1.2–1.5 g/kg body weight/day should be administered and the additional enrichment of TPN with glutamine should be considered in severe, progressive forms of pancreatitis.

  12. Usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Les G; Dalvi Tapashi B; Norkus Edward P; Jensen Christopher D; Block Gladys; McManus Jamie F; Hudes Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Dietary supplement use in the United States is prevalent and represents an important source of nutrition. However, little is known about individuals who routinely consume multiple dietary supplements. This study describes the dietary supplement usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users, and where possible makes comparisons to non-users and multivitamin/mineral supplement users. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design...

  13. Impact of the components of Mediterranean nutrition regimen on long-term prognosis of diabetic patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Mosharraf

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of different nutritional regimens on long-term prognosis and outcome in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD has been questioned. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of different nutritional components of Mediterranean regimen on long-term cardiovascular events in diabetic patients with CAD in the Iranian population. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, we recruited 233 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and with at least 6 months of documented CAD. Nutritional assessment was obtained by a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and the diet score was calculated on the basis of the Mediterranean diet quality index (Med-DQI. For Assessing long-term CAD prognosis, the patients were followed by telephone for one year. The study endpoint was long-term major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE. RESULTS: Death was observed in 19 patients (8.2% during the one-year follow-up. Two patients (0.9% suffered non-fatal myocardial infarction and 14 (6.0% needed revascularization within 1 year after discharge from hospital. Overall MACCE within one year in the study population was 12.4%. There were significant differences between number of deaths and dietary scores of saturated fatty acid, cholesterol, meats, fish, and fruit and vegetables (P < 0.05. Moreover, significant differences were found between MACCE rate and dietary scores of saturated fatty acid, cholesterol, and fruit and vegetables (P < 0.05. Using multivariate logistic regression models, Mediterranean dietary regimen could effectively predict long-term death as well as MACCE adjusted for gender and age variables. CONCLUSION: Mediterranean dietary regimens, including low level of cholesterol and saturated fatty acid, can effectively improve long-term outcome including death and MACCE in diabetic patients with CAD.   Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Coronary

  14. Refeeding syndrome: screening, incidence, and treatment during parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Russell S

    2013-12-01

    The possible deleterious effects of feeding after a period of prolonged starvation have been known for over 60 years. The resultant biochemical disturbance, symptoms, and signs have been termed the refeeding syndrome (RS). The key to the pathophysiology is the stimulation of insulin release resulting in anabolic activity. Depleted electrolyte and micronutrient stores are overwhelmed and cellular function disrupted. A concise definition of RS is not agreed and hampers interpretation of clinical data. Hypophosphatemia and appearance of tissue edema/pathological fluid shifts are the most often agreed diagnostic criteria. The characteristics of particular patient groups at risk have been recognized for some time, and there are guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK to aid recognition of individuals at high risk along with protocols for initiating nutrition. Using loose diagnostic criteria, RS appears to occur in 4% of cases of parenteral nutrition (PN) when case records were reviewed by experts in a large study into PN care in the UK. Disappointingly, prescribers recognized only 50% of at risk cases. Early data from a similar study in New Zealand appear to show a similar pattern. Prospective series looking at patients receiving nutrition support in institutions with Nutrition Support Teams have found an incidence of 1-5%. RS is still underrecognized. Patients receiving PN should be counted as being in a high-risk category and feeding protocols to avoid RS applied. Low rates of RS then occur and death from this cause be avoided. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Assessment of parenteral nutrition prescription in Canadian acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Daniela; Arendt, Bianca M; Allard, Johane P

    2018-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) prescription can be challenging in patients with complex conditions and has potential complications. To assess PN prescription, monitoring, and PN-related complications in a Canadian acute care setting. This was a prospective cohort study in which patients receiving PN were assessed by an auditor for nutritional status, PN-related prescription, monitoring, and complications. In addition, length of stay and mortality were recorded. 147 patients (mean ± SD 56.1 ± 16.4 y) with complex diseases (Charlson comorbidity index, median [p25-p75] 2 [1-4]) were enrolled. Before starting PN, 18.6%, 63.9%, and 17.5% of patients were classified as subjective global assessment A, B, and C, respectively. Body mass index remained unchanged during the period on PN. On average, 89% and 73% of patients received <90% of their energy and protein requirements, respectively, but 65% received oral or enteral nutrition at some point during PN. The average daily energy provided by PN increased and stabilized on day 10, reaching 87.2 ± 20.1% of the requirements. Line sepsis (6.8% of patients) and hyperglycemia (6.9%) were the most common complications. The overall mortality was 15.6%. For those alive, length of stay was 30 (range: 4-268) d. PN was discontinued because of transitioning to an oral diet (56.6%), enteral nutrition (17.6%), home PN (14.7%), palliative care (5.1%), death (4.4%), or other (1.5%). Most patients were malnourished at the start of PN. Energy and protein provided from PN were less than requirements, and the goals were reached with delay. Mortality was high, possibly as a result of complex diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Organization of managed clinical networking for home parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Janet P; McKee, Ruth F

    2006-05-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is an established treatment for intestinal failure, and organization of HPN is variable throughout the UK and Europe. Managed clinical networking is the single most important feature of the UK National Health Service strategy for acute services in Scotland and has the potential to improve the management of HPN patients. This review addresses the role of managed clinical networking in HPN and compares outcome data between centres. The Scottish HPN Managed Clinical Network has published the main body of the current literature supporting the concept of managed clinical networking in this context. The Network is responsible for the organization and quality assurance of HPN provision in Scotland, and has been established for 5 years. It has captured significant patient data for the purpose of clinical audit and illustrates that this is an effective model for the management of this patient population. This review provides advice for other areas wishing to improve equity of access, and to smooth the patient journey between primary, secondary and tertiary health care in the context of artificial nutrition support.

  17. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Arwa Y

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010 for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This

  18. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Muhannad R M; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Abd, Arwa Y

    2010-12-31

    To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly imperative in certain clinical situations

  19. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy

  20. Quality assessment of total parenteral nutrition admixtures by the use of fractional factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković, Dušica; Ibrić, Svetlana; Antunović, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Parenteral nutrition as a specific aspect of providing nutritients still remains a permanent topic of both theoretical and experimental research. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) admixtures have complex contents making difficult to maintain their stability. The most critical parameter is the diameter of a lipid droplet, i.e. droplet size distribution. It is recommended that droplet size should not be more than 5 m and that the presence of greater droplets should not exceed th...

  1. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-01-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition

  2. ROLE OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL OCCLUSION AND PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aría Guerra, Eva; Cortés-Salgado, Alfonso; Mateo-Lobo, Raquel; Nattero, Lía; Riveiro, Javier; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Valbuena, Beatriz; Carabaña, Fátima; Carrero, Carmen; Grande, Enrique; Carrato, Alfredo; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    the precise role of parenteral nutrition in the management of oncologic patients with intestinal occlusion is not well defined yet. We aimed to identify the effects of parenteral nutrition in these patients regarding prognosis. 55 patients with intestinal occlusion and peritoneal carcinomatosis were included. Parenteral nutrition aimed at 20-35 kcal/Kg/day, and 1.0 g/kg/day of amino-acids. Weight, body mass index, type of tumor, type of chemotherapy, and ECOG among others were recorded and analyzed. 69.1% of the patients had gastrointestinal tumors, 18.2% gynecologic and 12.7% others. Age was 60 ± 13y, baseline ECOG 1.5 ± 0.5 and body mass index 21.6 ± 4.3. Malnutrition was present in 85%. Survival from the start of parenteral nutrition was not significant when considering baseline ECOG (log rank = 0.593, p = 0.743), previous lines of chemotherapy (log rank = 2.117, p = 0.548), baseline BMI (log rank = 2.686, p = 0.261), or type of tumor (log rank = 2.066, p = 0.356). Survival in patients who received home parenteral nutrition after hospital discharge was higher than those who stayed in-hospital (log rank = 7.090, p = 0.008). Survival in patients who started chemotherapy during or after parenteral nutrition was higher than those who did not so (log rank = 17.316, p Parenteral nutrition in patients with advanced cancer and intestinal occlusion is safe, and in tho se who respond to chemotherapy, further administration of home parenteral nutrition together with chemotherapy may enhance prolonged survival. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Quality assessment of total parenteral nutrition admixtures by the use of fractional factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Dušica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Parenteral nutrition as a specific aspect of providing nutritients still remains a permanent topic of both theoretical and experimental research. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN admixtures have complex contents making difficult to maintain their stability. The most critical parameter is the diameter of a lipid droplet, i.e. droplet size distribution. It is recommended that droplet size should not be more than 5

  4. Changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients and brush border glycoproteins after total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S; Tanaka, S; Yoshioka, M; Serizawa, H; Tashiro, H; Shiozaki, H; Imaeda, H; Tsuchiya, M

    1992-01-01

    The effect of total parenteral nutrition on nutrients absorption and glycoprotein changes of brush border membrane was examined in rat small intestine. In total parenteral nutrition rats, a marked decrease in activity of brush border enzymes was observed mainly in the proximal and middle segments of the intestine. Galactose perfusion of jejunal segment showed that hexose absorption was significantly inhibited, while intestinal absorption of glycine or dipeptide, glycylglycine was not significantly affected by total parenteral nutrition treatment. When brush border membrane glycoprotein profile was examined by [3H]-glucosamine or [3H]-fucose incorporation into jejunal loops, significant changes were observed in the glycoprotein pattern of brush border membrane especially in the high molecular weight range over 120 kDa after total parenteral nutrition treatment, suggesting strong dependency of glycoprotein synthesis on luminal substances. Molecular weight of sucrase isomaltase in brush border membrane detected by specific antibody showed no significant difference, however, in total parenteral nutrition and control rats. Also, molecular weight of specific sodium glucose cotransporter of intestinal brush border membrane detected by selective photoaffinity labelling was not altered in total parenteral nutrition rats. It may be that prolonged absence of oral food intake may produce significant biochemical changes in brush border membrane glycoprotein and absorptive capacity of small intestine, but these changes were not observed in all brush border membrane glycoproteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1582592

  5. [When enteral nutrition is not possible in intensive care patients: whether to wait or use parenteral nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, Q L M; Pickkers, P

    2016-01-01

    - Overfeeding of critically ill patients is associated with a higher incidence of infections and an increased length of ventilation. However, trophic nutrition or permissive underfeeding appears to have no negative effect on the patient and may even provide a survival benefit.- Initiation of enteral nutrition within 24-48 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission may reduce the number of complications and increase the chance of survival.- Total parenteral nutrition is associated with a higher risk of infections than enteral nutrition. This seems to be related to the higher calorie intake with parenteral nutrition rather than the route of administration.- In previously well-nourished patients, in whom enteral nutrition is only partially successful, it is safe to wait for up to 8 days before initiating supplemental parenteral nutrition.- In critically ill children, it is also safe to start supplemental parenteral nutrition at a late (on the 8th day after admission) rather than an early stage (within 24 hours of admission). Late supplemental parenteral nutrition may even result in fewer infectious complications and shorter hospitalisation.

  6. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Sanchez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations.

  7. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunnaja, Salim; Cuviello, Andrea; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations. PMID:23429491

  8. Intestine, immunity, and parenteral nutrition in an era of preferred enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith; Demehri, Farokh R; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    To review the benefits of enteral nutrition in contrast to the inflammatory consequences of administration of parenteral nutrition and enteral deprivation. To present the most recent evidence for the mechanisms of these immunologic changes and discuss potential areas for modification to decrease infectious complications of its administration. There is significant data supporting the early initiation of enteral nutrition in both medical and surgical patients unable to meet their caloric goals via oral intake alone. Despite the preference for enteral nutrition, some patients are unable to utilize their gut for nutritious gain and therefore require parenteral nutrition administration, along with its infectious complications. The mechanisms behind these complications are multifactorial and have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent study utilizing both animal and human models has provided further information regarding parenteral nutrition's deleterious effect on intestinal epithelial barrier function along with the complications associated with enterocyte deprivation. Changes associated with parenteral nutrition administration and enteral deprivation are complex with multiple potential areas for modification to allow for safer administration. Recent discovery of the mechanisms behind these changes present exciting areas for future study as to make parenteral nutrition administration in the enterally deprived patient safer.

  9. Standardised versus Individualised Parenteral Nutrition. Further Food for Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R; Segurado, R; Crealey, M; Twomey, A

    2016-04-11

    Parenteral Nutrition may be prescribed as a standard PN (SPN) formulation or as an individualised PN (IPN) formulation. SPN may have advantages in terms of rapid availability, less prescription errors, decreased risk of infection and cost savings but IPN, specifically tailored to an infants needs, may achieve better outcomes in terms of nutrient intake and weight gain. The aim of our study was to determine if VLBW infants in our NICU benefited from receiving IPN over currently available SPN solutions. Our findings were that VLBW infants prescribed IPN received significantly more amino acid (28%), glucose (6%), energy (11%) and calcium (8%) from the aqueous phase of PN than had they received a similar volume of SPN. The benefits were seen over all the days for which PN was administered. In conclusion, IPN was found to offer significant benefits to our VLBW infants. Modifications to currently available SPN would result in better SPN formulations. Our study also supported the recent recommendation to reduce the calcium:phosphate ratio in PN solutions to avoid early hypophosphataemia.

  10. Prediction of parenteral nutrition osmolarity by digital refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2011-05-01

    Infusion of high-osmolarity parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations into a peripheral vein will damage the vessel. In this study, the authors developed a refractometric method to predict PN formulation osmolarity for patients receiving PN. Nutrients in PN formulations were prepared for Brix value and osmolality measurement. Brix value and osmolality measurement of the dextrose, amino acids, and electrolytes were used to evaluate the limiting factor of PN osmolarity prediction. A best-fit equation was generated to predict PN osmolarity (mOsm/L): 81.05 × Brix value--116.33 (R(2) > 0.99). To validate the PN osmolarity prediction by these 4 equations, a total of 500 PN admixtures were tested. The authors found strong linear relationships between the Brix values and the osmolality measurement of dextrose (R(2) = 0.97), amino acids (R(2) = 0.99), and electrolytes (R(2) > 0.96). When PN-measured osmolality was between 600 and 900 mOsm/kg, approximately 43%, 29%, 43%, and 0% of the predicted osmolarity obtained by equations 1, 2, 3, and 4 were outside the acceptable 90% to 110% confidence interval range, respectively. When measured osmolality was between 900 and 1,500 mOsm/kg, 31%, 100%, 85%, and 15% of the predicted osmolarity by equations 1, 2, 3, and 4 were outside the acceptable 90% to 110% confidence interval range, respectively. The refractive method permits accurate PN osmolarity prediction and reasonable quality assurance before PN formulation administration.

  11. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min. In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important.

  12. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolder, U.; Ebener, C.; Hauner, H.; Jauch, K. W.; Kreymann, G.; Ockenga, J.; Traeger, K.

    2009-01-01

    The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition) in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min). In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy) an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day) or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important. PMID:20049080

  13. [Home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage of cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, S; Sakuyama, T; Nakamura, Y; Takahashi, N; Hattori, M

    1997-12-01

    In the last 6 years, we have experienced 20 cancer patients who received home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage. The patients had 13 gastric cancers, 3 esophageal cancers and 5 others. The prognosis of upper G-I cancer is known to be poorer than that of colon cancer. The home care of our cases, the gastric cancer lasted 25 days on average, which was shorter than others. So the home care for patients in the terminal stage of gastric cancer is very short. Therefore we decide the home care for the terminal stage of gastric cancer as soon as possible. We conducted a questionnaire survey of our cases and family. We finally found that the most important thing is the safety of patient for the maintenance of home care. Our home care system is made up of a 3-way relationship among the patient, support system and doctor. The doctor is on call for the problems of the patient for 24 hours. Therefore, we believe that this system is comfortable for both the patient and family.

  14. A parenteral nutrition use survey with gap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Guenter, Peggi; Mirtallo, Jay M

    2013-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication for which safe practice guidelines are available. Recent adverse events associated with PN have been widely reported. A survey of current practices was indicated as new guidelines are being considered. A web-based survey consisting of 70 items was made available for the month of August 2011. Respondents provided answers to questions that addressed all aspects of the PN use process. There were a total of 895 respondents to the survey, including dietitians, nurses, pharmacists, and physicians. They predominantly represented hospital settings (89%), with 44% from academic institutions. Most organizations use a once-daily PN admixture with 21% outsourcing preparation. Electronic PN order entry is available in one-third of organizations, and the use of standardized order sets prevails. Unfortunately, electronic interfaces between computer systems remain infrequent, meaning that at least one transcription step is required by most in the PN use process. There are a wide variety of methods for ordering PN components, many of which are inconsistent with safe practices. Most organizations dedicate a pharmacist to review the PN orders, many of which require clarifications. Documentation at each step of the PN use process with oversight to identify deviations from best practice recommendations is infrequent. A significant proportion (44%) does not track PN-related medication errors. The survey data are a valuable snapshot of current practices with PN. Poor compliance with some of the safe practice guidelines continues. This will help guide new safety initiatives for the PN use process.

  15. Standardised versus Individualised Parenteral Nutrition. Further Food for Thought

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, R

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral Nutrition may be prescribed as a standard PN (SPN) formulation or as an individualised PN (IPN) formulation. SPN may have advantages in terms of rapid availability, less prescription errors, decreased risk of infection and cost savings but IPN, specifically tailored to an infant’s needs, may achieve better outcomes in terms of nutrient intake and weight gain. The aim of our study was to determine if VLBW infants in our NICU benefited from receiving IPN over currently available SPN solutions. Our findings were that VLBW infants prescribed IPN received significantly more amino acid (28%), glucose (6%), energy (11%) and calcium (8%) from the aqueous phase of PN than had they received a similar volume of SPN. The benefits were seen over all the days for which PN was administered. In conclusion, IPN was found to offer significant benefits to our VLBW infants. Modifications to currently available SPN would result in better SPN formulations. Our study also supported the recent recommendation to reduce the calcium:phosphate ratio in PN solutions to avoid early hypophosphataemia

  16. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%, rectal carcinoma (17.3%, colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%, gastric carcinoma (29.8%, pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%, and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%. The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG

  17. Nutrition and Hyperglycemia Management in the Inpatient Setting (Meals on Demand, Parenteral, or Enteral Nutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drincic, Andjela T; Knezevich, Jon T; Akkireddy, Padmaja

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide the latest evidence and expert recommendations for management of hospitalized patients with diabetes or hyperglycemia receiving enteral (EN), parenteral (PN) nutrition support or, those with unrestricted oral diet, consuming meals on demand. Patients with and without diabetes mellitus commonly develop hyperglycemia while receiving EN or PN support, placing them at increased risk of adverse outcomes, including in-hospital mortality. Very little new evidence is available in the form of randomized controlled trials (RCT) to guide the glycemic management of these patients. Reduction in the dextrose concentration within parenteral nutrition as well as selection of an enteral formula that diminishes the carbohydrate exposure to a patient receiving enteral nutrition are common strategies utilized in practice. No specific insulin regimen has been shown to be superior in the management of patients receiving EN or PN nutrition support. For those receiving oral nutrition, new challenges have been introduced with the most recent practice allowing patients to eat meals on demand, leading to extreme variability in carbohydrate exposure and risk of hypo and hyperglycemia. Synchronization of nutrition delivery with the astute use of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy to match the physiologic action of insulin in patients receiving nutritional support should be implemented to improve glycemic control in hospitalized patients. Further RCTs are needed to evaluate glycemic and other clinical outcomes of patients receiving nutritional support. For patients eating meals on demand, development of hospital guidelines and policies are needed, ensuring optimization and coordination of meal insulin delivery in order to facilitate patient safety.

  18. [Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in the oncological patient: an expert group consensus report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camblor-Álvarez, Miguel; Ocón-Bretón, María Julia; Luengo-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Viruzuela, Juan Antonio; Sendrós-Maroño, María José; Cervera-Peris, Mercedes; Grande, Enrique; Álvarez-Hernández, Julia; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula

    2018-01-10

    Malnutrition is a frequent medical problem of cancer patients that negatively impacts their quality of life. To analyze and respond to different issues related to the nutritional management of cancer patients in the clinical setting. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Nutrition developed a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients, which were grouped into three blocks: Nutritional support; Parenteral nutrition (PN); and Home PN (HPN) in cancer patients. A literature search, which included articles published in Spanish, English, and French until February 2017, was carried out. The document was organized as a questionnaire with those questions that, according to the panel's criteria, could generate greater controversy or doubt. Of the 18 questions addressed, 9 focused on nutritional support: 5 were related to PN and 4 about HPN. Among the different recommendations, the panel emphasized that in the cancer patient, PN is indicated mainly when it is not possible to use the digestive tract and/or oral feeding and/or enteral nutrition is not sufficient or possible. Additionally, the objective of the HPN is to improve or maintain the nutritional status of a patient at home. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for the nutritional management of cancer Patients.

  19. Evidence for the use of parenteral nutrition in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-02-01

    During hospitalization in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), critically ill children are fed artificially. Administered via the preferred enteral route, caloric targets are often not reached. Hence, parenteral nutrition is given to this patient population. In this review we analyzed the available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that supports the use of parenteral nutrition in children during critical illness. A search strategy in Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBASE was created and trial registries were screened to identify the relevant RCTs. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials, involved pediatric patients admitted to PICU, and compared different dosing/compositions of parenteral nutrition. Descriptive studies and reviews were excluded. Of the 584 articles identified by the search strategy, only 114 articles were retained after title screening. Further abstract and full text screening identified 6 small RCTs that compared two dosing/composition strategies of parenteral nutrition. These trials reported differences in surrogate endpoints without an effect on hard clinical endpoints. The RCTs observed improvements in these surrogate endpoints with the use of more calories or when parenteral glutamine or fish oil was added. The few RCTs suggest that surrogate endpoints can be affected by providing parenteral nutrition to critically ill children, but the studies were not statistically powered to draw meaningful clinical conclusions. Large RCTs with clinically relevant outcome measures are urgently needed to support the current nutritional guidelines that advise the use of parenteral nutrition in the PICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus

    OpenAIRE

    Kruk, J J; Kortekaas, F; Lucas, C; Jager-Wittenaar, H

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood weight control interventions. We include European Union studies targeting parents in order to improve children's weight status in multi-component (parental, behaviour change and nutrition) health promo...

  1. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  2. Parenteral nutrition following intensive cytotoxic therapy: an exploratory study on the need for parenteral nutrition after various treatment approaches for haematological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iestra, J. A.; Fibbe, W. E.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Romijn, J. A.; Kromhout, D.

    1999-01-01

    Patients receiving intensive cytotoxic therapy are traditionally supported with parenteral nutrition (PN), although it is unclear whether all patients benefit from PN. This study aimed to identify regimen-associated differences in PN requirements, to reveal discrepancies between the number of PN

  3. Managing children and adolescents on parenteral nutrition: Challenges for the nutritional support team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracey; Sexton, Elaine

    2006-08-01

    Managing infants, children and adolescents, ranging from premature infants to 18-year-old adolescents, on parenteral nutrition (PN) is a challenge. The ability of children to withstand starvation is limited and, unlike adults, children require nutrition for growth. PN in children is often required secondary to a congenital bowel problem rather than because of an acquired condition. Conditions requiring PN include motility disorders, congenital disorders of the intestinal epithelium and short-bowel syndrome (SBS). Intestinal failure may be temporary and children with SBS may be weaned from PN. However, other children require permanent PN. There are no comprehensive guidelines for the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents requiring PN. Practice in individual centres is based on clinical experience rather than clinical trials. Requirements are assessed on an individual basis according to age, nutritional status and clinical condition. These requirements need regular review to ensure that they remain appropriate for the changing age and weight of the child. Assessments of intakes use different methods, e.g. reference tables and predictive equations. Complications of PN include infection, accidental damage to, or removal of, the line and cholestatic liver disease. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is associated with fewer line infections and allows continuation of nutritional support in a more normal environment, encouraging normal development and participation in family activities. However, having a child at home on HPN is associated with physical and psychological stresses. A feeling of depression, loneliness and social isolation is common amongst children and their families. Home-care services are essential to supporting children at home and should be tailored to, and sensitive to, the individual needs of each family.

  4. Parenteral nutrition versus enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis Nutrição parenteral versus enteral em pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiel Paiva Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effect of parenteral versus enteral nutritional support in severe acute pancreatitis, with respect to efficacy, safety, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. METHODS: The study was comprised of 31 patients, divided into a parenteral group (n=16 and an enteral group (n=15, who met severity criteria for abdominal tomography (Balthazar classes C, D, and E. The patients were compared by demographics, disease etiology, antibiotic prophylaxis, use or not of somatostatin, nutritional support, complications and disease progression. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the average duration of nutritional support, somatostatin, or antibiotics in the two groups. Imipenem was the drug of choice for prophylaxis of pancreatic infections in both groups. More complications occurred in the parenteral group, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.10. Infectious complications, such as catheter sepsis and infections of the pancreatic tissue, were significantly more frequent in the parenteral group (p=0.006. There was no difference in average length of hospitalization in the two groups. There were three deaths in the parenteral group and none in the enteral group. CONCLUSION: Enteral nutritional support is associated with fewer septic complications compared to parenteral nutritional support.OBJETIVO: Comparar o efeito do suporte nutricional parenteral versus enteral, em pancreatite aguda grave, com relação à eficácia, à segurança, à morbi-mortalidade e ao tempo de internação. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 31 pacientes distribuídos em grupo parenteral (n=16, no período de 1995 a 1998 e grupo enteral (n=15, no período de 1999 a 2002, que preencheram os critérios de gravidade pela tomografia de abdome (Balthazar C,D,E. Os pacientes foram comparados quanto aos dados demográficos, etiologia, antibioticoprofilaxia, somatostatina, suporte nutricional, complicações e evolução. RESULTADOS

  5. Parenteral Nutrition Basics for the Clinician Caring for the Adult Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenski, Karrie; Catlin, Jennifer; Allen, Livia

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy providing nutrients to individuals with impaired intestinal tract function and enteral access challenges. It is one of the most complex prescriptions written routinely in the hospital and home care settings. This article is to aid the nutrition support clinician in the safe provision of PN, including selecting appropriate patients for PN, vascular access, development of a PN admixture, appropriate therapy monitoring, recognition of preparation options, and awareness of preparation and stability concerns. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. Chronic parenteral nutrition induces hepatic inflammation, steatosis and insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematurity and overfeeding in infants are associated with insulin resistance in childhood and may increase the risk of adult disease. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a major source of infant nutrition support and may influence neonatal metabolic function. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that...

  7. Review of macronutrients in parenteral nutrition for neonatal intensive care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has become essential in the management of sick and growing newborn populations in the NICU. In the past few decades, PN has become fundamental in the nutritional management of the very low birth weight infant (macronutrients in PN, including carbohydrates, protein, and fat. A subsequent article will review the micronutrients in PN, including electrolytes, minerals, and vitamins.

  8. Clinical relevance of trace element measurement in patients on initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salota, Rashim; Omar, Sohail; Sherwood, Roy A; Raja, Kishor; Vincent, Royce P

    2016-11-01

    Background and Aims Serum zinc, copper and selenium are measured in patients prior to commencing on parenteral nutrition; however, their interpretation can be difficult due to acute phase reactions. We assessed (i) the relationship of raised C-reactive protein with trace elements and albumin (ii) benefits of measuring trace elements when C-reactive protein is raised in patients requiring short-term parenteral nutrition. Methods Samples were collected for zinc, copper, selenium and albumin at baseline and then every two weeks and correlated with C-reactive protein results in patients on parenteral nutrition. Results were categorized into four groups based on the C-reactive protein concentrations: (i)  0.05), whereas selenium and albumin were lower in the group with C-reactive protein > 40 mg/L ( P parenteral nutrition, measurement of C-reactive protein is essential when interpreting zinc and selenium but not copper results. Routine measurement of trace elements prior to commencing parenteral nutrition has to be considered on an individual basis in patients with inflammation.

  9. Predictive Potential of Preoperative Nutritional Status in Long-Term Outcome Projections for Patients with Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Katsunobu; Ohira, Masaichi; Tamura, Tatsuro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-01

    Preoperative nutritional status not only correlates with the incidence of postoperative complications but also may be indicative of long-term outcomes for patients with cancer. The impact of preoperative nutritional status on outcomes for patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) was investigated. The study reviewed 594 patients treated for GC by gastrectomy at the authors' hospital between January, 2004 and December, 2010. Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (PNI) was invoked, using an optimal cut point to group patients as having high (PNI > 45; n = 449) or low (PNI ≤ 45; n = 145) nutritional status. Clinicopathologic features, perioperative results, and long-term outcomes, including cause of death, were compared. Multivariate analysis of 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) indicated that low PNI was independently associated with unfavorable outcomes for patients with GC. In subgroup analysis, the 5-year OS and DSS rates for patients with GC at stages 1 and 2 were significantly worse in the low PNI group than in the high PNI group. Although wound and extrasurgical field infections also tended to be more frequent in the low PNI group, postoperative intraabdominal infections did not differ significantly by group. Preoperative PNI may have merit as a gauge of prognosis for patients with GC at stages 1 and 2, but PNI and postoperative morbidity showed no correlation in this setting.

  10. Parenteral nutrition improves nutritional status, autonomic symptoms and quality of life in transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Stancanelli, Claudia; Mazzeo, Anna; Vita, Giuseppe; Messina, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is an inherited amyloidosis, leading to death in about ten years in most cases due to cardiac failure or wasting syndrome. Previous studies showed that modified body mass index was related to time before death, duration of gastrointestinal disturbances, malabsorption and functional capacity. We report two patients in whom nutritional status worsened despite diet modification, hypercaloric supplement and two relevant therapeutic approaches such as liver transplant and tafamidis meglumine, respectively. The first patient, a 52-year-old lady carrying Thr49Ala mutation, had a disease duration of twelve years and had lost weight up to 35 kg because of daily diarrhea. The second patient, a 63-year-old man with Glu89Gln mutation and a disease duration of fifteen years, was in the New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification class III and his weight was 39 kg. In both cases, a peripherally inserted central catheter was placed for parenteral nutrition. It allowed to improve their nutritional status and clinical conditions, with body weight gains of 11 and 8 kg in a one year follow-up, respectively. Moreover, reduction of autonomic symptoms including postural hypotension, nausea and diarrhoea was recorded with ameliorated quality of life. Our experience suggests that parenteral nutrition may be useful in reducing complications and disabilities in TTR-FAP patients, even when all dietary adjustments have been ineffective. Reasonably, the improvement in nutritional status may prolong survival in TTR-FAP patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Postoperative long-term changes of nutritional and immunological states in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Keiko

    1990-01-01

    Under nutritional support, surgical and postoperative adjuvant therapy were performed in 27 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer. The patients were divided into 2 groups, that were patients with postoperative chemotherapy (group A; 13 cases) and patients with postoperative radiation therapy (group B; 14 cases). Nutritional and immunological parameters were measured and compared among each groups. Group B had received higher nutritional support than group A, especially during the period of postoperative therapy. In group B, nutritional and immunological parameters maintained normal level, except serum albumin levels, counts of peripheral lymphocytes and factor XIII. In spite of higher nutritional support, levels of Zn in group B kept low. As for arterio-venous difference of amino acids, the tendency of negative balance in group B was stronger than that in group A. Arginine concentration in venous plasma increased evidently in group B. (author)

  12. Nutritional and clinical aspects of parenteral nutrition in pigs irradiated on the abdomen with supralethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Duee, P.H.

    1976-01-01

    Nutritional balances of nitrogen and minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus) were established in 10 pigs receiving a continuous parenteral nutrition supplying a daily amount of 1500ml containing 1500kcal and 2.2-5.4g of protein, and in addition, 2 liters of water per day. The balances were recorded for 5 days in the animals used as controls and for 9 days in those irradiated with 1000 rd in the median plane. This dose represents the inferior limit for appearence of the gastrointestinal syndrome in this species. The irradiated subjects seemed to be able to use a relatively high supply of energy and protein. Water and nitrogen balances were easy to obtain with respect to sodium, potassium and calcium, whereas the deficiency in phosphorus was difficult to compensate for through the intravenous route only

  13. Assessing the appropriateness of parenteral nutrition use in hospitalized patients. A comparison on parenteral nutrition bag prescription in different wards and nutritional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponta, Monica Laura; Rabbione, Laura; Borgio, Cristina; Quirico, Eliana; Patrito, Elena; Petrachi, Maria Novella; Girotto, Elisabetta; Sillano, Marisa; Geninatti, Silvio; Zanardi, Michela; Pezzana, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    Our aim is to assess parenteral nutrition (PN) bag prescription in hospitalized patients and evaluate clinical outcomes linked to PN therapy. We performed an observational longitudinal retrospective study on PN prescription in a General Public Hospital in Turin, Italy, on ninety-five patients receiving PN prescribed by the Nutrition Support Team (NST). We described patients' demography and assessed nutritional outcomes, as well as PN bag prescription in different wards. Medians were calculated for several clinical parameters before and after PN therapy. A z-test for proportions has been performed to better understand the impact of various conditions on clinical outcomes and to compare differences between administered nutrients and required amounts. The NST resulted responsible for only 18% of bags prescribed in the geriatrics ward and for 48% in the surgery wards. PN was not able to fulfill nutritional requirements resulting in a median lack of 3.1 calories and 0.23 g of proteins per kilogram of reference body weight per day. Despite this, PN therapy was able to improve total blood proteins and calcium blood levels in our cohort. The NST changed the prescription in 55.8% of the pre-existing PN regimens. More strict adherence to guidelines is needed in order to maximize effectiveness of PN and observe a positive impact on clinical parameters. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does nutritional intervention maintain its prognostic benefit in the long term for malnourished patients hospitalised for heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Palomas, J L; Gámez-López, A L; Castillo-Domínguez, J C; Moreno-Conde, M; López-Ibáñez, M C; Anguita-Sánchez, M

    2018-03-01

    To assess the long-term effect of nutritional intervention on malnourished, hospitalised patients with heart failure (HF). A total of 120 malnourished patients hospitalized for HF were randomised to undergo (or not) an individual nutritional intervention for 6 months. The primary event was the combination of all-cause death and readmission for HF. We performed an intent-to-treat analysis and assessed the effect of the intervention at 24 months. The combined event occurred in 47.5% of the intervention group and in 73.8% of the control group (hazard ratio: 0.45; 95% confidence interval: 0.28-0.72; P=.001). Thirty-nine percent of the intervention group and 59% of the control group died (hazard ratio: 0.53; 95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.89; P=.017). A nutritional intervention for malnourished patients hospitalised for HF maintains its prognostic benefit in the long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Quality indicators for enteral and parenteral nutrition therapy: application in critically ill patients "at nutritional risk".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Filho, Ronaldo Sousa; Ribeiro, Lia Mara Kauchi; Caruso, Lucia; Lima, Patricia Azevedo; Damasceno, Náglia Raquel Teixeira; García Soriano, Francisco

    2016-09-20

    Quality Indicators for Nutritional Therapy (QINT) allow a practical assessment of nutritional therapy (NT) quality. To apply and monitor QINT for critically ill patients at nutritional risk. Cross sectional study including critically ill patients > 18 years old, at nutritional risk, on exclusive enteral (ENT) or parenteral nutritional therapy (PNT) for > 72 hours. After three consecutive years, 9 QINT were applied and monitored. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 17.0. A total of 145 patients were included, 93 patients were receiving ENT, among then 65% were male and the mean age was 55.7 years (± 17.4); 52 patients were receiving PNT, 67% were male and the mean age was 58.1 years (± 17.4). All patients (ENT and PNT) were nutritionally screened at admission and their energy and protein needs were individually estimated. Only ENT was early initiated, more than 70% of the prescribed ENT volume was infused and there was a reduced withdrawal of enteral feeding tube. The frequency of diarrhea episodes and digestive fasting were not adequate in ENT patients. The proper supply of energy was contemplated only for PNT patients and there was an expressive rate of oral intake recovery in ENT patients. After three years of research, the percentage of QINT adequacy varied between 55%-77% for ENT and 60%-80% for PNT. The results were only made possible by the efforts of a multidisciplinary team and the continuous re-evaluation of the procedures in order to maintain the nutritional assistance for patients at nutritional risk.

  16. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  17. Association of positive screening for dysphagia with nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas-Martínez, Ana B; Bucar-Barjud, Marina; Campos-Fernández, Julia; Gimeno-Orna, José Antonio; Pérez-Calvo, Juan; Ocón-Bretón, Julia

    2018-04-24

    To assess the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) using the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and its association with malnutrition and long-term mortality. A retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the general internal medicine ward. In the first 48hours after hospital admission, OD was assessed using the EAT-10, and presence of malnutrition with the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Association of OD to malnutrition and long-term mortality was analyzed. Ninety patients with a mean age of 83 (SD: 11.8) years were enrolled. Of these, 56.7% were at risk of OD according to EAT-10. This group of patients had greater prevalence rates of malnutrition (88.2% vs. 48.7%; P=.001) and mortality (70% vs 35.9%; P=.001). During follow-up for 872.71 (SD: 642.89) days, risk of DO according to EAT-10 was an independent predictor of mortality factor in a multivariate analysis (HR: 2.8; 95%CI: 1.49-5.28; P=.001). The EAT-10 is a useful tool for screening OD. Adequate screening for OD is important because of its associated risks of malnutrition and long-term mortality. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and conseque...

  19. Brief Parenteral Nutrition Accelerates Weight Gain, Head Growth Even in Healthy VLBWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Naho; Belfort, Mandy B.; McCormick, Marie C.; Mori, Rintaro; Noma, Hisashi; Kusuda, Satoshi; Fujimura, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Whether parenteral nutrition benefits growth of very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants in the setting of rapid enteral feeding advancement is unclear. Our aim was to examine this issue using data from Japan, where enteral feeding typically advances at a rapid rate. Methods We studied 4005 hospitalized VLBW, very preterm (23–32 weeks' gestation) infants who reached full enteral feeding (100 ml/kg/day) by day 14, from 75 institutions in the Neonatal Research Network Japan (2003–2007). Main outcomes were weight gain, head growth, and extra-uterine growth restriction (EUGR, measurement parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for maternal, infant, and institutional characteristics, infants who received parenteral nutrition had greater weight gain [0.09 standard deviation (SD), 95% CI: 0.02, 0.16] and head growth (0.16 SD, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.28); lower odds of EUGR by head circumference (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.88). No statistically significant difference was seen in the proportion of infants with EUGR at discharge. SGA infants and infants who took more than a week until full feeding had larger estimates. Discussion Even in infants who are able to establish enteral nutrition within 2 weeks, deprivation of parenteral nutrition in the first weeks of life could lead to under nutrition, but infants who reached full feeding within one week benefit least. It is important to predict which infants are likely or not likely to advance on enteral feedings within a week and balance enteral and parenteral nutrition for these infants. PMID:24586323

  20. Biliopancreatic Diversion for Severe Obesity: Long-Term Effectiveness and Nutritional Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; González de Francisco, Tomás; Urioste-Fondo, Ana; González-Herraez, Luis; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Simó-Fernández, Vicente; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the treatment of choice for those patients with severe obesity, but the procedure of choice is not clearly established. We describe weight loss and nutritional parameters in severely obese patients after biliopancreatic diversion for 10 years of follow-up. Patients were followed by the same multidisciplinary team, and data are shown for 10 years. Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) questionnaire, data regarding the evolution of obesity-related diseases, and nutritional parameters are reported. Two hundred ninety-nine patients underwent biliopancreatic diversion, 76.1 % women, initial BMI 50.1 kg/m(2) (7.2). Weight loss was maintained throughout 10 years with EWL% around 65 % and EBMIL% around 70 %. More than 80 % of the patients showed EWL higher than 50 %. Blood pressure, glucose metabolism, and lipid profile clearly improved after surgery. Mean nutritional parameters remained within the normal range during follow-up. Protein malnutrition affected less than 4 % and anemia up to 16 %. Fat-soluble vitamin levels decreased along the time, with vitamin D deficiency in 61.5 % of patients. No significant differences were found either in nutritional parameters or weight loss regarding gastrectomy or gastric preservation, or common limb length longer or shorter than 55 cm Biliopancreatic diversion is an effective surgical procedure in terms of weight loss, quality of life, and evolution of obesity-related diseases. Nutritional deficiencies are less frequent than feared for a malabsorptive procedure, but must be taken into account, especially for fat-soluble vitamins.

  1. Hidrotórax secundário à nutrição parenteral: relato de caso Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Silvah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hidrotórax secundário à infusão de nutrição parenteral é uma condição rara, embora se apresente cada vez mais comum. Neste relato de caso, uma paciente com síndrome do intestino curto desenvolveu instabilidade hemodinâmica e insuficiência respiratória algumas horas após o início da infusão de nutrição parenteral. Ressaltamos também as manobras para evitar e tratar tal complicação.Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition infusion is a rare, although increasingly common event. This report shows a short bowel patient who developed hemodynamic instability and respiratory failure few hours after parenteral nutrition infusion's start. We also emphasize the maneuvers to avoid and treat such complication.

  2. Individualized nutrition intervention is of major benefit to colorectal cancer patients: long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasco, Paula; Monteiro-Grillo, Isabel; Camilo, Maria

    2012-12-01

    In our published randomized trial in colorectal cancer, group 1 (n = 37) received individualized nutritional counseling and education about regular foods, group 2 (n = 37) received dietary supplements and consumed their usual diet of regular foods, and group 3 (n = 37) consumed their usual diet of regular foods. Neither group 2 nor group 3 received individualized counseling. Early nutritional counseling during radiotherapy was highly effective at reducing acute radiotherapy toxicity and improving nutritional intake/status and quality of life (QoL). Efficacy persisted for 3 mo after the intervention. The objective was to perform long-term follow-up in survivors of that clinical trial to specifically evaluate survival, late toxicity, QoL, and nutritional variables. Medical data were collected from patients' records, and prescheduled interviews were conducted by dietitians for individualized evaluations. Analyses and comparisons between groups (adjusted for stage) were performed after a median follow-up of 6.5 (range: 4.9-8.1) y. Patients complied with the Radiotherapy Department's follow-up protocol. Nutritional deterioration was higher (P nutritional status was maintained in 91% of group 1 patients but not in any of the group 3 patients (P group 2 > group 1 (P group 1 (P nutritional status and intake (P nutritional status, and QoL predicted shorter survival and late toxicity (HR: 8.25; 95% CI: 2.74, 1.47; P nutrition at improving long-term prognosis in colorectal cancer. Overall, the data indicate that early individualized nutritional counseling and education during radiotherapy is valuable for patients.

