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Sample records for london safety of life at sea convention

  1. The role of the IAEA in the London Convention 1972 on Dumping of Wastes at Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telleria, Diego; Berkovsky, Volodymyr; Jova Sed, Luis; Louvat, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was adopted after an Inter-Governmental Conference, held in London in 1972, following the principles for environmental protection enunciated in the Report of the United Nations Conference on Human Environment, held the same year in Stockholm. The IAEA has been involved since the early days of the London Convention when the Contracting Parties designated the IAEA as the competent international authority in matters related to sea disposal of radioactive waste, providing technical advice and services. The IAEA developed, for the Convention, the definition of 'radioactive wastes or radioactive matters unsuitable for dumping at sea' (e.g., high level radioactive waste) and recommended the technical basis applicable by the national authorities to issue special permits for those radioactive materials which could be dumped (mainly low and intermediate level radioactive waste, properly conditioned and 'de minimis' quantities). However, in 1985, based more on political reasons than on the existing radiation protection principles and policies, the Contracting Parties to the London Convention introduced a 'voluntary moratorium' on the disposal of low level radioactive wastes at sea, and later in 1993, a total ban of radioactive waste disposal at sea. The IAEA continues to support the objectives of the London Convention by providing scientific advice. Since 1989, at the request of the Contracting Parties, the IAEA has developed and maintained global databases on radioactive waste disposed of at sea in the past and on accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material. The purpose of these databases is to serve as the basis for radiological impact assessment on the marine environment. The last revised reports on the above mentioned inventories were published in 1999 and in 2001 respectively. The databases are currently in the process of being updated. The paper presents

  2. Determining the Suitability of Materials for Disposal at Sea under the London Convention 1972 and London Protocol 1996: A Radiological Assessment Procedure. 2015 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on performing specific assessments of candidate materials for dumping at sea, to determine whether the materials are de minimis in the meaning of the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter 1972 (the London Convention 1972) and the related Protocol 1996 (the London Protocol 1996). It presents a detailed radiological procedure to assess doses to workers and members of the public and doses to marine flora and fauna related to the dumping of materials at sea. The procedures in this publication follow the requirements to protect the environment in the IAEA Safety Standards and in the recommendations by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. It is expected to be used by national regulatory authorities responsible for authorizing disposal at sea of candidate materials as well as by those companies and individuals applying to obtain permission to dispose these materials at sea

  3. Requirements of the London Convention for dumping radioactive waste at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, H.C.

    1982-10-01

    This report outlines the requirements of the London Convention for dumping radioactive waste at sea and considers their scientific basis more fully. It is intended primarily as an appraisal and aid to understanding of the two documents IAEA 210 and IAEA 211, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and relating to the oceanographic and radiobiological basis of their definitions of high level waste and recommendations relating to its dumping at sea, which were required for London Convention purposes. The adequacy and conservation in these recommendations are considered, and the report also compares the predictions of the model on which the recommendations are based with some limited but relevant observations on radiation doses resulting from natural causes (radium in the sea), and from fallout from nuclear bomb tests. It is concluded that if dumping is carried out within the limits and according to the recommendations required by the IAEA, then it is extremely unlikely that this could lead to significant human hazard, either now or in the future. Some of the reasons for this conclusion are summarised in the final chapter

  4. Determining the suitability of materials for disposal at sea under the London Convention 1972: A radiological assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (London Convention 1972) prohibits the disposal at sea of radioactive wastes and other radioactive matter. However natural radionuclides are present in all materials, including natural and inert materials, which can also contain artificial radionuclides from anthropogenic sources such as fallout due to past atmospheric nuclear testing. Therefore, the Contracting Parties to the London Convention 1972 recognized the need to develop definitions and guidelines so that candidate materials (those wastes or other matter not otherwise prohibited from disposal at sea in accordance with Annex I to the Convention) containing less than de minimis levels of specific activity, can be regarded as 'non-radioactive' and may be disposed of at sea subject to the other provisions of the Convention. At the Nineteenth Consultative Meeting in 1997, Contracting Parties to the London Convention 1972 agreed to request the IAEA to develop further the concept of de minimis levels and, in particular, to 'provide guidance for making judgements on whether materials planned to be dumped could be exempted from radiological control or whether a specific assessment was needed' (LC 19/10, paragraph 6.31). This paragraph continues: 'The IAEA would then further be requested to provide guidance to national authorities responsible for conducting specific assessments.' The IAEA presented its advice on de minimis in IAEA-TECDOC-1068, entitled Application of Radiological Exclusion and Exemption Principles to Sea Disposal, to the Twenty-first Consultative Meeting of Contracting Parties to the London Convention 1972 in October 1999. The Contracting Parties accepted these principles and criteria and interpreted them further in the Guidelines for the Application of the De Minimis Concept Under the London Convention 1972 (the Guidelines). At that time, the Contracting Parties asked the IAEA to prepare additional guidance

  5. 46 CFR 2.01-25 - International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Inspection, will issue a completed Form CG-969, describing the passenger ship and certifying that an... TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Inspecting and Certificating of Vessels § 2.01-25 International... certain passenger, cargo or tankships engaged in international voyages: (i) Passenger Ship Safety...

