WorldWideScience

Sample records for long-term interim storage

  1. Report on the long-term interim storage of spent fuels and vitrified wastes; Gutachten zur Langzeitzwischenlagerung abgebrannter Brennelemente und verglaster Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-12-03

    Long-term interim storage for several hundred years is an option on the management of high-level radioactive wastes. The decision on final disposal is postponed. Worldwide the long-term interim storage is not part of the disposal concept - a geologic final repository is the ultimate aim. Using today's technology the interim storage over several hundred years is supposed to be uncritical. Aging management is the most important challenge - the renewal of the facilities would have to be expected. Possible social change and their impact on the interim storage problem has not been considered.

  2. Safety aspects of long-term dry interim storage of type-B spent fuel and HLW transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, D.; Probst, U.; Voelzke, H.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Based on the German decision to minimise transports of spent fuel casks between nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and central storage facilities several on-site storage facilities have been licensed till the end of 2003. Because of the large amount of type-B transport casks which are going to be used for long-term interim storage the question of time limited type-B license maintenance during the storage period of up to 40 years has been discussed under different aspects. This paper describes present technical aspects of the discussion. A main aspect of transport cask qualification for interim storage is the long-term behaviour of the metallic seal lid system. Concerning this results from current experimental long-term tests with metallic ''Helicoflex''-seals in which pool water is enclosed are presented. The test series has been performed by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) on behalf of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) since 2001. Finally, the paper presents a German concept for an authorities' and technical experts' exchange of experience, know-how and state of the art referring to cask dispatch in nuclear facilities. BAM has taken over a central role in this so-called ''co-ordinating institution for cask dispatching information'' (''KOBAF'') which contains an online data base and a technical working group meeting twice a year. The goal is to keep comparable technical standards for all nuclear sites and storage facilities which are going to load and dispatch casks of the same or similar types under the responsibility of different German state governments for the next decades.

  3. Specific outcomes of the research on the spent fuel long-term evolution in interim dry storage and deep geological disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, C.; Poinssot, C.; Cappelaere, C.; Desgranges, L.; Jegou, C.; Miserque, F.; Piron, J. P.; Roudil, D.; Gras, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the main results of the French research on the long-term evolution of spent fuel. The behavior of the spent fuel rods in the various conditions likely to be encountered during dry storage and deep geological disposal, i.e., in a closed system, in air and in water were investigated. It appears that in a closed system the effects of helium production on the mechanical stability of grain boundaries remain the major unanswered question. In air, microscopic characterization of the UO2 oxidation leads to introduce a new phase in the classical oxidation scheme. The limiting step assumption on which the oxidation kinetics are based is only partially valid. In water, the effect of the alpha radiolysis which accelerates UO2 dissolution was demonstrated for anoxic conditions. However this effect could be counteracted by the environmental conditions, such as the presence of H2 produced by the container corrosion. The effects of the environmental parameters on the fuel matrix dissolution still need to be assessed.

  4. Long-term data storage in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Henshaw, Jacob; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV−) center in diamond is the focus of widespread attention for applications ranging from quantum information processing to nanoscale metrology. Although most work so far has focused on the NV− optical and spin properties, control of the charge state promises complementary opportunities. One intriguing possibility is the long-term storage of information, a notion we hereby introduce using NV-rich, type 1b diamond. As a proof of principle, we use multicolor optical microscopy to read, write, and reset arbitrary data sets with two-dimensional (2D) binary bit density comparable to present digital-video-disk (DVD) technology. Leveraging on the singular dynamics of NV− ionization, we encode information on different planes of the diamond crystal with no cross-talk, hence extending the storage capacity to three dimensions. Furthermore, we correlate the center’s charge state and the nuclear spin polarization of the nitrogen host and show that the latter is robust to a cycle of NV− ionization and recharge. In combination with super-resolution microscopy techniques, these observations provide a route toward subdiffraction NV charge control, a regime where the storage capacity could exceed present technologies.

  5. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.L.

    1995-01-03

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location.

  6. Seismic Performance of Dry Casks Storage for Long- Term Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Luis [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sanders, David [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Yang, Haori [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Pantelides, Chris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The main goal of this study is to evaluate the long-term seismic performance of freestanding and anchored Dry Storage Casks (DSCs) using experimental tests on a shaking table, as well as comprehensive numerical evaluations that include the cask-pad-soil system. The study focuses on the dynamic performance of vertical DSCs, which can be designed as free-standing structures resting on a reinforced concrete foundation pad, or casks anchored to a foundation pad. The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at nuclear power plants (NPPs) is initially stored in fuel-storage pools to control the fuel temperature. After several years, the fuel assemblies are transferred to DSCs at sites contiguous to the plant, known as Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs). The regulations for these storage systems (10 CFR 72) ensure adequate passive heat removal and radiation shielding during normal operations, off-normal events, and accident scenarios. The integrity of the DSCs is important, even if the overpack does not breach, because eventually the spent fuel-rods need to be shipped either to a reprocessing plant or a repository. DSCs have been considered as a temporary storage solution, and usually are licensed for 20 years, although they can be relicensed for operating periods of up to 60 years. In recent years, DSCs have been reevaluated as a potential mid-term solution, in which the operating period may be extended for up to 300 years. At the same time, recent seismic events have underlined the significant risks DSCs are exposed. The consideration of DCSs for storing spent fuel for hundreds of years has created new challenges. In the case of seismic hazard, longer-term operating periods not only lead to larger horizontal accelerations, but also increase the relative effect of vertical accelerations that usually are disregarded for smaller seismic events. These larger seismic demands could lead to casks sliding and tipping over, impacting the concrete pad or adjacent casks. The casks

  7. Interim storage study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  8. Treatment of defective fuel rods for interim storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchow, K.; Hummel, W. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we look exclusively at the treatment of defective fuel rods for long-term dry interim storage at the nuclear power plant, in order to avoid off-site transports. AREVA has developed a technique that allows verifiably adequate drying of the defective fuel rods and reconstructs the barrier for retaining radioactive materials. This is done by individually encapsulating the defective fuel rods and achieving gas-tightness by seal welding. This guarantees the retention of radioactive materials during the storage period of at least 40 years in a transport and storage flask in an interim storage facility at site. (orig.)

  9. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  10. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCullum, Rod [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW, Washington, DC, 20004 (United States); Brookmire, Tom [Dominion Energy, 5000 Dominion Boulevard Glen Allen, VA 23060 (United States); Kessler, John [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Leblang, Suzanne [Entergy, 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson, MS 39211 (United States); Levin, Adam [Exelon, 4300 Winfield Road, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States); Martin, Zita [Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402 (United States); Nesbit, Steve [Duke Energy, 550 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States); Nichol, Marc [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW Washington DC, 2004 (United States); Pickens, Terry [Xcel Energy, 414 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  11. Long-Term Cryogenic Propellant Storage for the TOPS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Francis, John; Li, Xiaoyi; Purves, Lloyd; DeLee, Hudson; Riall, Sara; McGuinness, Dan; Willis, Dewey; Nixon, Conor; Devine Matt; hide

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) can dramatically enhance NASAs ability to explore the solar system because of their superior specific impulse (Isp) capability. Although these cryogenic propellants can be challenging to manage and store, they allow significant mass advantages over traditional hypergolic propulsion systems and are therefore technically enabling for many planetary science missions. New cryogenic storage techniques such as subcooling and the use of advanced insulation and low thermal conductivity support structures will allow for the long term storage and use of cryogenic propellants for solar system exploration and hence allow NASA to deliver more payloads to targets of interest, launch on smaller and less expensive launch vehicles, or both. Employing cryogenic propellants will allow NASA to perform missions to planetary destinations that would not be possible with the use of traditional hypergolic propellants. These new cryogenic storage technologies were implemented in a design study for the Titan Orbiter Polar Surveyor (TOPS) mission, with LH2 and LOX as propellants, and the resulting spacecraft design was able to achieve a 43 launch mass reduction over a TOPS mission, that utilized a conventional hypergolic propulsion system with mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants. This paper describes the cryogenic propellant storage design for the TOPS mission and demonstrates how these cryogenic propellants are stored passively for a decade-long Titan mission.

  12. Long-term storage effects-up-date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The long-term effects of storing batteries over a period of years prior to their use in a synchronous orbit application are discussed. A previous experiment is discussed where life testing was performed on cells after having stored the battery for a period of three years with the cell shorted and at a temperature on the order of 5-10 C. The test consisted of performing a sequence of 10 simulated eclipse seasons (equivalent in cycling of five years in synchronous orbit). Results of this test indicated very little degradation and change in the physical and chemical conditions of the cell. The program was extended for an additional year (battery was stored for four years) under the same conditions and testing. The results of the four year storage (one exception) indicate that no further change occurred that is significant from the three year test.

  13. Long-term stability of the APS storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

    1999-10-26

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne ''National Laboratory and has been fully-operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATS). The 7-GeV synchrotrons light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/ environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

  14. Long-term stability of orbits in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    We describe a numerical method to establish long-term bounds on nonlinear Hamiltonian motion. By bounding the change in a nearly constant action variable, uniformly in initial condition, one can predict stability for N turns by tracking many orbits for a member of turns of N{sub 0} much less than N. In a first application to a model sextupole lattice in a region of strong nonlinearity, we predict stability of betatron motion in two degrees of freedom for 10{sup 8} turns. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Defining sale ethylene for long term storage of tulip bulbs

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, de, H.P.J.; Peppelenbos, H.W.; Dijkstra, M.H.G.E.; Gude, H.

    2002-01-01

    The maximum ethylene level that can be permitted in storage rooms, without causing damage to tulip bulbs, is not exactly known. Therefore, a zero-tolerance for the presence of ethylene during storage of tulip bulbs is common practice. This results in excessive ventilation and coherent large energy costs. It is questioned whether this is always necessary. In different phases of the storage period the critical levels of ethylene were determined. Bulbs of eight economically important cultivars (...

  16. Defining sale ethylene for long term storage of tulip bulbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de H.P.J.; Peppelenbos, H.W.; Dijkstra, M.H.G.E.; Gude, H.

    2002-01-01

    The maximum ethylene level that can be permitted in storage rooms, without causing damage to tulip bulbs, is not exactly known. Therefore, a zero-tolerance for the presence of ethylene during storage of tulip bulbs is common practice. This results in excessive ventilation and coherent large energy

  17. Defining sale ethylene for long term storage of tulip bulbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de H.P.J.; Peppelenbos, H.W.; Dijkstra, M.H.G.E.; Gude, H.

    2002-01-01

    The maximum ethylene level that can be permitted in storage rooms, without causing damage to tulip bulbs, is not exactly known. Therefore, a zero-tolerance for the presence of ethylene during storage of tulip bulbs is common practice. This results in excessive ventilation and coherent large energy c

  18. [Transformation of free radicals of gamma-irradiated enzymes during long-term storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryl'tsev, V V; Virnik, R B; Dovbiĭ, E V; Filatov, V N

    1988-01-01

    The ESR method was used to study free radical processes occurring in gamma-irradiated enzymes upon their long-term storage (up to 4 years) both at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. Simultaneously, studied was the biological activity of gamma-irradiated enzymes subjected to a long-term storage. The immobilization of enzymes on dialdehyde cellulose or polycaproamine was shown to preserve their biological activity during the postirradiation storage.

  19. Analysis of Long-term Terrestrial Water Storage Variations in the Yangtze River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bob; Huang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Salama, Suhyb; Krol, Maaten; Hoekstra, Arjen; Zhou, Yunxuan; van der Velde, Rogier

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we analyze 32 years of TWS data obtained from Interim Reanalysis Data (ERA-Interim) and Noah model from Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS-Noah) for the period between 1979 and 2010. The accuracy of these datasets is validated against 26 years (1979-2004) of runoff dataset from Yichang gauging station and compared to 32 years of independent precipitation data obtained from Global Precipitation Climatology Centre Full Data Reanalysis Version 6 (GPCC) and NOAA's PRECipitation REConstruction over Land (PREC/L). Spatial and temporal analysis of the TWS data shows that TWS in the Yangtze River basin is decreasing significantly since the year 1998. The driest period of the basin is noted from 2005 to 2010, especially in the middle and lower Yangtze reaches. The TWS changed abruptly into persistently high negative anomalies in the middle and lower Yangtze Reaches in 2004. From both basin and annual perspectives, 2006 is detected as the major inflection point at which the system exhibits a persistent decrease in TWS. Comparing these TWS trends to independent precipitation datasets shows that the recent decrease in TWS can mainly be attributed to a decrease in precipitation amount. Our finding is based on observation and modeling data sets and confirms previous results based on gauging station datasets. Reference: Huang, Y., Salama, M.S., Krol, M.S., van der Velde, R., Hoekstra, A.Y., Zhou, Y. and Su, Z. (2013) Analysis of long - term terrestrial water storage variations in the Yangtze River basin. In: Hydrology and earth system sciences (HESS): 17 (2013)5 pp. 1985-2000.

  20. Report on the possibilities of long-term storage of irradiated nuclear fuels; Rapport sur les possibilites d'entreposage a long terme de combustibles nucleaires irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report aims at giving a legislative aspect to the many rules that govern the activities of the back-end of the fuel cycle in France. These activities concern the unloading of spent nuclear fuels, their reprocessing, storage, recycling and definitive disposal. The following points are reviewed and commented: the management of non-immediately reprocessed fuels (historical reasons of the 'all wastes reprocessing' initial choice, evolution of the economic and political context, the future reprocessing or the definitive disposal of spent fuels in excess); the inevitable long-term storage of part of the spent fuels (quantities and required properties of long-term stored fuels, the eventuality of a definitive disposal of spent fuels); the criteria that long-term storage facilities must fulfill (confinement measures, reversibility, surveillance and control during the whole duration of the storage); storage concept to be retained (increase of storage pools capacity, long-term storage in pools of reprocessing plants, centralized storage in pools, surface dry-storage on power plant sites, reversible underground storage, subsurface storage and storage/disposal in galleries, surface dry-storage facilities); the preliminary studies for the creation of long-term storage facilities (public information, management by a public French organization, clarifying of the conditions of international circulation of spent fuels); problems linked with the presence of foreign spent fuels in France (downstream of the reprocessing cycle, foreign plutonium and wastes re-shipment); conclusions and recommendations. (J.S.)

  1. The effect of long-term storage on nanoleakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H P; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the durability of dentin bonding over time, the nanoleakage of four dentin bonding systems (Single Bond, Stae, Clearfil SE Bond and PermaQuik) over 24 hours, three months, six months and 12 months, was investigated. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper and bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems following manufacturers' instructions. The bonded surface was covered with Lex disks after initial 24-hour storage. At the end of each storage time, the surrounding tooth surfaces except for 1 mm adjacent to the restoration were coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in a 50% w/v solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours, placed in photodeveloping solution and exposed to fluorescent light for eight hours. The samples were cut longitudinally and buccoligually, polished, mounted on stubs, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using backscattered electron mode. The results showed that systems using phosphoric acid as the etchant had a line of silver deposition at the base of the hybrid layer. Silver deposition increased in all systems over 12-months storage, with PermaQuik changing the least. Nanoleakage of the dentin bonding systems increased slightly during the 12-month storage period, indicating that they may be subject to hydrolytic attack over time.

  2. Antioxidants in yacon products and effect of long term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Castro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. and Endl. H. Robinson is a storage root originally grown in the Andean highlands. The fresh roots are perishable and quickly turn brown during handling and processing. Aiming to prolong shelf-life and to preserve the antioxidant compounds in yacon roots, 3 mm thick yacon slices were dried in a drying cabinet at 40, 50, and 60 ºC to a moisture content of 10-14%, and yacon strips were sun dried to a moisture content of 15-20%. The total phenolic content was measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the quenching capacity was evaluated by measuring the amount of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pidrylhydrazyl inhibited in samples after drying and after 7 months of storage. The results showed that it is possible to preserve the antioxidant capacity in yacon after cabinet or sun drying. Both yacon chips and strips presented total phenolic content values similar to those of fresh yacon roots. Both products also showed a high inhibition capacity of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pidrylhydrazyl. A significant decrease in the phenolic content was observed in the yacon chips after storage, which indicates that the sun dried strips are more suitable for storage.

  3. Interim irradiated fuel storage facility for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolich, Jose [INVAP SE, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    In most research reactors irradiated fuel discharged from the reactor is initially stored underwater inside the reactor building for along period of time. This allows for heat dissipation and fission product decay. In most cases this initial storage is done in a irradiated fuel storage facility pool located closed to the reactor core. After a certain cooling time, the fuel discharged should be relocated for long-term interim storage in a Irradiated Fuel Storage (IFS) Facility. IFS facilities are required for the safe storage of irradiated nuclear fuel before it is reprocessed or conditioned for disposal as radioactive waste. The IFS Facility described in this report is not an integral part of an operating nuclear reactor. This facility many be either co-located with nuclear facilities (such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant) or sited independently of other nuclear facilities. (author)

  4. Stability of Schmallenberg virus during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel insect-transmitted orthobunyavirus that infects ruminants, caused a large epidemic in European livestock since its emergence in 2011. For the in vitro characterization of this hitherto unknown virus as well as for antibody detection tests like indirect immunofluorescence and neutralization test infectious virus is necessary. To determine the most suitable storage temperature, culture-grown SBV was kept at 37°C, 28°C, 4°C, -20°C and -70°C for up to one year. A storage at 37°C led to a complete loss of infectivity within days and at 28°C within a few weeks. When stored at 4°C the infectious titer decreased dependent on the starting quantity, whereas the viral titer was almost constant for a month at -20°C and remained constant for the study period when stored at -70°C. Consequently, SBV should be kept at -70°C, if retention of infectivity is required.

  5. Quality changes of Antarctic krill powder during long term storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Bruheim, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Krill is a valuable sustainable resource of omega-3 fatty acids and protein, which may be processed into a krill powder for human consumption. The objective of this study was to investigate the stability of krill powder when stored for up to 12 months at room temperature. In addition, the effect......) is a shrimp-like marine crustacean. It is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, primarily bound in phospholipids in the sn-2 position of the molecule, making it highly bioavailable. Krill may be processed into powder also rich in protein and astaxanthin. Stability of krill powder, stored for up to 12 months at room...... and a concomitant decrease in antioxidants, tocopherol, and astaxanthin was observed. In addition, there was a minor decrease in phospholipids and n-3 fatty acids; however, storage at vacuum improved the oxidative stability of krill powder. Practical applications: For the use of krill powder in human nutrition...

  6. Long-term storage of three unconventional oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein, Ismail H.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Three samples, Sclerocarya birrea oil (SCO, Melon bug oil (Aspongubus viduatus (MBO, and Sorghum bug oil (Agonoscelis pubescens (SBO, were stored (autoxidized in the dark at 30±2 °C for 24 months. Oil aliquots were withdrawn every 2-4 month for analyses of changes in four quality indexes, namely fatty acid composition, tocopherol content, peroxide value and oxidative stability index by Rancimat. After 24 months of storage the fatty acid composition of the three oils showed no change while tocopherol contents were decreased. SCO and MBO showed only slight changes in their oxidative stability as indicated by the peroxide value and induction period during the 24 months of storage. Sorghum bug oil showed a periodical increase in the peroxide value and had less stability as measured by the Rancimat in comparison to other oils.Tres muestras de aceite, Sclerocarya birrea oil (SCO, Melon bug oil (Aspongubus viduatus (MBO, and Sorghum bug oil (Agonoscelis pubescens (SBO, fueron almacenadas en la oscuridad a 30±2 °C durante 24 meses. Cada 2- 4 meses se toman alícuotas para analizar los cambios de calidad. Se determinaron la composición en ácidos grasos, el contenido en tocoferol, el índice de peróxidos y la estabilidad oxidativa mediante el aparato Rancimat. Después de 24 meses de almacenamiento, la composición en ácidos grasos no experimentó variación mientras que el contenido en tocoferol disminuyó en los tres aceites. SCO y MBO mostraron cambios minoritarios como se comprobó por los indices de peroxides y estabilidad a los 24 meses. SBO fue el menos estable de los tres aceites.

  7. 78 FR 23548 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long- Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury... (DOE) announces the availability of the Draft Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury... identify a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury...

  8. NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-08-06

    GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 54 - 57 months. No additional O-ring failures have been observed since the last interim report was issued. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures. Additional irradiation of several fixtures is recommended to maintain a balance between thermal and radiation exposures similar to that experienced in storage, and to show the degree of consistency of radiation response between GLT and GLT-S O-rings.

  9. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  10. Statistical analysis for long-term stability studies with multiple storage conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Almalik, Osama; Nijhuis, Michiel B.; Warner, Edward I.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the shelf life of new medicinal products, long-term stability studies are conducted of at least three registration batches at multiple storage conditions. It is common practice to perform a statistical analysis on the resulting data separately for each storage condition. Although this i

  11. Long Term Preservation of a Collection of Rhizoctonia Solani, using Cryogenic Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn is an important plant pathogen on a number of crops and maintaining an extensive collection of reference isolates is important in understanding relationships of this pathogen with multiple hosts. While a number of long-term storage methods have been developed, mos...

  12. Long-term Preservation of a Collection of Rhizoctonia solani, using Cryogenic Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important plant pathogen on a number of crops and maintaining an extensive collection of reference isolates is important in understanding relationships of this pathogen with multiple hosts. Current long-term storage methods typically call for frequent transfer increasing the...

  13. Long-term storage of samples for flow cytometric DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, L L; Christensen, I J; Keiding, N

    1983-01-01

    A simple procedure for long-term storage of cells for flow cytometric DNA analysis was developed and tested. The cells were stored as single cells or fine-needle aspirates suspended in a citrate buffer with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or as small blocks of tissue from solid tumors. The cells were...

  14. Laboratory Testing of Solar Combi System with Compact Long Term PCM Heat Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Berg; Englmair, Gerald; Dannemand, Mark

    2016-01-01

    To enable the transition from fossil fuels as a primary heat source for domestic hot water preparation and space heating solar thermal energy has great potential. The heat from the sun has the disadvantage that it is not always available when there is a demand. To solve this mismatch a thermal...... seasonal storage can be used to store excess heat from the summer to the winter when the demand is higher than the supply. Installing a long term thermal storage in a one family house it needs to be compact and sensible heat storages are not suitable. A latent heat storage with a phase change material (PCM...

  15. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  16. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  17. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociu F.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa, to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  18. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fako, R.; Barariu, Gh.; Toma, R.; Georgescu, R.; Sociu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  19. Influence of long-term storage on fire hazard properties of metal nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrmakova, O. S.; Sechin, A. I.; Nazarenko, O. B.

    2017-08-01

    The production and application of nanomaterials is rapidly expanding. Therefore the problem of their properties change during long-term storage becomes essential. The properties of metal nanopowders after long-term storage under ambient conditions were studied and the results are presented in this work. The aluminum, iron, zinc, and copper nanopowders produced by the method of electrical explosion of wires were investigated in this work. The investigation was carried out by X-ray and thermal analysis. The estimation of the flame propagation velocity in the bulk layer of nanopowders was carried out. The characteristics of the nanopowders of nanometals studied are given in terms of their fire hazard. The results can be used for diagnostic of fire hazard of nanomaterials and protection of the enterprises against fire and explosion.

  20. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  1. Long term spatio-temporal analyses of snow cover in Central Asia using ERA-Interim and MODIS products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. P.; Zhang, W. C.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an approach for generating a long term series of snow-cover products from 1979 to 2015 was proposed by integrating the data of ERA-Interim snow-depth and 8-day cloud-free MODIS snow-cover derived by removing cloud from MOD10A2/MYD10A2 product. On the basis of the spatio-temporal analyses and evaluation of snow-cover duration (SCD) during the hydrological year from 1979/1980 to 2014/2015 over Central Asia, the average start and melt date of snow-cover (SCS and SCM, respectively) were estimated using the long term snow-cover product. The results suggested that the snow-cover product derived by this approach is fairly satisfactory with the mean bias error (MBE) of -.55%±5.03%. The SCD, SCS and SCM all presented an apparent north-south towards gradient as long as mountainous regions and waterbodies were avoided. The mean SCD over the high-latitude and high-mountainous regions were all beyond 122 days, however, it gradually became shorter with a significant level of a < 0.05 or even a < 0.001 from 1979/1980 to 2014/2015. In contrast, the SCD over low-latitude and low-altitude regions, like Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, were evidently shorter than the former, but it became significantly longer with a significant level of a < 0.05 or even a < 0.001 in the southwestern, northern Turkmenistan and most of Uzbekistan in the same duration. Notably, most of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, where snow-cover usually appeared late and melting out early, even always stay snow-free throughout the year.

  2. EIGHTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2013-09-03

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 61 - 85 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KArea Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leaktight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 41 - 45 months. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures.

  3. CANE FIBERBOARD DEGRADATION WITHIN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE DURING LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.

    2013-06-19

    The 9975 shipping package is used as part of the configuration for long-term storage of special nuclear materials in the K Area Complex at the Savannah River Site. The cane fiberboard overpack in the 9975 package provides thermal insulation, impact absorption and criticality control functions relevant to this application. The Savannah River National Laboratory has conducted physical, mechanical and thermal tests on aged fiberboard samples to identify degradation rates and support the development of aging models and service life predictions in a storage environment. This paper reviews the data generated to date, and preliminary models describing degradation rates of cane fiberboard in elevated temperature – elevated humidity environments.

  4. SEVENTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.

    2012-08-30

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 54-72 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 ºF will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at an intermediate temperature of 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 30 - 36 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51 – 96%. This is greater than seen to date for any packages inspected during KAC field

  5. SIXTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.

    2011-08-31

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for seven years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 33 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 F and higher temperatures, and in 7 fixtures aging at 300 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 41-60 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 F will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging within the past year at an intermediate temperature of 270 F, with hopes that they may leak before the 200 F fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200-300 F for up to 26 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-96%. This is greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAC field surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress relaxation

  6. Laboratory and field studies concerning the long-term storage of elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.M.; Clark, P.D.; Bernard, F. [Alberta Sulfur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Calgary Univ., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Canadian sour gas processing facilities supply much of the elemental sulfur to the international market. Elemental sulfur is a pure commodity obtained when hydrogen sulfide is removed from raw gases by way of the Claus process. Excess production is usually stored above ground as a bulk solid at the processing facility. It is possible that sulfur may have to be stored in large quantities if a market imbalance may occurs due to expanding exploration in sulfur-bearing formations and increasing regulations on sulfur levels in processing effluents. For that reason, long-term storage methods are being examined in detail. Both above and below ground block storage is considered environmentally acceptable for sulfur storage as long as measures are taken to minimize the physical and biological breakdown of the sulfur. The main concern regarding above ground storage is the generation of sulfur dust from phase transformations within the sulfur itself. Other concerns include acid production from bacterial activity and the weathering of the material when it is exposed to the elements over the long-term. This paper addresses these concerns and presents results from a series of research studies on underground storage of elemental sulfur both in the laboratory and in pilot-scale field studies.

  7. NDE of copper canisters for long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2003-07-01

    Sweden has been intensively developing methods for long term storage of spent fuel from the nuclear power plants for twenty-five years. A dedicated research program has been initiated and conducted by the Swedish company SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuels and Waste Management Co.). After the interim storage SKB plans to encapsulate spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters that will be placed at a deep repository located in bedrock. The canisters filled with fuel rods will be sealed by an electron beam weld. This paper presents three complementary NDE techniques used for assessing the sealing weld in copper canisters, radiography, ultrasound, and eddy current. A powerful X-ray source and a digital detector are used for the radiography. An ultrasonic array system consisting of a phased ultrasonic array and a multi-channel electronics is used for the ultrasonic examination. The array system enables electronic focusing and rapid electronic scanning eliminating the use of a complicated mechanical scanner. A specially designed eddy current probe capable of detecting small voids at the depth up to 4 mm in copper is used for the eddy current inspection. Presently, all the NDE techniques are verified in SKB's Canister Laboratory where full scale canisters are welded and examined.

  8. Transuranic storage and assay facility interim safety basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porten, D.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) Interim Safety Basis document provides the authorization basis for the interim operation and restriction on interim operations for the TRUSAF. The TRUSAF ISB demonstrates that the TRUSAF can be operated safely, protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF Hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1987) is superseded by this document.

  9. Using electrophysiology to demonstrate that cuing affects long-term memory storage over the short term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxcey, Ashleigh M.; Fukuda, Keisuke; Song, Won S.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    As researchers who study working memory, we often assume that participants keep a representation of an object in working memory when we present a cue that indicates that object will be tested in a couple of seconds. This intuitively accounts for how well people can remember a cued object relative to their memory for that same object presented without a cue. However, it is possible that this superior memory does not purely reflect storage of the cued object in working memory. We tested the hypothesis that cued presented during a stream of objects, followed by a short retention interval and immediate memory test, change how information is handled by long-term memory. We tested this hypothesis using a family of frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) believed to reflect long-term memory storage. We found that these frontal indices of long-term memory were sensitive to the task relevance of objects signaled by auditory cues, even when objects repeat frequently such that proactive interference was high. Our findings indicate the problematic nature of assuming process purity in the study of working memory, and demonstrate how frequent stimulus repetitions fail to isolate the role of working memory mechanisms. PMID:25604772

  10. Using electrophysiology to demonstrate that cueing affects long-term memory storage over the short term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxcey, Ashleigh M; Fukuda, Keisuke; Song, Won S; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2015-10-01

    As researchers who study working memory, we often assume that participants keep a representation of an object in working memory when we present a cue that indicates that the object will be tested in a couple of seconds. This intuitively accounts for how well people can remember a cued object, relative to their memory for that same object presented without a cue. However, it is possible that this superior memory does not purely reflect storage of the cued object in working memory. We tested the hypothesis that cues presented during a stream of objects, followed by a short retention interval and immediate memory test, can change how information is handled by long-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by using a family of frontal event-related potentials believed to reflect long-term memory storage. We found that these frontal indices of long-term memory were sensitive to the task relevance of objects signaled by auditory cues, even when the objects repeated frequently, such that proactive interference was high. Our findings indicate the problematic nature of assuming process purity in the study of working memory, and demonstrate that frequent stimulus repetitions fail to isolate the role of working memory mechanisms.

  11. Qualification of polysiloxanes for long-term storage of radioactive waste; Qualifizierung von Polysiloxanen fuer die langzeitstabile Konditionierung radioaktiver Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharczyk, P.

    2005-12-15

    At present German policy envisages interim storage of all radioactive waste (for approximately 30 years) until a final repository is available. This therefore leads to higher standards for storage containers. Silicone elastomers (polysiloxanes), materials on the basis of silicon and oxygen with organic substituents, have various physical and chemical properties and seem to be suitable for the long-term storage of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. The aim of the present work is the qualification of a new coating material for storage containers. The use of polysiloxanes in other applications was also investigated. An important criterion for the coating is the simplicity of its application. Moreover, it should also have a high adhesion on steel as well as providing protection against corrosion. These properties were investigated for different polysiloxanes. The spraying tests showed that polysiloxane material with a viscosity of up to 45 000 mPas could be applied by the airless spraying method. An elastic coating was produced which could ensure protection against mechanical impacts. In the framework of water vapour experiments, a very high diffusion constant was determined. The corrosion test confirmed that the polysiloxane coating provided only insufficient corrosion protection if the sample was in contact with water and water vapour at the same time. This problem was solved by using an additional priming coat of 60 {mu}m zinc paint. The adhesion test showed that polysiloxanes have different levels of adhesion. The best adhesion was determined for condensation-cured silicones. The addition-cured materials had a lower adhesion, which was improved by the application of a priming coat. The outcome of these investigations is a wide spectrum of applications for polysiloxanes which can be used as firmly adhering coatings or removable decontamination layers. (orig.)

  12. Long term storage of dilute acid pretreated corn stover feedstock and ethanol fermentability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Shao, Shuai; Bao, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study reported a new solution of lignocellulose feedstock storage based on the distributed pretreatment concept. The dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment (DDAP) was conducted on corn stover feedstock, instead of ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment. Then the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover was stored for three months during summer season with high temperature and humidity. No negative aspects were found on the physical property, composition, hydrolysis yield and ethanol fermentability of the long term stored pretreated corn stover, plus the additional merits including no chemicals recovery operation, anti-microbial contaminant environment from stronger acid and inhibitor contents, as well as the mild and slow hydrolysis in the storage. The new pretreatment method expanded the distributed pretreatment concept of feedstock storage with potential for practical application.

  13. Optimization of phytoplankton preservative concentrations to reduce damage during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Das, Subhajit; Bhattacharya, Tanima; De, Minati; Maiti, Tusharkanti; Kumar De, Tarun

    2014-04-01

    A study was performed to establish the optimal concentration of traditional preservatives or fixatives such as formaldehyde and acidic Lugol's iodine, in order to preserve phytoplankton samples for long-term storage without the introduction of artifacts or other physical aberrations. The goal of the study was to avoid any visible morphological changes to the preserved cells, minimizing the errors induced by traditional preservative concentrations, and ensuring better accuracy of ecological analyses. We found that both formaldehyde and acidic Lugol's iodine have adverse effects on the preservation of samples. Trichodesmium erythraeum was found to be most susceptible to the effects of acidic Lugol's iodine, since it displayed the highest degree of chain fragmentation when this preservative was used. However, we found that 2.0% (v/v) formaldehyde, 2.5% (v/v) acidic Lugol's iodine, and 2.0% (v/v) formaldehyde+2.5%(v/v) acidic Lugol's iodine combined were most promising, with the latter the most effective even after 3 weeks of preservation. This study also revealed that, in general, the centric diatom species were more sensitive to long-term preservation than their pennate counterparts. The present study is significant as it sheds light on the damage endured by phytoplankton cells during long-term preservation, which can lead to erroneous and biased results upon analyses. The optimal concentration of preservative established experimentally from a wide variety of concentrations caused comparatively moderate changes to the cell dimensions as well as effectively prevented microbial contamination.

  14. Long-term manure amendment increases organic C storage and stabilization in Loess soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B.; Zhao, W.; Yang, X.; Zhou, J.

    2011-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial pool for organic carbon in the biosphere. Therefore, sequestration of C in soils is often seen as a 'win-win' proposition. The long-term combined application of manure with chemical fertilizers had increased the accumulation of organic carbon in soil (SOC); and the results from the application of chemical fertilizers on the stock of SOC in soil were inconsistent. Furthermore, less studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of different fertilization, especially the application of N fertilizer, on the stabilization of SOC in the different fertilized soils. In this study, we hypothesized that the long-term different fertilization not only affect organic C storage, but also its stabilization in soil. Therefore, we conducted an incubation experiment with the soils from a long-term fertilization trials. Soil samples were collected from the three fertilized plots, ((1) no fertilizer, NF soil, (2) inorganic NPK fertilizers, NPK soil; and (3) Manure + NPK fertilizers, MNPK soil) of a long-term fertilization experiment initiated in 1990 in Shaanxi, China. The soils were incubated at 28o C for 30 days with the different treatments, i.e., (1) control with no addition (CK), (2) added 200 mg N kg-1 soil (+ NH4-N), (3) added 1000 mg C kg-1 soil (+ glucose), and (4) added 200 mg N kg-1 soil + 1000 mg C kg-1 soil (+glucose + NH4-N). The evolved CO2 was determined by titration of the excess NaOH with 0.1 M HCl. Decomposition of SOC in the different soils was evaluate with the accumulation of released CO2-C based on dry soil (in mg C kg-1 soil), and the decomposition rate of SOC during the incubation (in % of total organic C in soil). Long-term different fertilization treatments (NPK, and MNPK soil) significantly increased the organic C storage in 0-100 cm soil profile. SOC storage in MNPK soil (83.0 t ha-1) was significantly higher than NPK soil (80.8 t ha-1), and both were significantly higher than the no fertilizer soil. The decomposition

  15. The effect of long-term storage on quality of malting barley grain and malt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš KRAJČOVIČ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the grain samples of five malting barley varieties harvested in 2011, the amount of basic components as well as physiological characteristics of barley were determined. These samples were micromalted and resulting malt was analyzed mainly according to the European Brewery Convention (EBC and the Mitteleuropäische Brautechnische Analysenkommission (MEBAK methodologies. The same samples of malting barley grain and also samples of malt were placed in polyethylene bags, from which the air was exhausted and they were further stored at 4 °C until 2016. In 2016, grain and malt samples were subjected to the same analyses as in 2011. Results were statistically evaluated by t-test of dependent samples. Most of the monitored parameters has remained at the same level as in 2011 or has slightly improved. The exception was statistically very highly significant decrease (P ≤ 0.001 of friability and increase of amount of whole and partly unmodified grains. Under conditions described, long-term storage of malting barley grain has not significantly negatively affected its germination. Long-term storage of malt has had not a significant negative impact on its quality too.

  16. Blood DNA Yield but Not Integrity or Methylation Is Impacted After Long-Term Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Alexandre; De Witt, Brian; Ammerlaan, Wim; Betsou, Fay; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Collection of human whole blood for genomic DNA extraction is part of numerous clinical studies. Since DNA extraction cannot always be performed at the time of sample collection, whole blood samples may be stored for years before being processed. The use of appropriate storage conditions is then critical to obtain DNA in sufficient quantity and of adequate quality in order to obtain reliable results from the subsequent molecular biological analyses. In this study, EDTA whole blood samples were collected from 8 healthy volunteers, and different durations (up to 1 year) and temperatures (room temperature, 4°C, -20°C, and -80°C) of storage were compared. The effect of the addition of a DNA preservative agent was also assessed before and after storage. DNA concentrations measured by UV spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry were used to calculate DNA extraction yields and double-strand DNA ratios. DNA integrity was controlled by agarose gel electrophoresis and long-range polymerase chain reaction. The impact of storage conditions on DNA methylation was also evaluated. Results showed that certain storage conditions have a significant impact on the DNA extraction yield but little or no effect on DNA integrity and methylation. Storage of EDTA blood at -80°C guarantees high-quality DNA with a good yield. Higher DNA extraction yields were obtained with the addition of a DNA preservative agent before thawing EDTA blood stored at -20°C or -80°C. Long-term storage at room temperature in the presence of a DNA preservative agent also appeared to be a reliable procedure.

  17. Evaluation of limiting mechanisms for long-term spent fuel dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, J. [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Machiels, A. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Several failure mechanisms have been postulated that could become limiting for spent fuel in dry storage. These are: stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC), Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) and Creep Rupture (CR). These mechanisms are examined in some detail from two perspectives: their initial environments in which they were developed and applied, and in relation to their applicability to dry storage. Extrapolation techniques are used to transfer the mechanisms from their initial in-reactor and laboratory domains to out-of-reactor spent fuel dry storage environments. This transfer is accomplished both qualitatively where necessary and quantitatively when possible, with fracture toughness used as the transfer function. In this regard, the paper provides useful information on cladding fracture toughness estimates that recognize the specific physical conditions of the cladding, which would not be found elsewhere in the literature. The arguments presented in this paper confirm the general technical consensus that creep is the governing mechanism for spent fuel in long-term dry storage. (author)

  18. Long-Term Cryogenic Propellant Storage for the Titan Orbiter Polar Surveyor (TOPS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Francis, John; Li, Xiaoyi; DeLee, Hudson; Purves, Lloyd; Willis, Dewey; Nixon, Conor; Mcguinness, Dan; Riall, Sara; Devine, Matt; hide

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) can dramatically enhance NASAs ability to explore the solar system because of their superior specific impulse (Isp) capability. Although these cryogenic propellants can be challenging to manage and store, they allow significant mass advantages over traditional hypergolic propulsion systems and are therefore technically enabling for many planetary science missions. New cryogenic storage techniques such as subcooling and the use of advanced insulation and low thermal conductivity support structures will allow for the long term storage and use of cryogenic propellants for solar system exploration and hence allow NASA to deliver more payloads to targets of interest, launch on smaller and less expensive launch vehicles, or both. Employing cryogenic propellants will allow NASA to perform missions to planetary destinations that would not be possible with the use of traditional hypergolic propellants. These new cryogenic storage technologies were implemented in a design study for the Titan Orbiter Polar Surveyor (TOPS) mission, with LH2 and LOX as propellants, and the resulting spacecraft design was able to achieve a 43 launch mass reduction over a TOPS mission, that utilized a conventional hypergolic propulsion system with mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants. This paper describes the cryogenic propellant storage design for the TOPS mission and demonstrates how these cryogenic propellants are stored passively for a decade-long Titan mission.

  19. Quality testing of autoclaved rodent drinking water during short-term and long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peveler, Jessica L; Crisler, Robin; Hickman, Deb

    2015-06-01

    All animals need clean water to drink. At the authors' animal facility, drinking water for immunocompromised rodents is filtered by reverse osmosis, acidified during bottling and sterilized in an autoclave. Autoclaved water bottles can be stored in unopened autoclave bags for 7 d or in opened bags for 2 d; if not used during that time, they are emptied, cleaned, refilled and sterilized again. The authors wished to determine whether the storage period of 2-7 d was adequate and necessary to ensure the quality of drinking water. They tested water bottles for pH levels and for the presence of adenosine triphosphate as a measure of organic contamination during short-term and long-term storage. The pH of autoclaved drinking water generally remained stable during storage. Furthermore, no instances of organic contamination were detected in autoclaved water bottles stored for up to 22 d in unopened bags and only one instance was detected in bottles stored for up to 119 d in opened bags in a room with individually ventilated cages. On the basis of these findings, the acceptable storage period for autoclaved water bottles in opened bags at the authors' facility was extended to 21 d.

  20. Dedicated-site, interim storage of high-level nuclear waste as part of the management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, E A

    1980-11-01

    Dedicated-site interim storage of high-level reprocessed nuclear waste and of spent fuel rods is proposed as a long-term integral part of the systems approach of the national nuclear waste isolation program. Separation of interim sites for retrievable storage from permanent-disposal repositories should enhance ensurance of the performance of the latter; maintenance of retrievability at separate sites also has many advantages in both safety and possible use of waste as resources. Interim storage sites probably will not be needed beyond about 100 years from now, so the institutional and technical considerations involved in their choice should be much less stringent than those for the selection of permanent sites. Development of interim sites must be concurrent with unabated effort to identify and to develop permanent repositories.

  1. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  2. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 2: Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  3. Long Term Stability of the LHC Superconducting Cryodipoles after Outdoor Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Seyvet, F; Bertarelli, A; Denis, O; El-Kallassi, P; Fernández-Cano, E D; Fessia, P; Ilie, S D; Jeanneret, J B; Letant, D; Poncet, A; Pugnat, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, Stefano; Siemko, A; Todesco, E; Tommasini, D; Veness, R; Vullierme, B; Wildner, E

    2006-01-01

    The main superconducting dipoles for the LHC are being stored outdoors for periods from a few weeks to several years after conditioning with dry nitrogen gas. Such a storage before installation in the 27 km circumference tunnel may affect not only the mechanical and cryogenic functionality of the cryodipoles but also their quench and field performance. A dedicated task force was established to study all aspects of long term behaviour of the stored cryodipoles, with particular emphasis on electrical and vacuum integrity, quench training behaviour, magnetic field quality, performance of the thermal insulation, mechanical stability of magnet shape and of the interface between cold mass and cryostat, degradation ofmaterials and welds. In particular, one specifically selected cryodipole stored outdoors for more than one year, was retested at cold. In addition, various tests have been carried out on the cryodipole assembly and on the most critical subcomponents to study aspects such as the hygrothermal behaviour of...

  4. Formation and Maintenance of Robust Long-Term Information Storage in the Presence of Synaptic Turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fauth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing problem is how memories can be stored for very long times despite the volatility of the underlying neural substrate, most notably the high turnover of dendritic spines and synapses. To address this problem, here we are using a generic and simple probabilistic model for the creation and removal of synapses. We show that information can be stored for several months when utilizing the intrinsic dynamics of multi-synapse connections. In such systems, single synapses can still show high turnover, which enables fast learning of new information, but this will not perturb prior stored information (slow forgetting, which is represented by the compound state of the connections. The model matches the time course of recent experimental spine data during learning and memory in mice supporting the assumption of multi-synapse connections as the basis for long-term storage.

  5. Investigation on polyetheretherketone composite for long term storage of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeesh, G.; Bhowmik, Shantanu; Sivakumar, Venugopal; Varshney, Lalit; Kumar, Virendra; Abraham, Mathew

    2015-12-01

    This investigation highlights the effect of radiation, chemical and thermal environments on mechanical and thermal properties of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites, which could prove to be an alternative material for long term storage of nuclear wastes. The tests are conducted on specimens made from PEEK and PEEK reinforced with carbon short fiber. The specimens are subjected to radiation doses, equivalent to the cumulative dosage for 500 years followed by exposure under highly corrosive and thermal environments. Studies under optical microscopy reveal that the dispersion of carbon short fiber in the PEEK Composites is significantly uniform. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that there are no significant changes in thermal properties of PEEK composite when exposed to aggressive environments. It is further observed that there are no significant changes in mechanical properties of the composite after exposure to radiation and thermo-chemical environment.

  6. Influence of vacuum packaging and long term storage on quality of whole chilli (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetti, Mahadev B; Deepa, G T; Antony, Roshny T; Khetagoudar, Mahadev C; Uppar, Dodappa S; Navalgatti, Channappa M

    2014-10-01

    Investigations were carried out to study the influence of vacuum packaging and long term storage on quality in red chilli. Chilli fruits were stored in vacuum packed and jute bags at two moisture levels (10 % and 12 %) in room and cold environments under both light and dark conditions for a period of 24 months. During storage period, average room and cool chamber temperatures were 25 ± 2 °C and 4 ± 1 °C, respectively. Changes of moisture (Halogen moisture analyzer), capsaicin (HPLC-UV), oleoresin and total extractable colour (spectrophotometer) were analyzed at 3 months interval up to 12 months and 6 months interval from 12 to 24 months. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) and Duncan's test were applied to the analytical data to evaluate the effect of treatments applied. It was observed that the vacuum packed chillies under cold storage were found to have the least per cent decline in various quality parameters. Chillies with 12 % moisture and stored in vacuum packaged bags recorded better quality parameters over 10 % moisture.

  7. Geological conditions of safe long-term storage and disposal of depleted uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Velichkin, V. I.; Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Tagirov, B. R.

    2010-08-01

    The production of enriched uranium used in nuclear weapons and fuel for atomic power plants is accompanied by the formation of depleted uranium (DU), the amount of which annually increases by 35-40 kt. To date, more than 1.6 Mt DU has accumulated in the world. The main DU mass is stored as environ-mentally hazardous uranium hexafluoride (UF6), which is highly volatile and soluble in water with the formation of hydrofluoric acid. To ensure safe UF6 storage, it is necessary to convert this compound in chemically stable phases. The industrial reprocessing of UF6 into U3O8 and HF implemented in France is highly expensive. We substantiate the expediency of long-term storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride in underground repositories localized in limestone. On the basis of geochemical data and thermodynamic calculations, we show that interaction in the steel container-UF6-limestone-groundwater system gives rise to the development of a slightly alkaline reductive medium favorable for chemical reaction with formation of uraninite (UO2) and fluorite (CaF2). The proposed engineering solution not only ensures safe DU storage but also makes it possible to produce uraninite, which can be utilized, if necessary, in fast-neutron reactors. In the course of further investigations aimed at safe maintenance of DU, it is necessary to study the kinetics of conversion of UF6 into stable phases, involving laboratory and field experiments.

  8. Chemical treatment of papaya seeds aiming at long-term storage and control of damping off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Carvalho Campos Botelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Damping off is a nursery disease of great economic importance in papaya and seed treatment may be an effective measure to control. The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of papaya seeds treated with fungicides and stored under two environmental and packaging conditions. Additionally, the efficiency of fungicide treatments in the control of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani was evaluated. Papaya seeds were treated with the fungicides Captan, Tolylfluanid and the mixture Tolylfluanid + Captan (all commercial wettable powder formulations. Seeds of the control group were not treated. The seeds were stored for nine months in two conditions: packed in aluminum coated paper and kept at 7 ± 1ºC and in permeable kraft paper and kept in non-controlled environment. At the beginning of the storage and every three months the seed quality (germination and vigor tests, emergence rate index, height, dry mass and damping of plants in pre and post-emergence (in contaminated substrate and mycelia-free substrate were analyzed. Both storage conditions as well as the fungicide treatments preserved the germination and seed vigor. In the infested substrate, seedling emergence was favored by fungicides, but in post-emergence, fungicides alone did not control the damping off caused by R. solani. Symptoms of damping off were not observed in the clean substrate. The results showed that the fungicide treatments may be used to pretreat papaya seed for long-term storage and commercialization.