  3. Usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gladys; Jensen, Christopher D; Norkus, Edward P; Dalvi, Tapashi B; Wong, Les G; McManus, Jamie F; Hudes, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Background Dietary supplement use in the United States is prevalent and represents an important source of nutrition. However, little is known about individuals who routinely consume multiple dietary supplements. This study describes the dietary supplement usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users, and where possible makes comparisons to non-users and multivitamin/mineral supplement users. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, information was obtained by online questionnaires and physical examination (fasting blood, blood pressure, body weight) from a convenience sample of long-term users of multiple dietary supplements manufactured by Shaklee Corporation (Multiple Supp users, n = 278). Data for non-users (No Supp users, n = 602) and multivitamin/mineral supplement users (Single Supp users, n = 176) were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2002 and NHANES III 1988–1994. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results Dietary supplements consumed on a daily basis by more than 50% of Multiple Supp users included a multivitamin/mineral, B-complex, vitamin C, carotenoids, vitamin E, calcium with vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, flavonoids, lecithin, alfalfa, coenzyme Q10 with resveratrol, glucosamine, and a herbal immune supplement. The majority of women also consumed gamma linolenic acid and a probiotic supplement, whereas men also consumed zinc, garlic, saw palmetto, and a soy protein supplement. Serum nutrient concentrations generally increased with increasing dietary supplement use. After adjustment for age, gender, income, education and body mass index, greater degree of supplement use was associated with more favorable concentrations of serum homocysteine, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as lower risk of prevalent elevated blood pressure and diabetes

  4. Usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Les G

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary supplement use in the United States is prevalent and represents an important source of nutrition. However, little is known about individuals who routinely consume multiple dietary supplements. This study describes the dietary supplement usage patterns, health, and nutritional status of long-term multiple dietary supplement users, and where possible makes comparisons to non-users and multivitamin/mineral supplement users. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, information was obtained by online questionnaires and physical examination (fasting blood, blood pressure, body weight from a convenience sample of long-term users of multiple dietary supplements manufactured by Shaklee Corporation (Multiple Supp users, n = 278. Data for non-users (No Supp users, n = 602 and multivitamin/mineral supplement users (Single Supp users, n = 176 were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001–2002 and NHANES III 1988–1994. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results Dietary supplements consumed on a daily basis by more than 50% of Multiple Supp users included a multivitamin/mineral, B-complex, vitamin C, carotenoids, vitamin E, calcium with vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, flavonoids, lecithin, alfalfa, coenzyme Q10 with resveratrol, glucosamine, and a herbal immune supplement. The majority of women also consumed gamma linolenic acid and a probiotic supplement, whereas men also consumed zinc, garlic, saw palmetto, and a soy protein supplement. Serum nutrient concentrations generally increased with increasing dietary supplement use. After adjustment for age, gender, income, education and body mass index, greater degree of supplement use was associated with more favorable concentrations of serum homocysteine, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as lower risk of prevalent elevated blood

  5. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radpay, Rojan; Poor Zamany Nejat Kermany, Mahtab; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (pnutritional status in each groups. This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress.

  6. Refeeding syndrome in a small-for-dates micro-preemie receiving early parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Mikami, Masamitsu; Oda, Hirotsugu; Hata, Daisuke

    2012-10-01

    This report describes a small-for-date extremely low birth weight infant who manifested bradycardic events, respiratory failure, and hemolytic jaundice during her first week of life. These complications were attributed to severe hypophosphatemia and hypokalemia. Inadequate supply and refeeding syndrome triggered by early aggressive parenteral nutrition were responsible for electrolyte abnormalities. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2012 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Responses of Preterm Pigs to an Oral Fluid Supplement During Parenteral Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berding, Kirsten; Makarem, Patty; Hance, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutrients and electrolytes in amniotic fluid swallowed by fetuses are important for growth and development. Yet, preterm infants requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) receive minimal or no oral inputs. With the limited availability of amniotic fluid, we evaluated the responses of preterm...

  8. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for

  9. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1982-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were dissolved once a day in an L-amino acid solution especially prepared for parenteral nutrition of newborn infants and infused continuously to 88 infants in whom septicaemia was suspected or had been proved. The mean dosages were 162 and 5.3 mg/kg per 24 hours...

  10. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition 1,2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P. B.; Høy, Carl-Erik; Mortensen, Per B

    1998-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN), initiated in patients with severe malabsorption or decreased oral intake, may exhaust stores of essential fatty acids and cause clinical manifestations, mainly dermatitis. Plasma fatty acid profiles were measured by gas-liquid chromatography in 37 healthy control...

  11. The prognosis of incurable cachectic cancer patients on home parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzetti, F; Santarpia, L; Pironi, L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in incurable cachectic cancer patients unable to eat is extremely controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors can influence the outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied prospectively 414 incurable cachectic (sub)obstruc...

  12. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoll, Barbara; Puiman, Patrycja Jolanta; Cui, Liwei

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had...

  13. Soil composition and nutritional status of apple as affected by long-term application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Nava

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum does not affect the soil negative charges and maintains sulfate in the soil solution, making it one of the cheapest products to increase Ca activity in soil solution, especially in the deeper soil layers. Higher Ca levels in the soil solution can increase the uptake of this nutrient by apple trees, reducing the risk of physiological disorders caused by Ca deficiency. This study assessed the effect of long-term gypsum application on some soil properties and on the chemical composition of leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to fruit disorders associated with low Ca. The experiment was conducted in São Joaquim, in the South of Brazil, from 2001 to 2009. Gypsum rates of 0, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 t ha-1 were annually broadcast over the soil surface, without incorporation, in an apple orchard with cultivar ´Catarina´, planted in 1997. Gypsum application over eight consecutive years had no effect on soil exchangeable K and Al to a depth of 80 cm, but increased exchangeable Ca in the sampled layers (0-10, 10-20, 40-60 and 60-80 cm, while exchangeable Mg decreased only in the surface layer (0-20 cm. Gypsum did not affect the concentration of any nutrient in the fruits, including Ca. The same was verified in the leaves, except for Mg which decreased with increased gypsum rate. Despite increasing the availability of Ca in the soil profile to a depth of 80 cm, gypsum was not effective to increase the Ca content in leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to Ca deficiency grown in an appropriately limed soil.

  14. Nutritional assessment using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in the scalp hair of geriatric patients who received enteral and parenteral nutrition formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, M; Ogasawara, H; Hotta, Y; Tsukagoshi, K; Kimura, O; Kura, T; Tarumi, T; Muramatsu, H; Endo, T

    2017-12-01

    The δ 13 C and δ 15 N values in the scalp hair of geriatric patients in Japan who received the enteral or parenteral nutrition formula were measured to assess nutritional status. The relations among δ 13 C, δ 15 N, calorie intake, BMI, albumin concentration, total cholesterol (T-CHO) and geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in the patients were investigated. Furthermore, the enrichment of δ 13 C and δ 15 N from the nutrients to the hair was investigated. The δ 13 C values in the hair of patients who received enteral nutrition decreased with decreases in the calories received, while the δ 15 N values increased, suggesting malnutrition in some patients with a low calorie intake due to a negative nitrogen balance. The distribution of patients with a low calorie intake (below 20 kcal/kg/day) when δ 13 C was plotted against δ 15 N differed from that of control subjects, but the distribution of patients with a high calorie intake (above 20 kcal/kg/day) was similar to that of control subjects. No significant differences were observed in BMI, albumin concentration, T-CHO or GNRI between the low and high calorie groups. The enrichment of δ 13 C and δ 15 N from the enteral nutrients to the hair were inversely correlated with the δ 13 C and δ 15 N in the enteral nutrients. The enrichment levels of δ 13 C and δ 15 N tended to be higher and lower, respectively, in the high calorie group. On the other hand, the δ 13 C and δ 15 N values in the hair of patients who received parenteral nutrition were higher and lower than those in the control subjects and in the patients who received enteral nutrition, respectively, reflecting the higher δ 13 C and lower δ 15 N contents of the parenteral nutrients. The δ 13 C and δ 15 N values in the hair of patients who received enteral nutrition may be effective indicators for evaluating the long-term nutritional status of geriatric patients. A calorie intake of 20 kcal/kg/day may be a cut-off value for malnutrition in

  15. Long-term impact of liver transplantation on respiratory function and nutritional status in children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, J K; Watson, D; Loganathan, S; Gunson, B K; Hodson, J; Mirza, D F; Clarke, J; Lloyd, C; Honeybourne, D; Whitehouse, J L; Nash, E F; Kelly, D; van Mourik, I; Newsome, P N

    2012-04-01

    Early liver transplant (LT) has been advocated for patients with cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) and evidence of deterioration in nutritional state and respiratory function to prevent further decline. However, the impact of single LT on long-term respiratory function and nutritional status has not been adequately addressed. We performed a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 40 (21 adult/19 pediatric) patients with CFLD transplanted between 1987 and 2009 with median follow-up of 47.8 months (range 4-180). One and five-year actuarial survival rates were 85%/64% for adult and 90%/85% for pediatric LT cohorts, respectively. Lung function remained stable until 4 years (FEV(1) % predicted; pretransplant 48.4% vs. 45.9%, 4 years posttransplant) but declined by 5 years (42.4%). Up to 4 years posttransplant mean annual decline in FEV(1) % was lower (0.74%; p = 0.04) compared with the predicted 3% annual decline in CF patients with comorbidity including diabetes. Number of courses of intravenous antibiotics was reduced following LT, from 3.9/year pretransplant to 1.1/year, 5 years posttransplant. Body mass index was preserved posttransplant; 18.0 kg/m(2) (range 15-24.3) pretransplant versus 19.6 kg/m(2) (range 16.4-22.7) 5 years posttransplant. In conclusion, LT is an effective treatment for selected patients with cirrhosis due to CFLD, stabilizing aspects of long-term lung function and preserving nutritional status. © Copyright 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Long-Term Health Impact of Early Nutrition: The Power of Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletzko, Berthold; Brands, Brigitte; Grote, Veit; Kirchberg, Franca F; Prell, Christine; Rzehak, Peter; Uhl, Olaf; Weber, Martina

    2017-01-01

    The Power of Programming conference 2016 at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich brought together about 600 researchers and other stakeholders from around the world who reviewed the recent evidence on the lasting health impact of environment and nutrition during early life, from pre-pregnancy to early childhood. The conference was hosted by the Early Nutrition Project, a multidisciplinary research collaboration funded by the European Commission with collaborating researchers from 35 institutions in 15 countries in Europe, the United States and Australia. The project explores the early origins of obesity, adiposity and associated non-communicable diseases, underlying mechanisms and opportunities for prevention. The project also proactively supports translational application of research findings. In fact, some existing evidence has already been rapidly adopted into policy, regulatory standards and practice. Further, broad dissemination of findings is achieved through the established digital eLearning platform of the Early Nutrition eAcademy, video clip-based learning and graphically supported messaging to consumers. The project demonstrated powerful effects of early metabolic programming on later health. Compared to other common prevention strategies, modifying risk trajectories in early life can achieve a much larger risk reduction and be more cost-effective. While some effective prevention strategies have been promptly implemented in policy and guidelines, legislation and practice, in other areas, the uptake is limited by a paucity of quality human intervention trials and insufficient evaluation of the feasibility of implementation and econometric impact. This needs to be strengthened by future collaborative research work. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic nutrients metabolism presents a severe problem in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, especially those with canceromatosis. A hypermetabolism-catabolism syndrome frequently develops in in patients with progressing canceromatosis. This leads to cachexia anorexia syndrome, which significantly impedes available treatment options. Artificial nutrition allows to improve available treatment in such patients. We present a successful case of concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patient with peritoneal canceromatosis.

  18. Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahova, Monika; Bratova, Miriam; Wohl, Petr

    2017-09-07

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides life-saving nutritional support in situations where caloric supply via the enteral route cannot cover the necessary needs of the organism. However, it does have serious adverse effects, including parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The development of liver injury associated with PN is multifactorial, including non-specific intestine inflammation, compromised intestinal permeability, and barrier function associated with increased bacterial translocation, primary and secondary cholangitis, cholelithiasis, short bowel syndrome, disturbance of hepatobiliary circulation, lack of enteral nutrition, shortage of some nutrients (proteins, essential fatty acids, choline, glycine, taurine, carnitine, etc.), and toxicity of components within the nutrition mixture itself (glucose, phytosterols, manganese, aluminium, etc.). Recently, an increasing number of studies have provided evidence that some of these factors are directly or indirectly associated with microbial dysbiosis in the intestine. In this review, we focus on PN-induced changes in the taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiome. We also discuss immune cell and microbial crosstalk during parenteral nutrition, and the implications for the onset and progression of PNALD. Finally, we provide an overview of recent advances in the therapeutic utilisation of pro- and prebiotics for the mitigation of PN-associated liver complications.

  19. Survival in Malnourished Older Patients Receiving Post-Discharge Nutritional Support; Long-Term Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelemaat, F; van Keeken, S; Langius, J A E; de van der Schueren, M A E; Thijs, A; Bosmans, J E

    2017-01-01

    Previous analyses have shown that a post-discharge individualized nutritional intervention had positive effects on body weight, lean body mass, functional limitations and fall incidents in malnourished older patients. However, the impact of this intervention on survival has not yet been studied. The objective of this randomized controlled study was to examine the effect of a post-discharge individualized nutritional intervention on survival in malnourished older patients. Malnourished older patients, aged ≥ 60 years, were randomized during hospitalization to a three-months post-discharge nutritional intervention group (protein and energy enriched diet, oral nutritional supplements, vitamin D3/calcium supplement and telephone counseling by a dietitian) or to a usual care regimen (control group). Survival data were collected 4 years after enrollment. Survival analyses were performed using intention-to-treat analysis by Log-rank tests and Cox regression adjusted for confounders. The study population consisted of 94 men (45%) and 116 women with a mean age of 74.5 (SD 9.5) years. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics. Survival data was available in 208 out of 210 patients. After 1 and 4 years of follow-up, survival rates were respectively 66% and 29% in the intervention group (n=104) and 73% and 30% in the control group (n=104). There were no statistically significant differences in survival between the two groups 1 year (HR= 0.933, 95% CI=0.675-1.289) and 4 years after enrollment (HR=0.928, 95% CI=0.671-1.283). The current study failed to show an effect of a three-months post-discharge multi-component nutritional intervention in malnourished older patients on long-term survival, despite the positive effects on short-term outcome such as functional limitations and falls.

  20. Parenteral nutrition in radiation therapy and combined treatment of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudzhyan, A.V.; Buzovkina, L.P.; Biletov, B.V.; Breusenko, E.Ya.; Krasnova, A.I.; Tsaryuk, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained while studying 165 patients with esophageal cancer are presented. It is shown that radiation therapy and combined treatment result in the body mass loss, in the increase of katabolic processes in organism, in the negative nitrogen balance. Weaken patients, being under starvation conditions, are subjected more often to reaction changes and complications developing during the treatment. A comparison characteristics of two methods providing the organism with nutrition is given, i.e. gastrostomy and parenteral nutrition. Shown is the advantage of the adequate parenteral nutrition preventing the appearence of reaction changes and complications, improving the subjective state of patients, homeostasis indices, promoting the elimination of esophagitis phenomena, general radiation response and reaction to chemical preparations; resulting in the increase of quantity of leucocytes at leukopenia

  1. Nutritional predictors for postoperative short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Mizuno, Akira; Tanaka, Chie; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Iwata, Naoki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Fujii, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Koike, Masahiko; Takami, Hideki; Niwa, Yukiko; Murotani, Kenta; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Evidence indicates that impaired immunocompetence and nutritional status adversely affect short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with cancer. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of preoperative immunocompetence and nutritional status according to Onodera's prognostic nutrition index (PNI) among patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC).This study included 260 patients with stage II/III GC who underwent R0 resection. The predictive values of preoperative nutritional status for postoperative outcome (morbidity and prognosis) were evaluated. Onodera's PNI was calculated as follows: 10 × serum albumin (g/dL) + 0.005 × lymphocyte count (per mm).The mean preoperative PNI was 47.8. The area under the curve for predicting complications was greater for PNI compared with the serum albumin concentration or lymphocyte count. Multivariate analysis identified preoperative PNI < 47 as an independent predictor of postoperative morbidity. Moreover, patients in the PNI < 47 group experienced significantly shorter overall and disease-free survival compared with those in the PNI ≥ 47 group, notably because of a higher prevalence of hematogenous metastasis as the initial recurrence. Subgroup analysis according to disease stage and postoperative adjuvant treatment revealed that the prognostic significance of PNI was more apparent in patients with stage II GC and in those who received adjuvant chemotherapy.Preoperative PNI is easy and inexpensive to determine, and our findings indicate that PNI served as a significant predictor of postoperative morbidity, prognosis, and recurrence patterns of patients with stage II/III GC.

  2. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pphysical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pphysical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Amino acids – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein catabolism should be reduced and protein synthesis promoted with parenteral nutrion (PN. Amino acid (AA solutions should always be infused with PN. Standard AA solutions are generally used, whereas specially adapted AA solutions may be required in certain conditions such as severe disorders of AA utilisation or in inborn errors of AA metabolism. An AA intake of 0.8 g/kg/day is generally recommended for adult patients with a normal metabolism, which may be increased to 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day, or to 2.0 or 2.5 g/kg/day in exceptional cases. Sufficient non-nitrogen energy sources should be added in order to assure adequate utilisation of AA. A nitrogen calorie ratio of 1:130 to 1:170 (g N/kcal or 1:21 to 1:27 (g AA/kcal is recommended under normal metabolic conditions. In critically ill patients glutamine should be administered parenterally if indicated in the form of peptides, for example 0.3–0.4 g glutamine dipeptide/kg body weight/day (=0.2–0.26 g glutamine/kg body weight/day. No recommendation can be made for glutamine supplementation in PN for patients with acute pancreatitis or after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, and in newborns. The application of arginine is currently not warranted as a supplement in PN in adults. N-acetyl AA are only of limited use as alternative AA sources. There is currently no indication for use of AA solutions with an increased content of glycine, branched-chain AAs (BCAA and ornithine-α-ketoglutarate (OKG in all patients receiving PN. AA solutions with an increased proportion of BCAA are recommended in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (III–IV.

  4. Long-term functional outcomes of PPPD in children--Nutritional status, pancreatic function, GI function and QOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwon-Ham; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Park, Kwi-Won

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the long-term outcomes, such as nutritional status, pancreatic function, gastrointestinal (GI) function, and quality of life (QOL), in children who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD). Between 1992 and 2013, there were 15 children who underwent PPPD at Seoul National University Children's Hospital, and 10 of them participated in this study. A retrospective review of the patients' medical records and follow-up was done. Their nutritional statuses were estimated by height, body weight, weight for age Z-score, body mass index (BMI), and serum protein, albumin levels. The endocrine and exocrine functions of the pancreas were estimated by diabetes mellitus (DM), steatorrhea, and Bristol stool chart. The GI function and QOL were evaluated via questionnaires. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 18years. There were no severe growth disturbances, 6 patients experienced mild steatorrhea and 3 showed above the category 6 in Bristol stool chart. All the patients experienced mild GI symptoms. As for the QOL, there were no significant negative answers, except for one patient with DM. Almost all the study subjects, who underwent PPPD in their childhood, did not present significant problems except for one patient with DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Independence From Parenteral Nutrition and Intravenous Fluid Support During Treatment With Teduglutide Among Patients With Intestinal Failure Associated With Short Bowel Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iyer, Kishore R; Kunecki, Marek; Boullata, Joseph I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In phase III clinical studies, treatment with teduglutide was associated with clinically meaningful reductions (≥20% from baseline) in parenteral support (PS; parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluids) requirements in adult patients with intestinal failure associated with short...

  6. A single-blinded randomised clinical trial of permissive underfeeding in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owais, Anwar Elias; Kabir, Syed Irfan; Mcnaught, Clare; Gatt, Marcel; MacFie, John

    2014-12-01

    The importance of adequate nutritional support is well established, but characterising what 'adequate nutrition' represents remains contentious. In recent years there has been increasing interest in the concept of 'permissive underfeeding' where patients are intentionally prescribed less nutrition than their calculated requirements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of permissive underfeeding on septic and nutrition related morbidity in patients requiring short term parenteral nutrition (PN). This was a single-blinded randomised clinical trial of 50 consecutive patients requiring parenteral nutritional support. Patients were randomized to receive either normocaloric or hypocaloric feeding (respectively 100% vs. 60% of estimated requirements). The primary end point was septic complications. Secondary end points included the metabolic, physiological and clinical outcomes to the two feeding protocols. Permissive underfeeding was associated with fewer septic complications (3 vs. 12 patients; p = 0.003), and a lower incidence of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (9 vs. 16 patients; p = 0.017). Permissively underfed patients had fewer feed related complications (2 vs. 9 patients; p = 0.016). Permissive underfeeding in patients requiring short term PN appears to be safe and may results in reduced septic and feed-related complications. NCT01154179 TRIAL REGISTRY: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01154179. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Perioperative Parenteral Nutrition in Adults With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with numerous nutrition implications, including an increased risk of malnutrition and various nutrient deficiencies. Surgical interventions are often necessary in the treatment of IBD, and patients with IBD presenting for surgery often have multiple issues, including acute inflammatory processes, malnutrition, anemia, and infections, which may increase the likelihood of poor surgical outcomes. Thus, determining adjunctive treatments that may decrease postoperative complications is paramount. Although enteral nutrition (EN) is considered the preferred nutrition support modality when the gastrointestinal tract is accessible and functional, parenteral nutrition (PN) may provide a suitable alternative when the use of EN is not feasible. The aim of this review is to evaluate the currently available literature on the impact of perioperative PN on postoperative complications, disease severity, and nutrition status in adults with IBD. Six studies within the past 10 years investigated this topic and are analyzed here. Results indicate general trends toward improvements in postoperative outcomes, disease severity, and nutrition status associated with perioperative PN use. Although results appear promising, additional, larger studies with an emphasis on PN composition will improve our understanding of the benefits of perioperative PN in adults with IBD. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Iodine: It's Important in Patients that Require Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development because of inadequate thyroid hormone production. Four methods are generally recommended for assessment of iodine nutrition: urinary iodine concentration, thyroid size, and blood concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone

  9. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer--improvement of the nutritional status and the therapeutic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Eva; Denecke, Almut; Klapdor, Silke; Klapdor, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent and serious problem of patients with pancreatic cancer (i.e. due to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, postoperative syndromes, anorexia, chemotherapy, and/or tumor progression). In many cases it has negative effects on the quality of life or on the tumor therapy. We investigated if malnutrition can be resolved or corrected by adequate home parenteral nutrition (PN) of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) patients, in cases where dietary advice and oral nutrition supplementation failed to correct the deficiencies. The energy supply via PN was analyzed in patients with PaCa, with focus on the single components in compounded PN. We examined a group of six women and eleven men with assured PaCa disease at different tumor stages (mean age: 64 years). Indications for PN were a reduction of body weight of >5 % in three months and/or a long-term reduced nutritional status, reduced results of the bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA), malassimilation and/or clinical symptoms like severe diarrhoea/vomitus, preventing adequate oral nutrition for weeks. The PN, administered via port-catheter, was initiated while the patients were undergoing chemotherapy. The course of treatment was assessed based on body weight, BIA (Data-Input Nutriguard-M), on laboratory parameters and on personal evaluation of the patients' quality of life. Retrospectively, the patients were subdivided into two groups (Gr): Gr1 (n=10) had a survival period of more than 5, up to more than 37 months, after the start of PN and Gr2 (n=7) had a survival between 1-4 months after start of PN. The calculations of the energy supply were based on the patients' body weight (per kg). Fluid volume, relation of macronutrients and addition of fish oil to PN are described in detail. Gr1: Eight of ten patients already showed an increase of body weight with the initial PN, two patients after dose adaption. This positive impact was also observable on the cellular level by means of BIA results (phase angle

  10. Safety, cost, and clinical considerations for the use of premixed parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacob W

    2015-06-01

    Premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) can be used for PN therapy in place of traditional compounded or customized PN. Premixed PN may have a number of advantages over compounded PN such as decreased costs, decreased compounding time, reduced chance for error, and reduced incidence of bloodstream infections. However, premixed PN may not be appropriate for all patients and may have other additional costs associated with its use. This article discusses the data available with regard to the use of premixed PN, focusing on the potential advantages and disadvantages of using premixed PN, and also discusses the implementation of premixed PN in a large tertiary cancer center. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Parenteral emulsions stabilized with a mixture of phospholipids and PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate: evaluation of accelerated and long-term stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaa, Muhannad; Müller, Bernd W

    2002-09-01

    Different emulsion formulations were prepared using phospholipids (Lipoid S57) and PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate (Solutol HS15) as single emulsifiers or in mixtures. The accelerated stability after autoclaving, freezing and centrifugation was investigated. The long-term stability was also studied at different temperatures (4, 20, and 37 degrees C) for 8 months. Emulsion stabilized with phospholipids displayed a stable behavior after the autoclaving and centrifugation, but it broke down after the freezing process. In mixture with Solutol HS15, however, the emulsion showed appropriate shelf stability at different temperatures for 8 months. A change in the particle size of the emulsion prepared only with Solutol HS15 was observed after centrifugation (slight) and after autoclaving (marked). In contrast to phospholipid emulsion, this emulsion (with only Solutol HS15) was less prone to breaking down after the freezing, as no complete phase separation was observed. The results obtained using an emulsifier mixture revealed that a combination of an anionic surfactant (phospholipids) and non-ionic surfactant (PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate) improves the emulsion's stability, compared to the emulsion's stability prepared using only a single emulsifier. However, no direct correlation could be found between the accelerated and the long-term stability data.

  12. Hyperintense brain lesions on T1-weighted MRI after parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Seiji; Nezu, Atsuo; Ohtsuki, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Osaka, Hitoshi; Uehara, Saori

    1996-01-01

    We experienced five children having T 1 -shortening lesions in basal ganglia or thalami on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which were supposed to be caused by manganese (Mn) overdoses. Instead of the presence of above-mentioned lesions, no neurological manifestations corresponding to them had developed in all patients. This observation suggests that MRI is useful for detecting side effects caused by overdoses of Mn in patients having parenteral nutrition. (author)

  13. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations and metabolism in breast milk, infant formula, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jesica A; Ninnis, Janet R; Hopper, Andrew O; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-09-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ~64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Cost analysis of premixed multichamber bags versus compounded parenteral nutrition: breakeven point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozat, Erkut; Korubuk, Gamze; Onar, Pelin; Abbasoglu, Osman

    2014-02-01

    Industrially premixed multichamber bags or hospital-manufactured compounded products can be used for parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to compare the cost of these 2 approaches. Costs of compounded parenteral nutrition bags in an university hospital were calculated. A total of 600 bags that were administered during 34 days between December 10, 2009 and February 17, 2010 were included in the analysis. For quality control, specific gravity evaluation of the filled bags was performed. It was calculated that the variable cost of a hospital compounded bag was $26.15. If we take the annual fixed costs into consideration, the production cost reaches $36.09 for each unit. It was estimated that the cost for the corresponding multichamber bag was $37.79. Taking the fixed and the variable costs into account, the breakeven point of the hospital compounded and the premixed multichamber bags was seen at 5,404 units per year. In specific gravity evaluation, it was observed that the mean and interval values were inside the upper and lower control margins. In this analysis, usage of hospital-compounded parenteral nutrition bags showed a cost advantage in hospitals that treat more than 15 patients per day. In small volume hospitals, premixed multichamber bags may be more beneficial.

  15. Standardized Parenteral Nutrition for the Transition Phase in Preterm Infants: A Bag That Fits.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Ann-Marie

    2018-02-02

    The optimal composition of standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN) is not yet known, contributing to nutrient deficit accrual and growth failure, with the period of parenteral nutrition weaning, i.e., transition (TN) phase, being identified as particularly vulnerable. We created a comprehensive nutrition database, representative of the nutritional course of a diverse range of preterm infants (n = 59, birth weight ≤ 1500 g, gestation < 34 weeks) by collecting hourly macronutrient intake data as part of a prospective, observational study over 19 months. Using a nutrient modeling technique for the TN phase, various amino acid (AA) concentrations of SPN were tested within the database, whilst acknowledging the nutritional contribution from enteral feeds until target AA intakes were consistently achieved. From the modeling, the AA composition of SPN was determined at 3.5 g\\/100 mL, which was the maximum to avoid exceeding target intakes at any point in the TN phase. However, in order to consistently achieve target AA intakes, additional nutritional strategies were required, which included increasing the exclusion of enteral feeds in fluid and nutrient calculations from <20 mL\\/kg\\/day to <40 mL\\/kg\\/day, and earlier fortification of breastmilk at 80 mL\\/kg\\/day. This data-driven nutrient modeling process supported the development of an improved SPN regimen for our preterm population in the TN phase.

  16. Standardized Parenteral Nutrition for the Transition Phase in Preterm Infants: A Bag That Fits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Brennan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The optimal composition of standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN is not yet known, contributing to nutrient deficit accrual and growth failure, with the period of parenteral nutrition weaning, i.e., transition (TN phase, being identified as particularly vulnerable. We created a comprehensive nutrition database, representative of the nutritional course of a diverse range of preterm infants (n = 59, birth weight ≤ 1500 g, gestation < 34 weeks by collecting hourly macronutrient intake data as part of a prospective, observational study over 19 months. Using a nutrient modeling technique for the TN phase, various amino acid (AA concentrations of SPN were tested within the database, whilst acknowledging the nutritional contribution from enteral feeds until target AA intakes were consistently achieved. From the modeling, the AA composition of SPN was determined at 3.5 g/100 mL, which was the maximum to avoid exceeding target intakes at any point in the TN phase. However, in order to consistently achieve target AA intakes, additional nutritional strategies were required, which included increasing the exclusion of enteral feeds in fluid and nutrient calculations from <20 mL/kg/day to <40 mL/kg/day, and earlier fortification of breastmilk at 80 mL/kg/day. This data-driven nutrient modeling process supported the development of an improved SPN regimen for our preterm population in the TN phase.

  17. Standardized Parenteral Nutrition for the Transition Phase in Preterm Infants: A Bag That Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ann-Marie; Fenton, Sarah; Murphy, Brendan P.

    2018-01-01

    The optimal composition of standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN) is not yet known, contributing to nutrient deficit accrual and growth failure, with the period of parenteral nutrition weaning, i.e., transition (TN) phase, being identified as particularly vulnerable. We created a comprehensive nutrition database, representative of the nutritional course of a diverse range of preterm infants (n = 59, birth weight ≤ 1500 g, gestation nutritional contribution from enteral feeds until target AA intakes were consistently achieved. From the modeling, the AA composition of SPN was determined at 3.5 g/100 mL, which was the maximum to avoid exceeding target intakes at any point in the TN phase. However, in order to consistently achieve target AA intakes, additional nutritional strategies were required, which included increasing the exclusion of enteral feeds in fluid and nutrient calculations from <20 mL/kg/day to <40 mL/kg/day, and earlier fortification of breastmilk at 80 mL/kg/day. This data-driven nutrient modeling process supported the development of an improved SPN regimen for our preterm population in the TN phase. PMID:29393903

  18. Influence of preoperative peripheral parenteral nutrition with micronutrients after colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yi; Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Hu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Hui-Lan; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory reactions are stronger after surgery of malnourished preoperative patients. Many studies have shown vitamin and trace element deficiencies appear to affect the functioning of immune cells. Enteral nutrition is often inadequate for malnourished patients. Therefore, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is considered an effective method for providing preoperative nutritional support. TPN needs a central vein catheter, and there are more risks associated with TPN. However, peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) often does not provide enough energy or nutrients. This study investigated the inflammatory response and prognosis for patients receiving a modified form of PPN with added fat emulsion infusion, multiple vitamins (MTV), and trace elements (TE) to assess the feasibility of preoperative nutritional support. Methods. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the influence of PPN with or without adding MTV and TE on malnourished abdominal surgery patients. Both preoperative groups received equal calories and protein, but due to the lack of micronutrients, patients in preoperative Group B exhibited higher inflammation, lower serum albumin levels, and higher anastomotic leak rates and also required prolonged hospital stays. Malnourished patients who receive micronutrient supplementation preoperatively have lower postoperative inflammatory responses and better prognoses. PPN with added fat emulsion, MTV, and TE provides valid and effective preoperative nutritional support.

  19. Comparison of the effects of enteral feeding with continuous and intermittent parenteral nutrition on hepatic triglyceride secretion in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isabel-Martinez, L.; Skinner, C.; Parkin, A.; Hall, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride turnover was measured during steady-state conditions in 22 postoperative patients. Nine had received nutritional support with an enteral regimen, seven had received an equivalent regimen as continuous parenteral nutrition, and six received the same parenteral regimen as a cyclical infusion. After 5 days of nutritional support, each patient received an intravenous bolus of tritiated glycerol. Plasma radiolabeled triglyceride content was measured during the subsequent 24 hours. The data were analyzed by means of a simple deterministic model of plasma triglyceride kinetics and compared with the results obtained by stochastic analysis. The rates of hepatic triglyceride secretion obtained by deterministic analysis were higher than those obtained by the stochastic approach. However, the mode of delivery of the nutritional regimen did not affect the rate of hepatic triglyceride secretion regardless of the method of analysis. The results suggest that neither complete nutritional bypass of the gastrointestinal tract nor interruption of parenteral nutrition in an attempt to mimic normal eating has any effect on hepatic triglyceride secretion. Any beneficial effect that enteral feeding or cyclical parenteral nutrition may have on liver dysfunction associated with standard parenteral nutrition appears to be unrelated to changes in hepatic triglyceride secretion

  20. Ketogenic enteral nutrition as a treatment for obesity: short term and long term results from 19,000 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello Gianfranco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only protein diet has been used successfully to prevent loss of lean body mass first in post-surgical and then in obese patients. We studied overweight and obese patients receiving short treatments of an exclusively protein-based nutritional solution as 24-hour enteral infusion. Methods 19,036 patients (age 44.3 ± 13, M:F = 2:5 with an initial body mass index of 36.5 ± 7.1 underwent 10-day cycles of enteral nutrition through a fine nasogastric tube. The nutritional solution consisted solely of 50–65 g of proteins, plus vitamins and electrolytes. The 24-hour infusion was controlled with a small portable pump. Before and after each 10-day cycle body composition was checked with a Handy 3000 impedance analyzer. At the onset of treatment, average fat mass was 40.9 ± 12.8 kg while body cell mass was 42.7 ± 7.2 kg in males and 27.4 ± 4.6 kg in females. Results After an average of 2.5 cycles the patients lost 10.2 ± 7.0 kg of body weight, 5.8 ± 5.5 kg of fat mass and 2.2 ± 3.3 kg of body cell mass. No significant adverse effects were recorded except asthenia and constipation which were easily controlled with therapy. Long-term results were obtained from 15,444 patients and after an average of 362 ± 296 days we found a mean weight regain of 15.4%. Conclusion Ketogenic Enteral Nutrition treatment of over 19,000 patients induced a rapid 10% weight loss, 57% of which was Fat Mass. No significant adverse effects were found. The treatment is safe, fast, inexpensive and has good one-year results for weight maintenance.

  1. Nutritional status and hyperglycemia in the peritransplant period: a review of associations with parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verdi Schumacher

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment option for various hematological diseases. This therapy involves complex procedures and is associated with several systemic complications. Due to the toxic effects of the conditioning regimen used in allogeneic transplantations, patients frequently suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications and are unable to feed themselves properly. This complex clinical scenario often requires specialized nutritional support, and despite the increasing number of studies available, many questions remain regarding the best way to feed these patients. Parenteral nutrition has been traditionally indicated when the effects on gastrointestinal mucosa are significant; however, the true benefits of this type of nutrition in reducing clinical complications have been questioned. Hyperglycemia is a common consequence of parenteral nutrition that seems to be correlated to poor transplantation outcomes and a higher risk of infections. Additionally, nutrition-related pre-transplantation risk factors are being studied, such as impaired nutritional status, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and obesity. This review aims to discuss some of these recent issues. A real case of allogeneic transplant was used to illustrate the scenario and to highlight the most important topics that motivated this literature review.

  2. Nutritional status and hyperglycemia in the peritransplant period: a review of associations with parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi Schumacher, Marina; Moreira Faulhaber, Gustavo Adolpho

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment option for various hematological diseases. This therapy involves complex procedures and is associated with several systemic complications. Due to the toxic effects of the conditioning regimen used in allogeneic transplantations, patients frequently suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications and are unable to feed themselves properly. This complex clinical scenario often requires specialized nutritional support, and despite the increasing number of studies available, many questions remain regarding the best way to feed these patients. Parenteral nutrition has been traditionally indicated when the effects on gastrointestinal mucosa are significant; however, the true benefits of this type of nutrition in reducing clinical complications have been questioned. Hyperglycemia is a common consequence of parenteral nutrition that seems to be correlated to poor transplantation outcomes and a higher risk of infections. Additionally, nutrition-related pre-transplantation risk factors are being studied, such as impaired nutritional status, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and obesity. This review aims to discuss some of these recent issues. A real case of allogeneic transplant was used to illustrate the scenario and to highlight the most important topics that motivated this literature review. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A common complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). The CRBSI incidence has been advocated as an outcome parameter assessing the quality of care. This study aimed to illustrate how the use of different CRBSI......) and European Society for Clinical Nutrition (ESPEN) CRBSI criteria. Employing a catheter-salvaging strategy, 40% of the CRBSI diagnoses were supported by the paired blood culture positivity criteria and only 6% by a positive catheter tip. In 53%, CRBSIs were categorized as a clinical or "probable CRBSI...

  4. Problems concerning the parenteral nutrition within the complex therapy of radiation injuries of the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloventantor, V.Yu.; Kurpesheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.; Bardychev, M.S.; Khmelevskij, Ya.M.

    1982-01-01

    The treatment results of 52 patients with radiation enterocolitis and rectosygmoiditis are reported. The complex therapy included a partial or a complete parenteral nutrition according to the indication. The treatment caused an improvement in 86.7% of the cases, no changes in 5.7% and a deterioration of the condition in 7.6%. The additional nutritive therapy rendered it possible to hold the cell mass of the body constant and to decrease the protein losses of the gastrointestinal tract significantly. (author)

  5. Acute impact of home parenteral nutrition in patients with late-stage cancer on family caregivers: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpia, Lidia; Bozzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Since there is no information regarding quality of life of caregivers assisting patients with advanced malignancy on home parenteral nutrition, herewith we report a preliminary series of 19 patients who received total parenteral nutrition at home under the strict supervision of their relatives. The relatives of 19 incurable patients with cancer-related cachexia, discharged from the hospital with a home parenteral nutrition program, were prospectively studied. They filled out a validated questionnaire, the Family Strain Questionnaire Short Form, prior to patient discharge and after 2 weeks of home care. The questionnaire included 30 items, which explored different domains regarding the superimposed burden on caregivers in relation to the assistance given to their relatives. Our findings show that the basal level of strain was relatively high (about three quarters of positive answers) but did not increase after 2 weeks of home care. Similarly, there was no difference in the nutritional status and quality of life of the patients. Eight patients and their relatives could be also analyzed after 2 months and the results maintained unchanged. This preliminary investigation shows that home parenteral nutrition does not exacerbate the level of strain on caregivers involved in surveillance of such a supportive intervention. It is possible that the perception of an active contribution to the benefit of patients, who maintained unchanged their nutritional status and quality of life, could gratify caregivers despite the objective burden in the constant supervision of administering Parenteral Nutrition.

  6. Effect of early enteral combined with parenteral nutrition in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin-Hua; Wu, Ya-Fu; Qiu, Yu-Dong; Jiang, Chun-Ping; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2013-09-21

    To investigate the effect of early enteral nutrition (EEN) combined with parenteral nutritional support in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). From January 2006, all patients were given EEN combined with parenteral nutrition (PN) (EEN/PN group, n = 107), while patients prior to this date were given total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (TPN group, n = 67). Venous blood samples were obtained for a nutrition-associated assessment and liver function tests on the day before surgery and 6 d after surgery. The assessment of clinical outcome was based on postoperative complications. Follow-up for infectious and noninfectious complications was carried out for 30 d after hospital discharge. Readmission within 30 d after discharge was also recorded. Compared with the TPN group, a significant decrease in prealbumin (PAB) (P = 0.023) was seen in the EEN/PN group. Total bilirubin (TB), direct bilirubin (DB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly decreased on day 6 in the EEN/PN group (P = 0.006, 0.004 and 0.032, respectively). The rate of grade I complications, grade II complications and the length of postoperative hospital stay in the EEN/PN group were significantly decreased (P = 0.036, 0.028 and 0.021, respectively), and no hospital mortality was observed in our study. Compared with the TPN group (58.2%), the rate of infectious complications in the EEN/PN group (39.3%) was significantly decreased (P = 0.042). Eleven cases of delayed gastric emptying were noted in the TPN group, and 6 cases in the EEN/PN group. The rate of delayed gastric emptying and hyperglycemia was significantly reduced in the EEN/PN group (P = 0.031 and P = 0.040, respectively). Early enteral combined with PN can greatly improve liver function, reduce infectious complications and delayed gastric emptying, and shorten postoperative hospital stay in patients undergoing PD.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a long-term Internet-delivered worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); S. Polinder (Suzanne); F.J. Bredt (Folef); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  9. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition of intensive care patients: current thinking and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gordon L.; Koletzko, Berthold V.; Singer, Pierre; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Energy deficit is a common and serious problem in intensive care units and is associated with increased rates of complications, length of stay, and mortality. Parenteral nutrition (PN), either alone or in combination with enteral nutrition, can improve nutrient delivery to critically ill patients. Lipids provide a key source of calories within PN formulations, preventing or correcting energy deficits and improving outcomes. Discussion In this article, we review the role of parenteral lipid emulsions (LEs) in the management of critically ill patients and highlight important biologic activities associated with lipids. Soybean-oil-based LEs with high contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were the first widely used formulations in the intensive care setting. However, they may be associated with increased rates of infection and lipid peroxidation, which can exacerbate oxidative stress. More recently developed parenteral LEs employ partial substitution of soybean oil with oils providing medium-chain triglycerides, ω-9 monounsaturated fatty acids or ω-3 PUFA. Many of these LEs have demonstrated reduced effects on oxidative stress, immune responses, and inflammation. However, the effects of these LEs on clinical outcomes have not been extensively evaluated. Conclusions Ongoing research using adequately designed and well-controlled studies that characterize the biologic properties of LEs should assist clinicians in selecting LEs within the critical care setting. Prescription of PN containing LEs should be based on available clinical data, while considering the individual patient’s physiologic profile and therapeutic requirements. PMID:20072779

  10. TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION (TPN: ROLE OF RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2 AND CYANOCOBALAMIN (VITAMIN B12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Shiekh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Total parenteral nutrition (TPN replaces and maintains essential nutrients in patients in whom oral or tube feedings are contraindicated or inadequate. A nutritional assessment must be carried out before initiating TPN in order to determine nutritional needs and any metabolic changes due to the patient’s underlying condition, medications or concurrent therapies. In addition to carbohydrates, proteins and fats, certain amounts of micronutirents are also added to TPN solutions. These micronutrients include electrolytes, vitamins, and trace minerals. This review highlights some basic concepts regarding the use and formulation of TPNs along with their advantages and disadvantages and the importance of water soluble vitamins B2 and B12 in human nutrition.