  6. Inventory of Radioactive Material Resulting from Historical Dumping, Accidents and Losses at Sea. For the Purposes of the London Convention 1972 and London Protocol 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    The IAEA was requested by the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (London Convention) and the 1996 Protocol (London Protocol) to develop and maintain an inventory of radioactive material entering directly into the ocean from all human made origins. The intent in producing such an inventory is to establish a record of past waste dumping and of accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material, based on official reports, for use as an information base for the assessment of the impact of radionuclide sources in the marine environment, when deemed necessary. To respond to the request of the London Convention and Protocol, the IAEA has undertaken the development of the inventory to include radioactive waste resulting from dumping at sea, and accidents and losses which occurred at sea and involved radioactive material. The first IAEA report on this subject, Inventory of Radioactive Material Entering the Marine Environment: Sea Disposal of Radioactive Waste (IAEA-TECDOC-588), was published in 1991. The report was subsequently revised to include information provided by the Russian Federation regarding waste dumping operations conducted by the former Soviet Union in the Arctic and North-west Pacific Seas and some additional information provided by Sweden and the United Kingdom. The revised report, Inventory of Radioactive Waste Disposals at Sea (IAEA-TECDOC-1105), was published in 1999. A report on the information available at the IAEA on such incidents was published in 2001 as Inventory of Accidents and Losses at Sea Involving Radioactive Material (IAEA-TECDOC-1242). The present publication updates and combines IAEA-TECDOCs 1105 and 1242. It describes the contents of the inventory on waste dumping, accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material. In order to prepare the publication, the IAEA, in cooperation with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), conducted a

  7. Sea disposal of radioactive wastes: The London Convention 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, K.L.; Linsley, G.

    1994-01-01

    For many years the oceans were used for the disposal of industrial wastes, including radioactive wastes. In the 1970s, the practice became subject to an international convention which had the aim of regularizing procedures and preventing activities which could lead to marine pollution. This article traces the history of radioactive waste disposal at sea from the time when it first came within the view of international organizations up to the present. 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Analysis of the London dumping convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauke, M.K.

    1983-05-01

    This report gives an in-depth review of the provisions of the London Dumping Convention and of its origins in the context of the international legal framework for controlling all aspects of marine pollution. Particular attention is paid to the provisions concerning radioactive waste. (NEA) [fr

  9. Application of radiological exclusion and exemption principles to sea disposal. The concept of 'de minimis' for radioactive substances under the London Convention 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    At the first Consultative Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (London Convention 1972) in 1975, the IAEA submitted to the Contracting Parties the provisional definition of high level wastes not suitable for dumping at sea and the recommendations concerning low level waste dumping, thus responding to the request of the Convention. The objective of this report is to respond to the request made by the Contracting Parties at their Nineteenth Consultative Meeting in 1997. It provides guidance for making judgements on whether the radiological concepts of exclusion, or exemption without further consideration, can be applied for materials planned to be dumped or whether a specific assessment is needed

  10. 15 CFR 970.801 - Criteria for safety of life and property at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Safety... jurisdiction on the high seas and subject to domestic enforcement procedures. With respect to foreign flag...

  11. 15 CFR 971.701 - Criteria for safety of life and property at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... (pursuant to § 971.205(a)). United States flag vessels are under United States jurisdiction on the high seas...

  12. 50 CFR 600.355 - National Standard 10-Safety of Life at Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., management measures should mitigate these effects, consistent with the overall management goals of the... conflicts. (8) Implementing management measures that reduce the race for fish and the resulting incentives...

  13. Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Sediment Remediation at the London Olympic Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, D.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there is an emerging 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) movement. It is drawing increasing attention from both the government and the industry, because this GSR movement is promising in accelerating process in addressing the contaminated land issue, by overcoming regulatory barriers, encouraging technological innovation, and balancing life cycle environmental stewardship with economic vitality and social well-being. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used by both researchers and industrial practitioners in an initiative to make environmental remediation greener and more sustainable. Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), aiming at expanding the traditional LCA model in both breadth and depth (e.g. to incorporate both environmental and social-economic sustainability), is an important research direction in the existing LCA research field. The present study intends to develop a LCSA method based on a hybrid LCA model and economic input-output (EIO) data. The LCSA method is applied to a contaminated sediment remediation project conducted at the London Olympic Park site.

  14. Comparison of safety equipment between London underground and Beijing subway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zhao, L. Z.; Xia, J. J.; Fu, X. C.; Bao, Z. M.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, R. J.; Hu, C.; Jing, L. S.; Wang, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to improve the safety equipment’s effectiveness through the comparison. Firstly, the history and safety accident of London Underground and Beijing Subway were shown. Secondly, fire equipment between these two cities was compared including station’s hardware installations and carriage’s hardware installations. Thirdly, the relative software installations were also compared such as emergency drills. The results showed that Beijing Subway’s hardware installations were better than London. However, London Underground’s some installations were more effective than Beijing. Both cities would pay more attention on anti-terrorist in tunnel.

  15. The safety assessment of radioactive material transpotation at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, K.; Ozaki, S.; Watabe, N.; Fukuda, S.; Iida, T.; Miyao, S.; Noguchi, K.; Nakajima, K.