  9. Modeling long-term, large-scale sediment storage using a simple sediment budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naipal, Victoria; Reick, Christian; Van Oost, Kristof; Hoffmann, Thomas; Pongratz, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the anthropogenic perturbation of the biogeochemical cycles remains unquantified due to the poor representation of lateral fluxes of carbon and nutrients in Earth system models (ESMs). This lateral transport of carbon and nutrients between terrestrial ecosystems is strongly affected by accelerated soil erosion rates. However, the quantification of global soil erosion by rainfall and runoff, and the resulting redistribution is missing. This study aims at developing new tools and methods to estimate global soil erosion and redistribution by presenting and evaluating a new large-scale coarse-resolution sediment budget model that is compatible with ESMs. This model can simulate spatial patterns and long-term trends of soil redistribution in floodplains and on hillslopes, resulting from external forces such as climate and land use change. We applied the model to the Rhine catchment using climate and land cover data from the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) for the last millennium (here AD 850-2005). Validation is done using observed Holocene sediment storage data and observed scaling between sediment storage and catchment area. We find that the model reproduces the spatial distribution of floodplain sediment storage and the scaling behavior for floodplains and hillslopes as found in observations. After analyzing the dependence of the scaling behavior on the main parameters of the model, we argue that the scaling is an emergent feature of the model and mainly dependent on the underlying topography. Furthermore, we find that land use change is the main contributor to the change in sediment storage in the Rhine catchment during the last millennium. Land use change also explains most of the temporal variability in sediment storage in floodplains and on hillslopes.

  10. 75 FR 4801 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... of Availability of the Draft Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental... Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0423D, ``Draft Mercury... effects of storing a projected total of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury....

  11. 76 FR 5145 - Notice of Availability of the Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... of Availability of the Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental... Mercury Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/ ] EIS-0423, ``Mercury Storage FEIS'' or ``FEIS''). This FEIS... tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury at each of seven alternative sites across the U.S. The...

  12. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  13. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Papash

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF^{+} ions at 93  keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3–30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The

  15. CRYOPRESERVATION OF TRUE-SEED AND EMBRYO OF MAIZE AND SOYBEAN FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enny Sudarmonowati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on cryopreservation of Indonesian local cultivars and improved  varieties of maize and soybean has never been done. This method may be used for long-term preservation of seeds of maize and soybean. In this study, the method was applied to maize and soybean, Arjuna and Wilis respectively, as a model for preserving germplasm of ortodox seeds. Whole seeds and excised embryos of both varieties were subjected to two methods of cryopreservation, i.e., two-stage cooling and rapid freezing with or without 15% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as cryoprotectant solution prior to immersion in liquid nitrogen (-196oC. Results indicated that there was no significant difference between the use of DMSO for both species in terms of viability, although pretreatment in DMSO was slightly reduced the percentage of viability of both species. Slow freezing to -30oC prior to immersion in the liquid nitrogen could give as high as 76.67% and 51.67% surviving whole seeds of maize and soybean, respectively. Preserving excised embryos of maize in the liquid nitrogen using either slow or rapid freezing significantly reduced the percentage of viability from 20-76.67% to 5-18.33% (four folds depending on treatments applied. Results also showed that one day or 15 minutes of immersion of samples in the liquid nitrogen gave rise to similar values of viability of maize and soybean, i.e., 20-60% and 20-51.67%, respectively depending on  treatments applied. These results implied that for long-term storage of maize and soybean seeds as they could survive at the rate of 76.67% and 51.67% respectively, the seed can be treated by prefreezing to -30oCwithout the presence of DMSO prior to immersion in liquid nitrogen.

  16. Safety relevant aspects of the long-term intermediate storage of spent fuel elements and vitrified high-level radioactive wastes; Sicherheitstechnische Aspekte der langfristigen Zwischenlagerung von bestrahlten Brennelementen und verglastem HAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger, A.; Geupel, S.; Gewehr, K.; Gmal, B.; Hannstein, V.; Hummelsheim, K.; Kilger, R.; Wagner, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Schmidt, G.; Spieth-Achtnich, A. [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer angewandte Oekolgie (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The currently in Germany pursued concept for management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants provides intermediate dry cask storage at the NPP sites until direct disposal in a deep geologic repository. In addition the earlier commissioned centralized dry storage facilities are being used for storage of high level radioactive waste returned from foreign reprocessing of German spent fuel performed so far. The dry interim storage facilities are licensed for 40 years of operation time. According to the German regulations a full scope periodic safety review is not required so far, neither practical experience on dry storage for this period of time is available. With regard to this background the report at hand is dealing with long term effects, which may affect safety of the interim storage during the 40 years period or beyond if appropriate, and with the question, whether additional analyses or monitoring measures may be required. Therefore relevant publications have been evaluated, calculations have been performed as well as a systematic screening with regard to loads and possible ageing effects has been applied to structures and components important for safety of the storage, in order to identify relevant long term effects, which may not have been considered sufficiently so far and to provide proposals for an improved ageing management. The report firstly provides an overview on the current state of technology describing shortly the national and international practice and experience. In the following chapters safety aspects of interim storage with regard to time dependent effects and variations are being analyzed and discussed. Among this not only technical aspects like the long term behavior of fuel elements, canisters and storage systems are addressed, but also operational long term aspects regarding personnel planning, know how conservation, documentation and quality management are taken into account. A separate chapter is dedicated to developing and describing

  17. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  18. Analysis of GHB and 4-methyl-GHB in postmortem matrices after long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Isenschmid, Daniel S; Hepler, Bradford R; Kanluen, Sawait

    2005-01-01

    Postmortem heart blood, peripheral blood, vitreous humor, urine, and bile specimens from 26 autopsy cases were analyzed for the presence of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-methyl gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (4-Me-GHB) after long-term freezer storage. Cases were selected for which exogenous GHB, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), gamma valerolactone (GVL), or 1,4-butanediol use was not suspected. One documented positive GHB case subjected to the same storage conditions was also evaluated for comparison. Specimens did not contain any preservatives or additives except heart blood, which contained sodium fluoride (2% w/v). The results of the analysis for GHB in vitreous humor (n = 26) demonstrated, with one exception, concentrations below the limit of detection for the method (5 mg/L). In the exception case, the value was determined to be 7 mg/L. Documented cases of GHB positive fatalities showed vitreous humor concentrations (n = 6) that exceeded this range by a factor of 12 or more. There was no apparent relationship between storage times and GHB concentrations. The data developed in this study demonstrate a postmortem endogenous range for GHB in vitreous humor that is less than or equal to 7 mg/L. Studies of the stored GHB-positive case demonstrated no significant change in concentration over the time period studied. None of the specimens analyzed in this study contained detectable amounts of 4-Me-GHB. This would support the contention that when 4-Me-GHB is detected, it is most likely due to the exogenous consumption of GVL.

  19. New Methods for Evaluation of Spent Fuel Condition during Long-Term Storage in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mikloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with an advanced spent nuclear fuel management in Slovakia are presented in this paper. The evaluation and monitoring procedures are based on practices at the Slovak wet interim spent fuel storage facility in NPP Jaslovské Bohunice. Since 1999, leak testing of WWER-440 fuel assemblies are provided by special leak tightness detection system “Sipping in pool” delivered by Framatomeanp with external heating for the precise defects determination. In 2006, a new inspection stand “SVYP-440” for monitoring of spent nuclear fuel condition was inserted. This stand has the possibility to open WWER-440 fuel assemblies and examine fuel elements. Optimal ways of spent fuel disposal and monitoring of nuclear fuel condition were designed. With appropriate approach of conservativeness, new factor for specifying spent fuel leak tightness is introduced in the paper. By using computer simulations (based on SCALE 4.4a code for fission products creation and measurements by system “Sipping in pool,” the limit values of leak tightness were established.

  20. Effect of dentin location and long-term water storage on bonding effectiveness of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; De Almeida Neves, Aline; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Dentin is a variable substrate with properties that change considerable in a single surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding effectiveness to these different dentin locations and evaluate these differences over time. After bonding procedures with five different adhesives, small micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) beams were prepared and dichotomously divided in 'center' and 'periphery' dentin specimens. After 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months of water storage the µTBS of specimens of each group was determined, enabling a paired study design. The bond strengths of both etch&rinse adhesives were insensitive to regional variability. For the two-step self-etch adhesives, a marked increase in bond strengths was observed with increasing amount of intertubular dentin. Regional variability did not affect the long-term bonding effectiveness for any of the adhesives tested. In conclusion, only for the mild self-etch adhesives, µTBS to 'periphery' dentin was higher than for the 'center' specimens.

  1. Study on containerisation of irradiated fuel at JRC ISPRA for medium/long-term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, S.; Bielli, G.; Covini, R.

    2001-07-01

    During the last 40 years big amounts of wastes arising from past experiments have been generated at JRC Ispra. These wastes are now stored on site in unconditioned form and must be characterised and re-conditioned to ensure their acceptance by future repositories. Among the several types of wastes produced, spent fuel has a great importance in JRC waste management. In fact, there are more than the tons of irradiated material, varying widely from commercial to experimental fuel elements or pins, in form of oxides and metal fuel, with very different geometry, dry and wet stored. The biggest part of it can be considered as unirradiated, according to the IAEA regulations (ST-1, 1996), while a relatively small amount (nearly 720 kg U total) are to be considered as irradiated and treated accordingly. Studies on the most suitable solutions for medium/long term storage for such irradiated experimental fuel are being performed, taking into account two main options, containerisation of the nuclear materials, as it is, in suitable casks or reprocessing. The technical aspects of the project for containerisation are here discussed. (Author)

  2. Fast stack activation procedure and effective long-term storage for high-performance polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Myeong-Ri; Seo, Min Ho; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Jung, Yong-Min; Kim, Beom-Jun; Yoon, Young-Gi; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Tae-Young

    2016-10-01

    Time-saving stack activation and effective long-term storage are one of most important issues that must be resolved for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Herein, we developed the cost-effective stack activation method to finish the whole activation within 30 min and the long-term storage method by using humidified N2 without any significant decrease in cell's performance for 30 days. Specifically, the pre-activation step with the direct injection of DI water into the stack and storage at 65 or 80 °C for 2 h increases the distinctive phase separation between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in Nafion membrane, which significantly reduces the total activation time within 30 min. Additionally, the long-term storage with humidified N2 has no effect on the Pt oxidation and drying of Nafion membrane for 30 days due to its exergonic reaction in the cell. As a result, the high water content in Nafion membrane and the decrease of Pt oxidation are the critical factors that have a strong influence on the activation and long-term storage for high-performance PEMFC.

  3. Predicting long-term performance of engineered geologic carbon dioxide storage systems to inform decisions amidst uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, R.

    2016-12-01

    Risk assessment and risk management of engineered geologic CO2 storage systems is an area of active investigation. The potential geologic CO2 storage systems currently under consideration are inherently heterogeneous and have limited to no characterization data. Effective risk management decisions to ensure safe, long-term CO2 storage requires assessing and quantifying risks while taking into account the uncertainties in a storage site's characteristics. The key decisions are typically related to definition of area of review, effective monitoring strategy and monitoring duration, potential of leakage and associated impacts, etc. A quantitative methodology for predicting a sequestration site's long-term performance is critical for making key decisions necessary for successful deployment of commercial scale geologic storage projects where projects will require quantitative assessments of potential long-term liabilities. An integrated assessment modeling (IAM) paradigm which treats a geologic CO2 storage site as a system made up of various linked subsystems can be used to predict long-term performance. The subsystems include storage reservoir, seals, potential leakage pathways (such as wellbores, natural fractures/faults) and receptors (such as shallow groundwater aquifers). CO2 movement within each of the subsystems and resulting interactions are captured through reduced order models (ROMs). The ROMs capture the complex physical/chemical interactions resulting due to CO2 movement and interactions but are computationally extremely efficient. The computational efficiency allows for performing Monte Carlo simulations necessary for quantitative probabilistic risk assessment. We have used the IAM to predict long-term performance of geologic CO2 sequestration systems and to answer questions related to probability of leakage of CO2 through wellbores, impact of CO2/brine leakage into shallow aquifer, etc. Answers to such questions are critical in making key risk management

  4. Long Term Assessment of ERS-1 and ERS-2 Wind and Wave Products Using ERA-Interim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aballa, Saleh; Hersbach, Hans; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2010-12-01

    The ERS mission is a great opportunity for the meteorological and ocean-wave communities. In particular, the wind and wave products from both ERS-1 and ERS-2 provide an invaluable data set. The quality of the fast delivery (FD) products of scatterometer wind (UWI), SAR Wave Mode (UWA) and radar altimeter wind and wave (URA) and the off- line OPR (Ocean Product) altimeter wind and wave products were already assessed against the consistent ECMWF 40-Year Reanalysis (ERA-40) wind fields and presented by Hersbach et al. [1]. The recent availability of the higher quality ECMWF interim reanalysis (ERA- Interim) motivated us to repeat the same exercise to get a better evaluation of the quality of ERS wind and wave products.

  5. Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

  6. The use of immobilization in alginate beads for long-term storage of Pseudanabaena galeata (Cyanobacteria) in the laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romo, S.; Perez-Martinez, C.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for long-term storage of algal cultures in the laboratory was tested, The procedure is based on the cell immobilization technique, Cells of the filamentous cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata Bocher were immobilized in sodium-alginate beads and stored for 14-18 months. The structure

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment on Quality of Sweet Potato in Wrapper Type Cold Store during Long-term Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenzhong; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Hori, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The effects of hot water treatment on the sprouting inhibition and spoilage of sweet potato roots were evaluated in Wrapper Type Cold Store (WTCS) during long-term storage. The changes in quality attribute were also determined. The results indicated that hot water treatment significantly inhibited sprouting and decay of sweet optato for the storage period. It also showed that there were no significant differences ni starch properties in terms of pasting properties, enthalpy and temperatures o...

  8. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-12-27

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository.

  9. New Software for Long-Term Storage and Analysis of Seismic Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, D. P.; Cervelli, P. F.; Murray, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    Large seismic networks generate a substantial quantity of data that must be first archived, and then disseminated, visualized, and analyzed, in real-time, in the office or from afar. To achieve these goals for the Alaska Volcano Observatory we developed two software packages: Winston, a database for storing seismic wave data, and Swarm, an application for analyzing and browsing the data. We also modified an existing package, Valve, an internet web-browser based interface to various data sets developed at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, to communicate with Winston. These programs provide users with the tools necessary to monitor many commonly used geophysical parameters. Winston, Wave Information Storage Network, uses a vendor-neutral SQL database to store seismic wave data. Winston's primary design goal was simple: develop a more robust, scalable, long-term replacement for the Earthworm waveserver. Access to data within the Winston database is through a scalable internet based server application, an Earthworm waveserver emulator, or directly via SQL queries. Some benefits of using an SQL database are easy backups and exports, speed, and reliability. Swarm, Seismic Wave Analysis and Real-time Monitor, is a stand-alone application that was designed to replace the traditional drum helicorder and computer wave viewer with an intuitive and interactive interface for rapidly assessing volcanic hazard, browsing through past data, and analyzing waveforms. Users can easily view waves in traditional analytic ways, such as frequency spectra or spectrograms, and employ standard analytic tools like filtering. Swarm allows efficient dissemination of data and breaks cross-disciplinary barriers by creating an accessible interface to seismic data for non-seismologists. Swarm currently operates with many seismic data sources including Earthworm waveservers and SEED files. Lastly, Swarm can be a valuable education and outreach tool by using its Kiosk Mode: a full-screen mode that

  10. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  11. Radiation analysis for a generic centralized interim storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, S.G.; Lopez, P. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States); Eble, R.G. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper documents the radiation analysis performed for the storage area of a generic Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The purpose of the analysis is to establish the CISF Protected Area and Restricted Area boundaries by modeling a representative SNF storage array, calculating the radiation dose at selected locations outside the storage area, and comparing the results with regulatory radiation dose limits. The particular challenge for this analysis is to adequately model a large (6000 cask) storage array with a reasonable amount of analysis time and effort. Previous analyses of SNF storage systems for Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations at nuclear plant sites (for example in References 5.1 and 5.2) had only considered small arrays of storage casks. For such analyses, the dose contribution from each storage cask can be modeled individually. Since the large number of casks in the CISF storage array make such an approach unrealistic, a simplified model is required.

  12. Massive Memory Revisited: Limitations on Storage Capacity for Object Details in Visual Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Corbin A.; Yassa, Michael A.; Egeth, Howard E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work suggests that visual long-term memory (VLTM) is highly detailed and has a massive capacity. However, memory performance is subject to the effects of the type of testing procedure used. The current study examines detail memory performance by probing the same memories within the same subjects, but using divergent probing methods. The…

  13. Changes in microbial populations of WPC34 and WPC80 whey protein during long term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of whey protein (WPC34 and WPC80) as a food ingredient and as a base for making biodegradable products is increasing. The need to alleviate world hunger in arid and semi-arid regions demands that we investigate the behavior of native bacteria in these products, especially during long term st...

  14. Werkendam, the Dutch natural analogue for CO2 storagelong-term mineral reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, M.; Wasch, L.J.; Zalinge, M.E. van; Nelskamp, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Werkendam (WED) and Barendrecht-Ziedewij (BRTZ) gas fields are CO2- and CH4-bearing stratigraphic equivalents in the Netherlands. A comparison in petrographic characteristics and burial histories of the two fields is performed to investigate long-term mineral reactions induced by the presence of

  15. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Sociu F.; Georgescu R.; Toma R.; Barariu Gh.; Fako R.

    2013-01-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to rema...

  16. Laboratory testing on the removal of the veterinary antibiotic doxycycline during long-term liquid pig manure and digestate storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyasari-Mehta, Arum; Suwito, Hanna Resti Kartika Ayu; Kreuzig, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The veterinary antibiotic doxycycline (DOXY) is today frequently applied in conventional pig husbandry for the control of respiratory diseases. After the treatment, pigs excrete major amounts of DOXY as the unchanged active substance. Thus, DOXY residues were found in liquid manures and digestates of biogas plants at concentrations of mg kg(-1) dry weight. In order to assess the impact of field applications of contaminated manures and digestates on the entry of DOXY residues into arable and grassland soils, thorough information about the removal of DOXY during long-term storage of farm fertilizers is required. Since this aspect has been only less investigated for manures but not for digestates, first long-term storage simulation tests were performed at laboratory scale. Within the 170-d incubation periods under strictly anaerobic conditions, doxycycline was removed in liquid pig manure by 61% and in digestate by 76%. The calculated half-lives of 120 d and 91 d thus emphasized the persistence of doxycycline in both matrices. Due to the substance specific properties of DOXY, this removal was caused neither by mineralization, epimerization nor biotransformation. According to the high affinity of DOXY to manure and digestate solids, however, the formation of non-extractable residues has to be taken into account as the predominant concentration determining process. This was indicated by the sequential extraction procedure applied. Hence, these results confirmed that a full removal capacity for doxycycline cannot be reached through the long-term storage of farm fertilizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Verification of geomechanical integrity and prediction of long-term mineral trapping for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Static and dynamic numerical modelling generally accompany the entire CO2 storage site life cycle. Thereto, it is required to match the employed models with field observations on a regular basis in order to predict future site behaviour. We investigated the coupled processes at the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site [1] using a model coupling concept focusing on the temporal relevance of processes involved (hydraulic, chemical and mechanical) at given time-scales (site operation, abandonment and long-term stabilization). For that purpose, long-term dynamic multi-phase flow simulations [2], [3] established the basis for all simulations discussed in the following. Hereby, pressure changes resulting in geomechanical effects are largest during site operation, whereas geochemical reactions are governed by slow kinetics resulting in a long-term stabilization. To account for mechanical integrity, which may be mainly affected during site operation, we incorporated a regional-scale coupled hydro-mechanical model. Our simulation results show maximum ground surface displacements of about 4 mm, whereas shear and tensile failure are not observed. Consequently, the CO2 storage operation at the Ketzin pilot site does not compromise reservoir, caprock and fault integrity. Chemical processes responsible for mineral trapping are expected to mainly occur during long-term stabilization at the Ketzin pilot site [4]. Hence, our previous assessment [3] was extended by integrating two long-term mineral trapping scenarios. Thereby, mineral trapping contributes to the trapping mechanisms with 11.7 % after 16,000 years of simulation in our conservative and with 30.9 % in our maximum reactivity scenarios. Dynamic flow simulations indicate that only 0.2 % of the CO2 injected (about 67,270 t CO2 in total) is in gaseous state, but structurally trapped after 16,000 years. Depending on the studied long-term scenario, CO2 dissolution is the dominating trapping mechanism with 68.9 % and 88

  18. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovykh, Mikhail; Tikhomirov, Georgy; Saldikov, Ivan; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  19. Long term storage of virus templated fluorescent materials for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, Raviraja N.; Szuchmacher Blum, Amy; Soto, Carissa M.; Whitley, Jessica L.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Chatterji, Anju; Lin, Tianwei; Johnson, John E.; Guerra, Charles; Satir, Peter; Ratna, Banahalli R.

    2008-03-01

    Wild type, mutant, and chemically modified Cowpea mosaic viruses (CPMV) were studied for long term preservation in the presence and absence of cryoprotectants. Viral complexes were reconstituted and tested via fluorescence spectroscopy and a UV/vis-based RNase assay for structural integrity. When viruses lyophilized in the absence of cryoprotectant were rehydrated and RNase treated, UV absorption increased, indicating that the capsids were damaged. The addition of trehalose during lyophilization protected capsid integrity for at least 7 weeks. Measurements of the fluorescence peak maximum of CPMV lyophilized with trehalose and reconstituted also indicate that the virus remained intact. Microarray binding assays indicated that CPMV particles chemically modified for use as a fluorescent tracer were intact and retained binding specificity after lyophilization in the presence of trehalose. Thus, we demonstrate that functionalized CPMV nanostructures can be stored for the long term, enabling their use in practical sensing applications.

  20. Long term storage of virus templated fluorescent materials for sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetharam, Raviraja N; Guerra, Charles; Satir, Peter [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Blum, Amy Szuchmacher; Soto, Carissa M; Ratna, Banahalli R [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Whitley, Jessica L [Geo-Centers, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Sapsford, Kim E [George Mason University, 10910 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Chatterji, Anju; Lin Tianwei; Johnson, John E [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)], E-mail: amy.blum@nrl.navy.mil

    2008-03-12

    Wild type, mutant, and chemically modified Cowpea mosaic viruses (CPMV) were studied for long term preservation in the presence and absence of cryoprotectants. Viral complexes were reconstituted and tested via fluorescence spectroscopy and a UV/vis-based RNase assay for structural integrity. When viruses lyophilized in the absence of cryoprotectant were rehydrated and RNase treated, UV absorption increased, indicating that the capsids were damaged. The addition of trehalose during lyophilization protected capsid integrity for at least 7 weeks. Measurements of the fluorescence peak maximum of CPMV lyophilized with trehalose and reconstituted also indicate that the virus remained intact. Microarray binding assays indicated that CPMV particles chemically modified for use as a fluorescent tracer were intact and retained binding specificity after lyophilization in the presence of trehalose. Thus, we demonstrate that functionalized CPMV nanostructures can be stored for the long term, enabling their use in practical sensing applications.

  1. Long-term retrievability and safeguards for immobilized weapons plutonium in geologic storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, P.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    If plutonium is not ultimately used as an energy source, the quantity of excess weapons plutonium (w-Pu) that would go into a US repository will be small compared to the quantity of plutonium contained in the commercial spent fuel in the repository, and the US repository(ies) will likely be only one (or two) locations out of many around the world where commercial spent fuel will be stored. Therefore excess weapons plutonium creates a small perturbation to the long-term (over 200,000 yr) global safeguard requirements for spent fuel. There are details in the differences between spent fuel and immobilized w-Pu waste forms (i.e. chemical separation methods, utility for weapons, nuclear testing requirements), but these are sufficiently small to be unlikely to play a significant role in any US political decision to rebuild weapons inventories, or to change the long-term risks of theft by subnational groups.

  2. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  3. Will interim storage sites become ultimate storage sites?; Werden aus Zwischenlager Endlager?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.P. [ia GmbH - Wissensmanagement und Ingenieurleistungen, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    According to a Prognos study, the maximum interim storage capacity required in Germany in 2008 will be 4 - 5 million cubic metres. Interim storage is necessary because there are not sufficient options for disposal. The stored waste will be combusted, so that German incinerators will be capable of running at full capacity until 2013. From mere disposal systems, incinerators are rapidly becoming waste-to-energy systems that will make a contribution to power supply. (orig.)

  4. Advantages on dry interim storage for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rzyski, B.M. [IPEN/ CNEN-SP, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2006-07-01

    When the nuclear fuel lose its ability to efficiently create energy it is removed from the core reactor and moved to a storage unit waiting for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside concrete basins with water within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. Water cools the generated heat and shields radioactivity emissions. After some period of time in water basins the SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing installations, or still wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet installations, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. In many SNF wet storage sites the capacity can be fulfilled very quickly. If so, additional area or other alternative storage system should be given. There are many options to provide capacity increase in the wet storage area, but dry storages are worldwide preferred since it reduces corrosion concerns. In the wet storage the temperature and water purity should be constantly controlled whereas in the dry storage the SNF stands protected in specially designed canisters. Dry interim storages are practical and approved in many countries especially that have the 'wait and see' philosophy (wait to see new technologies development). This paper shows the advantages of dry interim storages sites in comparison with the wet ones and the nowadays problems as terrorism. (Author)

  5. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, M. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  6. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, M. [Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  7. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate makes it possible to store thermal energy partly loss free. This principle makes seasonal heat storage in compact systems possible. To keep high and stable energy content and cycling stability phase separation of the storage material must...... to 230 kJ/kg. TRNSYS simulations of a solar combi system including a storage with four heat storage modules of each 200 kg of sodium acetate trihydrate utilizing stable supercooling achieved a solar fraction of 80% for a low energy house in Danish climatic conditions....

  8. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  9. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  10. Criteria for Preparing and Packaging Plutonium Metals and Oxides for Long-Term Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This Standard provides criteria for packaging of plutonium metals and stabilized oxides for storage periods of at least 50 years. To meet the criteria, plutonium-bearing materials must be in stable forms and be packaged in containers designed to maintain their integrity both under normal storage conditions and during anticipated handling accidents.

  11. Long-term efficacy and safety of mipomersen in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia: 2-year interim results of an open-label extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Raul D; Duell, P Barton; East, Cara; Guyton, John R; Moriarty, Patrick M; Chin, Wai; Mittleman, Robert S

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended dosing with mipomersen in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (HC) taking maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy. A planned interim analysis of an ongoing, open-label extension trial in patients (n = 141) with familial HC receiving a subcutaneous injection of 200 mg mipomersen weekly plus maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy for up to 104 weeks. The mean changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) from baseline to weeks 26 (n = 130), 52 (n = 111), 76 (n = 66), and 104 (n = 53) were -28, -27, -27, and -28%; and in apolipoprotein B -29, -28, -30, and -31%, respectively. Reductions in total cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) were comparable with decreases in LDL-C and apolipoprotein B levels. Mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased from baseline by 7 and 6% at weeks 26 and 52, respectively. The long-term safety profile of mipomersen was similar to that reported in the associated randomized placebo-controlled Phase 3 trials. Adverse events included injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. There was an incremental increase in the median liver fat during the initial 6-12 months that appeared to diminish with continued mipomersen exposure beyond 1 year and returned towards baseline 24 weeks after last drug dose suggestive of adaptation. The median alanine aminotransferase level showed a similar trend over time. Long-term treatment with mipomersen for up to 104 weeks provided sustained reductions in all atherosclerotic lipoproteins measured and a safety profile consistent with prior controlled trials in these high-risk patient populations. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT00694109. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Density-driven enhanced dissolution of injected CO2 during long-term CO2 geological storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations is increasingly seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, possible leakage of injected CO2 from the storage formation through vertical pathways such as fractures, faults and abandoned wells is a huge challenge for CO2 geological storage projects. Thus, the density-driven fluid flow as a process that can accelerate the phase change of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase is receiving more and more attention. In this paper, we performed higher-resolution reactive transport simulations to investigate the possible density-driven fluid flow process under the ‘real’ condition of CO2 injection and storage. Simulation results indicated that during CO2 injection and geological storage in deep saline formations, the higher-density CO2-saturated aqueous phase within the lower CO2 gas plume migrates downward and moves horizontally along the bottom of the formation, and the higher-density fingers within the upper gas plume propagate downward. These density-driven fluid flow processes can significantly enhance the phase transition of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase, consequently enhancing the effective storage capacity and long-term storage security of injected CO2 in saline formations.

  13. Effects of Long-Term Storage Time and Original Sampling Month on Biobank Plasma Protein Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enroth, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Grankvist, Kjell; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The quality of clinical biobank samples is crucial to their value for life sciences research. A number of factors related to the collection and storage of samples may affect the biomolecular composition. We have studied the effect of long-time freezer storage, chronological age at sampling, season and month of the year and on the abundance levels of 108 proteins in 380 plasma samples collected from 106 Swedish women. Storage time affected 18 proteins and explained 4.8-34.9% of the observed variance. Chronological age at sample collection after adjustment for storage-time affected 70 proteins and explained 1.1-33.5% of the variance. Seasonal variation had an effect on 15 proteins and month (number of sun hours) affected 36 proteins and explained up to 4.5% of the variance after adjustment for storage-time and age. The results show that freezer storage time and collection date (month and season) exerted similar effect sizes as age on the protein abundance levels. This implies that information on the sample handling history, in particular storage time, should be regarded as equally prominent covariates as age or gender and need to be included in epidemiological studies involving protein levels.

  14. Accounting for Long Term Sediment Storage in a Watershed Scale Numerical Model for Suspended Sediment Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, J. J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Skalak, K.; Karwan, D. L.; Benthem, A.; Ackerman, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the delivery of suspended sediment from upland sources to downstream receiving waters is important for watershed management, but current routing models fail to accurately represent lag times in delivery resulting from sediment storage. In this study, we route suspended sediment tagged by a characteristic tracer using a 1-dimensional model that implicitly includes storage and remobilization processes and timescales. From an input location where tagged sediment is added, the model advects suspended sediment downstream at the velocity of the stream (adjusted for the intermittency of transport events). Deposition rates are specified by the fraction of the suspended load stored per kilometer of downstream transport (presumably available from a sediment budget). Tagged sediment leaving storage is evaluated from a convolution equation based on the probability distribution function (pdf) of sediment storage waiting times; this approach avoids the difficulty of accurately representing complex processes of sediment remobilization from floodplain and other deposits. To illustrate the role of storage on sediment delivery, we compare exponential and bounded power-law waiting time pdfs with identical means of 94 years. In both cases, the median travel time for sediment to reach the depocenter in fluvial systems less than 40km long is governed by in-channel transport and is unaffected by sediment storage. As the channel length increases, however, the median sediment travel time reflects storage rather than in-channel transport; travel times do not vary significantly between the two different waiting time functions. At distances of 50, 100, and 200 km, the median travel time for suspended sediment is 36, 136, and 325 years, orders of magnitude slower than travel times associated with in-channel transport. These computations demonstrate that storage can be neglected for short rivers, but for longer systems, storage controls the delivery of suspended sediment.

  15. Use of information-retrieval languages in automated retrieval of experimental data from long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khovanskiy, Y. D.; Kremneva, N. I.

    1975-01-01

    Problems and methods are discussed of automating information retrieval operations in a data bank used for long term storage and retrieval of data from scientific experiments. Existing information retrieval languages are analyzed along with those being developed. The results of studies discussing the application of the descriptive 'Kristall' language used in the 'ASIOR' automated information retrieval system are presented. The development and use of a specialized language of the classification-descriptive type, using universal decimal classification indices as the main descriptors, is described.

  16. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

  17. Mean PB To Failure - Initial results from a long-term study of disk storage patterns at the RACF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramarcu, C.; Hollowell, C.; Rao, T.; Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The RACF (RHIC-ATLAS Computing Facility) has operated a large, multi-purpose dedicated computing facility since the mid-1990’s, serving a worldwide, geographically diverse scientific community that is a major contributor to various HEPN projects. A central component of the RACF is the Linux-based worker node cluster that is used for both computing and data storage purposes. It currently has nearly 50,000 computing cores and over 23 PB of storage capacity distributed over 12,000+ (non-SSD) disk drives. The majority of the 12,000+ disk drives provide a cost-effective solution for dCache/XRootD-managed storage, and a key concern is the reliability of this solution over the lifetime of the hardware, particularly as the number of disk drives and the storage capacity of individual drives grow. We report initial results of a long-term study to measure lifetime PB read/written to disk drives in the worker node cluster. We discuss the historical disk drive mortality rate, disk drive manufacturers' published MPTF (Mean PB to Failure) data and how they are correlated to our results. The results help the RACF understand the productivity and reliability of its storage solutions and have implications for other highly-available storage systems (NFS, GPFS, CVMFS, etc) with large I/O requirements.

  18. Stabilization of Neem Oil Biodiesel with Corn Silk Extract during Long-term Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rehab Farouk M; El-Anany, Ayman M

    2017-02-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant efficiency of different extracts of corn silk. In addition, the impact of corn silk extract on oxidative stability of neem biodiesel during storage was studied. The highest phenolics, DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power activities were recorded for methanol-water extract. The longest oxidation stability (10 h) was observed for biodiesel samples blended with 1000 ppm of corn silk extract (CSE). At the end of storage period the induction time of biodiesel samples mixed with 1000 ppm of CSE or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were about 6.72 and 5.63 times as high as in biodiesel samples without antioxidants. Biodiesel samples blended with 1000 ppm of CSE had the lowest acidity at the end of storage period. Peroxide value of biodiesel samples containing 1000 ppm of CSE was about 4.28 times as low as in control sample without antioxidants.

  19. Advances in Large-Scale Solar Heating and Long Term Storage in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    2000-01-01

    According to (the) information from the European Large-Scale Solar Heating Network, (See http://www.hvac.chalmers.se/cshp/), the area of installed solar collectors for large-scale application is in Europe, approximately 8 mill m2, corresponding to about 4000 MW thermal power. The 11 plants...... Central Solar Heating Plants, servicing District Heating and related developments in large-scale thermal storage. Central solar heating today is a mature and economic realistic solution for district heating based on a renewable source. The cost for solar collectors has decreased by nearly ¼ during...... the last 10 years and the corresponding cost per collector area for the final installed plant is kept constant, even so the solar production is increased. Unfortunately large-scale seasonal storage was not able to keep up with the advances in solar technology, at least for pit water and gravel storage...

  20. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caputo Mariela

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disaster victim identification (DVI represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt, (b no additional substances and (c garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing.

  1. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, L I

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  2. The effect of long-term storage on the quality of sterilized processed cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubelová, Zuzana; Tremlová, Bohuslava; Buňková, Leona; Pospiech, Matej; Vítová, Eva; Buňka, František

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect three different storage temperatures (6, 23 and 40 °C) on the sterilized processed cheese quality during 24-month storage. Sterilized processed cheese (SPC) is a product with extended shelf life (up to 2 years). The samples of SPC were subjected to basic chemical analyses, i.e. pH-values, dry matter, fat, crude protein and ammonia content, and microbiological analyses, i.e. total number of microorganisms, number of coliforms, colony forming units of yeasts and/or moulds and spore-forming microorganisms. Furthermore, amino acid content (ion-exchange chromatography), protein profile (SDS-PAGE) and fat globules size (image analysis of microscopic technique) were monitored and sensory analysis (scale test and pair comparative test) was implemented, too. Increasing storage temperature and length evoked decrease of total amino acid content and protein nutrition value, increase of ammonia amount, protein changes, enlargement of fat globule size and deterioration of sensory properties of SPC. All the changes grew expressive with increasing storage temperature and time.

  3. Woody debris along an upland chronosequence in boreal Manitoba and its impact on long-term carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; O'Neill, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the role of fire-killed woody debris as a source of soil carbon in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) stands in Manitoba, Canada. We measured the amount of standing dead and downed woody debris along an upland chronosequence, including wood partially and completely covered by moss growth. Such woody debris is rarely included in measurement protocols and composed up to 26% of the total amount of woody debris in older stands, suggesting that it is important to measure all types of woody debris in ecosystems where burial by organic matter is possible. Based on these data and existing net primary production (NPP) values, we used a mass-balance model to assess the potential impact of fire-killed wood on long-term carbon storage at this site. The amount of carbon stored in deeper soil organic layers, which persists over millennia, was used to represent this long-term carbon. We estimate that between 10% and 60% of the deep-soil carbon is derived from wood biomass. Sensitivity analyses suggest that this estimate is most affected by the fire return interval, decay rate of wood, amount of NPP, and decay rate of the char (postfire) carbon pool. Landscape variations in these terms could account for large differences in deep-soil carbon. The model was less sensitive to fire consumption rates and to rates at which standing dead becomes woody debris. All model runs, however, suggest that woody debris plays an important role in long-term carbon storage for this area. ?? 2005 NRC Canada.

  4. Dynamic simulation and metabolome analysis of long-term erythrocyte storage in adenine-guanosine solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiko Nishino

    Full Text Available Although intraerythrocytic ATP and 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG are known as direct indicators of the viability of preserved red blood cells and the efficiency of post-transfusion oxygen delivery, no current blood storage method in practical use has succeeded in maintaining both these metabolites at high levels for long periods. In this study, we constructed a mathematical kinetic model of comprehensive metabolism in red blood cells stored in a recently developed blood storage solution containing adenine and guanosine, which can maintain both ATP and 2,3-BPG. The predicted dynamics of metabolic intermediates in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and purine salvage pathway were consistent with time-series metabolome data measured with capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry over 5 weeks of storage. From the analysis of the simulation model, the metabolic roles and fates of the 2 major additives were illustrated: (1 adenine could enlarge the adenylate pool, which maintains constant ATP levels throughout the storage period and leads to production of metabolic waste, including hypoxanthine; (2 adenine also induces the consumption of ribose phosphates, which results in 2,3-BPG reduction, while (3 guanosine is converted to ribose phosphates, which can boost the activity of upper glycolysis and result in the efficient production of ATP and 2,3-BPG. This is the first attempt to clarify the underlying metabolic mechanism for maintaining levels of both ATP and 2,3-BPG in stored red blood cells with in silico analysis, as well as to analyze the trade-off and the interlock phenomena between the benefits and possible side effects of the storage-solution additives.

  5. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlova, Elena, E-mail: waterlake@mail.ru [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation); I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chernysh, Aleksandr [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation); I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Olga; Kuzovlev, Artem [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °C in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50–55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2–3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures (“grains”) sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the “grains” which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion. - Highlights: • Domains with “grains” are formed on membranes surface on 9–16 days of PRBC storage. • The development of domains is the reason of irreversible changes of PRBC structure. • The origin of domains is the consequence of alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. • Study of nanostructure may form basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC.

  6. Examination of the rheological properties of stirred joghurt during the long-term storage by using dynamic oscillation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Vilušić

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the rheological properties of stirred yoghurt during the longterm storage at 4 and 8°C were investigated. The optimal quantity of additives, in order to increase dry matter content (whole milk powder and whey protein-lactalbumin, was preliminary determined and the fermentation was performed. During 42 days, i.e., 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd day of storage of stirred yoghurt, in refrigerator at 4 and 8°C, the changes of pH value, acidity and rheological properties by using of dynamic oscillation method were observed. Results of this work indicated that an addition of whole milk powder and whey protein have an influence on rheological properties of stirred yoghurt. The long-term storage of stirred yoghurt and the results of dynamic oscilations showed permanently higher G’storage (elasticity modulus, where elastic properties of viscoelastic products dominate, in comparison with the G” loss (viscosity modulus. Increased moduls of elasticy and viscosity, as function of time, permanently occurs at pH value 4.00 and lower, as an indication of alteration of long casein chains in the coagulum structure. Different temperatures of storage had no influence on changes of rheological properties of examinated types of stirred yoghur. The relation of above mentioned moduls of elasticy and viscosity kept the same increasing tendency.

  7. Survival, growth and pathogenicity of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis with different methods of long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M L

    2005-01-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis was preserved with 12 different storage methods. Five strains, each with unique morphological and pathological characteristics, were used for comparison of the methods. The storage treatments included potato-dextrose agar slants, with or without mineral oil, stored at either 4 C, 28 C or ambient temperature; colonized agar plugs placed in glycerol solution at either -75 C or -20 C; colonized agar plugs placed in sterile deionized water at either 4 C or ambient temperature; and mycelial growth on intact or precut pieces of filter paper, desiccated and stored at ambient temperature. Survival was evaluated at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 120 mo. The three best treatments for survival were PDA slants, with or without mineral oil, and colonized agar plugs stored in water, all at ambient temperature. All five fungal strains were recovered from all four replicates at each sampling date for agar plugs stored in water at ambient temperature. The worst treatments were agar slants and agar plugs in water stored at 4 C and agar plugs stored in glycerol at -20 C. Morphological characteristics were not affected by storage treatments. In general, there were minimal or no effects on growth and pathogenicity for all strains for all storage treatments with survival. Colonized agar plugs stored in water at ambient temperature provides an economical storage method (materials and labor) that does not need an electrical power for long-term maintenance.

  8. Soil charcoal as long-term pyrogenic carbon storage in Amazonian seasonal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcios, Maryory M; Jaramillo, Margarita M A; do Vale, José F; Fearnside, Philip M; Barbosa, Reinaldo Imbrozio

    2016-01-01

    Forest fires (paleo + modern) have caused charcoal particles to accumulate in the soil vertical profile in Amazonia. This forest compartment is a long-term carbon reservoir with an important role in global carbon balance. Estimates of stocks remain uncertain in forests that have not been altered by deforestation but that have been impacted by understory fires and selective logging. We estimated the stock of pyrogenic carbon derived from charcoal accumulated in the soil profile of seasonal forest fragments impacted by fire and selective logging in the northern portion of Brazilian Amazonia. Sixty-nine soil cores to 1-m depth were collected in 12 forest fragments of different sizes. Charcoal stocks averaged 3.45 ± 2.17 Mg ha(-1) (2.24 ± 1.41 Mg C ha(-1) ). Pyrogenic carbon was not directly related to the size of the forest fragments. This carbon is equivalent to 1.40% (0.25% to 4.04%) of the carbon stocked in aboveground live tree biomass in these fragments. The vertical distribution of pyrogenic carbon indicates an exponential model, where the 0-30 cm depth range has 60% of the total stored. The total area of Brazil's Amazonian seasonal forests and ecotones not altered by deforestation implies 65-286 Tg of pyrogenic carbon accumulated along the soil vertical profile. This is 1.2-2.3 times the total amount of residual pyrogenic carbon formed by biomass burning worldwide in 1 year. Our analysis suggests that the accumulated charcoal in the soil vertical profile in Amazonian forests is a substantial pyrogenic carbon pool that needs to be considered in global carbon models.

  9. Long-Term Storage of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria in Sterile Distilled Water

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola S. Iacobellis; DeVay, James E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was made to determine the effectiveness of the preservation of plant-pathogenic bacteria in sterile distilled water. After 20 or 24 years of storage in distilled water, a very high percentage (90 to 92%) of the isolates of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. were still alive. Moreover, 12 of 13 viable (after 24 years) isolates of P. syringae subsp. syringae maintained their ability to produce syringomycin and were pathogenic to bean seedlings. The water-stored cells of t...

  10. US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-08-05

    Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

  11. REACTOR REFUELING - INTERIM DECAY STORAGE (FFTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCFADDEN NR; OMBERG RP

    1990-06-18

    The IDS facility is located between the CLEM rails and within the FFTF containment building. It is located in a rectangular steel-lined concrete cell which lies entirely below the 550 ft floor level with the top flush with the 550 ft floor level. The BLTC rails within containment traverse the IDS cover (H-4-38001). The facility consists of a rotatable storage basket submerged in liquid sodium which is contained in a stainless steel tank. The storage positions within the basket are arranged so that it is not physically possible to achieve a critical array. The primary vessel is enclosed in a secondary guard tank of such size and arrangement that, should a leak develop in the primary tank, the sodium level would not fall below the top of the fueled section of the stored core components or test assemblies. The atmosphere outside the primary vessel, but within the concrete cell, is nitrogen which also serves as a heat transfer medium to control the cell temperature. To provide space for the storage of test assemblies such as the OTA and CLIRA, 10 storage tubes (each approximately 43-1/4 ft long) are included near the center of the basket. This arrangement requires that the center of the primary vessel be quite deep. In this region, the primary vessel extends downward to elevation 501 ft 6 inches while the guard tank reaches 500 ft 4 inches. The floor of the cell is at 499 ft a inches which is 51 ft below the operating room floor. Storage positions are provided for 112 core components in the upper section of the storage basket. These positions are arranged in four circles, all of which are concentric with the test element array and the storage basket. The primary vessel and the guard tank are shaped to provide the necessary space with a minimum of excess volume. Both these vessels have a relatively small cylindrical lower section connected to a larger upper cylinder by a conical transition. The primary vessel is supported from a top flange by a vessel support structure

  12. Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2009-02-01

    Subsurface reservoirs being considered for storing CO{sub 2} include saline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams (Baines and Worden, 2004; IPCC, 2005). By far the greatest storage capacity is in saline aquifers (Dooley et al., 2004), and our discussion will focus primarily on CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations. Most issues for safety and security of CO{sub 2} storage arise from the fact that, at typical temperature and pressure conditions encountered in terrestrial crust, CO{sub 2} is less dense than aqueous fluids. Accordingly, CO{sub 2} will experience an upward buoyancy force in most subsurface environments, and will tend to migrate upwards whenever (sub-)vertical permeable pathways are available, such as fracture zones, faults, or improperly abandoned wells (Bachu, 2008; Pruess, 2008a, b; Tsang et al., 2008). CO{sub 2} injection will increase fluid pressures in the target formation, thereby altering effective stress distributions, and potentially triggering movement along fractures and faults that could increase their permeability and reduce the effectiveness of a caprock in containing CO{sub 2} (Rutqvist et al., 2008; Chiaramonte et al., 2008). Induced seismicity as a consequence of fluid injection is also a concern (Healy et al., 1968; Raleigh et al., 1976; Majer et al., 2007). Dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the aqueous phase generates carbonic acid, which may induce chemical corrosion (dissolution) of minerals with associated increase in formation porosity and permeability, and may also mediate sequestration of CO{sub 2} as solid carbonate (Gaus et al., 2008). Chemical dissolution of caprock minerals could promote leakage of CO{sub 2} from a storage reservoir (Gherardi et al., 2007). Chemical dissolution and geomechanical effects could reinforce one another in compromising CO{sub 2} containment. Additional issues arise from the potential of CO{sub 2} to mobilize hazardous chemical species (Kharaka et al., 2006), and from migration of

  13. Long-term variability of UV irradiance over Northern Eurasia according to satellite measurements, ERA-INTERIM dataset and INM-RSHU chemical climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Pastukhova, Anna; Zhdanova, Ekaterina; Khlestova, Julia; Poliukhov, Alexei; Smyshlyaev, Sergei; Galin, Vener

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of long-term erythemal UV irradiance (ERY) changes over the territory of Northern Eurasia according to the ERA-INTERIM reanalysis dataset, INM-RSHU chemical climate model (CCM), and TOMS and OMI satellite data with the correction on absorbing aerosol based on the new Macv2 climatology updated from Kinne et al. (2013) over the 1979-2015 period. We show the existence of the pronounced positive ERY trend due to ozone in spring and summer over Europe and over the central areas of Siberia (up 3% over the decade). The changes in cloud cover provide even more significant ERY increase (up to 6-8% per decade). However, over Arctic region there is a pronounced negative ERY trend probably due to the effects of melting ice on global circulation processes. The combination of ozone and cloud effects provides the enhanced increase of the overall ERY trend: up to 6-9% in spring and summer over Eastern Europe, some regions of Siberia and the Far East. In addition, based on the method described in (Chubarova, Zhdanova, 2013) we estimated changes in UV resources over Northern Eurasia since 1979. We show that for the first skin type there is a significant geographical shift of UV categories: the increase in the UV optimum area in winter, where the vitamin D generation is possible without risk of getting sunburn, and its reducing in other months due to decrease in ozone and clouds. We also analyze the long-term UV changes simulated according to different scenarios using the INM-RSHU CCM. There is a general agreement between CCM and observational datasets, however, ERY trends due to cloudiness do not correspond sometimes in space and are smaller. We show that the positive ERY trend due to ozone is determined by the anthropogenic emissions of halogens. The variations in natural factors (solar activity and ocean surface temperature, stratospheric aerosol) only provide the increase in ERY dispersion. References: Kinne, S., O'Donnel D., Stier P., et al., J. Adv. Model

  14. Long-term safety and efficacy of Omnitrope®, a somatropin biosimilar, in children requiring growth hormone treatment: Italian interim analysis of the PATRO Children study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iughetti, Lorenzo; Tornese, Gianluca; Street, Maria Elisabeth; Napoli, Flavia; Giavoli, Claudia; Antoniazzi, Franco; Stagi, Stefano; Luongo, Caterina; Azzolini, Sara; Ragusa, Letizia; Bona, Gianni; Zecchino, Clara; Aversa, Tommaso; Persani, Luca; Guazzarotti, Laura; Zecchi, Emiliano; Pietropoli, Alberto; Zucchini, Stefano

    2016-11-03

    PATRO Children is an ongoing observational, longitudinal, non-interventional, global post-marketing surveillance study, which is investigating the long-term safety and effectiveness of Omnitrope®, a somatropin biosimilar to Genotropin®, in children with growth disturbances. The primary endpoint of PATRO Children is long-term safety and the secondary endpoint is effectiveness, which is assessed by analysing auxological data such as height (HSDS) and height velocity (HVSDS) standard deviation scores. Here, we report the data from the Italian interim analysis of PATRO Children data up to August 2015. PATRO Children is enrolling children who are diagnosed with conditions of short stature requiring GH treatment and are receiving Omnitrope®. Adverse events (AEs) are assessed in all Omnitrope®-treated patients. Height is evaluated yearly to near-adult (final) height, and is herein reported as HSDS; height velocity is also assessed and reported as a standard deviation score (HVSDS). Up to August 2015, a total of 186 patients (mean age 10.2 years, 57.5 % males) were enrolled :156 [84 %] had growth hormone deficiency, 12 [6.5 %] were born small for gestational age, seven [3.8 %] had Prader-Willi syndrome, one [0.5 %] had Turner syndrome and one [0.5 %] had chronic renal insufficiency; seven [3.8 %] patients had other indication profiles. The mean treatment duration with Omnitrope® was 28.1 ± 19.1 months. AEs were reported in 35.6 % of patients and included headache, pyrexia, arthralgia, abdominal pain, leg and/or arm pain and increased blood creatine phosphokinase. Two serious AEs in two patients were thought to be drug-related; one patient experienced a minimal increase in a known residual craniopharyngioma, and another a gait disturbance with worsening of walking difficulties. Similar to investigational studies, Omnitrope® treatment was associated with improvements in both HSDS and HVSDS. Omnitrope® appears to be well tolerated and effective for the

  15. ''Public impact of long term wastes storage links'' between wastes radiological characterization and public impact evaluation at short and long term; ''Impact sur le public des stockages a long terme des dechets'' liens entre caracterisation radiologique des dechets et evaluations d'impact pour le public a court et a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillion, E. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs ANDRA, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2001-07-01

    The food for thought of these days SFRP being the wastes characterisation, this presentation will put the emphasis on the radioisotopes that interest ANDRA because they are important for their contribution to radiological impact calculated for some scenario. The approach of storage safety and the impact evaluations are presented, for the short term safety, for the long term safety in the case of a surface storage concerning the low and intermediate level radioactive waste, the long term safety in deep storage for high level and years living radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  16. The role of reconsolidation and the dynamic process of long-term memory formation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Alberini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the processes of memory formation and storage are exquisitely dynamic. Elucidating the nature and temporal evolution of the biological changes that accompany encoding, storage and retrieval is key to understand memory formation. For explicit or medial temporal lobe-dependent memories that form after a discrete event and are stored for a long time, the physical changes underlying the encoding and processing of the information (memory trace or engram remain in a fragile state for some time. However, over time, the new memory becomes increasingly resistant to disruption until it is consolidated. Retrieval or reactivation of an apparently consolidated memory can render the memory labile again, and reconsolidation is the process that occurs to mediate its restabilization. Reconsolidation also evolves with the age of the memory: Young memories are sensitive to postreactivation disruption, but older memories are more resistant. Why does a memory become labile again if it is retrieved or reactivated? Here I suggest that the main function of reconsolidation is to contribute to the lingering consolidation process and mediate memory strengthening. I also discuss the literature and results regarding the influence of the passage of time on the reconsolidation of memory. These points have important implications for the use of reconsolidation in therapeutic settings.