  11. [Applied studies of structured triglycerides for parenteral nutrition in severe hemorrhagic shock patients after resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mao-sheng; He, Lei; Liu, Zhi-wei; Ma, Huan-xian; Zhao, Qing-hua; Zhang, Wen-zhi

    2012-03-27

    To evaluate the effects of structured triglycerides in parenteral nutrition versus a physical medium-chain triglycerides (MCT)/long-chain triglycerides (LCT) mixture on severe hemorrhagic shock patients after resuscitation. In a randomized trial, we studied 20 critical patients with a total blood loss of over 3000 ml perioperatively and/or intraoperatively. The use of triglycerides started from Day 3 postoperation and parenteral nutrition lasted for no less than 5 days. They were allocated to receive one of two nutrition regiments: structured triglycerides in Group A (n = 10) and MCT/LCT in Group B (n = 10). There were no significant differences of general conditions in two groups. Before the start of parenteral nutrition (d0), d1 d3 and d5 after start of infusion, the following parameters were measured: hemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (Plt), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (TB), direct bilirubin (DB), serum triglycerides (TG), prealbumin (PA) and transferrin (TF). And mean artery pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and central vein pressure (CVP) were also recorded at the same time-points. Then the post-TG changes of the above data were compared in both groups. After the use of triglycerides, there were no significant differences of MAP, HR, CVP, Hb and Plt in both groups (P > 0.05). At D3 and D5, the serum levels of TG ((2.1 ± 0.4) vs (1.6 ± 0.6) mg/L, (2.3 ± 0.7) vs (1.5 ± 0.3) mg/L) and alanine aminotransferase ((133 ± 58) vs (97 ± 26) U/L; (116 ± 48) vs (77 ± 31) U/L) were significantly higher in Group B versus those receiving structured triglycerides in Group A (P 0.05). The serum levels of such nutrition markers as PA ((195 ± 55) vs (166 ± 55) mg/L,(245 ± 53) vs (195 ± 58) mg/L) and TF ((2.6 ± 0.5) vs (2.5 ± 0.6) g/L, (3.3 ± 0.8) vs (2.9 ± 0.6) g/L)were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (P synthesis and hepatocyte protection, structured triglycerides in parenteral nutrition is advantageous to standard MCT

  12. Vitamin E in new Generation Lipid Emulsions Protects Against Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver disease in Parenteral Nutrition-Fed Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenneth, Ng; Stoll, Barbara; Chacko, Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Hypothesis: Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E...... composition of soy and fish oil lipid emulsions affects development of PNALD in preterm pigs. Methods: We measured markers of PNALD in preterm pigs that received 14 days of PN that included 1 of the following: (1) Intralipid (IL, 100% soybean oil), (2) Intralipid + vitamin E (ILE, d-α-tocopherol), (3......, OV, and PS compared to IL. Hepatic cholesterol 7-hydroxylase and organic solute transporter-α expression was lower (P E1 fatty acid...

  13. [Value of early application of different doses of amino acids in parenteral nutrition among preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Juan; Liu, Guo-Sheng; Chen, Yong-Ge; Zhang, Hui-Li; Wu, Xue-Fen

    2015-01-01

    To study the short-term response and tolerance of different doses of amino acids in parenteral nutrition among preterm infants. This study included 86 preterm infants who had a birth weight between 1 000 to 2 000 g and were admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of birth between March 2013 and June 2014. According to the early application of different doses of amino acids, they were randomized into low-dose group (n=29, 1.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 3.5 g/kg per day), medium-dose group (n=28, 2.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 3.7 g/kg per day), and high-dose group (n=29, 3.0 g/kg per day with an increase of 0.5-1.0 g/kg daily and a maximum of 4.0 g/kg per day). Other routine parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition support were also applied. The maximum weight loss was lower and the growth rate of head circumference was greater in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group (Pnutrition, shorter duration of hospital stay, and less hospital cost than those in the low-dose group (P0.05). Parenteral administration of high-dose amino acids in preterm infants within 24 hours after birth can improve the short-term nutritional status of preterm infants, but there is a transient increase in BUN level.

  14. Conclusions to the first Baxter-Senpe workshop on: ready-to-use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    García de Lorenzo Mateos, A.; Bermejo Vicedo, T.; Gómez Candela, C.; Planas Vila, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conclusiones de la Mesa de Trabajo sobre productos listos para su uso (RTU) en nutrición parenteral. Se efectúa una aproximación a la definición y a las ventajas en comparación con otros modelos de nutrición parenteral. Destacan los aspectos relacionados con la gestión, composición de la RTU e indicaciones tanto intrahospitalarias como domiciliarias.Conclusions to the workshop on ready-to use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition. An approximation is done to the definition and advantages in...

  15. Early optimal parenteral nutrition and metabolic acidosis in very preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bonsante

    Full Text Available It is currently recognized that an optimized nutritional approach, consisting of an early and substantial supply of protein and energy by parenteral route, may be beneficial for very low birth weight infants and recent guidelines endorse this strategy. However, the impact of the enhanced parenteral nutrition (PN on acid-basic balance has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of nutrient intake on acid-base homeostasis in a large population of preterm infants on PN.This observational study described the acid-base profile of very preterm infants (≤29 week's gestation receiving PN during the first week of life. For this purpose three different cohorts of infants who received increasing (group 1 to group 3 nutritional intakes were considered. Nutrition data were recorded daily and correlated to acid-base data (pH, base excess, and lactate. The outcome measure to assess metabolic acidosis was the base excess (BE.161 infants were included. 1127 daily nutritional records and 795 blood gas data were analyzed. The three groups were different with regard to nutritional intravenous intakes. Group 3 in particular had a higher mean intake of both amino acids (3.3 ± 0.8 g/kg/d and lipids (2.8 ± 1.4 g/kg/d during the first week of life. Metabolic acidosis was more severe in the group with the highest parenteral intake of amino acids and lipids: mean BE = -8.7 ± 3.4 (group 3; -6.4 ± 3.4 (group 2; -5.1 ± 3.0 (group 1]. At the multivariate analysis the significant risk factors for metabolic acidosis were: gestational age, initial base excess, amino acid and lipid intravenous intakes.Acid-base homeostasis was influenced by the nutritional intake. Earlier and higher intravenous amino acid and lipid intakes particularly increased the risk of metabolic acidosis. The nutritional tolerance was different depending on gestational age, and the smaller infants (24-26 week's gestation displayed greater acidotic disequilibrium

  16. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients with post-bariatric surgery complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Gossum, A; Pironi, L; Chambrier, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity is a worldwide health problem. Bariatric surgery (BS) is becoming one of the most commonly used methods for fighting obesity and its associated comorbidities. However, current BS techniques can be associated with early or late complications that may require nutritional...... support. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to determine the indications and outcomes for patients on Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) due to post-bariatric surgery complications. METHODS: A specific questionnaire was designed by the ESPEN HAN/CIF working group and submitted to HPN...... centers. This questionnaire included: patient demographics, type of surgery, BMI before surgery and at start of HPN, indications for HPN including technical and nutritional complications (early within 2 months after surgery or late), outcome, PN regimen, and HPN complications. Patients were...

  18. Management of Parenteral Nutrition in Hospitalized Adult Patients [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Nystrom, Erin M; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in adult hospitalized patients, surveys continue to report that many clinicians are undertrained in clinical nutrition, making targeted nutrition education for clinicians essential for best patient care. Clinical practice models also continue to evolve, with more disciplines prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN) or managing the cases of patients who are receiving it, further adding to the need for proficiency in general PN skills. This tutorial focuses on the daily management of adult hospitalized patients already receiving PN and reviews the following topics: (1) PN basics, including the determination of energy and volume requirements; (2) PN macronutrient content (protein, dextrose, and intravenous fat emulsion); (3) PN micronutrient content (electrolytes, minerals, vitamins, and trace elements); (4) alteration of PN for special situations, such as obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, refeeding, and hepatic/renal disease; (5) daily monitoring and adjustment of PN formula; and (6) PN-related complications (PN-associated liver disease and catheter-related complications).

  19. Impact of Complete Parenteral Nutrition on Metabolic Processes in Cancer Patients in the Early Postoperative Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Obukhova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate blood glucose levels during complete parenteral nutrition (CPN, by using the three-in-one system with a high glucose level. Subjects and methods. Thirty adult patients without diabetes mellitus (including 18 men were examined. Twelve and 18 patients were operated on for colonic and gastric cancers, respectively. CPN (Oliclinomel No. 7 — 1000, 1500 ml; glucose, 240 g in 1500 ml, Baxter, Belgium was carried out at the Surgery Department in the early postoperative period (3-5 postoperative days with stable hemodynamics and no organ dysfunction (acute respiratory, renal, hepatic failure. The preparation was administered at a rate of about 83 ml/h over 18 hours. Insulin was not used. Serum glucose concentrations were measured before the study and then for 24 hours at an interval of 6 hours. Results. Glucose concentrations were not found to exceed the allowable values in the majority of patients during CPN at the given rate. In 5 (16.7% patients, short-term glucose increases up to 13.3 mmol/l were corrected, by decreasing the infusion rate. There was no hypoglycemia or other complications during CPN. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that three-in-one parenteral feeding is safe and causes no metabolic disturbances if simple principles are followed, the basic ones of which are to observe the intake of an adequate total dose and the rate of administration of nutrients. Key words: parenteral feeding, hyperglycemia, metabolic disturbances.

  20. Translational Research in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Support for Patients with Severe Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-liang LIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the key points of the translational research in enteral and pareenteral nutrition support for patients with severe head injury (SHI, and to analyze the influence of different nutritional support routes on the prognosis of SHI patients. Methods: Totally 141 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were selected as study subjects, 47 cases for each group, and were given early enteral nutrition (EEN, delayed enteral nutrition (DEN, and parenteral nutrition (PN, respectively. The effect of different nutritional support routes on SHI patients was observed. Results: After 14 d of treatment, Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores of 3 groups were higher than treatment before (P<0.01, and with statistical differences among groups (P<0.05, or P<0.01. The levels of serum albumin, total serum protein and hemoglobin were higher in EEN group than the other groups (P<0.01. The level of serum albumin was lower in PN group than in DEN group (P<0.05. There were statistical differences in the incidence of complications among three groups (χ2=9.2487, P=0.0098. Conclusion: EEN support is more conductive to the improvement of the nutrition status, reduction of the incidence of complications, and promotion of the prognosis of SHI patients than DEN and PN.

  1. Effect of parenteral nutrition on the bone marrow recovery under exsperimental conditions of uneven irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.

    1986-01-01

    Using white rats-males the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) on blood formation (hemopoiesis) recovery under the conditions of total (control), subtotal (shielding of animal hind limb) with 7.5 Gy and X-ray partial irradiation of abdomen region with the 13.5 Gy has been studied. It has been found that bone marrow recovery increases either at subtotal or partial irradiation under the conditions of PN. Mechanisms of PN favourable effect are discussed. The advisability of using PN under uneven irradiations of organism is indicated

  2. Enteral versus parenteral nutrition and enteral versus a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition for adults in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sharon R; Schofield-Robinson, Oliver J; Alderson, Phil; Smith, Andrew F

    2018-06-08

    Critically ill people are at increased risk of malnutrition. Acute and chronic illness, trauma and inflammation induce stress-related catabolism, and drug-induced adverse effects may reduce appetite or increase nausea and vomiting. In addition, patient management in the intensive care unit (ICU) may also interrupt feeding routines. Methods to deliver nutritional requirements include provision of enteral nutrition (EN), or parenteral nutrition (PN), or a combination of both (EN and PN). However, each method is problematic. This review aimed to determine the route of delivery that optimizes uptake of nutrition. To compare the effects of enteral versus parenteral methods of nutrition, and the effects of enteral versus a combination of enteral and parenteral methods of nutrition, among critically ill adults, in terms of mortality, number of ICU-free days up to day 28, and adverse events. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase on 3 October 2017. We searched clinical trials registries and grey literature, and handsearched reference lists of included studies and related reviews. We included randomized controlled studies (RCTs) and quasi-randomized studies comparing EN given to adults in the ICU versus PN or versus EN and PN. We included participants that were trauma, emergency, and postsurgical patients in the ICU. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We assessed the certainty of evidence with GRADE. We included 25 studies with 8816 participants; 23 studies were RCTs and two were quasi-randomized studies. All included participants were critically ill in the ICU with a wide range of diagnoses; mechanical ventilation status between study participants varied. We identified 11 studies awaiting classification for which we were unable to assess eligibility, and two ongoing studies.Seventeen studies compared EN versus PN, six compared EN versus EN and PN, two were multi-arm studies comparing EN versus PN

  3. Early Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Biliopancreatic Mass Lesions, a Prospective, Randomized Intervention Trial.

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    Janine Krüger

    Full Text Available Patients with biliopancreatic tumors frequently suffer from weight loss and cachexia. The in-hospital work-up to differentiate between benign and malignant biliopancreatic lesions requires repeated pre-interventional fasting periods that can aggravate this problem. We conducted a randomized intervention study to test whether routine in-hospital peripheral intravenous nutrition on fasting days (1000 ml/24 h, 700 kcal has a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition.168 patients were screened and 100 enrolled in the trial, all undergoing in-hospital work-up for biliopancreatic mass lesions and randomized to either intravenous nutrition or control. Primary endpoint was weight loss at time of hospital discharge; secondary endpoints were parameters determined by bioelectric impedance analysis and quality of life recorded by the EORTC questionnaire.Within three months prior to hospital admission patients had a median self-reported loss of 4.0 kg (25*th: -10.0 kg and 75*th* percentile: 0.0kg of body weight. On a multivariate analysis nutritional intervention increased body weight by 1.7 kg (95% CI: 0.204; 3.210, p = 0.027, particularly in patients with malignant lesions (2.7 kg (95% CI: 0.71; 4.76, p < 0.01.In a hospital setting, patients with suspected biliopancreatic mass lesions stabilized their body weight when receiving parenteral nutrition in fasting periods even when no total parenteral nutrition was required. Analysis showed that this effect was greatest in patients with malignant tumors. Further studies will be necessary to see whether patient outcome is affected as well.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02670265.

  4. Results of home parenteral nutrition in patients with severe inflammatory bowel disease - an alternative for surgery of malnourished patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkot, Maryla; Sobocki, Jacek

    2017-10-31

    In the world, the inflammatory bowel disease affects an increasing number of younger and younger patients, and in some of them parenteral nutrition is an alternative to high-risk surgical intervention due to advancement of the disease and malnutrition. The aim of the study was to assess the results of home parenteral nutrition in patients with severe bowel inflammatory disease, in whom surgical treatment is associated with high risk of complications. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 46 patients, who received home parenteral nutrition instead of another surgical intervention. The inclusion criteria included home parenteral nutrition and diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mean number of complications requiring hospital admission per patient was 1.76, the BMI increased by 4.3 on average [kg/m2]. During parenteral nutrition, the percentage of patients, in whom anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant drugs were completely discontinued, was 17.4%. In the whole group, at least one immunosuppressive drug was discontinued in onefifth of patients. Mean albumin level increased by 2.4 g/L, lymphocyte count dropped by 474 lymphocytes/mm3, and leukocyte count increased by 747.6/mm3. The patients described their condition as good in 87%, and 7.4% of patients were able to work. Home parenteral nutrition positively affects patient's general condition by increasing BMI and normalizing biochemical test results. The results indicate the need to consider this method as an alternative to surgical intervention in severe bowel inflammatory disease with high perioperative risk, which could reduce the complication rate.

  5. Relationship between turnover rate and oxidation rate of alanine in the post-absorptive state and during parenteral nutrition before and after surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauerwein, H. P.; Michels, R. P.; Cejka, V.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of total parenteral nutrition and stomach resection on alanine turnover rate and alanine oxidation rate was measured in ten patients after single injection of U-14 C-alanine. Sequential studies were done in three patients. During parenteral nutrition alanine turnover was significantly

  6. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkman, Adam S; Murali, Sangita G; Hitt, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral...

  7. Usefulness of gram staining of blood collected from total parenteral nutrition catheter for rapid diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, F; el Alami, S; Van Gossum, A; Struelens, M J; Serruys, E

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of Gram staining of blood drawn from catheters used to administer total parenteral nutrition was compared with paired quantitative blood cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis. Gram staining was positive in 11 of 18 episodes of catheter-related sepsis documented by quantitative culture (sensitivity, 61%) but in none of the 5 episodes of fever unrelated to catheter infection. Thus, this procedure enabled the rapid presumptive diagnosis and guidance of antimicrobial therapy for total parenteral nutrition catheter sepsis, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 42%. PMID:7521359

  8. Higher versus lower amino acid intake in parenteral nutrition for newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David A; Schindler, Tim; Jones, Lisa J; Sinn, John Kh; Bolisetty, Srinivas

    2018-03-05

    Sick newborn and preterm infants frequently are not able to be fed enterally, necessitating parenteral fluid and nutrition. Potential benefits of higher parenteral amino acid (AA) intake for improved nitrogen balance, growth, and infant health may be outweighed by the infant's ability to utilise high intake of parenteral AA, especially in the days after birth. The primary objective is to determine whether higher versus lower intake of parenteral AA is associated with improved growth and disability-free survival in newborn infants receiving parenteral nutrition.Secondary objectives include determining whether:• higher versus lower starting or initial intake of amino acids is associated with improved growth and disability-free survival without side effects;• higher versus lower intake of amino acids at maximal intake is associated with improved growth and disability-free survival without side effects; and• increased amino acid intake should replace non-protein energy intake (glucose and lipid), should be added to non-protein energy intake, or should be provided simultaneously with non-protein energy intake.We conducted subgroup analyses to look for any differences in the effects of higher versus lower intake of amino acids according to gestational age, birth weight, age at commencement, and condition of the infant, or concomitant increases in fluid intake. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2 June 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to 2 June 2017), Embase (1980 to 2 June 2017), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to 2 June 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and citations of articles. Randomised controlled trials of higher versus lower intake of AAs as parenteral nutrition in newborn infants. Comparisons of higher intake at commencement, at maximal intake, and at both commencement and maximal

  9. Hypophosphatemia occurs with insulin administration during refeeding by total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Sarasa; Uenami, Yuri; Tani, Mariko; Ishitani, Midori; Morii, Saeko; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Ito, Mikiko

    2018-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is characterized by the metabolic and clinical changes that occur following aggressive nutritional supplementation in malnourished patients. Hypophosphatemia is the hallmark of RFS and is key to its prevention and treatment in clinical practice. However, the mechanism of hypophosphatemia during RFS is unclear because of the lack of an animal model. In this study, we developed a rat RFS model as a first step to clarifying the molecular mechanism. After establishing the parenteral route, rats were fasted for 5 days and refeeding was started using total parenteral nutrition. The animals were infused with a high calorie solution with or without insulin administration. Results showed that plasma phosphate levels did not decrease in rats infused with the high calorie solution alone;in contrast, a 20% reduction compared to baseline was observed in rats administered insulin. In addition, rats infused with the high calorie solution containing added phosphate did not present with hypophosphatemia. Thus, we developed a rat RFS model with hypophosphatemia by tube feeding and insulin administration, and demonstrated the importance of phosphate in preventing refeeding hypophosphatemia. J. Med. Invest. 65:50-55, February, 2018.

  10. Assessing Selenium, Manganese, and Iodine Status in Pediatric Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Jacob Clarke; Reese, Susan Anne; Mackay, Mark; Anderson, Collin R; Jackson, Daniel; Paul, Irasema Libertad

    2017-08-01

    Pediatric patients who are receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) unsupplemented with trace minerals can become deficient. Due to shortages in trace mineral products and the 2004 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition report stating that individualized trace element supplementation may be warranted, a review was conducted concerning the trace minerals selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and iodine (I). A retrospective review of pediatric patients receiving PN that contained Se and Mn was conducted to determine if a difference existed between them and patients receiving PN without Se and Mn. Statistical analysis was done to assess a difference between trace mineral levels and the time to deficiency between supplemented and unsupplemented patients. Unsupplemented I patients had urine I levels assessed to determine deficiencies in patients receiving PN. Plasma Se levels were measured at a mean of 20 days for supplemented patients (n = 131) and 19 days for nonsupplemented patients (n = 57) with no difference between groups ( P = .2973). Plasma Mn levels were measured at a mean of 28 days, showing no statistical difference ( P = .721). Of the 177 nonsupplemented I patients, 74% demonstrated I deficiencies without supplementation. Time to the development of a Se, Mn, or I deficiency is important to guide supplementation of exclusive PN in children when trace mineral products are short in supply. Our retrospective experience supports assessment of the trace minerals Se at 21 days and Mn at 30 days. It also suggests that some pediatric patients receiving PN are deficient in I.

  11. Use of Piggyback Electrolytes for Patients Receiving Individually Prescribed vs Premixed Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Rebecca A; Curtis, Caitlin S; Leverson, Glen E; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2015-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is available as individualized prescriptions frequently prepared with an automated compounding device or as commercially prepared premixed solutions. Our institution exclusively used individualized PN until an amino acid shortage forced a temporary switch to premixed solutions. In general, premixed solutions contain lower electrolyte levels than individualized formulations prescribed for patients with normal organ function. We aimed to quantify supplemental intravenous piggyback (IVPB) electrolyte use in adult patients receiving individualized and premixed PN and to quantify any effect on difference in the cost of therapy. We compared use of supplemental IVPB electrolytes administered to patients receiving PN during consecutive periods prior to and during the amino acid shortage. Electrolyte IVPBs tabulated were potassium chloride, 10 and 20 mEq; magnesium sulfate, 2 g and 4 g; potassium phosphate, 7.5 and 15 mmol; and sodium phosphate, 7.5 and 15 mmol IVPB. There was no statistical difference in the number of PN formulations administered per day during each period (14.7 ± 3.9 vs 14.0 ± 2.6, individualized vs premixed, respectively). Total IVPB electrolytes prescribed per day increased significantly from the individualized PN period to the premixed PN period (7.03 ± 3.8 vs 13.8 ± 6.8; P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis in Omani Neonates; Single centre experience

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    Sharef W. Sharef

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC is one of the most challenging complications of prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN in neonates. There is a lack of research investigating its incidence in newborn infants in Oman and the Arab region. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the incidence of PNAC and its risk factors in Omani neonates. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January and April 2014. All neonates who received PN for ≥14 days during a four-year period (June 2009 to May 2013 at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, were enrolled. Results: A total of 1,857 neonates were admitted to the NICU over the study period and 135 neonates (7.3% received PN for ≥14 days. Determining the incidence of PNAC was only possible in 97 neonates; of these, 38 (39% had PNAC. The main risk factors associated with PNAC were duration of PN, duration of enteral starvation, gastrointestinal surgeries, blood transfusions and sepsis. Neonates with PNAC had a slightly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in comparison to those without PNAC. Conclusion: This study found a PNAC incidence of 39% in Omani neonates. There were several significant risk factors for PNAC in Omani neonates; however, after logistic regression analysis, only total PN duration remained statistically significant. Preventive strategies should be implemented in NICUs so as to avoid future chronic liver disease in this population.

  13. Early Enteral Combined with Parenteral Nutrition Treatment for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Immune Function, Nutritional Status and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingchao; Wang, Qiaoling; Fang, Wei; Jiang, Yunxia; Li, Liandi; Sun, Peng; Wang, Zhihong

    2016-11-20

    Objective To compare the conjoint effect of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) with single EN or PN on immune function, nutritional status, complications and clinical outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI). Methods A prospective randomized control trial was carried out from January 2009 to May 2012 in Neurological Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Patients of STBI who met the enrolment criteria (Glasgow Coma Scale score 6~8; Nutritional Risk Screening ≥3) were randomly divided into 3 groups and were admi- nistrated EN, PN or EN+PN treatments respectively. The indexes of nutritional status, immune function, complications and clinical outcomes were examined and compared statistically. Results There were 120 patients enrolled in the study, with 40 pationts in each group. In EN+PN group, T lymthocyte subsets CD3+%, CD4+%, ratio of CD3+/CD25+, ratio of CD4+/CD8+, the plasma levels of IgA, IgM, and IgG at 20 days after nutritional treatment were significantly increased compared to the baseline(t=4.32-30.00, Pnutritional status, the serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin and hemoglobin were significantly higher in the EN (t=5.87-11.91; Pnutrition treatment. The serum prealbumin was higher in EN+PN group than that in EN group (t=2.08; Pnutritional status, decrease complications and improve the clinical outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

  14. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruk, Joke; Kortekaas, F.; Lucas, Cees; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood

  15. Internet as a Source of Long-Term and Real-Time Professional, Psychological, and Nutritional Treatment: A Qualitative Case Study Among Former Israeli Soviet Union Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shalayeva, Svetlana

    2017-02-03

    The Internet is considered to be an effective source of health information and consultation for immigrants. Nutritional interventions for immigrants have become increasingly common over the past few decades. However, each population of immigrants has specific needs. Understanding the factors influencing the success of nutrition programs among immigrants requires an examination of their attitudes and perceptions, as well as their cultural values. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of the Internet as a tool for long-term and "real-time" professional, psychological, and nutritional treatment for immigrants from the former Soviet Union who immigrated to Israel (IIFSU) from 1990 to 2012. A sample of nutrition forum users (n=18) was interviewed and comments of 80 users were analyzed qualitatively in accordance with the grounded theory principles. The results show that IIFSU perceive the Internet as a platform for long-term and "real-time" dietary treatment and not just as an informative tool. IIFSU report benefits of online psychological support with professional dietary treatment. They attribute importance to cultural customization, which helps reduce barriers to intervention. In light of the results, when formulating nutritional programs, it is essential to have a specific understanding of immigrants' cultural characteristics and their patterns of Internet use concerning dietary care. ©Anat Gesser-Edelsburg, Svetlana Shalayeva. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 03.02.2017.

  16. Development and implementation of an audit tool for quality control of parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodicio, Sonsoles; Abajo, Celia; Godoy, Mercedes; Catalá, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the development of a quality control methodology applied to patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) and to present the results obtained over the past 10 years. Development of the audit tool: In 1995, a total of 13 PN quality criteria and their standards were defined based on literature and past experiences. They were applied during 5 different 6-month audits carried out in subsequent years. According to the results of each audit, the criteria with lower validity were eliminated, while others were optimized and new criteria were introduced to complete the monitoring of other areas not previously examined. Currently, the quality control process includes 22 quality criteria and their standards that examine the following 4 different areas: (1) indication and duration of PN; (2) nutrition assessment, adequacy of the nutrition support, and monitoring; (3) metabolic and infectious complications; and (4) global efficacy of the nutrition support regimen. The authors describe the current definition of each criterion and present the results obtained in the 5 audits performed. In the past year, 9 of the 22 criteria reached the predefined standards. The areas detected for further improvements were: indication for PN, nutrition assessment, and management of catheter infections. The definition of quality criteria and their standards is an efficient method of providing a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the clinical care of patients receiving PN. It detects areas for improvement and assists in developing a methodology to work efficiently.

  17. Transition from parenteral to enteral nutrition induces immediate diet-dependent gut histological and immunological responses in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Jayda; Sangild, Per T.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2011-01-01

    bacterial groups (Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus species) increased with time. We conclude that a switch from parenteral to enteral nutrition rapidly induces diet-dependent histopathological, functional, and proinflammatory insults to the immature intestine. Great care is required when introducing......-six preterm pigs were fed total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 48 h followed by enteral feeding for 0, 8, 17, or 34 h with either colostrum (Colos, n = 20) or formula (Form, n = 31). Macroscopic NEC lesions were detected in Form pigs throughout the enteral feeding period (20/31, 65%), whereas most Colos pigs...... no histopathological lesions, increased maltase activity, and induced changes in gene expressions related to tissue development. Total bacterial density was high after 2 days of parenteral feeding and was not significantly affected by diet (colostrum, formula) or length of enteral feeding (8–34 h), except that a few...

  18. Supplemental parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a study protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Emma J; Davies, Andrew R; Parke, Rachael; Bailey, Michael; McArthur, Colin; Gillanders, Lyn; Cooper, David J; McGuinness, Shay

    2015-12-24

    Nutrition is one of the fundamentals of care provided to critically ill adults. The volume of enteral nutrition received, however, is often much less than prescribed due to multiple functional and process issues. To deliver the prescribed volume and correct the energy deficit associated with enteral nutrition alone, parenteral nutrition can be used in combination (termed "supplemental parenteral nutrition"), but benefits of this method have not been firmly established. A multi-centre, randomised, clinical trial is currently underway to determine if prescribed energy requirements can be provided to critically ill patients by using a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy in the critically ill. This prospective, multi-centre, randomised, stratified, parallel-group, controlled, phase II trial aims to determine whether a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy will reliably and safely increase energy intake when compared to usual care. The study will be conducted for 100 critically ill adults with at least one organ system failure and evidence of insufficient enteral intake from six intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. Enrolled patients will be allocated to either a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy for 7 days post randomisation or to usual care with enteral nutrition. The primary outcome will be the average energy amount delivered from nutrition therapy over the first 7 days of the study period. Secondary outcomes include protein delivery for 7 days post randomisation; total energy and protein delivery, antibiotic use and organ failure rates (up to 28 days); duration of ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. At both intensive care unit and hospital discharge strength and health-related quality of life assessments will be undertaken. Study participants will be followed up for health-related quality of life, resource utilisation and survival at 90 and 180 days post randomisation (unless death occurs first). This trial

  19. Stability investigation of total parenteral nutrition admixture prepared in a hospital pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Dušica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In the cases when nutrition of patients can not be orally nor enterally performed, parenteral nutrition is a method of the therapy that provides more successful and rapid recovery. In that way, hospitalization can be significantly shorter, healing costs reduced and mortality minimized. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN admixtures are the most complex systems which contain amino acids, carbohydrates, lipid emulsion, macroelectrolytes (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, PO43-, oligoelements, hydro- and liposoluble vitamines, heparin, insulin and water. Concerning the mentioned complexity, special attention should be payed to physicochemical and microbiological stability of a mixture, because of interactions among components, that can be very hard to analyze. The aim of this study was to investigate the problem of stability of TPN admixtures prepared in a hospital pharmacy. Methods. Admixture TPN was aseptically prepared in laminar air - flow environment on the basis of the specified order in supplementing components and additives to basic solutions. Solutions were kept in sterile multicompartment ethylene-vinyl-acetate bags. After preparation and slow homogenization, TPN admixtures were submitted to physicochemical and microbiological stability analyses in various period of time. The assessment of physical stability of TPN admixture was done on the basis of visual inspection, determination of pH value and measuring of particle size. The investigation of sterility and pyrogenic test were performed according to Ph. Yug. V regulations. Results. Physico-chemical and microbiological analyses were applied and no significant changes in visual sense, pH value and droplet size stability of the TPN admixture were observed during the period of 60 hours. The lipid droplets were smaller in size than 5 μm, that is the most common pharmacopoeia requirement. Conclusion. The results of our study confirmed that a TPN admixture prepared in a hospital

  20. Interdisciplinary Discrepancies Between Parenteral Nutrition Macronutrient Prescribing and Recommendations: Is Body Mass Index a Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Katie L; Kandiah, Jay; Walroth, Todd A

    2017-07-01

    Formal nutrition training in medical schools and residencies is lacking and needed. Registered dietitians (RDs) are formally trained in nutrition support and considered experts in the nutrition field. Our purpose was to examine prescribing and recommending discrepancies of parenteral nutrition macronutrients between medical residents (MRs) and RDs and compare results with the ASPEN clinical care guidelines. We also looked at discrepancies among obese patients, due to their increased risk of mortality. The primary end point of this retrospective review was discrepancies in nonprotein calories (NPCs) and grams of protein (PRO) between MRs and RDs. The secondary end point was discrepancies in NPCs and PRO between MRs and RDs among patients stratified by body mass index category. MRs prescribed 300 NPCs more versus RDs ( P < .001). When compared with RDs, MRs prescribed fewer NPCs for underweight patients and more for obese patients ( P < .001). The same analysis found that the PRO discrepancies significantly varied by body mass index classification as well ( P = .022). When these results were compared with the ASPEN clinical care guidelines, RDs adhered closer to the guidelines than did MRs in terms of permissive underfeeding of obese patients. It is widely accepted that MRs are in need of increased formal training, and the results of our study confirm this need and suggest a short-term solution of increasing order-writing privileges for the RD. RDs with this privilege may adhere more closely to clinical care guidelines and therefore increase patient safety.

  1. Gluconeogenesis is not regulated by either glucose or insulin in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 11 hou...

  2. Validation of doubly labeled water for measuring energy expenditure during parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeller, D.A.; Kushner, R.F.; Jones, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The doubly labeled water method was compared with intake-balance for measuring energy expenditure in five patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Because parenteral solutions were isotopically different from local water, patients had to be placed on TPN at least 10 days before the metabolic period. Approximately 0.1 g 2H2O and 0.25 g H2(18)O per kg total body water were given orally. We collected saliva before, 3 h, and 4 h after the dose for measurement of total body water and urine before, 1 day, and 14 days after the dose for measurement of isotope eliminations. On day 14, total body weight was remeasured and change in body energy stores was calculated, assuming constant hydration. Intake was assessed from weights of TPN fluids plus dietary record for any oral intake. Energy expenditure from doubly labeled water (+/- SD) averaged 3 +/- 6% greater than intake-balance. Doubly labeled water method is a noninvasive, nonrestrictive method for measuring energy expenditure in patients receiving TPN

  3. Randomised clinical trial: enteral nutrition does not improve the long-term outcome of alcoholic cirrhotic patients with jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, B; Dao, T; Joubert, C; Dupont-Lucas, C; Gloro, R; Nguyen-Khac, E; Beaujard, E; Mathurin, P; Vastel, E; Musikas, M; Ollivier, I; Piquet, M-A

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition and jaundice are independent prognostic factors in cirrhosis. To assess the impact of enteral nutrition on the survival of alcoholic cirrhotic patients with jaundice but without acute alcoholic hepatitis. The study was a multicentre prospective randomised controlled trial comparing effects of enteral nutrition vs. a symptomatic support in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and jaundice (bilirubin ≥51 µmol/L) but without severe acute alcoholic hepatitis. A total of 99 patients were randomised to receive either the conventional symptomatic treatment (55 patients) or the symptomatic support associated with 35 kcal/Kg/day of enteral nutrition during 4 weeks followed by an oral nutritional support during 2 months (44 patients). Randomisation was stratified on nutritional status. One-year survival curves were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Logrank test. Populations in both arms were similar. One-year survival was similar in the overall population (27/44 patients (61.4%) in the enteral nutrition arm vs. 36/55 (65.5%) in the control arm; Logrank P = 0.60) and in the subgroup suffering from malnutrition [18/29 patients (62.1%) in the enteral nutrition arm vs. 20/32 (62.5%) in the control arm; Logrank P = 0.99]. There was no statistical difference for bilirubin, prothrombin rate, Child-Pugh score, albumin or nutritional assessment. Complications during treatment (bleeding, encephalopathy, infection) occurred in 23% of patients in the enteral nutrition group (10/44) vs. 16% (9/55) of the control patients (P = 0.59). Enteral nutrition does not improve the survival and hepatic or nutritional parameters of cirrhotic patients with jaundice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Interdependency of EGF and GLP-2 Signaling in Attenuating Mucosal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Yongjia; Demehri, Farok R; Xiao, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), a crucial treatment for patients who cannot receive enteral nutrition, is associated with mucosal atrophy, barrier dysfunction, and infectious complications. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) improve intestinal...... deprived of enteral nutrition. METHODS: Adult C57BL/6J, IEC-Egfr(knock out (KO)) and IEC-pik3r1(KO) mice receiving TPN or enteral nutrition were treated with EGF or GLP-2 alone or in combination with reciprocal receptor inhibitors, GLP-2(3-33) or gefitinib. Jejunum was collected and mucosal atrophy and IEC...

  5. [Intrahepatic cholestasis associated with parenteral nutrition: an experimental study in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Martínez, J; Morán Penco, J M; Mahedero Ruiz, G; García Gamito, F; Limón Mora, M; Maciá Botejara, E; Vinagre Velasco, L M

    1989-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a condition often observed in patients receiving parenteral nutrition, especially in new born babies who are underweight (taurina. This makes it impossible to achieve a correct conjugation of toxic biliary acids. The access of nutrients to the liver may have an effect on this. An experimental study on rats was performed, administering an oral diet at the expense of lipids (20% Intralipid, 60% of caloric needs) and glucose (40% of caloric needs) in one group, another group received amino acid supplements to this diet (16N) at a proteic rate of 2 gr/kg of weight and day orally, with an identical diet to the above, except that the proteic intake was intraperitoneal. Two control groups were established. We found a microvacuolization in hepatic fat with the help of an electronic microscope in the groups lacking proteins and those with oral or intraperitoneal supplements of amino acids, as well as an increase in plasmatic AST.

  6. Parenteral nutrition in experimental acute radiation injury of the abdominal cavity organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdov, S.P.; Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Kendysh, I.N.; Vasilevskaya, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The peculiarities of metabolism in rats after partial body irradiation of the abdomen in a high dose and the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with various compositions of diagrams on metabolic indexes with the aim of explaining diagram under conditions of intensive radiation injury of gastrointestinal tract, are investigated. Experiments have been carried out on male rats of the Vistar line, subjected to partial-body X-ray irradiation of the abdomen with the dose of 1400 R. It is shown that under conditions of radiation effect with predominnt unjury of the abdomen, considerable suppression of oxidation processes limits metabolism of nutritious substances. A decrease of glucose and amino acid content in PN produces a pronounced therapeutic effect under these conditions. The increase of lipid component in the PN composition and retabolile introduction increases PN therapeutic effect [ru

  7. Studies on adjuvant parenteral nutrition during chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic measures in haematological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, F.

    1988-01-01

    In patients subjected to bone marrow transplantation the aggressive measures necessarily preceding this treatment lead to drastic metabolic changes which, in turn, are a cause of marked disturbances of homeostasis. The general preparatory measures in the form of cytoreduction by cytostatic drugs are broadened for leukaemic patients to include wholebody irradiation. During the study described here investigations were carried out into the resulting strain on the metabolism. One of the most essential changes observed in those patients was a nitrogen loss of up to approx. 20 g/day that occurred during the immunosuppressive phase. This was accompanied by markedly pronounced variations in fluid elimination, which partly were of an iatrogenic nature. An immediate and sufficient substitution of amino acids in connection with complete parenteral nutrition rapidly acted to compensate for the nitrogen losses, even though these could not be totally reversed to achieve a positive nitrogen balance. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Evaluation of the hepatobiliary function with 99mTc-EHIDA imaging during total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qian; Jiang Zhouming; Yang Meifang

    1988-01-01

    14 surgical patients with non-hepatobiliary diseases were studied with 99m Tc-EHIDA imaging to evaluate the effect of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on the hepatobiliary function. Duration of TPN ranged from 6-56 days, 10 of the 14 patients Beijing within 10 days. The results showed that: (1) 11 of 14 patients had abnormal scintigraphic features. The most prominet findings were delayed liver excretion and prolonged blood clearance time. This fact suggests that not only the rate of excretion of the bile from the liver is decreased but the uptake ability of the hepatorcyte is also impaired. (2) The effect of TPN on liver function is reversible. It was concluded that in order to prevent irreversible damage of hepatobiliary function caused by TPN, the duration of TPN should not be too long and oral intake of nutrients should be resumed as soon as possible

  9. Parenteral Nutrition Supplementation in Biliary Atresia Patients Listed for Liver Transplantation”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jillian S; Sundaram, Shikha S; Pan, Zhaoxing; Sokol, Ronald J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of parenteral nutrition (PN) on outcomes in biliary atresia (BA) patients listed for liver transplantation (LTx). Study Design We retrospectively reviewed charts of all BA patients from 1990 through 2010 at our institution, s/p hepatoportoenterostomy, ≤ 36 months old, and listed for LTx. Initiation of PN was based on clinical indications. Results 25 PN and 22 non-PN subjects (74% female) were studied. Median PN initiation age was 7.7 months, mean duration 86 days, and mean PN energy supplied 77 kcal/kg/day. Prior to PN, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) and mid-arm circumference (MAC) Z-scores were decreasing. After PN, TSF (p=0.003) and MAC (pnutritional status in malnourished BA patients awaiting LTx, which is associated with post-LTx outcomes comparable to those not requiring PN. PMID:21987426

  10. [Description of the ISO 9001/2000 certification process in the parenteral nutrition area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miana Mena, M T; Fontanals Martínez, S; López Púa, Y; López Suñé, E; Codina Jané, C; Ribas Sala, J

    2007-01-01

    In order to guarantee quality and safety and to increase user satisfaction, healthcare organisations have integrated quality management systems into their structures. This study describes the process for introducing the UNE-EN-ISO-9001/2000 standard in the parenteral nutrition area. A multidisciplinary group established the scope of the standard, focusing on transcription, preparation, dispensation and microbiological control. A detailed procedure describing the sequences of circuits and associated activities, the responsible staff and the action guidelines to be followed was established. Quality and activity markers were also established. This process has enabled a standard system to be implemented, with its operation perfectly described and documented, allowing its stages to be traceable and supervised. As there is no record of the data obtained beforehand, no direct comparison can be made; its evolution must therefore be analysed in the future.