    1989-01-01

    Large quantities of low level wastes are prepared for transportation by special use vessels from each power plant to the storage facility at Rokkasho-mura in Aomori Prefecture. Large quantities of reprocessed wastes are also planned for return by similar vessels to the same place from France and the UK. In this paper the authors describe the safety assessment in hypothetical accident conditions during such mass transportation at sea. Although the possibilities of the sinking of the special use vessels as shown in figure 1 are considered to be very low on account of their double-hull structure, it is necessary to estimate the radiological risks of the transportation in order to obtain public acceptance. In this study, the following procedure is taken: (i) assumption of accident; (ii) establishment of safety assessment procedure; (iii) determination of source terms; (iv) diffusion calculation of radionuclide; (v) estimation of radiation exposure of the public

  16. Question of right to stay of nuclear-powered vessels in foreign ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szafranek, J.

    1976-01-01

    Question of right to stay of nuclear-powered vessels in foreign ports is considered in the light of London Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, Brussels Convention on Liability for Operation of Nuclear Ships and bilateral agreements. (Z.M.)

  17. Northwest Russia and the Dumping of Radioactive Waste: The London Convention Implemented

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokke, Olav Schram

    1997-12-31

    The `Polar Oceans and the Law of the Sea Project`, POLOS, is a three-year international research project in international law and international relations. This report is one of the publications under POLOS. The subject is the Soviet dumping of radioactive waste in the Barents and Kara Seas. The most intensely radioactive waste is a number of submarine reactors still containing high-level spent fuel. Some of this dumping violated Soviet commitments to the 1972 London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, and this is the starting point of the report. The discussion focuses on how international regimes may affect the domestic implementation in member states, that is, how international agreements can be converted into behavioural adaptation on the part of target groups. Soviet and later Russian management of nuclear waste in the north has been significantly influenced by regulations and programmes generated under international dumping instruments. These international programmes have been supported by the active participation of the Navy itself in the belief that they would lead to transfer of technology and financial resources to Russia from the West. Inspection of military nuclear waste management is largely left to the Northern Fleet. As for monitoring, measurements were for a long time not taken near the dumping sites. As for regulations, the Northern Fleet continued dumping long into the 1990s without permission. Regarding compliance stimulation, foreign support has helped the Northern Fleet avoid dumping. 113 refs.

  18. Merchant shipping (Safety Convention) Act 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    When this Act comes into force, it will enable the United Kingdom to ratify and to give effect to the 1974 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (the SOLAS Convention) which replaces the SOLAS Convention of 1960. Under the Act, the Secretary of State may make such rules as he considers appropriate regarding ships provided with nuclear power plants in accordance with Chapter VIII of the Annex to the 1974 Convention and to Recommendations attached to it, dealing with nuclear ships, and insofar as those provisions have not been implemented by the Merchant Shipping Acts 1894 to 1974. (NEA) [fr

  19. Inventory of radioactive waste disposals at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The IAEA was requested by the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (London Convention 1972) to develop and maintain an inventory of radioactive material entering the marine environment from all sources. The rationale for having such an inventory is related to its use as an information base with which the impact of radionuclides from different sources entering the marine environment can be assessed and compared. To respond to the request of the London Convention, the IAEA has undertaken the development of the inventory to include: disposal at sea of radioactive wastes, and accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive materials. This report addresses disposal at sea of radioactive waste, a practice which continued from 1946 to 1993. It is a revision of IAEA-TECDOC-588, Inventory of Radioactive Material Entering the Marine Environment: Sea Disposal of Radioactive Waste, published in 1991. In addition to the data already published in IAEA-TECDOC-588, the present publication includes detailed official information on sea disposal operations carried out by the former Soviet Union and the Russian Federation provided in 1993 as well as additional information provided by Sweden in 1992 and the United Kingdom in 1997 and 1998

  20. Implications of the Law of the Sea Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, W.C. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that protection and preservation of the marine environment from wastes and toxic substances was an early concern of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, and the subject is extensively dealt with in the text of the Convention, adopted on 30 April 1982. The environmental provisions of the Convention are intended to serve as an umbrella treaty that states general goals, delimits the power and geographical jurisdiction of states in dealing with environmental problems, and requires states to cooperate through regional and global organizations in the development of standards. The most complex provisions of the environmental text deal with vessel discharges, reflecting the high degree of public interest in oil pollution, whereas the ocean dumping provisions rely largely on the standards of the London Dumping Convention. Pollution carried by air and rivers and wastes from seabed mining within national jurisdiction are treated briefly. The International Seabed Authority, created elsewhere in the Convention to regulate seabed mining, is granted power to regulate pollution from such mining beyond national jurisdiction. Overall, the most important contribution made by the Law of the Sea Convention to the protection of the marine environment is the obligation of states to bring national marine pollution laws up to global standards

  1. Safety at the End of a Nuclear Facility's Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geis, John A.; McEahern, Patrice; Evans, Brad