  17. Long term storage of dry versus frozen RNA for next generation molecular studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Seelenfreund

    Full Text Available The standard method for the storage and preservation of RNA has been at ultra-low temperatures. However, reliance on liquid nitrogen and freezers for storage of RNA has multiple downsides. Recently new techniques have been developed for storing RNA at room temperature utilizing desiccation and are reported to be an effective alternative for preserving RNA integrity. In this study we compared frozen RNA samples stored for up to one year to those which had been desiccated using RNAstable (Biomatrica, Inc., San Diego, CA and stored at room temperature. RNA samples were placed in aliquots and stored after desiccation or frozen (at -80°C, and were analyzed for RNA Integrity Number (RIN, and by qPCR, and RNA sequencing. Our study shows that RNAstable is able to preserve desiccated RNA samples at room temperature for up to one year, and that RNA preserved by desiccation is comparable to cryopreserved RNA for downstream analyses including real-time-PCR and RNA sequencing.

  18. Long-term large-scale holographic storage in iron doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xin

    1998-11-01

    The centerpiece of my work described in this thesis is a large-scale fast random-access holographic memory using LiNbO3:Fe. This system is described in detail in Chapter 2 and 3 and has been used repeatedly and extensively through all of our works. In Chapter 2, various design issues related to this system are discussed. High, system dynamic-range-limited storage capacity is demonstrated by using angle, fractal and spatial multiplexing with a key custom-designed component-the segmented mirror array. The SNR and BER obtained from the reconstructed information are comparable to those of conventional CD-ROMs. Fast random access to the memory contents is materialized in a separate system using an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) as the addressing device and an electro-optic modulator (EOM) to compensate for the Doppler shift. Chapter 3 discusses the design issues and presents experimental demonstration of holographic storage using the system. The design and application of an optical phase-lock loop using the AOD and EOM for phase stabilization are also described at the end of this chapter. Chapter 4 and 5 address two methods of thermal fixing to solve the volatility problem in holographic memories using photorefractive materials. First, 'Low-High-Low' fixing is described in Chapter 4, along with the characterization of system error performance of non- volatile holographic storage using thermal fixing. A novel 'incremental fixing schedule' is introduced to improve the system fixing efficiency. Experimental demonstration of a large-scale non-volatile memory with good error performance is also presented. Chapter 5 shows theoretical treatment and experimental demonstration of high-temperature recording in LiNbO3:Fe. Different charge transport mechanisms and their influence on the dynamics of holographic recording as well as the system dynamic range are discussed in detail. The two thermal fixing methods are examined and compared in terms of the M/#. In Chapter 6, a very

  19. Reactive transport modeling of the long-term effects of CO2 storage in the P18 depleted gas field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambach, T. J.; Koenen, M.; Wasch, L. J.; Loeve, D.; Maas, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Depleted gas fields are an import CO2 storage sink for The Netherlands, with a total storage capacity of more than 3 Gtonne. The CO2 sources are located at relatively short distances from potential storage reservoirs and an infrastructure for (cross-border) gas transport over large distances already exists. Several depleted gas fields in the subsurface of the Netherlands have yet been evaluated as potential locations for CO2 storage (for example the K12-B field). The P18 gas field is located in the offshore of The Netherlands and is currently evaluated as potential CO2 storage reservoir. The aim of this study is to predict the long-term effects of CO2 injection into the P18 field using reactive transport modeling (TOUGHREACT). The storage reservoir is described using the mineralogy and petrophysical characteristics of three geological layers in a radial (R,Z) reservoir model with top depth of 3456 m, a thickness of 98 m, and 3300 grid cells. The initial reservoir temperature was defined as 90 degrees C with an initial (depletion) pressure of 20.0 bars. Capillary pressure curves are based on empirical relations. The CO2 is injected uniformly distributed over the model height, at a constant rate of 35 kg/s (1.1 Mton/year), and a temperature of 40 degrees C for 30 years. The well is then shut-in with a reservoir pressure of approximately 375 bar. The simulations are continued up to 10,000 years for computing the long-term effects in the reservoir. The results show that the near-well area is dried out during injection, leading to salt precipitation and reduced permeability during injection. Condensation of the evaporated water occurs outside the near-well area. Water imbibition is modelled after shut in of the well, leading to rewetting of the near-well area and redissolution of the salt. Most geochemical reactions need water to occur, including well-cement minerals, and therefore predictions of water flow after well shut-ins are important to take into account

  20. Effects of Long-Term Storage on Plasmid Stability in Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Chung K.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Wilson, Kathy E.; Bragg, Sandra L.; Plikaytis, Brian; Brachman, Philip; Johnson, Scott; Kaufmann, Arnold F.; Popovic, Tanja

    2005-01-01

    The plasmid profiles of 619 cultures of Bacillus anthracis which had been isolated and stored between 1954 and 1989 were analyzed using the Laboratory Response Network real-time PCR assay targeting a chromosomal marker and both virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2). The cultures were stored at ambient temperature on tryptic soy agar slants overlaid with mineral oil. When data were stratified by decade, there was a decreasing linear trend in the proportion of strains containing both plasmids with increased storage time (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the proportion of strains containing only pXO1 or strains containing only pXO2 (P = 0.25), but there was a statistical interdependence between the two plasmids (P = 0.004). Loss of viability of B. anthracis cultures stored on agar slants is also discussed. PMID:16332750

  1. The role of tree-fall dynamics in long-term carbon storage of tropical peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommain, R.; Cobb, A.; Joosten, H.; Glaser, P. H.; Chua, A.; Gandois, L.; Kai, F. M.; Noren, A. J.; Kamariah, A. S.; Su'ut, N. S.; Harvey, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    The forested peatlands of the Earth's tropical belt represent a major terrestrial carbon pool that may contain over 90 petagram C. However, the mechanisms that led to the build-up of this significant pool of carbon are poorly understood. Moreover, the rates of carbon uptake by peat accumulation in these tropical settings have rarely been quantified and natural variations in uptake on decadal to millennial scales are not well constrained. We studied carbon accumulation dynamics on these timescales of a peat swamp forest dominated by the dipterocarp Shorea albida - a unique forest type that, until recently, widely covered the lowlands of northwest Borneo. The impressive Shorea albida trees may reach heights of 70 m and are therefore strongly susceptible to windthrow and lightning. Such natural disturbances cause these trees to fall and uproot - excavating over 1 m deep holes into the peat that fill with water to become tip-up pools. The analysis of high-resolution aerial photographs and radiocarbon dated peat cores from our field site in Brunei together with the construction of a simulation model of peat accumulation allowed us to determine the role of tree-fall and tip-up pools in carbon storage. In a hectare of Shorea albida forest four tip-up pools form per decade. A pool completely fills with organic matter within 200 years according to our pollen record and a dated pool deposit stored 40 kg C m-2 of the total 110 kg C m-2 large local peat carbon pool. The carbon accumulation rates in these pools reach over 800 g C m-2 yr-1 - within the range of annual litterfall in dipterocarp forests. The simulation model indicates that up to 60% of the peat deposits under Shorea albida forests could be derived from infilled pools. Tip-up pools are therefore local hotspots for carbon storage in tropical forested peatlands.

  2. The British Library Newspaper Collection: Long Term Storage, Preservation and Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Fleming

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The British Library has recently unveiled plans for improving the collection care of, and digital access to, one of the world's greatest newspaper collections. The collection, which dates from the 16th century, contains UK titles as well as 200 overseas titles and is at risk. 15% of the collection is unusable because of its deterioration, and there are pressures on space and a need to develop greater digital content for access. The solution is to place all of the physical newspapers into a new, state of the art Newspaper Storage Building at Boston Spa, the British Library's main storage and logistics site, and home to its document delivery service. The building will comprise of 160 km of high density shelf space, fully automated under special environmental conditions including low oxygen, regulated 16 degree Celsius temperature, and 52% humidity. Future access to the collection will be at the BL's main Library site at St Pancras, in a specially equipped reading room, so that researchers can integrate other collection items into their studies. However, access will be by surrogate means, initially microfilm, stored in London, and then, increasingly, digital access. By March 2009, the British Library will have digitised 3 million historic newspapers with JISC funds, and this content will be available to readers for free in reading rooms and on a paid for basis online, or via subscriptions. The Library is investigating a similar model going forward with a private sector partner who is willing to digitise and sell online out of copyright newspapers from the BL's collection for a fixed period. This will provide digital content for customers in reading rooms, free at the point of access.

  3. Interim storage of wastes and refuse derived fuels; Zwischenlagerung von Abfaellen und Ersatzbrennstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, K.J.; Versteyl, A.; Beckmann, M. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    Authors comment on interim storage of municipal wastes and refuse derived fuels. Topics of the 16 contributions are: Logistics and engineering, planning, estimation of storage time, cost and commitment, amend ment of the regulations, penal risks of interim storage, material flow management at waste incinerators, fire prevention, environmental risk, insurances. (uke)

  4. Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lav Tandon

    2000-05-01

    The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

  5. Sol-gels with fiber-optic chemical sensor potential: Effects of preparation, aging, and long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badini, G. E.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Tseung, A. C. C.

    1995-08-01

    The features of sol-gels, incorporating pH-sensitive dyes, designed as potential substrates for fiber-optic chemical sensors, have been investigated in terms of a variety of characteristics resulting from the preparation methods used and following the storage of samples for a period of several years. These materials, organically doped sol-gels, have been used as the heart of a number of prototype chemical sensing instruments, and a key issue in their effective use in instrumentation is their long-term durability and stability. In this work, it has been shown that such aged gel substrates can withstand immersion in water, drying, and reimmersion without fragmenting. Such impregnated gels were shown to still exhibit strong fluorescence, although some changes to the gel structure, determined from microhardness measurements, were observed and reported, reflecting their potential for use in chemically sensitive fiber optic-based instruments.

  6. Long-term modelling of Carbon Capture and Storage, Nuclear Fusion, and large-scale District Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Lüthje, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Among the technologies for mitigating greenhouse gasses, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and nuclear fusion are interesting in the long term. In several studies with time horizon 2050 CCS has been identified as an important technology, while nuclear fusion cannot become commercially available...... on nuclear fusion and the Pan European TIMES model, respectively. In the next decades CCS can be a driver for the development and expansion of large-scale district heating systems, which are currently widespread in Europe, Korea and China, and with large potentials in North America. If fusion will replace...... fossil fuel power plants with CCS in the second half of the century, the same infrastructure for heat distribution can be used which will support the penetration of both technologies. This paper will address the issue of infrastructure development and the use of CCS and fusion technologies using...

  7. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  8. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  9. Structural Changes in the Surface of Red Blood Cell Membranes during Long-Term Donor Blood Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study changes in the surface of red blood cell membranes of donor blood at the macro- and ultrastructural level during its storage for 30 days and to evaluate the functional state of the red blood cell membrane during the whole storage period. Material and methods. The investigation was conducted on human whole blood and packed red blood cells placed in the specialized packs containing the preservative CPDA-1, by using calibrated electroporation and atomic force microscopy and measuring plasma pH. Conclusion. The long-term, up to 30-day, storage of whole blood and packed red blood cells at 4°C was attended by lower plasma pH and increased hemolysis rate constant during calibrated electroporation and by the development of oxidative processes. The hemolysis rate constant was also higher in the packed red blood cells than that in the whole blood. On days 5—6, the membrane structure showed defects that developed, as the blood was stored, and caused irreversible cell membrane damage by day 30. Key words: donor blood, red blood cell membranes, atomic force microscopy.

  10. Morphological analysis of flowable resins after long-term storage or surface polishing with a mini-brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Ishizaki, Hiroko; Fukushima, Masayoshi; Okiji, Takashi

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness and morphological changes of various flowable resins after long-term storage in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or surface polishing with a mini-brush. The tested products were Beautifil Flow BF02 and BF10, Clearfil Majesty LV, Filtek Supreme XT, and UniFil LoFlo Plus. A paste-type resin composite, Filtek Supreme, was used as a control. The prepared specimens were 10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height. The standard surfaces were polished with #600-1200 diamond disks and kept in deionized water for 24 hours. Surface roughness was detected after storage in PBS (pH 7.4) for either 2 weeks or 6 months, or after polishing with a mini-brush. Results of this study demonstrated that the surface roughness of the standard specimens had a lower value as compared to those after storage in PBS for 2 weeks and 6 months, or after polishing with a mini-brush.

  11. Dosimetry at an interim storage for spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králík, M; Kulich, V; Studeny, J; Pokorny, P

    2007-01-01

    The Czech nuclear power plant Dukovany started its operation in 1985. All fuel spent from 1985 up to the end of 2005 is stored at a dry interim storage, which was designed for 60 CASTOR-440/84 casks. Each of these casks can accommodate 84 fuel assemblies from VVER 440 reactors. Neutron-photon mixed fields around the casks were characterized in terms of ambient dose equivalent measured by standard area dosemeters. Except this, neutron spectra were measured by means of a Bonner sphere spectrometer, and the measured spectra were used to derive the corresponding ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons.

  12. Reducing CO2 accumulation and its phytotoxicity to lettuce with absorbent in hermetic storage as a simulation of long-term fumigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceberg and romaine lettuce were subjected to hermetic storage as a simulation of long-term fumigation without a fumigant to determine: 1) effects of long hermetic storage on atmosphere composition and postharvest quality of lettuce, and 2) whether the negative effects can be prevented by scrubbing ...

  13. Insights into the molecular basis of long-term storage and survival of sperm in the honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Ellen; Millar, A. Harvey; Welch, Mat; Baer-Imhoof, Barbara; Cao, Danyang; Baer, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Honeybee males produce ejaculates consisting of large numbers of high quality sperm. Because queens never re-mate after a single mating episode early in life, sperm are stored in a specialised organ for years but the proximate mechanisms underlying this key physiological adaptation are unknown. We quantified energy metabolism in honeybee sperm and show that the glycolytic metabolite glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GA3P) is a key substrate for honeybee sperm survival and energy production. This reliance on non-aerobic energy metabolism in stored sperm was further supported by our findings of very low levels of oxygen inside the spermatheca. Expression of GA3P dehydrogenase (GAPDH), the enzyme involved in catabolism of GA3P, was significantly higher in stored compared to ejaculated sperm. Therefore, long-term sperm storage seems facilitated by the maintenance of non-aerobic energy production, the need for only the ATP-producing steps of glycolysis and by avoiding sperm damage resulting from ROS production. We also confirm that honeybee sperm is capable of aerobic metabolism, which predominates in ejaculated sperm while they compete for access to the spermatheca, but is suppressed during storage. Consequently, the remarkable reproductive traits of honeybees are proximately achieved by differential usage of energy production pathways to maximise competitiveness and minimise damage of sperm. PMID:28091518

  14. Prognostic value of interim and restaging PET/CT in Hodgkin lymphoma. Results of the CHEAP (Chemotherapy Effectiveness Assessment by PET/CT) study - long term observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenyi, Z; Barna, S; Garai, I; Simon, Z; Jona, A; Magyari, F; Gergely, M; Nagy, Z; Keresztes, K; Pettendi, P; Illes, A

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have determined the prognostic value of interim and restaging PET/CT in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma using current standard of care therapy outside clinical trials. We analyzed the effect of the results of interim and restaging PET/CT on the survival (overall- and relapse-free) in patients who received standard first-line treatment based on the stage of disease and risk factors. We investigated the differences between the relapse and non-relapse groups based on the clinical pathological characteristics of patients who had positive interim PET/CT results.Between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011, the staging, interim and restaging PET/CT scans of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma were analyzed. The Deauville criteria were used for the evaluation of interim PET/CT scans. One hundred and thirteen Hodgkin lymphoma patients underwent staging, interim and restaging PET/CT scans. None of the therapy was modified based on the interim PET/CT results. The median follow-up time was 43.5 months. A total of 62 early stage patients and 51 advanced stage patients were identified. The five-year overall survival rates were 93.4% in the interim PET negative group and 58% in the interim PET positive group (pinterim PET positive group, patients over 40 years of age had a significantly higher probability of relapse (p=0.057).The routine clinical use of interim PET/CT is highly recommended based on our investigation. However, patients with positive interim PET/CT results required frequent additional evaluations.

  15. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  16. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  17. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  18. Delayed wave of c-Fos expression in the dorsal hippocampus involved specifically in persistence of long-term memory storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katche, Cynthia; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Slipczuk, Leandro; Goldin, Andrea; Izquierdo, Ivan A; Cammarota, Martin; Medina, Jorge H

    2010-01-05

    Memory formation is a temporally graded process during which transcription and translation steps are required in the first hours after acquisition. Although persistence is a key characteristic of memory storage, its mechanisms are scarcely characterized. Here, we show that long-lasting but not short-lived inhibitory avoidance long-term memory is associated with a delayed expression of c-Fos in the hippocampus. Importantly, this late wave of c-Fos is necessary for maintenance of inhibitory avoidance long-term storage. Moreover, inhibition of transcription in the dorsal hippocampus 24 h after training hinders persistence but not formation of long-term storage. These findings indicate that a delayed phase of transcription is essential for maintenance of a hippocampus-dependent memory trace. Our results support the hypothesis that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place late after learning in the dorsal hippocampus to maintain memories.

  19. RADIATION SAFETY JUSTIFICATION FOR THE LONG-TERM STORAGE OF GAS CONDENSATE IN THE UNDERGROUND RESERVOURS FORMED BY THE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Romanovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents approaches to the safety justification of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs formed by the nuclear explosion technology. Gas condensate and brine are the intermediate level liquid radioactive waste containing isotopes: 3Н, 137Cs and 90Sr, in traces - 239Pu, 235U, 241Am.Safety of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs is assessed on the base of the multi-barrier principle implementation, used during radioactive waste disposal. It is shown that the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the sealed underground reservoirs formed by nuclear explosion technologies in salt domes does not lead to the surface radioactive contamination and population exposure.

  20. Materials Assessment of Insulating Foam in the 9977 Shipping Package for Long-Term Storage - Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-01

    The 9977 shipping package is being evaluated for long-term storage applications in the K-Area Complex (KAC) with specific focus on the packaging foam material. A rigid closed cell polyurethane foam, LAST-A-FOAM® FR-3716, produced by General Plastics Manufacturing Company is sprayed and expands to fill the void between the inner container and the outer shell of the package. The foam is sealed in this annular space and is not accessible. During shipping and storage, the foam experiences higher than ambient temperatures from the heat generated by nuclear material within the package creating the potential for degradation of the foam. A series of experiments is underway to determine the extent of foam degradation. Foam samples of three densities have been aging at elevated temperatures 160 °F, 160 °F + 50% relative humidity (RH), 185 °F, 215 °F, and 250 °F since 2014. Samples were periodically removed and tested. After approximately 80 weeks, samples conditioned at 160 °F, 160 °F + 50% RH, and 185 °F have retained initial property values while samples conditioned at 215 °F have reduced intumescence. Samples conditioned at 250 °F have shown the most degradation, loss of volume, mass, absorbed energy under compression, intumescence, and increased flammability. Based on the initial data, temperatures up to 185 °F have not yet shown an adverse effect on the foam properties and it is recommended that exposure of FR-3716 foam to temperatures in excess of 250 °F be avoided or minimized. Testing will continue beyond the 96 week mark. This will provide additional data to help define the long-term behavior for the lower temperature conditions. Additional testing will be pursued in an attempt to identify transition points (threshold times and temperatures) at the higher temperatures of interest, as well as possible benefits of aging within the relatively oxygen-free environment the foam experiences inside the 9977 shipping package.

  1. Long-term storage of irradiated potatoes for processing use, 4. Suitable storage conditions and potato chips processing test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Shohei; Umeda, Keiji; Kameyama, Kenji

    1984-03-01

    In order to develop suitable storage conditions in potatoes for processing use, non-irradiated and irradiated potatoes var. Norin No. 1 were stored in containers and in bulk. The contents of reducing sugars were determined and the properties of potato chips were analysed. Reconditioning at 10 deg C and RH 90 % for 4 weeks during an early period of dormancy lowered the content of reducing sugars remarkably in both the non-irradiated and irradiated potatoes which were either stored in containers or in bulk. The optimum conditions for the storage of potatoes were 8 deg C and RH 90 %, which enabled the potatoes to retain their hardness while the content reducing sugars decreased. The potatoes stored under the above conditions gave chips with a fairly good color. In contrast, the non-irradiated potatoes stored for a period of 6 months or longer sprouted and aged, resulting in chips with unsatisfactory color. It was found necessary to use potatoes with low contents of both amino acids and reducing sugars to avoid the browning of chips. Bulk storage which was found to be effective for air circulation through potatoes caused creeping phenomenon. (author).

  2. Effect of postharvest pretreatments on organic Early Superior Seedless "Sugraone" table grapes assigned to long term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admane, Naouel; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Di Gennaro, Domenico; Genovese, Francesco; Altieri, Giuseppe; Carlo Di Renzo, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Every year a significant amount of organic table grapes is lost during postharvest mainly due to the incidence of decay, stem browning and fast alteration of the taste and aroma. The demand for this fresh product with immaculate appearance and high sensory quality in terms of flavor, is a hard challenge considering the difficulties to conserve them, with alternative safe treatments to the sulphur dioxide (SO2) which is not allowed in organic product. The aim of this experiment was to maintain the quality of organic table grapes and extend their shelf-life for medium and long term, in order to reach new distant promising markets, by using safe methods. The effectiveness of the combination of pretreatment with Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) compounds, physical means and storage under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were performed by using detached organic table grape berries as alternatives to usual industrial SO2 application. The detached organic Early Superior Seedless "Sugraone" berries were pretreated by: i) dipping in ethanol and potassium bicarbonate; ii) massive CO2 concentrations; iii) ozone (O3) fumigation; whereas, untreated berries were included in the trial as control. Moreover, all the samples were packed in thermo-sealed ALPAK bags with MAP of 2% O2:5% CO2:93% N2 and stored at 0°C for 45 days. Initially and after 15, 30 and 45 days of storage, weight loss, decay incidence, berry/skin firmness, pedicel detachment force, skin color parameters, SSC, pH, titratable acidity and sensory evaluation scores, were monitored. After 45 days of storage, the weight loss was higher in the sample pretreated with massive CO2 concentration at 70 - 90 % and the control. The samples pretreated with CO2 at 70% and O3 at 20 ppm maintained the strength of the berry linked to its pedicel, also the berry and skin firmness were statistically higher in samples pretreated with CO2 at 90 - 70% and O3 at 20 ppm in comparison with the control. The skin color parameters and

  3. Frictional healing and sealing in anhydrite-filled faults: from short duration experiments to long-term CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Bakker, Elisenda; Samuelson, Jon; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of long-term subsurface CO2 storage requires that the stored gas remains isolated from the atmosphere for thousands of years. Faults crosscutting the reservoir and topseal system of storage sites are considered one of the most likely leakage pathways, especially if reactivation leads to fault dilation. For a proper risk assessment it is important to know if CO2 affects the self-sealing potential of fault gouges, as well as how it affects strength recovery after fault slip ceases (frictional healing). A thorough understanding of the physical processes operating in the fault gouge will help to extrapolate the data from short-term experimental time scales to long-term storage time scales. Anhydrite is a common caprock mineral in many hydrocarbon fields worldwide, and particularly in the Netherlands. In cases where faults crosscut the caprock, it is likely that these contain fine-grained, anhydrite-rich, damage material, or "fault gouge". Therefore, we have performed two sets of experiments: 1) fault shearing experiments on simulated anhydrite fault gouge, to investigate the frictional behavior of anhydrite faults, and 2) compaction creep experiments, to investigate the potential for self-sealing. All experiments were performed under pressure and temperature conditions representative for CO2 storage conditions (set 1: T = 80-150°C; normal stress = 25MPa; Pf = 15MPa; set 2: T = 80°C; stress = 5-12MPa and P¬f = 15MPa). The use of different pore fluid phases (air, vacuum, water, CO2 saturated solution, moist CO¬2 and dry CO2), as well as the range in pressures and temperatures, allows us to study the effect of the in-situ conditions on the frictional behavior, and also to identify the mechanisms responsible for the compaction behavior. Our results indicate that in both types of experiments water plays an essential role, by enhancing both fault-healing (type 1) and fault-sealing potential (type 2). The compaction experiments indicate fault sealing in fine

  4. Chemical and proteolysis-derived changes during long-term storage of lactose-hydrolyzed ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Therese; Jensen, Hanne B; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Clausen, Morten R; Eggers, Nina; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-11-19

    Proteolytic activity in milk may release bitter-tasting peptides and generate free amino terminals that react with carbohydrates, which initiate Maillard reaction. Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) heat treatment inactivates the majority of proteolytic enzymes in milk. In lactose-hydrolyzed milk a β-galactosidase preparation is applied to the milk after heat treatment, which has proteolytic side activities that may induce quality deterioration of long-term-stored milk. In the present study proteolysis, glycation, and volatile compound formation were investigated in conventional (100% lactose), filtered (60% lactose), and lactose-hydrolyzed (lactose) UHT milk using reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteolysis was observed in all milk types. However, the degree of proteolysis was significantly higher in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to the conventional and filtered milk. The proteins most prone to proteolysis were β-CN and αs1-CN, which were clearly hydrolyzed after approximately 90 days of storage in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk.

  5. Development of a protocol to solidify native and artificial oil bodies for long-term storage at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Tsung; Chen, Chun-Ren; Liu, Ting-Hang; Lee, Chin-Pei; Tzen, Jason T C

    2013-04-01

    Oil bodies isolated from sesame seeds coalesced to form large oil drops when they were solidified in a drying process commonly used for food products. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol to solidify oil bodies for long-term storage at room temperature. On the basis of testing several excipients, the coalescence of oil bodies could be effectively prevented when they were combined with mannitol. Sizes of oil bodies appeared similar under a light microscope before and after powderisation in combination with 70% or more mannitol. Artificial oil bodies were successfully generated with sesame oil, phospholipid and recombinant sesame caleosin. Following the developed protocol, native and artificial oil bodies were stably solidified in tablets. Both native and artificial oil bodies dissolved from the tablets remained stable after an accelerated stress test under a condition of 75% humidity at 40 °C for 4 months. A protocol was successfully developed for the solidification of native and artificial oil bodies in stable powder and tablet forms. This successful protocol is very likely to expedite the utilisation of artificial oil bodies in their potential applications. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Vertically integrated approaches to large scale CO2 storage: Evaluating long-term storage security of CO2 injection in saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasda, S. E.; Nordbotten, J.; Celia, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Storage security of injected carbon dioxide (CO2) is an essential component of risk management for geological carbon sequestration operations. During the injection and early post-injection periods, CO2 leakage may occur along faults and leaky wells, but this risk may be partly managed by proper site selection and sensible deployment of monitoring and remediation technologies. On the other hand, long-term storage security is an entirely different risk management problem—one that is dominated by a mobile CO2 plume that may travel over very large spatial and temporal scales before it is trapped by different physical and chemical processes. The primary trapping mechanisms are capillary and solubility trapping, which evolve over thousands to tens of thousands of years and can immobilize a significant portion of the mobile, free-phase CO2 plume. However, these processes are complex, involving a combination of small and large spatial scales over varying time scales. Solubility trapping is a prime example of this complexity, where small-scale density instabilities in the dissolved CO2 region leads to convective mixing that has that has a significant effect on the large-scale dissolution process over very long time scales. Using appropriate models that can capture both large and small-scale effects is essential for understanding the role of dissolution and convective mixing on the long-term storage security of CO2 sequestration operations. There are several approaches to modeling long-term CO2 trapping mechanisms. One modeling option is the use of traditional numerical methods, which are often highly sophisticated models that can handle multiple complex phenomena with high levels of accuracy. However, these complex models quickly become prohibitively expensive for the type of large-scale, long-term modeling that is necessary for risk assessment applications such as the late post-injection period. We present an alternative modeling option, the VESA model, that combines

  7. Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.E.

    1982-12-01

    The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  8. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  9. Dry corrosion prediction of radioactive waste containers in long term interim storage: mechanisms of low temperature oxidation of pure iron and numerical simulation of an oxide scale growth; Prevision de la corrosion seche des conteneurs de dechets radioactifs en condition d'entreposage: etude des mecanismes d'oxydation du fer a basse temperature et simulation numerique de la croissance d'une couche d'oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, N

    2006-10-15

    In the framework of research on long term behaviour of radioactive waste containers, this work consists on the one hand in the study of low temperature oxidation of iron and on the other hand in the development of a numerical model of oxide scale growth. Isothermal oxidation experiments are performed on pure iron at 300 and 400 C in dry and humid air at atmospheric pressure. Oxide scales formed in these conditions are characterized. They are composed of a duplex magnetite scale under a thin hematite scale. The inner layer of the duplex scale is thinner than the outer one. Both are composed of columnar grains, that are smaller in the inner part. The outer hematite layer is made of very small equiaxed grains. Markers and tracers experiments show that a part of the scale grows at metal/oxide interface thanks to short-circuits diffusion of oxygen. A model for iron oxide scale growth at low temperature is then deduced. Besides this experimental study, the numerical model EKINOX (Estimation Kinetics Oxidation) is developed. It allows to simulate the growth of an oxide scale controlled by mixed mechanisms, such as anionic and cationic vacancies diffusion through the scale, as well as metal transfer at metal/oxide interface. It is based on the calculation of concentration profiles of chemical species and also point defects in the oxide scale and in the substrate. This numerical model does not use the classical quasi-steady-state approximation and calculates the future of cationic vacancies at metal/oxide interface. Indeed, these point defects can either be eliminated by interface motion or injected in the substrate, where they can be annihilated, considering sinks as the climb of dislocations. Hence, the influence of substrate cold-work can be investigated. The EKINOX model is validated in the conditions of Wagner's theory and is confronted with experimental results by its application to the case of high temperature oxidation of nickel. (author)

  10. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Lee

    2005-09-15

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  11. Long-term trends of terrestrial water storage in south-east Australia revealed by GRACE and superconducting gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takashi; Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; McQueen, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    between gravity data and model estimates probably indicate groundwater changes which are not calculated in the model, although we cannot rule out the possibility that erroneous model soil moisture calculation caused the discrepancies. Our results indicate long-term gravity observations provide a useful measurement for monitoring TWS trend and constraining unspecified factors in hydrological model.

  12. Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

    2012-07-06

    The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that

  13. Carbon storage and long-term rate of accumulation in high-altitude Andean peatlands of Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Hribljan; D.J. Cooper; J. Sueltenfuss; E.C. Wolf; K.A. Heckman; Erik Lilleskov; R.A. Chimner

    2015-01-01

    The high-altitude (4,500+ m) Andean mountain range of north-western Bolivia contains many peatlands. Despite heavy grazing pressure and potential damage from climate change, little is known about these peatlands. Our objective was to quantify carbon pools, basal ages and long-term peat accumulation rates in peatlands in two areas of the arid puna ecoregion of Bolivia:...

  14. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: a possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, G T

    1997-12-09

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling the synaptic weights responsible for any given movement, such corrections will degrade the memories for other learned movements stored in overlapping sets of synapses. The present paper shows that long-term storage can be accomplished by a second site of plasticity at synapses from parallel fibers onto stellate/basket interneurons (pf*St/Bk). Plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses can be insulated from ongoing fluctuations in climbing fiber activity by assuming that changes in pf*St/Bk synapses occur only after changes in pf*Pkj synapses have built up to a threshold level. Although climbing fiber-dependent plasticity at pf*Pkj synapses allows for the exploration of novel motor strategies in response to changing environmental conditions, plasticity at pf*St/Bk synapses transfers successful strategies to stable long-term storage. To quantify this hypothesis, both sites of plasticity are incorporated into a dynamical model of the cerebellar cortex and its interactions with the inferior olive. When used to simulate idealized motor conditioning trials, the model predicts that plasticity develops first at pf*Pkj synapses, but with additional training is transferred to pf*St/Bk synapses for long-term storage.

  15. A model of long-term memory storage in the cerebellar cortex: A possible role for plasticity at parallel fiber synapses onto stellate/basket interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Garrett T.

    1997-01-01

    By evoking changes in climbing fiber activity, movement errors are thought to modify synapses from parallel fibers onto Purkinje cells (pf*Pkj) so as to improve subsequent motor performance. Theoretical arguments suggest there is an intrinsic tradeoff, however, between motor adaptation and long-term storage. Assuming a baseline rate of motor errors is always present, then repeated performance of any learned movement will generate a series of climbing fiber-mediated corrections. By reshuffling...

  16. Interim storage of power reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and its potential application to SNF separations and closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Salomon, E-mail: slevy112@aol.com

    2009-10-15

    Interim, centralized, engineered (dry cask) storage facilities for USA light water power reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) should be implemented to complement and to offer much needed flexibility while the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is funded to complete its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain License and to subject it to public hearings. The interim sites should use the credo reproduced in Table 1 [Bunn, M., 2001. Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Harvard University and University of Tokyo] and involve both the industry and government. The sites will help settle the 50 pending lawsuits against the government and the $11 billion of potential additional liabilities for SNF delay damages if Yucca Mountain does not being operation in 2020 [DOE, 2008a. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Stations (December)]. Under the developing consensus to proceed with closed fuel cycles, it will be necessary to develop SNF separation facilities with stringent requirements upon separation processes and upon generation of only highly resistant waste forms. The location of such facilities at the interim storage sites would offer great benefits to those sites and assure their long term viability by returning them to their original status. The switch from once-through to closed fuel cycle will require extensive time and development work as illustrated in 'The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy' [DOE, 2005. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles. DOE (September)]. A carefully crafted long term program, funded for at least 5 years, managed by a strong joint government-industry team, and subjected to regular independent reviews should be considered to assure the program stability and success. The new uncertainty about Yucca Mountain role raises two key issues: (a) what to do with the weapons and other high level government

  17. The long term storage performance of MH/Ni battery%MH/Ni电池的长期储存性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱钟明; 谈健; 吴爱深

    2012-01-01

    将MH/Ni电池在室温下以不同的荷电态(SOC)进行长期储存,对储存前后的电池性能进行测试.长期储存后,电池的内阻变化较大,储存24个月后的平均内阻增加43.46%,平均容量恢复率为90.33%.长期储存对MH/Ni电池的容量、放电平台及循环寿命都会产生不利的影响.%MH/Ni battery was stored for long term under normal temperature with different state of charge(SOC) ,the battery performance before and after storage was tested. When stored for long term, the internal resistance change of the battery was larger, the average increasing ratio of the internal resistance within 24 months storage was above 43.46%, the average capacity recovery ratio was 90.33% . The long term storage was unfavorable for the capacity,discharge voltage plateaus and cycle life of the battery.

  18. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Dhanesh [Primary Contact; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255°C; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly

  19. Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

    2012-07-06

    The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that

  20. Wayne Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Wayne, New Jersey. [Wayne Interim Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the envirormental monitoring program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of WISS and surrounding area began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. WISS is a National Priorities List site. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  1. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  2. Integrating end-user and grid focused batteries and long-term power-to-gas storage for reaching a 100 % renewable energy supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlusiak, Markus; Breyer, C. [Reiner Lemoine Institut gGmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents results of modelling cost optimised electricity generation systems for renewable energy shares varying from 0 % to 100 % on an hourly timescale. The model takes into account generation from solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, hydro, biogas and natural gas fuelled power plants. Storage is incorporated as short-term storage in batteries and biogas bladders and long-term storage via renewable power methane (RPM) and biomethane. Gridparity enabled PV-battery systems are taken into account to model electricity end-user behaviour. We use localised hourly solar insolation, wind and hydro power output, and electricity demand data. Results include optimum component sizing as well as levelised cost of electricity (LCOE). Impacts of changing storage technology prices are investigated.

  3. Disorders in the Morphology and Nanostructure of Erythrocyte Membranes after Long-term Storage of Erythrocyte Suspension: Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V V; Chernysh, A M; Kozlova, E K; Sergunova, V A; Gudkova, O E; Khoroshilov, S E; Onufrievich, A D; Kostin, A I

    2015-07-01

    Disorders in the erythrocyte morphology and structure of their membranes during long-term storage of erythrocyte suspension (30 days at 4°C) were studied by atomic force microscopy. The morphology and nanostructure of erythrocyte membranes, biochemical parameters, ion exchange parameters, and hemoglobin spectra were recorded. The transformation of erythrocyte morphology and destruction of their membranes were observed throughout the storage period. Irreversible forms of spheroechinocytes and their fragments formed by the end of storage. The concentrations of potassium ions and lactate in solution of the blood preservatiive increased, while pH value decreased. Hemolysis detected by the erythrocyte "leakage" effect was observed starting from days 16-23 of storage.

  4. Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel. Midwestern high-level radioactive waste transportation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

  5. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

  6. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  7. Long-term storage effect on chemical composition, nutritional value and quality of Greek onion landrace "Vatikiotiko".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, S A; Ntatsi, G; Fernandes, Â; Barros, L; Barreira, J C M; Ferreira, I C F R; Antoniadis, V

    2016-06-15

    The effect of storage at two temperatures (5±1 and 25±1 °C and 60-70±5% RH for both temperatures) on marketability and quality features of dry bulbs of local landrace "Vatikiotiko", "Sivan F1", "Red Cross F1" and "Creamgold" was examined. During storage measurements for fresh and dry weight of bulbs, tunic and flesh color, bulb firmness, nutritional value and mineral composition were taken at regular intervals. Storage concluded when either bulbs lost marketable quality or sprouting occurred. "Vatikiotiko" onion can be stored for at least 7months at 25±1 °C, whereas at 5±1 °C storage could be prolonged without significant marketability and quality loss. The fact that "Vatikiotiko" landrace can be considered a "storage" onion has to be capitalized in order to increase total production and yield, since storage could cover the market needs that arise throughout the year.

  8. Key Performance Criteria Affecting the Most the Safety of a Nuclear Waste Long Term Storage : A Case Study Commissioned by CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvy, A.; Lioure, A; Heriard-Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.; Schneider, T.; Schieber, C.

    2003-02-24

    As part of the work scope set in the French law on high level long lived waste R&D passed in 1991, CEA is conducting a research program to establish the scientific basis and assess the feasibility of long term storage as an option for the safe management of nuclear waste for periods as long as centuries. This goal is a significant departure from the current industrial practice where storage facilities are usually built to last only a few decades. From a technical viewpoint such an extension in time seems feasible provided care and maintenance is exercised. Considering such long periods of time, the risk for Society of loosing oversight and control of such a facility is real, which triggers the question of whether and how long term storage safety can be actually achieved. Therefore CEA commissioned a study (1) in which MUTADIS Consultants (2) and CEPN (3) were both involved. The case study looks into several past and actual human enterprises conducted over significant periods o f time, one of them dating back to the end of the 18th century, and all identified out of the nuclear field. Then-prevailing societal behavior and organizational structures are screened out to show how they were or are still able to cope with similar oversight and control goals. As a result, the study group formulated a set of performance criteria relating to issues like responsibility, securing funds, legal and legislative implications, economic sustainable development, all being areas which are not traditionally considered as far as technical studies are concerned. These criteria can be most useful from the design stage onward, first in an attempt to define the facility construction and operating guiding principles, and thereafter to substantiate the safety case for long term storage and get geared to the public dialogue on that undertaking should it become a reality.

  9. Carbon storage and long-term rate of accumulation in high-altitude Andean peatlands of Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Hribljan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 The high-altitude (4,500+ m Andean mountain range of north-western Bolivia contains many peatlands. Despite heavy grazing pressure and potential damage from climate change, little is known about these peatlands. Our objective was to quantify carbon pools, basal ages and long-term peat accumulation rates in peatlands in two areas of the arid puna ecoregion of Bolivia: near the village of Manasaya in the Sajama National Park (Cordillera Occidentale, and in the Tuni Condoriri National Park (Cordillera Real. (2 We cored to 5 m depth in the Manasaya peatland, whose age at 5 m was ca. 3,675 yr. BP with a LARCA of 47 g m-2 yr-1. However, probing indicated that the maximum depth was 7–10 m with a total estimated (by extrapolation carbon stock of 1,040 Mg ha-1. The Tuni peat body was 5.5 m thick and initiated ca. 2,560 cal. yr. BP. The peatland carbon stock was 572 Mg ha-1 with a long-term rate of carbon accumulation (LARCA of 37 g m-2 yr-1. (3 Despite the dry environment of the Bolivian puna, the region contains numerous peatlands with high carbon stocks and rapid carbon accumulation rates. These peatlands are heavily used for llama and alpaca grazing.

  10. Effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the viability, motility and abnormality of frozen thawed Frisian Holstein bull spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul MALIK; Muhammad LAILY; Muhammad Irwan ZAKIR

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the motility, concentration, viability, and abnormality of frozen-thawed. Methods: A total of four Friesian Holstein bulls were used for this study. One hundred forty semen straws with produced during period from 2008 to 2013 and stored in the liquid nitrogen at the AI center were used in the research. The sample straw was divided into six groups;each group consist 20 semen straws. For group one all straw semen was produced on the 2013 with storage in liquid nitrogen as long as one year, the group 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were produced on the 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008 with storage in liquid nitrogen as long as 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 year, respectively. Results:The viability of thawed sperm was not significantly different decreased (P>0.05) between storage on the 1 year and storage on the 2 years. Whereas, the viability was significantly different (P0.05) on the storage 1, 2 and 3 years. Whereas, the motility was significantly different (P0.05) on the storage 1, 2 and 3 years. Whereas, the abnormality was significantly increased (P0.05) during storage in liquid nitrogen as long as six years. Conclusions:Based on the results in these experiments, it may be concluded that concentration sperm during one year storage in liquid nitrogen resulted in similar concentration storage as long as six years. However, the viability and motility sperm thawed storage in liquid nitrogen during six years was lower than storage on the 1 and 2 years.

  11. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment.

  12. Storage of solid propellants in a dry environment. [mechanical properties resulting from long term exposure to aerospace environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udlock, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Storage of solid propellants in either a dry or a vacuum environment causes a significantly greater increase in the propellants' modulus and maximum tensile strength than does ambient storage. It is postulated that these physical property changes can be attributed to the effect trace amount of moisture has on the bond between the propellants' binder and oxidizer.

  13. A 72% error reduction scheme based on temperature acceleration for long-term data storage applications: Cold flash and millennium memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Senju; Iwasaki, Tomoko Ogura; Hachiya, Shogo; Takahashi, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-07-01

    A solid-state drive (SSD) with 1Xnm triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash is proposed for low cost data storage applications with long-term data-retention requirements. Specifically, cold data storage requires 20 years data-retention with 100 write/erase (W/E) cycles, whereas digital archive storage requires 1000 years retention time with 1 W/E cycle. To achieve these requirements, a flexible-nLC scheme is proposed to improve the reliability of 1Xnm TLC NAND flash (Yamazaki et al., 2015). The proposed scheme combines two schemes, n-out-of-8 level cell (nLC) (Tanakamaru et al., 2014) and asymmetric coding (AC) (Tanakamaru et al., 2012) with the addition of a vertical flag. By measuring 1Xnm TLC NAND flash memory, the proposed scheme reduces errors by 72% and 69% for digital archive and cold flash respectively, compared to the conventional nLC scheme.

  14. Long-term safety and efficacy of clobazam for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: interim results of an open-label extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yu-Tze; Conry, Joan; Paolicchi, Juliann; Kernitsky, Lydia; Mitchell, Wendy; Drummond, Rebecca; Isojarvi, Jouko; Lee, Deborah; Owen, Randall

    2012-12-01

    In an ongoing open-label extension (OV-1004), patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome who had completed 1 of 2 randomized controlled trials (OV-1002 [Phase II] or OV-1012 [Phase III]) are receiving clobazam at dosages ≤2.0 mg/kg/day (≤80 mg/day). Of 306 eligible patients from OV-1002 or OV-1012, 267 entered the open-label extension. As of the interim date, July 1, 2010, 213 patients (79.8%) had remained in the trial, and 189 had received clobazam for ≥12 months, 128 for ≥18 months, and 94 for ≥24 months. Median percentage decreases in average weekly rates of drop seizures were 71.1% and 91.6% at Months 3 and 24. Mean modal and mean maximum daily dosages were 0.94 mg/kg and 1.22 mg/kg for those who had received clobazam for ≥1 year. The 4 most common adverse events were upper respiratory tract infection (18.4%), fall (14.2%), pneumonia (13.9%), and somnolence (12.7%). Clobazam's adverse event profile was consistent with its profile in controlled trials.