  11. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Hanno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia is a common problem in patients (pts suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, most of these patients suffer from malabsorption and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract due to their illness. Various methods of supplementary nutrition (enteral, parenteral are practised. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC, phase angle, determined by bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA, seems to be a survival predictor. The positive influence of BIA determinate predictors by additional nutrition is currently under discussion. Methods To examine the impact of additional parenteral nutrition (APN we assessed outpatients suffering from APC and progressive cachexia. The assessment based on the BIA method. Assessment parameters were phase angle, ECM/BCM index (ratio of extracellular mass to body cell mass, and BMI (body mass index. Patients suffering from progressive weight loss in spite of additional enteral nutritional support were eligible for the study. Results Median treatment duration in 32 pts was 18 [8-35] weeks. Response evaluation showed a benefit in 27 pts (84% in at least one parameter. 14 pts (43.7% improved or stabilised in all three parameters. The median ECM/BCM index was 1.7 [1.11-3.14] at start of APN and improved down to 1.5 [1.12-3.36] during therapy. The median BMI increased from 19.7 [14.4-25.9] to 20.5 [15.4-25.0]. The median phase angle improved by 10% from 3.6 [2.3-5.1] to 3.9 [2.2-5.1]. Conclusions We demonstrated the positive impact of APN on the assessed parameters, first of all the phase angle, and we observed at least a temporary benefit or stabilisation of the nutritional status in the majority of the investigated patients. Based on these findings we are currently investigating the impact of APN on survival in a larger patient cohort. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00919659

  12. Phytosterol Esterification is Markedly Decreased in Preterm Infants Receiving Routine Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Sara; Correani, Alessio; Pupillo, Daniele; D'Ascenzo, Rita; Biagetti, Chiara; Pompilio, Adriana; Simonato, Manuela; Verlato, Giovanna; Cogo, Paola; Taus, Marina; Nicolai, Albano; Carnielli, Virgilio Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Several studies reported the association between total plasma phytosterol concentrations and the parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC). To date, no data are available on phytosterol esterification in animals and in humans during parenteral nutrition (PN). We measured free and esterified sterols (cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and sitosterol) plasma concentrations during PN in 16 preterm infants (500-1249 g of birth weight; Preterm-PN), in 11 term infants (Term-PN) and in 12 adults (Adult-PN). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for measurements. Plasma concentrations of free cholesterol (Free-CHO), free phytosterols (Free-PHY) and esterified phytosterols (Ester-PHY) were not different among the three PN groups. Esterified cholesterol (Ester-CHO) was statistically lower in Preterm-PN than Adult-PN. Preterm-PN had significantly higher Free-CHO/Ester-CHO and Free-PHY/Ester-PHY ratios than Adult-PN (Free-CHO/Ester-CHO: 1.1 ± 0.7 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2; Free-PHY/Ester-PHY: 4.1 ± 2.6 vs. 1.3 ± 0.8; *P phytosterol intake in Preterm-PN. Free-PHY/Ester-PHY of Preterm-PN was positively correlated with the Free-CHO/Ester-CHO and negatively correlated with gestational age and birth weight. In conclusion, PHY were esterified to a lesser extent than CHO in all study groups; the esterification was markedly decreased in Preterm-PN compared to Adult-PN. The clinical consequences of these findings warrant further investigations.

  13. Choline Alleviates Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Duodenal Motility Disorder in Infant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Wu, Yang; Guo, Yonggao; Tang, Qingya; Lu, Ting; Cai, Wei; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been found to influence duodenal motility in animals. Choline is an essential nutrient, and its deficiency is related to PN-associated organ diseases. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the role of choline supplementation in an infant rat model of PN-associated duodenal motility disorder. Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed chow and water (controls), PN solution (PN), or PN plus intravenous choline (600 mg/kg) (PN + choline). Rats underwent jugular vein cannulation for infusion of PN solution or 0.9% saline (controls) for 7 days. Duodenal oxidative stress status, concentrations of plasma choline, phosphocholine, and betaine and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were assayed. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of c-Kit proto-oncogene protein (c-Kit) and membrane-bound stem cell factor (mSCF) together with the electrophysiological features of slow waves in the duodenum were also evaluated. Rats on PN showed increased reactive oxygen species; decreased total antioxidant capacity in the duodenum; reduced plasma choline, phosphocholine, and betaine; and enhanced serum TNF-α concentrations, which were reversed by choline intervention. In addition, PN reduced mRNA and protein expression of mSCF and c-Kit, which were inversed under choline administration. Moreover, choline attenuated depolarized resting membrane potential and declined the frequency and amplitude of slow waves in duodenal smooth muscles of infant rats induced by PN, respectively. The addition of choline to PN may alleviate the progression of duodenal motor disorder through protecting smooth muscle cells from injury, promoting mSCF/c-Kit signaling, and attenuating impairment of interstitial cells of Cajal in the duodenum during PN feeding. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Transthyretin levels: Potential biomarker for monitoring nutritional support efficacy and clinical complications risk in patients receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata Germano; Hessel, Gabriel; Junqueira Vasques, Ana Carolina; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José

    2018-04-01

    Nutritional support is an effective strategy to restore or maintain nutritional status, to reduce clinical complications, hospitalization period and the morbidity/mortality risk of hospitalized patients. So, a good marker is important to evaluate the nutritional support. This study aims to evaluate the evolution of transthyretin levels in patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) during 14 days. Longitudinal study of 88 hospitalized patients. The assessments and samples were taken during the first 72 h (T0), on the 7th day (T7) and 14th day (T14) of PN. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the School of Medical Sciences at UNICAMP (No 538/2011). The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were high and albumin and transthyretin levels were low at baseline. From T0 to T14, only transthyretin increased (p = 0.03). According to the receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curve, we found that the transthyretin had some improvement when the CRP levels were less than 10.4 mg/dl (T7). According to the CRP/albumin ratio, all patients classified as without risk for complications were discharged from the hospital. In addition, we observed that patients with transthyretin reduction had a concomitant higher risk for complications according to their ratio CRP/albumin (p = 0.03). CRP/albumin ratio was associated with the evolution of transthyretin levels. Transthyretin values showed significant improvement in the 14 days of PN. Especially, less inflamed patients (ie CRP less than 10.4 mg/dl) improved their transthyretin levels. So, CRP value at day 7 that predicts the transthyretin and transthyretin is a good biomarker for classification of nutritional support and clinical complications risk in patients receiving PN. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Resveratrol Based Oral Nutritional Supplement Produces Long-Term Beneficial Effects on Structure and Visual Function in Human Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Richer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Longevinex® (L/RV is a low dose hormetic over-the-counter (OTC oral resveratrol (RV based matrix of red wine solids, vitamin D3 and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6 with established bioavailability, safety, and short-term efficacy against the earliest signs of human atherosclerosis, murine cardiac reperfusion injury, clinical retinal neovascularization, and stem cell survival. We previously reported our short-term findings for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients. Today we report long term (two to three year clinical efficacy. Methods: We treated three patients including a patient with an AMD treatment resistant variant (polypoidal retinal vasculature disease. We evaluated two clinical measures of ocular structure (fundus autofluorescent imaging and spectral domain optical coherence extended depth choroidal imaging and qualitatively appraised changes in macular pigment volume. We further evaluated three clinical measures of visual function (Snellen visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and glare recovery to a cone photo-stress stimulus. Results: We observed broad bilateral improvements in ocular structure and function over a long time period, opposite to what might be expected due to aging and the natural progression of the patient’s pathophysiology. No side effects were observed. Conclusions: These three cases demonstrate that application of epigenetics has long-term efficacy against AMD retinal disease, when the retinal specialist has exhausted other therapeutic modalities.

  16. Pediatric parenteral nutrition: clinical practice guidelines from the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE), the Spanish Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrón Giner, Consuelo; Cuervas-Mons Vendrell, Margarita; Galera Martínez, Rafael; Gómez López, Lilianne; Gomis Muñoz, Pilar; Irastorza Terradillos, Iñaki; Martínez Costa, Cecilia; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Pérez-Portabella Maristany, Cleofé; Pozas Del Río, M ª Teresa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana E; Prieto Bozano, Gerardo; Grupo de Estandarización de la Senpe, Senpe

    2017-06-05

    Introduction:Parenteral nutrition (PN) in childhood is a treatment whose characteristics are highly variable depending on the age and pathology of the patient. Material and methods: The Standardization and Protocols Group of the Spanish Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) is an interdisciplinary group formed by members of the SENPE, the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pediatric Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH) that intends to update this issue. For this, a detailed review of the literature has been carried out, looking for the evidences that allow us to elaborate a Clinical Practice Guide following the criteria of the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine. Results: This manuscript summarizes the recommendations regarding indications, access routes, requirements, modifi cations in special situations, components of the mixtures, prescription and standardization, preparation, administration, monitoring, complications and home NP. The complete document is published as a monographic number. Conclusions: This guide is intended to support the prescription of pediatric PN. It provides the basis for rational decisions in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling individual clinical circumstances.

  17. Selenium supplementation in pediatric patients using parenteral nutrition: Is it time to do something?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Hessel, Gabriel

    2018-03-01

    To analyze the nutritional status of selenium and verify the effect of its supplementation in pediatric patients during 14 days of parenteral nutrition (PN). This is a series of cases with patients followed for two weeks while using PN. Data collection was performed at the beginning (T0), in the 7th (T1) and 14th days of PN (T2). The supplemented group received 2 µg/kg/day of selenous acid. Weight and height were measured for nutritional status assessment. Tests requested: plasma selenium, albumin, pre-albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol. Fourteen (14) patients with inflammatory process and with low or very low weight for their ages were evaluated. In both groups (with and without supplementation), all patients had low selenium levels. Median plasma selenium concentrations were 17.4 µg/L (T0), 23.0 µg/L (T1) and 20.7 µg/L (T2). Increase and reduction of selenium occurred both in patients with high CRP and in those presenting normalization of this parameter. Lower plasma selenium levels have been detected since the start of the research and supplementation (2 µg/kg/day of selenous acid) was not to enough to approach the reference values.

  18. Factors contributing to the development of hypophosphataemia when refeeding using parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Vanessa A; Brown, David; Portlock, Jane; Livingstone, Callum

    2008-08-01

    To identify individual attributes or risk factors which predispose to the development of refeeding hypophosphataemia in patients on parenteral nutrition (PN). The Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) a 530 bed, non-teaching Trust with a cancer centre, medical and surgical inpatients and intensive care unit (ICU). Subjects were recruited prospectively from all adult inpatients referred for initiation of PN. Seventy patients (cases) with refeeding hypophosphataemia were matched with controls who had not experienced a fall in phosphate levels when commenced on PN. Their nutritional requirements, nutrition intake, and biochemical test results were compared and statistical analyses performed to show if any differences between cases and controls were due to chance. Independent risk factors for developing refeeding hypophosphataemia were: significant malnutrition measured as a Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) score of three or more; less than 12 mmols total phosphate in the first day's PN regimen; and an initial rate of infusion of PN of more than 70% of calculated requirements. In addition increasing amounts of non-lipid phosphate in the first day's PN regimen were found to be protective. Hypomagnesaemia prior to starting PN was non-significantly associated with refeeding hypophosphataemia. Other biochemical markers included in the study: albumin, calcium, C-reactive protein, glucose and urea, did not show an association. ICU, cancer and postoperative patients were not found to be more at risk. Patients with a high NRS score prior to commencing nutrition support may be more at risk than others of refeeding hypophosphataemia. The first 24 h PN regimen should be run slowly providing less than 70% of calculated protein and calorie requirements but containing more than 12 mmol phosphate.

  19. Adult parenteral nutrition in the North of England: a region-wide audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Jessica K; Thompson, Nick

    2017-01-10

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is widely used to provide nutritional support to patients with inaccessible or inadequate length of gut or non-functioning gut. The objective was to compare practice in PN administration to results of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) report, 'A Mixed Bag', and to establish whether good practice was being followed within this part of the UK. Using the Northern Nutrition Network (NNN), we examined the care of adult patients receiving PN in all 10 secondary care hospitals in our region. All patients receiving PN were included with no exclusions. Data were collected on 192 patients (51% females, median age 65 years (range 18-96)). A data collection tool was designed based on the recommendations of the NCEPOD report. PN was used for a median of 7 days with a 30-day mortality rate of 8%. Metabolic complications occurred in 34%, of which only 13% were avoidable. The catheter sepsis rate was 1.5 per 1000 PN days. The audit suggests that nutrition team input improves patient assessment prior to starting PN and review once PN is established. Risk of refeeding syndrome was identified in 75%. Areas for improvement are documentation of treatment goal (39%), review of PN constitution (38%), ensuring patients are weighed regularly (56%) and documentation of line-tip position (52%). This region-wide prospective audit suggests improved practice within the UK compared to the NCEPOD audit with lower mortality and line sepsis rates. However, documentation remains suboptimal. This work strengthens the case for introducing nutrition teams in hospitals without this service. These findings are likely to be reproduced across the UK and in other healthcare settings. We provide a template for similar audits of clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Impact of clinical pharmacist-based parenteral nutrition service for bone marrow transplantation patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Maryam; Hayatshahi, Alireza; Sarayani, Amir; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Torkamandi, Hassan; Gholami, Kheirollah; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a well-documented supportive care which maintains the nutritional status of patients. Clinical pharmacists are often involved in providing PN services; however, few studies have investigated the effect of a clinical pharmacy-based PN service in resource-limited settings. We designed a randomized clinical trial to compare the clinical pharmacist-based PN service (intervention group) with the conventional method (control group) for adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2011-2012). In the intervention group, the clinical pharmacists implemented standard guidelines of nutrition support. The conventional method was a routine nutrition support protocol which was pursued for all patients in the bone marrow transplantation wards. Main study outcomes included nutritional status (weight, albumin, total protein, pre-albumin, and nitrogen balance), length of hospital stay, time to engraftment, rate of graft versus host disease, and mortality rate. Patients were followed for 3 months. Fifty-nine patients were randomly allocated to a study group. The overall intake (oral and parenteral) in the control group was significantly lower than standard daily needed calories (P nutritional outcomes were either preserved or improved in the intervention group while the nutritional status in the control group was deteriorated (P values nutrition support service significantly improved nutritional status and clinical outcomes in comparison with the suboptimal conventional method. Future studies should assess the cost effectiveness of clinical pharmacists' PN services.

  1. Early nutritional support and physiotherapy improved long-term self-sufficiency in acutely ill older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerová, Petra; Dědková, Zuzana; Sobotka, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    An acute disease is regularly associated with inflammation, decreased food intake, and low physical activity; the consequence is loss of muscle mass. However, the restoration of muscle tissue is problematic, especially in older patients. Loss of muscle mass leads to further decrease of physical activity which leads, together with recurring disease, to the progressive muscle mass loss accompanied by loss of self-sufficiency. Early nutrition support and physical activity could reverse this situation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether an active approach based on early nutritional therapy and exercise would influence the development of sarcopenia and impaired self-sufficiency during acute illness. Two hundred patients >78 y were admitted to a hospital internal medicine department and participated in a prospective, randomized controlled study. The patients were randomized to a control group receiving standard treatment (n = 100) or to an intervention group (n = 100). The intervention consisted of nutritional supplements (600 kcal, 20 g/d protein) added to a standard diet and a simultaneous intensive rehabilitation program. The tolerance of supplements and their influence on spontaneous food intake, self-sufficiency, muscle strength, and body composition were evaluated during the study period. The patients were then regularly monitored for 1 y post-discharge. The provision of nutritional supplements together with early rehabilitation led to increased total energy and protein intake while the intake of standard hospital food was not reduced. The loss of lean body mass and a decrease in self-sufficiency were apparent at discharge from the hospital and 3 mo thereafter in the control group. Nutritional supplementation and the rehabilitation program in the study group prevented these alterations. A positive effect of nutritional intervention and exercise during the hospital stay was apparent at 6 mo post-discharge. The early nutritional intervention

  2. Nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term survivors with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Manon G A; Rütten, Heidi; Rasmussen-Conrad, Ellen L; Knuijt, Simone; Takes, Robert P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Wanten, Geert J A; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Merkx, Matthias A W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term head and neck cancer survivors. Thirty-two patients with stage III-IV head and neck cancer treated by chemoradiotherapy were invited to evaluate nutritional status (malnutrition, relative weight loss), food intake (food modification; quality), and dysphagia. At a median follow up of 44 months, 6 of 32 patients were at risk for malnutrition. Women (p = .049) and patients with high body mass index before treatment (p = .024) showed more weight loss. None of the 32 patients could eat a "full diet." Six patients used nutritional supplements/tube feeding. Low dysphagia-related quality of life scores were significantly correlated to increased food modification (r = 0.405; p = .024). Nutritional advice in patients with head and neck cancer is still necessary years after chemoradiation and should focus on nutritional status, food modification, and quality, in accord with recommended food groups. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for Predicting Short- and Long-Term Surgical Outcomes After Gastrectomy: A Retrospective Analysis of 7781 Gastric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Kim, You-Na; Hong, Jung Hwa; Alshomimi, Saeed; An, Ji Yeong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the predictive and prognostic significance of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in a large cohort of gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy.Assessing a patient's immune and nutritional status, PNI has been reported as a predictive marker for surgical outcomes in various types of cancer.We retrospectively reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of 7781 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy from January 2001 to December 2010 at a single center. From this data, we analyzed clinicopathologic characteristics, PNI, and short- and long-term surgical outcomes for each patient. We used the PNI value for the 10th percentile (46.70) of the study cohort as a cut-off for dividing patients into low and high PNI groups.Regarding short-term outcomes, multivariate analysis showed a low PNI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.505, 95% CI = 1.212-1.869, P cancer recurrence.

  4. Long-Term Effect of a Leonardite Iron Humate Improving Fe Nutrition As Revealed in Silico, in Vivo, and in Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieschi, María T; Caballero-Molada, Marcos; Menéndez, Nieves; Naranjo, Miguel A; Lucena, Juan J

    2017-08-09

    Novel, cheap and ecofriendly fertilizers that solve the usual iron deficiency problem in calcareous soil are needed. The aim of this work is to study the long-term effect of an iron leonardite fertilizer on citrus nutrition taking into account a properly characterization, kinetic response with a ligand competition experiment, efficiency assessment using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and finally, in field conditions with citrus as test plants. Its efficiency was compared with the synthetic iron chelate FeEDDHA. Leonardite iron humate (LIH) is mainly humic acid with a high-condensed structure where iron is present as ferrihydrite and Fe 3+ polynuclear compounds stabilized by organic matter. Iron and humic acids form aggregates that decrease the iron release from these kinds of fertilizers. Furthermore, LIH repressed almost 50% of the expression of FET3, FTR1, SIT1, and TIS11 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, indicating increasing iron provided in cells and improved iron nutrition in citrus.

  5. Survival in Malnourished Older Patients Receiving Post-Discharge Nutritional Support; Long-Term Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelemaat, F; van Keeken, S; Langius, J A E; de van der Schueren, M A E; Thijs, A; Bosmans, J E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous analyses have shown that a post-discharge individualized nutritional intervention had positive effects on body weight, lean body mass, functional limitations and fall incidents in malnourished older patients. However, the impact of this intervention on survival has not yet been

  6. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    AKBULUT, GAMZE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be presc...

  7. Long-term enteral immunonutrition containing lactoferrin in tube-fed bedridden patients: immunological and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Takuya; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Katayose, Kozo; Kohga, Shin; Takase, Mitsunori; Imawari, Michio

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of a novel immune-enhancing enteral formula, Prem-8, which contains lactoferrin as an immunonutrient. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial was conducted in 5 hospitals in Japan, and 71 tube-fed bedridden patients with serum albumin concentrations between 2.5 and 3.5 g/dL were allocated to Prem-8 (n = 38) or control formula (n = 33) groups for an observation period of 12 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing immunological (natural killer cell activity, neutrophil-phagocytic activity, neutrophil-sterilizing activity, and C-reactive protein), and nutritional (anthropometric measurements and serum levels of nutritional assessment proteins and total cholesterol) variables. Safety was assessed by comparing the incidence of adverse events. In a secondary analysis, patients were subgrouped according to the amount of protein supplemented (1 g/kg/d) so that immunological and nutritional variables and safety could be further compared. Natural killer activity and neutrophil functions were normal for both groups throughout the study period, without significant between-group differences at any point. Nutritional status was stably maintained in both groups, although the body mass index at 12 weeks was marginally lower in the Prem-8 group than in the control group (p < 0.01). The incidence of adverse events were comparable between both groups, but the incidence of fever in the Prem-8 group (7/14) was significantly lower than in the control group (10/11) in a subgroup of patients whose supplemented protein was less than 1 g/kg/d (p < 0.05). Prem-8 did not demonstrate superiority to the control formula with respect to immunological and nutritional variables, whereas the body mass index of patients in the Prem-8 group marginally decreased. However, Prem-8 had a favorable effect on the incidence of fever in a subgroup of patients with low protein intake.

  8. Benefits of a new pediatric triple-chamber bag for parenteral nutrition in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Jacques; Marlowe, Monica L; Bonnot, Denis; Senterre, Thibault; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa; Hascoet, Jean Michel; Desandes, Roxane; Malfilâtre, Geneviève; Pladys, Patrick; Beuchée, Alain; Colomb, Virginie

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, flexibility, and ease of handling and use of the Ped3CB-A 300  mL, the first ready-to-use multichamber parenteral nutrition (PN) system, with optional lipid bag activation, specially designed for administration to preterm infants. In this prospective, open-label, multicenter, noncomparative, phase III clinical trial, preterm infants were treated with Ped3CB-A for 5 to 10 consecutive days. A total of 113 preterm infants were enrolled in the study and 97 (birth weight 1382 ± 520 g; gestational age 31.2 ± 2.5 weeks; postnatal age administration 5.6 ± 6.1 days) were included in the per protocol analysis accounting for 854 perfusion days. Double-chamber bag activation was used for 32 perfusion days. Macronutrient, electrolyte, and mineral supplements were primarily administered through a Y-line or directly in the activated bag. In all, 199 additions (mainly sodium, 95%) were made to the Ped3CB-A bags on 197 infusion days (23.1%) in 43 infants (44.3%). More than 1 of these nutrients was added to the bag on only 1 perfusion day. Mean and maximum parenteral nutrient intakes were 2.8 ± 0.7 and 3.6 ± 0.8  g amino acids per kilogram per day, and 80 ± 20 and 104 ± 22  kcal · kg(-1) · day(-1). Mean weight gain represented 10.0, 21.5, and 22. 6 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) according to age at inclusion (0-3, 4-7, or >7 days of life). A visual analog scale was completed and produced positive results. No adverse events were attributable to the design of the Ped3CB-A system. Ped3CB-A provides easy-to-use, well-balanced, and safe nutritional support. Nutritional intakes and weight gain were within the recent PN recommendations in preterm infants.

  9. Glutamine Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in the Intensive Care Unit

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    Meltem Türkay Aydoğmuş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN. We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU. Material and Methods: With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20, and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20 while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20. C-reactive protein (CRP, sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. Results: No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622. Conclusion: Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  10. Glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğmuş, Meltem Türkay; Tomak, Yakup; Tekin, Murat; Katı, Ismail; Hüseyinoğlu, Urfettin

    2012-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU). With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20), and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20) while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20). C-reactive protein (CRP), sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622). Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  11. Central line associated sepsis in children receiving parenteral nutrition in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lawati, Tawfiq T; Al Jamie, Adawaiya; Al Mufarraji, Nasra

    Parenteral Nutrition (PN) is used when gut fails to provide complete nutrition. Central line Associate Blood Stream Infection (CLABSI) a major complication of this therapy. The objective of the study was to report the incidence of CLABSI and associated mortality in children receiving PN in the Royal Hospital and study the indication and duration of PN use. All children from the age of 0-48 months who received TPN outside NICU from the period between 1/1/2011 till 31/12/2014 were included. Data were retrieved from the hospital electronic data base. There were 42 children 27 males and 15 females who used PN through a central line for a total duration of 569 days. The incidence of CLABSI was 14 days per 1000 days catheter and mortality of 556 per 10000. The average duration of TPN was 14.5 days. Most of the patient had CLABSI in the PICU and cardiac related illness or surgery was the most common indication of PN use. The average duration of use was 14 days. Inspite of that short duration use of PN, there is a very high incidence of CLABSI and its related mortality. Bundle policy for central line care is not used in the Royal Hospital and this study calls for urgent implementation of central line care bundle policy in the Royal Hospital. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term nutritional morbidity for congenital diaphragmatic hernia survivors: Failure to thrive extends well into childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliburton, Beth; Mouzaki, Marialena; Chiang, Monping; Scaini, Vikki; Marcon, Margaret; Moraes, Theo J; Chiu, Priscilla P

    2015-05-01

    Failure to thrive (FTT) is well documented among congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survivors ≤3years of age, but its etiology, severity, and persistence beyond this age require further elucidation. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study assessing anthropometrics, measured energy expenditure, and feeding tube (FT) use of 5-17 year olds in our multidisciplinary CDH clinic since January 2001. We stratified clinic visits based on age A: 5.0-6.9, B: 7.0-9.9, C: 10.0-14.9, and D: 15-17.9years. One hundred sixteen patients with 376 outpatient visits were reviewed. Anthropometric z-scores were below zero and did not vary across age cohorts. FTT and growth stunting each occurred in 14% of clinic visits. FTs inserted during infancy occurred in 25% of patients, and 60% remained by age 7years. In cohort A, those with FTs were lighter and shorter than those without (pFailure to thrive continues in long-term CDH survivors, FTs may not improve incidence of FTT. Increased energy expenditure may play a role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A protocol for sustained reduction of Total Parenteral Nutrition and cost savings by improvement of nutritional care in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Rian; Van den Abeele, Kurt; Melsens, Glenn; Schepens, Peter; Lanssens, Truus; Vlaemynck, Bernadette; Devisch, Maria; Niewold, Theo A

    2016-10-01

    Malnutrition and the use of Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) contribute considerably to hospital costs. Recently, we reported on the introduction of malnutrition screening and monitoring of TPN use in our hospital, which resulted in a large (40%) reduction in TPN and improved quality of nutritional care in two years (2011/12). Here, we aimed to assure continuation of improved care by developing a detailed malnutrition screening and TPN use protocol involving instruction tools for hospital staff, while monitoring the results in the following two years (2013/14). A TPN decision tree for follow up of TPN in patients and a TP-EN instruction card for caregivers was introduced, showing TPN/EN introduction schedules based on the energy needs of patients according to EB guidelines, also addressing the risk of refeeding syndrome. TPN patients were monitored by dietitians and TPN usage and costs were presented to the (medical) staff. Screening and treatment of malnourished patients by dietitians is simultaneously ongoing. In 2014 48% of patients, hospitalized for at least 48 h, were screened on malnutrition, 17% of them were diagnosed at risk, 7.9% malnourished and treated by dietitians. TPN usage dropped by 53% and cost savings of 51% were obtained due to 50% decrease of TPN users in 2014 versus 2010. TPN over EN ratio dropped from 2.4 in 2010 to 1.2 in 2014. Sustained improvement of nutritional care and reduction of TPN usage and costs is possible by introduction of procedures embedded in the existing structures. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Early enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition for esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J; Cai, J; Niu, Z-X; Chen, L-Q

    2016-05-01

    Early postoperative enteral nutrition (EN) after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patient has been reported to be correlated with a better rehabilitation than parenteral nutrition (PN). However, a robust conclusion has not been achieved. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the postoperative EN and PN in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing esophagectomy. Three electronic databases were searched for eligible studies to be included in the meta-analysis. The summary relative risk/weighted mean difference (RR/WMD) estimates and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. The analysis demonstrated that the early postoperative EN could significantly decrease the pulmonary complications (RR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.22-0.62, P = 0.00, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.89) and anastomotic leakage (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22-0.96, P = 0.04, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.66) compared with PN. On the eighth postoperative day, the EN group had a higher levels of albumin (WMD = 1.84, 95% CI = 0.47-3.21, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 84.5%, P = 0.00) and prealbumin (WMD = 12.96, 95% CI = 3.63-22.29, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.63) compared with the PN group. However, there was no difference in digestive complications between these two approaches (RR = 1.30, 95% CI = 0.79-2.13, P = 0.30, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.97). For patients with esophageal cancer following esophagectomy, the early postoperative EN support could decrease the morbidity of severe complications, such as pulmonary complications and anastomotic leakage, and maintain patients at a better nutritional status than parenteral nutrion support. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  15. Home parenteral nutrition improves quality of life and nutritional status in patients with cancer: a French observational multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culine, S; Chambrier, C; Tadmouri, A; Senesse, P; Seys, P; Radji, A; Rotarski, M; Balian, A; Dufour, P

    2014-07-01

    Malnutrition is a predictor of poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Little is known about the benefit of nutritional support in these patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) on quality of life (Qol) in cancer patients. We performed an observational prospective study to determine the impact of HPN on Qol in a population of patients with heterogeneous cancer. Physicians, patients and family members had to complete a questionnaire before HPN administration and 28 days after the course of HPN. Qol was evaluated using the self-administered questionnaire FACT-G. We included 767 patients with cancer of whom 437 ended the study. Mean patient age was 63±11.4 years and 60.5% were men. Primary gastrointestinal cancer was reported in 50% of patients and 65.3% were presenting metastases. Malnutrition was reported in 98.3%. After 28 days of HPN intake, significant improvement was observed in the Qol (49.95±5.82 vs. 48.35±5.01 at baseline, pnutrition risk index had also improved significantly. Most patients (78%) had perceived a positive impact of the HPN. A significant improvement in patient's well-being was perceived also by family members and physicians. Our data suggest that preventing and correcting malnutrition using HPN in patients with cancer might have a significant benefit on their well-being. Randomized controlled studies are required to confirm this finding.

  16. Five-year survival and causes of death in patients on home parenteral nutrition for severe chronic and benign intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joly, Francisca; Baxter, Janet; Staun, Michael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIM: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions and underl......BACKGROUND & AIM: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions...

  17. Blood glucose control in healthy subject and patients receiving intravenous glucose infusion or total parenteral nutrition using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, Michael A; Walberg, Jörg; Vethacke, Arndt

    2004-01-01

    It was the aim of the study to examine whether the insulinotropic gut hormone GLP-1 is able to control or even normalise glycaemia in healthy subjects receiving intravenous glucose infusions and in severely ill patients hyperglycaemic during total parenteral nutrition.......It was the aim of the study to examine whether the insulinotropic gut hormone GLP-1 is able to control or even normalise glycaemia in healthy subjects receiving intravenous glucose infusions and in severely ill patients hyperglycaemic during total parenteral nutrition....

  18. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... + CDCA for 14 days, and responses were assessed by serum markers, histology, and levels of key regulatory peptides. Cholestasis and steatosis were demonstrated in the TPN group relative to EN controls by elevated levels of serum total and direct bilirubin and also bile acids and liver triglyceride (TG...

  19. The nutritional index 'CONUT' is useful for predicting long-term prognosis of patients with end-stage liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Koji; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kondo, Yasuteru; Inoue, Jun; Kakazu, Eiji; Ninomiya, Masashi; Wakui, Yuta; Saito, Naoko; Satomi, Susumu; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2011-07-01

    Organ allocation in Japan remains difficult due to the shortage of deceased-donor livers. The screening tool for controlling nutritional status (CONUT) has been considered to be an established assessment model for evaluating nutritional aspects in surgical patients. However, the application of this CONUT for evaluating the prognosis of patients with end-stage liver diseases has not been evaluated. We assessed the predictability of the prognoses of 58 patients with end-stage liver disease using various prognostic models. The patients registered at the transplantation center of Tohoku University Hospital for the waiting list of Japan Organ Transplant Network for liver transplantation were retrospectively analyzed. The prognoses of the patients were evaluated using the following 5 models: CONUT, the model for ELD with incorporation of sodium (MELD-Na), Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (CTP), prognostic nutritional indices (Onodera: PNI-O), and the Japan Medical Urgency criteria of the liver (JMU). Cox's proportional hazard model, log-rank test and concordance(c)-static were used for the statistics. The indices were 17.74 ± 5.80 for MELD-Na, 9.21 ± 2.19 for CTP, 33.92 ± 11.16 for PNI-O, and 7.57 ± 3.09 for CONUT. Univariate analysis revealed the significance of CONUT (p = 0.017, Odds: 1.325) but not MELD-Na, CTP, JMU or PNI-O for prediction. The cumulative survival rate was clearly discriminated at CONUT point 7. The c-static was 0.081 for the 6-month (M) survival rate, 0.172 for 12M, 0.517 for 36M, 0.821 for 48M, and 0.938 for 60M for CONUT. In conclusion, CONUT shows best predictability for the distant prognoses of patients with ELD.

  20. Compatibility of intravenous ibuprofen with lipids and parenteral nutrition, for use as a continuous infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jowell; Garg, Alka; Song, Yunmei; Fotios, Ambados; Andersen, Chad; Garg, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing interest to administer ibuprofen as a continuous infusion instead of a traditional bolus for treating Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA). However, its compatibility data with commonly used drugs in the neonatal period, including parenteral nutrition (PN) and lipids is unavailable. The aim is to determine the compatibility of intravenous ibuprofen lysine with various ANZNN parenteral nutrition consensus group standard neonatal PN formulations and lipids. The PN and lipid solutions used in a tertiary neonatal unit were obtained. These included a Starter, Standard Preterm and low carbohydrate PN, and IV SMOF lipid admixture (SMOFLipid 20% 15 mL; Vitalipid N infant 4 mL, Soluvit N 1 mL) plus vitamin mixtures. 10% glucose was used as a control. 1:1 mixtures of different concentrations (1.25 to 5mg/mL) of ibuprofen lysine and each of the PN/glucose/lipid formulations were made. Samples were taken at hourly intervals for a total of 4 hours and tested for both physical (visual assessment, pH and microscopy) and chemical compatibility (High Performance Liquid Chromatography analysis). Zeta potential and particle diameter were measured for SMOF lipid admixture and ibuprofen combination to assess emulsion stability. 24 hour stability of ibuprofen dilution in 5 mL BD Luer-lok polypropylene syringes at 25°C was also assessed. Most PN formed opaque solutions when mixed with ibuprofen 2.5 and 5mg/mL solutions. However, ibuprofen dilution of 1.25mg/mL produced clear, colourless solutions with no microscopic particles when mixed with all PN/glucose/lipid formulations tested. Ibuprofen was chemically stable with all PN and SMOF lipid admixture, for a period of 4 hours. The zeta potential and particle diameter were within acceptable limits. Ibuprofen lysine was stable over 24 hours in Luer-lok polypropylene syringes. Ibuprofen 1.25mg/mL is physically and chemically compatible with 10% glucose, starter PN, standard preterm and low carbohydrate PN, and SMOF lipid

  1. Changes in body weight, body composition and cardiovascular risk factors after long-term nutritional intervention in patients with severe mental illness: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahavas George

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared with the general population, individuals with severe mental illness (SMI have increased prevalence rates of obesity and greater risk for cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a long term nutritional intervention on body weight, body fat and cardiovascular risk factors in a large number of patients with SMI. Methods Nine hundred and eighty-nine patients with a mean ± S.D age of 40 ± 11.7 yrs participated in a 9 mo nutritional intervention which provided personalised dietetic treatment and lifestyle counselling every two weeks. Patients had an average body mass index (BMI of 34.3 ± 7.1 kg.m-2 and body weight (BW of 94.9 ± 21.7 kg. Fasted blood samples were collected for the measurement of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL- cholesterol. All measurements were undertaken at baseline and at 3 mo, 6 mo and 9 mo of the nutritional intervention. Results Four hundred and twenty-three patients of 989 total patients' cases (42.8% dropped out within the first 3 months. Two hundred eighty-five completed 6 months of the program and 145 completed the entire 9 month nutritional intervention. There were progressive statistically significant reductions in mean weight, fat mass, waist and BMI throughout the duration of monitoring (p -2 (p Conclusion The nutritional intervention produced significant reductions in body weight, body fat and improved the cardiometabolic profile in patients with SMI. These findings indicate the importance of weight-reducing nutritional intervention in decreasing the cardiovascular risk in patients with SMI.

  2. Early enteral nutrition and total parenteral nutrition on the nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Zhao, Jiamin; Zhang, Yanling; Liu, Chong

    2018-07-01

    Effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support on nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy were investigated. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus type 2 admitted to the First People's Hospital of Jinan (Jinan, China), from June 2012 to June 2016 were selected into the study. According to different nutrition support pathways, these patients were randomly divided into the EEN group and the TPN group. The improvement of nutritional indexes, postoperative complications, gastrointestinal function recovery and perioperative blood glucose fluctuation were compared between the two groups. On the 4th day after operation, the improvement levels of total bilirubin (TBL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (TP), prealbumin (PAB), hemoglobin (HGB) and weight (Wt) in the EEN group were significantly higher than those in the conventional group (P0.05). No patients had complications in the EEN group, while a total of 29 patients in the TPN group suffered adverse reactions, indicating that the incidence rate of complications in the EEN group was significantly lower than that in the TPN group (Pnutrition for patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy, which is worthy of clinical promotion as it maintains good nutritional status, produces few postoperative complications and keeps the blood glucose level stable, by which the postoperative evacuation time is early, the hospitalization time is short and the cost is low.

  3. Successful long-term maintenance following Nutrition Care Process Terminology implementation across a state-wide health-care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Angela; O'Sullivan, Therese A; Porter, Jane; Hogg, Marion

    2017-09-01

    Three years following a state-wide Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) implementation project, the present study aimed to (i) assess changes in NCPT knowledge and attitudes, (ii) identify implementation barriers and enablers and (iii) seek managers' opinions post-implementation. Pre-implementation and three years post-implementation, all Queensland Government hospitals state-wide were invited to repeat a validated NCPT survey. Additionally, a separate survey sought dietetic managers' opinions regarding NCPT's use and acceptance, usefulness for patient care, role in service planning and continued use. A total of 238 dietitians completed the survey in 2011 and 82 dietitians in 2014. Use of diagnostic statement in the previous six months improved (P  0.05). Key elements in sustaining NCPT implementation over three years included ongoing management support, workshops/tutorials, discussion and mentor and peer support. The most valued resources were pocket guides, ongoing workshops/tutorials and mentor support. Dietetic managers held many positive NCPT views, however, opinions differed around the usefulness of service planning, safer practice, improving patient care and facilitating communication. Some managers would not support NCPT unless it was recommended for practice. Immediate improvements following the NCPT implementation project were sustained over three years. Moving forward, a professional focus on continuing to incorporate NCPT into standard practice will provide structure for process and outcomes assessment. © 2017 State of Queensland. Nutrition and Dietetics © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  4. Parenteral nutrition combined with rice soup can be a safe and effective intervention for congenital chylous ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Yan, Weihui; Lu, Lina; Tao, Yijing; Lu, Wei; Chen, Yingwei; Tang, Qingya; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites in the neonatal period is a rare entity. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), medium chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet, octreotide and repeated paracentesis are regarded as appropriate medical treatment for congenital chylous ascites, and surgery is recommended when conservative therapy has failed. We present two cases in which ascites were confirmed via an abdominal sonogram and diagnostic paracentesis. In our clinical experience, rice soup combined with PN can be a safe and effective intervention.

  5. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnvad, Charlotte R.; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E.

    2008-01-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely,delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first...... formula after TPN. Conversely, colostrum milk diets improve gut maturation and NEC resistance in preterm pigs subjected to a few days of TPN after birth....

  6. Nutritional assessment of residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFS): recommendations of the task force on nutrition and ageing of the IAGG Europe region and the IANA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salva, A.; Coll-Planas, L.; Bruce, S.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Andrieu, S.; Abellan, G.; Vellas, B.

    2009-01-01

    Unintentional weight loss and Undernutrition are major problems among older people living in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF). Undernutrition manifests in LTCF particularly as weight loss and low Body Mass Index (BMI) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as with

  7. Effects of Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition of Esophageal Cancer Surgical Patients Receiving Enteral Nutrition: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Ping Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Olive oil-based lipid emulsion (LE and medium chain triglyceride/long chain triglyceride (MCT/LCT emulsion are both LEs with low ω-6 polyunsaturated fat acids (PUFAs content. However, which one of these LEs is associated with a lower infection risk in patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN remains unclear. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the two LEs in PN in esophageal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods: Patients with resectable esophageal carcinoma were recruited and allocated randomly to two groups. The test group was given enteral nutrition (EN with PN containing olive oil-based LE after tumor resection for ≥7 days, and the patients in the control group were supported by EN with MCT/LCT emulsion-based PN after surgery for the same time period. Immunological markers and inflammatory indicators were tested and perioperative clinical outcomes were determined. The trial was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Register, number ChiCTR-TRC-13003562. 94 Patients were recruited, and grouped (olive oil-based LE, n = 46 and MCT/LCT, n = 48, matched for sex, age, body mass index, histological type, TNM stage, and nutrition risk screening (NRS 2002 score. Results: There were no differences in perioperative fever (>38 °C, infectious complications, length of hospital stay (>14 days, length of critical care stay (>2 days, time for oral food intake, and in-hospital mortality between the two groups. The test group showed a higher increase in IgG level compared with the MCT/LCT group (p = 0.028. There was no difference in other immunological markers and inflammatory indicators between the two groups. Conclusion: PN containing olive oil-based or MCT/LCT LEs had similar effects on perioperative outcome, cell-mediated immune function and inflammatory response in esophageal cancer patients who had undergone surgery and were receiving EN.