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to capture the changes that are caused by the transition from nuclear operation through closure of defense nuclear facilities and convey lessons learned from their deactivation, decontamination and demolition. The specific area of discussion is focused on the planned reduction of safety equipment and consequent shift in hazard controls and safety management programs as the facility moves toward closure. The premise of the paper is that as the dominant hazards transition from nuclear to radiological and/or industrial, the facility control of the hazards and response to the potential upset conditions must transition as well to ensure safe and efficient operations. Using recent experience of the accelerated closure mission for U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the current culture with respect to developing and implementing hazard controls and response to upset conditions is illustrated. Several events have been documented that provide insight into the challenges facing line managers and safety professionals at the end of a facility's life cycle. Replacing permanent systems with temporary equipment challenges the traditional concept of reliability. Workers disassemble safety systems daily, but must rely on some of these components or redundant systems as work continues. Decisions governing upkeep of systems that await demolition balance the risk of running to failure against the cost benefit of maintenance and repair. This is further complicated as regulators and safety professionals are often unfamiliar with these new conditions and continue to view facility work activities and potential upset conditions from a nuclear operations perspective. The results of this paper evaluate the differences in how regulatory, safety basis, and operational practices must adapt to the dynamic environment of decontamination and decommissioning in contrast to the relatively constant

  2. National report of Brazil. Nuclear Safety Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  3. 46 CFR 91.60-40 - Duration of Convention certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea... period of not more than 60 months. (1) A Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate. (2) A Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (3) A Safety Management Certificate. (4) A Cargo Ship Safety Radio...

  4. Structure and Mediation: Glimpses of Everyday Life at the London Technical and Commercial High School, 1920-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Christopher J.; Goodson, Ivor F.

    1993-01-01

    Examines everyday events at a Canadian high school in the period between the two world wars. Interviews with former students reveal the highly structured experience, continually reconstructed by staff and student action. Male students in senior technical classes had the most control of their own educational conditions. (SLD)

  5. Information About Dynamics of the Sea Surface as a Means to Improve Safety of the Unmanned Vessel at Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przyborski Marek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental states of the sea surface is its heave. Despite of years of the intense scientific inquiry, no clear understanding of the influence of this aspect on the dynamics of the sea environment has emerged. The separation of two nearby fluid elements which one may observed for example as a free floating of small objects on the sea surface (rescuers on the rough sea or small research vessels is caused by the interaction of different components. On the other hand one may say that the heave of the sea is also a summary interaction of a few components describing the dynamics of the sea. Therefore it is the most important aspect, which influenced the dispersion phenomenon. This observation has important consequences for many different problems as for example conducting Search and Rescue missions and using unmanned ships. We would like to present results of our experiment focused on finding the answer to question about nature of the heave of the sea and its influence on safety of Unmanned Surface Vessels (USV.

  6. The Lampedusa Disaster: How to Prevent Further Loss of Life at Sea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Coppens

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lampedusa – an Italian island barely 70 miles from northern Africa and 100 miles from Malta – has become a gateway to Europe for migrants. In some seasons, boats filled with asylum seekers arrive almost daily. However, yearly, hundreds of people die trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea. This paper will deal with the obligations of States towards seaborne migrants, the question of why so many people die near Lampedusa and the possible solutions in order to prevent further loss of life at sea.

  7. Act No. 305 of 2 May 1983. Ratification and execution of the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter, opened for signature in Mexico, London, Moscow and Washington on 29th December 1972, as modified by the amendments annexed to the resolution adopted in London on 12 October 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The London Convention provides for a system classifying radioactive waste for sea dumping. It prohibits the dumping of high level radioactive waste and makes the dumping of other categories of such waste subject to and in compliance with a special permit. (NEA) [fr

  8. Effectiveness of the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) has been established after the Chernobyl accident with the primary objective of achieving and maintaining a high level of nuclear safety worldwide, through the enhancement of national measures and international cooperation. The CNS is an incentive convention. It defines the basic safety standard which shall be met by the Contracting Parties. The verification of compliance is based on a self-assessment by the Countries and a Peer Review by the other Contracting Parties. As of July 2015, there are 78 Contracting Parties. Among the Contracting Parties of the Convention are all countries operating nuclear power plants except the Islamic Republic of Iran and Taiwan, all countries constructing nuclear power plants, all countries having nuclear power plants in long term shutdown and all countries having signed contracts for the construction of nuclear power plants. The National Reports under the CNS therefore cover almost all nuclear power plants of the world. The peer review of reports, questions and answers that are exchanged in connection with the Review Meetings provided a unique overview of nuclear safety provisions and issues in countries planning or operating nuclear power plants. This is especially important for neighbouring countries to those operating nuclear power plants.

  9. Second Meeting for Evaluation of the Nuclear Safety Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Second Meeting for Evaluation of the Nuclear Safety Convention. the CSN. as the only competent Government organism on nuclear safety, represented Spain in the preparation of the national report and at the Review Meeting, acquiring a set of obligations for the next three years, until the holding of third meeting. (Author)

  10. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety was adopted on 17 June 1994 by Diplomatic Conference convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994. The Convention will enter into force on the ninetieth day after the date of deposit with the Depository (the Agency's Director General) of the twenty-second instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval, including the instruments of seventeen States, having each at leas one nuclear installation which has achieved criticality in a reactor core. The text of the Convention as adopted is reproduced in the Annex hereto for the information of all Member States