  15. Long-term Effect of Pig Slurry Application on Soil Carbon Storage, Quality and Yield Sustainability in Murcia Region, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkılıç Yanardaǧ, Asuman

    2013-04-01

    Sustainability of agriculture is now a major global concern, especially since the 1980s. Soil organic matter is very important in the proper functions of the soil, which is also a good indicator of soil quality. This is due to its influence on many of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that control the capacity of a soil to perform properly. Understanding of nutrient supply through organic matter mineralization in agricultural systems is essential for maintaining long-term quality and productivity. The composition of pig manure will have a profound impact on soil properties, quality and crop yield when used in agriculture. We studied the effects of pig slurry (PS) application as an organic fertilizer, trying to determine the optimum amount that can be added to the soil, and the effect on soil properties, quality, and productivity. We applied 3 different doses on silty loam soils: Single (D1), Double (D2), Triple (D3) and unfertilized plots (C) served as controls. Samples were collected at two different levels, surface (0-30 cm) and subsurface (30-60 cm). D1 application dose, which is the agronomic rate of N-requirement (170 kg N/ha/yr) (European Directive 91/676/CEE), is very appropriate in term of sustainable agriculture and also can improve physical, chemical and biological soil properties. Therefore that the long-term use of PS with low dose may necessarily enhance soil quality in the long term. There are many factors to be considered when attempting to assess the overall net impact of a management practice on productivity. Additions of pig manure to soils at agronomic rates (170 kg N ha-1 yr-1) to match crop nutrient requirements are expected to have a positive impact on soil productivity. Therefore, the benefits from the use of application depend on the management of PS, carbon and environmental quality. However, PS have high micronutrient contents, and for this reason the application of high doses can pollute soils and damage human, animal and

  16. The effects of long-term management on patterns of carbon storage in a northern highbush blueberry production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Denise; Lambrinos, John G; Strik, Bernadine C

    2017-02-01

    Perennial crops potentially provide a sink for atmospheric carbon. However, there is a poor understanding of how perennial crops differ in their carbon allocation patterns, and few studies have tested how agronomic practices such as fertilization influence long-term patterns of carbon allocation in actual production systems. In this study, we report results of a long-term field experiment that tested the individual and combined effects of organic matter incorporation and nitrogen fertilization on carbon allocation. The mature (nine-year-old) blueberry plants in this study had an average standing carbon stock of 1147gCm(-2) and average annual Net Primary Production (NPP) of 523gCm(-2)yr(-1), values that are similar to those reported for other woody crops. Forty-four percent of blueberry annual NPP was sequestered in persistent biomass, 19% was exported as harvested fruit, and 37% entered the detrital pathway. Nitrogen applied at rates typical for blueberry production throughout the span of the study had no significant effect on total plant or soil C. However, pre-planting organic matter incorporation and periodic mulching with sawdust significantly increased both soil organic matter and soil C. Pre-planting organic matter incorporation also increased total standing plant C nine years later at maturity. At the field scale, we estimate that fields receiving pre-planting organic matter incorporation would have 4.8% (4.5Mgha(-1)) more standing C relative to non-amended fields, although the difference is within the range of uncertainty of the estimated values. These results suggest that blueberry production can provide a valuable medium-term carbon store that is comparable in magnitude to that of temperate tree crops, but overall carbon budgets are influenced by management practices over the first decade after planting.

  17. PRESERVING VITAMIN C CONTENT IN MELONS DURING LONG-TERM STORAGE BY TREATMNET WITH IONIZED AIR AND SHRINK WRAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stepanenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and analyzes the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of vitamin C content in fruit of melons. We considered melons of average ripening period from Bereginya and Golden varieties during storage by treatment with ionized air and shrink wrapping. Studies conducted in 2011-2013 at the National Institute of Vine and Wine Magarach (Yalta and Taurian State Agrotechnological University (Melitopol. For the experiment we used a melon fruit of medium ripening, varieties Golden and Bereginya that grow in the steppe zone of southern Ukraine (farm PE Borisov of Yakymovka district, Zaporozhye region. Collection of fruits and their selection for laying deposited were performed in accordance with relevant standards. To determine the mass concentration of ascorbic acid we used iodometric method. Before laying melon fruit for storage of pre-cooled for 25 hours and then spent processing and packaging. In our experiment, we maintained the relative humidity (GDP about of 85% and air temperature of +3 Celcium degrees in the repository. The treatment was carried out using the fruits developed by own patented device for preparing food for storage. Analysis of the experimental data led to the following conclusions: The content of ascorbic acid during the storage of fruits melon was reduced. Storage of fruits, packed (in whole or in part in shrimp and processed by ionized air gave significantly better preservation of vitamin C in the fruit compared to fruit without processing by air and  unpackaged fruits and in control. Storage of fruits, fully packaged and processed by ionized air, gave the best results in the equalization of other research options. The fruits of melon of variety Golden somewhat better retained vitamin C by the end of the storage period, although its original content was lower than in fruit of varieties Bereginya. Keywords: storage of fruits, vitamin C, ionized air, shrink wrap.

  18. 1988 Federal Interim Storage Fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The information in this report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc., under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program. The FIS Program was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1989. 13 refs.

  19. 1987 Federal interim storage fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This information in the report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program, which was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information in this report will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1988. 13 tabs.

  20. Influence of processing factors on the stability of model mayonnaise with whole egg during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariizumi, Masahiro; Kubo, Megumi; Handa, Akihiro; Hayakawa, Takashi; Matsumiya, Kentaro; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2017-04-01

    Mayonnaise-like oil-in-water emulsions with different stabilities-evaluated from the degree of macroscopic defects, e.g., syneresis-were prepared by different formulations and processing conditions (egg yolk weight, homogenizer speed, and vegetable oil temperature). Emulsions prepared with lower egg yolk content were destabilized for shorter periods. The long-term stability of emulsions was weakly related to initial properties, e.g., oil droplet distribution and protein coverage at the interface. Protein aggregation between oil droplets was observed and would be responsible for the instability of emulsions exhibited by the appearance defects. SDS-PAGE results for adsorbed and unadsorbed proteins at the O/W interface suggested that predominant constituents adsorbed onto the interface were egg white proteins as compared with egg yolk components when the amount of added egg yolk was low. In present condition, egg white proteins adsorbed at the O/W interface could be a bridge of neighboring oil droplets thereby causing flocculation in emulsions.

  1. Modeling the long-term durability of concrete barriers in the context of low-activity waste storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson E.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the long-term durability of concrete barriers in contact with a cementitious wasteform designed to immobilize low-activity nuclear waste. The high-pH pore solution of the wasteform contains high concentration level of sulfate, nitrate, nitrite and alkalis. The multilayer concrete/wasteform system was modeled using a multiionic reactive transport model accounting for coupling between species, dissolution/ precipitation reactions, and feedback effect. One of the primary objectives was to investigate the risk associated with the presence of sulfate in the wasteform on the durability of concrete. Simulation results showed that formation of expansive phases, such as gypsum and ettringite, into the concrete barrier was not extensive. Based on those results, it was not possible to conclude that concrete would be severely damaged, even after 5,000 years. Lab work was performed to provide data to validate the modeling results. Paste samples were immersed in sulfate contact solutions and analyzed to measure the impact of the aggressive environment on the material. The results obtained so far tend to confirm the numerical simulations.

  2. Long term storage of Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor isolates using different cryopreservation techniques and its impact on laccase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichlerová, Ivana; Homolka, Ladislav; Tomšovský, Michal; Lisá, Ludmila

    2015-12-01

    The strain Pleurotus ostreatus Florida f6, its 45 basidiospore-derived isolates (both monokaryons and dikaryons prepared in our laboratory), Trametes versicolor strain CCBAS 614 and 22 other T. versicolor isolates obtained from the sporocarps collected in distant localities were successfully preserved for 12 y using perlite and straw cryopreservation protocols. All tested isolates survived a 12-year storage in liquid nitrogen (LN) and their laccase production and Poly B411 decolorization capacity was preserved. Also mycelium extension rate and the types of colony appearance of individual isolates remained unchanged. Different cryopreservation techniques were also tested for the short time (24 h) and the long time (6 m) storage of the culture liquid with extracellular laccase produced by T. versicolor strain CCBAS 614. The results showed that 10 % glycerol was the most suitable cryopreservant. The absence of the cryopreservant did not cause high loss of laccase activity in the samples; the presence of DMSO (5 or 10 %) in LN-stored samples caused mostly a decrease of laccase activity. For the preservation of laccase activity in the liquid culture the storage in the freezer at -80 °C is more convenient than the storage in liquid nitrogen.

  3. Sensory descriptive quantitative analysis of unpasteurized and pasteurized juçara pulp (Euterpe edulis) during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paula Porrelli Moreira; Casemiro, Renata Cristina; Zillo, Rafaela Rebessi; de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Prospero, Evanilda Teresinha Perissinotto; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pasteurization followed by storage under different conditions on the sensory attributes of frozen juçara pulp using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Pasteurization of packed frozen pulp was performed by its immersion in stainless steel tank containing water (80°C) for 5 min, followed by storage under refrigerated and frozen conditions. A trained sensory panel evaluated the samples (6°C) on day 1, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90. Sensory attributes were separated as follows: appearance (foamy, heterogeneous, purple, brown, oily, and creamy), aroma (sweet and fermented), taste (astringent, bitter, and sweet), and texture (oily and consistent), and compared to a reference material. In general, unpasteurized frozen pulp showed the highest score for foamy appearance, and pasteurized samples showed highest scores to creamy appearance. Pasteurized samples remained stable regarding brown color development while unpasteurized counterparts presented increase. Color is an important attribute related to the product identity. All attributes related to taste and texture remained constant during storage for all samples. Pasteurization followed by storage under frozen conditions has shown to be the best conservation method as samples submitted to such process received the best sensory evaluation, described as foamy, slightly heterogeneous, slightly bitter, and slightly astringent.

  4. A coupled geochemical-transport-geomechanical model to address caprock integrity during long-term CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, E.F. van der; Waldmann, S.; Fokker, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Underground storage of CO2 will lead to chemical fluid-rock interactions which may potentially alter the porosity and the flow patterns in faults. In this study, we present a coupled numerical model combining chemical fluid-rock interactions, aqueous diffusion, fluid flow, and mechanical processes,

  5. Long-term effects of drying conditions on the essential oil and color of tarragon leaves during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ArabHosseini, A.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Huisman, W.; Muller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of storage on the essential oil content and color of French Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) leaves is studied. Tarragon leaves were dried at temperatures 45, 60 and 90 °C with, respectively, the relative humidity levels 17%, 7% and 2.5%. At 60 °C also a relative humidity level of 18%

  6. Used Fuel Logistics: Decades of Experience with transportation and Interim storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, G.; Shelton, C.

    2015-07-01

    Used fuel inventories are growing worldwide. While some countries have opted for a closed cycle with recycling, numerous countries must expand their interim storage solutions as implementation of permanent repositories is taking more time than foreseen. In both cases transportation capabilities will have to be developed. AREVA TN has an unparalleled expertise with transportation of used fuel. For more than 50 years AREVA TN has safely shipped more than 7,000 used fuel transport casks. The transportation model that was initially developed in the 1970s has been adapted and enhanced over the years to meet more restrictive regulatory requirements and evolving customer needs, and to address public concerns. The numerous “lessons learned” have offered data and guidance that have allowed for also efficient and consistent improvement over the decades. AREVA TN has also an extensive experience with interim dry storage solutions in many countries on-site but also is working with partners to developed consolidated interim storage facility. Both expertise with storage and transportation contribute to safe, secure and smooth continuity of the operations. This paper will describe decades of experience with a very successful transportation program as well as interim storage solutions. (Author)

  7. Long-term alteration of Rousse rock samples for CO2 storage: an experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachaud, P.; Sissmann, O.; Parra, T.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 injection into the Rousse depleted gas reservoir, located in the south-west of France, started in January 2010 and 50,000 tons of this greenhouse effect gas were ultimately injected until March 2013 (Prinet et al. 2013). CO2 fate in the reservoir represents a problem of primary importance, that have been studied by several complementary research works led in collaboration by Total and IFPEN (e.g. Girard et al. 2013, Chiquet et al. 2013). One of the aspects covered by these studies concerned geochemical reactions between the injected fluid, reservoir water and rock minerals. A long-term CO2-exposure experiment was conducted in pressure vessels, and allowed the ageing of reservoir mini-plugs at in situ temperature and pressure conditions (150°C and 80 bar) during almost 24 months. Solid characterization was led every 2 to 3 months using an X-ray microprobe. Elementary maps were then acquired and converted into mineralogical maps using a statistical analysis based on pixels composition. This method allowed the identification of main minerals and of their evolution with alteration. Solution elementary composition was analyzed every week using an ICP-MS. These compositions were used for speciation calculations using the IFPEN's geochemical code Arxim. Initial reservoir mineralogy is mainly constituted of two types of dolomites. One of which forms the rock matrix, the other fills the main reservoir fractures. Quartz, pyrite and calcite traces, as well as two types of phyllosilicates (a potassic illite and a magnesian mixture of chlorite and mica) were also evidenced thanks to our analytical method. After some months of alteration, mineralogical evolutions were observed at the sample edge. Magnesian carbonates (dolomite and magnesite) seemed to precipitate, while an increase of iron, sodium and sulphur (probably due to anhydrite formation) was detected. The combination of these experimental observations to numeric speciation and minerals Saturation Index (SI

  8. Characterization of the Wymark CO2 Reservoir: A Natural Analog to Long-Term CO2 Storage at Weyburn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F; Johnson, J

    2010-11-22

    Natural accumulations of CO{sub 2} occur in the Duperow and other Devonian strata on the western flank of the Williston Basin in lithologies very similar to those into which anthropogenic CO{sub 2} is being injected as part of an EOR program in the Weyburn-Midale pool. Previous workers have established the stratgraphic and petrographic similarities between the Duperow and Midale beds (Lake and Whittaker, 2004 and 2006). As the CO{sub 2} accumulations in the Devonian strata may be as old as 50 Ma, this similarity provides confidence in the efficacy of long-term geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the Midale-Weyburn pool. Here we attempt to extend this comparison with whole rock and mineral chemistry using the same sample suite used by Lake and Whittaker. We provide XRD, XRF, and electron microprobe analysis of major constituent minerals along with extensive backscattered electron and x-ray imaging to identify trace phases and silicate minerals. LPNORM analysis is used to quantify modal concentrations of minerals species. Samples from depth intervals where CO{sub 2} has been observed are compared to those where CO{sub 2} was absent, with no systematic differences in mineral composition observed. Gas accumulation can be correlated with sample porosity. In particular gas-bearing samples from the Eastend region are more porous than the overlying gas-free samples. Silicate minerals are rare in the Duperow carbonates, never exceeding 3 wt%. As such, mineral trapping is precluded in these lithologies. The geochemical data presented here will be used for comparison with a similar geochemical-mineralogical study of the Midale (Durocher et al., 2003) in a subsequent report.

  9. A DFT based equilibrium study of a chemical mixture Tachyhydrite and their lower hydrates for long term heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. D.; Nedea, S. V.; Zondag, H. A.; Rindt, C. C. M.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Chloride based salt hydrates are promising materials for seasonal heat storage. However, hydrolysis, a side reaction, deteriorates, their cycle stability. To improve the kinetics and durability, we have investigated the optimum operating conditions of a chemical mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates. In this study, we apply a GGA-DFT to gain insight into the various hydrates of CaMg2Cl6. We have obtained the structural properties, atomic charges and vibrational frequencies of CaMg2Cl6 hydrates. The entropic contribution and the enthalpy change are quantified from ground state energy and harmonic frequencies. Subsequently, the change in the Gibbs free energy of thermolysis was obtained under a wide range of temperature and pressure. The equilibrium product concentration of thermolysis can be used to design the seasonal heat storage system under different operating conditions.

  10. Factors affecting immunoreactivity in long-term storage of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Federica; Pigozzi, Simona; Ceriolo, Paola; Calamaro, Paola; Fiocca, Roberto; Mastracci, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Antigen decay in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections for immunohistochemistry is a well-known phenomenon which may have repercussions on translational and research studies and length of storage time appears fundamental. The aim of this study was to evaluate all possible factors which may lead to antigen decay on a prospective standardized collection of human tissues with a panel of 14 routinely used antibodies. Serial slide sections from FFPE control tissues were stored using different methods (routine storage at room temperature, Parafilm(®) protected, paraffin coated and cold stored at 4 °C) and for different time periods: 1, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36 months. Immunohistochemistry was performed at each time cutoff simultaneously on stored sections and on freshly cut sections using a panel of 14 antibodies. Immunoreactivity was compared with immunoreactions performed at time zero. Reduction in immunostaining was observed for a subset of antibodies (CD3, CD 31, CD117, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki67, p53, TTF-1, vimentin) while for others (smooth muscle actin, keratins 7, 20, AE1/AE3, 34βE12), no antigen decay was observed. Loss of antigenicity was proportional to tissue section age and was dependent on mode of storage with cold storage slides being the least affected. All antigens with reductions in immunosignal were nuclear or membranous, and they all required heat pre-treatment for antigen retrieval. In contrast to results from other studies, when pre-analytical factors are strictly controlled and standardized, antigen decay seems to be restricted to nuclear or membrane antigens which require heat antigen retrieval.

  11. A review of international trends in mercury management and available options for permanent or long-term mercury storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun Jeong; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2012-11-30

    Although mercury (Hg) is a poisonous substance that has harmful effects on the environment and in humans, it is widely used in industrial facilities and in goods for daily use. Given the recent recognition of the risk posed by Hg exposure, the international society is trying to reduce the use of and demand for Hg by implementing more stringent regulations. Relevant policies and laws recommend alternatives to Hg or prohibit the use of Hg in certain applications. In addition, it is recommended that the amount of Hg used in Hg-containing products be reduced or that manufacturers discontinue such products. Disposal methods for elemental Hg include landfill, incineration, stabilization/solidification, and permanent storage. In this review, the major sources of Hg and expected amount of surplus Hg are described after summarizing international policies and plans for Hg management. In addition, a study on the establishment of proper storage facilities was performed by comparing existing Hg storage technologies with newly designed technologies for facilities where surplus Hg may be stored permanently. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of long-term grazing disturbance on the belowground storage of organic carbon in the Patagonian Monte, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larreguy, C; Carrera, A L; Bertiller, M B

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of grazing disturbance on the amount and the spatial distribution (vertical and horizontal) of root biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) in order to evaluate whether grazing alters the belowground storage of organic carbon (C) in arid rangelands of the Patagonian Monte. We selected three representative sites (3 ha each) with low, moderate and high grazing disturbance located far, mid-distance and near the watering point, respectively, in rangelands submitted to sheep grazing for more than 100 years. We assessed the canopy structure and identified the four most frequent plant patch types at each site. We selected four replications of each patch type and extracted a soil sample (0-30 cm depth) underneath the canopy and in the middle of the nearest inter-patch bare soil area in winter and summer. We assessed the root and soil dry mass and the respective organic C concentration in each sample and then we estimated the total belowground organic C storage at each site. Total plant and perennial grass cover were lower with high than low grazing disturbance while the reverse occurred with dwarf shrub cover. High grazing disturbance led to the increase in total root biomass in the whole soil profile of patch areas and in the upper soil of inter-patch areas. SOC was higher in patch than in inter-patch areas at all sites but at both areas was reduced with high grazing disturbance. This was probably the result of the low total plant cover and the low and recalcitrant contribution of above and below-ground plant litter to soils at sites with high grazing disturbance. Accordingly, these changes did not result in variations in the total belowground organic C storage. We concluded that high grazing disturbance did not affect the total belowground organic C storage but led to changes in the spatial patterning of this organic C storage (i.e shifting from soil to roots).

  13. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  14. The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project: A comprehensive approach to study the long term fate of CO2 geological storage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigane, P.; Brown, S.; Dimier, A.; Pearce, J.; Frykman, P.; Maurand, N.; Le Gallo, Y.; Spiers, C. J.; Cremer, H.; Rutters, H.; Yalamas, T.

    2013-12-01

    The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project aims at significantly advance our knowledge of specific processes that could influence the long-term fate of geologically stored CO2: i) trapping mechanisms, ii) fluid-rock interactions and effects on mechanical integrity of fractured caprock and faulted systems and iii) leakage due to mechanical and chemical damage in the well vicinity, iv) brine displacement and fluid mixing at regional scale. A realistic framework is ensured through collaboration with two demonstration sites in deep saline sandstone formations: the onshore former NER300 West Lorraine candidate in France (ArcelorMittal GeoLorraine) and the offshore EEPR Don Valley (former Hatfield) site in UK operated by National Grid. Static earth models have been generated at reservoir and basin scale to evaluate both trapping mechanisms and fluid displacement at short (injection) and long (post injection) time scales. Geochemical trapping and reservoir behaviour is addressed through experimental approaches using sandstone core materials in batch reactive mode with CO2 and impurities at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions and through geochemical simulations. Collection of data has been generated from natural and industrial (oil industry) analogues on the fluid flow and mechanical properties, structure, and mineralogy of faults and fractures that could affect the long-term storage capacity of underground CO2 storage sites. Three inter-related lines of laboratory experiments investigate the long-term evolution of the mechanical properties and sealing integrity of fractured and faulted caprocks using Opalinus clay of Mont Terri Gallery (Switzerland) (OPA), an analogue for caprock well investigated in the past for nuclear waste disposal purpose: - Characterization of elastic parameters in intact samples by measuring strain during an axial experiment, - A recording of hydraulic fracture flow properties by loading and shearing samples in order to create a 'realistic

  15. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO

  16. Microbial Carbon Pump ---A New Mechanism for Long-Term Carbon Storage in the Global Ocean (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, N.; Azam, F.; McP Working Group; Scor Wg134

    2010-12-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) reservoir, containing carbon equivalent to the total carbon inventory of atmospheric CO2, is an important issue in understanding the role of the ocean in climate change. The known biological mechanism for oceanic carbon sequestration is the biological pump, which depends on vertical transportation of carbon either through particulate organic matter (POM) sedimentation or DOM export by mixing and downwelling. Both the POM and the DOM are subject to microbial mineralization and most of the organic carbon will be returned to dissolved inorganic carbon within a few decades. Only a small fraction of the POM escapes mineralization and reaches the sediment where organic carbon can be buried and stored for thousands and even millions of years. The efficiency of the biological pump is currently the basic measure of the ocean’s ability to store biologically fixed carbon. However, the production and fate of the large pool of recalcitrant DOM with an averaged turnover time of 4000-6000 thousands of years in the water column has not been adequately considered to date. Marine microbes essentially monopolize the utilization of DOM. Although their diverse adaptive strategies for using newly fixed carbon are well known, major gaps exist in our knowledge on how they interact with the large pool of DOM that appears to be recalcitrant. This is an important problem, as DOM molecules that are not degraded for extended periods of time constitute carbon storage in the ocean. A newly proposed concept - the “microbial carbon pump (MCP)” (NATURE REVIEWS Microbiology 2010.8:593-599) (also see diagram below) provides a formalized focus on the significance of microbial processes in carbon storage in the recalcitrant DOM reservoir, and a framework for testing hypotheses on the sources and sinks of DOM and the underlying biogeochemical mechanisms. The MCP, through concessive processing of DOM, transforms some organic carbon from the reactive DOM pools

  17. Safety, Efficacy, and Persistence of Long-Term Mirabegron Treatment for Overactive Bladder in the Daily Clinical Setting: Interim (1-Year) Report from a Japanese Post-Marketing Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Hiromi; Uno, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    To report interim 1-year results from a 3-year surveillance study evaluating safety, efficacy, and persistence of long-term mirabegron for overactive bladder (OAB). Patients starting treatment with mirabegron for urinary urgency, daytime frequency, and urgency incontinence associated with OAB were registered and followed up for 3 years. Data were collected on adverse drug reactions (ADR), changes in OAB symptoms, changes in Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), and treatment discontinuations. Treatment persistence rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Eighty-one ADR were observed in 72/1139 patients (6.3%) through 1 year of mirabegron treatment, with the incidence highest during the first month. No significant change in residual urine volume was observed at any observation point up to 1 year of mirabegron treatment. Mirabegron was deemed "effective" in 883/1091 patients (80.9%) at 1 year/discontinuation. Total OABSS was decreased with statistical significance at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year, or at discontinuation (P < 0.001 at each time point). Kaplan-Meier treatment persistence rates were 84.8% at 3 months, 77.6% at 6 months, and 66.0% at 1 year. Treatment persistence rates were similar for male and female patients but significantly higher for patients aged ≥65 years (67.3%; n = 908) compared with those aged <65 years (59.8%; n = 231; log-rank test: P = 0.032). Long-term OAB treatment with mirabegron was well-tolerated, with effectiveness maintained through 1 year. Mirabegron treatment persistence was higher than has been previously reported, and was greater in patients aged ≥65 years compared with those aged <65 years. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Neutron spectrometry at the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Králik, M; Studeny, J

    2002-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of neutron and photon components of mixed fields around casks for spent nuclear fuel have been determined at various places at the dry interim storage facility. The results obtained with metrological grade instruments were compared with data provided by usual survey meters for both neutrons and photons.

  19. Cost Implications of an Interim Storage Facility in the Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Joshua J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joseph, III, Robert Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petersen, Gordon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the cost implications of incorporating a consolidated interim storage facility (ISF) into the waste management system (WMS). Specifically, the impacts of the timing of opening an ISF relative to opening a repository were analyzed to understand the potential effects on total system costs.

  20. The long term charged storage performance of Li-ion battery%锂离子电池的长期荷电贮存性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪; 杨驰; 王大兴; 郭春泰

    2011-01-01

    Li-ion battery was long term (5 ~ 10 a) stored under normal temperature with different state of charge (SOC), the performance of battery before and after storage was teated. When the battery was stored for a long time, the internal resistance improved, the average internal resistance increasing ratio was above 79.95 %, polymer Li-ion battery had a lower internal resistance increasing ratio. The capacity recovery performance of Li-ion battery stored for a long time was fine, the average capacity recovery ratio with 10 a storage could reach to 88% .Long term storage had unfavorable effect to the capacity,platform and cycle life of the battery.%将锂离子电池在常温下以不同的荷电态(SOC)长期(5-10 a)贮存,对贮存前后的电池性能进行测试.长期贮存后,电池的内阻增加,10 a贮存后的内阻平均增加率高达79.95%,聚合物锂离子电池的内阻增加稍低.锂离子电池长期贮存后,容量恢复性能较好,10 a贮存容量平均恢复率可迭88%.长期贮存对电池的容量、平台和循环寿命都会产生不利的影响.

  1. The effect of microwave pretreatment of seeds on the stability and degradation kinetics of phenolic compounds in rapeseed oil during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rękas, Agnieszka; Ścibisz, Iwona; Siger, Aleksander; Wroniak, Małgorzata

    2017-05-01

    Storage stability and degradation kinetics of phenolic compounds in rapeseed oil pressed from microwave treated seeds (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10min, 800W) during long-term storage (12months) at a temperature of 20°C was discussed in the current study. The dominant phenolic compound detected in rapeseed oil was canolol, followed by minor amounts of free phenolic acids and sinapine. The most pronounced effect of seeds microwaving was noted for canolol formation - after 10-min exposure the quantity of this compound was approximately 63-fold higher than in control oil. The degradation of phenolics during storage displayed pseudo first-order kinetics. Differences in the initial degradation rate (r0) demonstrated significant impact of the period of seeds microwave exposure on the degradation rates of phenolic compounds. Results of the half-life calculation (t1/2) showed that the storage stability of phenolic compounds was higher in oils produced from microwave treated rapeseeds than in control oil.

  2. Stability of Virgin Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds during Long-Term Storage (18 Months) at Temperatures of 5-50 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichene, Dhouha; Salvador, María Desamparados; Fregapane, Giuseppe

    2015-08-05

    Virgin olive oil (VOO) phenolic compounds have high nutritional and biological properties. The purpose of this research was to study the stability of VOO phenolic compounds during long-term storage (18 months) at different temperatures (5, 15, 25, and 50 °C) and to verify the advantage of storing VOO at a temperature lower than the usual commercial conditions (20-25 °C). Four monovarietal VOOs that differed in their fatty acid profile and content of natural antioxidants were used in this study. The degradation of secoiridoid phenolics during storage displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics and depended on the initial content of phenolics related to olive oil variety. The initial degradation rate was similar at 5 and 15 °C but increased considerably at 25 °C and was even faster at 50 °C. Tyrosol derivatives were more stable than hydroxytyrosol compounds, especially in closed bottles with limited oxygen availability. The increase in the content of simple phenolics, the decrease of their secoiridoid derivatives, or the ratio of simple to secoiridoid phenolics could be used as indices of the oxidative and hydrolytic degradation of VOO phenolics. The shelf life of the studied VOO was considerably extended at reduced storage temperature (15 vs 25 °C). Moreover, storage conditions affected VOO phenolic content and therefore the expiration date of the health claim that olive oil polyphenols contribute to the protection of blood lipids from oxidative stress.

  3. Long-term energy and climate implications of carbon capture and storage deployment strategies in the US coal-fired electricity fleet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric

    2012-09-04

    To understand the long-term energy and climate implications of different implementation strategies for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in the US coal-fired electricity fleet, we integrate three analytical elements: scenario projection of energy supply systems, temporally explicit life cycle modeling, and time-dependent calculation of radiative forcing. Assuming continued large-scale use of coal for electricity generation, we find that aggressive implementation of CCS could reduce cumulative greenhouse gas emissions (CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O) from the US coal-fired power fleet through 2100 by 37-58%. Cumulative radiative forcing through 2100 would be reduced by only 24-46%, due to the front-loaded time profile of the emissions and the long atmospheric residence time of CO(2). The efficiency of energy conversion and carbon capture technologies strongly affects the amount of primary energy used but has little effect on greenhouse gas emissions or radiative forcing. Delaying implementation of CCS deployment significantly increases long-term radiative forcing. This study highlights the time-dynamic nature of potential climate benefits and energy costs of different CCS deployment pathways and identifies opportunities and constraints of successful CCS implementation.

  4. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The

  5. Long-term storage of clinical samples in CyMol® medium for PNA- FISH® and culturing from the eSwab™ system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lone Heimann; Xu, Yijuan; Pedersen, Malene Schibler

    comparable to the isolates obtained by culturing at the time of sampling. The detection limit for both FISH and PNA-FISH® were >10^3 bacteria/mL. With the eSwab™ system we were able to detect a broad range of bacteria including Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Corynebacterium...... spp. by culture and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Conclusion: It is possible to preserve samples for FISH and PNA-FISH® for long-term storage by using CyMol® with an effective detection limit in the order of >10^3 bacteria/mL. Both the morphology and intensity of staining with nucleic acid......Objectives: A steadily growing diversity of bacteria is reported in foreign body infections, and culture-independent methods have been shown to supplement established culture methods. Therefore, sampling and preservation of specimens have become an important issue. We report here experience from...

  6. A minimally invasive method of piscine tissue collection and an analysis of long-term field-storage conditions for samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smalley John V

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acquisition of high-quality DNA for use in phylogenetic and molecular population genetic studies is a primary concern for evolutionary and genetic researchers. Many non-destructive DNA sampling methods have been developed and are used with a variety of taxa in applications ranging from genetic stock assessment to molecular forensics. Results The authors have developed a field sampling method for obtaining high-quality DNA from sunfish (Lepomis and other freshwater fish that employs a variation on the buccal swab method and results in the collection of DNA suitable for PCR amplification and polymorphism analysis. Additionally, since the circumstances of storage are always a concern for field biologists, the authors have tested the potential storage conditions of swabbed samples and whether those conditions affect DNA extraction and PCR amplification. It was found that samples stored at room temperature in the dark for over 200 days could still yield DNA suitable for PCR amplification and polymorphism detection. Conclusion These findings suggest that valuable molecular genetic data may be obtained from tissues that have not been treated or stored under optimal field conditions. Furthermore, it is clear that the lack of adequately low temperatures during transport and long term storage should not be a barrier to anyone wishing to engage in field-based molecular genetic research.

  7. Technical and economic assessments of storage techniques for long-term retention of industrial-beet sugar for non-food industrial fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ramirez, Juan Manuel

    Industrial beets may compete against corn grain as an important source of sugars for non-food industrial fermentations. However, dependable and energy-efficient systems for beet sugar storage and processing are necessary to help establish industrial beets as a viable sugar feedstock. Therefore, technical and economic aspects of beet sugar storage and processing were evaluated. First, sugar retention was evaluated in whole beets treated externally with either one of two antimicrobials or a senescence inhibitor and stored for 36 wk at different temperature and atmosphere combinations. Although surface treatment did not improve sugar retention, full retention was enabled by beet dehydration caused by ambient air at 25 °C and with a relative humidity of 37%. This insight led to the evaluation of sugar retention in ground-beet tissue ensiled for 8 wk at different combinations of acidic pH, moisture content (MC), and sugar:solids. Some combinations of pH ≤ 4.0 and MC ≤ 67.5% enabled retentions of at least 90%. Yeast fermentability was also evaluated in non-purified beet juice acidified to enable long-term storage and partially neutralized before fermentation. None of the salts synthesized through juice acidification and partial neutralization inhibited yeast fermentation at the levels evaluated in that work. Conversely, yeast fermentation rates significantly improved in the presence of ammonium salts, which appeared to compensate for nitrogen deficiencies. Capital and operating costs for production and storage of concentrated beet juice for an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 76 x 106 L y-1 were estimated on a dry-sugar basis as U.S. ¢34.0 kg-1 and ¢2.2 kg-1, respectively. Storage and processing techniques evaluated thus far prove that industrial beets are a technically-feasible sugar feedstock for ethanol production.

  8. Development of operational criteria for the interim spent fuel storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. H.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, D. K.; Cho, D. K.; Bae, K. M. [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-15

    The final objective is to develop the technical criteria for the facility operation of the interim spent fuel storage facility. For this purpose, elementary technical issues are evaluated for the wet storage of spent fuels and status of operation in foreign counties are examined. Urgent objective of this study is to provide technical back data for the development of operational criteria. For the back data for the development of operational criteria, domestic technical data for the wet storages are collected as well as standards and criteria related to the spent fuel storage. Operational stutus of spent fuel storages in foreign countries CLAB in Sweden and MRS in the United States are studied. Dry storage concept is also studied in order to find the characteristics of wet storage concept. Also basic technical issues are defined and studied in order to build a draft of operational criteri00.

  9. Desorption behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after long-term storage of two harbour sludges from the port of Rotterdam, The Netherlands

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Katja

    2013-04-12

    Purpose: The desorption behaviour of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sludges from two sites of the port of Rotterdam, The Netherlands, which are designated to be stored in a subaqueous sludge depository, was investigated after a storage time of 14 years at 4 °C under anaerobic conditions in the dark, mimicking depository conditions. Such long-term storage is believed to effect the desorption of the PAHs. Materials and methods: Batch desorption experiments over a time period of 130 days were performed with the brackish Beerkanaal (BK) sludge and the freshwater Beneden Merwede River (BMR) sludge. The organic carbon-water partitioning coefficient (K OC) values were calculated and compared to values of a previous study on the same sludges after a storage time of 3 years and to values obtained from calculations based on octanol-water partitioning coefficient (K OW) values. Additionally, the organic matter of the sludges was characterised by C and N elemental analysis and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results and discussion: Only desorption of low molecular weight PAHs up to pyrene was detected. Several K OC values were higher compared to the values from the previous study, and all were increased compared to values based on K OW values. It is assumed that the increase in K OC was an effect of the prolonged contact time, causing slow intradomain diffusion of PAHs into the condensed carbon domains. Desorption was higher in BK than in BMR, which is explained by differences in organic matter composition because BMR (containing predominantly aromatic carbon) and BK (which was dominated by lipids) contained the same amount of organic carbon. It is inferred that lipids compete with PAHs for sorption sites on the aromatic carbon, so that lipids block these sorption sites, and the PAHs are adsorbed to the lipids. Conclusions: Since the amounts of PAHs desorbed from both sludges in this study were so low, it is supposed that long-term

  10. Physical and metabolic causes of sub-lethal damage in Listeria monocytogenes after long-term chilled storage at 4 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, G A

    1999-12-01

    Cells of Listeria monocytogenes display sub-lethal injury when subjected to long-term chill-storage in a nutrient-poor environment. The physical and metabolic causes of sub-lethal injury to two meat (L61 and L62) and two clinical (L98 and L99) L. monocytogenes strains chill-stored (4 degrees C) for 4 weeks in phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.0 and pH 5.5, and pH 5.5 in the presence of 0.3% potassium sorbate, were characterized. Causes of sub-lethal injury were determined by examining changes in the cell structure, leakage of nucleic acids and proteins from the cells, and cell recovery from injury in the presence of the metabolic inhibitors rifampicin, D-cycloserine, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and chloramphenicol. Visible shrinkage of the cytoplasm and slight cell wall damage were apparent over the 4 week storage period by electron microscopy for all four strains and three storage conditions. By contrast, over the same storage period, only three of the strains (L62, L98 and L99) displayed slight leakage of cellular content in all three storage media, while one strain (L61) displayed greater leakage. The three strains also displayed similar storage media-dependent metabolic damage. For these strains, phosphate-buffered saline pH 5.5 caused the least damage and potassium sorbate, the most. Recovery experiments also indicated that at pH 5.5, the energy transduction system of these three strains remained undamaged, and that injury to the cell transcription machinery was greatest at pH 7.0. The fourth strain, L61, displayed less damage than the others but this was attributed to the death of the injured cell sub-population in this strain. In this study, damage to sub-lethally injured chill-stored L. monocytogenes was different from that caused by other agents, such as heat. Therefore, cells injured by chill-storage under starvation conditions may require novel protocols to assure their effective recovery.

  11. Issues for the long term management of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.; Schieber, C. [CEPN, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Lavelle, S. [ICAM, 59 - Lille (France)

    2006-07-01

    High-level radioactive waste are currently managed in interim storage installations, providing an adequate protection of the public and the workers for the short term period. However, the long-term persistence of the radioactivity of the waste gives a new timescale dimension, never experimented by the society for the development of protection systems. In the framework of the European Commission research project 'COWAM-2' (COmmunity WAste Management) dedicated to the governance of radioactive waste management, the issues of 'long term governance' have been addressed by exploring the elements which can contribute to a better integration of the technical and societal time dimensions, taking into account technical, ethical, economic and organizational considerations. The originality of this project is to address the various issues within working groups involving stakeholders from different origins and European countries together with a research team. After a discussion on the time dimensions to be taken into account from the technical and societal perspective, this paper presents, mainly based on the findings of the COWAM-2 project, a brief analysis of the ethical criteria to be considered when future generations are concerned as well as some performance criteria regarding long term governance. Finally, it proposes a discussion on the interest for the radiation protection experts to engage a process with stakeholders concerned by radioactive waste management in order to favour the emergence of a sustainable management responding to the issues at stake and including radiation protection considerations for long term periods. (authors)

  12. Rapid fabrication of superhydrophobic Al/Fe2O3 nanothermite film with excellent energy-release characteristics and long-term storage stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiang; Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Gaozi; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    One of the challenges for the application of energetic materials is their energy-retaining capabilities after long-term storage. In this study, we report a facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic Al/Fe2O3 nanothermite film by combining electrophoretic deposition and surface modification technologies. Different concentrations of dispersion solvents and additives are investigated to optimize the deposition parameters. Meanwhile, the dependence of deposition rates on nanoparticle concentrations is also studied. The surface morphology and chemical composition are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A static contact angles as high as 156° shows the superhydrophobicity of the nanothermite film. Natural and accelerated aging tests are performed and the thermal behavior is analyzed. Thermal analysis shows that the surface modification contributes to significantly improved energy-release characteristics for both fresh and aged samples, which is supposed to be attributed to the preignition reaction between Al2O3 shell and FAS-17. Superhydrophobic Al/Fe2O3 nanothermite film exhibits excellent long-time storage stability with 83.4% of energy left in natural aging test and 60.5% in accelerated aging test. This study is instructive to the practical applications of nanothermites, especially in highly humid environment.

  13. Polycistronic lentivirus induced pluripotent stem cells from skin biopsies after long term storage, blood outgrowth endothelial cells and cells from milk teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrot, C; van de Pas, S; van Zijl, L; Brändl, B; Wang, J W; Schalij, M J; Hoeben, R C; Atsma, D E; Mikkers, H M; Mummery, C L; Freund, C

    2013-02-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires the collection of donor tissue, but clinical circumstances in which the interests of patients have highest priority may compromise the quality and availability of cells that are eventually used for reprogramming. Here we compared (i) skin biopsies stored in standard physiological salt solution for up to two weeks (ii) blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) isolated from fresh peripheral blood and (iii) children's milk teeth lost during normal replacement for their ability to form somatic cell cultures suitable for reprogramming to hiPSCs. We derived all hiPSC lines using the same reprogramming method (a conditional (FLPe) polycistronic lentivirus) and under similar conditions (same batch of virus, fetal calf serum and feeder cells). Skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed robustly even after long-term biopsy storage. Generation of hiPSCs from juvenile dental pulp cells gave similar high efficiencies, but that of BOECs was lower. In terms of invasiveness of biopsy sampling, biopsy storage and reprogramming efficiencies skin fibroblasts appeared best for the generation of hiPSCs, but where non-invasive procedures are required (e.g., for children and minors) dental pulp cells from milk teeth represent a valuable alternative.

  14. Quercetin and isorhamnetin glycosides in onion (Allium cepa L.): varietal comparison, physical distribution, coproduct evaluation, and long-term storage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyun; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2011-02-09

    During onion processing, the outer dried protective layer (outer paper layer) and first two fleshy leaf layers are removed. This coproduct material is a potential commercial source of flavonoids especially quercetin. In the following study, the flavonoid composition was determined in coproduct materials and the press cake (material generated after juice extraction) in several commercially important onion varieties grown in California. Flavonoids were characterized and quantified using LC-(ESI)MS/MS and HPLC. The long-term stability of quercetin glycosides was assessed in dried coproduct materials stored at 4 and 22 °C over a 12 month period. In all varieties, the predominant forms of quercetin were the quercetin 3,4'-O-glucoside and 4'-O-glucoside. The first layer had significantly higher levels of flavonoids than the outer paper, second, and inner flesh layers on a DW basis (p < 0.05). Allium cepa "Milestone" contained the highest levels (p < 0.05) of flavonoids (1703 mg/100 g on a dry weight basis (DW). Onion press cake had significantly higher levels of total quercetin as compared with fresh onions (p < 0.05). The levels of 4'-O-glucoside significantly decreased during the first month of storage and remained stable for 12 months of storage at either 4 or 22 °C (p < 0.05).

  15. Buffy coat specimens remain viable as a DNA source for highly multiplexed genome-wide genetic tests after long term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Donald W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood specimen collection at an early study visit is often included in observational studies or clinical trials for analysis of secondary outcome biomarkers. A common protocol is to store buffy coat specimens for future DNA isolation and these may remain in frozen storage for many years. It is uncertain if the DNA remains suitable for modern genome wide association (GWA genotyping. Methods We isolated DNA from 120 Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD clinical trial buffy coats sampling a range of storage times up to 9 years and other factors that could influence DNA yield. We performed TaqMan SNP and GWA genotyping to test whether the DNA retained integrity for high quality genetic analysis. Results We tested two QIAGEN automated protocols for DNA isolation, preferring the Compromised Blood Protocol despite similar yields. We isolated DNA from all 120 specimens (yield range 1.1-312 ug per 8.5 ml ACD tube of whole blood with only 3/120 samples yielding Conclusions When collected as a long term clinical trial or biobank specimen for DNA, buffy coats can be stored for up to 9 years in a -80degC frozen state and still produce high yields of DNA suitable for GWA analysis and other genetic testing. Trial Registration The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00000620.

  16. Assessment of Hanford burial grounds and interim TRU storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, J.F.; Brown, D.J.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1977-08-01

    A review and assessment is made of the Hanford low level solid radioactive waste management sites and facilities. Site factors considered favorable for waste storage and disposal are (1) limited precipitation, (2) a high deficiency of moisture in the underlying sediments (3) great depth to water table, all of which minimize radionuclide migration by water transport, and (4) high sorbtive capacity of the sediments. Facilities are in place for 20 year retrievable storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes and for disposal of nontransuranic radioactive wastes. Auxiliary facilities and services (utilities, roads, fire protection, shops, etc.) are considered adequate. Support staffs such as engineering, radiation monitoring, personnel services, etc., are available and are shared with other operational programs. The site and associated facilities are considered well suited for solid radioactive waste storage operations. However, recommendations are made for study programs to improve containment, waste package storage life, land use economy, retrievability and security of TRU wastes.

  17. Changes in chemical quality indices during long-term storage of palm-olein oil under heated storage and transport-type conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, GH

    2004-01-15

    Full Text Available -term storage trial of 52 weeks at 50degreesC of palm-olein, a monounsaturated oil. Three concentrations of copper (0.035, 0.17 and 0.69 mg kg (-1)) were added. FFA values for all the sample treatments increased slightly over the storage period but remained...

  18. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, W.W.

    1997-12-30

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

  19. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, W.W.

    1997-12-30

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

  20. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JANIN, L.F.

    2000-08-30

    This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

  1. Criteria for designing an interim waste storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The long-lived radioactive wastes with activity above clearance levels generated by radioisotope users in Brazil are collected into centralized waste storage facilities under overview of the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (CNEN). One of these centers is the Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), in Sao Paulo, which since 1978 also manages the wastes generated by IPEN itself. Present inventory of stored wastes includes about 160 tons of treated wastes, distributed in 1290 steel, 200-liters drums, and 52 steel, 1.6 m{sup 3}-boxes, with an estimated total activity of 0.8 TBq. Radionuclides present in these wastes are fission and activation products, transuranium elements, and isotopes from the uranium and thorium decay series. The capacity and quality of the storage rooms at GRR evolved along the last decades to meet the requirements set forth by the Brazilian regulatory authorities.From a mere outdoor concrete platform over which drums were simply stacked and covered with canvas to the present day building, a great progress was made in the storage method. In this paper we present the results of a study in the criteria that were meant to guide the design of the storage building, many of which were eventually adopted in the final concept, and are now built-in features of the facility. We also present some landmarks in the GRR's activities related to waste management in general and waste storage in particular, until the treated wastes of IPEN found their way into the recently licensed new storage facility. (author)

  2. Nutritional value of cold-pressed rapeseed oil during long term storage as influenced by the type of packaging material, exposure to light & oxygen and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroniak, Małgorzata; Rękas, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    The effect of various conditions (storage temperature, exposure to light, access of oxygen) and different packaging material (amber glass, amber polyethylene terephthalate) on the nutritional value of cold-pressed rapeseed oil during 12 months of storage was investigated. Quantified quality parameters included: acidity, peroxide value, spectrophotometric indices (K 232 , K 268 ), fatty acid composition, tocopherols and sterols. Storage of oil at 4 °C was found to be most appropriate for maintaining the quality of cold-pressed rapeseed oil. Exposure of oil samples stored at room temperature to light in combination with the access of oxygen caused the most pronounced losses in the total tocopherols (ca. 90-91 % of α-T, and ca. 80-81 % of γ-T), total phytosterols (ca. 15-16 %) and substantial deterioration in oil qualitative properties. Although storage at room temperature is common for use in households, storage of at low temperatures (4 °C) significantly increases the possibility of prolonged shelf life of cold-pressed rapeseed oil.

  3. A tissue retrieval and postharvest processing regimen for rodent reproductive tissues compatible with long-term storage on the international space station and postflight biospecimen sharing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijayalaxmi; Holets-Bondar, Lesya; Roby, Katherine F; Enders, George; Tash, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Collection and processing of tissues to preserve space flight effects from animals after return to Earth is challenging. Specimens must be harvested with minimal time after landing to minimize postflight readaptation alterations in protein expression/translation, posttranslational modifications, and expression, as well as changes in gene expression and tissue histological degradation after euthanasia. We report the development of a widely applicable strategy for determining the window of optimal species-specific and tissue-specific posteuthanasia harvest that can be utilized to integrate into multi-investigator Biospecimen Sharing Programs. We also determined methods for ISS-compatible long-term tissue storage (10 months at -80°C) that yield recovery of high quality mRNA and protein for western analysis after sample return. Our focus was reproductive tissues. The time following euthanasia where tissues could be collected and histological integrity was maintained varied with tissue and species ranging between 1 and 3 hours. RNA quality was preserved in key reproductive tissues fixed in RNAlater up to 40 min after euthanasia. Postfixation processing was also standardized for safe shipment back to our laboratory. Our strategy can be adapted for other tissues under NASA's Biospecimen Sharing Program or similar multi-investigator tissue sharing opportunities.