  8. Calcium Chloride and Calcium Gluconate in Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition Solutions without Cysteine: Compatibility Studies Using Laser Light Obscuration Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Huston

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There are no compatibility studies for neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions without cysteine containing calcium chloride or calcium gluconate using light obscuration as recommended by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP. The purpose of this study was to do compatibility testing for solutions containing calcium chloride and calcium gluconate without cysteine. Solutions of TrophAmine and Premasol (2.5% amino acids, containing calcium chloride or calcium gluconate were compounded without cysteine. Solutions were analyzed for particle counts using light obscuration. Maximum concentrations tested were 15 mmol/L of calcium and 12.5 mmol/L of phosphate. If the average particle count of three replicates exceeded USP guidelines, the solution was determined to be incompatible. This study found that 12.5 and 10 mmol/L of calcium and phosphate, respectively, are compatible in neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions compounded with 2.5% amino acids of either TrophAmine or Premasol. There did not appear to be significant differences in compatibility for solutions containing TrophAmine or Premasol when solutions were compounded with either CaCl2 or CaGlu-Pl. This study presents data in order to evaluate options for adding calcium and phosphate to neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions during shortages of calcium and cysteine.

  9. Hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition: a multicenter study. (Study group on the problem of hyperglycemia in parenteral nutrition; Nutrition area of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Petrina, Estrella; Manjón, Laura; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, Ma José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Sánchez-Vilar, Olga; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; Del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among hospitalized patients. Treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin is potentially associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypoglycemia (capillary blood glucose parenteral nutrition (TPN). This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill adults who were prescribed TPN were included, thus enabling us to collect data on capillary blood glucose and insulin dosage. The study included 605 patients of whom 6.8% (n = 41) had at least one capillary blood glucose <70 mg/dL and 2.6% (n = 16) had symptomatic hypoglycemia. The total number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 d of TPN was 0.82. In univariate analysis, hypoglycemia was significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, a lower body mass index (BMI), and treatment with intravenous (IV) insulin. Patients with hypoglycemia also had a significantly longer hospital length of stay, PN duration, higher blood glucose variability, and a higher insulin dose. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a lower BMI, high blood glucose variability, and TPN duration were risk factors for hypoglycemia. Use of IV insulin and blood glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. The occurrence of hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving PN is low. A lower BMI and a greater blood glucose variability and TPN duration are factors associated with the risk for hypoglycemia. IV insulin and glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physicochemical stable standard all-in-one parenteral nutrition admixtures for infants and children in accordance with the ESPGHAN/ESPEN guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cloet, Joeri; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Van Winckel, Myriam

    2018-05-01

    Because there are almost no standard all-in-one parenteral nutrition admixtures available for infants and children, the aim was to develop standard two-compartment parenteral nutrition bags for different weight categories based on the ESPGHAN/ESPEN (European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition/European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) guidelines. The 1 g/kg/d lipid version for the 3 to 10 kg weight category (PED1) was assessed for short- and long-term physicochemical stability with the ability to add additional electrolytes (PED1+E). The lipid compartment A and the all-in-one admixture of A + B + vitamins + trace elements were assessed physically by visual inspection, Sudan red test, pH measurement, and lipid droplet size distribution. Chemical stability for compartment A was evaluated by quantitative analyses of non-esterified fatty acids and peroxide content. The glucose-amino acid-electrolyte compartment B was evaluated physically by visual inspection, measuring particle contamination and pH. Chemical stability was assessed by discoloration, quantitative analyses of glucose, and the amino acids L-cysteine, L-tyrosine, and L-tryptophan. No phase separation or coalescence occurred, and the mean droplet size diameter did not exceed 0.5 µm. Peroxide content and non-esterified fatty acids concentration of compartment A remained well below the limit of acceptation. No precipitation was detected for compartment B; only a slight yellow discoloration was noted at 80 d. Concentrations of glucose, L-tyrosine, and L-tryptophan remained stable; only L-cysteine decreased significantly from its initial concentration. The two-compartment PED1 and PED1+E admixtures are stable up to 80 d 2° to 8°C + 24 h room temperature (RT) with an additional 7 d 2° to 8°C + 48 h RT after mixing and addition of vitamins and trace elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structured triglyceride for parenteral nutrition: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Li, Ni; Zhuang, Wen; Liu, Guanjian; Wu, Taixiang; Wei, Mao-Ling

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the safety and efficacy of structured triglyceride (ST) for parenteral nutrition. A meta-analysis of all the relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. Clinical trials were identified from the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Chinese Bio-medicine Database. The search was undertaken in March 2005. Language was restricted to Chinese and English. Literature references were checked at the same time. Only RCTs were extracted and evaluated by two reviewers independently of each other. The statistical analysis was performed by RevMan4.2 software which was provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. A P value of triglyceride (LCT), and the combined results showed that the ST had significant effect on resting energy expenditure (weighted mean difference [WMD] =1.54, 95%CI [ 1.26, 1.82], ptriglycerides (WMD = -0.10, 95%CI [-0.30, 0.10], P=0.32). Only two RCTs compared ST with the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglyceride (MCT/LCT), data from trials were not combined due to clinical differences between trials, and conclusions can not be drew from the present data. ST appeared to be safe and well tolerated. Further trials are required, especially compared with the MCT/LCT, with sufficient size and rigorous design.

  12. Meta-analysis of structured triglyceride versus other lipid emulsions for parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengbai; Li, Xueliang

    2013-06-01

    Structured triglyceride (STG) is a new emulsion synthesized from long-chain fatty acids and medium-chain fatty acids bound to the same glycerol backbone. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of STG for parenteral nutrition. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Chinese Biomedicine Database, with the last search done in May 2012. Only randomized controlled trials in humans published in Chinese or English were included. Search terms included structured triglyceride and structural lipid. Methodologic quality was evaluated using the Jadad Scale. Meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.0.24 to calculate the weighted mean difference (WMD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals. Twenty-one studies (833 participants) published in English or Chinese were included in the analysis. STG significantly affected plasma triglycerides (WMD = -0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.29 to -0.01; P = 0.04), plasma glycerol (WMD = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41; P = 0.04), free fatty acids (WMD = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.03-0.39; P = 0.02), nitrogen balance (SMD = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.26-1.99; P = 0.01), AST (WMD = -5.97; 95% CI, -7.17 to -4.76; P triglycerides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of refractometry to quality assurance monitoring of parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; Chao, You-Chen; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2008-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) solution contains various concentrations of dextrose, amino acids, lipids, vitamins, electrolytes, and trace elements. Incorrect preparation of PN solution could lead to patient death. In this study we used the refractive index as a quality assurance tool to monitor the preparation of PN solution. Refractive indices of single nutrient components and PN solutions consisting of various concentrations of dextrose, amino acids, electrolytes, and lipids were measured. A mathematical equation and its linear plot were generated then used to predict the refractive index of the PN solution. The best-fit refractive index for PN solution (i.e., the predicted refractive index)=0.9798x(% dextrose)+1.2889x(% amino acids)+1.1017x(% lipids)+0.9440x(% sum of the electrolytes)+0.5367 (r2=0.99). This equation was validated by comparing the measured refractive indices of 500 clinical PN solutions to their predicted refractive indices. We found that 2 of the 500 prepared samples (0.4%) had less than the predicted refractive index (<95%). Refractive index can be used as a reliable quality assurance tool for monitoring PN preparation. Such information can be obtained at the bedside and used to confirm the accuracy of the PN solution composition.

  14. [Depyrogenation test regarding inox and glass containers in the preparation of parenteral nutrition mixtures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoinie, A; Vasselon, P; Tall, M-L; Salmon, D; Bréant, V; Diouf, E; Pivot, C; Pirot, F

    2012-09-01

    The preparation of parenteral nutrition mixture (PNM) in an open chamber requires the use of intermediate containers sterile and non-pyrogenic. A sterilization of containers by moist heat in large autoclaves is the suitable method. However, sterilization by moist heat is not a depyrogenation method. In our study, we report the validation of a sterilization and depyrogenation method for containers by dry heat using a convection oven. Sterilization and depyrogenation of material by dry heat have been audited by the reduction of at least three logarithms of original endotoxin rate. The containers were initially artificially contaminated with a suspension of endotoxin for 16 hours. Contaminated containers were placed in an oven with revolving heat at 250 °C for 1 hour. After treatment with dry heat, the residual endotoxin levels in the containers were determined by a kinetic chromogenic method. After treatment with dry heat, the average log reductions of endotoxin levels were respectively, for glass and steel containers, 4.78 ± 0.07 and 4.87 ± 0.03. The present validation study confirms the effectiveness of treatment with dry heat for sterilization and depyrogenation of glass and steel containers. This method of sterilization and depyrogenation meets the microbiological quality requirements for the preparation of MNP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. [Accuracy, precision and speed of parenteral nutrition admixture bags manufacturing: comparison between automated and manual methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegbeh, H; Pirot, F; Quessada, T; Durand, T; Vételé, F; Rose, A; Bréant, V; Aulagner, G

    2011-01-01

    The parenteral nutrition admixture (PNA) manufacturing in hospital pharmacy is realized by aseptic transfer (AT) or sterilizing filtration (SF). The development of filling systems for PNA manufacturing requires, without standard, an evaluation comparing to traditional methods of SF. The filling accuracy of automated AT and SF was evaluated by mass and physical-chemistry tests in repeatability conditions (identical composition of PNA; n=five bags) and reproducibility conditions (different composition of PNA; n=57 bags). For each manufacturing method, the filling precision and the average time for PNA bags manufacturing were evaluated starting from an identical composition and volume PNA (n=five trials). Both manufacturing methods did not show significant difference of accuracy. Precision of both methods was lower than limits generally admitted for acceptability of mass and physical-chemistry tests. However, the manufacturing time for SF was superior (five different binary admixtures in five bags) or inferior (one identical binary admixture in five bags) to time recorded for automated AT. We show that serial manufacturing of PNA bags by SF with identical composition is faster than automated AT. Nevertheless, automated AT is faster than SF in variable composition of PNA. The manufacturing method choice will be motivate by the nature (i. e., variable composition or not) of the manufactured bags. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Use of the Six Sigma methodology for the preparation of parenteral nutrition mixtures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silgado Bernal, M F; Basto Benítez, I; Ramírez García, G

    2014-04-01

    To use the tools of the Six Sigma methodology for the statistical control in the elaboration of parenteral nutrition mixtures at the critical checkpoint of specific density. Between August of 2010 and September of 2013, specific density analysis was performed to 100% of the samples, and the data were divided in two groups, adults and neonates. The percentage of acceptance, the trend graphs, and the sigma level were determined. A normality analysis was carried out by using the Shapiro Wilk test and the total percentage of mixtures within the specification limits was calculated. The specific density data between August of 2010 and September of 2013 comply with the normality test (W = 0.94) and show improvement in sigma level through time, reaching 6/6 in adults and 3.8/6 in neonates. 100% of the mixtures comply with the specification limits for adults and neonates, always within the control limits during the process. The improvement plans together with the Six Sigma methodology allow controlling the process, and warrant the agreement between the medical prescription and the content of the mixture. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Water Soluble Vitamins Enhance the Growth of Microorganisms in Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotani, Sachiko; Tani, Katsuji; Nagai, Katsuhito; Hatsuda, Yasutoshi; Mukai, Junji; Myotoku, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) solutions contain amino acids, glucose, and electrolytes, with or without some water soluble vitamins. Peripheral venous catheters are one of the causes of catheter related blood stream infection (CRBSI), which requires infection control. In Japan, PPN solutions have rarely been prepared under aseptic conditions. However, in recent years, the necessity of adding vitamins to infusions has been reported. Therefore, we investigated the effects of water soluble vitamins on growth of microorganisms in PPN solutions. AMINOFLUID ® (AF), BFLUID ® (BF), PARESAFE ® (PS) and PAREPLUS ® (PP) PPN solutions were used. Water soluble vitamins contained in PP were also used. Causative microorganisms of CRBSI were used. Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased after 24 hours or 48 hours in all solutions. On the other hand, Escherichia coli , Serratia marcescens , Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans increased, especially in PP. When each water soluble vitamin was added to BF and PS, growth of S. aureus was greater in solutions that contained nicotinamide than in solutions that contained other vitamins. As for C. albicans , they grew in all test solutions. C. albicans grew especially well in solutions that contained biotin. When commercial amino acids and glucose solutions with electrolytes are administered, in particular those containing multivitamins or water soluble vitamins, efforts to control infection must be taken to prevent proliferation of microorganisms.

  18. Practical handling of AIO admixtures – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanga, Z.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available All-in-one admixtures (AIO-admixtures provide safe, effective and low-risk PN (parenteral nutrition for practically all indications and applications. Water, energy (carbohydrates and lipids, amino acids, vitamins and trace elements are infused together with PN either as industrially-manufactured AIO admixtures provided as two- or three-chamber bags (shelf life usually more than 12 months completed with electrolytes and micronutrients where appropriate or as individually compounded ready-to-use AIO admixtures (compounding, usually prepared by a pharmacy on either a daily or weekly basis and stored at 2–8°C. Physico-chemical and microbial stability of an AIO admixture is essential for the safety and effectiveness of patient-specific PN, and its assurance requires specialist pharmaceutical knowledge. The stability should be documented for an application period of 24 (–48 hours. It is advisable to offer a limited selection of different PN regimes in each hospital. For reasons of drug and medication safety, PN admixtures prepared for individual patients must be correctly labelled and specifications for storage conditions must also be followed during transport. Monitoring is required where applicable. Micronutrients are usually administered separately to AIO admixtures. In case compatibility and stability have been well documented trace elements and/or combination preparations including water-soluble or water-soluble/fat soluble vitamin supplements can be added to PN admixtures under strict aseptic conditions. AIO admixtures are usually not used as vehicles for drugs (incompatibilities.

  19. Parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hopewell, J

    2012-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g\\/kg\\/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g\\/kg\\/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g\\/kg\\/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g\\/kg\\/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg\\/kg\\/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.

  20. Study on optimal fat content in total parenteral nutrition in partially hepatectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S; Sakabe, S; Hirata, M; Kamuro, H; Asahara, N; Watanabe, M

    1997-04-01

    In order to investigate the optimal fat content for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions, male Wistar rats were subjected to 70% hepatectomy and then placed, for five days, on one of five TPN regimens in which fat represented 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%, respectively, of the total calorie content. As serum triglyceride levels in the fat-treated groups were lower than those in the non-treated normal rats, it was concluded that the administered fat was sufficiently hydrolyzed. The greater the fat content, the higher the regeneration rate of the remnant liver. Significant differences were found between the 0%-fat group and 20%-plus fat groups. Hepatic triglyceride level was significantly lower in the 20%-fat group. Hepatic protein level was significantly elevated in all fat-treated groups. Serum phospholipids and total cholesterol due to the lecithin contained in fat emulsion were significantly elevated in the 30 and 40%-fat groups, indicating that fat content of 30 and 40% was excessive. The results suggest that TPN containing fat is superior to fat-free TPN for liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, and that optimal fat content is estimated to be about 20% of total calorie content in the case of this fat emulsion.

  1. Early parenteral nutrition and growth outcomes in preterm infants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyses, Helen E; Johnson, Mark J; Leaf, Alison A; Cornelius, Victoria R

    2013-04-01

    The achievement of adequate nutritional intakes in preterm infants is challenging and may explain the poor growth often seen in this group. The use of early parenteral nutrition (PN) is one potential strategy to address this problem, although the benefits and harms are unknown. We determined whether earlier administration of PN benefits growth outcomes in preterm infants. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies. Eight RCTs and 13 observational studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 553 and 1796 infants). The meta-analysis was limited by disparate growth-outcome measures. An assessment of bias was difficult because of inadequate reporting. Results are given as mean differences (95% CIs). Early PN reduced the time to regain birth weight by 2.2 d (1.1, 3.2 d) for RCTs and 3.2 d (2.0, 4.4 d) in observational studies. The maximum percentage weight loss with early PN was lower by 3.1 percentage points (1.7, 4.5 percentage points) for RCTs and by 3.5 percentage points (2.6, 4.3 percentage points) for observational studies. Early PN improved weight at discharge or 36 wk postmenstrual age by 14.9 g (5.3, 24.5 g) (observational studies only), but no benefit was shown for length or head circumference. There was no evidence that early PN significantly affects risk of mortality, necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, chronic lung disease, intraventricular hemorrhage, or cholestasis. The results of this review, although subject to some limitations, show that early PN provides a benefit for some short-term growth outcomes. No evidence that early PN increases morbidity or mortality was found. Neonatal research would benefit from the development of a set of core growth outcome measures.

  2. Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition in Very Low Birthweight Neonates; A retrospective study from Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitha R Aroor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the biochemical parameters, weight gain, osteopenia and phosphate supplementation in very low birth weight (VLBW neonates receiving early versus late parenteral nutrition (EPN versus LPN. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken in the level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman: from January 2007 to October 2008 (LPN group, n = 47 and from January 2009 to June 2010 (EPN group, n = 44. Demographic data, anthropometric and laboratory parameters were extracted from the electronic record system. Results: The mean age of PN initiation was LPN = 47.3 hours versus EPN = 14.3 hours. Biochemical parameters analysed during the first week of life revealed a reduction in hypernatraemia (12.7% versus 6.8% and non-oliguric hyperkalemia (12.7% versus 6.8% in EPN, with no significant differences in acidosis and urea levels between the two groups. Hyperglycemia >12 mmol/L in <1000g was higher in EPN. Nutritional parameters in 81 babies who survived/stayed in the unit up to a corrected gestational age (CGA of 34 weeks (40 in LPN and 41 in EPN, revealed a reduction in metabolic bone disease (osteopenia of prematurity [OOP], 17.5% versus 7.3% and the need for phosphate supplementation (22.5% versus 7.3% in the EPN group. There was no increase in acidosis or cholestasis. No difference was noted in albumin levels, time to full feeds, time to regain birthweight and mean weight gain per day till 34 weeks corrected CGA. Conclusion: EPN in VLBW newborns is well tolerated and reduces hypernatraemia, non-oliguric hyperkalemia, OOP and the need for phosphate supplementation.

  3. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu GH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo Hao Wu,1 Jian Gao,2 Chun Yan Ji,2 Lorenzo Pradelli,3 Qiu Lei Xi,1 Qiu Lin Zhuang1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Nutrition, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3AdRes Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Piazza Carlo Emanuele II, Torino, Italy Background and objectives: Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN for intensive care unit (ICU patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. Methods: We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. Results: The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven® 10% fish oil emulsion would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB, mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days. The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Conclusion: Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN. Keywords: omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipids, ICU patients, total costs, microsimulation, external validation, length of hospital stay

  4. Influence of adding pyrroloquinoline quinone to parenteral nutrition on gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Jiro; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Murakoshi, Satoshi; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Ueno, Chikara; Maeshima, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Koichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Experimental intravenous (IV) parenteral nutrition (PN) diminishes gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) cell number and function. PN solution cannot maintain GALT at the same level as a normal diet, even when delivered intragastrically (IG). Previous studies demonstrated pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-deficient mice to be less immunologically responsive. Because standard (STD) PN solution lacks PQQ, PQQ supplementation may prevent PN-induced GALT changes. This study was designed to determine the influence of adding PQQ to PN on GALT. In experiment 1, mice (n = 32) were randomized to chow, IV-STD-PN, and IV-PQQ-PN groups. The chow group was fed chow with the same caloric content as PN. The IV-STD-PN group received STD-PN solution, whereas the IV-PQQ-PN group was given PQQ (3 mcg/d)-enriched PN by the IV route. After 5 days of feeding, lymphocytes were isolated from the Peyer's patch (PPs), intraepithelial space (IE), and lamina propria (LP) of the small intestine. GALT lymphocyte number and phenotype (αβTCR+, γδTCR+, CD4+, CD8+, B220+ cells) and intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) level were determined. In experiment 2, mice (n = 28) were randomized to IG-STD-PN or IG-PQQ-PN group. After IG nutrition supports, GALT mass and function were determined as in experiment 1. The IV-PQQ-PN group showed increased PP lymphocyte number and PP CD8+ cell number compared with the IV-STD PN group. The IG-PQQ-PN group had significantly greater PP lymphocyte number and PP CD4+ cell numbers than the IG-STD-PN group. Neither IV nor IG PQQ treatment raised IgA level. PQQ added to PN partly restores GALT mass, although its effects on GALT function remain unclear.

  5. Combined enteral feeding and total parenteral nutritional support improves outcome in surgical intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Min-Hui; Yu, Ying E; Tsai, Yueh-Miao; Lee, Hui-Chen; Huang, Ying-Che; Hsu, Han-Shui

    2012-09-01

    For intensive care unit (ICU) patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction and in need of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, the benefit of additional enteral feeding is not clear. This study aimed to investigate whether combined TPN with enteral feeding is associated with better outcomes in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients. Clinical data of 88 patients in SICU were retrospectively collected. Variables used for analysis included route and percentage of nutritional support, total caloric intake, age, gender, body weight, body mass index, admission diagnosis, surgical procedure, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, blood glucose values and hospital mortality. Wound dehiscence and central catheter infection were observed more frequently in the group of patients receiving TPN calories less than 90% of total calorie intake (p = 0.004 and 0.043, respectively). APACHE II scores were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (p = 0.001). More nonsurvivors received TPN calories exceeding 90% of total calorie intake and were in need of dialysis during ICU admission (p = 0.005 and 0.013, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that the percentage of TPN calories over total calories and APACHE II scores were independent predictors of ICU mortality in patients receiving supplementary TPN after surgery. In SICU patients receiving TPN, patients who could be fed enterally more than 10% of total calories had better clinical outcomes than patients receiving less than 10% of total calorie intake from enteral feeding. Enteral feeding should be given whenever possible in severely ill patients. 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V

  6. Comparison of Effects of Soy Oil, Olive Oil, Mct-Lct Based Nutrition Solutions in Parenterally Fed Intensive Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurşen Gürsoy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare the changes in biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition by using parenteral nutrition solutions with different lipid content in critically ill patients. Material and Method: Fourty-five intensive care patients were randomized into three groups to receive either soy bean based (Group 1 or olive oil based (Group 2 or MCT/LCT based (Group 3 nutrition solutions. The calorie requirement was calculated using Schofield equation day. The levels of albumin, total protein, AST, ALT, LDH, GGT, ALP, glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR, CRP, transferin and prealbumin were measured on days 1, 7 and 14. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups according to glucose, liver function tests, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, aPTT, PT, INR levels. CRP and prealbumin were similar within-group and between-group comparisons. In groups II and III, CRP levels decreased while prealbumin levels were increasing. Conclusion: As a conclusion, no difference was found comparing the biochemical parameters and efficacy of nutrition, in ICU patients fed with soy oil, olive oil or MCT/LCT based parenteral nutrition solutions. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 52-8

  7. Nutritional support teams: the cooperation among physicians and pharmacists helps improve cost-effectiveness of home parenteral nutrition (HPN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietka, Magdalena; Watrobska-Swietlikowska, Dorota; Szczepanek, Kinga; Szybinski, Piotr; Sznitowska, Małgorzata; Kłęk, Stanisław

    2014-09-12

    Modern home parenteral nutrition (HPN) requires the preparation of tailored admixtures. The physicians' demands for their composition are often at the variance with pharmaceutical principles, which causes the necessity of either the preparation of ex tempore admixtures or stability testing ensuring long shelf life. Both approaches are not cost-effective. The aim of the study was to use the cooperation among physicians and pharmacists to assure both: cost-effectiveness and patient-tailored HPN admixtures. The first part of the study consisted of the thorough analysis of prescriptions for the most demanding 47 HPN patients (27 females and 20 males, mean age 53.1 year) treated at one HPN center to create few as possible long-shelf life admixtures. The second part of the study consisted of stability testing and modifications. The analysis showed over 137 variations needed to cover all macro- and micronutrients requirements. Their cost as ex-tempore solutions was extremely high (over 110 000 EURO/month) due to logistics and similarly high if stability test for variation were to be performed (68 500 EURO). Therefore prescription was prepared de novo within team of physicians and pharmacists and four base models were designed. Water and electrolytes, particularly magnesium and calcium showed to be the major issues. Stability tests failed in one admixture due to high electrolytes concentration. It was corrected, and the new formula passes the test. Five basic models were then used for creation of new bags. Cost of such an activity were 3 700 EURO (pcooperation within the members of nutritional support team could improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of HPN. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicted versus measured resting energy expenditure in patients requiring home parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ławiński, Michał; Singer, Pierre; Gradowski, Łukasz; Gradowska, Aleksandra; Bzikowska, Agnieszka; Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines from the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) recommend between 20 and 35 kcal/kg daily for patients requiring home parenteral nutrition (PN). Other guidelines use predictive equations. However, these equations have not been validated. Indirect calorimetry is recommended as the gold standard for determining resting energy expenditure (REE). The aim of this study was to compare the frequently used equations with measured REE. Seventy-six hospitalized patients suffering from intestinal failure (ages 21-85 y) were enrolled between January 2012 and May 2014. They were eligible for implementation of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) due to short bowel syndrome (54%), intestinal fistulae (24%), cancer obstruction (16%), and radiation-induced intestinal injury (6%). REE measurements were compared with predictive equations by Harris and Benedict (HB), Owen, Ireton-Jones, and Mifflin, as well as recommendations from ESPEN. In all, 152 calorimetry measurements (two per patient) were performed in 76 patients, after total PN administrations. An average result of REE measurement by indirect calorimetry was 1181 ± 322 kcal/d. Variability in momentary energy expenditure (MEE) from one measurement to the other was 8% ± 7%. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean bias of -192 ± 300 kcal/d between MEE and estimated energy expenditure using the HB equation, which means that the equation increased the score on average by 192 ± 300 kcal/d. Limits of agreement (LoA) between the two methods was -780 to +396 kcal/d. Estimation energy expenditure using the Ireton-Jones equation gave a mean bias of -359 ± 335 kcal/d. LoA between the two methods was -1015 to +297 kcal/d. For Owen equation, Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean bias of -208 ± 313 kcal/d and the LoA between the two methods was -822 to +406 kcal/d. Using the Mifflin equation, estimation energy expenditure gave a mean bias of -172 ± 312 kcal/d and the LoA between the

  9. Successful term pregnancy in an intestine-pancreas transplant recipient with chronic graft dysfunction and parenteral nutrition dependence: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, E A; Wozniak, L J; Venick, R S; Ponthieux, S M; Cheng, E Y; Farmer, D G

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy after solid organ transplantation is becoming more common, with the largest recorded numbers in renal and liver transplant recipients. Intestinal transplantation is relatively new compared to other solid organs, and reports of successful pregnancy are far less frequent. All pregnancies reported to date in intestinal transplant recipients have been in women with stable graft function. The case reported here involves the first reported successful term pregnancy in an intestine-pancreas transplant recipient with chronic graft dysfunction and dependence on both transplant immunosuppression and parenteral nutrition (PN) at the time of conception. Pregnancy was unplanned and unexpected in the setting of chronic illness and menstrual irregularities, discovered incidentally on abdominal ultrasound at approximately 18 weeks' gestation. Rapamune was held, tacrolimus continued, and PN adjusted to maintain consistent weight gain. A healthy female infant was delivered vaginally at term. Medical complications during pregnancy included anemia and need for tunneled catheter replacements. Ascites and edema were improved from baseline, with recurrence of large volume ascites shortly after delivery. Successful pregnancy is possible in the setting of transplant immunosuppression, chronic intestinal graft dysfunction, and long-term PN requirement, but close monitoring is required to ensure the health of mother and child. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Current status of parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition application: an assessment of nutritional prescriptions from 59 hospitals in the People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Yu, Zhenwei; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study reported here was to assess the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) and enteral nutrition (EN), and the prevalence of PN and EN formulas, in the People’s Republic of China. Methods Fifty-nine hospitals in the People’s Republic of China participated in a nutrition survey. The resulting information on nutritional support was analyzed. Results We received 379,584 nutritional-support prescriptions over 40 days in 2013. PN provided approximately 63.2% and EN provided approximately 36.8% of nitrogen intake. PN provided 63.5% and EN provided 36.5% of lipid intake. There were obvious differences in nitrogen and lipid intake between PN and EN in different regions, departments, and diseases. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different regions was highest in Chengdu, followed by the Beijing, Guangzhou, and Hangzhou areas. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different departments was highest in general surgery, followed by gastroenterology and the intensive care unit. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different diseases/conditions was highest in acute pancreatitis, followed by cancer, and burns. The main source of nitrogen in PN was balanced amino-acid preparations, and in EN, it was protein. The main source of lipids in PN was long- and medium-chain triglyceride lipid emulsion injection. Conclusion Despite recent improvements in the application of nutritional support in the People’s Republic of China, a much higher percentage of nitrogen and lipids is delivered through PN than through EN. Furthermore, there are marked regional, departmental, and disease-based differences in the selection of PN versus EN. The rationale for use of nutritional support needs to be improved. PMID:25709462

  11. Early and intensive nutritional strategy combining parenteral and enteral feeding promotes neurodevelopment and growth at 18months of corrected age and 3years of age in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Satoshi; Ichiba, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yuko; Harada, Sayaka; Matsumura, Hisako; Kan, Ayako; Asada, Yuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate whether aggressive nutrition can improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes and growth in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). This single-center cohort study included 137 ELBW AGA infants born in two epochs. The first group received standard nutrition (SN; n=79) consisting of amino acids started at 0.5g/kg/day on Day 4 of life and increased to 1.0g/kg/day. The second aggressive nutrition (AN) group received amino acids started at 1.5-2.0g/kg/day within 24h of life and increased to 3.5g/kg/day. Parenteral and enteral feedings were combined in both groups. Neurodevelopmental outcomes by the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development and growth were followed up to 18months of corrected age or 3years of age and compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. At 3years of age, AN children had a significantly greater mean value of head circumference, but not length or weight, than SN children (49.1 vs 48.0cm, p=0.014). The cognitive-adaptive (C-A) score in the AN group was also significantly higher than that in the SN group (98.3 vs 91.9 at 18months, p=0.039 and 89.5 vs 83.1 at 3years, p=0.047). AN infants born ≥26weeks of gestation were less likely to develop borderline disability in C-A, language-social and overall developmental scores compared to gestational age-matched SN infants. Parenteral and enteral AN after birth improved the long-term cognitive neurodevelopment in ELBW AGA infants, especially in those born ≥26weeks of gestational age, however results need to be confirmed in a larger, multi-site randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of lean body mass with nutritional parameters and mortality in hemodialysis patients: A long-term follow-up clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong Chi; Yang, Xiu Hong; Zhan, Xiao Li; Gu, Yan Hong; Guo, Li Li; Jin, Hui Min

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between lean body mass (LBM) and nutritional status in hemodialysis (HD) patients to better predict their long-term prognosis. Anthropometric body measurements and biochemical parameters were recorded from 222 patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) at the Shanghai Pudong Hospital Hemodialysis Center. LBM was calculated using the serum creatinine index (LBM-SCR), mid-arm muscle circumference (LBM-MAMC), and dominant-arm hand-grip strength (LBM-HGS). Patient mortality and hospitalization were observed after 24 months. LBMs measured from LBM-SCR and LBM-MAMC were associated with sex, body mass index (BMI), serum albumin, and serum creatinine (SCR) ( p LBM evaluation, low LBM was shown to be associated with a higher mortality in patients undergoing HD ( p LBM-SCR and LBM-HGS are strongly associated with hospitalization and mortality in HD patients, indicating LBM is an important factor in prediction of outcomes in those patients. LBM is associated with nutritional parameters in HD patients, and LBM-SCR, HGS, and MAMC are simple approaches for accurately predicting the patient's risk of hospitalization and/or death.

  13. Consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: indicators recommended for the identification and documentation of pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Patricia; Carney, Liesje Nieman; Corkins, Mark R; Monczka, Jessica; Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan E; Spear, Bonnie A; White, Jane V

    2015-02-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), utilizing an evidence-informed, consensus-derived process, recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic indicators be used to identify and document pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition) in routine clinical practice. The recommended indicators include z scores for weight-for-height/length, body mass index-for-age, or length/height-for-age or mid-upper arm circumference when a single data point is available. When 2 or more data points are available, indicators may also include weight gain velocity (nutritional risk is not the purpose of this paper. Clinicians should use as many data points as available to identify and document the presence of malnutrition. The universal use of a single set of diagnostic parameters will expedite the recognition of pediatric undernutrition, lead to the development of more accurate estimates of its prevalence and incidence, direct interventions, and promote improved outcomes. A standardized diagnostic approach will also inform the prediction of the human and financial responsibilities and costs associated with the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in this vulnerable population and help to further ensure the provision of high-quality, cost-effective nutritional care. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

  14. A qualitative study of the perceived value of membership in The Oley Foundation by home parenteral and enteral nutrition consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopy, Katelyn; Winkler, Marion; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna; Melanson, Kathleen; Greene, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Support and educational organizations have been shown to improve quality of life of consumers of home nutrition support. One such organization, The Oley Foundation, offers resources for the home parenteral and enteral nutrition (HPEN) consumer. While research has shown proven benefits to HPEN consumers affiliated with The Oley Foundation, no studies have investigated the perceived value of membership to the consumer or the way in which consumers are introduced to the organization. Qualitative methodology was used to gain a deeper understanding of the perceived value of membership in The Oley Foundation. Audiotaped, in-depth, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted to explore participants' experiences with The Oley Foundation and HPEN. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze data and identify themes associated with membership value. The value of The Oley Foundation lies in programs and resources and the competency, inspiration, normalcy, and advocacy gained from membership, helping individuals adjust to life with HPEN dependency. More than half of participants found the organization through self-initiated Internet searches, but all participants clearly expressed the desire "I wish I knew about it sooner." This study identifies the value of membership in The Oley Foundation and the important role the organization has in the lives of HPEN-dependent consumers. Nutrition support clinicians should introduce the organization to patients when the need for HPEN is established and prior to hospital discharge. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. A prospective observational study assessing home parenteral nutrition in patients with gastrointestinal cancer: benefits for quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesse, Pierre; Tadmouri, Abir; Culine, Stéphane; Dufour, Patrick R; Seys, Patrick; Radji, Abderraouf; Rotarski, Maciej; Balian, Axel; Chambrier, Cecile

    2015-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancer are at high risk for deterioration of nutrition. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) could improve nutritional status and quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was 1) to evaluate the impact of HPN on QoL, 2) to assess changes in nutritional status, and 3) to assess proxy perception of patient well-being. We conducted a prospective, observational, and a multicenter study. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with gastrointestinal cancer, for whom HPN was indicated and prescribed for at least 14 days. The physician, the patient, and a family member completed questionnaires at inclusion and 28 days later. The QoL was assessed by the patients using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaire, at inclusion and 28 days later. The study included 370 patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The HPN was indicated for cancer-related undernutrition in 89% of the patients and was used as a complement to oral intake in 84%. After 28 days of parenteral intake, global QoL was significantly increased (48.9 at inclusion vs. 50.3, P=0.007). The patients' weight improved significantly by 2.7% (Pnutrition risk screening also decreased significantly (3.2±1.1 vs. 2.8±1.3, P=0.003). HPN could provide benefit for malnourished patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, randomized controlled studies are required to confirm this benefit and the safety profile. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  17. Virtual Telemedicine Visits in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Bram P; Schumann, Caitlin; Garrity-Gentille, Sara; McClelland, Jennifer; Rosa, Carolyn; Tascione, Christina; Gallotto, Mary; Takvorian-Bené, Melissa; Carey, Alexandra N; McCarthy, Patrick; Duggan, Christopher; Ozonoff, Al

    2018-05-04

    Despite being less costly than prolonged hospitalization, home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is associated with high rates of post-discharge complications, including frequent readmissions and central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Telemedicine has been associated with improved outcomes and reduced healthcare utilization in other high-risk populations, but no studies to date have supported effectiveness of telemedicine in pediatric HPN. We prospectively collected data on pediatric patients managed at a single HPN program who participated in postdischarge telemedicine visits from March 1, 2014 to March 30, 2016. We excluded patients with a history of HPN and strictly palliative care goals. Univariate analysis was performed for primary outcomes: Community-acquired CLABSI and 30-day readmission rate. Twenty-six families participated in the pilot initiative with median (interquartile range) patient age 1.5 (5.7) years old, diagnosis of short bowel syndrome in 16 (62%), and in-state residence in 17 (55%). Ishikawa (fishbone) diagram identified causes of post-discharge HPN complications. Areas of focus during telemedicine visit included central venous catheter care methods, materials, clinical concerns, and equipment. Compared to historical comparison group, the telemedicine group experienced CLABSI rates of 1.0 versus 2.7 per 1,000 line days and readmission rates of 38% versus 17% (p = 0.03, 0.02, respectively). Telemedicine visits identified opportunities for improvement for families newly discharged on HPN. In a small cohort of patients who experienced telemedicine visits, we found lower CLABSI rates alongside higher readmission rates compared with a historical comparison group. Further studies are needed to optimize telemedicine in delivering care to this high-risk population.

  18. Cost analysis of neonatal and pediatric parenteral nutrition in Europe: a multi-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, E; Liu, F X; Maton, P; Storme, T; Perrinet, M; von Delft, O; Puntis, J; Hartigan, D; Dragosits, A; Sondhi, S

    2012-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is critical in neonatal and pediatric care for patients unable to tolerate enteral feeding. This study assessed the total costs of compounding PN therapy for neonates, infants and children. Face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted in 12 hospitals across four European countries (Belgium, France, Germany and UK) to collect information on resources utilized to compound PN, including nutrients, staff time, equipment cost and supplies. A bottom-up cost model was constructed to assess total costs of PN therapy by assigning monetary values to the resource utilization using published list prices and interview data. A total of 49,922 PN bags per year were used to treat 4295 neonatal and pediatric patients among these hospitals. The daily total costs of one compounded PN bag for neonates in the 12 hospitals across the four countries equalled euro 55.16 (Belgium euro 53.26, France euro 46.23, Germany euro 64.05, UK Ł 37.43/\\[euro]42.86). Overall, nutrients accounted for 25% of total costs, supplies 18%, wages 54% and equipment 3%. Average costs per bag for infants France, euro 92.70 in Germany and Ł 52.63/euro 60.26 in the UK), and for children 2-18 years euro 118.02 (euro 93.85 in Belgium, euro 121.35 in France, euro 124.54 in Germany and Ł 69.49/euro 79.56 in the UK), of which 63% is attributable to nutrients and 28% to wages. The data indicated that PN costs differ among countries and a major proportion was due to staff time (Ł 1=euro 1.144959).

  19. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections in patients receiving parenteral nutrition prepared by a compounding pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan N; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Stevens, Kelly M; McIntyre, Mary G; Jensen, Bette; Kuhar, David T; Noble-Wang, Judith A; Schnatz, Rick G; Becker, Shawn C; Kastango, Eric S; Shehab, Nadine; Kallen, Alexander J

    2014-07-01

    Compounding pharmacies often prepare parenteral nutrition (PN) and must adhere to rigorous standards to avoid contamination of the sterile preparation. In March 2011, Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified in 5 patients receiving PN from a single compounding pharmacy. An investigation was conducted to identify potential sources of contamination and prevent further infections. Cases were defined as S. marcescens BSIs in patients receiving PN from the pharmacy between January and March 2011. We reviewed case patients' clinical records, evaluated pharmacy compounding practices, and obtained epidemiologically directed environmental cultures. Molecular relatedness of available Serratia isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nineteen case patients were identified; 9 died. The attack rate for patients receiving PN in March was 35%. No case patients were younger than 18 years. In October 2010, the pharmacy began compounding and filter-sterilizing amino acid solution for adult PN using nonsterile amino acids due to a national manufacturer shortage. Review of this process identified breaches in mixing, filtration, and sterility testing practices. S. marcescens was identified from a pharmacy water faucet, mixing container, and opened amino acid powder. These isolates were indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by PFGE. Compounding of nonsterile amino acid components of PN was initiated due to a manufacturer shortage. Failure to follow recommended compounding standards contributed to an outbreak of S. marcescens BSIs. Improved adherence to sterile compounding standards, critical examination of standards for sterile compounding from nonsterile ingredients, and more rigorous oversight of compounding pharmacies is needed to prevent future outbreaks. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public

  20. Ascorbylperoxide Contaminating Parenteral Nutrition Is Associated With Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ibrahim; Elremaly, Wesam; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2017-08-01

    Ascorbylperoxide (AscOOH) is a hydrogen peroxide-dependent by-product of ascorbic acid that contaminates parenteral nutrition. In a guinea pig model, it caused oxidized redox potential, increased apoptosis, and decreased alveolarization. AscOOH detoxification is carried out by glutathione peroxidase (GPX). We hypothesize that extremely preterm infants have limited capacity for AscOOH detoxification. Our objective was to determine if there is an association between an early level of urinary AscOOH and later development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death. This prospective cohort study included 51 infants at <29 weeks of gestation. Baseline clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes data were collected. Urine samples were collected on days 3, 5, and 7 of life for urinary AscOOH. Blood samples on day 7 were collected for total plasma glutathione, GPX, and glutathione reductase. χ 2 , Student's t test, Spearman correlation ( r), linear regression (adjusted r 2 ), and repeated-measure analysis of variance were used as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. Urinary AscOOH increased over time ( P = .001) and was higher in infants who later developed BPD or died ( P = .037). Compared with adults and full-term infants, total plasma glutathione concentration was low (median, 1.02 µmol/L; 25th-75th percentiles, 0.49-1.76 µmol/L), whereas GPX and glutathione reductase activities were sufficient (3.98 ± 1.25 and 0.36 ± 0.01 nmol/min/mg of protein, respectively). Extremely preterm infants have low glutathione levels, which limit their capacity to detoxify AscOOH. Higher first-week urinary AscOOH levels are associated with an increased incidence of BPD or death.