  11. The epidemiology of injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, Stuart E; Webborn, Nick; Emery, Carolyn; Blauwet, Cheri A; Pit-Grosheide, Pia; Stomphorst, Jaap; Van de Vliet, Peter; Patino Marques, Norma Angelica; Martinez-Ferrer, J Oriol; Jordaan, Esmè; Derman, Wayne; Schwellnus, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The characteristics and incidence of injuries at the Summer Paralympic Games have not previously been reported. A better understanding of injuries improves the medical care of athletes and informs future injury prevention strategies. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to characterise the incidence and nature of injuries during the London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games. Injury information was obtained from two databases. One database was populated from medical encounter forms completed by providers at the time of assessment in one of the medical stations operated by the Organising Committee. The second database was populated daily with information provided by team medical personnel who completed a comprehensive, web-based injury survey. The overall injury incidence rate was 12.7 injuries/1000 athlete-days. Injury rates were similar in male and female athletes. The precompetition injury rates in women were higher than those in the competition period. Higher injury rates were found in older athletes and certain sports such as football 5-a-side (22.4 injuries/1000 athlete-days). Overall, 51.5% of injuries were new onset acute traumatic injuries. The most commonly injured region (percentage of all injuries) was the shoulder (17.7%), followed by the wrist/hand (11.4%), elbow (8.8%) and knee (7.9%). This is the largest and most comprehensive epidemiological report examining injuries in Paralympic athletes. Injury rates differ according to age and sport. Upper limb injuries are common. The knowledge gained from this study will inform future injury surveillance studies and the development of prevention strategies in Paralympic sport. The Epidemiology of Injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

  12. Safety of Transport and Disposal for Explosive Ordnance in Ports, Roadsteads and at Open Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Cichocki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article principles, pertaining to the safety of transport for explosives and unexploded ordnance of military origin and procedures that guarantee maximal effectiveness of the process of their neutralization, are presented. Since the end of the 2nd World War operations of neutralizing unexploded ordnance (UXO of that era that still lie in ports, roadsteads and coastal areas are continuously conducted. During that war the Polish coast was one of the major battlegrounds and till now unexploded ordnance are found either on the sea bed or along the coast. Various analyses state that searching the sea and the coastline for unexploded ordnance is a task still to be carried out in the foreseeable future.

  13. Life satisfaction and air quality in London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKerron, George; Mourato, Susana

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research in economics concerns self-reported happiness, or life satisfaction (LS), and its relationship to a wide range of other variables. The findings of this research tend to highlight the importance of non-income aspects of individuals' life conditions. These findings are strongly complementary to themes within the sustainable development discourse. Firstly, they suggest ways in which we might consume less without compromising on our current levels of LS. And secondly, they help demonstrate the immediate LS benefits that could be gained from higher levels of environmental quality (EQ). However, the empirical evidence for the link between EQ and LS is, to date, somewhat weak, due in part to a lack of EQ data at a level of detail to match the individual-by-individual resolution of LS measures. This small, exploratory study therefore seeks to assess how the use of EQ data at very high spatial resolution could advance the empirical literature examining connections between LS and EQ levels, focusing on air quality in particular. It collects original survey data for approximately 400 Londoners, and uses geographical information system (GIS) software to calculate pollutant concentrations in the immediate vicinity of their homes. It uses this data to estimate maximum likelihood regression models explaining LS ratings in terms of a range of individual, household and local variables. Both perceived and measured air pollution levels are significantly negatively associated with the LS of the survey respondents, even when controlling for a wide range of other effects. An increase of 10 μg/m 3 in annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentration appears to correspond on average to a drop of nearly half a point of LS on an 11-point rating scale. These findings cannot yet be generalised with confidence. However, if they were confirmed by larger future studies, they would appear to strengthen and extend existing arguments in favour of policies to reduce urban air

  14. Life satisfaction and air quality in London

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKerron, George; Mourato, Susana [Department of Geography and Environment, and Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    A growing body of research in economics concerns self-reported happiness, or life satisfaction (LS), and its relationship to a wide range of other variables. The findings of this research tend to highlight the importance of non-income aspects of individuals' life conditions. These findings are strongly complementary to themes within the sustainable development discourse. Firstly, they suggest ways in which we might consume less without compromising on our current levels of LS. And secondly, they help demonstrate the immediate LS benefits that could be gained from higher levels of environmental quality (EQ). However, the empirical evidence for the link between EQ and LS is, to date, somewhat weak, due in part to a lack of EQ data at a level of detail to match the individual-by-individual resolution of LS measures. This small, exploratory study therefore seeks to assess how the use of EQ data at very high spatial resolution could advance the empirical literature examining connections between LS and EQ levels, focusing on air quality in particular. It collects original survey data for approximately 400 Londoners, and uses geographical information system (GIS) software to calculate pollutant concentrations in the immediate vicinity of their homes. It uses this data to estimate maximum likelihood regression models explaining LS ratings in terms of a range of individual, household and local variables. Both perceived and measured air pollution levels are significantly negatively associated with the LS of the survey respondents, even when controlling for a wide range of other effects. An increase of 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentration appears to correspond on average to a drop of nearly half a point of LS on an 11-point rating scale. These findings cannot yet be generalised with confidence. However, if they were confirmed by larger future studies, they would appear to strengthen and extend existing arguments in favour of policies to reduce

  15. International antiterrorist conventions concerning the safety of air transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek BARCIK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the international law regulations are presented concerning the civilian safety of the air transport. The history concerning air terrorism and international antiterrorist conventions was described in detail, involving The Chicago Convention, The Tokyo Convention, The Hague Convention and Montreal Convention.