  4. A Tissue Retrieval and Postharvest Processing Regimen for Rodent Reproductive Tissues Compatible with Long-Term Storage on the International Space Station and Postflight Biospecimen Sharing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalaxmi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collection and processing of tissues to preserve space flight effects from animals after return to Earth is challenging. Specimens must be harvested with minimal time after landing to minimize postflight readaptation alterations in protein expression/translation, posttranslational modifications, and expression, as well as changes in gene expression and tissue histological degradation after euthanasia. We report the development of a widely applicable strategy for determining the window of optimal species-specific and tissue-specific posteuthanasia harvest that can be utilized to integrate into multi-investigator Biospecimen Sharing Programs. We also determined methods for ISS-compatible long-term tissue storage (10 months at −80°C that yield recovery of high quality mRNA and protein for western analysis after sample return. Our focus was reproductive tissues. The time following euthanasia where tissues could be collected and histological integrity was maintained varied with tissue and species ranging between 1 and 3 hours. RNA quality was preserved in key reproductive tissues fixed in RNAlater up to 40 min after euthanasia. Postfixation processing was also standardized for safe shipment back to our laboratory. Our strategy can be adapted for other tissues under NASA’s Biospecimen Sharing Program or similar multi-investigator tissue sharing opportunities.

  5. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  6. Classification methodology for tritiated waste requiring interim storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cana, D.; Dall' ava, D. [CEA/DEN/DADN, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Decanis, C.; Liger, K. [CEA/DEN, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pamela, J. [CEA, Agence ITER-France, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    Fusion machines like the ITER experimental research facility will use tritium as fuel. Therefore, most of the solid radioactive waste will result not only from activation by 14 MeV neutrons, but also from contamination by tritium. As a consequence, optimizing the treatment process for waste containing tritium (tritiated waste) is a major challenge. This paper summarizes the studies conducted in France within the framework of the French national plan for the management of radioactive materials and waste. The paper recommends a reference program for managing this waste based on its sorting, treatment and packaging by the producer. It also recommends setting up a 50-year temporary storage facility to allow for tritium decay and designing future disposal facilities using tritiated radwaste characteristics as input data. This paper first describes this waste program and then details an optimized classification methodology which takes into account tritium decay over a 50-year storage period. The paper also describes a specific application for purely tritiated waste and discusses the set-up expected to be implemented for ITER decommissioning waste (current assumption). Comparison between this optimized approach and other viable detritiation techniques will be drawn. (authors)

  7. Geochemical changes and microbial activities during CO2 storage - Long-term experiments under in situ conditions within the frame of CO2SINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, Maren; Scherf, Ann-Kathrin; Vieth, Andrea; Zettlitzer, Michael; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the frame of the CO2SINK project, CO2 is injected into a saline aquifer of the Stuttgart formation (Triassic, Middle Keuper) at a depth of about 640 m below surface near Ketzin (Northeast German Basin, about 40 km west of Berlin) (Schilling et al., 2009). The injection of CO2 may induce a variety of geochemical changes in the reservoir system. Inorganic components may be dissolved from mineral phases (Wigand et al., 2008) and mineral precipitation from fluid components (Ketzer et al., 2009) may occur. In addition, organic molecules may be relocated, since supercritical CO2 is an excellent solvent for organic components. These geochemical shifts probably affect the microbial community composition and activity. The dissolution and precipitation of minerals, as well as corresponding microbial processes (Bennet et al., 2001) can affect reservoir permeability. In order to detect and quantify changes in geochemical characteristics and microbial processes during CO2storage and to estimate their impact on storage efficiency long-term experiments under in situ P-T conditions are performed. Freshly drilled sandstone sections from the target reservoir at Ketzin from a depth of about 630 m were incubated together with synthetic brine (20 % lower total dissolved solids than the Ketzin reservoir fluid) in high pressure vessels at 5.5 MPa and 40 ° C since September 2007. Since outer core sections were contaminated with drilling mud, as shown with fluorescein tracer detection (Wandrey et al., 2010), only clean inner core sections were used for long-term experiments to avoid contamination with microorganisms, as well as organic and inorganic mud components. After 15, 21 and 24 month fluid and rock samples were taken for chemical, microbial, mineralogical and petrophysical analyses. In fluid samples the concentrations of Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ were found to exceed those of the Ketzin reservoir fluid. Assuming chemical equilibrium between mineral and formation brine, observed

  8. OVERVIEW OF CRITERIA FOR INTERIM WET & DRY STORAGE OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.; Vinson, D.; Iyer, N.; Fisher, D.

    2010-11-03

    Following discharge from research reactors, spent nuclear fuel may be stored 'wet' in water pools or basins, or it may be stored 'dry' in various configurations including non-sealed or sealed containers until retrieved for ultimate disposition. Interim safe storage practices are based on avoiding degradation to the fuel that would impact functions related to safety. Recommended practices including environmental controls with technical bases, are outlined for wet storage and dry storage of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based research reactor fuel. For wet storage, water quality must be maintained to minimize corrosion degradation of aluminum fuel. For dry storage, vented canister storage of aluminum fuel readily provides a safe storage configuration. For sealed dry storage, drying must be performed so as to minimize water that would cause additional corrosion and hydrogen generation. Consideration must also be given to the potential for radiolytically-generated hydrogen from the bound water in the attendant oxyhydroxides on aluminum fuel from reactor operation for dry storage systems.

  9. Review of the seismic risk in the design of civil engineering of nuclear installations excepted the long term storage of radioactive wastes; Prise en compte du risque sismique a la conception des ouvrages de genie civil d'installations nucleaires de base a l'exception des stockages a long terme des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This guide aims to define, for the nuclear installations excepted the long term storage of radioactive wastes, from site data, the design specifications of earthquake resistant civil engineering and the possible methods for: the determination of the seismic response of the buildings, taking into account the interactions with the materials and the evaluation of the associated strains to size the installation; the determination of seismic displacements to be considered to size the materials. (A.L.B.)

  10. Long-term collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Collectes à long terme

    2007-01-01

    The Committee of the Long Term Collections (CLT) asks for your attention for the following message from a young Peruvian scientist, following the earthquake which devastated part of her country a month ago.

  11. Study on the fire-protection-system for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel and transportation ships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. O; Choi, M. H.; Lee, S. C. and others [Dongbang Electron Industry Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    This study consists of : the fire risk and it's fire protection for the storage facilities and transportation equipments of dangerous goods, the fire risk and it's fire protection for the interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel, the fire risk and it's fire protection for the dangerous goods transportation ships, the necessary equipment for safety of ships and regulations of fire fighting equipment for ships, technical specification of spent nuclear fuel transportation ships which are operated in foreign countries, draft of fire protection guideline for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel, inspection items of fire fighting equipment, scope of education and training. On the basis of the aforementioned, a draft of fire protection guideline for interim storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel is proposed and the regulations for ship engaged in the a carrage of dangerous goods that should be considered in design and operation stage are proposed.

  12. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  13. Synthesis on the long term behavior of spent nuclear fuel. Vol.1,2; Synthese sur l'evolution a long terme des colis de combustibles irradies. Tome 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Toulhoat, P.; Grouiller, J.P.; Pavageau, J.; Piron, J.P.; Pelletier, M.; Dehaudt, Ph.; Cappelaere, Ch.; Limon, R.; Desgranges, L.; Jegou, Ch.; Corbel, C.; Maillard, S.; Faure, M.H.; Cicariello, J.C.; Masson, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DDIN/DPRGD, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this report is to present the major objectives, the key scientific issues, and the preliminary results of the research conducted in France in the framework of the third line of the 1991 Law, on the topic of the long term behavior of spent nuclear fuel in view of long term storage or geological disposal. Indeed, CEA launched in 1998 the Research Program on the Long Term Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel (abbreviated and referred to as PRECCI in French; Poinssot, 1998) the aim of which is to study and assess the ability of spent nuclear fuel packages to keep their initially allocated functions in interim storage and geological disposal: total containment and recovery functions for duration up to hundreds of years (long term or short-term interim storage and/or first reversible stages of geological disposal) and partial confinement function (controlled fluxes of RN) for thousands of years in geological disposal. This program has to allow to obtain relevant and reliable data concerning the long term behavior of the spent fuel packages so that feasibility of interim storage and/or geological disposal can be assessed and demonstrated as well as optimized. Within this framework, this report presents for every possible scenario of evolution (closed system, in Presence of water in presence of gases) what are estimated to be the most relevant evolution mechanism. For the most relevant scientific issues hence defined, a complete scientific review of the best state of knowledge is subsequently here given thus allowing to draw a clear guideline of the major R and D issues for the next years. (authors)

  14. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Comité des collectes à long terme

    2011-01-01

    It is the time of the year when our fireman colleagues go around the laboratory for their traditional calendars sale. A part of the money of the sales will be donated in favour of the long-term collections. We hope that you will welcome them warmly.

  15. A security vulnerabilities assessment tool for interim storage facilities of low-level radioactive wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, J; Emery, R J; Williams, T; Wang, S

    2006-11-01

    Limited permanent low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal capacity and correspondingly high disposal costs have resulted in the creation of numerous interim storage facilities for either decay-in-storage operations or longer term accumulation efforts. These facilities, which may be near the site of waste generation or in distal locations, often were not originally designed for the purpose of LLRW storage, particularly with regard to security. Facility security has become particularly important in light of the domestic terrorist acts of 2001, wherein LLRW, along with many other sources of radioactivity, became recognized commodities to those wishing to create disruption through the purposeful dissemination of radioactive materials. Since some LLRW materials may be in facilities that may exhibit varying degrees of security control sophistication, a security vulnerabilities assessment tool grounded in accepted criminal justice theory and security practice has been developed. The tool, which includes dedicated sections on general security, target hardening, criminalization benefits, and the presence of guardians, can be used by those not formally schooled in the security profession to assess the level of protection afforded to their respective facilities. The tool equips radiation safety practitioners with the ability to methodically and systematically assess the presence or relative status of various facility security aspects, many of which may not be considered by individuals from outside the security profession. For example, radiation safety professionals might not ordinarily consider facility lighting aspects, which is a staple for the security profession since it is widely known that crime disproportionately occurs more frequently at night or in poorly lit circumstances. Likewise, the means and associated time dimensions for detecting inventory discrepancies may not be commonly considered. The tool provides a simple means for radiation safety professionals to

  16. Long-term nuclear waste management: Present status and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, J. P.

    1989-08-01

    Long-term nuclear waste management deals with the final and irreversible stage of waste disposal, on surface and in deep geological formations (according to the waste type), when institutional surveillance is over. There are presently two main options available to deal with the wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel unloaded from reactors and containing most of the radiotoxicity produced all along the nuclear fuel cycle. Since the end of Word War II, spent-fuel reprocessing technology has gone through three different stages, ending up with considerable technical achievements and large investments (construction of large facilities, UP3 in France and THORP in the UK). However, having to face spent-fuel risings and lack of reprocessing capacities, since the mid-seventies some countries are considering the possibility of direct spent-fuel disposal without reprocessing. These two options are discussed in terms of long-term waste management. Because of the types of waste conditioning and packaging adopted with present reprocessing technology, in that case long-term safety, after a few centuries, relies completely on the geological barriers. On the other hand, long-term safety with the second option is based essentially on the retention properties of uranium oxide with respect to actinides. Finally, alternatives such as chemical partitioning of minor actinides followed by their transmutation, either in reactors or using high-energy particle accelerators, are under discussion. Apart from the standard reprocessing (after a cooling period of 3-5 years), all the other options called for a long period (50 years) of interim storage, preventing the adoption of irreversible, costly and not well proved waste management solutions, and leaving time to develop and assess these alternative methods.

  17. Effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the viability, motility and abnormality of frozen thawed Frisian Holstein bull spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul MALIK

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results in these experiments, it may be concluded that concentration sperm during one year storage in liquid nitrogen resulted in similar concentration storage as long as six years. However, the viability and motility sperm thawed storage in liquid nitrogen during six years was lower than storage on the 1 and 2 years.

  18. Risk Assessment and Management for Long-Term Storage of CO2 in Geologic Formations — United States Department of Energy R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Deel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Concern about increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG and their impact on the earth's climate has grown significantly over the last decade. Many countries, including the United States, wrestle with balancing economic development and meeting critical near-term environmental goals while minimizing long-term environmental risks. One promising solution to the buildup of GHGs in the atmosphere, being pursued by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL and its industrial and academic partners, is carbon sequestration—a process of permanent storage of CO2 emissions in underground geologic formations, thus avoiding CO2 release to the atmosphere. This option looks particularly attractive for point source emissions of GHGs, such as fossil fuel fired power plants. CO2 would be captured, transported to a sequestration site, and injected into an appropriate geologic formation. However, sequestration in geologic formations cannot achieve a significant role in reducing GHG emissions unless it is acceptable to stakeholders, regulators, and the general public, i.e., unless the risks involved are judged to be acceptable. One tool that can be used to achieve acceptance of geologic sequestration of CO2 is risk assessment, which is a proven method to objectively manage hazards in facilities such as oil and natural gas fields, pipelines, refineries, and chemical plants. Although probabilistic risk assessment (PRA has been applied in many areas, its application to geologic CO2 sequestration is still in its infancy. The most significant risk from geologic carbon sequestration is leakage of CO2. Two types of CO2 releases are possible—atmospheric and subsurface. High concentrations of CO2 caused by a release to the atmosphere would pose health risks to humans and animals, and any leakage of CO2 back into the atmosphere negates the effort expended to sequester the CO2

  19. Cost Sensitivity Analysis for Consolidated Interim Storage of Spent Fuel: Evaluating the Effect of Economic Environment Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumberland, Riley M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Kent Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jarrell, Joshua J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joseph, III, Robert Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report evaluates how the economic environment (i.e., discount rate, inflation rate, escalation rate) can impact previously estimated differences in lifecycle costs between an integrated waste management system with an interim storage facility (ISF) and a similar system without an ISF.

  20. A long-term randomised trial on tenoxicam and piroxicam in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a 24-month interim report focusing on the 12-24 month interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, B; Andersen, R B; Fossgreen, J

    1987-01-01

    or knee have been reported. This interim analysis focuses mainly on the 12 to 24 month interval. The clinical improvements obtained within the first 12 months persisted during the second year in the 55 patients remaining on treatment. After 24 months, 53 patients had been withdrawn prematurely, three...

  1. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  2. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    45 years helping in developing countries! CERN personnel have been helping the least fortunate people on the planet since 1971. How? With the Long-Term Collections! Dear Colleagues, The Staff Association’s Long-Term Collections (LTC) Committee is delighted to share this important milestone in the life of our Laboratory with you. Indeed, whilst the name of CERN is known worldwide for scientific discoveries, it also shines in the many humanitarian projects which have been supported by the LTC since 1971. Several schools and clinics, far and wide, carry its logo... Over the past 45 years, 74 projects have been supported (9 of which are still ongoing). This all came from a group of colleagues who wanted to share a little of what life offered them here at CERN, in this haven of mutual understanding, peace and security, with those who were less fortunate elsewhere. Thus, the LTC were born... Since then, we have worked as a team to maintain the dream of these visionaries, with the help of regular donat...

  3. Long-Term Collection

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, As previously announced in Echo (No. 254), your delegates took action to draw attention to the projects of the Long-Term Collections (LTC), the humanitarian body of the CERN Staff Association. On Tuesday, 11 October, at noon, small Z-Cards were widely distributed at the entrances of CERN restaurants and we thank you all for your interest. We hope to have achieved an important part of our goal, which was to inform you, convince you and find new supporters among you. We will find out in the next few days! An exhibition of the LTC was also set up in the Main Building for the entire week. The Staff Association wants to celebrate the occasion of the Long-Term Collection’s 45th anniversary at CERN because, ever since 1971, CERN personnel have showed great support in helping the least fortunate people on the planet in a variety of ways according to their needs. On a regular basis, joint fundraising appeals are made with the Directorate to help the victims of natural disasters around th...

  4. Collectes à long terme

    CERN Document Server

    Collectes à long terme

    2014-01-01

    En cette fin d’année 2014 qui approche à grands pas, le Comité des Collectes à Long Terme remercie chaleureusement ses fidèles donatrices et donateurs réguliers pour leurs contributions à nos actions en faveur des plus démunis de notre planète. C’est très important, pour notre Comité, de pouvoir compter sur l’appui assidu que vous nous apportez. Depuis plus de 40 ans maintenant, le modèle des CLT est basé principalement sur des actions à long terme (soit une aide pendant 4-5 ans par projet, mais plus parfois selon les circonstances), et sa planification demande une grande régularité de ses soutiens financiers. Grand MERCI à vous ! D’autres dons nous parviennent au cours de l’année, et ils sont aussi les bienvenus. En particulier, nous tenons à remercier...

  5. DKJStartDKJStartGHGT-12 Regulating the operational and long-term liabilities associated with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Approaches and lessons from Europe, Australia and Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havercroft, Ian; Macrory, Richard

    2014-01-01

    ... detailed legislative regimes for regulating and facilitating the development of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) activities. While many aspects of these regulatory regimes vary between countrie...

  6. Experimental determination of the long-term strength and stability of laterally bounding fault zones in CO2 storage reservoirs based on kinetic modeling of fault zone evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, J. E.; Koenen, M.; Tambach, T.

    2011-12-01

    Long-term sequestration of CO2, harvested from point sources such as coal burning power plants and cement manufactories, in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is considered to be one of the most attractive options for short- to medium-term mitigation of anthropogenic forcing of climate change. Many such reservoirs are laterally bounded by low-permeability fault zones which could potentially be reactivated either by changes in stress state during and after the injection process, and also by alterations in the frictional strength of fault gouge material. Of additional concern is how the stability of the fault zones will change as a result of the influence of supercritical CO2, specifically whether the rate and state frictional constitutive parameters (a, b, DC) of the fault zone will change in such a way as to enhance the likelihood of seismic activity on the fault zone. The short-term influence of CO2 on frictional strength and stability of simulated fault gouges prepared from mixtures of cap rock and reservoir rock has been analyzed recently [Samuelson et al., In Prep.], concluding that CO2 has little influence on frictional constitutive behavior on the timescale of a typical experiment (CO2 is intended to be sequestered, we have chosen to model the long-term mineralogical alteration of a fault zone with a simple starting mineralogy of 33% quartz, 33% illite, and 33% dolomite by weight using the geochemical modeling program PHREEQC and the THERMODDEM database, assuming instantaneous mixing of the CO2 with the fault gouge. The geochemical modeling predicts that equilibrium will be reached between fault gouge, reservoir brine, and CO2 in approximately 440 years, assuming an average grain-size (davg) of 20 μm, and ~90 years assuming davg =4 μm, a reasonable range of grain-sizes for natural fault gouges. The main change to gouge mineralogy comes from the complete dissolution of illite, and the precipitation of muscovite. The final equilibrium mineralogy of the fault

  7. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  8. New strategies for submicron characterization the carbon binding of reactive minerals in long-term contrasting fertilized soils: implications for soil carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jian; He, Xinhua; Hao, Jialong; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Lirong; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Yu, Guanghui

    2016-06-01

    Mineral binding is a major mechanism for soil carbon (C) stabilization. However, the submicron information about the in situ mechanisms of different fertilization practices affecting organo-mineral complexes and associated C preservation remains unclear. Here, we applied nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) to examine differentiating effects of inorganic versus organic fertilization on interactions between highly reactive minerals and soil C preservation. To examine such interactions, soils and their extracted colloids were collected during a 24-year long-term fertilization period (1990-2014) (no fertilization, control; chemical nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) fertilization, NPK; and NPK plus swine manure fertilization, NPKM). The results for different fertilization conditions showed a ranked soil organic matter concentration with NPKM > NPK > control. Meanwhile, oxalate-extracted Al (Alo), Fe (Feo), short-range ordered Al (Alxps), Fe (Fexps), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranked with NPKM > control > NPK, but the ratios of DOC / Alxps and DOC / Fexps ranked with NPKM > NPK > control. Compared with the NPK treatment, the NPKM treatment enhanced the C-binding loadings of Al and Fe minerals in soil colloids at the submicron scale. Furthermore, a greater concentration of highly reactive Al and Fe minerals was presented under NPKM than under NPK. Together, these submicron-scale findings suggest that both the reactive mineral species and their associations with C are differentially affected by 24-year long-term inorganic and organic fertilization.

  9. LONG TERM COLLECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Long-Term Collections (CLT) committee would like to warmly thank its faithful donors who, year after year, support our actions all over the world. Without you, all this would not be possible. We would like to thank, in particular, the CERN Firemen’s Association who donated 5000 CHF in the spring thanks to the sale of their traditional calendar, and the generosity of the CERN community. A huge thank you to the firemen for their devotion to our cause. And thank you to all those who have opened their door, their heart, and their purses! Similarly, we warmly thank the CERN Yoga Club once again for its wonderful donation of 2000 CHF we recently received. We would also like to tell you that all our projects are running well. Just to remind you, we are currently supporting the activities of the «Réflexe-Partage» Association in Mali; the training centre of «Education et Développement» in Abomey, Benin; and the orphanage and ...

  10. Impact of different cryoprotectants on the survival of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei/paracasei during long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré, A; Aymerich, T; Garriga, M

    2015-01-01

    The production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried probiotic/starter cultures is of paramount importance for the food industry. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of glucose, lactose, trehalose, and skim milk applied alone or combined upon the survival of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, Lactobacillus casei/paracasei CTC1677 and L. casei/paracasei CTC1678 during freeze-drying and after 39 weeks of storage at 4 and 22 °C. Immediately after freeze-drying, the percentage of survivors was very high (≥ 94%) and only slight differences were observed among strains and cryoprotectants. In contrast, during storage, survival in the dried state depended on the cryoprotectant, temperature and strain. For all the protectants assayed, the stability of the cultures was remarkably higher when stored under refrigeration (4 °C). Under these conditions, skim milk alone or supplemented with trehalose or lactose showed the best performance (reductions ≤ 0.9 log units after 39 weeks of storage). The lowest survival was observed during non-refrigerated storage and with glucose and glucose plus milk; no viable cells left at the end of the storage period. Thus, freeze-drying in the presence of appropriate cryoprotectants allows the production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried cultures ready for incorporation in high numbers into food products as starter/potential probiotic cultures.

  11. Changes in the contents of anthocyanins and other compounds in blackberry fruits due to freezing and long-term frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veberic, Robert; Stampar, Franci; Schmitzer, Valentina; Cunja, Vlasta; Zupan, Anka; Koron, Darinka; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja

    2014-07-23

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fast and slow freezing and frozen storage on the metabolite content of six blackberry cultivars. The content of metabolites determined with HPLC RI/PDA-MS in stored blackberries was compared with the initial content of the fruit. During frozen storage of fruits a loss of vitamin C up to 80% has been recorded along with changes of color values, which shifted to blue and yellow hues. The color changes were accompanied with increased pH levels and content of anthocyanins. Most of the phenolic groups, sugars, and organic acids showed a better extraction after storage, especially in the slow freezing treatment due to a higher degree of tissue damage by freezing. The 'Thornless Evergreen' cultivar was especially rich in sugars, vitamin C, and phenolic compounds, but the highest levels of anthocyanins were determined in 'Loch Ness' cultivar.

  12. A good long-term electricity storage. Biomethanisation by Power-to-Gas; Ein guter Langzeitstromspeicher. Biomethanisierung durch Power-to-Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finck, Christian

    2013-10-15

    With the Power-to-Gas process, the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW) developed in cooperation with the Fraunhofer IWES, in 2009, a technique that would enable to store electricity from renewable energy plants (EEA) for a long term. The underlying Sabatier process is old, the inclusion of renewable energy to biomethanisation is new. The Power-to-Gas process uses electricity produced from wind turbines for the electrolysis of water to produce hydrogen and oxygen. In a subsequent synthesis with the emitted CO{sub 2} from the biogas plants biomethane is produced with an energy efficiency of >65% kWh{sub SNG}/kWh{sub el}. [German] Mit dem Power-to-Gas-Verfahren entwickelte das Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), in Zusammenarbeit mit der Fraunhofer IWES, im Jahr 2009 eine Technik, die es ermoeglichen wuerde, Strom aus Erneuerbaren Energieanlagen (EEA) langfristig zu speichern. Der zugrunde liegende Sabatierprozess ist alt, die Einbeziehung der EE zur Biomethanisierung ist neu. Das Power-to-Gas-Verfahren nutzt den produzierten Strom aus Windenergieanlagen, um das Wasser elektrolytisch in Wasserstoff und Sauerstoff zu spalten. In einer anschliessenden Synthese mit dem emittierten CO{sub 2} aus den Biogasanlagen wird Biomethan, mit einem energetischen Wirkungsgrad >65% kWh{sub SNG}/kWh{sub el}, produziert.

  13. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O. [AREVA, 33 rue Lafayette, F-75009 Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  14. Long-term simulations of forest management impacts on carbon storage from loblolly pine plantations in the Southern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huei-Jin Wang; Philip J. Radtke; Stephen P. Prisley

    2012-01-01

    Accounting for forest components in carbon accounting systems may be insufficient when substantial amounts of sequestered carbon are harvested and converted to wood products in use and in landfill. The potential of forest offset – in-woods aboveground carbon storage, carbon stored in harvested wood, and energy offset by burning harvested wood – from loblolly pine...

  15. Assessing the short-term and long-term integrity of top seals in feasibility studies of geological CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.

    2011-01-01

    The geomechanical effects of past hydrocarbon production and subsequent CO2 injection in depleted gas reservoirs were evaluated as a part of several recently accomplished feasibility studies of CO2 storage in the Netherlands. The objectives of geomechanical studies were to assess the mechanical

  16. Subsurface impact of CO2: Response of carbonate rocks and wellbore cement to supercritical CO2 injection and long-term storage. Geologica Ultraiectina (310)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liteanu, E.

    2009-01-01

    Capture of CO2 at fossil fuel power station coupled with geological storage in empty oil and gas reservoirs is widely viewed as the most promising option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, i.e. for climate change mitigation. Injection of CO2 into such reservoirs will change their chemical

  17. Preliminary decommissioning plan for Clab (Central interim storage for spent fuels); Preliminaer avvecklingsplan foer Clab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatter, Patrik; Wikstroem, Nina [SWECO, Stockholm (Sweden); Hallberg, Bengt [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2005-12-15

    In the The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority's Regulations SSI FS 2002:04 and The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Regulations SKI FS 2004:1 it is stated that the owner of a nuclear facility must have a preliminary plan for decommissioning of the plant. The present report is a preliminary plan for decommissioning the Central interim storage for spent fuels (Clab). Clab will be decommissioned when all spent fuels and reactor core components have been sent to final disposal. The time for the decommissioning is dependent on the time for phasing out the last Swedish nuclear reactor. At present it is thought that Clab will remain in operation until after year 2050. During the work with this project, nothing has been found that indicates that decommissioning Clab could be more complicated than other plants whose decommissioning is closer in time. On the contrary, smaller radiation doses to the personnel are expected, as well as limited amounts of low and medium activity waste. This plan will be updated and more detailed as the time for decommissioning approaches.

  18. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for monitoring for radioactive and non-radioactive parameters, summaries of environmental program at HISS, a summary of the results, and the calculated hypothetical radiation dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) began environmental monitoring of HISS in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and subsequent to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). Contamination at HISS originated from uranium processing work conducted at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) from 1942 through 1957.

  19. Operational Implementation of the MARSSIM Process at the Wayne Interim Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, D. C. Jr.; Trujillo, P. A. IV.; Zoller, S. G.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the methodologies behind the operational implementation of the Multi Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) process at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Environmental Chemical Corporation (ECC) have implemented the MARSSIM process using various surveys producing raw data. The final remedial status of a survey unit is derived through data reduction, while maintaining a high degree of efficiency in the construction aspects of the remedial action. Data reduction of field measurements is accomplished by merging the data outputs of a Digital Global Positioning System, an exposure rate meter, and laboratory analyses to produce maps which present exposure rates, elevations, survey unit boundaries, direct measurement locations, and sampling locations on a single map. The map serves as a data-posting plot and allows the project team to easily judge the survey unit's remedial status. The operational implementation of the MARSSIM process has been successful in determining the eligibility of survey units for final status surveys at the WISS and also in demonstrating final status radiological and chemical conditions while maintaining an efficient remedial action effort.

  20. Exploitation of FTA cartridges for the sampling, long-term storage, and DNA-based analyses of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Martin; Zouhar, Miloslav; Douda, Ondřej; Maňasová, Marie; Ryšánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    The use of DNA-based analyses in molecular plant nematology research has dramatically increased over recent decades. Therefore, the development and adaptation of simple, robust, and cost-effective DNA purification procedures are required to address these contemporary challenges. The solid-phase-based approach developed by Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) has been shown to be a powerful technology for the preparation of DNA from different biological materials, including blood, saliva, plant tissues, and various human and plant microbial pathogens. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, that this FTA-based technology is a valuable, low-cost, and time-saving approach for the sampling, long-term archiving, and molecular analysis of plant-parasitic nematodes. Despite the complex structure and anatomical organization of the multicellular bodies of nematodes, we report the successful and reliable DNA-based analysis of nematode high-copy and low-copy genes using the FTA technology. This was achieved by applying nematodes to the FTA cards either in the form of a suspension of individuals, as intact or pestle-crushed nematodes, or by the direct mechanical printing of nematode-infested plant tissues. We further demonstrate that the FTA method is also suitable for the so-called "one-nematode-assay", in which the target DNA is typically analyzed from a single individual nematode. More surprisingly, a time-course experiment showed that nematode DNA can be detected specifically in the FTA-captured samples many years after initial sampling occurs. Collectively, our data clearly demonstrate the applicability and the robustness of this FTA-based approach for molecular research and diagnostics concerning phytonematodes; this research includes economically important species such as the stem nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci), the sugar beet nematode (Heterodera schachtii), and the Northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla).

  1. Detection of nuclear and membrane antigens by liquid-based cytology following long-term storage of d1 cells, karpas cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, Roberta; Aiello, Francesca B; D'Antuono, Tommaso; Procopio, Antonio D; Durum, Scott K; Conti, Pio; Rosini, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is the most frequently utilized technique to analyze protein expression. Fixed immunofluorescent cell suspensions, however, can only be stored for a week. We investigated whether liquid-based cytology could be used to detect antigens in cultured cells after a long storage period. Murine and human cells were fixed in PreservCyt solution, stored for various periods, and then used to perform an automated immunocytochemical analysis. Phosphorylation of the nuclear transcription factor Stat-5 induced by IL-7 was detected up to 4 months after IL-7 stimulation. Simultaneous nuclear positivity for the proliferation index MIB-1 and membrane positivity for the CD30 antigen were evident three months after fixation. Liquid-based cytology thus ensures long-lasting nuclear and membrane antigen immunoreactivity and permits the storage of cells from laborious experiments at room temperature for future analyses.

  2. Biochemical Basis of CO2-Related Internal Browning Disorders in Pears (Pyrus communis L. cv. Rocha) during Long-Term Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuchande, Teresa; Larrigaudière, Christian; Giné-bordonaba, Jordi; Pinto de Carvalho, Susana; Vasconcelos, Marta W.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding the biochemical basis of internal browning disorders (IBDs) in ‘Rocha’ pear. For this purpose, the effects of storage under normal controlled atmosphere (CA) (3 kPa of O2 + 0.5 kPa of CO2) and IBD-inducing CA (1 kPa of O2 + 10 kPa of CO2) on the antioxidant and ferm

  3. Biochemical Basis of CO2-Related Internal Browning Disorders in Pears (Pyrus communis L. cv. Rocha) during Long-Term Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuchande, Teresa; Larrigaudière, Christian; Giné-bordonaba, Jordi; Pinto de Carvalho, Susana; Vasconcelos, Marta W.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding the biochemical basis of internal browning disorders (IBDs) in ‘Rocha’ pear. For this purpose, the effects of storage under normal controlled atmosphere (CA) (3 kPa of O2 + 0.5 kPa of CO2) and IBD-inducing CA (1 kPa of O2 + 10 kPa of CO2) on the antioxidant and

  4. Changes in the Bioactive Compounds Content of Soybean as a Function of Grain Moisture Content and Temperature during Long-Term Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Valmor; Vanier, Nathan Levien; Ferreira, Cristiano Dietrich; Paraginski, Ricardo Tadeu; Monks, Jander Luis Fernandes; Elias, Moacir Cardoso

    2016-03-01

    Soybean is a rich source of bioactive compounds, such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, isoflavones, carotenoids, and tocopherols. The amount of bioactive compounds in freshly harvested soybeans and their derived products has been determined; however, when they are used in the food industry, soybeans are generally stored prior to being processed. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of soybean moisture content (12%, 15%, and 18%) and storage temperature (11, 18, 25, and 32 °C) on the free phenolic, total flavonoid, vanillic acid, total carotenoid, and δ- and γ-tocopherol content of soybeans stored for 12 mo. Moreover, the ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activities of phenolic extracts were determined. There was an increase in free phenolics and total flavonoids in the stored grains compared with the grains on the 1st d of storage. Vanillic acid showed a decrease in soybeans stored at 15% and 18% moisture content and 25 or 32 °C, which indicated some degradation into other metabolites. Total carotenoid content decreased as a function of storage temperature and showed some temperature-dependent degradation. The δ- and γ-tocopherol content also tended to decrease in grains stored at 15% or 18% moisture content or 25 or 32 °C, regardless of the moisture content studied.

  5. The use of gelatine in long-term storage (up to 48 hr) at 5°C preserves the pre-freezing and post-thawing quality of brown bear sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Urueña, E; Anel-López, L; Borragan, S; Ortega Ferrusola, C; Manrique, P; de Paz, P; Anel, L; Alvarez, M

    2016-10-01

    Sedimentation of spermatozoa occurs during long-term liquid storage and this may produce deleterious changes. Our aim was to apply gelatine supplementation during long-term pre-freezing storage of bear sperm, applying final dilution and 6% glycerol at room temperature and cool in straws. We tested four models of sperm storage using a 1:1 dilution in TTF-ULE-Bear extender (TesT-fructose-egg yolk-glycerol 6%): (i) second 1:1 dilution at room temperature (RT), cooling at 5°C in a tube and final dilution (100 × 10(6)  sperm ml(-1) ) (Standard); (ii) final dilution at RT and cooling in a tube (FD-Tube); (iii) final dilution at RT and cooling in 0.25 ml plastic straw (FD-Straw); and (iv) final dilution at RT in extender supplemented with 1.5% gelatine (Gelatine) and cooling in a 0.25 ml plastic straw. A Standard sample was stored at 5°C for 1 hr (Control); the rest of the samples (Standard, FD-Tube, FD-Straw, Gelatine) were stored for 24 or 48 hrs before freezing (100 × 10(6)  sperm ml(-1) , glycerol 6%). The quality of the samples was assessed for motility by CASA, and viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide-PI-; VIAB), acrosomal status (PNA-FITC/PI; iACR) and apoptotic status (YO-PRO-1/PI; YOPRO-) by flow cytometry. At pre-freezing, after 48 hr, Gelatine showed significantly higher viability (for VIAB and YOPRO-) and progressiveness (PM, LIN and STR). At 48 hr, Gelatine showed similar YOPRO-, iACR, LIN, STR and ALH respect to Control. At both 24 and 48 h post-thawing, Gelatine sample had similar scores for YOPRO-, iACR, LIN, STR, WOB and VIAB (only 24 hr) when compared with Control, and lower for TM, PM, rapidPM, VAP and ALH. No differences were found among others experimental groups with respect to Control. In conclusion, gelatine could be a suitable alternative to preserve the viability and progressive motility of brown bear ejaculates during long-term pre-freezing storage at 5°C.

  6. Implications of Sub-Hydrostatic Pressures in the Bravo Dome Natural CO2 Reservoir for the Long-Term Security of Geological Carbon Dioxide Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.; Larson, T.

    2014-12-01

    for the observed 5 MPa drop in pore pressures at Bravo Dome. This is consistent with geochemical observation suggesting significant dissolution of CO2 at Bravo Dome (Gilfillan 2009). The observation of sub-hydrostatic pressures in CO2 reservoirs is important because they illustrate that CO2 dissolution may mitigate problems due to injection induced overpressure in the long-term.

  7. Evaluation of a low-cost procedure for sampling, long-term storage, and extraction of RNA from blood for qPCR analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Frøkiær, Hanne; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: In large clinical trials, where RNA cannot be extracted immediately after sampling, preserving RNA in whole blood is a crucial initial step in obtaining robust qPCR data. The current golden standard for RNA preservation is costly and designed for time-consuming column-based RNA....../binding solution over time and between samples stored and extracted by the two systems. Conclusions: The MagMAX system can be used for storage of human blood for up to 4 months and is equivalent to the PAXgene system for RNA extraction. It furthermore, provides a means for significant cost reduction in large...

  8. Water management issues in the underground gasification of coal and the subsequent use of the voids for long-term carbon dioxide storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younger, P.L. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Newcastle Inst. for Research on Sustainability; Gonzalez, G. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Sir Joseph Swan Inst. for Energy Research; Amezaga, J.M. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Hydrogeochemical Engineering Research and Outreach

    2010-07-01

    A coupled underground coal gasification (UCG) and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology was discussed. The technologies can be coupled so that voids created by mining can be uses as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites. UCG involves the in-situ gasification of coal using directionally-drilled wells. The gasification is achieved by spontaneous combustion initiated by the injection of steam and oxygen. The rate of UCG is controlled by varying the availability of oxygen. The syngas produced during the process is drawn to the surface via neighbouring production boreholes where it can then be transported by pipeline for use in range of applications. Voids created by the UCG process will collapse, leaving high permeability zones isolated from the surface by low permeability superincumbent strata. The UCG goaf and relaxed roof strata will have permeabilities 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than the permeabilities of deep saline aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs. The void volume needed to store the CO{sub 2} produced from the syngas can be 4 or 5 times the volume occupied by the extracted coal. Risks for groundwater arising from UCG are groundwater depletion, contamination, and gas leakage. Prudent site selection and the use of an effective risk assessment framework are needed to ensure the successful implementation of UCG-CCS processes. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Submicron-sized mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} beads with trapped SnO{sub 2} for long-term, high-rate lithium storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: liushengzhongtju@163.com; Zhu, Kunlei, E-mail: zhukunlei_123@163.com; Tian, Jianhua, E-mail: jhtian@tju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wenxuan, E-mail: wenxuanzhang1989@163.com; Bai, Shuming, E-mail: bai_shuming@126.com; Shan, Zhongqiang, E-mail: shanzq@tju.edu.cn

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • The TS beads were synthesized using mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} beads as precursors. • The SnO{sub 2} is successfully trapped by TiO{sub 2} beads confirmed by SEM, XRD and XPS etc. • The electrochemical performance of TiO{sub 2} beads is greatly improved by trapping SnO{sub 2}. • The excellent electrochemical ability of TS beads is due to their special structure. - Abstract: Submicron-sized mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} beads with trapped SnO{sub 2} (TS beads) have been fabricated by using mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} beads as precursors prepared by a combined sol–gel and solvothermal method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to confirm that the SnO{sub 2} is successfully trapped by mesoporous anatase TiO{sub 2} beads. The electrochemical performance of TiO{sub 2} beads for lithium storage is significantly improved by trapping SnO{sub 2}. The TS beads with 24.12% SnO{sub 2} trapping ratio show a discharge capacity of 436.5 mA h g{sup −1} after 850 cycles at 1 C (1 C = 170 mA g{sup −1}) charge–discharge rate. Moreover, the TS beads also exhibit 225.7 mA h g{sup −1} and 119.7 mA h g{sup −1} discharge capacities at 5 C and 10 C charge–discharge rates after 2000 cycles, respectively. In addition, the Coulombic efficiency is nearly 100% at each cycle at various charge–discharge rates. The excellent lithium storage properties of TS beads could be attributed to their synergistic effect that SnO{sub 2} provides high lithium storage capacity and mesoporous TiO{sub 2} accommodates volume change of SnO{sub 2} effectively.

  10. Antioxidants in yacon products and effect of long term storage Antioxidantes em produtos de yacon e efeito de armazenamento a longo prazo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Castro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. and Endl. H. Robinson is a storage root originally grown in the Andean highlands. The fresh roots are perishable and quickly turn brown during handling and processing. Aiming to prolong shelf-life and to preserve the antioxidant compounds in yacon roots, 3 mm thick yacon slices were dried in a drying cabinet at 40, 50, and 60 ºC to a moisture content of 10-14%, and yacon strips were sun dried to a moisture content of 15-20%. The total phenolic content was measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the quenching capacity was evaluated by measuring the amount of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pidrylhydrazyl inhibited in samples after drying and after 7 months of storage. The results showed that it is possible to preserve the antioxidant capacity in yacon after cabinet or sun drying. Both yacon chips and strips presented total phenolic content values similar to those of fresh yacon roots. Both products also showed a high inhibition capacity of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pidrylhydrazyl. A significant decrease in the phenolic content was observed in the yacon chips after storage, which indicates that the sun dried strips are more suitable for storage.Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. e Endl. H. Robinson é uma cultura de raiz de reserva, originária dos planaltos andinos. As raízes frescas são perecíveis e escurecem facilmente durante o manuseio e o processamento. Com o objetivo de aumentar o tempo de prateleira e a preservação de antioxidantes nas raízes frescas, rodelas finas (chips de raízes de 3 mm de tamanho foram secas numa estufa a 40, 50 e 60 ºC e pedaços de raízes também foram secas ao sol até apresentarem umidade de 10-14% e 15-20%, respectivamente. O conteúdo de fenóis totais foi determinado pelo método de Folin-Ciocalteu, e a estabilidade oxidativa foi avaliada através da determinação da quantidade de DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pidrylhydrazyl inibida nas amostras após a secagem e durante os 7

  11. Inter- and intra-breed comparative study of sperm motility and viability in Iberian and Duroc boar semen during long-term storage in MR-A and XCell extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hidalgo, D; Barón, F J; Robina, A; Bragado, M J; Llera, A Hurtado de; García-Marín, L J; Gil, M C

    2013-06-01

    During boar semen liquid preservation, extender is one of the factors that influence storage tolerance of spermatozoa. However, there are few studies about intra-breed variation in the preservation of semen quality during storage in different extenders. Similarly, boar breed is generally not considered a possible factor influencing variation in the semen storage tolerance in a particular extender. The aim of this study was to compare boar semen storage potential, in terms of the ability to maintain sperm viability and motility, of two currently used long-term extenders, MR-A and XCell. Extended semen from two breeds, Iberian and Duroc that had been stored at 17°C for up to 7 days was used. Intra- and inter-breed effect was studied. On Days 1, 4 and 7 (Day 0=day of semen collection), motility parameters and the percentage of total motile sperm and progressively motile sperm using a CASA system was evaluated. Viability (SYBR-14/PI) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Within each breed and for each storage day, there were differences between extenders, although semen tolerance to preservation was more influenced by the extender in the Iberian than in the Duroc breed. Neither breed nor extender influenced the percentage of viable spermatozoa during the storage time. Moreover, differences in motility parameters were observed between breeds, although the differences were greater when the XCell extender was used. In conclusion, both extender and breed influence motility characteristics of liquid-stored boar semen, so both aspects have to be considered in the design of comparative studies about stored boar semen quality from different breeds or with different extenders. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  12. Long-term urethral catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Dickens, Nicola

    This article discusses long-term urethral catheterisation, focusing on the relevant anatomy and physiology, indications for the procedure, catheter selection and catheter care. It is important that nurses have a good working knowledge of long-term catheterisation as the need for this intervention will increase with the rise in chronic health conditions and the ageing population.

  13. Co-modification of nitrogen-doped graphene and carbon on Li3V2(PO4)3 particles with excellent long-term and high-rate performance for lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Manman; Yang, Mingzhi; Liu, Weiliang; Li, Mei; Su, Liwei; Wu, Xianbin; Wang, Yuanhao

    2016-09-01

    In this work, N-doped graphene and carbon co-modified Li3V2(PO4)3 composites (LVP/NGC) are successfully fabricated through a xerogel method for the first time. The obtained architecture combines two types of electronic contact with Li3V2(PO4)3 particles: the point-to-face contact of N-doped graphene and the face-to-face contact of N-doped carbon coating layers. Profiting from the favorable complex structure, graphene and carbon coating layers offer an extraordinary network for electron transfer and hence an excellent long-term and high-rate performance. Even tested at the rate of 40 C, the reversible capacity still maintains 86.9 mAh g-1 after 800 cycles without any fading. This work provides a promising route to improve the long-term and high-rate performance of cathodes for LIBs and enlightens us on exploring preferable strategies to develop advanced electrode materials for other energy storage devices.

  14. Antifungal activity of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Lactobacillus plantarum during sourdough fermentation: identification of novel compounds and long-term effect during storage of wheat bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Cassone, Angela; Rizzello, Carlo G; Nionelli, Luana; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Gobbetti, Marco

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the antifungal activity of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and sourdough lactic acid bacteria to extend the shelf life of wheat flour bread. The antifungal activity was assayed by agar diffusion, growth rate inhibition, and conidial germination assays, using Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1 as the indicator fungus. Sourdough fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum 1A7 (S1A7) and dough fermented by W. anomalus LCF1695 (D1695) were selected and characterized. The water/salt-soluble extract of S1A7 was partially purified, and several novel antifungal peptides, encrypted into sequences of Oryza sativa proteins, were identified. The water/salt-soluble extract of D1695 contained ethanol and, especially, ethyl acetate as inhibitory compounds. As shown by growth inhibition assays, both water/salt-soluble extracts had a large inhibitory spectrum, with some differences, toward the most common fungi isolated from bakeries. Bread making at a pilot plant was carried out with S1A7, D1695, or a sourdough started with a combination of both strains (S1A7-1695). Slices of the bread manufactured with S1A7-1695 did not show contamination by fungi until 28 days of storage in polyethylene bags at room temperature, a level of protection comparable to that afforded by 0.3% (wt/wt) calcium propionate. The effect of sourdough fermentation with W. anomalus LCF1695 was also assessed based on rheology and sensory properties.

  15. Fitness is Recovered with the Decline of Dimethachlon Resistance in Laboratory-induced Mutants of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum after Long-term Cold Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Li Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available After four years of cold storage, dimethachlon resistance of two laboratory-induced resistant Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates SCG7 and LA50 declined by 99.5% and 98.9%, respectively, and cross resistance to iprodione and procymidone also declined dramatically. Along with the decline of fungicide resistance, osmotic sensitivity to sodium chloride and glucose decreased tremendously; mycelial growth rate, sclerotia number and weight per potato dextrose agar (PDA plate increased on average by 118.6%, 85. 5% and 64.5%, respectively; and virulence to detached leaves of oilseed rape increased by 72.7% on average. Significant negative correlations were detected between dimethachlon resistance levels and mycelial growth rate on PDA (r = −0.980, P = 0.021, and between resistance levels and lesion diameters on detached leaves of oilseed rape plants (r = −0.997, P = 0.002. These results have profound implications for assessing the potential risk for resistance development to dicarboximide fungicides in S. sclerotiorum.