  1. Adding Biotin to Parenteral Nutrition Solutions Without Lipid Accelerates the Growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Candida albicans requires multivitamins (MVs) or lipid to increase rapidly in parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions. In this study, in detail, the effects of vitamins on the growth of C. albicans in PN solutions without lipid were investigated. In the 1st experiment, a commercial PN solution without lipid was supplemented with water-soluble vitamins (SVs: vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12 and C, folic acid, nicotinamide, biotin and panthenol), water-insoluble vitamins (IVs: vitamins A, D, E and K) or both (MVs). In the 2nd experiment, the test solutions were prepared by supplementing the PN solution with one of each or all of the SVs. In the 3rd experiment, another commercial peripheral PN (PPN) solution without lipid was supplemented with SVs, nicotinic acid, biotin or both nicotinic acid and biotin. In each of the experiments, a specified number of C. albicans organisms was added to each test solution, and all of the test solutions were allowed to stand at room temperature (23-26ºC). The number of C. albicans was counted at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the addition of the organism. In the 1st experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs, but increased slowly without the SVs, regardless of the addition of the IVs. In the 2nd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with each of the other water-soluble vitamins. In the 3rd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PPN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with the addition of nicotinic acid. These results suggested that adding MVs or SVs to PN solutions without lipid promotes the growth of C. albicans, and that this effect is mostly attributable to biotin.

  2. Long-term effect of altered nutrition induced by litter size manipulation and cross-fostering in suckling male rats on development of obesity risk and health complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozeš, Stefan; Sefčíková, Zuzana; Raček, L'ubomír

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the long-term effect of pre-weaning nutrition on positive and/or adverse regulation of obesity risk and health complications in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two experimental models were used in the present work: (1) To induce postnatal over- or normal nutrition, the litter size was adjusted to 4 (small litters-SL) and to 10 pups (normal litters-NL) in the nest, (2) in suckling pups at day 10, we used cross-fostering to identify the effect of altered dietary environment on their future body fat regulation, food intake, blood pressure, and the duodenal and jejunal alkaline phosphatase activity. After weaning, these control (NL, SL) and cross-fostered (NL-SL, SL-NL) groups were exposed to standard laboratory diet. On day 50, the SL in comparison with NL rats became heavier and displayed enhanced adiposity accompanied by significantly increased systolic blood pressure (19%) and duodenal (16%) and jejunal (21%) alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. The impact of pre-weaning over-nutrition of NL-SL pups was associated with long-lasting positive effect on obesity. In contrast, SL-NL rats submitted until weaning to the opposite normalized feeding condition on day 50 showed significantly decreased fat deposition (21%), systolic blood pressure (20%), and AP activity in duodenum and jejunum (14%). These results contribute to a better understanding of how early-acquired dietary habits determine the attenuation or prevention of obesity development in later life and can provide some benefit for optimizing the future dietary strategies in young and adult obese individuals.

  3. SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) Increases Long-Term Food Security among Indiana Households with Children in a Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rebecca L; Maulding, Melissa K; Abbott, Angela R; Craig, Bruce A; Eicher-Miller, Heather A

    2016-11-01

    Food insecurity is negatively associated with US children's dietary intake and health. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) aims to alleviate food insecurity by offering nutrition, budgeting, and healthy lifestyle education to low-income individuals and families. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term impact of the Indiana SNAP-Ed on food security among households with children. A randomized, controlled, parallel study design with SNAP-Ed as an intervention was carried out during a 4- to 10-wk intervention period. Intervention group participants received the first 4 Indiana SNAP-Ed curriculum lessons. Study participants (n = 575) were adults aged ≥18 y from low-income Indiana households with ≥1 child living in the household. Both treatment groups completed an assessment before and after the intervention period and 1 y after recruitment. The 18-item US Household Food Security Survey Module was used to classify the primary outcomes of food security for the household and adults and children in the household. A linear mixed model was used to compare intervention with control group effects over time on food security. Mean ± SEM changes in household food security score and food security score among household adults from baseline to 1-y follow-up were 1.2 ± 0.4 and 0.9 ± 0.3 units lower, respectively, in the intervention group than in the control group (P security score from baseline to 1-y follow-up among household children was not significantly different in the intervention group compared with the control group. SNAP-Ed improved food security over a longitudinal time frame among low-income Indiana households with children in this study. SNAP-Ed may be a successful intervention to improve food security. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Parenteral lipids and partial enteral nutrition affect hepatic lipid composition but have limited short term effects on formula-induced necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Rapid transition from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feeding is a risk factor for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants. We hypothesized that partial enteral nutrition with colostrum, increased proportion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or exclusion of lipid...

  5. Use of Subjective Global Assessment, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 to evaluate the nutritional status of non-critically ill patients on parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia-Tahull, M B; Cobo-Sacristán, S; Leiva-Badosa, E; Miquel-Zurita, M E; Méndez-Cabalerio, N; Jódar-Masanés, R; Llop-Talaverón, J

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the nutritional status of non-critically ill digestive surgery patients at the moment of parenteral nutrition initiation using three different nutritional test tools and to study their correlation. To study the association between the tests and the clinical and laboratory parameters used in the follow-up of PN treatment. Prospective study over 4 months. Anthropometric and clinical variables were recorded. Results of Subjective Global Assessment; Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment; and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 were compared applying kappa test. Relationship between the clinical and laboratory parameters with Subjective Global Assessment was studied by multinominal regression and with the other two tests by multiple linear regression models. Age and sex were included as adjustment variables. Malnutrition in 45 studied patients varied from 51% to 57%. Subjective Global Assessment correlated well with Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (κ = 0531 p = 0.000). The test with the greatest correlation with the clinical and analytical variables was the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Worse nutritional state in this test was associated with worse results in albumin (B = -0.087; CI = -0.169/-0.005], prealbumin (B = -0.005; CI = [-0.011/-0.001]), C-reactive protein (B = 0.006;CI = [0.001/ 0.011]) and leukocytes (B = 0.134; CI = [0.031/0.237]) at the en of parenteral nutrition treatment. Half of the digestive surgery patients were at malnutritional risk at the moment of initiating parenteral nutrition. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 was the test with best association with the parameters used in the clinical follow-up of parenteral nutrition treated patients. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

    OpenAIRE

    J Salas Salvado; A Recaséns Garica

    1993-01-01

    Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

  7. A Rare Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in Overcorrection of Hyponatremia with Total Parenteral Nutrition in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Janga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old high risk pregnant female presented with hyponatremia from multiple causes and was treated with total parenteral nutrition. She developed acute hypernatremia due to the stage of pregnancy and other comorbidities. All the mechanisms of hyponatremia and hypernatremia were summarized here in our case report. This case has picture (graph representation of parameters that led to changes in serum sodium and radiological findings of central pontine myelinolysis on MRI. In conclusion we present a complicated case serum sodium changes during pregnancy and pathophysiological effects on serum sodium changes during pregnancy.

  8. Functioning and health in patients with cancer on home-parenteral nutrition: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Martin; Lohmann, Stefanie; Thul, Paul; Weimann, Arved; Grill, Eva

    2010-04-16

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cancer. One possible strategy to prevent malnutrition and further deterioration is to administer home-parenteral nutrition (HPN). While the effect on survival is still not clear, HPN presumably improves functioning and quality of life. Thus, patients' experiences concerning functioning and quality of life need to be considered when deciding on the provision of HPN. Currently used quality of life measures hardly reflect patients' perspectives and experiences. The objective of our study was to investigate the perspectives of patients with cancer on their experience of functioning and health in relation to HPN in order to get an item pool to develop a comprehensive measure to assess the impact of HPN in this population. We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed to identify categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) addressed by patients' statements. Patients were consecutively included in the study until an additional patient did not yield any new information. We extracted 94 different ICF-categories from 16 interviews representing patient-relevant aspects of functioning and health (32 categories from the ICF component 'Body Functions', 10 from 'Body Structures', 32 from 'Activities & Participation', 18 from 'Environmental Factors'). About 8% of the concepts derived from the interviews could not be linked to specific ICF categories because they were either too general, disease-specific or pertained to 'Personal Factors'. Patients referred to 22 different aspects of functioning improving due to HPN; mainly activities of daily living, mobility, sleep and emotional functions. The ICF proved to be a satisfactory framework to standardize the response of patients with cancer on HPN. For most aspects reported by the patients, a matching concept and ICF category could be found. The development of categories of the component

  9. Functioning and health in patients with cancer on home-parenteral nutrition: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohmann Stefanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cancer. One possible strategy to prevent malnutrition and further deterioration is to administer home-parenteral nutrition (HPN. While the effect on survival is still not clear, HPN presumably improves functioning and quality of life. Thus, patients' experiences concerning functioning and quality of life need to be considered when deciding on the provision of HPN. Currently used quality of life measures hardly reflect patients' perspectives and experiences. The objective of our study was to investigate the perspectives of patients with cancer on their experience of functioning and health in relation to HPN in order to get an item pool to develop a comprehensive measure to assess the impact of HPN in this population. Methods We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed to identify categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF addressed by patients' statements. Patients were consecutively included in the study until an additional patient did not yield any new information. Results We extracted 94 different ICF-categories from 16 interviews representing patient-relevant aspects of functioning and health (32 categories from the ICF component 'Body Functions', 10 from 'Body Structures', 32 from 'Activities & Participation', 18 from 'Environmental Factors'. About 8% of the concepts derived from the interviews could not be linked to specific ICF categories because they were either too general, disease-specific or pertained to 'Personal Factors'. Patients referred to 22 different aspects of functioning improving due to HPN; mainly activities of daily living, mobility, sleep and emotional functions. Conclusions The ICF proved to be a satisfactory framework to standardize the response of patients with cancer on HPN. For most aspects reported by the patients, a matching concept and ICF category

  10. n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition improves postoperative recovery for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binhao; Wei, Gang; Li, Rui; Wang, Yanjun; Yu, Jie; Wang, Rui; Xiao, Hua; Wu, Chao; Leng, Chao; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-10-01

    A new lipid emulsion enriched in n-3 fatty acid has been reported to prevent hepatic inflammation in patients following major surgery. However, the role of n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition for postoperative patients with cirrhosis-related liver cancer is unclear. We investigated the safety and efficacy of n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer followed hepatectomy. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial (Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT02321202) was conducted for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer that underwent hepatectomy between March 2010 and September 2013 in our institution. We compared isonitrogenous total parenteral nutrition with 20% Structolipid and 10% n-3 fatty acid (Omegaven, Fresenius-Kabi, Germany) (treatment group) to Structolipid alone (control group) for five days postoperatively, in the absence of enteral nutrition. We enrolled 320 patients, and 312 (97.5%) were included in analysis (155 in the control group and 157 in the treatment group). There was a significant reduction of morbidity and mortality in the treatment group, when compared with the control group (total complications 78 [50.32%] vs. 46 [29.30%]; P parenteral nutrition significantly improved postoperative recovery for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer following hepatectomy, with a significant reduction in overall mortality and length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced bone mineral density is not associated with significantly reduced bone quality in men and women practicing long-term calorie restriction with adequate nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villareal, Dennis T; Kotyk, John J; Armamento-Villareal, Reina C; Kenguva, Venkata; Seaman, Pamela; Shahar, Allon; Wald, Michael J; Kleerekoper, Michael; Fontana, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) reduces bone quantity but not bone quality in rodents. Nothing is known regarding the long-term effects of CR with adequate intake of vitamin and minerals on bone quantity and quality in middle-aged lean individuals. In this study, we evaluated body composition, bone mineral density (BMD), and serum markers of bone turnover and inflammation in 32 volunteers who had been eating a CR diet (approximately 35% less calories than controls) for an average of 6.8 ± 5.2 years (mean age 52.7 ± 10.3 years) and 32 age- and sex-matched sedentary controls eating Western diets (WD). In a subgroup of 10 CR and 10 WD volunteers, we also measured trabecular bone (TB) microarchitecture of the distal radius using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. We found that the CR volunteers had significantly lower body mass index than the WD volunteers (18.9 ± 1.2 vs. 26.5 ± 2.2 kg m(-2) ; P = 0.0001). BMD of the lumbar spine (0.870 ± 0.11 vs. 1.138 ± 0.12 g cm(-2) , P = 0.0001) and hip (0.806 ± 0.12 vs. 1.047 ± 0.12 g cm(-2) , P = 0.0001) was also lower in the CR than in the WD group. Serum C-terminal telopeptide and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase concentration were similar between groups, while serum C-reactive protein (0.19 ± 0.26 vs. 1.46 ± 1.56 mg L(-1) , P = 0.0001) was lower in the CR group. Trabecular bone microarchitecture parameters such as the erosion index (0.916 ± 0.087 vs. 0.877 ± 0.088; P = 0.739) and surface-to-curve ratio (10.3 ± 1.4 vs. 12.1 ± 2.1, P = 0.440) were not significantly different between groups. These findings suggest that markedly reduced BMD is not associated with significantly reduced bone quality in middle-aged men and women practicing long-term calorie restriction with adequate nutrition.

  12. The relationship between baseline nutritional status with subsequent parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes in cancer patients undergoing hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Pankaj G; Gupta, Digant; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A; Braun, Donald P; Popiel, Brenten; Misra, Subhasis; Brown, Komen C

    2013-08-14

    The combination of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a promising treatment option for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. This retrospective study investigated the relationship between baseline nutritional assessment with subsequent parenteral nutritional (PN) and clinical outcomes in cancer patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC. A consecutive series of 60 patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC at our institution between January 2009 and May 2011. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) was used to assess nutritional status. Patients were classified preoperatively as: well nourished (SGA-A), mildly-moderately malnourished (SGA-B), and severely malnourished (SGA-C). For PN, patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received PN (PN+) and those who did not receive PN (PN-). The primary outcomes of interest were length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications, ECOG performance status (PS) and survival. LOS was calculated as the number of days in the hospital post surgery. Performance status was measured on a scale of 0-4. Survival was calculated from the date of first visit to the date of death/last contact. Of 60 patients, 19 were males and 41 females. The mean age at presentation was 50.3 years. The most common cancer types were colorectal (n = 24) and gynecologic (n = 19) with the majority of patients (n = 47) treated previously before coming to our institution. 33 patients were SGA-A, 22 SGA-B and 5 SGA-C prior to surgery. Of a total of 60 patients, 31 received PN. Mean LOS for the entire cohort was 16.2 days (SD = 9.8). Mean LOS for preoperative SGA-A, SGA-B and SGA-C were 15.0, 15.2 and 27.8 days respectively (ANOVA p = 0.02). Overall incidence of complications was 26.7% (16/60). Complications were recorded in 9 of 33 (27.3%) preoperative SGA-A patients and 7 of 27 (25.9%) SGA-B + C patients (p = 0.91). The median overall survival was 17.5 months (95% CI = 13.0 to 22

  13. Quality of newborn care: adherence to guidelines for parenteral nutrition in preterm infants in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Carnielli, Virgilio Paolo; Embleton, Nicholas David; Mihatsch, Walter

    2013-09-18

    The level of adherence to guidelines should be explored particularly in preterm infants for whom poor nutrition has major effects on outcomes in later life. The objective was to evaluate compliance to international guidelines for parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants across neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of four European countries. Clinical practice survey by means of a questionnaire addressing routine PN protocols, awareness and implementation of guidelines. NICUs in the UK, Italy, Germany and France. One senior physician per unit; 199 units which represent 74% of the NICUs of the four countries. Adherence of unit protocol to international guidelines. Factors that influence adherence to guidelines. 80% of the respondents stated that they were aware of some PN clinical practice guidelines. For amino acid infusion (AA), 63% of the respondents aimed to initiate AA on D0, 38% aimed to administer an initial dose ≥1.5 g/kg/day and 91% aimed for a target dose of 3 or 4 g/kg/day, as recommended. For parenteral lipids, 90% of the respondents aimed to initiate parenteral lipids during the first 3 days of life, 39% aimed to use an initial dose ≥1.0 g/kg/day and 76% defined the target dose as 3-4 g/kg/day, as recommended. Significant variations in PN protocols were observed among countries, but the type of hospital or the number of admissions per year had only a marginal impact on the PN protocols. Most respondents indicated that their clinical practice was based on common guidelines. However, the initiation of PN is frequently not compliant with current recommendations, with the main differences being observed during the first days of life. Continuous education focusing on PN practice is needed, and greater efforts are required to disseminate and implement international guidelines.

  14. Long-term effect of early nutrition on endocrine parameters and liver and endometrial gene expression of the members of the somatotrophic axis in Hereford heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggeri, D; Meikle, A; Carriquiry, M; De Barbieri, I; Montossi, F; Viñoles, C

    2018-04-23

    This study compared the effect of different management systems on endocrine parameters, and gene expression of members of the somatotrophic axis in the liver and endometrium of beef heifers. Twenty-two 709-days-old heifers submitted to Early Weaning (EW, n = 8), Traditional Weaning (TW, n = 7) and TW plus creep feeding (TW+CF, n = 7) were used. Animals were synchronized with two prostaglandin (PG) injections at 11-day interval (Oestrus = Day 0). Blood samples were collected daily for progesterone (P4) determination, and endometrial and liver biopsies on Days 7 and 16 for transcript determination of members of the somatotrophic axis. Progesterone concentrations were greater on Days 15 and 16 (p < .02) of the cycle in TW+CF than TW and EW heifers. On Day 7, TW+CF heifers expressed greater liver total growth hormone receptor transcripts than TW heifers (p = .05) and greater insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein 3 mRNA than both EW and TW groups (p < .05). On Days 7 and 16, TW+CF expressed more endometrial IGF1 mRNA than the other groups (p < .01). We conclude that increasing the plane of nutrition of nursing calves may have a long-term effect on the functioning of the somatotrophic axis both in the liver and in the endometrium. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Effect of long-term mineral fertilization with different nutrition elements norms and ratios on humic condition of the slightly leached chernozem in Dobroudja

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nankova, M.; Djendova, R.; Kirchev, H.; Penchev, E.

    1999-01-01

    As a result from a 30 year dressing with mineral fertilizers, a considerable differences were established in the soil nitrogen and humic content both along the soil profile and according to the combination of applied nutrition elements. The fertilization variant N 180 P 180 K 180 had the highest humus content - 3.51 % in the 0-20 cm layer, and 3.35 % in the 20-40 cm layer. This consecutively lead to accumulation of highest humus reserves in soil - 168 t/ha for the root-deep layer (0-40 cm) in total. Total nitrogen content in soil varied from 0.184 to 0.220 % according to the fertilization norms and the profile depth. Highest reserves of total nitrogen were formed in the variants with N 60 P 0 K 0 , N 60 P 60 K 0 and N 120 P 60 K 0 . The degree of nitrogen concentration in humus within the limits of the trial was determined as moderate for the whole root-deep layer. In the 20-40 cm layer, however, it tended to be high in the variants with independent nitrogen fertilization, regardless of the fertilization norm. The long-term application of high nitrogen norms lead to an increase in the humus mobility. It was also established that fertilization with moderate and high nitrogen norms increased the C ha : C pa , ratio, as well as the humic acid content linked with Ca, especially in the 0-20 cm layer. The amount of non-hydrolyzable residue (humine) also increased with the increase mainly of the nitrogen fertilization norm. In the variants dressed with moderate and high nitrogen norms the humus type was markedly humatic. Refs. 9 (author)

  16. Can We Rely on Predicted Basal Metabolic Rate in Patients With Intestinal Failure on Home Parenteral Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skallerup, Anders; Nygaard, Louis; Olesen, Søren Schou; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Køhler, Marianne; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a serious and common complication of short bowel syndrome with patients depending on parenteral nutrition (PN) support. Effective nutrition management requires an accurate estimation of the patient's basal metabolic rate (BMR) to avoid underfeeding or overfeeding. However, indirect calorimetry, considered the gold standard for BMR assessment, is a time- and resource-consuming procedure. Consequently, several equations for prediction of BMR have been developed in different settings, but their accuracy in patients with IF are yet to be investigated. We evaluated the accuracy of predicted BMR in clinically stable patients with IF dependent on home parenteral nutrition (HPN). In total, 103 patients with IF were included. We used indirect calorimetry for assessment of BMR and calculated predicted BMR using different equations based on anthropometric and/or bioelectrical impedance parameters. The accuracy of predicted BMR was evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis with measured BMR as the gold standard. The average measured BMR was 1272 ± 245 kcal/d. The most accurate estimations of BMR were obtained using the Harris-Benedict equation (mean bias, 14 kcal/d [ P = .28]; limits of agreement [LoA], -238 to 266 kcal/d) and the Johnstone equation (mean bias, -16 kcal/d [ P = .24]; LoA, -285 to 253 kcal/d). For both equations, 67% of patients had a predicted BMR from 90%-110% All other equations demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant difference between measured and predicted BMR. The Harris-Benedict and Johnstone equations reliably predict BMR in two-thirds of clinically stable patients with IF on HPN.

  17. Long-term collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Collectes à long terme

    2007-01-01

    The Committee of the Long Term Collections (CLT) asks for your attention for the following message from a young Peruvian scientist, following the earthquake which devastated part of her country a month ago.

  18. Prospective randomized double-blind trial of branched chain amino acid enriched versus standard parenteral nutrition solutions in traumatized and septic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vente, J. P.; Soeters, P. B.; von Meyenfeldt, M. F.; Rouflart, M. M.; van der Linden, C. J.; Gouma, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The addition of branched chain amino acids (BCAA) to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions of balanced aminoacid composition has been reported to result in improved nitrogen balance, preservation of plasma protein levels, and improved immune function; however, only a few large clinical studies

  19. Provision of Amniotic Fluid During Parenteral Nutrition Increases Weight Gain With Limited Effects on Gut Structure, Function, Immunity, and Microbiology in Newborn Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette Viberg; Liang Shen, Rene; Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Small enteral boluses with human milk may reduce the risk of subsequent feeding intolerance and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). We hypothesized that feeding amniotic fluid, the natural enteral diet of the mammalian fetus, will have sim...

  20. The prognosis of incurable cachectic cancer patients on home parenteral nutrition: a multi-centre observational study with prospective follow-up of 414 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozzetti, F.; Santarpia, L.; Pironi, L.; Thul, P.; Klek, S.; Gavazzi, C.; Tinivella, M.; Joly, F.; Jonkers, C.; Baxter, J.; Gramlich, L.; Chicharro, L.; Staun, M.; van Gossum, A.; Lo Vullo, S.; Mariani, L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in incurable cachectic cancer patients unable to eat is extremely controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors can influence the outcome. We studied prospectively 414 incurable cachectic (sub)obstructed cancer patients receiving HPN and

  1. Quantitative Ultrasound for Staging of Hepatic Steatosis in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition Validated with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, G.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Thijssen, J.M.; Graaf, M. van der; Korte, C.L. de

    2016-01-01

    Patients on home parenteral nutrition are at risk for developing liver dysfunction, which is due partly to the accumulation of lipids in the liver (steatosis) and may progress to end-stage liver disease with overt liver failure. Therefore, a timely diagnosis with easy access to repeated assessment

  2. Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition with butyrate acutely increases structural aspects of intestinal adaptation after an 80% jejunoileal resection in neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholome, Anne L; Albin, David M; Baker, David H

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with a mixture of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) enhances intestinal adaptation in the adult rodent model. However, the ability and timing of SCFA to augment adaptation in the neonatal intestine is unknown. Furthermore, the specific...

  3. Changes in Parenteral Nutrition During the First Week of Life Influence Early but Not Late Postnatal Growth in Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Montserrat; Martínez-Monseny, Antonio Federico; Pociello, Neus; Gonzalez, Paloma; Del Rio, Ruth; Iriondo, Martin; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    Postnatal growth restriction remains a serious problem in very low-birth-weight infants. Enhanced parenteral supply of nutrients as soon as possible after birth is one of the strategies addressed to avoid extrauterine growth restriction. We aimed to analyze changes in growth patterns and in clinical outcomes in our unit after a change in our parenteral nutrition (PN) protocol. We collected data from 2 time periods, comprising the 2 years before (period I) and the 2 years after (period II) the change of protocol. We included 142 very low-birth-weight infants ≤32 weeks of gestation with a birth weight ≤1500 g. Data regarding nutrition intakes (parenteral and enteral) in the first week of life, growth during admission, and clinical outcomes were retrieved from clinical charts. Babies in period II received a higher nutrition supply during the first week of life, but no further differences were found after this period. Weight at 14 days of life was significantly higher in period II but not at day 28 of life or discharge. In our population, an enhanced PN regimen for very low-birth-weight infants led to a better growth at 14 days of life. However, this positive effect had disappeared at day 28 of life. Strategies to improve nutrient supply once the preterm baby is stable and on full enteral feeds should be implemented and analyzed. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition in patient with acute leukaemia: unusual involvement of caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aprile, P.; Tarantino, A.; Carella, A. [Division of Neuroradiology, Policlinico, Univ. of Bari (Italy); Santoro, N. [Inst. of Paediatric Clinic I, Policlinico, University of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    We report a 13-year-old girl with leukaemia and Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition. MRI showed unusual bilateral lesions of the caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex, as well as typical lesions surrounding the third ventricle and aqueduct. After intravenous thiamine, the patient improved, and the abnormalities on MRI disappeared. (orig.)

  5. Erlotinib plus parenteral nutrition: an opportunity to get through the hardest days of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yuan-Sheng; Fang, Zheng; Li, Bing

    2013-03-01

    This case study details the poor performance status of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer and cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome got through the hardest days of high tumor burden and malnutrition, by using a combined therapy of lung cancer-targeted therapy drug and parenteral nutrition. The related literatures were reviewed.

  6. Frequency and Severity of Parenteral Nutrition Medication Errors at a Large Children's Hospital After Implementation of Electronic Ordering and Compounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Mark; Anderson, Collin; Boehme, Sabrina; Cash, Jared; Zobell, Jeffery

    2016-04-01

    The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has stated that parenteral nutrition (PN) is considered a high-risk medication and has the potential of causing harm. Three organizations--American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, and National Advisory Group--have published guidelines for ordering, transcribing, compounding and administering PN. These national organizations have published data on compliance to the guidelines and the risk of errors. The purpose of this article is to compare total compliance with ordering, transcription, compounding, administration, and error rate with a large pediatric institution. A computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) program was developed that incorporates dosing with soft and hard stop recommendations and simultaneously eliminating the need for paper transcription. A CPOE team prioritized and identified issues, then developed solutions and integrated innovative CPOE and automated compounding device (ACD) technologies and practice changes to minimize opportunities for medication errors in PN prescription, transcription, preparation, and administration. Thirty developmental processes were identified and integrated in the CPOE program, resulting in practices that were compliant with A.S.P.E.N. safety consensus recommendations. Data from 7 years of development and implementation were analyzed and compared with published literature comparing error, harm rates, and cost reductions to determine if our process showed lower error rates compared with national outcomes. The CPOE program developed was in total compliance with the A.S.P.E.N. guidelines for PN. The frequency of PN medication errors at our hospital over the 7 years was 230 errors/84,503 PN prescriptions, or 0.27% compared with national data that determined that 74 of 4730 (1.6%) of prescriptions over 1.5 years were associated with a medication error. Errors were categorized by steps in the PN process

  7. Perioperative Alanyl-Glutamine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition in Chronic Radiation Enteritis Patients With Surgical Intestinal Obstruction: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Danhua; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Mingxiao; Yin, Jianyi; Li, Yousheng

    2016-04-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled study was performed to evaluate the effects of perioperative alanyl-glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (PN) support on the immunologic function, intestinal permeability, and nutrition status of surgical patients with chronic radiation enteritis (CRE)-induced intestinal obstruction. Patients who received 0.4 g/kg/d alanyl-glutamine and isonitrogenous PN were assigned to an alanyl-glutamine-supplemented PN (Gln-PN) group and a control group, respectively. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and glutamine, body fat mass (FM), immunologic function, and intestinal permeability were measured before and after surgery. Serum glutamine levels of the Gln-PN group significantly exceeded that of the control group (P nutrition state and intestinal motility of surgical patients with CRE-induced intestinal obstruction. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Comparison of 15N analysis by optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry for clinical studies during total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragon, A.; Reynier, J.P.; Guiraud, G.

    1985-01-01

    During total and stable parenteral nutrition, a branched chain amino acid enriched solution containing [ 15 N]leucine was infused into a patient to determine the fate of the nitrogen administered through this formulation. Measurements of 15 N isotopic enrichments were performed on the same biological samples (urinary urea, total plasma proteins and albumin) by optical emission spectrometry (OES) and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine if OES with its specific advantages (cost, handling maintenance) constituted even with low enrichments a useful alternative technique to MS considered as the reference method. The results show that OES constituted a very useful analytical technique to obtain reliable information in clinical metabolic studies when low 15 N enrichments must be determined. (Auth.)

  9. Estimating the oligoelement requirements of children subject to exclusively parenteral nutrition by means of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.; Gros, J.; Comar, D.

    1979-01-01

    Because of the rich and varied food he eats, deficiencies in oligoelements of dietary origin are very rarely found in man. However, several cases of zinc and copper deficiency have been reported in adults and children subject to prolonged entirely parenteral nutrition. In the present case ten children (eight infants of less than 18 months and two children aged between 2 and 8 years) fed exclusively by intracardiac catheter on a reconstituted diet were studied. The serum concentrations of copper, manganese, selenium and zinc in the children fed on this artificial diet were measured by neutron activation and gamma spectrometry, both with and without chemical separation. The values obtained in the young patients and in controls of the same age were compared. The result of these comparisons and a study of the kinetics of serum concentrations in the patients (one analysis every 20 days for 90 days) enabled us to determine that there was a balanced intake of copper, an excess of manganese and a considerable deficiency in zinc and selenium. In view of these observations, the diet was modified and it was established that the serum oligoelement content followed changes in oligoelement intake. Thus the serum concentrations of selenium and zinc were restored in a few weeks - completely in the case of selenium with an intake three times higher (3 μg/kg/24 h) and incompletely in the case of zinc with the intake doubled (50 μg/kg/24 h). On the basis of these results and kinetic data on the mineral metabolism, we have been able to estimate the copper, manganese, selenium and zinc requirements of children undergoing parenteral nutrition. (author)

  10. Determinants of urea nitrogen production in sepsis. Muscle catabolism, total parenteral nutrition, and hepatic clearance of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittiruti, M; Siegel, J H; Sganga, G; Coleman, B; Wiles, C E; Placko, R

    1989-03-01

    The major determinants of urea production were investigated in 26 patients with multiple trauma (300 studies). The body clearances (CLRs) of ten amino acids (AAs) were estimated as a ratio of muscle-released AAs plus total parenteral nutrition-infused AAs to their extracellular pool. While clinically septic trauma (ST) patients without multiple-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) had a higher level of urea nitrogen production (25.6 +/- 13.4 g of N per day) compared with nonseptic trauma (NST) patients (14 +/- 7.5 g of N per day) and with ST patients with MOFS (4.28 +/- 1.5 g of N per day), in all groups urea N production was found to be a function of muscle protein degradation (catabolism), total parenteral nutrition-administered AAs, and the ratio between leucine CLR and tyrosine CLR (L/T) (r2 = .82, P less than .0001). Since tyrosine is cleared almost exclusively by the liver, the L/T ratio may be regarded as an index of hepatic function. The significant differences between urea N production in ST and NST patients lay in an increased positive dependence on muscle catabolism and increased negative correlation with L/T in the ST group. At any L/T ratio, urea N production was increased in ST patients over NST patients, but in ST patients with MOFS, it fell to or below levels of NST patients. These data show that the ST process is associated with enhancement of ureagenesis, due to increased hepatic CLR of both exogenous and endogenous AAs. In sepsis with MOFS, a marked inhibition of urea synthesis occurs, partially explained by a decreased hepatic CLR of non-branched-chain AAs.

  11. Effect of parenteral nutrition on postradiational metabolic changes under experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdov, S.P.; Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Vasil'evskaya, V.V.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    The assimilation of carbohydrates, nitrogen compounds, fat and electrolytes during parenteral feeding (PF) of irradiated animals was studied. Rats were subjected to PF from 2nd to 5th day after total gamma irradiation at 750 R, dogs - from 8th to 11th day after irradiation at 300 R. The results are indicative of a satisfactory assimilation of carbohydrates, nitrogen compounds, fat and electrolytes by animals in the cource of PF. The negative nitrogen balance characteristic of irradiated animals was expressed to a lesser degree. A trend to a lower sodium excretion has been observed during PF period

  12. Interventional radiology in the provision and maintenance of long-term central venous access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, S.M.; Given, M.; Marshall, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Establishing and maintaining venous access forms an increasing proportion of the workload in interventional radiology. Several patient groups require medium-term to long-term venous catheters for a variety of purposes, including chemotherapy, long-term antimicrobials, parenteral nutrition, short-term access for haemodialysis or exhausted haemodialysis. Often, these catheters are required for treatment and frequent blood testing, which can quickly exhaust the peripheral veins. Venous access devices include implantable catheters (ports), tunnelled catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters, which have different functions, advantages and limitations. Imaging-guided placement is the preferred method of insertion in many institutions because of higher success rates and radiologists are well suited to address catheter complications.

  13. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Al-Taweel, Dalal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN) therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs). This study was designed to explore pharmacists' role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital) in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists' demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists' education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists' communication and conducting TPN-research research. TPN

  14. Role of the pharmacist in parenteral nutrition therapy: challenges and opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists can provide beneficial pharmaceutical care services to patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition (PN therapy by working within Nutrition Support Teams (NSTs. Objective: This study was designed to explore pharmacists’ role in PN therapy in hospitals of Kuwait, sources of PN-related information, opinions on NSTs, perceptions about the barriers to pharmaceutical care implementation and views on how to enhance their practices. Methods: Data were collected via face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the senior Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN pharmacists at all the hospitals which provide TPN preparation services (six governmental hospitals and one private hospital in Kuwait. Descriptive statistics were used to describe pharmacists’ demographic details and practice site characteristics. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The pharmacists mainly performed technical tasks such as TPN compounding with minimal role in providing direct patient care. They used multiple different sources of TPN-related information to guide their practice. They reported positive and negative experiences with physicians depending on their practice environment. None of the hospitals had a functional NST. However, pharmacists expressed preference to work within NSTs due to the potential benefits of enhanced communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners and to improve service. Pharmacists perceived several barriers to providing pharmaceutical care including lack of reliable sources of TPN-related information, lack of a standard operating procedure for TPN across hospitals, insufficient staff, time constraints and poor communication between TPN pharmacists. To overcome these barriers, they recommended fostering pharmacists’ education on TPN, establishing national standards for TPN practices, provision of pharmacy staff, development of NSTs, enhancing TPN pharmacists

  15. Water, electrolytes, vitamins and trace elements – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A close cooperation between medical teams is necessary when calculating the fluid intake of parenterally fed patients. Fluids supplied parenterally, orally and enterally, other infusions, and additional fluid losses (e.g. diarrhea must be considered. Targeted diagnostic monitoring (volume status is required in patients with disturbed water or electrolyte balance. Fluid requirements of adults with normal hydration status is approximately 30–40 ml/kg body weight/d, but fluid needs usually increase during fever. Serum electrolyte concentrations should be determined prior to PN, and patients with normal fluid and electrolyte balance should receive intakes follwing standard recommendations with PN. Additional requirements should usually be administered via separate infusion pumps. Concentrated potassium (1 mval/ml or 20% NaCl solutions should be infused via a central venous catheter. Electrolyte intake should be adjusted according to the results of regular laboratory analyses. Individual determination of electrolyte intake is required when electrolyte balance is initially altered (e.g. due to chronic diarrhea, recurring vomiting, renal insufficiency etc.. Vitamins and trace elements should be generally substituted in PN, unless there are contraindications. The supplementation of vitamins and trace elements is obligatory after a PN of >1 week. A standard dosage of vitamins and trace elements based on current dietary reference intakes for oral feeding is generally recommended unless certain clinical situations require other intakes.

  16. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Comité des collectes à long terme

    2011-01-01

    It is the time of the year when our fireman colleagues go around the laboratory for their traditional calendars sale. A part of the money of the sales will be donated in favour of the long-term collections. We hope that you will welcome them warmly.

  17. The meaning of food and eating among home parenteral nutrition-dependent adults with intestinal failure: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Marion F; Wetle, Terrie; Smith, Carol; Hagan, Elizabeth; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2010-11-01

    Using content and interpretative phenomenological analysis, we explored the meaning of food and eating from the perspective of adults receiving home parenteral nutrition (PN). The aim of this research was to obtain a deeper understanding of how issues related to food and eating influence quality of life (QOL). Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted between May 2006 and January 2007 with 24 adults with intestinal failure and home PN dependency. The analysis revealed themes relevant to eating behaviors, hunger and thirst, strategies for dining in restaurants, and a perception of wasting money because of malabsorbed food. Three patterns of eating emerged: eating for survival, eating for health benefits, and eating for socialization. A proposed model illustrates how these eating patterns are linked to QOL. Being able to eat and enjoy food is an important ingredient for good self-reported QOL. Measurements of QOL for this population may be enhanced with inclusion of a food and eating domain. The social and emotional context of food and mealtimes is an important component to address in the nutrition care plan for PN-dependent adults. Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Régimen corto de antibioticoterapia parenteral frente a régimen largo: Análisis de minimización de costes A short-term parenteral antibiotic therapy regime versus a long-term regime: Analysis of cost reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Medina García

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de análisis económico, del tipo de minimización de costes, con el objetivo de evaluar los costes de un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días utilizado en recién nacidos con infección del tracto urinario alta, de evolución inicial favorable, en comparación con otro de larga duración (≥ 5 días. Se tuvo como base un estudio analítico, observacional, en el que se conformaron dos grupos según el régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral (corto o largo seguido de antibioticoterapia oral, que generó un ciclo de tratamiento parenteral-oral secuencial de 10 días de duración. Se evaluaron los costes por concepto de tratamiento con antibióticos y de hospitalización. Con el tratamiento corto se habrían ahorrado 29 054,58 CU con respecto a los costes derivados del régimen de tratamiento largo, a lo que se suman otros beneficios en la esfera psico-social familiar. Con los resultados obtenidos concluimos que un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días para el tratamiento de una infección del tracto urinario alta de evolución inicial favorable, tiene mayor eficiencia que un régimen largo (≥ 5 días, pues se logra minimizar los costes relativos al tratamiento antibiótico y a la hospitalización.

  19. Hepatocellular integrity in patients requiring parenteral nutrition: comparison of structured MCT/LCT vs. a standard MCT/LCT emulsion and a LCT emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, S N; Röhm, K D; Boldt, J; Odermatt, B; Maleck, W H; Suttner, S W

    2008-07-01

    The aetiology of parenteral nutrition-associated hepatic injury remains unresolved. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of structured triglycerides in parenteral nutrition compared either to a physical medium-chain triglycerides (MCT)/long-chain triglcerides (LCT) mixture or to a LCT emulsion on hepatic integrity. In a randomized, double-blinded trial, we studied 45 patients undergoing abdominal surgery, who were expected to receive parenteral nutrition for 5 days. Patients were allocated to one of three nutrition regimens: Group A (n = 15) received structured triglycerides, Group B (n = 15) a MCT/LCT and Group C (n = 15) a LCT lipid emulsion. Before the start of parenteral nutrition (T0), 24 h (T1), 48 h (T2), 72 h (T3) and 120 h (T4) after start of infusion the following parameters were measured: Alpha-glutathione S-transferase (alpha-GST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose and serum triglycerides. At T3 and T4, alpha-GST levels were significantly higher in Group B (T3: 9.4 +/- 9.9; T4: 14.6 +/- 19.5 microg L-1) and Group C (T3: 14.2 +/- 20.8; T4: 22.4 +/- 39.3 microg L-1) compared with the patients receiving structured triglycerides (T3: 1.9 +/- 1.8; T4: 3.2 +/- 2.7 microg L-1). Whereas the mean alpha-GST-levels in structured triglycerides group always remained in the normal range, this was not the case in both other groups at T3 and T4. There were no significant differences concerning ALT, AST and glucose levels. At T3 and T4, triglyceride levels were significantly lower in Group A than in Groups B and C. Hepatic integrity was well retained with the administration of structured triglycerides, whereas both MCT/LCT emulsion and LCT emulsion caused subclinical hepatic injury.

  20. Pacientes assintomáticos apresentam infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral Asymptomatic patients present infection related to the central venous catheter used for total parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Deh Carvalho Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos a terapia nutricional parenteral. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os cateteres venosos centrais de pacientes em terapia nutricional parenteral que tiveram a indicação de retirada do cateter venoso central por infecção, alta hospitalar, ou trombose. Os pacientes com infecção foram denominados de Grupo 1 e os demais de Grupo 2. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante quanto ao estado nutricional dos 18 pacientes analisados. Foram analisados 28 cateteres e destes 68% estavam infectados, sendo 72% do Grupo 1 e 28% do Grupo 2 (assintomáticos. No Grupo 1, houve infecção sistêmica em 70% dos casos, já no Grupo 2 a hemocultura foi positiva em 17% dos casos. A colonização por Staphylococcus sp. ocorreu em 48% dos casos, seguida de Candida sp. (21%, Enterococcus faecalis (16%, Pseudomonas aerurginosa (10% e Proteus sp.(5%. CONCLUSÃO: A contaminação de cateter venoso central utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral é freqüente. Mesmo pacientes assintomáticos recebendo nutrição parenteral têm uma incidência maior de infecção por Candida sp. Portanto é necessária a criação de barreiras que impeçam a colonização destes cateteres venosos centrais, a fim de diminuir a morbimortalidade de pacientes dependentes deste tipo de terapia.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of central venous catheter-related infections in hospitalized patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Central venous catheters were analyzed immediately after removal due to infection, hospital discharge or thrombosis. The patients with catheter-related infection were named Group 1 and the other patients were named Group 2. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were studied. There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the two groups. A total of 28 catheters were analyzed

  1. Development of the management for parenteral nutrition traceability in a standard hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Bernabeu Soria

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop the traceability control and the hazard analysis in the processes of parenteral nutrients (PN. Method: a standardized graphical notation was generated, describing in detail each of the stages in the overall process. The presence of hazards was analysed by sequencing decisions. The existence of Control Points (CP or Critical Control Points (CCP was estimated by Criticality Index (CI for each hazard taking into account the probability of occurrence and the severity of the damage. The threshold for the IC was set in 6. Results: a specific flow chart for the management and traceability of PN was obtained, defining each of the stages in CPs (validation and transcription of the prescription and administration or CCPs (preparation, storage and infusion pump –flow and filter-. Stages regarding the delivery, the recovery and the recycle of the packing material of PNs are not considered CPs and, therefore, they were not included in the dashboard. Conclusions: PN must be dealt with in the frame of a standardized management system in order to improve patient safety, clinical relevance, maximize resource efficiency and minimize procedural issues. The proposed system provides a global management model whose steps are fully defined, allowing monitoring and verification of PN. It would be convenient to make use of a software application to support the monitoring of the traceability management and to store the historical records in order to evaluate the system.