  16. Singularity of the London penetration depth at quantum critical points in superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debanjan; Swingle, Brian; Berg, Erez; Sachdev, Subir

    2013-10-11

    We present a general theory of the singularity in the London penetration depth at symmetry-breaking and topological quantum critical points within a superconducting phase. While the critical exponents and ratios of amplitudes on the two sides of the transition are universal, an overall sign depends upon the interplay between the critical theory and the underlying Fermi surface. We determine these features for critical points to spin density wave and nematic ordering, and for a topological transition between a superconductor with Z2 fractionalization and a conventional superconductor. We note implications for recent measurements of the London penetration depth in BaFe2(As(1-x)P(x))2 [K. Hashimoto et al., Science 336, 1554 (2012)].

  17. The Black Sea one decade after the Bucharest Convention an overview of the international activities in the Black Sea region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goektepe, G.

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophic degradation of the Black Sea in a period of four decade has been the major concern of the Black Sea countries and international communities since Bucharest Convention signed in 1992. The Black Sea Region has became a challenging international arena for political scientific and socio-economic activities. Intensive international programmes and establishment of governmental and Non Governmental Organizational structures of the 1990s including Black Sea Economic Cooperation (BSEC), Black Sea Environmental Programme(BSEP), Environmental Programme for the Danube River Basin, Marine Environmental Assessment of the Black Sea Region Technical Cooperation Programme by the IAEA and establishment of the Black Sea Commission Permanent Secretariat are some of the major international efforts of the past decade that emphasizes the multi-nationality and large dimension of the Black Sea environmental management issues. The environmental degradation of the Black Sea is briefly reviewed based on the BSEP reports and data available for land based pollution sources. The environmental risk of marine vessel accidents are indicated and environmental safety concern is emphasized under the current conditions of intense energy transportation projects in the Black Sea and Caspian regions. The international policy actions, co-operation issues and scientific programmes of the past decade are overviewed with emphasis on the international achievements. Concluding remarks include the vital importance of continuation of the international commitments and sharing the political, scientific and socio-economic responsibility on the transboundary environmental pollution, rehabilitation and the safety issues of the Black Sea

  18. Inclusion and Exclusion in the safety culture at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse

    The acceleration of the globalization faces us as a nation with the challenge of adjusting our procedures and policies to accommodate foreign citizens working in Danish workplaces. In this paper I analyse data from field work voyages at sea. The data is presented in categories of bonding, bridging...... and linking acts inspired from research in social capital, and supplemented with acts of exclusion, all to describe the power conflicts which includes and excludes members in the unitary, divided or fragmented safety cultures that I met on board. The data shows that foreign seafarers are treated equally...... as long as the basic structures are not addressed. They are however treated equally on the majority´s terms, which still lead to a minority position even in the safety culture. A shared safety culture is therefore difficult to achieve....

  19. The IAEA's responsibilities in connection with the dumping at sea of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Vinh Phuong

    1983-01-01

    In the context of IAEA's responsibilities regarding the sea dumping of radioactive wastes, this paper reviews international laws of relevance to sea dumping of wastes, and examines IAEA's role under the London Dumping Convention. The paper also describes the OECD/NEA Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism on radioactive waste sea dumping operations. (NEA) [fr

  20. Securing the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants against Oil Spill Accidents at Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Seung Gyu; Choi, Ho Seon; Kim, Sang Yun

    2008-01-01

    As of 2008, 20 nuclear power plants are under operation and six plants are under construction in Korea. NPPs account for approximately 38% of Korea's electric power production; however, it is expected that the share of power produced by NPPs will be further increased to reduce the level of CO 2 emissions, taking into account the concern over global warming. All of NPPs in Korea are located on the coast to facilitate the supply of cooling water sources. Thus, tar and other floating matters from vessels following oil spill accidents at sea may affect intake systems, and consequently interrupt the supply of cooling water. This study will review cases of response measures taken by NPPs against large-scale crude oil spill accidents that had occurred off the coast of Korea, including such accidents as the Sea Prince (July 23, 1995) and the Hebei Sprit(December 7, 2007), and relevant regulatory requirements at home and abroad

  1. Comparison and assessment of the participation of Polish swimmers at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Seidel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to assess and analyze the results of the Polish national team swimmers (Olympic and Paralympic at the XIV Summer Games 2012 in London (UK . Material : Score Polish swimmers start in London was carried out on the basis of medals won, participation in the finals. London also comparing the results with respect to the personal life record. The studies used the method of improving the outcome of the relative percentages - RPG% (relative performance gain %. It is based on the equation of RPG% = start time - end time / start time x 100. Material was to analyze and develop the results obtained by the Polish swimmers at the XIV Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012 in London. Results : the basic criterion for evaluating the training and participation of Polish swimmers at the games in London was the number of medals won. By this criterion, the Poles showed a rather weak result. Healthy athletes do not receive medals. Thus, they confirmed their poor showing four years ago. Athletes with disabilities unable to get on the podium three times. In relation to the previous games (they won 10 medals the result was rather weak. Conclusions : in terms of participation in the Olympic finals and improve individual life records, the results were slightly better swimmers with disabilities.