  16. Long term immersion corrosion tests on metal-PCM pairs used for latent heat storage in the 24 to 29 C temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, L.F.; Roca, J.; Noguees, M. [Universitat de Lleida, Jaume II, 69, 25001 Lleida (Spain); Mehling, H.; Hiebler, S. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Div. of Energy Conversion and Storage, Walther-Meissner-Str. 6, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) can be used for heating and cooling in buildings with two applications in mind. First, using natural heat and cold sources, that is solar energy for heating or night cold for cooling. Second, using manmade heat or cold sources more efficiently. In any case, storage of heat or cold with PCMs is necessary to match availability and demand with respect to time and also with respect to power. Depending on where and how the PCM is integrated, PCMs with different melting points are applied. Currently, there is a lack of commercial PCMs in the lower temperature range, that is between 5 and 29 C. The research to develop such materials is bringing new PCMs to the market, but they should be tested before application. Their corrosion behaviour is one of the aspects to be considered. In the present work, we tested the corrosion resistance of five commercial metals in contact with PCMs with a melting temperature in the range of 5 to 29 C in experiments with a duration up to 500 days. The PCMs were a commercial one, TH29 from TEAP (Australia), with a chemical composition of CaCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O and an unknown nucleator, and the mixture of this material with MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O (2:1wt%) to obtain a new PCM with melting temperature around 23 C. The main conclusions to be taken were that aluminum and steel should not be used in combination with these PCMs, but all the other metals have shown no problems. Maybe, only the fact that stainless steel can produce some orange precipitate, together with former literature recommendations to avoid the use of this metal, should be highlighted. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Long-term fungal inhibitory activity of water-soluble extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto and sourdough lactic acid bacteria during bread storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo G; Nigro, Franco; De Angelis, Maria; Arnault, Philip; Gobbetti, Marco

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal activity of proteinaceous compounds from different food matrices was investigated. In initial experiments, water-soluble extracts of wheat sourdoughs, cheeses, and vegetables were screened by agar diffusion assays with Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1 as the indicator fungus. Water-soluble extracts of sourdough fermented with Lactobacillus brevis AM7 and Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto were selected for further study. The crude water-soluble extracts of L. brevis AM7 sourdough and P. vulgaris cv. Pinto had a MIC of 40 mg of peptide/ml and 30.9 mg of protein/ml, respectively. MICs were markedly lower when chemically synthesized peptides or partially purified protein fractions were used. The water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto showed inhibition toward a large number of fungal species isolated from bakeries. Phaseolin alpha-type precursor, phaseolin, and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin precursor were identified in the water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto by nano liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. When the antifungal activity was assayed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all three proteins were inhibitory. A mixture of eight peptides was identified from the water-soluble extract of sourdough L. brevis AM7, and five of these exhibited inhibitory activity. Bread was made at the pilot plant scale by sourdough fermentation with L. brevis AM7 and addition of the water-soluble extract (27%, vol/wt; 5 mg of protein/ml) of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto. Slices of bread packed in polyethylene bags did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage at room temperature, a level of protection comparable to that afforded by 0.3% (wt/wt) calcium propionate.

  18. Influence of oxygen and long term storage on the profile of volatile compounds released from polymeric multilayer food contact materials sterilized by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salafranca, Jesús, E-mail: fjsl@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Clemente, Isabel, E-mail: isabelclemente1984@gmail.com [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Isella, Francesca, E-mail: Francesca.Isella@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy); Nerín, Cristina, E-mail: cnerin@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bosetti, Osvaldo, E-mail: Osvaldo.Bosetti@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy)

    2015-06-09

    Highlights: • 13 different food-use multilayers unirradiated and gamma-irradiated were studied. • 60–80 compounds/sample were identified by SPME–GC–MS even after 8-month storage. • Volatile profile of air- and N{sub 2}-filled bags greatly differed after irradiation. • Principal component analysis classified the samples into 4 groups. • Migration from irradiated materials to vapor phase was much lower than EU limits. - Abstract: The profile of volatile compounds released from 13 different multilayer polymeric materials for food use, before and after their exposure to gamma radiation, has been assessed by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Thermosealed bags of different materials were filled with either air or nitrogen to evaluate the oxygen influence. One-third of the samples were analyzed without irradiation, whereas the rest were irradiated at 15 and 25 kGy. Half of the samples were processed just after preparation and the other half was stored for 8 months at room temperature prior to analysis. Very significant differences between unirradiated and irradiated bags were found. About 60–80 compounds were released and identified per sample. A huge peak of 1,3-ditertbutylbenzene was present in most of the irradiated samples. An outstanding reproducibility in all the variables evaluated (chromatograms, oxygen percentage, volume of bags) was noticed. Independently of filling gas, the results of unirradiated materials were almost identical. In contrast, the chromatographic profile and the odor of irradiated bags filled with nitrogen were completely different to those filled with air. Principal component analysis was performed and 86.9% of the accumulated variance was explained with the first two components. The migration of compounds from irradiated materials to the vapor phase was much lower than the limits established in the Commission Regulation (EU) No 10/2011.

  19. Gamma Irradiation of in-Shell and Blanched Peanuts Protects against Mycotoxic Fungi and Retains Their Nutraceutical Components during Long-Term Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Guidolin Canniatti-Brazaca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Peanut samples were irradiated (0.0, 5.2, 7.2 or 10.0 kGy, stored for a year (room temperature and examined every three months. Mycotoxic fungi (MF were detected in non-irradiated blanched peanuts. A dose of 5.2 kGy was found suitable to prevent MF growth in blanched samples. No MF was detected in in-shell peanuts, with or without irradiation. The colors of the control in-shell and blanched samples were, respectively, 44.72 and 60.21 (L *; 25.20 and 20.38 (Chroma; 53.05 and 86.46 (°Hue. The water activities (Aw were 0.673 and 0.425. The corresponding fatty acids were 13.33% and 12.14% (C16:0, 44.94% and 44.92% (C18:1, ω9 and 37.10% and 37.63% (C18:2, ω6. The total phenolics (TP were 4.62 and 2.52 mg GAE/g, with antioxidant activities (AA of 16.97 and 10.36 μmol TEAC/g. Storage time negatively correlated with Aw (in-shell peanuts or L *, linoleic acid, TP and AA (in-shell and blanched peanuts but positively correlated with Aw (blanched peanuts, and with oleic acid (in-shell and blanched peanuts. Irradiation positively correlated with antioxidant activity (blanched peanuts. No correlation was found between irradiation and AA (in-shell samples or fatty acids and TP (in-shell and blanched peanuts. Irradiation protected against MF and retained both the polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols in the samples.

  20. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  1. Tenacity of human norovirus and the surrogates feline calicivirus and murine norovirus during long-term storage on common nonporous food contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormann, Sascha; Heißenberg, Cathrin; Pfannebecker, Jens; Becker, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of human norovirus (hNV) to food via contaminated surfaces is highly probable during food production, processing, and preparation. In this study, the tenacity of hNV and its cultivable surrogates feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) on two common nonporous surface materials at two storage temperatures was directly compared. Virus titer reduction on artificially inoculated stainless steel and plastic carriers was monitored for 70 days at room temperature and at 7°C. Viruses were recovered at various time points by elution. Genomes from intact capsids (hNV, FCV, and MNV) were quantified with real-time reverse transcription (RT) PCR, and infectivity (FCV and MNV) was assessed with plaque assay. RNase treatment before RNA extraction was used to eliminate exposed RNA and to assess capsid integrity. No significant differences in titer reduction were found between materials (stainless steel or plastic) with the plaque assay or the real-time quantitative RT-PCR. At room temperature, infectious FCV and MNV were detected for 7 days. Titers of intact hNV, FCV, and MNV capsids dropped gradually and were still detectable after 70 days with a loss of 3 to 4 log units. At 7°C, the viruses were considerably more stable than they were at room temperature. Although only MNV infectivity was unchanged after 70 days, the numbers of intact capsids (hNV, FCV, and MNV) were stable with less than a 1-log reduction. The results indicate that hNV persists on food contact surfaces and seems to remain infective for weeks. MNV appears to be more stable than FCV at 7°C, and thus is the most suitable surrogate for hNV under dry conditions. Although a perfect quantitative correlation between intact capsids and infective particles was not obtained, real-time quantitative RT-PCR provided qualitative data about hNV inactivation characteristics. The results of this comparative study might support future efforts in assessment of foodborne virus risk and food safety.

  2. Carbon Storage and Carbon Dioxide Emission as Influenced by Long-term Conservation Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization in Corn-Soybean Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although agriculture is a victim of environmental risk due to global warming, but ironically it also contributes toglobal greenhouse gas (GHG emission. The objective of this experiment was to determine the influence of long-termconservation tillage and N fertilization on soil carbon storage and CO2 emission in corn-soybean rotation system. Afactorial experiment was arranged in a randomized completely block design with four replications. The first factorwas tillage systems namely intensive tillage (IT, minimum tillage (MT and no-tillage (NT. While the second factorwas N fertilization with rate of 0, 100 and 200 kg N ha-1 applied for corn, and 0, 25, and 50 kg N ha-1 for soybeanproduction. Samples of soil organic carbon (SOC after 23 year of cropping were taken at depths of 0-5 cm, 5-10cm and 10-20 cm, while CO2 emission measurements were taken in corn season (2009 and soybean season (2010.Analysis of variance and means test (HSD 0.05 were analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System package. At 0-5 cm depth, SOC under NT combined with 200 kg N ha-1 fertilization was 46.1% higher than that of NT with no Nfertilization, while at depth of 5-10 cm SOC under MT was 26.2% higher than NT and 13.9% higher than IT.Throughout the corn and soybean seasons, CO2-C emissions from IT were higher than those of MT and NT, whileCO2-C emissions from 200 kg N ha-1 rate were higher than those of 0 kg N ha-1 and 100 kg N ha-1 rates. With any Nrate treatments, MT and NT could reduce CO2-C emission to 65.2 %-67.6% and to 75.4%-87.6% as much of IT,respectively. While in soybean season, MT and NT could reduce CO2-C emission to 17.6%-46.7% and 42.0%-74.3% as much of IT, respectively. Prior to generative soybean growth, N fertilization with rate of 50 kg N ha-1could reduce CO2-C emission to 32.2%-37.2% as much of 0 and 25 kg N ha-1 rates.

  3. Sugar metabolism, chip color, invertase activity, and gene expression during long-term cold storage of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers from wild-type and vacuolar invertase silencing lines of Katahdin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberley-Bradford, Amy E; Busse, James S; Jiang, Jiming; Bethke, Paul C

    2014-11-16

    Storing potato tubers at low temperatures minimizes sprouting and disease but can cause an accumulation of reducing sugars in a process called cold-induced sweetening. Tubers with increased amounts of reducing sugars produce dark-colored, bitter-tasting fried products with elevated amounts of acrylamide, a possible carcinogen. Vacuolar invertase (VInv), which converts sucrose produced by starch breakdown to glucose and fructose, is the key determinant of reducing sugar accumulation during cold-induced sweetening. In this study, wild-type tubers and tubers in which VInv expression was reduced by RNA interference were used to investigate time- and temperature-dependent changes in sugar contents, chip color, and expression of VInv and other genes involved in starch metabolism in tubers during long-term cold storage. VInv activities and tuber reducing sugar contents were much lower, and tuber sucrose contents were much higher, in transgenic than in wild-type tubers stored at 3-9°C for up to eight months. Large differences in VInv mRNA accumulation were not observed at later times in storage, especially at temperatures below 9°C, so differences in invertase activity were likely established early in the storage period and maintained by stability of the invertase protein. Sugar contents, chip color, and expression of several of the studied genes, including AGPase and GBSS, were affected by storage temperature in both wild-type and transgenic tubers. Though transcript accumulation for other sugar-metabolism genes was affected by storage temperature and duration, it was essentially unaffected by invertase silencing and altered sugar contents. Differences in stem- and bud-end sugar contents in wild-type and transgenic tubers suggested different compartmentalization of sucrose at the two ends of stored tubers. VInv silencing significantly reduced cold-induced sweetening in stored potato tubers, likely by means of differential VInv expression early in storage. Transgenic

  4. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  5. Progress and future direction for the interim safe storage and disposal of Hanford high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzer, J.E.; Wodrich, D.D. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, R.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the progress made at the largest environmental cleanup program in the United States. Substantial advances in methods to start interim safe storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes, waste characterization to support both safety- and disposal-related information needs, and proceeding with cost-effective disposal by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford Site contractors, have been realized. Challenges facing the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program, which is charged with the dual and parallel missions of interim safe storage and disposal of the high-level tank waste stored at the Hanford Site, are described. In these times of budget austerity, implementing an ongoing program that combines technical excellence and cost effectiveness is the near-term challenge. The technical initiatives and progress described in this paper are made more cost effective by DOE`s focus on work force productivity improvement, reduction of overhead costs, and reduction, integration and simplification of DOE regulations and operations requirements to more closely model those used in the private sector.

  6. Charge variants characterization of a monoclonal antibody by ion exchange chromatography coupled on-line to native mass spectrometry: Case study after a long-term storage at +5°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Y; Ramon, C; Bihoreau, N; Chevreux, G

    2017-03-24

    Numerous putative post-translational modifications may induce variations of monoclonal antibodies charge distribution that can potentially affect their biological activity. The characterization and the monitoring of these charge variants are critical quality requirements to ensure stability and process consistency. Charge variants are usually characterized by preparative ion exchange chromatography, collection of fractions and subsequent reverse-phase liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis. While this process can be automatized by on-line two-dimensional chromatography, it remains often complex and time consuming. For this reason, a straightforward on-line charge variant analysis method is highly desirable and analytical laboratories are actively pursuing efforts to overcome this challenge. In this study, a mixed mode ion exchange chromatographic method using volatile salts and coupled on-line to native mass spectrometry was developed in association with a middle-up approach for a detailed characterization of monoclonal antibodies charge variants. An aged monoclonal antibody, presenting a complex charge variant profile was successfully investigated by this methodology as a case study. Results demonstrate that deamidation of the heavy chain was the major degradation pathway after long-term storage at 5°C while oxidation was rather low. The method was also very useful to identify all the clipped forms of the antibody. Copyright © 2017 LFB Biotechnologies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  8. Establishing a store baseline during interim storage of waste packages and a review of potential technologies for base-lining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTeer, Jennifer; Morris, Jenny; Wickham, Stephen [Galson Sciences Ltd. Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom); Bolton, Gary [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); McKinney, James; Morris, Darrell [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Moor Row, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Angus, Mike [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cann, Gavin; Binks, Tracey [National Nuclear Laboratory Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Interim storage is an essential component of the waste management lifecycle, providing a safe, secure environment for waste packages awaiting final disposal. In order to be able to monitor and detect change or degradation of the waste packages, storage building or equipment, it is necessary to know the original condition of these components (the 'waste storage system'). This paper presents an approach to establishing the baseline for a waste-storage system, and provides guidance on the selection and implementation of potential base-lining technologies. The approach is made up of two sections; assessment of base-lining needs and definition of base-lining approach. During the assessment of base-lining needs a review of available monitoring data and store/package records should be undertaken (if the store is operational). Evolutionary processes (affecting safety functions), and their corresponding indicators, that can be measured to provide a baseline for the waste-storage system should then be identified in order for the most suitable indicators to be selected for base-lining. In defining the approach, identification of opportunities to collect data and constraints is undertaken before selecting the techniques for base-lining and developing a base-lining plan. Base-lining data may be used to establish that the state of the packages is consistent with the waste acceptance criteria for the storage facility and to support the interpretation of monitoring and inspection data collected during store operations. Opportunities and constraints are identified for different store and package types. Technologies that could potentially be used to measure baseline indicators are also reviewed. (authors)

  9. Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

    1999-02-17

    Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

  10. Analysing long term discursive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders

    What do timescales - the notion that processes take place or can be viewed within a shorter or longer temporal range (Lemke 2005) - mean for the analysis of discourse? What are the methodological consequences of analyzing discourse at different timescales? It may be argued that discourse analysis...... in general has favored either the analysis of short term processes such as interviews, discussions, and lessons, or the analysis of non-processual entities such as (multimodal) texts, arguments, discursive repertoires, and discourses (in a Foucaultian sense). In contrast, analysis of long term processes...... which extend beyond the single interaction, for instance negotiations or planning processes, seems to have played a less important role, with studies such as Iedema 2001 and Wodak 2000 as exceptions. These long term processes, however, are central to the constitution and workings of organizations...

  11. Long-term potentiation and long-term depression: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V.P. Bliss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation and long-term depression are enduring changes in synaptic strength, induced by specific patterns of synaptic activity, that have received much attention as cellular models of information storage in the central nervous system. Work in a number of brain regions, from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex, and in many animal species, ranging from invertebrates to humans, has demonstrated a reliable capacity for chemical synapses to undergo lasting changes in efficacy in response to a variety of induction protocols. In addition to their physiological relevance, long-term potentiation and depression may have important clinical applications. A growing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, and technological advances in non-invasive manipulation of brain activity, now puts us at the threshold of harnessing long-term potentiation and depression and other forms of synaptic, cellular and circuit plasticity to manipulate synaptic strength in the human nervous system. Drugs may be used to erase or treat pathological synaptic states and non-invasive stimulation devices may be used to artificially induce synaptic plasticity to ameliorate conditions arising from disrupted synaptic drive. These approaches hold promise for the treatment of a variety of neurological conditions, including neuropathic pain, epilepsy, depression, amblyopia, tinnitus and stroke.

  12. Long-term energy contracts and cartel law. Overview of the case practice of the cartel authorities and courts on long-term gas, electricity, and district heating supply contracts and corresponding energy transport and gas storage contracts; Langfristige Energievertraege und Kartellrecht. Uebersicht ueber die Entscheidungspraxis der Kartellbehoerden und Gerichte zu langfristigen Gas-, Strom- und Fernwaermeliefervertraegen sowie entsprechenden Energietransport- und Gasspeichervertraegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Florian

    2011-07-01

    Energy contracts should be drawn up with due consideration not only to the stipulations of civil law but also to aspects of cartel law. In recent times the cartel authorities and legislature have again sharpened their focus on long-term energy contracts. The present study gives an overview of the decisions of the European Commission and the German Federal Cartel Office concerning long-term energy contracts. It offers energy supply companies reference points for an assessment of their own contract practice. It also takes account of the new regulations of the amended Gas Network Access Ordinance as well as the changes soon to come with the EU's Third Single Energy Market Package. For the sake of clarity the study presents the case practice of the cartel authorities separately by energy carrier, making further distinctions by economic level and contractual relationships. It deals not only with natural gas and electricity but also district heating, an energy carrier which is increasingly moving into the focus of the German cartel authorities. The study also discusses the compatibility of long-term energy contracts with European state aid legislation.

  13. Long term stability of power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundur, P.; Gao, B. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Power system long term stability is still a developing subject. In this paper we provide our perspectives and experiences related to long term stability. The paper begins with the description of the nature of the long term stability problem, followed by the discussion of issues related to the modeling and solution techniques of tools for long term stability analysis. Cases studies are presented to illustrate the voltage stability aspect and plant dynamics aspect of long term stability. (author) 20 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Development of Aircraft Impact Scenario on a Concrete Cask in Interim Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momani, Belal Al; Yoo, Min; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper provides a method for determining the failure criteria in global and local damage responses for the concrete cask under extreme mechanical impact condition. IAEA safety guide No. SSG-15 mentions the hypothetical initiating events of SNF storage. Among the external initiating events, the aircraft strike on a storage cask is considered one of the dominant contributions to the risk during storage phase. Although the probability of aircraft crash on ISF is extremely small, it is important to develop the accident scenario caused by an intentional malicious acts launched towards the storage facility in terms to improve inherent security. Thus, the probabilistic approach to develop aircraft impact scenarios on a storage cask is needed.

  15. Reactivation performance of nitrosation granular sludge after long-term storage and microbial community variation%长期储存亚硝化颗粒污泥的活化及菌群结构变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱飞跃; 王琰; 王建芳; 王书永; 沈耀良

    2016-01-01

    specific nitrite accumulation rate of 23.8mg/(gVSS·h) were observed, while average particle size of NGS remained at 0.5mm. During this period, the microbial diversity of NGS decreased obviously, ascribed to the washing out of most of anaerobic and heterotrophic bacteria. The relative abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, such as Nitrosomonas ect., increased from 1% to 58%, and the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was inhibited selectively. It indicated that the NGS after a long-term storage could be inoculated in SBR to achieve its rapid start-up.

  16. What is plutonium stabilization, and what is safe storage of plutonium?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1995-06-29

    The end of the cold war has resulted in the shutdown of nuclear weapons production and the start of dismantlement of significant numbers of nuclear weapons. This, in turn, is creating an inventory of plutonium requiring interim and long-term storage. A key question is, ``What is required for safe, multidecade, plutonium storage?`` The requirements for storage, in turn, define what is needed to stabilize the plutonium from its current condition into a form acceptable for interim and long-term storage. Storage requirements determine if research is required to (1) define required technical conditions for interim and long-term storage and (2) develop or improve current stabilization technologies. Storage requirements depend upon technical, policy, and economic factors. The technical issues are complicated by several factors. Plutonium in aerosol form is highly hazardous. Plutonium in water is hazardous. The plutonium inventory is in multiple chemical forms--some of which are chemically reactive. Also, some of the existing storage forms are clearly unsuitable for storage periods over a few years. Gas generation by plutonium compounds complicates storage: (1) all plutonium slowly decays creating gaseous helium and (2) the radiation from plutonium decay can initiate many chemical reactions-some of which generate significant quantities of gases. Gas generation can pressurize sealed storage packages. Last nuclear criticality must be avoided.

  17. Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditye, Thomas; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-10-22

    Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied extensively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the integration of adaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test compared with controls who stayed awake. Participants' individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adaptation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interference known as 'storage'. In the light of the well-established link between sleep and memory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation--which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes--with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition.

  18. Environmental permits and approvals plan for high-level waste interim storage, Project W-464

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1998-05-28

    This report discusses the Permitting Plan regarding NEPA, SEPA, RCRA, and other regulatory standards and alternatives, for planning the environmental permitting of the Canister Storage Building, Project W-464.

  19. Environmental permits and approvals plan for high-level waste interim storage, Project W-464

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1998-05-28

    This report discusses the Permitting Plan regarding NEPA, SEPA, RCRA, and other regulatory standards and alternatives, for planning the environmental permitting of the Canister Storage Building, Project W-464.

  20. Modeling Maintenance of Long-Term Potentiation in Clustered Synapses: Long-Term Memory without Bistability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Smolen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Memories are stored, at least partly, as patterns of strong synapses. Given molecular turnover, how can synapses maintain strong for the years that memories can persist? Some models postulate that biochemical bistability maintains strong synapses. However, bistability should give a bimodal distribution of synaptic strength or weight, whereas current data show unimodal distributions for weights and for a correlated variable, dendritic spine volume. Thus it is important for models to simulate both unimodal distributions and long-term memory persistence. Here a model is developed that connects ongoing, competing processes of synaptic growth and weakening to stochastic processes of receptor insertion and removal in dendritic spines. The model simulates long-term (>1 yr persistence of groups of strong synapses. A unimodal weight distribution results. For stability of this distribution it proved essential to incorporate resource competition between synapses organized into small clusters. With competition, these clusters are stable for years. These simulations concur with recent data to support the “clustered plasticity hypothesis” which suggests clusters, rather than single synaptic contacts, may be a fundamental unit for storage of long-term memory. The model makes empirical predictions and may provide a framework to investigate mechanisms maintaining the balance between synaptic plasticity and stability of memory.

  1. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic versions of ... form, they are used exclusively for long-term control; they are not very effective for acute symptoms. ...

  2. Long term complications after radical cystoprostatectomy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long term complications after radical cystoprostatectomy with orthotopic diversion in male ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Objective: To evaluate the long-term outcomes beyond 1 year, both ...

  3. Gratitude in Long Term Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Abrams Sunding

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a group gratitude intervention with 29 permanent residents at a long term care/skilled nursing facility in improving elder mood, behavior and well- being over a 3 week time period. The sample included individuals diagnosed with dementia, other cognitive impairment, major depressive disorder, insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder. The gratitude intervention consisted of asking elders to share what they are thankful for at the dinner table each day. Measures included the Elder Well Being Scale and The Dinner Rating Scale. On both measures, higher scores indicated better functioning. To test the hypothesis that post treatment elder well-being will be significantly higher than pretreatment elder well-being ratings, a one-way ANOVA was conducted. Post-hoc tests revealed a statistically significant increase in Elder Well Being Scale scores. An ANOVA of comparing Dinner Ratings demonstrated a nonsignificant increase over the 3 week experiment. Implications are discussed.

  4. Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility, Interim Response Action, Final Implementation Document for Decommissioning, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-18

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVES OF THE IRA 2. SITE INVENTORY - TANKS, PIPING, BUILDINGS, ASBEST , DEBRIS, DRUMS 3. PLAN OF ACTION - TRANSFER OF UNTREATED WASTEWATER...Response Action (IRA) H at thte Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility (HBSF) located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Commerce City , Colorado. It was...LOCATION MAP Commerce CIty , Colorado 1A U) Cl)) zr LU .i I 0< 9< z (’ICM ..w co ai >. r 0) IC., Z C’) ________________0 W jl cor cliB destruction of

  5. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang (Taiwan Power Co., Taipei, 10016 Taiwan); Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian (Jow International, Kirkland, WA)

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  6. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) is located in the 200 East Area adjacent to B Plant on the Hanford Site north of Richland, Washington. The current WESF mission is to receive and store the cesium and strontium capsules that were manufactured at WESF in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations. The scope of WESF operations is currently limited to receipt, inspection, decontamination, storage, and surveillance of capsules in addition to facility maintenance activities. The capsules are expected to be stored at WESF until the year 2017, at which time they will have been transferred for ultimate disposition. The WESF facility was designed and constructed to process, encapsulate, and store the extracted long-lived radionuclides, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, from wastes generated during the chemical processing of defense fuel on the Hanford Site thus ensuring isolation of hazardous radioisotopes from the environment. The construction of WESF started in 1971 and was completed in 1973. Some of the {sup 137}Cs capsules were leased by private irradiators or transferred to other programs. All leased capsules have been returned to WESF. Capsules transferred to other programs will not be returned except for the seven powder and pellet Type W overpacks already stored at WESF.

  7. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir

  8. Marijuana effects on long-term memory assessment and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darley, C F; Tinklenberg, J R; Roth, W T; Vernon, S; Kopell, B S

    1977-05-01

    The ability of 16 college-educated male subjects to recall from long-term memory a series of common facts was tested during intoxication with marijuana extract calibrated to 0.3 mg/kg delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and during placebo conditions. The subjects' ability to assess their memory capabilities was then determined by measuring how certain they were about the accuracy of their recall performance and by having them predict their performance on a subsequent recognition test involving the same recall items. Marijuana had no effect on recall or recognition performance. These results do not support the view that marijuana provides access to facts in long-term storage which are inaccessible during non-intoxication. During both marijuana and placebo conditions, subjects could accurately predict their recognition memory performance. Hence, marijuana did not alter the subjects' ability to accurately assess what information resides in long-term memory even though they did not have complete access to that information.

  9. HOME LONG-TERM CARE IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kułagowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The considerable proportion of the elderly, the chronically ill and the disabled in community is an economic and organizational challenge for the state social policy. It requires a large, steadily increasing financing from the public funds and creating an optional care model to fulfill the needs of citizens and guarantee high quality services. Development of the long-term care is one of the problems to be solved. This paper presents: – a long-term care forms, organization and tasks; – a role of long-term care but particularly home longterm care to protect health in Poland; – problems related with home long-term care functioning.

  10. Long-term dynamics simulation: Modeling requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morched, A.S.; Kar, P.K.; Rogers, G.J.; Morison, G.K. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    This report details the required performance and modelling capabilities of a computer program intended for the study of the long term dynamics of power systems. Following a general introduction which outlines the need for long term dynamic studies, the modelling requirements for the conduct of such studies is discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on models for system elements not normally modelled in power system stability programs, which will have a significant impact in the long term time frame of minutes to hours following the initiating disturbance. The report concludes with a discussion of the special computational and programming requirements for a long term stability program. 43 refs., 36 figs.

  11. LONG-TERM MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen P. Farrington; John W. Haas; Neal Van Wyck

    2003-10-16

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) associated with subsurface contamination sites is a key element of Long Term Stewardship and Legacy Management across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, both within the DOE and elsewhere, LTM is an expensive endeavor, often exceeding the costs of the remediation phase of a clean-up project. The primary contributors to LTM costs are associated with labor. Sample collection, storage, preparation, analysis, and reporting can add a significant financial burden to project expense when extended over many years. Development of unattended, in situ monitoring networks capable of providing quantitative data satisfactory to regulatory concerns has the potential to significantly reduce LTM costs. But survival and dependable operation in a difficult environment is a common obstacle to widespread use across the DOE complex or elsewhere. Deploying almost any sensor in the subsurface for extended periods of time will expose it to chemical and microbial degradation. Over the time-scales required for in situ LTM, even the most advanced sensor systems may be rendered useless. Frequent replacement or servicing (cleaning) of sensors is expensive and labor intensive, offsetting most, if not all, of the cost savings realized with unattended, in situ sensors. To enable facile, remote monitoring of contaminants and other subsurface parameters over prolonged periods, Applied Research Associates, Inc has been working to develop an advanced LTM sensor network consisting of three key elements: (1) an anti-fouling sensor chamber that can accommodate a variety of chemical and physical measurement devices based on electrochemical, optical and other techniques; (2) two rapid, cost effective, and gentle means of emplacing sensor packages either at precise locations directly in the subsurface or in pre-existing monitoring wells; and (3) a web browser-based data acquisition and control system (WebDACS) utilizing field-networked microprocessor-controlled smart

  12. Thermal analysis of the unloading cell of the Spanish centralized interim storage facility (CISF); Analisis termico de la celda de desarga del almacen temporal centralizado (ATC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Dominguez, J. R.; Perez Vara, R.; Huelamo Martinez, E.

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with the thermal analysis performed for the Untoading Cell of Spain Centralized Interim Storage Facility, CISF (ATC, in Spanish). The analyses are done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, with the aim of obtaining the air flow required to remove the residual heat of the elements stored in the cell. Compliance with the admissible heat limits is checked with the results obtained in the various operation and accident modes. The calculation model is flexible enough to allow carrying out a number of sensitivity analyses with the different parameters involved in the process. (Author)

  13. Long-term survival after perforated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vermeulen (Jan); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); E. van der Harst (Erwin); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); G.H.H. Mannaerts (Guido); P-P. Coene (Peter Paul); W.F. Weidema (Wibo); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAim: Short-term survival after emergency surgery for perforated diverticulitis is poor. Less is known about long-term survival. The aims of this study were to evaluate long-term survival after discharge from hospital and to identify factors associated with prognosis. Method: All patients

  14. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  15. Related Studies in Long Term Lithium Battery Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, R. J.; Chua, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The continuing growth of the use of lithium electrochemical systems in a wide variety of both military and industrial applications is primarily a result of the significant benefits associated with the technology such as high energy density, wide temperature operation and long term stability. The stability or long term storage capability of a battery is a function of several factors, each important to the overall storage life and, therefore, each potentially a problem area if not addressed during the design, development and evaluation phases of the product cycle. Design (e.g., reserve vs active), inherent material thermal stability, material compatibility and self-discharge characteristics are examples of factors key to the storability of a power source.

  16. Effects of Long-Term Winter Planted Green Manure on Distribution and Storage of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Water-Stable Aggregates of Reddish Paddy Soil Under a Double-Rice Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zeng-ping; ZHENG Sheng-xian; NIE Jun; LIAO Yu-lin; XIE Jian

    2014-01-01

    In agricultural systems, maintenance of soil organic matter has long been recognized as a strategy to reduce soil degradation. Manure amendments and green manures are management practices that can increase some nutrient contents and improve soil aggregation. We investigated the effects of 28 yr of winter planted green manure on soil aggregate-size distribution and aggregate-associated carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). The study was a randomized completed block design with three replicates. The treatments included rice-rice-fallow, rice-rice-rape, rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch and rice-rice-ryegrass. The experiment was established in 1982 on a silty light clayey paddy soil derived from Quaternary red clay (classiifed as Fe-Accumuli-Stagnic Anthrosols) with continuous early and late rice. In 2009, soil samples were collected (0-15 cm depth) from the ifeld treatment plots and separated into water-stable aggregates of different sizes (i.e.,>5, 2-5, 1-2, 0.5-1, 0.25-0.5 and<0.25 mm) by wet sieving. The long-term winter planted green manure signiifcantly increased total C and N, and the formation of the 2-5-mm water-stable aggregate fraction. Compared with rice-rice-rape, rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch and rice-rice-ryegrass, the rice-rice-fallow signiifcantly reduced 2-5-mm water-stable aggregates, with a signiifcant redistribution of aggregates into micro-aggregates. Long-term winter planted green manure obviously improved C/N ratio and macro-aggregate-associated C and N. The highest contribution to soil fertility was from macro-aggregates of 2-5 mm in most cases.

  17. Long-term-consequence analysis of no action alternative 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Staven, L.H.; Serne, R.J. [and others

    1996-07-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Disposal-Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. Data and information is described which pertains to estimated impacts from postulated long-term release of radionuclides and hazardous constituents from alpha-bearing wastes stored at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control (no action alternative 2). Under this alternative, wastes would remain at the generator sites and not be emplaced at WIPP.

  18. Interim Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd

    2009-01-01

    The Registry for College and University Presidents places former executives in interim presidential and other senior-level posts and is familiar with the challenges interim executives and institutions encounter in times of leadership transitions. However, the one big advantage interims bring to institutions, says Registry Vice President Kevin J.…

  19. Does the radiation from the interim storage in Gorleben affect the sex ratio of newborn children?; Beeinflusst die Strahlung aus dem Zwischenlager in Gorleben das Geschlechterverhaeltnis von Neugeborenen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, H.W.; Schulze, H.; Wede, S. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Gorleben (Germany); Mueller, S. [Studsvik GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In the professional world but especially in public, the question is discussed whether ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities has a significant impact on the secondary sex ratio of newborn children in the vicinity of the plants. This issue is of exceptional importance in the region around Gorleben, where the opposition to nuclear facilities and activities for decades is particularly strong. At the site borders of the interim storage facility (TBL-G) of GNS the effective individual dose is about 0.2 mSv per year, mainly caused by neutron irradiation from 108 casks with high-level radioactive waste from reprocessing. In the surrounding villages there is no radiation measurable. Statistical studies allegedly have shown evidence that in some villages in the area and during certain periods, proportionately fewer girls were born in comparison to the average for the Federal Republic of Germany. Based on these purely statistical results henceforward was also alleged that neutron-induced secondary effects such as activation or secondary gamma radiation would be responsible for it. Monte Carlo calculations and special measurements yielded values of the dose at the plant border for activation products less than E-04 mSv/a and for secondary gamma radiation of about E-03 mSv/a. These results indicate that the ionizing radiation from the Gorleben interim storage facility cannot be held accountable for shifts of the secondary sex ratio.

  20. Central waste complex interim operational safety requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendixsen, R.B.; Ames, R.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-20

    This Interim Operational Safety Requirements document supports the authorization basis for interim operations and identifies restrictions on interim operations for the disposal and storage of solid waste in the Central Waste Complex. The Central Waste Complex Interim Operational Safety Requirements provide the necessary controls on operations in the Central Waste Complex to ensure the radiological and hazardous material exposure will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, 1327 the public and the environment.

  1. Single-crystal elastic properties of (Cs,Na)AlSi2O6.H2O pollucite: A zeolite with potential use for long-term storage of Cs radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Chio, Chi-Hong; Gatta, G. Diego

    2010-11-01

    The single-crystal and aggregate elastic properties of the zeolite pollucite (Cs,Na)AlSi2O6ṡH2O, a potential host for Cs radionucleides in geological repositories, have been determined by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The three nonzero individual elastic constants of cubic pollucite are: C11=105.0(1.3) GPa, C44=27.0(3) GPa, and C12=25.7(6) GPa. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are KS=52.2(1.0) GPa, G=31.5(7) GPa, E=78.6(1.0) GPa, and ν =0.248(4), respectively. The bulk modulus of pollucite is 12.7% lower than that of the all-Na isotypic mineral analcime NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O whereas the shear moduli G are identical within mutual uncertainties. The higher compressibility of pollucite results from the weaker Cs-O bonds compared to Na-O bonds, suggesting strong control of the nature and configuration of the extraframework content on the behavior of the structure. The elastic properties of pollucite reported here will help in the prediction of its behavior as a geological barrier and in the modeling of the short-term and long-term safety of the Cs-repositories.

  2. Long-Term Ownership by Industrial Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Christa Winther; Kuhn, Johan Moritz; Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Short-termism has become a serious concern for businesses and policy makers and this has inspired a search for governance arrangement to promote long term decision making. In this paper we study a particularly long-term ownership structure, which is fairly common in Northern Europe, particularly...... in Denmark. Industrial foundations are independent legal entities without owners or members typically with the dual objective of preserving the company and using excess profits for charity. We use a unique Danish data set to examine the governance of foundation-owned companies. We show that they are long-term...... in several respects. Foundations hold on to their shares for longer. Foundation-owned companies replace managers less frequently. They have more conservative capital structures with less leverage. Their companies survive longer. Their business decisions appear to be more long term. This paper supports...

  3. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  4. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  5. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strategic Plan Federal Initiatives Career Opportunities Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program ( ... Prevention HIV/AIDS Nutrition Services Oral Health Elder Justice & Adult Protective Services Elder Justice Coordinating Council Prevention ...

  6. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  7. Long-term outcome of meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Ostenberg, A; Roos, H;

    2001-01-01

    To describe the long-term influence of meniscectomy on pain, functional limitations, and muscular performance. To assess the effects of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA), gender and age on these outcomes in patients with meniscectomy....

  8. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  9. Long-term outcomes after severe shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Cristina M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Lanspa, Michael J; Wilson, Emily L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Brown, Samuel M

    2015-02-01

    Severe shock is a life-threatening condition with very high short-term mortality. Whether the long-term outcomes among survivors of severe shock are similar to long-term outcomes of other critical illness survivors is unknown. We therefore sought to assess long-term survival and functional outcomes among 90-day survivors of severe shock and determine whether clinical predictors were associated with outcomes. Seventy-six patients who were alive 90 days after severe shock (received ≥1 μg/kg per minute of norepinephrine equivalent) were eligible for the study. We measured 3-year survival and long-term functional outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the EuroQOL 5-D-3L, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and an employment instrument. We also assessed the relationship between in-hospital predictors and long-term outcomes. The mean long-term survival was 5.1 years; 82% (62 of 76) of patients survived, of whom 49 were eligible for follow-up. Patients who died were older than patients who survived. Thirty-six patients completed a telephone interview a mean of 5 years after hospital admission. The patients' Physical Functioning scores were below U.S. population norms (P shock had a high 3-year survival rate. Patients' long-term physical and psychological outcomes were similar to those reported for cohorts of less severely ill intensive care unit survivors. Anxiety and depression were relatively common, but only a few patients had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This study supports the observation that acute illness severity does not determine long-term outcomes. Even extremely critically ill patients have similar outcomes to general intensive care unit survivor populations.

  10. Anticipating Long-Term Stock Market Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Christian; Loch, Karin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between long-term U.S. stock market risks and the macroeconomic environment using a two component GARCH-MIDAS model. Our results provide strong evidence in favor of counter-cyclical behavior of long-term stock market volatility. Among the various macro variables in our dataset the term spread, housing starts, corporate profits and the unemployment rate have the highest predictive ability for stock market volatility . While the term spread and housing starts are...

  11. High-level radioactive wastes storage characterization and behaviour of spent fuels in long-term; Almacenamiento definitivo de residuos de radiactividad alta. Caracterizacion y comportamiento a largo plazo de los combustibles nucleares irradisos (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Arocas, P.; Cobos, J.; Quinones, J.; Rodriguez Almazan, J.L.; Serrano, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    In order to understand the long term spent fuel dissolution under repository this report shows the study performed by considering spent fuel as a part of the multi barriers containment system. The study takes into account that the oxidative alteration/dissolution of spent fuel matrix is influenced by the intrinsic spent fuel physicochemical characteristics and the repository environmental parameters. Experimental and modelling results for granite and saline repositories are reported. Parameters considered in this work were pH, pCO{sub 2}, S/V ratio, redox conditions and the influence of the container material in the redox conditions. The influence of alpha, beta and gamma radiation and the resulting radiolytic products formed remains as one of the main uncertainties to quantify the spent fuel behaviour under repository conditions. It was studied in a first approach through dose calculations, modelling of radiolytic products formation and leaching experiments in the presence of external gamma irradiation source and leaching experiments of alpha doped UO{sub 2} pellets. Materials considered are LWR spent fuel (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel) and their chemical analogues non irradiated UO{sub 2}, SIMFUEL and alpha doped UO{sub 2}. Lea chants were granite groundwater, synthetic granite groundwater, synthetic granite groundwater saturated in bentonite, and high concentrated saline solutions. The matrix dissolution rate and release rate of key radionuclides (i. e. actinides and fission products) obtained through the several experimental techniques and methodologies (dissolution, co-dissolution, precipitation and co-precipitation) together with modelling studies supported in geochemical codes are proposed. Moreover, secondary phases formed that could control release and retention of key nuclides are identified. Maximum concentration values for these radionuclides are reported. The data provided by this study were used in ENRESA-2000 performance assessment. (Author)

  12. Role of Atypical Protein Kinases in Maintenance of Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinova, A A; Zuzina, A B; Balaban, P M

    2017-03-01

    Investigation of biochemical mechanisms underlying the long-term storage of information in nervous system is one of main problems of modern neurobiology. As a molecular basis of long-term memory, long-term changes in kinase activities, increase in the level and changes in the subunit composition of receptors in synaptic membranes, local activity of prion-like proteins, and epigenetic modifications of chromatin have been proposed. Perhaps a combination of all or of some of these factors underlies the storage of long-term memory in the brain. Many recent studies have shown an exclusively important role of atypical protein kinases (PKCζ, PKMζ, and PKCι/λ) in processes of learning, consolidation and maintenance of memory. The present review is devoted to consideration of mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control of atypical protein kinases and their roles in induction and maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory in vertebrates and invertebrates.

  13. Oxidation of nuclear fuel below 400 deg. Consequence on long-term dry storage; L'oxydation du combustible nucleaire au-dessous de 400 deg. Consequences sur l'entreposage a sec de longue duree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehaudt, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document reviews the status of the knowledge on the oxidation of fuels below 400 deg C, in all its forms, including fuel rods, by examining the consequences of this reaction on the strength or ruin of the fuel rods during dry storage in air for a hundred years. The data available in the scientific literature, and the data acquired by CEA, are abundant on irradiated powders and pellets, but sparser for irradiated fuel fragments and for rods or sections of fuel rods. A bibliographic review is made to identify the morphological and structural changes, as well as the kinetic laws. An analysis and a summary is made with a concern to evaluate the risks of rod ruin by oxidation. The final section, in a few pages, addresses the essential lessons from this study. It presents: first, a summary of the main results of this review and its analysis, recommendations and remedies for storage; proposed research guidelines as well as precise topics, in order to fill out our knowledge and, even better, to identify the acceptable limits for storage. (author)

  14. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  15. Synthesis of knowledge on the long-term behaviour of concretes. Applications to cemented waste packages; Synthese des connaissances sur le comportement a long terme des betons. Application aux colis cimentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richet, C.; Galle, C.; Le Bescop, P.; Peycelon, H.; Bejaoui, S.; Tovena, I.; Pointeau, I.; L' Hostis, V.; Levera, P

    2004-03-01

    As stipulated in the former law of December 91 relating to 'concrete waste package', a progress report (phenomenological reference document) was first provided in 1999. The objective was to make an assessment of the knowledge acquired on the long-term behaviour of cement-based waste packages in the context of deep disposal and/or interim storage. The present document is an updated summary report. It takes into account a new knowledge assessment, considers coupled mechanisms and should contribute to the first performance studies (operational calculations). Handling and radio-nuclides (RN) confinement are the two major functional properties requested from the concrete used for the waste packages. In unsaturated environment (interim storage/disposal prior to closing), the main problem is the generation of cracks in the material. This aspect is a key parameter from the mechanical point of view (retrievability). It can have a major impact on the disposal phase (confinement). In saturated environment (disposal post-closing phase), the main concern is the chemical degradation of the waste package concrete submitted to underground waters leaching. In this context, the major thema are: the durability of the concretes under water (chemical degradation) and in unsaturated medium (corrosion of reinforcement), matter transport, RN retention, chemistry / transport / mechanical couplings. On the other hand, laboratory data on the behaviour of concretes are used to evaluate the RN source term of waste packages in function of time (concrete waste package OPerational Model, i.e. 'Concrete MOP'). The 'MOP' provides the physico-chemical description of the RN release in relationship with the waste package degradation itself. This description is based on simplified phenomenology for which only dimensioning mechanisms are taken into account. The use of Diffu-Ca code (basic module for the MOP) on the CASTEM numerical plate-form, already allows operational

  16. Long-term follow-up study and long-term care of childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Jin Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of long-term survivors is increasing in the western countries due to remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer. The long-term complications of childhood cancer survivors in these countries were brought to light by the childhood cancer survivor studies. In Korea, the 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer patients is approaching 70%; therefore, it is extremely important to undertake similar long-term follow-up studies and comprehensive long-term care for our population. On the basis of the experiences of childhood cancer survivorship care of the western countries and the current Korean status of childhood cancer survivors, long-term follow-up study and long-term care systems need to be established in Korea in the near future. This system might contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of childhood cancer survivors through effective intervention strategies.

  17. Long-term storage and long-distance transportation of hydrogen by use of catalyst-addisted decalin dehydrogenation/naphthalene hydrogenation pair; Dekarin dassuiso/nafutarensuisoka shokubai hannotai wo mochiiru suiso no chokikan chozo/chokyori yuso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.; Sakaguchi, M.; Saito, Y. [Scince Univ.of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    To enable taking in and out hydrogen with little energy consumption, it is sufficient if decalin is dehydrogenated to naphthalene under moderate heating condition. It is found that carbon supporting metal catalyst in liquid film state shows extremely high dehydrogeno-aromatization activity of decalin. The result of comparison with liquid hydrogen or metal hydride as media for hydrogen storage and transportation media is reported. The platinum-tungsten composite metal catalyst is prepared from an aqueous solution of K2PtC16 and Li2WO4 in the ratio of 1 to 1 so as to achieve 5wt-metal% carbon supporting. When hydrogen and naphthalene are discharged from the liquid phase reaction medium to the vapor phase and solid phase, respectively, under boiling and refluxing conditions, hydrogen is produced steadily by heating at 200 to 210degC. If economical efficiency is ignored, development of an inter-season energy storage system is desired to be developed which can be used in the season between summertime when sufficient hydrogen is obtained by photovoltaic power generation and electrolysis of water and wintertime when heat source is obtained by catalytic combustion of hydrogen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Long-term Multiwavelength Observations of Polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Joshua; Mason, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Polars are cataclysmic variables with the highest magnetic field strengths (10-250 MG). Matter is accreted after being funneled by the strong magnetic field of the white dwarf. We perform a meta-study of multi-wavelength data of polars. Many polars have been observed in surveys, such as SDSS, 2MASS, ROSAT, just to name a few. Some polars have now been detected by the JVLA, part of an expanding class of radio CVs. A large subset of polars have long-term optical light curves from CRTS and AAVSO. We suggest that the long term light curves of polars display a variety of signature behaviors and may be grouped accordingly. Additional characteristics such a binary period, magnetic field strengths, X-ray properties, and distance estimates are examined in context with long-term observations.

  19. Long-term home care scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Thomas Sejr

    In several countries, home care is provided for certain citizens living at home. The long-term home care scheduling problem is to generate work plans spanning several days such that a high quality of service is maintained and the overall cost is kept as low as possible. A solution to the problem...... provides detailed information on visits and visit times for each employee on each of the covered days. We propose a branch-and-price algorithm for the long-term home care scheduling problem. The pricing problem generates one-day plans for an employee, and the master problem merges the plans with respect...

  20. [Fetal pain: immediate and long term consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houfflin Debarge, Véronique; Dutriez, Isabelle; Pusniak, Benoit; Delarue, Eléonore; Storme, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Several situations are potentially painful for fetuses, such as malformations and invasive procedures. Nociceptive pathways are known to be functional at 26 weeks. Even if it is not possible to evaluate the fetal experience of pain, it is essential to examine its immediate and long-term consequences. As early as the beginning of the second trimester, hemodynamic and hormonal responses are observed following fetal nociceptive stimulation, In experimental studies, long-term changes have been noted in the corticotrop axis, subsequent responses to pain, and behavior after perinatal nociceptive stimulation.

  1. Keratoprosthesis: a long-term review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnham, J J; Roper-Hall, M J

    1983-07-01

    A keratoprosthesis (KP), is an artificial cornea which is inserted into an opacified cornea in an attempt to restore useful vision or, less commonly, to make the eye comfortable in painful keratopathy. Results o a retrospective study of 35 patients, with 55 KP insertions, are reviewed with regard to visual acuity, length of time vision is maintained, retention time, and complication. Overall there were a number of long-term real successes, eith retention of the KP and maintenance of improved vision in eyes not amenable to conventional treatment. Careful long-term follow-up was needed, with further surgical procedures often being necessary.