  2. Comparison of lipid emulsions on antioxidant capacity in preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Nilgün; Kavurt, Ahmet V; Cetinkaya, Merih; Ozarda, Yesim; Ozkan, Hilal

    2011-08-01

    Although a variety of different lipid emulsions with varying fatty acid contents have been developed, there are some concerns about the administration of these lipid emulsions because of potential adverse effects, including oxidative stress-related morbidity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effects of the standard soybean oil-based and olive oil-based i.v. lipid emulsions (ILE) on oxidative stress, determined by total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and to investigate the safety of the use of these two emulsions in terms of biochemical indices. In this prospective study, premature infants were randomly assigned to two groups, each group consisting of 32 patients who received parenteral ILE of either 20% olive oil or 20% soybean oil. They were given ILE for 7 days and then were evaluated with regard to TAC. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups in terms of routine biochemical parameters. TAC for both groups on day 7 was significantly lower compared with that on day 0. Although the decrease in TAC within 7 days of ILE administration was greater in the soybean group compared with that in the olive oil group, it was not statistically significant. Olive oil-based ILE exhibit similar antioxidant activity and can be used as an alternative to soybean oil-based ILE. TAC significantly decreased in infants following administration of either lipid emulsion, and premature infants tolerated either ILE well, both biochemically and clinically. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Síndrome do intestino curto na criança: tratamento com nutrição parenteral domiciliar Short bowel syndrome in children: treatment with home parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uenis Tannuri

    2004-09-01

    estado nutricional com a via oral exclusiva.BACKGROUND: In 1979 the author first utilized the method of home parenteral nutrition in a child in Brazil. The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, during the last 23 years, of treatment of children with short bowel utilizing home parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Nineteen children with short bowel syndrome (resection of more than 75% of total intestinal length were initially treated in the hospital and then nutrition therapy was continued at home. Total duration of nutrition therapy ranged from 4 months to 4 years and a half, while periods of home nutrition therapy ranged from 1 week to 4 years (median 8 months. Complete nutrition mixtures containing amino acids, glucose, lipid emulsion, electrolytes, vitamins and micro-elements were administered through Broviac or Hickman central venous catheters. Solutions were infused during the day or the night according to preference of the parents. RESULTS: In all cases weight gain, growth and development similar to normal children under oral nutrition were verified. Catheter occlusion, liver dysfunction and sepsis related to the catheter were the most frequent complications. Seven children (37% are alive and treatment free. Twelve children died (ten of them with resection of the entire small bowel and cecum, 11 due to parenteral nutrition complications (nine due to catheter sepsis and two due to massive pulmonary embolization and one child died with neurological complications after a combined liver and small bowel transplantation. CONCLUSION: Home parenteral nutrition is sometimes the only therapeutic choice for children with short bowel syndrome and promotes a maximal level of comfort to the patient and to the parents. Furthermore it reduces the period of hospitalization, while adaptation of the remaining small bowel occurs with maintenance of the nutritional status by oral route.

  4. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    45 years helping in developing countries! CERN personnel have been helping the least fortunate people on the planet since 1971. How? With the Long-Term Collections! Dear Colleagues, The Staff Association’s Long-Term Collections (LTC) Committee is delighted to share this important milestone in the life of our Laboratory with you. Indeed, whilst the name of CERN is known worldwide for scientific discoveries, it also shines in the many humanitarian projects which have been supported by the LTC since 1971. Several schools and clinics, far and wide, carry its logo... Over the past 45 years, 74 projects have been supported (9 of which are still ongoing). This all came from a group of colleagues who wanted to share a little of what life offered them here at CERN, in this haven of mutual understanding, peace and security, with those who were less fortunate elsewhere. Thus, the LTC were born... Since then, we have worked as a team to maintain the dream of these visionaries, with the help of regular donat...

  5. Long-Term Collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, As previously announced in Echo (No. 254), your delegates took action to draw attention to the projects of the Long-Term Collections (LTC), the humanitarian body of the CERN Staff Association. On Tuesday, 11 October, at noon, small Z-Cards were widely distributed at the entrances of CERN restaurants and we thank you all for your interest. We hope to have achieved an important part of our goal, which was to inform you, convince you and find new supporters among you. We will find out in the next few days! An exhibition of the LTC was also set up in the Main Building for the entire week. The Staff Association wants to celebrate the occasion of the Long-Term Collection’s 45th anniversary at CERN because, ever since 1971, CERN personnel have showed great support in helping the least fortunate people on the planet in a variety of ways according to their needs. On a regular basis, joint fundraising appeals are made with the Directorate to help the victims of natural disasters around th...

  6. Collectes à long terme

    CERN Multimedia

    Collectes à long terme

    2014-01-01

    En cette fin d’année 2014 qui approche à grands pas, le Comité des Collectes à Long Terme remercie chaleureusement ses fidèles donatrices et donateurs réguliers pour leurs contributions à nos actions en faveur des plus démunis de notre planète. C’est très important, pour notre Comité, de pouvoir compter sur l’appui assidu que vous nous apportez. Depuis plus de 40 ans maintenant, le modèle des CLT est basé principalement sur des actions à long terme (soit une aide pendant 4-5 ans par projet, mais plus parfois selon les circonstances), et sa planification demande une grande régularité de ses soutiens financiers. Grand MERCI à vous ! D’autres dons nous parviennent au cours de l’année, et ils sont aussi les bienvenus. En particulier, nous tenons à remercier...

  7. The present challenges of parenteral nutrition in preterm infants and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester

    2013-01-01

    The goal of pediatricians involved in the nutritional management of preterm infants is to mimic intrauterine growth and to obtain a functional outcome comparable to that for infants born at term. Appropriate administration of nutrients in the first few days to weeks of life will reduce the growth

  8. High incidence of rickets in extremely low birth weight infants with severe parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Min; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Eun, Ho Sun; Park, Kook In; Lee, Chul

    2012-12-01

    Risk factors for rickets of prematurity have not been re-examined since introduction of high mineral formula, particularly in ELBW infants. We analyzed the incidence and the risk factors of rickets in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. As a retrospective case-control study from 2004 to 2008, risk factors were analyzed in 24 patients with rickets versus 31 patients without. The frequency of rickets in ELBW infants was 24/55 (44%). Infants with rickets were diagnosed at 48.2 ± 16.1 days of age, and improved by 85.3 ± 25.3 days. By radiologic evaluation, 29% were grade 1 rickets, 58% grade 2 and 13% grade 3. In univariate analysis, infants with rickets had significantly higher incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC), severe PNAC and moderate/severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). In multiple regression analysis, after adjustment for gestation and birth weight, rickets significantly correlated with severe PNAC and with moderate/severe BPD. Serum peak alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly elevated in rickets (P rickets of prematurity remains high and the incidence of severe PNAC and moderate/severe BPD was significantly increased 18 and 3 times, respectively.

  9. Changes in Antioxidant Defense System Using Different Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition in Children after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Auxiliadora Baena-Gómez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally, lipids used in parenteral nutrition (PN are based on ω-6 fatty acid-rich vegetable oils, such as soybean oil, with potential adverse effects involving oxidative stress. Methods: We evaluated the antioxidant defense system in children, after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, who were randomized to use a lipid emulsion with fish oil or soybean oil. Blood samples at baseline, at 10 days, and at the end of the PN were taken to analyze plasma retinol, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, coenzyme Q9 and coenzyme Q10 levels, and catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPOX, and superoxide dismutase (SOD levels in lysed erythrocytes. Results: An increase in plasma α-tocopherol levels in the group of patients receiving the fish oil-containing emulsion (FO compared with the group receiving the soybean emulsion was observed at day 10 of PN. Concurrently, plasma α-tocopherol increased in the FO group and β-carotene decreased in both groups at day 10 compared with baseline levels, being more significant in the group receiving the FO emulsion. Conclusion: FO-containing emulsions in PN could improve the antioxidant profile by increasing levels of α-tocopherol in children after HSCT who are at higher risk of suffering oxidative stress and metabolic disorders.

  10. Assessment of anti-factor Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition admixtures for premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foinard, A; Perez, M; Barthélémy, C; Lannoy, D; Flamein, F; Storme, L; Tournoys, A; Décaudin, B; Odou, P

    2015-07-01

    An in vitro study was carried out to determine the anti-Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition (BPN) admixtures for premature neonates in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after a 24-hour infusion, as well as to assess drug interaction with a 50% glucose solution. Two types of bags were prepared: (1) BPN admixtures (composition defined in the NICU) including sodium heparin at 77 UI/mL and (2) bags containing only G50% with sodium heparin at 193 UI/mL. The anti-Xa activity of heparin was measured in bags at T0, after the 24-hour infusion and in eluates at the outlet of the infusion line after 24hours, using a validated chromogenic anti-Xa method. Comparisons of the mean concentration observed with the theoretical value for anti-Xa activity were performed with the Student t-test. Mean values of anti-Xa activity do not differ significantly from the values expected for all conditions. We found a slight variation in anti-Xa activity when infused over 24hours for both types of bags, with and without in-line filtration, showing that heparin remains stable during this infusion period in both BPN admixtures and G50%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Indicaciones no quirúrgicas de la nutrición parenteral periférica Parenteral periferic nutrition: non surgical indications

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta; F. Pita Gutiérrez; F. Mosteiro Pereira; L. Cordero Lorenzana; S. Gómez Canosa; C. Seco Vilariño

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: La Nutrición Parenteral Perif��rica, definida como la mezcla de macronutrientes, vitaminas y minerales con osmolaridad menor de 800 mOsm/L, permite evitar los riesgos del catéter central. Clásicamente ha sido utilizada en postoperados, pero actualmente la patología médica también puede beneficiarse de ella, bien como única fuente de nutrientes, ya que un alto porcentaje de pacientes precisan menor aporte calórico de lo que se creía, o como complementaria. Objetivo: Evaluación de...

  12. Enteral versus parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elke, Gunnar; van Zanten, Arthur R H; Lemieux, Margot; McCall, Michele; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed N; Kott, Matthias; Jiang, Xuran; Day, Andrew G; Heyland, Daren K

    2016-04-29

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is recommended as the preferred route for early nutrition therapy in critically ill adults over parenteral nutrition (PN). A recent large randomized controlled trial (RCT) showed no outcome differences between the two routes. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of the route of nutrition (EN versus PN) on clinical outcomes of critically ill patients. An electronic search from 1980 to 2016 was performed identifying relevant RCTs. Individual trial data were abstracted and methodological quality of included trials scored independently by two reviewers. The primary outcome was overall mortality and secondary outcomes included infectious complications, length of stay (LOS) and mechanical ventilation. Subgroup analyses were performed to examine the treatment effect by dissimilar caloric intakes, year of publication and trial methodology. We performed a test of asymmetry to assess for the presence of publication bias. A total of 18 RCTs studying 3347 patients met inclusion criteria. Median methodological score was 7 (range, 2-12). No effect on overall mortality was found (1.04, 95 % CI 0.82, 1.33, P = 0.75, heterogeneity I(2) = 11 %). EN compared to PN was associated with a significant reduction in infectious complications (RR 0.64, 95 % CI 0.48, 0.87, P = 0.004, I(2) = 47 %). This was more pronounced in the subgroup of RCTs where the PN group received significantly more calories (RR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.37, 0.82, P = 0.003, I(2) = 0 %), while no effect was seen in trials where EN and PN groups had a similar caloric intake (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.80, 1.10, P = 0.44, I(2) = 0 %; test for subgroup differences, P = 0.003). Year of publication and methodological quality did not influence these findings; however, a publication bias may be present as the test of asymmetry was significant (P = 0.003). EN was associated with significant reduction in ICU LOS (weighted mean difference [WMD] -0.80, 95 % CI -1.23, -0.37, P = 0.0003, I(2

  13. [When enteral nutrition is not possible in intensive care patients: whether to wait or use parenteral nutrition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habes, Q.L.M.; Pickkers, P.

    2016-01-01

    - Overfeeding of critically ill patients is associated with a higher incidence of infections and an increased length of ventilation. However, trophic nutrition or permissive underfeeding appears to have no negative effect on the patient and may even provide a survival benefit.- Initiation of enteral

  14. Accuracy and Utility of Estimating Lean Body Mass and Nutritional Status in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease on Long-Term Hemodialysis Using Anthropometric Skinfold Thickness Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Khai Gene; Chee, Jia Lian; Karahalios, Amalia; Skelley, Annabelle; Wong, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients on hemodialysis (prevalence of 30% to 50%) and is associated with higher mortality. Lean body mass (LBM) assessment is an accurate way of assessing nutritional status. The dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan is a reliable method in assessing body compositions and LBM; however, it is expensive and largely inaccessible. Anthropometric skinfold thickness measurement (ASFM) is useful in assessing LBM. It is cheaper and accessible, but underutilized clinically. The subjective global score (SGA) is a well-established method of assessing nutritional status. All three methods of assessing nutritional status were compared. In this pilot observational study, there was a significant correlation between LBM% estimated by DEXA and ASFM (mean difference -1.46% [95% CI -4.09 to 1.18]; LOA -14.0 to 11.1). Nutritional status by SGA could only detect those severely malnourished when using LBM% by ASFM as comparison. Our study demonstrated that ASFM is a useful method of assessing LBM and nutritional status, which can be easily utilized clinically. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  15. Naples Prognostic Score, Based on Nutritional and Inflammatory Status, is an Independent Predictor of Long-term Outcome in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizia, Gennaro; Lieto, Eva; Auricchio, Annamaria; Cardella, Francesca; Mabilia, Andrea; Podzemny, Vlasta; Castellano, Paolo; Orditura, Michele; Napolitano, Vincenzo

    2017-12-01

    The existing scores reflecting the patient's nutritional and inflammatory status do not include all biomarkers and have been poorly studied in colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to assess a new prognostic tool, the Naples prognostic score, comparing it with the prognostic nutritional index, controlling nutritional status score, and systemic inflammation score. This was an analysis of patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. The study was conducted at a university hospital. A total of 562 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in July 2004 through June 2014 and 468 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery were included. MaxStat analysis dichotomized neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio, lymphocyte:monocyte ratio, prognostic nutritional index, and the controlling nutritional status score. The Naples prognostic scores were divided into 3 groups (group 0, 1, and 2). The receiver operating characteristic curve for censored survival data compared the prognostic performance of the scoring systems. Overall survival and complication rates in all patients, as well as recurrence and disease-free survival rates in radically resected patients, were measured. The Naples prognostic score correlated positively with the other scoring systems (p cancer. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A469.

  16. High Protein Intake Does Not Prevent Low Plasma Levels of Conditionally Essential Amino Acids in Very Preterm Infants Receiving Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Colin; Burgess, Laura

    2017-03-01

    We have shown that increasing protein intake using a standardized, concentrated, added macronutrients parenteral (SCAMP) nutrition regimen improves head growth in very preterm infants (VPIs) compared with a control parenteral nutrition (PN) regimen. VPIs are at risk of conditionally essential amino acid (CEAA) deficiencies because of current neonatal PN amino acid (AA) formulations. We hypothesized that the SCAMP regimen would prevent low plasma levels of CEAAs. To compare the plasma AA profiles at approximately day 9 of life in VPIs receiving SCAMP vs a control PN regimen. VPIs (parenteral and enteral protein, energy, and individual AA intake and the first plasma AA profile. Plasma profiles of the 20 individual protogenic AA levels were measured using ion exchange chromatography. Plasma AA profiles were obtained at median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 9 (8-10) days in both SCAMP (n = 59) and control (n = 67) groups after randomizing 150 VPIs. Median (IQR) plasma levels of individual essential AAs were higher than the reference population mean (RPM) in both groups, especially for threonine. SCAMP infants had higher plasma levels of essential AAs than did the controls. Median (IQR) plasma levels of glutamine, arginine, and cysteine (CEAAs) were lower than the RPM in both groups. Plasma AA levels in PN-dependent VPIs indicate there is an imbalance in essential and CEAA provision in neonatal PN AA formulations that is not improved by increasing protein intake.

  17. Nutrición enteral total vs. nutrición parenteral total en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave Total enteral nutrition vs. total parenteral nutrition in patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Casas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar la eficacia de la instauración precoz de nutrición enteral total (NET frente a nutrición parenteral total (NPT en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave (PAG. Métodos: estudio prospectivo aleatorio. Se incluyeron consecutivamente 22 pacientes con PAG aplicando los criterios APACHE II, valores de PCR y graduación de Balthazar en la TC. El grupo I (n = 11 recibió NPT y el grupo II (n = 12 NET. Se valoró la respuesta inflamatoria (PCR, TNF-alfa, IL-6, las proteínas viscerales (pre-albúmina, albúmina, la tasa de complicaciones (síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica, fallo multiorgánico, infecciones, las intervenciones quirúrgicas, la estancia hospitalaria y la mortalidad. Resultados: no hubo diferencias significativas en los primeros 10 días entre los dos grupos en la evolución de los criterios APACHE II, en las concentraciones de PCR, TNF-alfa e IL-6 ni tampoco en los valores de pre-albúmina y albúmina. Siete pacientes del grupo I presentaron complicaciones graves frente a 4 del grupo II. Requirieron intervención quirúrgica 3 pacientes del grupo I. La estancia hospitalaria fue similar en los dos grupos. Dos pacientes del grupo I fallecieron. Conclusiones: se ha observado una tendencia a una mejor evolución de los pacientes con PAG que utilizaron NET frente a los que utilizaron NPT.Objective: to compare the efficacy of early total enteral nutrition (TEN vs. total parenteral nutrition (TPN in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Methods: a total of 22 consecutive patients with SAP were randomized to receive TPN (group I or TEN (group II. SAP was defined applying APACHE II score, C-reactive protein (CRP measurements and/or Balthazar CT scan score. Acute inflammatory response (CRP, TNF-alpha, IL-6, visceral proteins (pre-albumin, albumin, complications (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiorgan failure, infections, surgical interventions, length of hospital stay and mortality were

  18. The (cost-)effectiveness of an individually tailored long-term worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: design of a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); F.J. Bredt (Folef); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disability and mortality in most Western countries. The prevalence of several risk factors, most notably low physical activity and poor nutrition, is very high. Therefore, lifestyle behaviour changes are of great importance. The worksite

  19. Introduction: Long term prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.

    2003-01-01

    Making a decision upon the right choice of a material appropriate to a given application should be based on taking into account several parameters as follows: cost, standards, regulations, safety, recycling, chemical properties, supplying, transformation, forming, assembly, mechanical and physical properties as well as the behaviour in practical conditions. Data taken from a private communication (J.H.Davidson) are reproduced presenting the life time range of materials from a couple of minutes to half a million hours corresponding to applications from missile technology up to high-temperature nuclear reactors or steam turbines. In the case of deep storage of nuclear waste the time required is completely different from these values since we have to ensure the integrity of the storage system for several thousand years. The vitrified nuclear wastes should be stored in metallic canisters made of iron and carbon steels, stainless steels, copper and copper alloys, nickel alloys or titanium alloys. Some of these materials are passivating metals, i.e. they develop a thin protective film, 2 or 3 nm thick - the so-called passive films. These films prevent general corrosion of the metal in a large range of chemical condition of the environment. In some specific condition, localized corrosion such as the phenomenon of pitting, occurs. Consequently, it is absolutely necessary to determine these chemical condition and their stability in time to understand the behavior of a given material. In other words the corrosion system is constituted by the complex material/surface/medium. For high level nuclear wastes the main features for resolving problem are concerned with: geological disposal; deep storage in clay; waste metallic canister; backfill mixture (clay-gypsum) or concrete; long term behavior; data needed for modelling and for predicting; choice of appropriate solution among several metallic candidates. The analysis of the complex material/surface/medium is of great importance

  20. Long-Term Symbolic Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kennedy, William G; Trafton, J. G

    2007-01-01

    What are the characteristics of long-term learning? We investigated the characteristics of long-term, symbolic learning using the Soar and ACT-R cognitive architectures running cognitive models of two simple tasks...

  1. LONG TERM COLLECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Long-Term Collections (CLT) committee would like to warmly thank its faithful donors who, year after year, support our actions all over the world. Without you, all this would not be possible. We would like to thank, in particular, the CERN Firemen’s Association who donated 5000 CHF in the spring thanks to the sale of their traditional calendar, and the generosity of the CERN community. A huge thank you to the firemen for their devotion to our cause. And thank you to all those who have opened their door, their heart, and their purses! Similarly, we warmly thank the CERN Yoga Club once again for its wonderful donation of 2000 CHF we recently received. We would also like to tell you that all our projects are running well. Just to remind you, we are currently supporting the activities of the «Réflexe-Partage» Association in Mali; the training centre of «Education et Développement» in Abomey, Benin; and the orphanage and ...

  2. What are the factors that influence the attainment of satisfactory energy intake in pediatric intensive care unit patients receiving enteral or parenteral nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernanda Souza; Leite, Heitor Pons; Nogueira, Paulo Cesar Koch

    2013-01-01

    Children admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of inadequate energy intake. Although studies have identified factors contributing to an inadequate energy supply in critically ill children, they did not take into consideration the length of time during which patients received their estimated energy requirements after having achieved a satisfactory energy intake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with the non-attainment of estimated energy requirements and consider the time this energy intake is maintained. This was a prospective study involving 207 children hospitalized in the ICU who were receiving enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. The outcome variable studied was whether 90% of the estimated basal metabolic rate was maintained for at least half of the ICU stay (satisfactory energy intake). The exposure variables for outcome were gender, age, diagnosis, use of vasopressors, malnutrition, route of nutritional support, and Pediatric Index of Mortality and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction scores. Satisfactory energy intake was attained by 20.8% of the patients, within a mean time of 5.07 ± 2.48 d. In a multivariable analysis, a diagnosis of heart disease (odds ratio 3.62, 95% confidence interval 1.03-12.68, P = 0.045) increased the risk of insufficient energy intake, whereas malnutrition (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.92, P = 0.030) and the use of parenteral nutrition (odds ratio 0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77, P = 0.001) were protective factors against this outcome. A satisfactory energy intake was reached by a small proportion of patients during their ICU stay. Heart disease was an independent risk factor for the non-attainment of satisfactory energy intake, whereas malnutrition and the use of parenteral nutrition were protective factors against this outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of the General Process of Parenteral Nutrition Using mHealth Technologies: Evaluation and Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera Peris, Mercedes; Alonso Rorís, Víctor Manuel; Santos Gago, Juan Manuel; Álvarez Sabucedo, Luis; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier

    2018-04-03

    Any system applied to the control of parenteral nutrition (PN) ought to prove that the process meets the established requirements and include a repository of records to allow evaluation of the information about PN processes at any time. The goal of the research was to evaluate the mobile health (mHealth) app and validate its effectiveness in monitoring the management of the PN process. We studied the evaluation and validation of the general process of PN using an mHealth app. The units of analysis were the PN bags prepared and administered at the Son Espases University Hospital, Palma, Spain, from June 1 to September 6, 2016. For the evaluation of the app, we used the Poststudy System Usability Questionnaire and subsequent analysis with the Cronbach alpha coefficient. Validation was performed by checking the compliance of control for all operations on each of the stages (validation and transcription of the prescription, preparation, conservation, and administration) and by monitoring the operative control points and critical control points. The results obtained from 387 bags were analyzed, with 30 interruptions of administration. The fulfillment of stages was 100%, including noncritical nonconformities in the storage control. The average deviation in the weight of the bags was less than 5%, and the infusion time did not present deviations greater than 1 hour. The developed app successfully passed the evaluation and validation tests and was implemented to perform the monitoring procedures for the overall PN process. A new mobile solution to manage the quality and traceability of sensitive medicines such as blood-derivative drugs and hazardous drugs derived from this project is currently being deployed. ©Mercedes Cervera Peris, Víctor Manuel Alonso Rorís, Juan Manuel Santos Gago, Luis Álvarez Sabucedo, Carmina Wanden-Berghe, Javier Sanz-Valero. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 03.04.2018.

  4. The effect of 5 intravenous lipid emulsions on plasma phytosterols in preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Sara; D'Ascenzo, Rita; Biagetti, Chiara; Serpentini, Giulia; Pompilio, Adriana; Bartoli, Alice; Cogo, Paola E; Carnielli, Virgilio P

    2013-08-01

    Elevated plasma phytosterol concentrations are an untoward effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with vegetable oil-based lipid emulsions (LEs). Phytosterols are elevated in neonatal cholestasis, but the relation remains controversial. The objective was to study the effect of 5 LEs on plasma phytosterols in preterm infants. One hundred forty-four consecutive admitted preterm infants (birth weight: 500-1249 g) were studied. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 5 different LEs: S [100% soybean oil (SO)], MS [50% medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and 50% SO], MSF (50% MCTs, 40% SO, and 10% fish oil (FO)], OS (80% olive oil and 20% SO), or MOSF (30% MCTs, 25% olive oil, 30% SO, and 15% FO). Phytosterols in the LEs and in plasma (on postnatal day 7 and day 14) were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Patients in the S group had significantly higher total phytosterol intakes than did the other study groups. On PN days 7 and 14, plasma phytosterol concentrations were highest in the S group and lowest in the MOSF group. Despite similar β-sitosterol intakes between the MS and MSF groups, plasma concentrations were significantly lower in the MSF than in the MS group. Only 3 patients (2.1%) developed cholestasis: 1 in the MS, 1 in the MSF, and 1 in the MOSF group. No cases of cholestasis were observed in the S and OS groups. In uncomplicated preterm infants receiving routine PN, we found a correlation between phytosterol intake and plasma phytosterol concentrations; however, cholestasis was rare and no difference in liver function at 6 wk was observed.

  5. Incidence and Severity of Prescribing Errors in Parenteral Nutrition for Pediatric Inpatients at a Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Hermanspann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesPediatric inpatients are particularly vulnerable to medication errors (MEs, especially in highly individualized preparations like parenteral nutrition (PN. Aside from prescribing via a computerized physician order entry system (CPOE, we evaluated the effect of cross-checking by a clinical pharmacist to prevent harm from PN order errors in a neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit (NICU/PICU.MethodsThe incidence of prescribing errors in PN in a tertiary level NICU/PICU was surveyed prospectively between March 2012 and July 2013 (n = 3,012 orders. A pharmacist cross-checked all PN orders prior to preparation. Errors were assigned to seven different error-type categories. Three independent experts from different academic tertiary level NICUs judged the severity of each error according to the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP Index (categories A–I.ResultsThe error rate was 3.9% for all 3,012 orders (118 prescribing errors in 111 orders. 77 (6.0%, 1,277 orders errors occurred in the category concentration range, all concerning a relative overdose of calcium gluconate for peripheral infusion. The majority of all events (60% were assigned to categories C and D (without major harmful consequences while 28% could not be assigned due to missing majority decision. Potential harmful consequences requiring interventions (category E could have occurred in 12% of assessments.ConclusionNext to systematic application of clinical guidelines and prescribing via CPOE, order review by a clinical pharmacist is still required to effectively reduce MEs and thus to prevent minor and major adverse drug events with the aim to enhance medication safety.

  6. Retrospective analysis of systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition for the treatment of malignant small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, Jay; Gupta, Rohan; Ensor, Joe; Raghav, Kanwal; Fogelman, David; Wolff, Robert A.; Fisch, Michael; Overman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant small bowel obstruction (MSBO) that does not resolve with conservative measures frequently leaves few treatment options other than palliative care. This single-institution retrospective study assesses the outcomes of a more aggressive approach—concurrent systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN)—in the treatment of MSBO. The MD Anderson pharmacy database was queried to identify patients who received concurrent systemic chemotherapy and TPN between 2005 and 2013. Only patients with MSBO secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis requiring TPN for ≥8 days were included. Survival and multivariate analyses were performed using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. The study included 82 patients. MSBO resolution was observed in 10 patients. Radiographic assessments showed a response to chemotherapy in 19 patients; 6 of these patients experienced MSBO resolution. Patients spent an average of 38% of their remaining lives hospitalized, and 28% of patients required admission to the intensive care unit. In multivariate modeling, radiographic response to chemotherapy correlated with MSBO resolution (odds ratio [OR] 6.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68–27.85, P = 0.007). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 12.6%. Radiographic response to chemotherapy (HR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.16–0.56, P < 0.001), and initiation of new chemotherapy during TPN (HR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33–0.94, P = 0.026) independently predicted for longer OS. Concurrent treatment with systemic chemotherapy and TPN for persistent MSBO results in low efficacy and a high morbidity and mortality, and thus should not represent a standard approach

  7. Hexapeptides from human milk prevent the induction of oxidative stress from parenteral nutrition in the newborn guinea pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloudi, Khalil; Tsopmo, Apollinaire; Friel, James K.; Rouleau, Thérèse; Comte, Blandine; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In preterm neonates, peroxides contaminating total parenteral nutrition (TPN) contribute to oxidative stress, which is suspected to be a strong inducer of hepatic complications related to prematurity. Recently, others reported that hexapeptides derived from human milk (HM) exerted free radical–scavenging activities in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the capacity of these hexapeptides to limit the generation of peroxides in TPN and to prevent TPN-induced hepatic oxidative stress. METHODS At 3 d of life, guinea pigs were infused, through a catheter in jugular vein, with TPN containing or not peptide-A (YGYTGA) or peptide-B (ISELGW). Peroxide concentrations were measured in TPN solutions, whereas glutathione, glutathionyl-1,4-dihydroxynonenal (GS-HNE) and mRNA levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were determined in liver after 4 d of infusion. RESULTS The addition of peptide-A to TPN allowed a reduction in peroxide contamination by half. In vivo, peptide-A or peptide-B corrected the hepatic oxidative status induced by TPN. Indeed, both peptides lowered the hepatic redox potential of glutathione and the level of GS-HNE, a marker of lipid peroxidation. As compared with animals infused with TPN without peptide, the hepatic mRNA levels of IL-1 and TNFα were lower in animals infused with TPN containing peptide-A or peptide-B. DISCUSSION These results suggest that the addition of YGYTGA or ISELGW to TPN will reduce oxidative stress in newborns. The reduction in mRNA of two proinflammatory cytokines could be important for the incidence of hepatic complications related to TPN. PMID:22337230

  8. Extending total parenteral nutrition hang time in the neonatal intensive care unit: is it safe and cost effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balegar V, Kiran Kumar; Azeem, Mohammad Irfan; Spence, Kaye; Badawi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of prolonging hang time of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) fluid on central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI), TPN-related cost and nursing workload. A before-after observational study comparing the practice of hanging TPN bags for 48 h (6 February 2009-5 February 2010) versus 24 h (6 February 2008-5 February 2009) in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit was conducted. The main outcome measures were CLABSI, TPN-related expenses and nursing workload. One hundred thirty-six infants received 24-h TPN bags and 124 received 48-h TPN bags. Median (inter-quartile range) gestation (37 weeks (33,39) vs. 36 weeks (33,39)), mean (±standard deviation) admission weight of 2442 g (±101) versus 2476 g (±104) and TPN duration (9.7 days (±12.7) vs. 9.9 days (±13.4)) were similar (P > 0.05) between the 24- and 48-h TPN groups. There was no increase in CLABSI with longer hang time (0.8 vs. 0.4 per 1000 line days in the 24-h vs. 48-h group; P < 0.05). Annual cost saving using 48-h TPN was AUD 97,603.00. By using 48-h TPN, 68.3% of nurses indicated that their workload decreased and 80.5% indicated that time spent changing TPN reduced. Extending TPN hang time from 24 to 48 h did not alter CLABSI rate and was associated with a reduced TPN-related cost and perceived nursing workload. Larger randomised controlled trials are needed to more clearly delineate these effects. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  9. Evaluating long term forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lady, George M. [Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA), and its predecessor organizations, has published projections of U.S. energy production, consumption, distribution and prices annually for over 30 years. A natural issue to raise in evaluating the projections is an assessment of their accuracy compared to eventual outcomes. A related issue is the determination of the sources of 'error' in the projections that are due to differences between the actual versus realized values of the associated assumptions. One way to do this would be to run the computer-based model from which the projections are derived at the time the projected values are realized, using actual rather than assumed values for model assumptions; and, compare these results to the original projections. For long term forecasts, this approach would require that the model's software and hardware configuration be archived and available for many years, possibly decades, into the future. Such archival creates many practical problems; and, in general, it is not being done. This paper reports on an alternative approach for evaluating the projections. In the alternative approach, the model is run many times for cases in which important assumptions are changed individually and in combinations. A database is assembled from the solutions and a regression analysis is conducted for each important projected variable with the associated assumptions chosen as exogenous variables. When actual data are eventually available, the regression results are then used to estimate the sources of the differences in the projections of the endogenous variables compared to their eventual outcomes. The results presented here are for residential and commercial sector natural gas and electricity consumption. (author)

  10. Effects of Saccharomyces boulardii on fecal short-chain fatty acids and microflora in patients on long-term total enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stéphane M; Girard-Pipau, Fernand; Filippi, Jérôme; Hébuterne, Xavier; Moyse, Dominique; Hinojosa, Gustavo Calle; Pompei, Anne; Rampal, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of Sb on fecal flora and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in patients on long-term TEN. METHODS: Ten patients (3 females, 7 males, 59±5.5 years), on TEN for a median of 13 mo (1-125), and 15 healthy volunteers (4 females, 11 males, 32±2.0 years) received Sb (0.5 g bid PO) for 6 d. Two stool samples were taken before, on the last 2 d and 9-10 d after treatment, for SCFA measurement and for culture and bacterial identification. Values (mean±SE) were compared using sign tests and ANOVA. RESULTS: Fecal butyrate levels were lower in patients (10.1±2.9 mmol/kg) than in controls (19.2±2.9, P = 0.02). Treatment with Sb increased total fecal SCFA levels in patients (150.2±27.2vs 107.5?8.2 mmol/kg, P = 0.02) but not in controls (129.0±28.6 vs 113.0±15.2 mmol/kg, NS). At the end of treatment with Sb, patients had higher fecal butyrate (16.0±4.4 vs 10.1 [2.9] mmol/kg, P = 0.004). Total SCFAs remained high 9 d after treatment was discon-tinued. Before the treatment, the anaerobe to aerobe ratio was lower in patients compared to controls (2.4±2.3 vs 69.8±1.8, P = 0.003). There were no significant changes in the fecal flora of TEN patients. CONCLUSION: Sb-induced increase of fecal SCFA concentrations (especially butyrate) may explain the preventive effects of this yeast on TEN-induced diarrhea. PMID:16273644

  11. Effect of early fasting and total parenteral nutrition support on the healing of incision and nutritional status in patients after sacrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S; Zheng, Y; Liu, X; Tian, Z; Zhao, Y

    2018-03-19

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications for patients after sacrectomy, which often accompanied by poor wound healing, sinus formation and serious metabolic disturbance. We tried to avoid the surgical site infection caused by feces during early period after surgery through early fasting and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, then compared the clinical results of these patients with other patients that received enteral nutrition (EN) early after sacrectomy. Forty-eight patients after sacrectomy (the level of sacrectomy above S 2 ) were randomly divided into two groups: TPN group and EN group. The patients of two groups received different nutrition support from the first day to the seventh day after surgery, then the factors such as nutritional and metabolic status after surgery, incidence of complications as well as the time of incision healing and hospitalization were observed. The p-value of total serum protein, albumin, serum alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin at seventh day after sacrectomy between TPN group and EN group is <0.0005. The p-value of hemoglobin at seventh day after sacrectomy between TPN group and EN group is 0.001. The p-value of total serum protein at fourteenth day after sacrectomy between TPN group and EN group is 0.003. The p-value of albumin and total bilirubin at fourteenth day after sacrectomy between TPN group and EN group is 0.001. The p-value of hemoglobin, serum alanine aminotransferase at fourteenth day after sacrectomy between TPN group and EN group is <0.0005. The incidence of gastrointestinal complication and delay of apparition of feces in EN group were lower than that in TPN group (p=0.041, p<0.0005). The incidence of surgical site infection, the time of incision healing and hospitalization in TPN group were lower than that in EN group (p=0.048, p=0.008, p<0.0005). The method of fasting and supported by TPN during the early period after sacrectomy contribute to the incision healing, meanwhile

  12. Health economic potential of early nutrition programming: a model calculation of long-term reduction in blood pressure and related morbidity costs by use of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid-supplemented formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Niels; Grunert, Philipp; von Kries, Rüdiger; Koletzko, Berthold

    2011-12-01

    The reported effect sizes of early nutrition programming on long-term health outcomes are often small, and it has been questioned whether early interventions would be worthwhile in enhancing public health. We explored the possible health economic consequences of early nutrition programming by performing a model calculation, based on the only published study currently available for analysis, to evaluate the effects of supplementing infant formula with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) on lowering blood pressure and lowering the risk of hypertension-related diseases in later life. The costs and health effects of LC-PUFA-enriched and standard infant formulas were compared by using a Markov model, including all relevant direct and indirect costs based on German statistics. We assessed the effect size of blood pressure reduction from LC-PUFA-supplemented formula, the long-term persistence of the effect, and the effect of lowered blood pressure on hypertension-related morbidity. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed an increased life expectancy of 1.2 quality-adjusted life-years and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of -630 Euros (discounted to present value) for the LC-PUFA formula in comparison with standard formula. LC-PUFA nutrition was the superior strategy even when the blood pressure-lowering effect was reduced to the lower 95% CI. Breastfeeding is the recommended feeding practice, but infants who are not breastfed should receive an appropriate infant formula. Following this model calculation, LC-PUFA supplementation of infant formula represents an economically worthwhile prevention strategy, based on the costs derived from hypertension-linked diseases in later life. However, because our analysis was based on a single randomized controlled trial, further studies are required to verify the validity of this thesis.

  13. Long-term follow-up of nutritional status, pancreatic function, and morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant after pancreatic tumor resection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugito, Kiminobu; Furuya, Takeshi; Kaneda, Hide; Masuko, Takayuki; Ohashi, Kensuke; Inoue, Mikiya; Ikeda, Taro; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi; Tomita, Ryouichi; Maebayashi, Toshiya

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine nutritional status, pancreatic function, and morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant after pancreatic tumor resection in children. The nutritional status was evaluated by the patterns of growth. Pancreatic function was evaluated by using a questionnaire, the Bristol stool form chart, the serum levels of fasting blood glucose, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Morphological changes of the pancreatic remnant were evaluated by computed tomography, magnetic resonance image, or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The present study consisted of 6 patients with pancreatic tumor (5 solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas and 1 pancreatoblastoma) who underwent the following operations: tumor enucleation (3), distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (1), and pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD [2]). The serum levels of HbA1c have been gradually elevated in 2 patients with PPPD. A significant decrease in pancreatic parenchymal thickness and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct were observed in 2 patients with PPPD. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency after PPPD may be explainable by obstructive pancreatitis after operation. Taking together the results of pancreatic endocrine function and morphological changes of pancreatic remnant after PPPD, tumor enucleation should be considered as surgical approach in children with pancreas head tumor whenever possible.

  14. [The registry of home artificial nutrition and ambulatory of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition; SWOT analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanden-Berghe, C; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Lobo Tamer, G; Calleja Fernández, A; Gómez Candela, C; Zugasti Murillo, A; Apezetxea Celaya, A; Torres Corts, A; Moreno Villarés, J M; de Luis, D; Penacho, Ma Á; Laborda, L; Burgos, R; Irles, J A; Cuerda Compes, C; Virgili Casas, Ma N; Martínez Olmos, M A; García Luna, P P

    2012-01-01

    To evidence by means of a SWOT-R analysis performed by an expert consensus the most worrying characteristics of the register on Home-based and Outpatient Artificial Nutrition. SWOT-R analysis with expert consensus. We requested the participation of the active members of the NADYA group within the last 5 years with the premise of structuring the SWOT-R based on the characteristics of the NADYA registry from its beginning. 18 experts from hospitals all over Spain have participated. The internal analysis seems to be positive, presenting the registry as having important resources. The external analysis did not show a great number of threats, there are very potent factors, "the voluntariness" of the registry and the "dependence on external financing". The opportunities identified are important. The recommendations are aimed at stabilizing the system by decreasing the threats as one of the main focus of the strategies to develop as well as promoting the items identified as opportunities and strengths. The analysis shows that the NADYA register shows a big potentiality for improvement. The proposed recommendations should be structured in order to stay on the track of development and quality improvement that has characterized the NADYA register from the beginning.

  15. What Is Enteral Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Solution Center NOVEL Project Parenteral Nutrition Resources Intravenous Lipid Emulsions (ILE) Video Series SmartPN Practice and Research Toolkits Publications & ASPEN Journals Journal of Parenteral and ...

  16. The (cost-effectiveness of an individually tailored long-term worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: design of a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdorf Alex

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disability and mortality in most Western countries. The prevalence of several risk factors, most notably low physical activity and poor nutrition, is very high. Therefore, lifestyle behaviour changes are of great importance. The worksite offers an efficient structure to reach large groups and to make use of a natural social network. This study investigates a worksite health promotion programme with individually tailored advice in physical activity and nutrition and individual counselling to increase compliance with lifestyle recommendations and sustainability of a healthy lifestyle. Methods/Design The study is a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with the worksite as the unit of randomisation. All workers will receive a standard worksite health promotion program. Additionally, the intervention group will receive access to an individual Health Portal consisting of four critical features: a computer-tailored advice, a monitoring function, a personal coach, and opportunities to contact professionals at request. Participants are employees working for companies in the Netherlands, being literate enough to read and understand simple Internet-based messages in the Dutch language. A questionnaire to assess primary outcomes (compliance with national recommendations on physical activity and on fruit and vegetable intake will take place at baseline and after 12 and 24 months. This questionnaire also assesses secondary outcomes including fat intake, self-efficacy and self-perceived barriers on physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake. Other secondary outcomes, including a cardiovascular risk profile and physical fitness, will be measured at baseline and after 24 months. Apart from the effect evaluation, a process evaluation will be carried out to gain insight into participation and adherence to the worksite health promotion programme. A cost-effectiveness analysis and

  17. Long Term Financing of Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sidharth

    2014-01-01

    Infrastructure projects, given their long life, require long term financing. The main sources of long term financings are insurance and pension funds who seek long term investments with low credit risk. However, in India household financial savings are mainly invested in bank deposits. Insurance and pension funds account for only a small percentage of household financial savings. In addition most infrastructure projects do not qualify for investment by insurance and pension funds because of t...