  2. Life expectancy at birth for people with serious mental illness and other major disorders from a secondary mental health care case register in London.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Kuo Chang

    Full Text Available Despite improving healthcare, the gap in mortality between people with serious mental illness (SMI and general population persists, especially for younger age groups. The electronic database from a large and comprehensive secondary mental healthcare provider in London was utilized to assess the impact of SMI diagnoses on life expectancy at birth.People who were diagnosed with SMI (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, substance use disorder, and depressive episode/disorder before the end of 2009 and under active review by the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLAM in southeast London during 2007-09 comprised the sample, retrieved by the SLAM Case Register Interactive Search (CRIS system. We estimated life expectancy at birth for people with SMI and each diagnosis, from national mortality returns between 2007-09, using a life table method.A total of 31,719 eligible people, aged 15 years or older, with SMI were analyzed. Among them, 1,370 died during 2007-09. Compared to national figures, all disorders were associated with substantially lower life expectancy: 8.0 to 14.6 life years lost for men and 9.8 to 17.5 life years lost for women. Highest reductions were found for men with schizophrenia (14.6 years lost and women with schizoaffective disorders (17.5 years lost.The impact of serious mental illness on life expectancy is marked and generally higher than similarly calculated impacts of well-recognised adverse exposures such as smoking, diabetes and obesity. Strategies to identify and prevent causes of premature death are urgently required.

  3. The possible impact of progressive fines on road safety. Paper presented at the Brake’s 5th international Speed Congress, London, 7 May 2014.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stipdonk, H.L. & Goldenbeld, C.

    2016-01-01

    Vehicles with more than one traffic violation annually are known to be more than proportionally involved in road crashes. It is known that crash frequency increases with the square of the violation frequency approximately. In this paper the possible effects of a progressive fine level is researched.

  4. Convention on nuclear safety. Rules of procedure and financial rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document is the first revision of the Rules of Procedures and Financial Rules that apply mutatis mutandis to any meetings of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety (INFCIRC/573), convened in accordance with the Chapter 3 of the Convention

  5. Convention on nuclear safety. Rules of procedure and financial rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document presents the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules that apply mutatis mutandis to any meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety (INFCIRC/449) convened in accordance with Chapter 3 of the Convention. It includes four parts: General provisions, Preparatory process for review meetings, Review meetings, and Amendment and interpretation of rules

  6. Convention on Nuclear Safety. Rules of procedure and financial rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The document is the second revision of the Rules of Procedures and Financial Rules that apply mutatis mutandis to any meetings of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety (INFCIRC/573), convened in accordance with the Chapter 3 of the Convention

  7. Ethnic Disparities in Oral Health Related Quality of Life among Adults in London, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahim, R; Delgado-Angulo, E K; Gallagher, J E; Bernabé, E

    2017-06-01

    To explore ethnic disparities in oral health related quality of life (OHQoL) among adults, and the role that socioeconomic factors play in that association. Data from 705 adults from a socially deprived, ethnically diverse metropolitan area of London (England) were analysed for this study. Ethnicity was self-assigned based on the 2001 UK Census categories. OHQoL was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), which provides information on the prevalence, extent and intensity of oral impacts on quality of life in the previous 12 months. Ethnic disparities were assessed in logistic regression models for prevalence of oral impacts and negative binomial regression models for extent and intensity of oral impacts. The prevalence of oral impacts was 12.7% (95% CI: 10.2-15.1) and the mean OHIP-14 extent and severity scores were 0.27 (95% CI: 0.20-0.34) and 4.19 (95% CI: 3.74-4.64), respectively. Black adults showed greater and Asian adults lower prevalence, extent and severity of oral impacts than White adults. However, significant differences were only found for the extent of oral impacts; Black adults reporting more and Asian adults fewer OHIP-14 items affected than their White counterparts. After adjustments for socioeconomic factors, Asian adults had significantly fewer OHIP-14 items affected than White adults (rate ratio: 0.28; 95%CI: 0.08-0.94). This study found disparities in OHQoL between the three main ethnic groups in South East London. Asian adults had better and Black adults had similar OHQoL than White adults after accounting for demographic and social factors. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  8. 78 FR 75249 - Safety Zone: Google's Night at Sea Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, Alameda, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone: Google's Night at Sea Fireworks Display, San Francisco Bay, Alameda, CA AGENCY: Coast... Google's Night at Sea Fireworks Displays on December 7, 2013 and December 14, 2013. These safety zones... Coast Guard to establish safety zones. Google will sponsor the Google's Night at Sea Fireworks Displays...

  9. National report of Brazil: nuclear safety convention - September 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This National Report was prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities in the field of nuclear safety, aiming the fulfilling the Convention of Nuclear Energy obligations. The Report contains a description of the Brazilian policy and programme on the safety of nuclear installations, and an article by article description of the measures Brazil is undertaking in order to implement the obligations described in the Convention. The last chapter describes plans and future activities to further enhance the safety of nuclear installations in Brazil

  10. National report of Brazil: nuclear safety convention - September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This National Report was prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities in the field of nuclear safety, aiming the fulfilling the Convention of Nuclear Energy obligations. The Report contains a description of the Brazilian policy and programme on the safety of nuclear installations, and an article by article description of the measures Brazil is undertaking in order to implement the obligations described in the Convention. The last chapter describes plans and future activities to further enhance the safety of nuclear installations in Brazil.