  2. Synthesis on the spent fuel long term evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch.; Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Broudic, V. [CEA Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires (DRN), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Cappelaere, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire(DMN), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Desgranges, L. [CEA Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires (DRN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garcia, Ph. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Jegou, Ch.; Roudil, D. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 30 - Marcoule (France); Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marimbeau, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gras, J.M.; Bouffioux, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The French research on spent fuel long term evolution has been performed by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) since 1999 in the PRECCI project with the support of EDF (Electricite de France). These studies focused on the spent fuel behaviour under various conditions encountered in dry storage or in deep geological disposal. Three main types of conditions were discerned: - The evolution in a closed system which corresponds to the normal scenario in storage and to the first confinement phase in disposal; - The evolution in air which corresponds to an incidental loss of confinement during storage or to a rupture of the canister before the site re-saturation in geological disposal; - The evolution in water which corresponds to the normal scenario after the breaching of the canister in repository conditions. This document produced in the frame of the PRECCI project is an overview of the state of knowledge in 2004 concerning the long-term behavior of spent fuel under these various conditions. The state of the art was derived from the results obtained under the PRECCI project as well as from a review of the literature and of data acquired under the European project on Spent Fuel Stability under Repository Conditions. The main results issued from the French research are underlined. (authors)

  3. Consequences of long-term hyperparathyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graal, M B; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    1998-01-01

    We describe a young woman with long-term untreated hyperparathyroidism with a superimposed vitamin D deficiency and an extremely decreased bone mineral density that was complicated by a vertebral fracture. Despite pretreatment with intravenous pamidronate and short-term vitamin D supplementation, se

  4. Long-term prevention of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoedt, K J; Hansen, H P; Tarnow, L

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria not receiving antihypertensive treatment, an increase in urinary AER (UAER) of 6-14%/year and a risk of developing diabetic nephropathy (DN) of 3-30%/year have been reported. We audited the long-term effect of blocking the renin-a...

  5. Long Term Transfer Effect of Metaphoric Allusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David A.; Mateja, John A.

    A study was conducted to investigate the long term transfer effect of metaphoric allusion used to clarify unfamiliar subject matter. Forty-nine high school students were given unfamiliar prose materials variously augmented by metaphoric allusion. The subjects' immediate performance on a transfer task was compared to their performance on an…

  6. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  7. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  8. The long term characteristics of greenschist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The greenschist in the Jinping II Hydropower Station in southwest China exhibits continuous creep behaviour because of the geological conditions in the region. This phenomenon illustrates the time-dependent deformation and progressive damage that occurs after excavation. In this study, the responses of greenschist to stress over time were determined in a series of laboratory tests on samples collected from the access tunnel walls at the construction site. The results showed that the greenschist presented time-dependent behaviour under long-term loading. The samples generally experienced two stages: transient creep and steady creep, but no accelerating creep. The periods of transient creep and steady creep increased with increasing stress levels. The long-term strength of the greenschist was identified based on the variation of creep strain and creep rate. The ratio of long-term strength to conventional strength was around 80% and did not vary much with confining pressures. A quantitative method for predicting the failure period of greenschist, based on analysis of the stress-strain curve, is presented and implemented. At a confining pressure of 40 MPa, greenschist was predicted to fail in 5000 days under a stress of 290 MPa and to fail in 85 days under the stress of 320 MPa, indicating that the long-term strength identified by the creep rate and creep strain is a reliable estimate.

  9. Pituitary diseases : long-term psychological consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemensma, Jitske

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, pituitary adenomas can be appropriately treated, but patients continue to report impaired quality of life (QoL) despite long-term remission or cure. In patients with Cushing’s disease, Cushing’s syndrome or acromegaly, doctors should be aware of subtle cognitive impairments and the

  10. Petrophysical examination of CO₂-brine-rock interactions-results of the first stage of long-term experiments in the potential Zaosie Anticline reservoir (central Poland) for CO₂ storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Radosław; Wdowin, Magdalena; Manecki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was determination of experiment-induced alterations and changes in the properties of reservoir rocks and sealing rocks sampled from potential reservoir for CO₂. In the experiment, rocks submerged in brine in specially constructed reactors were subjected to CO₂ pressure of 6 MPa for 20 months at room temperature. Samples of Lower Jurassic reservoir rocks and sealing rocks (sandstones, claystones, and mudstones) from the Zaosie Anticline (central Poland) were analysed for their petrophysical properties (specific surface area, porosity, pore size and distribution) before and after the experiment. Comparison of the ionic composition the brines before and after the experiment demonstrated an increase in total dissolved solids as well as the concentration of sulphates and calcium ions. This indicates partial dissolution of the rock matrix and the cements. As a result of the reaction, the properties of reservoir rocks did not changed significantly and should not affect the process of CO₂ storage. In the case of the sealing rocks, however, the porosity, the framework density, as well as the average capillary and threshold diameter increased. Also, the pore distribution in the pore space changed in favour of larger pores. The reasons for these changes could not be explained by petrographic characteristics and should be thoroughly investigated.

  11. Interim Rationalizability

    OpenAIRE

    Eddie Dekel; Drew Fudenberg; Stephen Morris

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes the solution concept of interim rationalizability, and shows that all type spaces that have the same hierarchies of beliefs have the same set of interim rationalizable outcomes. This solution concept characterizes common knowledge of rationality in the universal type space.

  12. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

      The aim of the present study was to investigate the stability of cannabinoids in cannabis resin slabs and cannabis extracts upon long-term storage. The levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) on both neutral and acidic form were measured...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  13. A simple technique for long-term preservation of leptospires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Ahmed; Wasfy, Momtaz O

    2013-03-01

    The viability of six serovars of Leptospira spp. was studied after long storage at -70°C. The bacteria were either preserved in Ellinghausen-McCullough-Johnson-Harris (EMJH) liquid growth medium or in sheep blood added as a cryoprotectant. The viability of the strains was observed on a monthly basis by dark-ground microscopy over a period of 20 months at -70°C. Addition of sheep blood was not significantly advantageous, since leptospires that were stored in EMJH showed a slight increase in number after recovery. The results suggest a very simple and useful technique for long-term preservation of such Leptospira.

  14. Synaptic scaling enables dynamically distinct short- and long-term memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tetzlaff

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory storage in the brain relies on mechanisms acting on time scales from minutes, for long-term synaptic potentiation, to days, for memory consolidation. During such processes, neural circuits distinguish synapses relevant for forming a long-term storage, which are consolidated, from synapses of short-term storage, which fade. How time scale integration and synaptic differentiation is simultaneously achieved remains unclear. Here we show that synaptic scaling - a slow process usually associated with the maintenance of activity homeostasis - combined with synaptic plasticity may simultaneously achieve both, thereby providing a natural separation of short- from long-term storage. The interaction between plasticity and scaling provides also an explanation for an established paradox where memory consolidation critically depends on the exact order of learning and recall. These results indicate that scaling may be fundamental for stabilizing memories, providing a dynamic link between early and late memory formation processes.

  15. Synaptic scaling enables dynamically distinct short- and long-term memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Tsodyks, Misha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-10-01

    Memory storage in the brain relies on mechanisms acting on time scales from minutes, for long-term synaptic potentiation, to days, for memory consolidation. During such processes, neural circuits distinguish synapses relevant for forming a long-term storage, which are consolidated, from synapses of short-term storage, which fade. How time scale integration and synaptic differentiation is simultaneously achieved remains unclear. Here we show that synaptic scaling - a slow process usually associated with the maintenance of activity homeostasis - combined with synaptic plasticity may simultaneously achieve both, thereby providing a natural separation of short- from long-term storage. The interaction between plasticity and scaling provides also an explanation for an established paradox where memory consolidation critically depends on the exact order of learning and recall. These results indicate that scaling may be fundamental for stabilizing memories, providing a dynamic link between early and late memory formation processes.

  16. A technique for long term continent gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, D L; Foster, J E; Craun, M L; Torma, M J

    1985-01-01

    The use of the continent gastrostomy described herein offers several advantages: 1, the elimination of an indwelling catheter; 2, prevention of soiling at skin level; 3, long term access to the normal gastrointestinal track for alimentation without fear of tube erosion; 4, little compromise to gastric volume, and 5, ease of stoma care. We recommend this operation in instances when long term tube feedings are indicated either because of damage to the central nervous system or as a palliative treatment for patients with higher obstructing gastrointestinal malignant disease. The procedure may also be useful for patients in whom esophagogastric continuity has been interrupted (surgically or traumatically) and in whom reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract would not seem feasible within a three to six month interval.

  17. Long-term opioid therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birke, H; Ekholm, O; Sjøgren, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Longitudinal population-based studies of long-term opioid therapy (L-TOT) in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) patients are sparse. Our study investigated incidence and predictors for initiating L-TOT and changes in self-rated health, pain interference and physical activities in long......-term opioid users. METHODS: Data were obtained from the national representative Danish Health and Morbidity Surveys and The Danish National Prescription Registry. Respondents with no dispensed opioids the year before the survey were followed from 2000 and from 2005 until the end of 2012 (n = 12...... defined as those who were dispensed at least one opioid prescription in six separate months within a year. RESULTS: The incidence of L-TOT was substantially higher in CNCP patients at baseline than in others (9/1000 vs. 2/1000 person-years). Smoking behaviour and dispensed benzodiazepines were...

  18. Case presentation: long-term treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucksman, Myron L

    2013-01-01

    The long-term (14 years) psychodynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy of a depressed, suicidal, self-mutilating female patient is described. Her diagnoses included Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, and Recurrent Major Depression. Treatment was punctuated with repeated hospitalizations for self-mutilation (cutting) and suicidal ideation. A major determinant for her psychopathology was sexual abuse by her father from ages 6 to 14. This resulted in feelings of guilt and rage that she repressed and acted out through self-mutilating and suicidal behavior. A prolonged negative transference gradually became ambivalent, then positive. This was associated with her internalization of the healing qualities of the therapeutic relationship. She also gained insight into the reasons for her need to punish herself. Her initial self-representation as unworthy and bad was transformed into perceiving herself as a worthwhile, loving person. This case illustrates the role of long-term treatment for a complex, life-threatening, psychiatric disorder.

  19. Long-Term Hearing Results After Ossiculoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Matthew D; Trinidade, Aaron; Russell, James Shep; Dornhoffer, John L

    2017-04-01

    To determine if the OOPS index is predictive of long-term hearing results after ossiculoplasty. Case series with retrospective chart review. Tertiary care otology practice. Adult and pediatric patients (3-88 years of age). Ossiculoplasty with cartilage tympanoplasty, with or without mastoidectomy. Primary outcome measures included short-term hearing results (pure-tone average air-bone gap [PTA-ABG] measured between 60 days and 1 year after surgery), long-term hearing results (PTA-ABG measured ≥5 years after surgery), and the rate of successful ABG closure to ≤20 dB. Secondary measures included the need for revision surgery, delayed tympanic membrane graft failure, worsening conductive hearing loss (after an initially satisfactory hearing result), and recurrence of cholesteatoma. There was no significant difference between adults and children for short-term hearing results (average post-op PTA-ABG was 18.9 dB vs. 19.8 dB, respectively; p = 0.544), long-term hearing results (average final PTA-ABG was 19.3 dB vs. 19.4 dB, respectively; p = 0.922), or rate of ABG closure to less than 20 dB (63.1% vs. 58.0%, p = 0.282). Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ) identified a strong positive correlation between OOPS index score and average post-operative PTA-ABG (ρ = 0.983; p hearing outcomes in adult and pediatric patients undergoing ossiculoplasty in both the short term and the long term.

  20. Timber joints under long-term loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldborg, T.; Johansen, M.

    This report describes tests and results from stiffness and strength testing of splice joints under long-term loading. During two years of loading the spicimens were exposed to cyclically changing relative humidity. After the loading period the specimens were short-term tested. The connectors were...... integral nail-plates and nailed steel and plywood gussets. The report is intended for designers and researchers in timber engineering....

  1. Cutaneous oxalosis after long-term hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Schwartz, S T; Reginato, A J

    1992-07-01

    A 27-year-old woman undergoing long-term hemodialysis developed cutaneous calcifications on her fingers. A skin biopsy specimen showed that the deposits were calcium oxalate. To our knowledge, only one previous article has reported pathologic and crystallographic studies on calcifications of the skin resulting from dialysis oxalosis. We speculate that vitamin C supplements, liberal tea consumption, an increased serum ionized calcium concentration, and the long duration of hemodialysis contributed to the production of these deposits.

  2. Long term evolution 4G and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Yacoub, Michel; Figueiredo, Fabrício; Tronco, Tania

    2016-01-01

    This book focus on Long Term Evolution (LTE) and beyond. The chapters describe different aspects of research and development in LTE, LTE-Advanced (4G systems) and LTE-450 MHz such as telecommunications regulatory framework, voice over LTE, link adaptation, power control, interference mitigation mechanisms, performance evaluation for different types of antennas, cognitive mesh network, integration of LTE network and satellite, test environment, power amplifiers and so on. It is useful for researchers in the field of mobile communications.

  3. Consequences of long-term hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graal, M B; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    1998-07-01

    We describe a young woman with long-term untreated hyperparathyroidism with a superimposed vitamin D deficiency and an extremely decreased bone mineral density that was complicated by a vertebral fracture. Despite pretreatment with intravenous pamidronate and short-term vitamin D supplementation, severe and long-standing hypocalcaemia ('hungry bone syndrome') developed after parathyroidectomy. We discuss the consequences of hyperparathyroidism, especially the effects on bone, the complications of parathyroidectomy and the possibilities of preoperative treatment with bisphosphonates.

  4. Long-term behaviour of GRP pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, H; A Vieira; Reis, J; Marques, A. T.; Guedes, R.M.; Ferreira, A. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the research programme /1/ described is the study of creep and relaxation behaviour of glass-rein forced thermosetting (GRP) pipes, in order to find alternative methods to predict the long-term properties, rendering a considerable reduction of the time needed for testing and assuring, as far as possible, equivalent reliability when compared to the existing methods. Experimental procedures were performed and are presented here, together with discussion of results, as well...

  5. Early Life Environments and Long Term Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bolbocean, Corneliu

    2015-01-01

    A large literature has linked “in utero” environment to health and socio-economic outcomes in adulthood. We consider the effect of early life environments on health and skill formation outcomes. We first evaluate the impact of perinatal-neonatal level of technology at birth, which varies across delivery institutions, on the long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of children with Cerebral Palsy. The level of technology at delivery determines the type of therapy newborns receive immediately afte...

  6. Long term economic relationships from cointegration maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Renato; Pereira, Carlos de B.; Leite, Vitor B. P.; Caticha, Nestor

    2007-07-01

    We employ the Bayesian framework to define a cointegration measure aimed to represent long term relationships between time series. For visualization of these relationships we introduce a dissimilarity matrix and a map based on the sorting points into neighborhoods (SPIN) technique, which has been previously used to analyze large data sets from DNA arrays. We exemplify the technique in three data sets: US interest rates (USIR), monthly inflation rates and gross domestic product (GDP) growth rates.

  7. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  8. Development of a probabilistic safety assessment framework for an interim dry storage facility subjected to an aircraft crash using best-estimate structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Belal; Jang, Dong Chan [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook [Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Using a probabilistic safety assessment, a risk evaluation framework for an aircraft crash into an interim spent fuel storage facility is presented. Damage evaluation of a detailed generic cask model in a simplified building structure under an aircraft impact is discussed through a numerical structural analysis and an analytical fragility assessment. Sequences of the impact scenario are shown in a developed event tree, with uncertainties considered in the impact analysis and failure probabilities calculated. To evaluate the influence of parameters relevant to design safety, risks are estimated for three specification levels of cask and storage facility structures. The proposed assessment procedure includes the determination of the loading parameters, reference impact scenario, structural response analyses of facility walls, cask containment, and fuel assemblies, and a radiological consequence analysis with dose–risk estimation. The risk results for the proposed scenario in this study are expected to be small relative to those of design basis accidents for best-estimated conservative values. The importance of this framework is seen in its flexibility to evaluate the capability of the facility to withstand an aircraft impact and in its ability to anticipate potential realistic risks; the framework also provides insight into epistemic uncertainty in the available data and into the sensitivity of the design parameters for future research.

  9. Data Preservation and Long Term Analysis in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    South, David M

    2012-01-01

    Several important and unique experimental high-energy physics programmes at a variety of facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, the B-factories and the Tevatron. The wealth of physics data from these experiments is the result of a significant financial and human effort, and yet until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on data preservation and long-term analysis in high-energy physics was convened at the end of 2008, publishing an interim report in 2009. The membership of the study group has since expanded, including the addition of the LHC experiments, and a full status report has now been released. This report greatly expands on the ideas contained in the original publication and provides a more solid set of recommendations, not only concerning data preservation and its implementation in high-energy physics, but also the future direction and organisational model of the study group. The main messag...

  10. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 3A, ORIGEN2 decay tables for immobilized high-level waste, Appendix 3B, Interim high-level waste forms, Appendix 3C, User's guide to the high-level waste PC data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this report, and the information contained in the associated computerized data bases, is to establish the DOE/OCRWM reference characteristics of the radioactive waste materials that may be accepted by DOE for emplacement in he mined geologic disposal system. This report provides relevant technical data for use by DOE and its supporting contractors and is not intended to be a policy document. This document is backed up by five PC-compatible data bases, written in a user-oriented, menu-driven format, which were developed for this purpose. The data bases are the LWR Assemblies Data Base; the LWR Radiological Data Base; the LWR Quantities Data Base; the LWR NFA Hardware Data Base; and the High-Level Waste Data Base. The above data bases may be ordered using the included form. Volume 6 contains decay tables for immobilized high-level waste, information on interim high-level waste forms, and a user's guide to the high-level waste PC data base.

  11. Spent fuel, plutonium and nuclear waste: long-term management; Le combustible use et le plutonium en tant que dechets nucleaires: gestion a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, G

    1998-11-01

    Different options for the management of nuclear waste arising from the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. Special emphasis is on reprocessing followed by geological disposal, geological disposal of reprocessing waste, direct geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, long term storage. Particular emphasis is on the management of plutonium including recycling, immobilisation and disposal, partitioning and transmutation.

  12. Long-Term Recency in Anterograde Amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Talmi

    Full Text Available Amnesia is usually described as an impairment of a long-term memory (LTM despite an intact short-term memory (STM. The intact recency effect in amnesia had supported this view. Although dual-store models of memory have been challenged by single-store models based on interference theory, this had relatively little influence on our understanding and treatment of amnesia, perhaps because the debate has centred on experiments in the neurologically intact population. Here we tested a key prediction of single-store models for free recall in amnesia: that people with amnesia will exhibit a memory advantage for the most recent items even when all items are stored in and retrieved from LTM, an effect called long-term recency. People with amnesia and matched controls studied, and then free-recalled, word lists with a distractor task following each word, including the last (continual distractor task, CDFR. This condition was compared to an Immediate Free Recall (IFR, no distractors and a Delayed Free Recall (DFR, end-of-list distractor only condition. People with amnesia demonstrated the full long-term recency pattern: the recency effect was attenuated in DFR and returned in CDFR. The advantage of recency over midlist items in CDFR was comparable to that of controls, confirming a key prediction of single-store models. Memory deficits appeared only after the first word recalled in each list, suggesting the impairment in amnesia may emerge only as the participant's recall sequence develops, perhaps due to increased susceptibility to output interference. Our findings suggest that interference mechanisms are preserved in amnesia despite the overall impairment to LTM, and challenge strict dual-store models of memory and their dominance in explaining amnesia. We discuss the implication of our findings for rehabilitation.

  13. Long-Term Recency in Anterograde Amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Caplan, Jeremy B; Richards, Brian; Moscovitch, Morris

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is usually described as an impairment of a long-term memory (LTM) despite an intact short-term memory (STM). The intact recency effect in amnesia had supported this view. Although dual-store models of memory have been challenged by single-store models based on interference theory, this had relatively little influence on our understanding and treatment of amnesia, perhaps because the debate has centred on experiments in the neurologically intact population. Here we tested a key prediction of single-store models for free recall in amnesia: that people with amnesia will exhibit a memory advantage for the most recent items even when all items are stored in and retrieved from LTM, an effect called long-term recency. People with amnesia and matched controls studied, and then free-recalled, word lists with a distractor task following each word, including the last (continual distractor task, CDFR). This condition was compared to an Immediate Free Recall (IFR, no distractors) and a Delayed Free Recall (DFR, end-of-list distractor only) condition. People with amnesia demonstrated the full long-term recency pattern: the recency effect was attenuated in DFR and returned in CDFR. The advantage of recency over midlist items in CDFR was comparable to that of controls, confirming a key prediction of single-store models. Memory deficits appeared only after the first word recalled in each list, suggesting the impairment in amnesia may emerge only as the participant's recall sequence develops, perhaps due to increased susceptibility to output interference. Our findings suggest that interference mechanisms are preserved in amnesia despite the overall impairment to LTM, and challenge strict dual-store models of memory and their dominance in explaining amnesia. We discuss the implication of our findings for rehabilitation.

  14. Lateral Habenula determines long-term storage of aversive memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol eTomaiuolo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Lateral Habenula (LHb is a small brain structure that codifies negative motivational value and has been related to major depression. It has been shown recently that LHb activation is sufficient to induce aversive associative learning; however the key question about whether LHb activation is required for an aversive memory to be formed has not been addressed. In this article we studied the function of the LHb in memory formation using the Inhibitory Avoidance task (IA. We found that LHb inactivation during IA training does not disrupt memory when assessed 24 hours after, but abolishes it 7 days later, indicating that LHb activity during memory acquisition is not necessary for memory formation, but regulates its temporal stability. These effects suggest that LHb inactivation modifies subjective perception of the training experience.

  15. Lateral Habenula determines long-term storage of aversive memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaiuolo, Micol; Gonzalez, Carolina; Medina, Jorge H.; Piriz, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    The Lateral Habenula (LHb) is a small brain structure that codifies negative motivational value and has been related to major depression. It has been shown recently that LHb activation is sufficient to induce aversive associative learning; however the key question about whether LHb activation is required for an aversive memory to be formed has not been addressed. In this article we studied the function of the LHb in memory formation using the Inhibitory Avoidance task (IA). We found that LHb inactivation during IA training does not disrupt memory when assessed 24 h after, but abolishes it 7 days later, indicating that LHb activity during memory acquisition is not necessary for memory formation, but regulates its temporal stability. These effects suggest that LHb inactivation modifies subjective perception of the training experience. PMID:24860453

  16. Storability Investigations of Water Long-Term Storage Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    previously for the other tankage and then descaled in a pickling solution of 33.2% HN03 , 1.6% HF, and 65.2% water at 140°F for 3 minutes. The titanium ...eras. 3ld. II necoe-ary and Identify by bf-tr number) Hig Purity Water, Stainless Steels, Inconel, Titanium , Particulate-Formation in Water, Effect of...aged) stainless steel, Inconel 718 (aged), 6A1-4V titanium (STA). Two types of water are used in ODno 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE ~UCASFE

  17. Long term storage of clonal material of lily (Lilium L.).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnier, F.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Germplasm collections are important for crop improvement and research. Lily genotypes must be preserved vegetatively as clones, because the genotypes are unique and heterozygous. Using seeds would affect the unique genetic combinations. Collections of bulb crops are usually maintained by yearly

  18. Management and long term storage of cork-oak acorns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.; Tesnier, K.

    2002-01-01

    Cork-oak trees can have unpredictable reproduction patterns, with some trees producing seeds only one every 2 to 5 years. The problem of the irregularity of mast-years is complicated by dormancy-related heterogeneity in germination of freshly harvested acorns. The long time taking by acorn to germin

  19. Long-term policy on gas composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhagen, M.J.M.

    2012-03-13

    This letter sets out the policy of the Dutch cabinet on the long-term change to the composition of low calorific gas that is distributed via the public gas grid. The title of a separate attachment to this letter is 'The composition of low calorific gas in the more distant future and the requirements for gas appliances covered by the Gas Appliances Directive'. The attachment sets out the composition of low calorific gas as network operators can distribute it via the public gas grid from 2021 (or from a later date). This relates to the changes in the 'exit specification' of the gas.

  20. Safety of long-term PPI therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have become the mainstay of medical treatment of acid-related disorders. Long-term use is becoming increasingly common, in some cases without a proper indication. A large number of mainly observational studies on a very wide range of possible associations have been published...... is based on a relevant indication. The concern for complications should primarily be directed at elderly, malnourished with significant co-morbidity. In this population an increased risk for enteric infections, fractures and nutritional deficiencies might have clinical consequences and should lead...

  1. Long-term space flights - personal impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, V. V.

    During a final 4-month stage of a 1-year space flight of cosmonauts Titov and Manarov, a physician, Valery Polyakov was included on a crew for the purpose of evaluating their health, correcting physical status to prepare for the spacecraft reentry and landing operations. The complex program of scientific investigations and experiments performed by the physician included an evaluation of adaptation reactions of the human body at different stages of space mission using clinicophysiological and biochemical methods; testing of alternative regimes of exercise and new countermeasures to prevent an unfavourable effect of long-term weightlessness.

  2. The long term stability of lidar calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael; Gayle Nygaard, Nicolai

    Wind lidars are now used extensively for wind resource measurements. One of the requirements for the data to be accepted in support of project financing (so-called ‘banka-bility’) is to demonstrate the long-term stability of lidar cali-brations. Calibration results for six Leosphere WindCube li-dars......-ters pertaining in the different calibration periods. This is supported by sliding-window analyses of one lidar at one location where the same order of variation is observed as between pre-service and post-service calibrations....

  3. Long-term effects of sibling incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daie, N; Witztum, E; Eleff, M

    1989-11-01

    Although sexual abuse of children is recognized as a serious problem, sibling incest has received relatively little attention. A distinction has been made between power-oriented sibling incest and nurturance-oriented incest. The authors review the relevant literature and present four clinical examples. The cases illustrate the broad range of sibling incest and demonstrate its effects, including the long-term consequences for the perpetrator. Lasting difficulties in establishing and maintaining close relationships, especially sexual ones, are prominent features of each case. Without denying the occurrences of benign sex-play between siblings, the authors emphasize exploitation and abuse as pathogenic aspects of sibling incest.

  4. Long Term Analysis for the BAM device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, D.; Gardiol, D.

    2011-02-01

    Algorithms aimed at the evaluation of critical quantities are based on models with many parameters, which values are estimated from data. The knowledge, with high accuracy, of these values and the control of their temporal evolution are important features. In this work, we focus on the latter subject, and we show a proposed pipeline for the BAM (Basic Angle Monitoring) Long Term Analysis, aimed at the study of the calibration parameters of the BAM device and of the Basic Angle variation, searching for unwanted trends, cyclic features, or other potential unexpected behaviours.

  5. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  6. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Long-term clinical trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found to be ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet another kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  7. Radiological characterization of container materials after interim storage using the example of CASTOR {sup registered} casks; Radiologische Charakterisierung von Behaelterwerkstoffen nach der Zwischenlagerung am Beispiel von CASTOR {sup registered} -Behaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, W. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Graf, R.; Winterhagen, D. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    During interim storage the spent fuel casks or the casks for high-level waste (HAW) coquilles are exposed to neutron irradiation from their inventory that induces activation of the pannier the container body and its components. The presented contribution is an exemplary calculation of mean radial and axial reaction rates for components of HAW coquille or PWR fuel element loaded casks of the type CASTOR {sup registered} HAW28M and CASTOR {sup registered} V/19. The results of the Monte Carlo calculations include statistical uncertainties dependent on several parameters. Using the typical assumption that the casks will be unloaded after 40 years of interim storage the specific activities of significant reaction products are radiological assessed for further 60 years. An unrestricted release according paragraph 29 StrlSchV is discussed.

  8. Long-Term Physical Stability of Plasticized Hemicellulose Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna L. Heikkinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oat spelt arabinoxylan (OsAX and spruce galactoglucomannan (GGM are hemicelluloses that can be extracted in large quantities from side-streams of the agriculture and forest industries. They both form self-standing films, making them potential future packaging materials. This systematic study focuses on the effect of long-term storage on the physical stability of hemicellulose-based films. OsAX and GGM films were plasticized with 40% (w/w of the polysaccharide of glycerol, sorbitol, or their blends, and their stability was followed for four months. Ageing especially affected the glycerol-containing films, in which the tensile strength and Young’s modulus increased and elongation at break decreased. Although the mechanical properties were altered, storage did not affect crystallinity of the films. Oxygen gas permeability (OP and water vapor permeability (WVP properties were monitored in OsAX films. Interestingly WVP decreased during storage; more than a 40% decrease was seen when plasticizer blends contained 50% or more glycerol. In contrast, there were no drastic changes in the OP during storage; all the OPs obtained were between 3.7 and 8.9 [cm3 µm/ (m2 d kPa].

  9. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, J. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France); Reguer, S.; Vantelon, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dillmann, P. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); IRAMAT UMR 5060 CNRS, Gif sur Yvette (France); Neff, D. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Guillot, I. [UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France)

    2010-05-15

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase's stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated. (orig.)

  10. Long term effects of Escherichia coli mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequently diagnosed causes of bovine mastitis, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long term effects of intramammary infections by E. coli on milk yield and quality, especially milk coagulation. Twenty-four Israeli Holstein cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis due to intramammary infection by E. coli were used in this study. Mean lactation number, days in milk (DIM) and daily milk yield (DMY) at the time of infection was 3.3 ± 1.3, 131.7 days ± 78.6 and 45.7 L ± 8.4, respectively. DMY, milk constituents, somatic cells count (SCC), differential leukocytes count and coagulation parameters were subsequently assessed. Two patterns of inflammation were identified: 'short inflammation', characterized by 15% decrease in DMY and >30 days to reach a new maximum DMY (n = 19). The estimated mean loss of marketable milk during the study was 200 L/cow for 'short inflammation' cases, and 1,500 L/cow for 'long inflammation' ones. Significant differences between 'short' and 'long inflammation' effects were found in almost all parameters studied. Long-term detrimental effects on milk quality were found regardless of clinical or bacteriological cure of affected glands.

  11. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  12. Long-term environmental behaviour of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F.; Moberg, L.; Suomela, M

    2000-04-01

    The radioactive pollution of the environment results from the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing (during the mid-years of twentieth century), from the development of the civilian nuclear industry and from accidents such as Chernobyl. Assessing the resulting radiation that humans might receive requires a good understanding of the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the environment. This document reports on a joint European effort to advance this understanding, 3 multinational projects have been coordinated: PEACE, EPORA and LANDSCAPE. This report proposes an overview of the results obtained and they are presented in 6 different themes: (i) redistribution in the soil-plant system, (ii) modelling, (iii) countermeasures, (iv) runoff (v) spatial variations, and (vi) dose assessment. The long term behaviour of the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239-240}Pu is studied through various approaches, these approaches range from in-situ experiments designed to exploit past contamination events to laboratory simulations. A broad scope of different ecosystems ranging from arctic and boreal regions down to mediterranean ones has been considered. (A.C.)

  13. Long term testing of PSI-membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huslage, J.; Brack, H.P.; Geiger, F.; Buechi, F.N.; Tsukada, A.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Long term tests of PSI membranes based on radiation-grafted FEP and ETFE films were carried out and FEP-based membranes were evaluated by monitoring the in-situ membrane area resistance measured by a current pulse method. By modifying our irradiation procedure and using the double crosslinking concept we obtain reproducible membrane cell lifetimes (in term of in-situ membrane resistance) of greater than 5000 hours at 60-65{sup o}C. Preliminary tests at 80-85{sup o}C with lifetimes of greater than 2500 demonstrate the potential long term stability of PSI proton exchange membranes based on FEP over the whole operating temperature range of low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Radiation grafted PSI membranes based on ETFE have better mechanical properties than those of the FEP membranes. Mechanical properties are particularly important in large area cells and fuel cell stacks. ETFE membranes have been tested successfully for approximately 1000 h in a 2-cell stack (100 cm{sup 2} active area each cell). (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  14. Climate Predictability and Long Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Blender, R.; Fraedrich, K.; Liu, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The benefit of climate Long Term Memory (LTM) for long term prediction is assessed using data from a millennium control simulation with the atmosphere ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPIOM. The forecast skills are evaluated for surface temperature time series at individual grid points. LTM is characterised by the Hurst exponent in the power-law scaling of the fluctuation function which is determined by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). LTM with a Hurst exponent close to 0.9 occurs mainly in high latitude oceans, which are also characterized by high potential predictability. Climate predictability is diagnosed in terms of potentially predictable variance fractions. Explicit prediction experiments for various time steps are conducted on a grid point basis using an auto-correlation (AR1) predictor: in regions with LTM, prediction skills are beyond that expected from red noise persistence; exceptions occur in some areas in the southern oceans and over the northern hemisphere continents. Extending the predictability analysis to the fully forced simulation shows large improvement in prediction skills.

  15. Long-term Caspian Sea level change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. L.; Pekker, T.; Wilson, C. R.; Tapley, B. D.; Kostianoy, A. G.; Cretaux, J.-F.; Safarov, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    Caspian Sea level (CSL) has undergone substantial fluctuations during the past several hundred years. The causes over the entire historical period are uncertain, but we investigate here large changes seen in the past several decades. We use climate model-predicted precipitation (P), evaporation (E), and observed river runoff (R) to reconstruct long-term CSL changes for 1979-2015 and show that PER (P-E + R) flux predictions agree very well with observed CSL changes. The observed rapid CSL increase (about 12.74 cm/yr) and significant drop ( -6.72 cm/yr) during the periods 1979-1995 and 1996-2015 are well accounted for by integrated PER flux predictions of +12.38 and -6.79 cm/yr, respectively. We show that increased evaporation rates over the Caspian Sea play a dominant role in reversing the increasing trend in CSL during the past 37 years. The current long-term decline in CSL is expected to continue into the foreseeable future, under global warming scenarios.

  16. Pediatric HIV Long-Term Nonprogressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Rimawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients infected with HIV are best categorized along a continuum from rapid progressors to HIV long-term nonprogressors. Long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs are those in which AIDS develop many years after being infected with HIV, often beyond the 10-year mark, and represent 15–20% of the HIV infected patients. Many of these patients are able to control their infection and maintain undetectable viral loads for long periods of time without antiretroviral therapy. After a comprehensive literature search, we found extensive data related to HIV LTNPs in the adult population; however, very limited data was available related to LTNPs within the pediatric population. We present a case of pediatric HIV LTNPs, perinatally infected patient with undetectable viral loads, despite never receiving ART. Although there are not many instances of LTNPs among children, this child may be one, though she had intermittent viremia. She has continued to manifest serologic evidence of infection, with yearly ELISA and western blot positive tests. Based on the viral fitness studies that were performed, this case exemplifies an adolescent LTNP.

  17. Institutionalization and Organizational Long-term Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Fleck

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalization processes have an ambivalent effect on organizational long-term success. Even though they foster organizational stability and permanence, they also bring about rigidity and resistance to change. As a result, successful organizations are likely to lose their competitive advantage over time. The paper addresses this issue through the investigation of the institutionalization processes of two long-lived companies: General Electric, a firm that has been a long-term success and its rival, Westinghouse, which was broken up after eleven decades of existence. The longitudinal, multilevel analysis of firms and industry has identified two different modes of organizational institutionalization. The reactive mode gives rise to rigidity and change resistance, much like institutional theory predicts; the proactive mode, on the other hand, neutralizes those negative effects of institutionalization processes. In the reactive mode, structure predominates. In the proactive mode, agency plays a major role in organizational institutionalization, and in managing the organization’s relations with the environment, clearly contributing to environmental institutionalization.

  18. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  19. Long-term logistic analysis of FBR introduction strategy: avoiding both uranium and plutonium shortage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for International Studies

    1995-12-31

    Despite comfortable predictions on short to mid-term uranium resources, there is still a concern about long-term availability of competitive uranium resources. In order to achieve substantial uranium saving, early introduction of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) is desirable. But it is also known that rapid introduction of FBR could result in plutonium storage. Will there be enough plutonium on a global scale to sustain fast FBR growth? is there any other way to save uranium resource? This paper concludes that multi-option strategies to achieve flexible long-term strategy to avoid both uranium and plutonium storage are desirable. (authors) 3 refs.

  20. Long Term Data Preservation for CDF at INFN-CNAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerio, S.; Chiarelli, L.; dell'Agnello, L.; De Girolamo, D.; Gregori, D.; Pezzi, M.; Prosperini, A.; Ricci, P.; Rosso, F.; Zani, S.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term preservation of experimental data (intended as both raw and derived formats) is one of the emerging requirements coming from scientific collaborations. Within the High Energy Physics community the Data Preservation in High Energy Physics (DPHEP) group coordinates this effort. CNAF is not only one of the Tier-1s for the LHC experiments, it is also a computing center providing computing and storage resources to many other HEP and non-HEP scientific collaborations, including the CDF experiment. After the end of data taking in 2011, CDF is now facing the challenge to both preserve the large amount of data produced during several years of data taking and to retain the ability to access and reuse it in the future. CNAF is heavily involved in the CDF Data Preservation activities, in collaboration with the Fermilab National Laboratory (FNAL) computing sector. At the moment about 4 PB of data (raw data and analysis-level ntuples) are starting to be copied from FNAL to the CNAF tape library and the framework to subsequently access the data is being set up. In parallel to the data access system, a data analysis framework is being developed which allows to run the complete CDF analysis chain in the long term future, from raw data reprocessing to analysis-level ntuple production. In this contribution we illustrate the technical solutions we put in place to address the issues encountered as we proceeded in this activity.

  1. Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 1130 Central Avenue, Colonie, New York. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and provides the results for 1992. The site is located in eastern New York State, approximately 6.4 km (4.0 mi) northwest of downtown Albany. From 1958 to 1984, National Lead (NL) Industries used the facility to manufacture various components from depleted and enriched uranium natural thorium. Environmental monitoring of CISS began in 1984 when Congress added, the site to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental surveillance program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposure and for thorium-232 and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several chemical parameters are also measured in groundwater, including total metals, volatile organics, and water quality parameters. This surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses. Results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements.

  2. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and provides the results for 1992. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and was placed under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. MISS is part of a National Priorities List (NPL) site. The environmental surveillance program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analysis includes metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling the DOE objective of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses to members of the general public. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other DOE requirements. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. The radiological data for all media sampled support the conclusion that doses to the public are not distinguishable from natural background radiation.

  3. Long-term monitoring of marine gas leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickenbom, Kai; Faber, Eckhard; Poggenburg, Jürgen; Seeger, Christian; Furche, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations is one of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study. Although offshore operations are significantly more expensive than comparable onshore operations, the growing public resistance against onshore CCS projects makes sub-seabed storage a promising option. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is always the possibility of leakage from the reservoir. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. The basic design of the monitoring system builds on our experience in volcano monitoring. Early prototypes were composed of a raft floating on the surface of a mud volcano, carrying sensors for CO2 flux and concentration, data storage and transmission, and power supply by battery-buffered solar panels. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, connected by a flexible tube. This setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. A system for unattended long-term monitoring in a marine environment has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system consists of a funnel-shaped gas collector, a sensor head and pressure housings for electronics and power supply. Since this setup is inexpensive, it can be deployed in numbers to cover larger areas. By addition of multi-channel data loggers, data

  4. [Femoral angioplasty. Long-term results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, H; Carlier, C; Baudrillard, J C; Joffre, F; Cécile, J P

    1990-01-01

    A study on the long-term efficacy of femoral-popliteal angioplasty was carried out on 185 angioplasty cases over a 5 year follow-up period. A classification of data according to the type of lesion treated, revealed that results were favorable in case of stenosis (87%), short obstruction (70%) and long obstruction (35%). A special study of the outcome of treatments for stage IV arteritis was carried out. After comparing results with those obtained by other teams, the authors list the complications encountered, hematomas, and thromboses, and show their current tendency for regression. Lastly, the authors stress the advantages of angioscopy, which permits to identify the nature of the treated lesions and to predict possible complications, which are usually underrated by angiography.

  5. Technology for long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Sunghee H; Benefield, Lazelle E; Mahoney, Diane Feeney

    2010-01-01

    Severe staff shortages in long-term care (LTC) make it difficult to meet the demands of the growing aging population. Further, technology-savvy Baby Boomers are expected to reshape the current institutional environments toward gaining more freedom and control in their care and lives. Voices from business, academia, research, advocacy organizations, and government bodies suggest that innovative technological approaches are the linchpin that may prepare society to cope with these projected demands. In this article, we review the current state of aging-related technology, identify potential areas for efficacy testing on improving the quality of life of LTC residents in future research, and discuss barriers to implementation of LTC technology. Finally, we present a vision of future technology use that could transform current care practices.

  6. Emotional behavior in long-term marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, L L; Gottman, J M; Levenson, R W

    1995-03-01

    In exploring the emotional climate of long-term marriages, this study used an observational coding system to identify specific emotional behaviors expressed by middle-aged and older spouses during discussions of a marital problem. One hundred and fifty-six couples differing in age and marital satisfaction were studied. Emotional behaviors expressed by couples differed as a function of age, gender, and marital satisfaction. In older couples, the resolution of conflict was less emotionally negative and more affectionate than in middle-aged marriages. Differences between husbands and wives and between happy and unhappy marriages were also found. Wives were more affectively negative than husbands, whereas husbands were more defensive than wives, and unhappy marriages involved greater exchange of negative affect than happy marriages.

  7. Long-Term Stability of Horseshoe Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Holman, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Unlike Trojans, horseshoe coorbitals are not generally considered to be long-term stable (Dermott and Murray, 1981; Murray and Dermott, 1999). As the lifetime of Earth's and Venus's horseshoe coorbitals is expected to be about a Gyr, we investigated the possible contribution of late-escaping inner planet coorbitals to the lunar Late Heavy Bombardment. Contrary to analytical estimates, we do not find many horseshoe objects escaping after first 100 Myr. In order to understand this behaviour, we ran a second set of simulations featuring idealized planets on circular orbits with a range of masses. We find that horseshoe coorbitals are generally long lived (and potentially stable) for systems with primary-to-secondary mass ratios larger than about 1200. This is consistent with results of Laughlin and Chambers (2002) for equal-mass pairs or coorbital planets and the instability of Jupiter's horseshoe companions (Stacey and Connors, 2008). Horseshoe orbits at smaller mass ratios are unstable because they must approa...

  8. [Enteral nutrition through long-term jejunostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, T; Neira, P; Enríquez, C

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient suffering a peritonitis episode after subtotal gastrectomy due to gastric neoplasm in relation to lesser curvature necrosis extending to the anterior esophageal wall. This an uncommon andsevere complication that made mandatory further aggressive surgery: transection of the abdominal esophagus, transection of the gastric stump, and cervical esophagostomy with creation of a jejunostomy with a needle catheter for feeding. This digestive tube access technique is generally used during major abdominal post-surgery until oral intake is reestablished. Our patient has been 187 days with this therapy since reconstruction of the GI tract was ruled out due to tumoral infiltration of the colon and tumor recurrence at the gastrohepatic omentum. To date, there has been no complication from permanence and/or long-term use of this technique.

  9. Long-term variations of solar activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram we analyzed two sunspot series: the one over the past 11000 years at the 10-year interval based upon the survey data of 14C concentration in tree-rings, reconstructed by Solanki et al.; and the sunspot number over the past 7000 years, derived from geomagnetic variations by Usoskin et al. We found the periods and quasi-periods in solar activity, such as about 225, 352, 441, 522 and 561 a, and near 1000 and 2000 a. An approach of wavelet transform was applied to check the two sunspot time series, with emphasis on investigating time-varying characteristics in the long-term fluctuations of solar activity. The results show that the lengths and amplitudes of the periods have changed with time, and large variations have taken place during some periods.

  10. Autobiographical reasoning in long-term fandom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lee Harrington

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We explore the social psychological processes through which fan-based experiences become situated in fans' larger life narratives. Drawing on original survey data with long-term U.S. soap opera fans, we examine how the psychological mechanism of autobiographical reasoning functions in fans' construction of self-narratives over time. The case study presented here is a subset of a larger investigation into the age-related structure of fans' activities, identities, and interpretive capacities. Situated at the intersections of gerontological (life span/life course theory and contemporary fan studies, our project mines relatively uninvestigated theoretical terrain. We conclude with a brief discussion of implications for future fan studies.

  11. Brodie's abscess. A long-term review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, M M; MacAuley, P

    1988-09-01

    In 20 patients with 21 Brodie's abscesses, a long-term review revealed that 13 occurred in the second decade of life. All had local symptoms for six weeks or more. The tibia was involved in 11 cases and seven of these were in the proximal metaphysis. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was elevated in only six cases. When the ESR was more than 40 mm per hour, recurrence was more likely. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from 11 abscesses. Curettage and antibiotics for six weeks were adequate for treatment in most cases. However, lesions larger than 3 cm in diameter should be grafted, and patients with an elevated ESR require more aggressive decompression and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Lesions within the neck of the femur pose particular anatomic problems and should not be approached laterally. All cases were followed to full bone maturity. No significant leg length inequality was clinically or roentgenologically apparent. If an abscess was juxtaphyseal, deformity of the epiphysis could develop.

  12. Long-term dynamics of Typha populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J.B.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The zonation of Typha populations in an experimental pond in Michigan was re-examined 15 years after the original sampling to gain insight into the long-term dynamics. Current distributions of Typha populations were also examined in additional experimental ponds at the site that have been maintained for 23 years. The zonation between T. latifolia and T. angustifolia in the previously studied pond 15 years after the initial sampling revealed that the density and distribution of shoots had not changed significantly. Thus, it appears that previously reported results (based on 7- year old populations) have remained consistent over time. Additional insight into the interaction between these two taxa was sought by comparing mixed and monoculture stands in five experimental ponds that have remained undisturbed for their 23-year history. The maximum depth of T. latifolia, the shallow- water species, was not significantly reduced when growing in the presence of the more flood tolerant T. angustifolia. In contrast, the minimum depth of T. angustifolia was reduced from 0 to 37 cm when in the presence of T. latifolia. When total populations were compared between monoculture and mixed stands, the average density of T. angustifolia shoots was 59.4 percent lower in mixed stands while the density of T. latifolia was 32 percent lower, with T. angustifolia most affected at shallow depths (reduced by 92 percent) and T. latifolia most affected at the deepest depths (reduced by 60 percent). These long-term observations indicate that competitive displacement between Typha taxa has remained stable over time.

  13. Long-term reductions in tinnitus severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folmer Robert L

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was undertaken to assess long-term changes in tinnitus severity exhibited by patients who completed a comprehensive tinnitus management program; to identify factors that contributed to changes in tinnitus severity within this population; to contribute to the development and refinement of effective assessment and management procedures for tinnitus. Methods Detailed questionnaires were mailed to 300 consecutive patients prior to their initial appointment at the Oregon Health & Science University Tinnitus Clinic. All patients were then evaluated and treated within a comprehensive tinnitus management program. Follow-up questionnaires were mailed to the same 300 patients 6 to 36 months after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. Results One hundred ninety patients (133 males, 57 females; mean age 57 years returned follow-up questionnaires 6 to 36 months (mean = 22 months after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. This group of patients exhibited significant long-term reductions in self-rated tinnitus loudness, Tinnitus Severity Index scores, tinnitus-related anxiety and prevalence of current depression. Patients who improved their sleep patterns or Beck Depression Inventory scores exhibited greater reductions of tinnitus severity scores than patients who continued to experience insomnia and depression at follow-up. Conclusions Individualized tinnitus management programs that were designed for each patient contributed to overall reductions in tinnitus severity exhibited on follow-up questionnaires. Identification and treatment of patients experiencing anxiety, insomnia or depression are vital components of an effective tinnitus management program. Utilization of acoustic therapy also contributed to improvements exhibited by these patients.