  18. Tandem mass spectrometric identification of dextrose markers in dried-blood spots from infants receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chace, Donald H; De Jesús, Víctor R; Lim, Timothy H; Hannon, W Harry; Spitzer, Alan R

    2010-11-11

    The false positive rate for the newborn screening of disorders of amino acid metabolism for premature infants is higher than full term infants. This may be due to very low birth weight infants receiving high concentrations of amino acids from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) administration and/or immature metabolism. An investigation of the possible influence of TPN on screening of premature infants resulted in the detection of three unusual peaks in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) acylcarnitine profile. These markers were closely correlated with the detection of very high multiple amino acid increases in the profiles of newborns administered with TPN and who were ultimately found to be normal and free of inherited metabolic disorders. TPN solutions contain a concentrated mixture of amino acids and dextrose and other nutrients in saline. Due to its high concentration and suggestion of a carbohydrate, it was hypothesized that dextrose (D-glucose) was the contaminant and source of the markers detected. Dextrose, stable isotope-labeled 13C6-dextrose and various TPN solutions were analyzed directly or after enrichment in whole blood by multiple MS/MS acquisition modes including MS-only, product and precursor ion and neutral loss scans. Analysis of dried-blood spots (DBS) prepared from whole blood spiked with TPN solutions containing 12.5% dextrose and amino acid formulations designed to deliver 2.5 gm/kg/day of an amino acid mixture had moderate increases of all 3 dextrose markers detected at m/z 325, 399 and 473 as compared to controls. MS-only scans, product and precursor ion scans of dextrose and 13C6-dextrose in positive ion mode confirmed that these 3 peaks are derived from dextrose. Mass spectral analysis of labeled and unlabeled dextrose suggested that these peaks were dimers derived from dextrose. The identification of dextrose markers in DBS indicates that high concentrations of dextrose were present in blood and the likely source was contamination by TPN

  19. Cost-effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in parenteral nutrition therapy in hospitals: a discrete event simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, Lorenzo; Eandi, Mario; Povero, Massimiliano; Mayer, Konstantin; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Heller, Axel R; Fries-Schaffner, Eva

    2014-10-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in parenteral nutrition (PN) regimens is associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in infection rate, and length of hospital stay (LOS) in medical and surgical patients admitted to the ICU and in surgical patients not admitted to the ICU. The objective of this present study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the addition of omega-3 fatty acids to standard PN regimens in four European countries (Italy, France, Germany and the UK) from the healthcare provider perspective. Using a discrete event simulation scheme, a patient-level simulation model was developed, based on outcomes from the Italian ICU patient population and published literature. Comparative efficacy data for PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids versus standard PN regimens was taken from the meta-analysis of published randomised clinical trials (n = 23 studies with a total of 1502 patients), and hospital LOS reduction was further processed in order to split the reduction in ICU stay from that in-ward stays for patients admitted to the ICU. Country-specific cost data was obtained for Italian, French, German and UK healthcare systems. Clinical outcomes included in the model were death rates, nosocomial infection rates, and ICU/hospital LOS. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to test the reliability of results. PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were more effective on average than standard PN both in ICU and in non-ICU patients in the four countries considered, reducing infection rates and overall LOS, and resulting in a lower total cost per patient. Overall costs for patients receiving PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were between €14 144 to €19 825 per ICU patient and €5484 to €14 232 per non-ICU patient, translating into savings of between €3972 and €4897 per ICU patient and savings of between €561 and €1762 per non

  20. Effect of early supplemental parenteral nutrition in the paediatric ICU: a preplanned observational study of post-randomisation treatments in the PEPaNIC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Verbruggen, Sascha; Casaer, Michaël P; Gunst, Jan; Wouters, Pieter J; Hanot, Jan; Guerra, Gonzalo Garcia; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-06-01

    Large randomised controlled trials have shown that early supplemental parenteral nutrition in patients admitted to adult and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) is harmful. Overdosing of energy with too little protein was suggested as a potential reason for this. This study analysed which macronutrient was associated with harm caused by early supplemental parenteral nutrition in the Paediatric Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition In Critical Illness (PEPaNIC) randomised trial. Patients in the initial randomised controlled trial were randomly assigned to receive suppplemental parenteral nutrition (PN) within 24 h of PICU admission (early PN) or to receive such PN after 1 week (late PN) when enteral nutrition was insufficient. In this post-randomisation, observational study, doses of glucose, lipids, and aminoacids administered during the first 7 days of PICU stay were expressed as % of reference doses from published clinical guidelines for age and weight. Independent associations between average macronutrient doses up to each of the first 7 days and likelihood of acquiring an infection in the PICU, of earlier live weaning from mechanical ventilation, and of earlier live PICU discharge were investigated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses. The three macronutrients were included in the analysis simultaneously and baseline risk factors were adjusted for. From June 18, 2012, to July 27, 2015, 7519 children aged between newborn and 17 years were assessed for eligibility. 6079 patients were excluded, and 1440 children were randomly assigned to receive either early PN (n=723) or late PN (n=717). With increasing doses of aminoacids, the likelihood of acquiring a new infection was higher (adjusted hazard ratios [HRs] per 10% increase between 1·043-1·134 for days 1-5, p≤0·029), while the likelihood of earlier live weaning from mechanical ventilation was lower (HRs 0·950-0·975 days 3-7, p≤0·045), and the likelihood of earlier live PICU

  1. Setting the stage for long-term reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Craig A; Vander Ley, Brian; Poock, Scott E

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses some of the aspects of heifer development that contribute to long-term health and productivity, such as disease prevention and control. Nutrition is also an important component of long-term health, and body condition score is discussed as a way to determine whether the nutrient demands of heifers are being met. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term urethral catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Dickens, Nicola

    This article discusses long-term urethral catheterisation, focusing on the relevant anatomy and physiology, indications for the procedure, catheter selection and catheter care. It is important that nurses have a good working knowledge of long-term catheterisation as the need for this intervention will increase with the rise in chronic health conditions and the ageing population.

  3. Oral nutritional support can shorten the duration of parenteral hydration in end-of-life cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiki, Hiroto; Iwase, Satoru; Gyoda, Yasuaki; Kanai, Yoshiaki; Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Miyaji, Tempei; Tahara, Yukiko; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Chinzei, Mieko; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Tube feeding or hydration is often considered for end-of-life cancer patients despite the negative effects on quality of life. The efficacy of oral nutritional support in this setting is unknown. We conducted a randomized trial to compare the efficacies of an amino acid jelly, Inner Power® (IP), and a liquid enteral product, Ensure Liquid® (EL), in terminally ill cancer patients. We randomly assigned patients to 3 arms: EL, IP, and EL+IP. The primary endpoint was drip infusion in vein (DIV)-free survival, which was defined as the duration from nutritional support initiation to administration of parenteral hydration. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 21 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The median age of the subjects was 69 yr. There were significant differences between the arms with regard to the median DIV-free survival (0.5, 6.0, and 4.5 days in the EL, IP, and EL + IP arms, respectively; P = 0.05). The median overall survival was 7, 9, and 8 days in the EL, IP, and EL + IP arms, respectively. IP may shorten the duration of parenteral hydration in terminally ill cancer patients and does not affect their survival.

  4. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): neurocritical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Escribano, J; Herrero Meseguer, I; Conejero García-Quijada, R

    2011-11-01

    Neurocritical patients require specialized nutritional support due to their intense catabolism and prolonged fasting. The preferred route of nutrient administration is the gastrointestinal route, especially the gastric route. Alternatives are the transpyloric route or mixed enteral-parenteral nutrition if an effective nutritional volume of more than 60% cannot be obtained. Total calore intake ranges from 20-30 kcal/kg/day, depending on the period of the clinical course, with protein intake higher than 20% of total calories (hyperproteic diet). Nutritional support should be initiated early. The incidence of gastrointestinal complications is generally higher to other critically-ill patients, the most frequent complication being an increase in gastric residual volume. As in other critically-ill patients, glycemia should be closely monitored and maintained below 150 mg/dL. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in maintenance hemodialysis patients suffering from protein-energy wasting. Results of a multicenter, open, prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsen, Tobias A; Beer, Justinus; Mann, Helmut

    2017-02-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is increasingly becoming a clinical problem in maintenance hemodialysis patients and guidelines call for nutritional interventions. Serum prealbumin (transthyretin) represents a critical nutritional marker positively correlated with patient survival and negatively correlated with morbidity. Nutritional counseling, oral supplementation as well as intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) are recommended to fight PEW, however clinical trials on their use are scarce. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled, parallel-group Phase IV clinical trial in 107 maintenance hemodialysis patients suffering from PEW to assess the impact of IDPN on prealbumin and other biochemical and clinical parameters reflecting nutritional status. Patients randomized to the intervention group received standardized nutritional counseling plus IDPN three times weekly over 16 weeks followed by a treatment-free period of 12 weeks. The control group received standardized nutritional counseling only. Main trial inclusion criteria included moderate to severe malnutrition (SGA score B or C), maintenance hemodialysis therapy (3 times per week) for more than six months, and presence of two out of the following three criteria: albumin 30 mg/L at week 16 (48.7% vs. 31.8%). Prealbumin response to IDPN therapy was more prominent in patients suffering from moderate malnutrition (SGA score B) compared to patients with severe malnutrition (SGA score C). The results of this trial demonstrate for the first time that IDPN therapy, given three times weekly in a 16-week short-term intervention, results in a statistically significant and clinically relevant increase in mean serum prealbumin, a surrogate marker for outcome and survival in hemodialysis patients suffering from PEW, and is superior to nutritional counseling. Clinical trial registry:www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00501956). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  6. Comparison of the fixed ratio and the Z-score of FEV1/FVC in the elderly population: a long-term mortality analysis from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Baek, Seunghee; Lee, Sei Won; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2018-01-01

    Despite the ongoing intense debate on the definition of airflow limitation by spirometry in the elderly population, there have only been few studies comparing the fixed ratio and the Z -score of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 )/forced vital capacity (FVC) in terms of long-term mortalities. In this study, we aimed to identify the proper method for accurately defining the airflow limitation in terms of long-term mortality prediction in the elderly population. Data were collected from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the US. Non-Hispanic Caucasians aged 65-80 years were included. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of both methods were plotted and compared for 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities. Of 1,331 subjects, the mean age was 71.7 years and 805 (60.5%) were males. For the 10-year all-cause mortality, the area under the curve (AUC) of the fixed ratio was significantly greater than that of the Z -score of FEV 1 /FVC, but both showed poor prediction performance (0.633 vs 0.616, p ratio and the Z -score of FEV 1 /FVC showed comparable prediction performance with greater AUCs (0.784 vs 0.778, p =0.160, and 0.896 vs 0.896, p =0.971, respectively). Interestingly, the conventional cutoff of 0.7 in the fixed ratio was consistently higher than the optimal for the 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities (0.70 vs 0.69, 0.62, and 0.61, respectively), whereas that of -1.64 in the Z -score of FEV 1 /FVC was consistently lower than the optimal cutoff (-1.64 vs -1.31, -1.47, and -1.41, respectively). In the elderly population, both the fixed ratio and the Z -score of FEV 1 /FVC showed comparable prediction performance for the 10-year respiratory and COPD mortalities. However, the conventional cutoff of neither 0.70 in the fixed ratio nor -1.64 in the Z -score of FEV 1 /FVC was optimal for predicting the long-term mortalities.

  7. Long term complications of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long-term complications of diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, ... other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood ...

  8. No Gut No Gain! Enteral Bile Acid Treatment Preserves Gut Growth but Not Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Injury in a Novel Extensive Short Bowel Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalona, Gustavo; Price, Amber; Blomenkamp, Keith; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Saxena, Saurabh; Ratchford, Thomas; Westrich, Matthew; Kakarla, Vindhya; Pochampally, Shruthika; Phillips, William; Heafner, Nicole; Korremla, Niraja; Greenspon, Jose; Guzman, Miguel A; Kumar Jain, Ajay

    2018-04-27

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides nutrition intravenously; however, this life-saving therapy is associated with significant liver disease. Recent evidence indicates improvement in PN-associated injury in animals with intact gut treated with enteral bile acid (BA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), and a gut farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist, which drives the gut-liver cross talk (GLCT). We hypothesized that similar improvement could be translated in animals with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Using piglets, we developed a novel 90% gut-resected SBS model. Fifteen SBS piglets receiving PN were given CDCA or control (vehicle control) for 2 weeks. Tissue and serum were analyzed posteuthanasia. CDCA increased gut FXR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; P = .008), but not downstream FXR targets. No difference in gut fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19; P = .28) or hepatic FXR (P = .75), FGF19 (P = .86), FGFR4 (P = .53), or Cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase (P = .61) was noted. PN resulted in cholestasis; however, no improvement was noted with CDCA. Hepatic fibrosis or immunostaining for Ki67, CD3, or Cytokeratin 7 was not different with CDCA. PN resulted in gut atrophy. CDCA preserved (P = .04 vs control) gut mass and villous/crypt ratio. The median (interquartile range) for gut mass for control was 0.28 (0.17-0.34) and for CDCA was 0.33 (0.26-0.46). We note that, unlike in animals with intact gut, in an SBS animal model there is inadequate CDCA-induced activation of gut-derived signaling to cause liver improvement. Thus, it appears that activation of GLCT is critically dependent on the presence of adequate gut. This is clinically relevant because it suggests that BA therapy may not be as effective for patients with SBS. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. [Long-term psychiatric hospitalizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancke, L; Amariei, A

    2017-02-01

    Long-term hospitalizations in psychiatry raise the question of desocialisation of the patients and the inherent costs. Individual indicators were extracted from a medical administrative database containing full-time psychiatric hospitalizations for the period 2011-2013 of people over 16 years old living in the French region of Nord-Pas-de-Calais. We calculated the proportion of people who had experienced a hospitalization with a duration of 292 days or more during the study period. A bivariate analysis was conducted, then ecological data (level of health-care offer, the deprivation index and the size of the municipalities of residence) were included into a multilevel regression model in order to identify the factors significantly related to variability of long-term hospitalization rates. Among hospitalized individuals in psychiatry, 2.6% had had at least one hospitalization of 292 days or more during the observation period; the number of days in long-term hospitalization represented 22.5% of the total of days of full-time hospitalization in psychiatry. The bivariate analysis revealed that seniority in the psychiatric system was strongly correlated with long hospitalization rates. In the multivariate analysis, the individual indicators the most related to an increased risk of long-term hospitalization were: total lack of autonomy (OR=9.0; 95% CI: 6.7-12.2; P<001); diagnoses of psychological development disorders (OR=9.7; CI95%: 4.5-20.6; P<.001); mental retardation (OR=4.5; CI95%: 2.5-8.2; P<.001): schizophrenia (OR=3.0; CI95%: 1.7-5.2; P<.001); compulsory hospitalization (OR=1.7; CI95%: 1.4-2.1; P<.001); having experienced therapeutic isolation (OR=1.8; CI95%: 1.5-2.1; P<.001). Variations of long-term hospitalization rates depending on the type of establishment were very high, but the density of hospital beds or intensity of ambulatory activity services were not significantly linked to long-term hospitalization. The inhabitants of small urban units had

  10. Serial changes in selected serum constituents in low birth weight infants on peripheral parenteral nutrition with different zinc and copper supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockitch, G; Pendray, M R; Godolphin, W J; Quigley, G

    1985-07-01

    One hundred and five infants of birth weight 2000 g or less who received peripherally administered parenteral nutrition for periods of three or more weeks, were randomly assigned to groups receiving different amounts of zinc and copper supplement. The blood concentrations of zinc, copper, retinol-binding protein, prealbumin, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate transaminase were followed weekly. Mean serum zinc, retinol-binding protein and prealbumin declined significantly over time while alkaline phosphatase rose. Only the group receiving the highest zinc supplement maintained a mean serum zinc concentration within the normal range at seven weeks. No difference in the protein or enzyme concentrations was found between the different zinc supplement groups. No difference was seen in serum copper or ceruloplasmin between copper dose groups although one intravenous supplement was double that of the other.

  11. Comparison of the fixed ratio and the Z-score of FEV1/FVC in the elderly population: a long-term mortality analysis from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh DK

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong Kyu Oh,1 Seunghee Baek,2 Sei Won Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,1 Sang-Do Lee,1 Yeon-Mok Oh1 1Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Background and objective: Despite the ongoing intense debate on the definition of airflow limitation by spirometry in the elderly population, there have only been few studies comparing the fixed ratio and the Z-score of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC in terms of long-term mortalities. In this study, we aimed to identify the proper method for accurately defining the airflow limitation in terms of long-term mortality prediction in the elderly population. Methods: Data were collected from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the US. Non-Hispanic Caucasians aged 65–80 years were included. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of both methods were plotted and compared for 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities. Results: Of 1,331 subjects, the mean age was 71.7 years and 805 (60.5% were males. For the 10-year all-cause mortality, the area under the curve (AUC of the fixed ratio was significantly greater than that of the Z-score of FEV1/FVC, but both showed poor prediction performance (0.633 vs 0.616, p<0.001. For the 10-year respiratory and COPD mortalities, both the fixed ratio and the Z-score of FEV1/FVC showed comparable prediction performance with greater AUCs (0.784 vs 0.778, p=0.160, and 0.896 vs 0.896, p=0.971, respectively. Interestingly, the conventional cutoff of 0.7 in the fixed ratio was consistently higher than the optimal for the 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities (0.70 vs 0.69, 0.62, and 0.61, respectively

  12. Nuclear Energy, Long Term Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2006-01-01

    There are serious warnings about depletion of oil and gas and even more serious warnings about dangers of climate change caused by emission of carbon dioxide. Should developed countries be called to replace CO2 emitting energy sources as soon as possible, and the time available may not be longer then few decades, can nuclear energy answer the call and what are the requirements? Assuming optimistic contribution of renewable energy sources, can nuclear energy expand to several times present level in order to replace large part of fossil fuels use? Paper considers intermediate and long-term requirements. Future of nuclear power depends on satisfactory answers on several questions. First group of questions are those important for near and intermediate future. They deal with economics and safety of nuclear power stations in the first place. On the same time scale a generally accepted concept for radioactive waste disposal is also required. All these issues are in the focus of present research and development. Safer and more economical reactors are targets of international efforts in Generation IV and INPRO projects, but aiming further ahead these innovative projects are also addressing issues such as waste reduction and proliferation resistance. However, even assuming successful technical development of these projects, and there is no reason to doubt it, long term and large-scale nuclear power use is thereby not yet secured. If nuclear power is to play an essential role in the long-term future energy production and in reduction of CO2 emission, than several additional questions must be replied. These questions will deal with long-term nuclear fuel sufficiency, with necessary contribution of nuclear power in sectors of transport and industrial processes and with nuclear proliferation safety. This last issue is more political then technical, thus sometimes neglected by nuclear engineers, yet it will have essential role for the long-term prospects of nuclear power. The

  13. The Impact of an Educational Program Regarding Total Parenteral Nutrition on Infection Indicators in Neonates Admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Bijani, Nahid; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Barekatain, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    One of the basic care measures for preterm infants is providing nutrition through total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and one of the most important complications of it is infection. Because prevention of nosocomial infections is an important issue for neonate's safety, this study aimed to determine the effects of a continuing medical education (CME) course on TPN for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses on indicators of infection in newborns. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 127 neonates who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They were selected through simple convenience sampling method at two stages of before and after the CME program. The inclusion criteria were prescription of TPN by the physician and lack of clinical evidences for infection in newborns before the beginning of TPN. Death of the infant during each stage of the study was considered as the exclusion criteria. The data gathering tool was a data record sheet including clinical signs of infection in the infants and their demographic characteristics. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and student's t -test in SPSS software. The results showed the frequency of clinical markers for infection in newborns at the pre-intervention stage ( n = 41; 65.10%) was significantly less than at the post-intervention stage ( n = 30; 46.90%) ( p = 0.04). Nursing educational programs on TPN reduce infection rates among neonates in NICUs.

  14. Analysing long term discursive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders

    which extend beyond the single interaction, for instance negotiations or planning processes, seems to have played a less important role, with studies such as Iedema 2001 and Wodak 2000 as exceptions. These long term processes, however, are central to the constitution and workings of organizations......What do timescales - the notion that processes take place or can be viewed within a shorter or longer temporal range (Lemke 2005) - mean for the analysis of discourse? What are the methodological consequences of analyzing discourse at different timescales? It may be argued that discourse analysis...... in general has favored either the analysis of short term processes such as interviews, discussions, and lessons, or the analysis of non-processual entities such as (multimodal) texts, arguments, discursive repertoires, and discourses (in a Foucaultian sense). In contrast, analysis of long term processes...

  15. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nilesh M; Skillman, Heather E; Irving, Sharon Y; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Vermilyea, Sarah; Farrington, Elizabeth Anne; McKeever, Liam; Hall, Amber M; Goday, Praveen S; Braunschweig, Carol

    2017-07-01

    This document represents the first collaboration between 2 organizations-the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine-to describe best practices in nutrition therapy in critically ill children. The target of these guidelines is intended to be the pediatric critically ill patient (>1 month and 2-3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2032 citations were scanned for relevance. The PubMed/MEDLINE search resulted in 960 citations for clinical trials and 925 citations for cohort studies. The EMBASE search for clinical trials culled 1661 citations. In total, the search for clinical trials yielded 1107 citations, whereas the cohort search yielded 925. After careful review, 16 randomized controlled trials and 37 cohort studies appeared to answer 1 of the 8 preidentified question groups for this guideline. We used the GRADE criteria (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to adjust the evidence grade based on assessment of the quality of study design and execution. These guidelines are not intended for neonates or adult patients. The guidelines reiterate the importance of nutrition assessment-particularly, the detection of malnourished patients who are most vulnerable and therefore may benefit from timely intervention. There is a need for renewed focus on accurate estimation of energy needs and attention to optimizing protein intake. Indirect calorimetry, where feasible, and cautious use of estimating equations and increased surveillance for unintended caloric underfeeding and overfeeding are recommended. Optimal protein intake and its correlation with clinical outcomes are areas of great interest. The optimal route and timing of nutrient delivery are areas of intense debate and investigations. Enteral nutrition remains the preferred route for nutrient delivery. Several strategies to optimize enteral nutrition during critical illness have emerged. The

  16. Comparing long term energy scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumo, M.; Simbolotti, G.

    2001-01-01

    Major projection studies by international organizations and senior analysts have been compared with reference to individual key parameters (population, energy demand/supply, resources, technology, emissions and global warming) to understand trends and implications of the different scenarios. Then, looking at the long term (i.e., 2050 and beyond), parameters and trends have been compared together to understand and quantify whether and when possible crisis or market turbulence might occur due to shortage of resources or environmental problems [it

  17. Long term radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    In France, waste management, a sensitive issue in term of public opinion, is developing quickly, and due to twenty years of experience, is now reaching maturity. With the launching of the French nuclear programme, the use of radioactive sources in radiotherapy and industry, waste management has become an industrial activity. Waste management is an integrated system dealing with the wastes from their production to the long term disposal, including their identification, sortage, treatment, packaging, collection and transport. This system aims at guaranteing the protection of present and future populations with an available technology. In regard to their long term management, and the design of disposals, radioactive wastes are divided in three categories. This classification takes into account the different radioisotopes contained, their half life and their total activity. Presently short-lived wastes are stored in the shallowland disposal of the ''Centre de la Manche''. Set up within the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Agency for waste management (ANDRA) is responsible within the framework of legislative and regulatory provisions for long term waste management in France [fr

  18. Initial amino acid intake influences phosphorus and calcium homeostasis in preterm infants--it is time to change the composition of the early parenteral nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bonsante

    Full Text Available Early aggressive parenteral nutrition (PN, consisting of caloric and nitrogen intake soon after birth, is currently proposed for the premature baby. Some electrolyte disturbances, such as hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia, considered unusual in early life, were recently described while using this PN approach. We hypothesize that, due to its impact on cell metabolism, the initial amino acid (AA amount may specifically influence the metabolism of phosphorus, and consequently of calcium. We aim to evaluate the influence of AA intake on calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and to create a calculation tool to estimate phosphorus needs.Prospective observational study. Phosphate and calcium plasma concentrations and calcium balance were evaluated daily during the first week of life in very preterm infants, and their relationship with nutrition was studied. For this purpose, infants were divided into three groups: high, medium and low AA intake (HAA, MAA, LAA. A calculation formula to assess phosphorus needs was elaborated, with a theoretical model based on AA and calcium intake, and the cumulative deficit of phosphate intake was estimated.154 infants were included. Hypophosphatemia (12.5% and hypercalcemia (9.8% were more frequent in the HAA than in the MAA (4.6% and 4.8% and in the LAA group (0% and 1.9%; both p<0.001.Calcium-phosphorus homeostasis was influenced by the early AA intake. We propose to consider phosphorus and calcium imbalances as being part of a syndrome, related to incomplete provision of nutrients after the abrupt discontinuation of the placental nutrition at birth (PI-ReFeeding syndrome. We provide a simple tool to calculate the optimal phosphate intake. The early introduction of AA in the PN soon after birth might be completed by an early intake of phosphorus, since AA and phosphorus are (along with potassium the main determinants of cellular growth.

  19. Efficacy, Safety, and Preparation of Standardized Parenteral Nutrition Regimens: Three-Chamber Bags vs Compounded Monobags-A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, Single-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianchun; Wu, Guohao; Tang, Yun; Ye, Yingjiang; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2017-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) covering the need for carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids can either be compounded from single nutrients or purchased as an industrially manufactured ready-to-use regimen. This study compares a commercially available 3-chamber bag (study group) with a conventionally compounded monobag regarding nutrition efficacy, safety, and regimen preparation time. This prospective, randomized, single-blind study was conducted at 5 Chinese hospitals from October 2010-October 2011. Postsurgical patients requiring PN for at least 6 days were randomly assigned to receive the study or control regimen. Plasma concentrations of prealbumin and C-reactive protein (CRP), regimen preparation time, length of hospital stay (LOS), 30-day mortality, safety laboratory parameters, and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. In total, 240 patients (121 vs 119 in study and control groups) participated in this study. Changes in prealbumin concentrations during nutrition support (Δ Prealb(StudyGroup) = 2.65 mg/dL, P < .001 vs Δ Prealb(ControlGroup) = 0.27 mg/dL, P = .606) and CRP values were comparable. Regimen preparation time was significantly reduced in the study group by the use of 3-chamber bags (t (StudyGroup) = 4.90 ± 4.41 minutes vs t (ControlGroup) = 12.13 ± 5.62 minutes, P < .001). No differences were detected for LOS, 30-day mortality, safety laboratory parameters, and postoperative AEs (37 vs 38 in study and control groups). The PN regimen provided by the 3-chamber bag was comparable to the compounded regimen and safe in use. Time savings during regimen preparation indicates that use of 3-chamber bags simplifies the process of regimen preparation.

  20. Validation of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Recommendations for Caloric Provision to Critically Ill Obese Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Kris M; Andrew, Benjamin Y; Corona, Jasmine C; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2016-07-01

    The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) recommend that obese, critically ill patients receive 11-14 kcal/kg/d using actual body weight (ABW) or 22-25 kcal/kg/d using ideal body weight (IBW), because feeding these patients 50%-70% maintenance needs while administering high protein may improve outcomes. It is unknown whether these equations achieve this target when validated against indirect calorimetry, perform equally across all degrees of obesity, or compare well with other equations. Measured resting energy expenditure (MREE) was determined in obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)), critically ill patients. Resting energy expenditure was predicted (PREE) using several equations: 12.5 kcal/kg ABW (ASPEN-Actual BW), 23.5 kcal/kg IBW (ASPEN-Ideal BW), Harris-Benedict (adjusted-weight and 1.5 stress-factor), and Ireton-Jones for obesity. Correlation of PREE to 65% MREE, predictive accuracy, precision, bias, and large error incidence were calculated. All equations were significantly correlated with 65% MREE but had poor predictive accuracy, had excessive large error incidence, were imprecise, and were biased in the entire cohort (N = 31). In the obesity cohort (n = 20, BMI 30-50 kg/m(2)), ASPEN-Actual BW had acceptable predictive accuracy and large error incidence, was unbiased, and was nearly precise. In super obesity (n = 11, BMI >50 kg/m(2)), ASPEN-Ideal BW had acceptable predictive accuracy and large error incidence and was precise and unbiased. SCCM/ASPEN-recommended body weight equations are reasonable predictors of 65% MREE depending on the equation and degree of obesity. Assuming that feeding 65% MREE is appropriate, this study suggests that patients with a BMI 30-50 kg/m(2) should receive 11-14 kcal/kg/d using ABW and those with a BMI >50 kg/m(2) should receive 22-25 kcal/kg/d using IBW. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Ω-3 fatty acids prevent hepatic steatosis, independent of PPAR-α activity, in a murine model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Esther; Lazare, Farrah B; Treem, William R; Xu, Jiliu; Iqbal, Jahangir; Pan, Xiaoyue; Josekutty, Joby; Walsh, Meghan; Anderson, Virginia; Hussain, M Mahmood; Schwarz, Steven M

    2014-07-01

    ω-3 Fatty acids (FAs), natural ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), attenuate parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). However, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of ω-3 FAs are still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ω-3 FAs on hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in a murine model of PNALD and to investigate the role of PPAR-α and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in this experimental setting. 129S1/SvImJ wild-type or 129S4/SvJaePparatm/Gonz/J PPAR-α knockout mice were fed chow and water (controls); oral, fat-free PN solution only (PN-O); PN-O plus intraperitoneal (IP) ω-6 FA-predominant supplements (PN-ω-6); or PN-O plus IP ω-3 FA (PN-ω-3). Control and PN-O groups received sham IP injections of 0.9% NaCl. Hepatic histology, TG and cholesterol, MTP activity, and PPAR-α messenger RNA were assessed after 19 days. In all experimental groups, PN feeding increased hepatic TG and MTP activity compared with controls. Both PN-O and PN-ω-6 groups accumulated significantly greater amounts of TG when compared with PN-ω-3 mice. Studies in PPAR-α null animals showed that PN feeding increases hepatic TG as in wild-type mice. PPAR-α null mice in the PN-O and PN-ω-6 groups demonstrated variable degrees of hepatic steatosis, whereas no evidence of hepatic fat accumulation was found after 19 days of oral PN plus IP ω-3 FAs. PN induces TG accumulation (steatosis) in wild-type and PPAR-α null mice. In PN-fed wild-type and PPAR-α null mice given IP ω-3 FAs, reduced hepatic TG accumulation and absent steatosis are found. Prevention of steatosis by ω-3 FAs results from PPAR-α-independent pathways. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Parenteral nutrition including an omega-3 fatty-acid-containing lipid emulsion for intensive care patients in China: a pharmacoeconomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yufei Feng,1 Chao Li,1 Tian Zhang,1 Lorenzo Pradelli2 1Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Hospital, National Center of Gerontology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2AdRes Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Piazza Carlo Emanuele II, Torino, Italy Background/objectives: Parenteral nutrition (PN incorporating omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsions has been shown to be cost effective in Western populations. A pharmacoeconomic evaluation was performed within the Chinese intensive care unit (ICU setting. This assessed whether the additional acquisition cost of PN with omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid vs standard PN was offset by improved clinical outcomes that can reduce subsequent costs. Materials and methods: A pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model was developed, based on an update to efficacy data from a previous international meta-analysis, with China-specific clinical and economic input parameters. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Results: The model predicted that PN with an omega-3 fatty-acid-enriched lipid emulsion was more effective and less costly than PN with standard lipid emulsions for Chinese ICU patients, as follows: reduced length of overall hospital length of stay (19.48 vs 21.35 days, respectively, reduced length of ICU stay (5.03 vs 6.18 days, respectively, and prevention of 35.6% of nosocomial infections leading to a lower total cost per patient (¥47 189 [US $6937] vs ¥54 783 [US $8053], respectively. Additional treatment costs were offset by savings in overall hospital and ICU stay cost, and antibiotic cost, resulting in a mean cost saving of ¥7594 (US $1116 per patient. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these findings. Conclusions: PN enriched with an omega-3 fatty-acid-containing lipid emulsion vs standard PN may be effective in reducing length of hospital and ICU stay and infectious complications in

  3. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Adam S.; Murali, Sangita G.; Hitt, Stacy; Solverson, Patrick M.; Holst, Jens J.

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that shows promise for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Our objective was to investigate how combination GLP-2 + enteral nutrients (EN) affects intestinal adaption in a rat model that mimics severe human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral reference group. Animals underwent massive distal bowel resection followed by jejunocolic anastomosis and placement of jugular catheters. Starting on postoperative day 4, rats in the EN groups were allowed ad libitum access to EN. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 had their rate of PN reduced by 0.25 ml/day starting on postoperative day 6. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 demonstrated significantly greater body weight gain with similar energy intake and a safe 80% reduction in PN compared with TPN ± GLP-2. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 for 7 or 18 days showed similar body weight gain, residual jejunal length, and digestive capacity. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 showed increased jejunal GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) expression. Treatment with TPN + GLP-2 demonstrated increased jejunal expression of epidermal growth factor. Cessation of GLP-2 after 7 days with continued EN sustained the majority of intestinal adaption and significantly increased expression of colonic proglucagon compared with PN + EN + GLP-2 for 18 days, and increased plasma GLP-2 concentrations compared with TPN alone. In summary, EN potentiate the intestinotrophic actions of GLP-2 by improving body weight gain allowing for a safe 80% reduction in PN with increased jejunal expression of GLP-2R, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 following distal bowel

  4. Long-term biodosimetry Redux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits and reiterates the needs, purposes and requirements of bio-dosimetric assays for long-term dose and health risk assessments. While the most crucial need for bio-dosimetric assays is to guide medical response for radiation accidents, the value of such techniques for improving our understanding of radiation health risk by supporting epidemiological (long-term health risk) studies is significant. As new cohorts of exposed persons are identified and new health risk studies are undertaken with the hopes that studying the exposed will result in a deeper understanding of radiation risk, the value of reliable dose reconstruction is underscored. The ultimate application of biodosimetry in long-term health risk studies would be to completely replace model-based dose reconstruction-a complex suite of methods for retrospectively estimating dose that is commonly fraught with large uncertainties due to the absence of important exposure-related information, as well as imperfect models. While biodosimetry could potentially supplant model-based doses, there are numerous limitations of presently available techniques that constrain their widespread application in health risk research, including limited ability to assess doses received far in the past, high cost, great inter-individual variability, invasiveness, higher than preferred detection limits and the inability to assess internal dose (for the most part). These limitations prevent the extensive application of biodosimetry to large cohorts and should be considered a challenge to researchers to develop new and more flexible techniques that meet the demands of long-term health risk research. Events in recent years, e.g. the Fukushima reactor accident and the increased threat of nuclear terrorism, underscore that any event that results in significant radiation exposures of a group of people will also produce a much larger population, exposed at lower levels, but that likewise needs (or demands) an exposure

  5. Malnutrition in the elderly residing in long-term care facilities: a cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: care facility, elderly, malnutrition, mini nutritional Assessment, nutrition screening, South Africa ..... hip fractures, confusion and preventable hospitalisation.29 .... in elderly patients in Dutch residential long-term care (LTC): a.

  6. Long term stability of power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundur, P; Gao, B [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Power system long term stability is still a developing subject. In this paper we provide our perspectives and experiences related to long term stability. The paper begins with the description of the nature of the long term stability problem, followed by the discussion of issues related to the modeling and solution techniques of tools for long term stability analysis. Cases studies are presented to illustrate the voltage stability aspect and plant dynamics aspect of long term stability. (author) 20 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Stability of hydrophilic vitamins mixtures in the presence of electrolytes and trace elements for parenteral nutrition: a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Aiello, Federica; Falugiani, Niccolò; Desideri, Ielizza

    2015-03-25

    In total parenteral nutrition (TPN), especially in the case of preterm infants, simultaneous administration of vitamins and trace elements is still a problematic issue: guidelines put in evidence the lack of specific documentation. In this work NMR spectroscopy was applied to the study of vitamins (pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine nitrate, riboflavin-5'-phosphate and nicotinamide) stability in presence of salts and trace elements. Vitamins in D2O were first analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy in absence of salts and trace elements; changes in chemical shifts or in diffusion coefficients, measured by NMR DOSY technique, were analyzed. The effects of salts and trace elements on single vitamins and on their admixtures were then investigated by performing quantitative analyses during 48h. Selected vitamins are subject to intermolecular interactions. No degradative effects were observed in presence of salts and trace elements. Only riboflavin-5'-phosphate is subject to precipitation in presence of divalent cations; however, at low concentration and in presence of other vitamins this effect was not observed. Solutions analyzed, in the condition of this study, are stable for at least 48h and vitamins and trace elements can be administered together in TPN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Navigating Long-Term Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Holt MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Americans over age 65 constitute a larger percentage of the population each year: from 14% in 2010 (40 million elderly to possibly 20% in 2030 (70 million elderly. In 2015, an estimated 66 million people provided care to the ill, disabled, and elderly in the United States. In 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 15 million Americans used some form of long-term care: adult day care, home health, nursing home, or hospice. In all, 13% of people over 85 years old, compared with 1% of those ages 65 to 74, live in nursing homes in the United States. Transitions of care, among these various levels of care, are common: Nursing home to hospital transfer, one of the best-studied transitions, occurs in more than 25% of nursing home residents per year. This article follows one patient through several levels of care.

  9. Prospective study of catheter-related central vein thrombosis in home parenteral nutrition patients with benign disease using serial venous Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, Cristina; Joly, Francisca; Corcos, Olivier; Concejo, Javier; Puiggrós, Carolina; Gil, Carmen; Pironi, Loris

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-related central vein thrombosis (CRVT) is a severe complication of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) that may be clinically manifest or subclinical. The aims of the study were to prospectively investigate the incidence of CRVT in patients on HPN with benign disease and determine the influence of different variables on this complication. A prospective, multicentre, observational study in the Home Artificial Nutrition-Chronic Intestinal Failure ESPEN group was performed. Patients with benign disease starting HPN or already on HPN after the insertion of a new catheter, were recruited and followed up with Color Doppler Duplex Sonography (CDDS) evaluations at baseline, 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months after catheter insertion. Fisher's exact test was used to calculate the association of different variables (related to the patient, type of catheter, vascular access, insertion method, catheter care and anticoagulant treatment) with CRVT events. Sixty-two patients (31 males, 31 females) aged 50 ± 19 (19-83) years were included and followed for a median 363 days, with an Inter Quartile Range of 180-365 days, and a total of 16,186 catheter-days. Six patients had previous CRVT and 16 had history of thromboembolic disease (pulmonary and mesenteric). Forty one patients were receiving anticoagulant treatment. Fifty two patients had tunneled catheters and 10 implanted ports. Two patients had symptomatic thrombosis at 3 and 12 months of follow-up (2 and 3 weeks after normal routine CDDS evaluation). The incidence of CRVT was 0.045/catheter/year. CRVT was not significantly associated with any of the variables analyzed. The incidence of CRVT in patients on HPN for benign disease followed by CDDS is low in the first year of catheterization. We did not observe any case of asymptomatic CRVT. Based on our data, CDDS seems to have low effectiveness as a screening tool for CRVT in asymptomatic patients on HPN with benign disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for

  10. ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition Position Paper. Intravenous lipid emulsions and risk of hepatotoxicity in infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojsak, Iva; Colomb, Virginie; Braegger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to perform a systematic review with meta-analysis of available scientific evidence regarding the role of different intravenous lipid emulsions (ILE) in the pathogenesis of cholestasis and parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD).A systematic review...... term use and 3 in infants and children receiving long term parenteral nutrition (PN).Meta-analysis showed no differences in the rate of cholestasis or bilirubin levels associated with short term use of different ILEs. Due to high heterogeneity of the long-term studies no meta-analysis could...... of patients. The ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition concludes that there is no evidence of a difference in rates of cholestasis or bilirubin levels between different ILE for short term use in neonates. The use of multicomponent FO containing ILE may contribute to a decrease in total bilirubin levels in children...

  11. Long term study of mechanical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Diab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, properties of limestone cement concrete containing different replacement levels of limestone powder were examined. It includes 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% of limestone powder as a partial replacement of cement. Silica fume was added incorporated with limestone powder in some mixes to enhance the concrete properties. Compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were determined. Also, durability of limestone cement concrete with different C3A contents was examined. The weight loss, length change and cube compressive strength loss were measured for concrete attacked by 5% sodium sulfate using an accelerated test up to 525 days age. The corrosion resistance was measured through accelerated corrosion test using first crack time, cracking width and steel reinforcement weight loss. Consequently, for short and long term, the use of limestone up to 10% had not a significant reduction in concrete properties. It is not recommended to use blended limestone cement in case of sulfate attack. The use of limestone cement containing up to 25% limestone has insignificant effect on corrosion resistance before cracking.

  12. Long-term competence restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Douglas R; DeYoung, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-01

    While the United States Supreme Court's Jackson v. Indiana decision and most state statutes mandate determinations of incompetent defendants' restoration probabilities, courts and forensic clinicians continue to lack empirical evidence to guide these determinations and do not yet have a consensus regarding whether and under what circumstances incompetent defendants are restorable. The evidence base concerning the restoration likelihood of those defendants who fail initial restoration efforts is even further diminished and has largely gone unstudied. In this study, we examined the disposition of a cohort of defendants who un