  14. Long term results of pneumatic retinopexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellakwa AF

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amin F EllakwaMenoufiya University, Shibin el Kom, Al-Menoufiya, EgyptBackground: Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is a commonly encountered retinal problem where rapid treatment can prevent irreversible vision loss. Pneumatic retinopexy (PR is a simple, minimally invasive procedure for retinal reattachment.Purpose: This study aimed to assess the long-term anatomical and functional outcome of pneumatic retinopexy in primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.Patients and methods: A prospective interventional study was performed. Subjects with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment who underwent pneumatic retinopexy from May 2006 to May 2007 at Menoufiya University Hospital were included in this study with at least 3 years follow-up.Results: A total of 40 cases were included in the study. The mean age of patients was 44.25 ± 10.85 years. Reattachment of the retina was achieved in 100% of cases. In 75% of cases, the primary intervention was successful. However, the retina redetached in 20% of these during the first 6 months, requiring reinjection or another procedure. Three years after the first intervention, follow-up measurement of the mean visual acuity of the eyes without reoperation was 0.40 ± 0.21 while the mean visual acuity of the eyes which needed additional operations was 0.22 ± 0.13.Conclusion: Sixty percent of the cases obtained long-term retinal reattachment with a single operation success (SOS, with good visual recovery and less morbidity than other more invasive procedures like scleral buckling or pars plana vitrectomy, translating to higher productivity for the patient. This procedure, being quicker than the alternatives, also saves the surgeon's time, making PR a good choice for managing primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in developing countries.Keywords: pneumatic, retinopexy, rhegmatogenous, retinal detachment

  15. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

      The aim of the present study was to investigate the stability of cannabinoids in cannabis resin slabs and cannabis extracts upon long-term storage. The levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) on both neutral and acidic form were measured...... at room temperature, 4 °C and - 20 °C for up to 4 years. Acidic THC degrades exponentially via decarboxylation with concentration halve-lives of approximately 330 and 462 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. The degradation of neutral THC seems to occur somewhat slower. When cannabinoids were...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  16. Verification of long-term load measurement technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe

    The present report is the final effort of tasks carried out under UPWIND WP1B2 transmission and conversion, which describes: 1) results and recommendations developed in the course of developing the long-term load measurement technique 2) the hardware details, type of sensors and location, data...... storage and 3) data analysis technique to verify design load assumptions. The work is carried out under Contract no 019945 (SES6) "UPWIND" within the European Commission The interaction between the mechanical and electrical generator subsystems is described rudimentarily, based primarily on HAWC2...... simulations below stall of the mechanical system with simple generator and gearbox systems. The electrical system simulations were not carried out as intended in DOW[2], but indications of the conditions for establishing the interaction have been described by measurements and by argument, that this might have...

  17. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David George [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  18. Standard guide for evaluation of materials used in extended service of interim spent nuclear fuel dry storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Part of the total inventory of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is stored in dry cask storage systems (DCSS) under licenses granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of this guide is to provide information to assist in supporting the renewal of these licenses, safely and without removal of the SNF from its licensed confinement, for periods beyond those governed by the term of the original license. This guide provides information on materials behavior under conditions that may be important to safety evaluations for the extended service of the renewal period. This guide is written for DCSS containing light water reactor (LWR) fuel that is clad in zirconium alloy material and stored in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), at an independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). The components of an ISFSI, addressed in this document, include the commercial SNF, canister, cask, and all parts of the storage installation including the ISFSI pad. The language of t...

  19. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

    2014-07-01

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  20. Solar-assisted district heating system - Scientific study. Solar-assisted district heating system with long-term thermal storage in Friedrichshafen-Wiggenhausen and Hamburg-Bramfeld.. Results of the first year of operation; Solar unterstuetzte Nahwaermeversorgung - Wissenschaftliches Begleitprogramm. Solare Nahwaermeversorgung mit Langzeitwaermespeicher in Friedrichshafen-Wiggenhausen und Hamburg-Bramfeld. Ergebnisse des ersten Betriebsjahres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M.E.; Mahler, B.; Hahne, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1998-12-31

    The first two pilot plants for solar district heating with seasonal thermal energy storage were put in operation in October 1996. Both projects were initiated by the Institute for Thermodynamics and Thermal Energy Technology (ITW) of the University of Stuttgart that also provided scientific support up to the present. This report presents the results of the first two years of operation of both plants. Both solar plants have been operated without any major problems. The solar energy yield in the first year of operation has only been reduced by the unsatisfactory operation of the heating grid. The most important step towards optimising the plants is the adjustment of the internal heating systems and thus the reduction of the heating temperatures which are currently too high. Based on subject pre-conditions the results projected for the first pilot plants for solar district heating and long-term thermal energy storage will be reached in the following years of operation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Oktober 1996 gingen die ersten beiden Pilotanlagen zur solaren Nahwaermeversorgung mit saisonaler Waermespeicherung in Betrieb. Beide Projekte wurden vom Institut fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik (ITW), Universitaet Stuttgart initiiert und ueber die gesamte bisherige Laufzeit wissenschaftlich begleitet. Die Ergebnisse des ersten Betriebsjahres der beiden Anlagen sind in diesem Bericht zusammengestellt. In beiden Faellen funktionieren die Solaranlagen ohne grosse Probleme. Die solaren Ertraege wurden im ersten Betriebsjahr noch durch die unzureichende Betriebsweise der Heiznetze gemindert. Wichtigster Ansatzpunkt fuer eine Optimierung der Anlagen ist die Einregulierung der hausinternen Heizungssysteme und damit die Absenkung der derzeit noch zu hohen Heiznetztemperaturen. Unter dieser Voraussetzung werden die vorausgesagten Ergebnisse fuer die ersten Pilotanlagen zur solaren Nahwaerme mit Langzeit-Waermespeicher in den naechsten Betriebsjahren erreicht werden. (orig.)

  1. Early calcium increase triggers the formation of olfactory long-term memory in honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Yukihisa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptic plasticity associated with an important wave of gene transcription and protein synthesis underlies long-term memory processes. Calcium (Ca2+ plays an important role in a variety of neuronal functions and indirect evidence suggests that it may be involved in synaptic plasticity and in the regulation of gene expression correlated to long-term memory formation. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ca2+ is necessary and sufficient for inducing long-term memory formation. A suitable model to address this question is the Pavlovian appetitive conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex in the honeybee Apis mellifera, in which animals learn to associate an odor with a sucrose reward. Results By modulating the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in the brain, we show that: (i blocking [Ca2+]i increase during multiple-trial conditioning selectively impairs long-term memory performance; (ii conversely, increasing [Ca2+]i during single-trial conditioning triggers long-term memory formation; and finally, (iii as was the case for long-term memory produced by multiple-trial conditioning, enhancement of long-term memory performance induced by a [Ca2+]i increase depends on de novo protein synthesis. Conclusion Altogether our data suggest that during olfactory conditioning Ca2+ is both a necessary and a sufficient signal for the formation of protein-dependent long-term memory. Ca2+ therefore appears to act as a switch between short- and long-term storage of learned information.

  2. DOE UST interim subsurface barrier technologies workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    This document contains information which was presented at a workshop regarding interim subsurface barrier technologies that could be used for underground storage tanks, particularly the tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford Reservation.

  3. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  4. Long term hypolipidaemic and anti-atherogenic effects of Carica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long term hypolipidaemic and anti-atherogenic effects of Carica papaya Linn. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... This study was designed to assess the long term (24 weeks) effects of daily oral ...

  5. Seasonal And Long Term Rainfall Trends In Calabar, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal And Long Term Rainfall Trends In Calabar, Nigeria. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Both seasonal and long term trends of rain fall in Calabar between 1985 and 2003 have been examined.

  6. Memory Vocabulary Learning Strategies and Long-Term Retention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Memory Vocabulary Learning Strategies and Long-Term Retention. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... The results were reflected in the students' short-term and long-term memory retention.

  7. IPO-related organizational change and long-term performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eije, J.H. von; Witte, M.C. de; Zwaan, A.H. van der

    2000-01-01

    Mainstream literature on long-term performance of initial public offerings focuses on long-term underperformance. Because underperformance is an anomalous phenomenon, many authors search for explanations based on financial market imperfections. More recently, however, the attention shifts from

  8. Long-term outcome of neuroparacoccidioidomycosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Francesconi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neuroparacoccidioidomycosis (NPCM is a term used to describe the invasion of the central nervous system by the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. NPCM has been described sporadically in some case reports and small case series, with little or no focus on treatment outcome and long-term follow-up. METHODS: All patients with NPCM from January 1991 to December 2006 were analyzed and were followed until December 2009. RESULTS: Fourteen (3.8% cases of NPCM were identified out of 367 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. A combination of oral fluconazole and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SMZ/TMP was the regimen of choice, with no documented death due to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Residual neurological deficits were observed in 8 patients. Residual calcification was a common finding in neuroimaging follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: All the patients in this study responded positively to the association of oral fluconazole and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, a regimen that should be considered a treatment option in cases of NPCM. Neurological sequela was a relatively common finding. For proper management of these patients, anticonvulsant treatment and physical therapy support were also needed.

  9. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. PMID:28788163

  10. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  11. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  12. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  13. Downlink Scheduling in Long Term Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Hossain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is an investigated research article on resource block scheduling of Long Term Evolution (LTE. LTE is one of the evolutions of the Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS. It provides internet access to mobile users through smart phone, laptop and other android devices. LTE offers a high speed data and multimedia services. It supports data rates up to 100 Mbps in the downlink and 50 Mbps in the uplink transmission. Our research investigation was aim to the downlink scheduling. We have considered The Best CQI scheduling algorithm and the Round Robin scheduling algorithm. The implementation, analysis and comparison of these scheduling algorithms have been performed through MATLAB simulator. We have analyzed the impact of the scheduling schemes on the throughput and the fairness of both scheduling schemes. Here we have proposed a new scheduling algorithm that achieves a compromise between the throughput and the fairness. Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM has been adopted as the downlink transmission scheme. We have considered the impact of the channel delay on the throughput. In addition, MIMO transceiver systems have been implemented to increase the throughput

  14. Long Term Evolution of Plasma Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B

    2014-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution (LTE) of plasma wakefields over multiple plasma-electron periods and few plasma-ion periods, much less than a recombination time. The evolution and relaxation of such a wakefield-perturbed plasma over these timescales has important implications for the upper limits of repetition-rates in plasma colliders. Intense fields in relativistic lasers (or intense beams) create plasma wakefields (modes around {\\omega}pe) by transferring energy to the plasma electrons. Charged-particle beams in the right phase may be accelerated with acceleration/focusing gradients of tens of GeV/m. However, wakefields leave behind a plasma not in equilibrium, with a relaxation time of multiple plasma-electron periods. Ion motion over ion timescales, caused by energy transfer from the driven plasma-electrons to the plasma-ions can create interesting plasma states. Eventually during LTE, the dynamics of plasma de-coheres (multiple modes through instability driven mixing), thermalizing into random motion (...

  15. Long term results of mandibular distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Puneet

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular distraction osteogenesis has become a popular surgical modality due to its many advantages over conventional orthognathic surgical procedures. However, in spite of the technique having been used for over 15 years, no concrete long term results are available regarding the stability of results. We discuss the various studies which have reported either in favour or against the stablility of results after distraction. We report a series of 6 cases (3 unilateral and 3 bilateral distraction where distraction was carried out before puberty and followed them up to seven years after removal of distractors. This case series shows that results achieved by distraction osteogenesis are unstable or best unpredictable with respect to producing a permanent size increase in the mandible. The role of the distraction osteogenesis in overcoming the pterygomassetric sling is questionable. We suggest a multicenter study with adequate patient numbers treated with a similar protocol and documented after growth cessation to have meaningful conclusions on the debate of distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF LONG TERM TONGUE ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Nidarsh D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral ulcers is a very common disorder of the oral mucosa. Patients with signs or symptoms of oral ulcers are sometimes referred to gastroenterology clinics, however, in most instances the ulcers does not reflect gastrointestinal disease, some with a chronic non- healing ulcer are advised biopsy. Indeed, a spectrum of disorders can give rise to oral mucosal ulcers ranging from minor local trauma to significant local disease such as malignancy or systemic illness. Lesions of the tongue have a broad differential diagnosis ranging from benign idiopathic processes to infections, cancers, and infiltrative disorders. This article will focus on common ulcerative disorders of the tongue in aspects of their clinical features and differential diagnosis, two case reports with the diagnosis and conservative management for long-term chronic ulcers. The two cases which are reported in this article had a differential diagnosis of Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. The clinical picture was craterlike lesion, having a velvety-red base and a rolled, indurated border and most important painless in both cases. Removal of the irritant which was the tooth, rehabilitation of the oral mucosa by lubrication with Cocus Nucifera resulted in the healing of the ulcers. Functional components of Cocus Nucifera are Squaline, tocopherol, phytosterols and other sterols which are all plant steroids.

  17. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Chladek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs, are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics.

  18. CERN Services for Long Term Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, Jamie; Blomer, Jakob; Ganis, Gerardo; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje; Simko, Tibor; Cancio Melia, German; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the services that are offered by CERN for Long Term preservation of High Energy Physics (HEP) data, with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as a key use case. Data preservation is a strategic goal for European High Energy Physics (HEP), as well as for the HEP community worldwide and we position our work in this global content. Specifically, we target the preservation of the scientific data, together with the software, documentation and computing environment needed to process, (re-)analyse or otherwise (re-)use the data. The target data volumes range from hundreds of petabytes (PB – 10^15 bytes) to hundreds of exabytes (EB – 10^18 bytes) for a target duration of several decades. The Use Cases driving data preservation are presented together with metrics that allow us to measure how close we are to meeting our goals, including the possibility for formal certification for at least part of this work. Almost all of the services that we describe are fully generic – the exception being A...

  19. 40 CFR 52.29 - Visibility long-term strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-term strategy. (1) A long-term strategy is a 10- to 15-year plan for making reasonable progress toward... every 3 years from November 24, 1987. (3) During the long-term strategy review process, the... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility long-term strategies. 52.29...

  20. TIA and Stroke: the long-term perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, I. van

    2006-01-01

    Background Survival after stroke has improved, but little is known about the long-term risk of new vascular events and the functioning of long-term survivors. The main objective of this thesis was to evaluate the long-term perspective of these patients. Methods Two longitudinal studies were carried

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYMENT SPELLS IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela-Emanuela Danacica; Raluca Mazilescu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze characteristics of long-term unemployment spells in Romania and to estimate the effect of factors influencing long-term unemployment spells. The study period is in between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2010. 468159 long-term spells registered in the specified period at the National Agency of Employment are analyzed.

  2. Long-term data series relating to Southern Africa's renewable natural resources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Macdonald, IAW

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available agricultural and veterinary data series. The remaining five chapters are of a more synthetic nature and examine the topics of palaeoenvironmental changes, environmental-forcing mechanisms, linkages between ecosyterns, the analysis and storage of long-term data...

  3. Endogenous BDNF Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in the Rat Parietal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mariana; Bekinschtein, Pedro, Cammarota, Martin; Vianna, Monica R. M.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H.

    2005-01-01

    Information storage in the brain is a temporally graded process involving different memory phases as well as different structures in the mammalian brain. Cortical plasticity seems to be essential to store stable long-term memories, although little information is available at the moment regarding molecular and cellular events supporting memory…

  4. Long-term maintenance of fungal cultures on perlite in cryovials - an alternative for agar slants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, L; Lisá, L

    2008-01-01

    Cultures of 33 basidiomycete strains out of 35 tested were viable with unchanged characteristics after four years of maintenance on perlite in cryovials. These cultures can be a good substitute for agar cultures in long-term maintenance of fungi. For comparison, the storage under oil was evaluated but it turned out to be unsuitable for the majority of our cultures.

  5. Two Waves of Transcription Are Required for Long-Term Memory in the Honeybee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefer, Damien; Perisse, Emmanuel; Hourcade, Benoit; Sandoz, JeanChristophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Storage of information into long-term memory (LTM) usually requires at least two waves of transcription in many species. However, there is no clear evidence of this phenomenon in insects, which are influential models for memory studies. We measured retention in honeybees after injecting a transcription inhibitor at different times before and after…

  6. Two Waves of Transcription Are Required for Long-Term Memory in the Honeybee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefer, Damien; Perisse, Emmanuel; Hourcade, Benoit; Sandoz, JeanChristophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Storage of information into long-term memory (LTM) usually requires at least two waves of transcription in many species. However, there is no clear evidence of this phenomenon in insects, which are influential models for memory studies. We measured retention in honeybees after injecting a transcription inhibitor at different times before and after…

  7. Scientific Understanding from Long Term Observations: Insights from the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosz, J.

    2001-12-01

    The network dedicated to Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) in the United States has grown to 24 sites since it was formed in 1980. Long-term research and monitoring are performed on parameters thatare basic to all ecosystems and are required to understand patterns, processes, and relationship to change. Collectively, the sites in the LTER Network provide opportunities to contrast marine, coastal, and continental regions, the full range of climatic gradients existing in North America, and aquatic and terrestrial habitats in a range of ecosystem types. The combination of common core areas and long-term research and monitoring in many habitats have allowed unprecedented abilities to understand and compare complex temporal and spatial dynamics associated with issues like climate change, effects of pollution, biodiversity and landuse. For example, McMurdo Dry Valley in the Antarctic has demonstrated an increase in glacier mass since 1993 which coincides with a period of cooler than normal summers and more than average snowfall. In contrast, the Bonanza Creek and Toolik Lake sites in Alaska have recorded a warming period unprecedented in the past 200 years. Nitrogen deposition effects have been identified through long-term watershed studies on biogeochemical cycles, especially at Coweeta Hydrological Lab, Harvard Forest, and the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. In aquatic systems, such as the Northern Temperate Lakes site, long-term data revealed time lags in effects of invaders and disturbance on lake communities. Biological recovery from an effect such as lake acidification was shown to lag behind chemical recovery. The long-term changes documented over 2 decades have been instrumental in influencing management practices in many of the LTER areas. In Puerto Rico, the Luquillo LTER demonstrated that dams obstruct migrations of fish and freshwater shrimp and water abstraction at low flows can completely obliterate downstream migration of juveniles and damage

  8. Visual working memory buffers information retrieved from visual long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keisuke; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2017-05-16

    Human memory is thought to consist of long-term storage and short-term storage mechanisms, the latter known as working memory. Although it has long been assumed that information retrieved from long-term memory is represented in working memory, we lack neural evidence for this and need neural measures that allow us to watch this retrieval into working memory unfold with high temporal resolution. Here, we show that human electrophysiology can be used to track information as it is brought back into working memory during retrieval from long-term memory. Specifically, we found that the retrieval of information from long-term memory was limited to just a few simple objects' worth of information at once, and elicited a pattern of neurophysiological activity similar to that observed when people encode new information into working memory. Our findings suggest that working memory is where information is buffered when being retrieved from long-term memory and reconcile current theories of memory retrieval with classic notions about the memory mechanisms involved.

  9. Nutritional deficit and Long Term Potentiation alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrosino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we examined the ability of prenatally malnourished offspring to produce and maintain long-term potentiation (LTP of the perforant path/dentate granule cell synapse in freely moving rats at 15,30, and 90 days of age. Population spike amplitude (PSA was calculated from dentate field potential recordings prior to and at 15, 30, 60 min. and 3, 5, 18 and 24 h following tetanization of the perforant pathway. All animals of both malnourished and well-nourished diet groups at 15 days of age showed potentiation of PSA measures but the measures obtained from 15-day-old prenatally malnourished animals were significantly less than that of age-matched, well-nourished controls. At 30 days of age, remarkable effect of tetanization was likely observed from PSA measures for this age group followed much the same pattern. At 90 days of age, PSA measures obtained from malnourished animals decreased from pretetanization levels immediately following tetanization. At this age, however, at three hours time recordings, this measure growing up to a level which did not differ significantly from that of the control group. These results indicate that the width of tetanization induced enhancement of dentate granule cell response in preweanling rats (15-day-old animals is signifacantly affected fromgestational protein malnutrition and this trend is kept in animals tested at 30 and 90 days of age. The fact, however, that considerable limitation in LTP generation was gained from prenatally malnourished animals at 90 days of age, implying that dietary rehabilitation starting at birth is an intervention strategy not capable to imbrove the effects of the gestational stress.

  10. A new long-term care manifesto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    This article argues for a fresh look at how we provide long-term care (LTC) for older persons. Essentially, LTC offers a compensatory service that responds to frailty. Policy debate around LTC centers on costs, but we are paying for something we really don't want. Building societal enthusiasm (or even support) for LTC will require re-inventing and re-branding. LTC has three basic components: personal care, housing, and health care (primarily chronic disease management). They can be delivered in a variety of settings. It is rare to find all three done well simultaneously. Personal care (PC) needs to be both competent and compassionate. Housing must provide at least minimal amenities and foster autonomy; when travel time for PC raises costs dramatically, some form of clustered housing may be needed. Health care must be proactive, aimed at preventing exacerbations of chronic disease and resultant hospitalizations. Enhancing preferences means allowing taking informed risks. Payment incentives should reward both quality of care and quality of life, but positive outcomes must be defined as slowing decline. Paying for services but not for housing under Medicaid would automatically level the playing field between nursing homes (NH) and community-based services. Regulations should achieve greater parity between NH and community care and include both positive and negative feedback. Providing post-acute care should be separate from LTC. Using the tripartite LTC framework, we can create innovative flexible approaches to providing needed services for frail older persons in formats that are both desirable and affordable. Such care will be more socially desirable and hence worth paying for.

  11. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light

  12. Hormonal changes during long-term isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custaud, M A; Belin de Chantemele, E; Larina, I M; Nichiporuk, I A; Grigoriev, A; Duvareille, M; Gharib, C; Gauquelin-Koch, G

    2004-05-01

    Confinement and inactivity induce considerable psychological and physiological modifications through social and sensory deprivation. The aim of the SFINCSS-99 experiment was to determine the cardiovascular and hormonal pattern of blood volume regulation during long-term isolation and confinement. Simulation experiments were performed in pressurized chambers similar in size to the volumes of modern space vehicles. Group I consisted of four Russian male volunteers, who spent 240 days in a 100-m(3 )chamber. Group II included four males (one German and three Russians) who spent 110 days in isolation (200-m(3) module). The blood samples, taken before, during and after the isolation period, were used to determine haematocrit (Ht), growth hormone (GH), active renin, aldosterone, and osmolality levels. From the urine samples, electrolytes, osmolality, nitrites, nitrates, cortisol, antidiuretic hormone (ADH), aldosterone, normetanephrine and metanephrine levels were determined. The increase in plasma volume (PV) that is associated with a tendency for a decrease in plasma active renin is likely to be due to decreased sympathetic activity, and concords with the changes in urinary catecholamine levels during confinement. Urinary catecholamine levels were significantly higher during the recovery period than during confinement. This suggests that the sympathoadrenal system was activated, and concords with the increase in heart rate. Vascular resistance is determined by not only the vasoconstrictor but also vasodilator systems. The ratio of nitrite/nitrate in urine, as an indicator of nitric oxide release, did not reveal any significant changes. Analysis of data suggests that the duration of the isolation was a main factor involved in the regulation of hormones.

  13. Perinatal respiratory infections and long term consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Indinnimeo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most important pathogen in the etiology of respiratory infections in early life. 50% of children are affected by RSV within the first year of age, and almost all children become infected within two years. Numerous retrospective and prospective studies linking RSV and chronic respiratory morbidity show that RSV bronchiolitis in infancy is followed by recurrent wheezing after the acute episod. According to some authors a greater risk of wheezing in children with a history of RSV bronchiolitis would be limited to childhood, while according to others this risk would be extended into adolescence and adulthood. To explain the relationship between RSV infection and the development of bronchial asthma or the clinical pathogenetic patterns related to a state of bronchial hyperreactivity, it has been suggested that RSV may cause alterations in the response of the immune system (immunogenic hypothesis, activating directly mast cells and basophils and changing the pattern of differentiation of immune cells present in the bronchial tree as receptors and inflammatory cytokines. It was also suggested that RSV infection can cause bronchial hyperreactivity altering nervous airway modulation, acting on nerve fibers present in the airways (neurogenic hypothesis.The benefits of passive immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, which seems to represent an effective approach in reducing the sequelae of RSV infection in the short- and long-term period, strengthen the implementation of prevention programs with this drug, as recommended by the national guidelines of the Italian Society of Neonatology. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the

  14. Long-term macronutrient stoichiometry of UK ombrotrophic peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillereff, Daniel N; Boyle, John F; Toberman, Hannah; Adams, Jessica L; Bryant, Charlotte L; Chiverrell, Richard C; Helliwell, Rachel C; Keenan, Patrick; Lilly, Allan; Tipping, Edward

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we report new data on peat carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and accumulation rates for 15 sites in the UK. Concentrations of C, N and P measured in peat from five ombrotrophic blanket mires, spanning 4000-10,000years to present were combined with existing nutrient data from ten Scottish ombrotrophic peat bogs to provide the first UK perspective on millennial scale macronutrient concentrations in ombrotrophic peats. Long-term average C, N and P concentrations (0-1.25m) for the UK are 54.8, 1.56 and 0.039wt%, of similar magnitude to the few published comparable sites worldwide. The uppermost peat (0-0.2m) is enriched in P and N (51.0, 1.86, and 0.070wt%) relative to the deeper peat (0.5-1.25m, 56.3, 1.39, and 0.027wt%). Long-term average (whole core) accumulation rates of C, N and P are 25.3±2.2gCm(-2)year(-)(1) (mean±SE), 0.70±0.09gNm(-2)year(-1) and 0.018±0.004gPm(-2)year(-1), again similar to values reported elsewhere in the world. The two most significant findings are: 1) that a regression model of N concentration on P concentration and mean annual precipitation, based on global meta data for surface peat samples, can explain 54% of variance in N concentration in these UK peat profiles; and 2) budget calculations for the UK peat cores yield an estimate for long-term average N-fixation of 0.8gm(-2)year(-1). Our UK results, and comparison with others sites, corroborate published estimates of N storage in northern boreal peatlands through the Holocene as ranging between 8 and 15Pg N. However, the observed correlation of N% with both mean annual precipitation and P concentration allows a potential bias in global estimates that do not take this into account. The peat sampling data set has been deposited at the NERC Data Centre (Toberman et al., 2016).

  15. Enhanced Polyhydroxybutyrate Production for Long-Term Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Ryan J.; Rahman, Asif; Miller, Charles D.; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology holds the promise of advancing long term space fight by the production of medicine, food, materials, and energy. One such application of synthetic biology is the production of biomaterials, specifically polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), using purposed organisms such as Escherichia coli. PHAs are a group of biodegradable bioplastics that are produced by a wide variety of naturally occurring microorganisms, mainly as an energy storage intermediate. PHAs have similar melting point to polypropylene and a Youngs modulus close to polystyrene. Due to limited resources and cost of transportation, large-scale extraction of biologically produced products in situ is extremely cumbersome during space flight. To that end, we are developing a secretion systems for exporting PHA from the cell in order to reduce unit operations. PHAs granules deposited inside bacteria are typically associated with proteins bound to the granule surface. Phasin, a granule bound protein, was targeted for type I secretion by fusion with HlyA signal peptide for indirect secretion of PHAs. In order to validate our secretion strategy, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) was tagged to the PHA polymerase enzyme (phaC), this three part gene cassette consists of phaA and phaB and are required for PHA production. Producing PHAs in situ during space flight or planet colonization will enable mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications thereby reducing resupply requirements. Biologically produced PHAs can be used in additive manufacturing such as three dimensional (3D) printing to create products that can be made on demand during space flight. After exceeding their lifetime, the PHAs could be melted and recycled back to 3D print other products. We will discuss some of our long term goals of this approach.

  16. Nuclear cost studies for decontamination and dismantling. The interim storage for spent fuels at Studsvik.; Kaerntekniska kostnadsstudier avseende dekontaminering och nedlaeggning. Mellanfoervaret foer anvaent kaernbraensle (FA) i Studsvik.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeblom, Rolf; Sjoeoe, Cecilia [Tekedo AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Lindskog, Staffan; Cato, Anna [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-05-01

    The interim store for spent fuel (FA) at Studsvik was designed and constructed in 1962-64. It has been used for wet storage of fuel from the Aagesta Nuclear Power Plant as well as the R2 reactor at Studsvik. FA comprises three cylindrical pools for fuel storage as well as equipment for handling and decontamination. The purpose of the present work is to develop methodology for calculation of future costs for decontamination and dismantling of nuclear research facilities. The analysis is based on information from Studsvik as well as results from information searches. The requirements on precision of cost calculations is high, also at early stages. The reason for this is that the funds are to be collected now but are to be used some time in the future. At the same time they should neither be insufficient nor superfluous. It is apparent from the compilation and analysis that when methodology that has been developed for the purpose of cost calculations for power reactors is applied to research facilities certain drawbacks become apparent, e.g. difficulties to carry out variation analyses. Generally, feedback of data on incurred costs for the purpose of cost calculations can be achieved by using one or more scaling factors together with weighing factors which are established based on e g expert judgement. For development and utilisation of such tools it is necessary to have access to estimated costs together with incurred ones. In the report, the following combination of aspects is identified as being of primary significance for achieving a high precision: Calculations with the possibility to 'calibrate' against incurred costs; Radiological surveying tailored to the needs for calculations; Technical planning including selection of techniques to be used; Identification of potential sources for systematic deviations. In the case of FA, some of the sources of uncertainty are as follows: Damaged surface layers in the pools; Maintenance status for the drains

  17. Analysis of Dust Samples Collected from an Unused Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Storage Container at Hope Creek, Delaware.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July, 2014, the Electric Power Research Institute and industry partners sampled dust on the surface of an unused canister that had been stored in an overpack at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station for approximately one year. The foreign material exclusion (FME) cover that had been on the top of the canister during storage, and a second recently - removed FME cover, were also sampled. This report summarizes the results of analyses of dust samples collected from the unused Hope Creek canister and the FME covers. Both wet and dry samples of the dust/salts were collected, using SaltSmart(TM) sensors and Scotch - Brite(TM) abrasive pads, respectively. The SaltSmart(TM) samples were leached and the leachate analyzed chemically to determine the composition and surface load per unit area of soluble salts present on the canister surface. The dry pad samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence and by scanning electron microscopy to determine dust texture and mineralogy; and by leaching and chemical analysis to deter mine soluble salt compositions. The analyses showed that the dominant particles on the canister surface were stainless steel particles, generated during manufacturing of the canister. Sparse environmentally - derived silicates and aluminosilicates were also present. Salt phases were sparse, and consisted of mostly of sulfates with rare nitrates and chlorides. On the FME covers, the dusts were mostly silicates/aluminosilicates; the soluble salts were consistent with those on the canister surface, and were dominantly sulfates. It should be noted that the FME covers were w ashed by rain prior to sampling, which had an unknown effect of the measured salt loads and compositions. Sulfate salts dominated the assemblages on the canister and FME surfaces, and in cluded Ca - SO4 , but also Na - SO4 , K - SO4 , and Na - Al - SO4 . It is likely that these salts were formed by particle - gas conversion reactions, either

  18. LOP- LONG-TERM ORBIT PREDICTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Long-Term Orbit Predictor (LOP) trajectory propagation program is a useful tool in lifetime analysis of orbiting spacecraft. LOP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) trajectories. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. LOP uses the variation-of-parameters method in formulating the equations of motion. Terms involving the mean anomaly are removed from numerical integrations so that large step sizes, on the order of days, are possible. Consequently, LOP executes much faster than programs based on Cowell's method, such as the companion program ASAP (the Artificial Satellite Analysis Program, NPO-17522, also available through COSMIC). The program uses a force model with a gravity field of up to 21 by 21, lunisolar perturbation, drag, and solar radiation pressure. The input includes classical orbital elements (either mean or oscillating), orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficients, gravitational constants, planet radius, rotation rate. The printed output contains the classical elements for each time step or event step, and additional orbital data such as true anomaly, eccentric anomaly, latitude, longitude, periapsis altitude, and the rate of change per day of certain elements. Selected output is additionally written to a plot file for postprocessing by the user. LOP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS with a minimum of 256K RAM. Recompiling the source requires the Lahey F77 v2.2 compiler. The LOP package includes examples that use LOTUS 1-2-3 for graphical displays, but any graphics software package should be able to handle the ASCII plot file. The program is available on two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. The program was written in 1986 and last updated in 1989. LOP is

  19. Northern European long term climate archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohl, Veronica [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is responsible for the management and disposal of Sweden's radioactive waste. It is intended to deposit the spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository. This repository shall keep the radiotoxic material separated from humans and the environment for extended periods, from decades to millennia and possibly to geological timescales. During this time perspective climate induced changes such as shore-level displacement and evolution of permafrost and ice sheets are expected to occur which may affect the repository. The possible occurrence, extent and duration of these long-term changes, are therefore of interest when considering the assessment of repository performance and safety. The main climate parameters determining both surface and subsurface conditions are temperature and precipitation. As a result of the last advance of the Weichselian ice sheet only few geological archives exist, which contain information on past climatic conditions in Sweden before c 16,000 years BP. The purpose of this literature review is to compile and evaluate available information from Scandinavian, Northern and Central European geological archives, which record climatic conditions during the Weichselian time period. The compilation provides paleotemperature data sets, which may be used to explore the possible evolution of periglacial permafrost in Sweden. This report is a synopsis of 22 publications detailing climatic and environmental changes during the Weichselian time period in Northwestern Europe based on quantified paleotemperature records. Some of the data is presented as temperature curves which were digitised specifically for this report. The time range covered by the different publications varies considerably. Only few authors dealt with the whole Weichselian period and the majority cover only a few thousand years. This however is not considered to influence the reliability of the archives. The reason for the

  20. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Peterson, Steven K [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  1. Storage for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitel, G.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1991-12-31

    EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is actively pursuing technical storage alternatives for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) until a suitable licensed disposal facility is operating. A recently completed study projects that between 2200 and 6000 m{sup 3} of GTCC LLW will be generated by the year 2035; the base case estimate is 3250 m{sup 3}. The current plan envisions a disposal facility available as early as the year 2010. A long-term dedicated storage facility could be available in 1997. In the meantime, it is anticipated that a limited number of sealed sources that are no longer useful and have GTCC concentrations of radionuclides will require storage. Arrangements are being made to provide this interim storage at an existing DOE waste management facility. All interim stored waste will subsequently be moved to the dedicated storage facility once it is operating. Negotiations are under way to establish a host site for interim storage, which may be operational, at the earliest, by the second quarter of 1993. Two major activities toward developing a long-term dedicated storage facility are ongoing. (a) An engineering study, which explores costs for alternatives to provide environmentally safe storage and satisfy all regulations, is being prepared. Details of some of the findings of that study will be presented. (b) There is also an effort under way to seek the assistance of one or more private companies in providing dedicated storage. Alternatives and options will be discussed.

  2. Long-term macronutrient stoichiometry of UK ombrotrophic peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillereff, Daniel; Boyle, John; Toberman, Hannah; Adams, Jessica; Tipping, Ed

    2016-04-01

    % of variance in N concentration in the UK peat profiles; ii) the patterns of long-term macronutrient stoichiometry and accumulation between sites across the world are strikingly similar similarity, such that peats may reasonably be treated as a single entity in global nutrient budget calculations. Our UK results corroborate published estimates of N storage in northern boreal peatlands through the Holocene as ranging between 8 and 17 Pg N; and iii) higher N and P concentrations in the surface peat is a distinctive feature that remains unconvincingly explained, raising the possibility that enhanced atmospheric supply of nutrients may impact C uptake and burial by peat bogs and meriting particular focus from the research community.

  3. Assessment of the long-term safety for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Vahlund, Frederik [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    During operation and decommissioning of the Swedish nuclear facilities, radioactive waste is generated that must be disposed of. Besides waste from the nuclear facilities, some waste derives from other activities such as industry, research, medical care, etc. Short-lived low- and intermediate-level waste from these activities is disposed of in the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, in Forsmark. The facility, which has been in operation since 1988, is owned and operated by Svensk Karnbranslehantering AB, SKB. The existing facility has neither sufficient space nor a license to receive decommissioning waste. SFR must therefore be extended so that shortlived low- and intermediate-level decommissioning waste from the nuclear facilities can also be received. The need for additional capacity has been accentuated by the closure of two reactors in Barseback. These reactors cannot be dismantled until the SFR facility has been extended. The existing repository is built to receive, and after closure serve as a passive repository for, low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. The disposal rooms are situated in the bedrock beneath the sea floor, covered by about 60 metres of rock. The repository has been designed so that it can be abandoned after closure without requiring further measures to maintain its function. The extension of SFR, is done at the -120 m level immediately adjacent to, and within the same depth range as, the existing facility. The basic function of the existing SFR and of the extended one will be the same. However, a clear difference is the design of the tunnel and the rock vault that are required to permit transport and storage of whole reactor pressure vessels. The application for a license to build this extension includes an assessment of the long-term safety (post-closure safety) of the facility. The safety assessment also contains an updated assessment of the long-term safety of the existing facility. The safety assessment for

  4. Long-term wave measurements in a climate change perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaro, Angela; Bertotti, Luciana; Cavaleri, Luigi; Lionello, Piero; Portilla-Yandun, Jesus

    2017-04-01

    At present multi-decadal time series of wave data needed for climate studies are generally provided by long term model simulations (hindcasts) covering the area of interest. Examples, among many, at different scales are wave hindcasts adopting the wind fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, Reading, U.K.) at the global level and by regional re-analysis as for the Mediterranean Sea (Lionello and Sanna, 2006). Valuable as they are, these estimates are necessarily affected by the approximations involved, the more so because of the problems encountered within modelling processes in small basins using coarse resolution wind fields (Cavaleri and Bertotti, 2004). On the contrary, multi-decadal observed time series are rare. They have the evident advantage of somehow representing the real evolution of the waves, without the shortcomings associated with the limitation of models in reproducing the actual processes and the real variability within the wave fields. Obviously, observed wave time series are not exempt of problems. They represent a very local information, hence their use to describe the wave evolution at large scale is sometimes arguable and, in general, it needs the support of model simulations assessing to which extent the local value is representative of a large scale evolution. Local effects may prevent the identification of trends that are indeed present at large scale. Moreover, a regular maintenance, accurate monitoring and metadata information are crucial issues when considering the reliability of a time series for climate applications. Of course, where available, especially if for several decades, measured data are of great value for a number of reasons and can be valuable clues to delve further into the physics of the processes of interest, especially if considering that waves, as an integrated product of the local climate, if available in an area sensitive to even limited changes of the

  5. Tenth interim status report: Model 9975 O-ring fixture long-term leak performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 °F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 °F.

  6. Eleventh interim status report: Model 9975 O-Ring fixture long-term leak performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF.

  7. Long term behaviour of singularly perturbed parabolic degenerated equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahima Faye

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider models built in [4] for short-term, mean-term and long-term morphodynamics of dunes and megariples. We give an existence and uniqueness result for long term dynamics of dunes. This result is based on a periodic-in-time-and-space solution existence result for degenerated parabolic equation that we set out. Finally the mean-term and long-term models are homogenized.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYMENT SPELLS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Emanuela Dănăcică

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze characteristics of long-term unemployment spells in Romania and to estimate the effect of factors influencing long-term unemployment spells. The study period is in between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2010. 468159 long-term spells registered in the specified period at the National Agency of Employment are analyzed.

  9. Quantification of long term emission potential from landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Heimovaara, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Novel approaches for the after-care of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills are based on technological measures to reduce the long term emission potential in a short time period. Biological degradation in landfills is a means to significantly reduce the long term emission potential. Leachate emission to the groundwater is considered to be one of the largest long-term impacts related to landfilling. Currently we are starting up a research program, partly subsidized by the Dutch Technology fou...

  10. A cost of long-term memory in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Mery, Frederic; Kawecki, Tadeusz J.

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct forms of consolidated associative memory are known in Drosophila: long-term memory and so-called anesthesia-resistant memory. Long-term memory is more stable, but unlike anesthesia-resistant memory, its formation requires protein synthesis. We show that flies induced to form long-term memory become more susceptible to extreme stress (such as desiccation). In contrast, induction of anesthesia-resistant memory had no detectable effect on desiccation resistance. This finding may hel...

  11. Long term behaviour of singularly perturbed parabolic degenerated equation

    CERN Document Server

    Faye, Ibrahima; Seck, Diaraf

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider models for short-term, mean-term and long-term morphodynamics of dunes and megariples. We give an existence and uniqueness result for long term dynamics of dunes. This result is based on a time-space periodic solution existence result for degenerated parabolic equation that we set out. Finally the mean-term and long-term models are homogenized.

  12. New approach of long-term modification of Topas® to acquire surface hydrophilicity for chromosome spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mednova, Olga; Kwasny, Dorota; Rozlosnik, Noemi;

    2014-01-01

    A modified and improved photografting procedure of Topas® surface hydrophilization is investigated in order to obtain stable modification of the polymer for long term storage. The achieved hydrophilicity and monitoring of the wettability during one month of storage are presented as well as a desc...

  13. Consider long-term care as service alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria, L S

    1987-04-01

    The increasing demand for elderly care services, pressures on inpatient average length of stay and payment levels, and potential financial rewards from providing additional services, makes long-term care look attractive to hospitals. Long-term care, however, is not for every hospital. Before deciding to establish long-term care services, management should examine how the service fits within the hospital's strategic plan. The action plan below provides guidance in evaluating a decision to use hospital facilities for long-term care. Examine how long-term care services fit within the hospital's strategic plan. Study area demographics and competitors to assess the need and supply of long-term care services. Survey the medical staff, consumers and payers to determine attitudes, perceptions and interests regarding long-term care services. Develop a facility plan that identifies areas of excess capacity that can be most easily converted into long-term care with minimal effects on hospital operations. Prepare a financial feasibility analysis of the contribution margin and return on investment attributable to long-term care services. Include an impact analysis on hospital operations. Establish a management task force to develop a detailed implementation plan including assigned individual responsibilities and related timetable. Develop an effective marketing plan designed to generate increased patient market share.

  14. Hydrodilatation (distension arthrography): a long-term clinical outcome series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watson, Lyn; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Dalziel, Rodney; Balster, Simon; Burke, Frank; Finch, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    To describe and compare the medium to long-term effectiveness of hydrodilatation and post-hydrodilatation physiotherapy in patients with primary and secondary glenohumeral joint contracture associated...

  15. Long-term flow monitoring of submarine gas emanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickenbom, K.; Faber, E.; Poggenburg, J.; Seeger, C.

    2009-04-01

    One of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study is the sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is the possibility of leaks from the reservoirs. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. Technically, however, these systems are not limited to CO2 but can be used for monitoring of any free gas emission (bubbles) on the seafloor. The basic design of the gas flow sensor system was derived from former prototypes developed for monitoring CO2 and CH4 on mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan. This design was composed of a raft floating on the surface above the gas vent to collect the bubbles. Sensors for CO2 flux and concentration and electronics for data storage and transmission were mounted on the raft, together with battery-buffered solar panels for power supply. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, which is then guided above water level through a flexible tube. Besides some technical problems (condensed water in the tube, movement of the buoys due to waves leading to biased measurement of flow rates), this setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. To allow unattended long-term monitoring in a submarine environment, such a system has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system

  16. Long-term sterility of orthodontic-surgical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, María I; Nastri, Natalia; Mosca, Christian O; Nastri, María L; Rosa, Alcira C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term sterility of new dental appliances according to the non rigid wrapping employed and assess the effectiveness of sterilization in a steam autoclave at 134 degrees for 20 minutes using physical, chemical, and biological indicators. All the experimental (E) samples and the control samples (C) were assigned to one of three groups according to the type of packaging: paper bag (E1), paper/plastic pouch (E2), nylon tubing bag (E3). Each bag contained standardized orthodontic wires and brackets and sterility indicators. The samples were evaluated at the following experimental times: immediately, and 6, 12, 24 and 30 months post-sterilization. The samples were analyzed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in keeping with the protocol currently in use at the Department of Microbiology, School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires. The group of control, non-sterilized samples (C1, C2, C3) were analyzed prior to the onset of the study, and were found to be contaminated. None of the sterilized samples in any of the three experimental groups evidenced contamination at any of the experimental times. The results showed that, under the present conditions, the packages and orthodontic appliances remained sterile for 30 months. These results show the importance of controlling sterility and the storage conditions over time for all the orthodontic/surgical appliances used in invasive treatments.

  17. Lyophilization as a method for pathogens long term preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyophilization (freeze-drying is one of the most suitable methods used for a long term preservation of pathogens. The aim of this paper was the application of lyophilization for storage of three significant plant pathogens: Fusarium graminearum, Helminthosporium gramineum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. gylicinea, respectively. The plant material was collected continuously (during a four year period 2002-2006, depending on a plant development stage, from different localities in Vojvodina. Pathogens were isolated from diseased parts with characteristic symptoms, and placed on nutritive media specific for a certain pathogen, using standard phytopathological methods. Lyophilization was carried out in marked and coded ampoules by freezing and drying of pathogen suspension and nutritive medium. Revitalization of lyophilized isolates was done after four days. High percentage of revitalization was characteristic for all studied isolates, and it ranged from 85-92%, confirming that lyophilized pathogens would be capable of keeping viability for a long time in the collection. Besides above mentioned pathogens, there were 200 isolates in the collection, originating mostly from field and vegetable crops. Each isolate that was put into the Collection, was followed by all the necessary data such as: name of the pathogen, number of isolates, locality, host plant year of isolation, name of the researcher and other relevant data.

  18. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O' Brien, J.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  19. Long-term stability of fibrinolytic factors stored at -80 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernestål-Boman, Jenny; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Nilsson, Torbjörn K; Eliasson, Mats; Johansson, Lars

    2010-05-01

    Blood samples in epidemiological studies are often stored for several years and analysed at different occasions. The reagent kits are continually modified for better precision and accuracy. Our hypothesis was that epidemiological studies are affected by long-term storage and/or modifications of reagent kits. Plasma samples stored at -80( degrees )C from two populations were used: A case-referent study with samples collected from 1985 to 2000 and analysed 2005 (n=1598) were used to study influence of long-term storage. A cross-sectional study analysed 1990 (n=1558) and re-analysed 2001 (n=78) and 2005 (n=828) was used to study influence of reagent kit modifications. Fibrinolytic analyses included immunoassays of tPA, PAI-1 and tPA-PAI-1 complex and chromogenic substrate assays of the activities of tPA and PAI-1. Long-term storage for a median time of 11.6 years (range 5 to 20) showed an effect of time on tPA antigen R(2)=0.01, PAI-1 antigen R(2)=0.01 and tPA-PAI-1 complex R(2) = 0.02. Modifications in reagent kits affected the levels of fibrinolytic factors; for tPA antigen the slope coefficients were between 0.72 and 0.95 (R(2) 0.47 - 0.75), whereas tPA activity showed an agreement with slope coefficients 1.06 to 1.09 (R(2) 0.67 - 0.93). This study showed that long-term storage affects fibrinolytic variables to a negligible extent, but modifications in reagent kits introduced an element of bias. We conclude that analysis of samples on a single occasion is preferable to multiple occasions, as storage has negligible effect. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil pyrogenic carbon lacks long-term persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Abiven, Samuel; Barré, Pierre; Wiedemeier, Daniel; Christensen, Bent; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Fok; Chenu, Claire

    2015-04-01

    In the context of climate change, one mitigation technique currently investigated is the use of pyrogenic organic carbon (PyOC) -which is biomass turned into charcoal- to sequester carbon in soils with the hypothesis that PyOC is persistent and will not be biodegraded (or mineralized). In this study, we use the unique opportunity offered by five long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments across Europe (Askov in Denmark, Grignon and Versailles in France, Ultuna in Sweden and Rothamsted in the United Kingdom) to compare the dynamics of PyOC and soil organic carbon (SOC) in the same plots at the decadal time scale (from 25 to 80 years of bare fallow depending on the site). Bare fallow plots were regularly sampled throughout the bare fallow duration and these samples were carefully archived. In bare fallow plots, with negligible external carbon input and with continuing biodegradation, SOC is depleting. Using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) technique to estimate the PyOC quantity and quality in the soils at different sampling dates, we investigated if PyOC content was also decreasing and compared the rates of depletion of PyOC and SOC. We found that PyOC contents decreased rapidly in soils at all sites. The loss of PyOC between the first and the last soil sampling ranged from 19.8 to 57.3% of the initial PyOC content. Furthermore, PyOC quality exhibited a similar evolution at all sites, becoming more enriched in condensed material with time. We applied a one pool model with mono-exponential decay to our data and found an average mean residence time of native PyOC of 116 years across the different sites, with a standard deviation of 15 years, just 1.6 times longer than that of SOC. Our results show that, though having a longer residence time than total SOC, PyOC content can decrease rapidly in soils suggesting that the potential for long-term C storage in soil by PyOC amendments is less than currently anticipated. Our results therefore question the concept of