  11. Fifth national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Fifth National Report is a new update to include relevant information for the period of 2007/2009. This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the Brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  12. Software safety analysis on the model specified by NuSCR and SMV input language at requirements phase of software development life cycle using SMV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Yong; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Safety-critical software process is composed of development process, verification and validation (V and V) process and safety analysis process. Safety analysis process has been often treated as an additional process and not found in a conventional software process. But software safety analysis (SSA) is required if software is applied to a safety system, and the SSA shall be performed independently for the safety software through software development life cycle (SDLC). Of all the phases in software development, requirements engineering is generally considered to play the most critical role in determining the overall software quality. NASA data demonstrate that nearly 75% of failures found in operational software were caused by errors in the requirements. The verification process in requirements phase checks the correctness of software requirements specification, and the safety analysis process analyzes the safety-related properties in detail. In this paper, the method for safety analysis at requirements phase of software development life cycle using symbolic model verifier (SMV) is proposed. Hazard is discovered by hazard analysis and in other to use SMV for the safety analysis, the safety-related properties are expressed by computation tree logic (CTL)

  13. Sixth national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has presented periodically its National Report prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities related to nuclear safety. Due to the implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011, an Extraordinary National Report was presented in 2012. This Sixth National Report is an update of the Fifth National Report in relation to the Convention on Nuclear Safety articles and also an update of the Extraordinary Report with respect to the action taken related to lesson learned from the Fukushima accident. It includes relevant information for the period of 2010/2012. This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  14. Sixth national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Brazil has presented periodically its National Report prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities related to nuclear safety. Due to the implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011, an Extraordinary National Report was presented in 2012. This Sixth National Report is an update of the Fifth National Report in relation to the Convention on Nuclear Safety articles and also an update of the Extraordinary Report with respect to the action taken related to lesson learned from the Fukushima accident. It includes relevant information for the period of 2010/2012. This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations.

  15. Evolution of genomic diversity and sex at extreme environments: Fungal life under hypersaline Dead Sea stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Kirzhner, Valery; Wasser, Solomon P.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2003-01-01

    We have found that genomic diversity is generally positively correlated with abiotic and biotic stress levels (1–3). However, beyond a high-threshold level of stress, the diversity declines to a few adapted genotypes. The Dead Sea is the harshest planetary hypersaline environment (340 g·liter–1 total dissolved salts, ≈10 times sea water). Hence, the Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for testing the “rise and fall” pattern of genetic diversity with stress proposed in this article. Here, we examined genomic diversity of the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus versicolor from saline, nonsaline, and hypersaline Dead Sea environments. We screened the coding and noncoding genomes of A. versicolor isolates by using >600 AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers (equal to loci). Genomic diversity was positively correlated with stress, culminating in the Dead Sea surface but dropped drastically in 50- to 280-m-deep seawater. The genomic diversity pattern paralleled the pattern of sexual reproduction of fungal species across the same southward gradient of increasing stress in Israel. This parallel may suggest that diversity and sex are intertwined intimately according to the rise and fall pattern and adaptively selected by natural selection in fungal genome evolution. Future large-scale verification in micromycetes will define further the trajectories of diversity and sex in the rise and fall pattern. PMID:14645702

  16. The sea - landfill or sphere of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haury, H.J.; Koller, U.; Assmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Information Agency held its third seminar for journalists, entitled 'The sea - landfill or sphere of life' in Hamburg on July 18, 1989. Some 40 journalists - radio journalists and journalists from the staff of dailies and the technical press - took the opportunity to listen for a day to short lectures on selected subjects and submit their questions concerning sea pollution to scientists of diverse disciplines. (orig.) [de

  17. National report of Brazil on nuclear safety convention - introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document was prepared for fulfilling the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Chapter 1 presents some historical aspects of the Brazilian nuclear policy, targets to be attained for increasing the nuclear energy contribution for the national production of electric energy

  18. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management was adopted on 5 September 1997 by a Diplomatic Conference convened by the IAEA from 1 to 5 September 1997. The Joint Convention was opened for signature at Vienna on 29 September 1997 during the forty-first session of the General Conference of the IAEA. This document reproduces the text of the Convention

  19. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-24

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management was adopted on 5 September 1997 by a Diplomatic Conference convened by the IAEA from 1 to 5 September 1997. The Joint Convention was opened for signature at Vienna on 29 September 1997 during the forty-first session of the General Conference of the IAEA. This document reproduces the text of the Convention.

  20. Peer Mentoring Experiences of Psychology Students at the London Metropolitan University Writing Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Savita; Harrington, Kathy; O'Neill, Peter

    2008-01-01

    "It really helps knowing that you are going to have someone around to help you..." This short article reports on research taking place into peer writing tutorials at London Metropolitan University and examines in particular, the experiences of psychology students who have taken part in the scheme. Some of the implications of this…

  1. Packaging of radioactive wastes for sea disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by the Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, known as the London Dumping Convention was adopted by an inter-governmental conference in London in 1972 and came into force in 1975. In 1977, the IAEA Board of Governors agreed that there is a continuing responsibility for the IAEA to contribute to the effectiveness of the London Dumping Conventions by providing guidance relevant to the various aspects of dumping radioactive wastes at sea. In the light of the above responsibilities, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee Meeting from 3 to 7 December 1979 to assess the current situation concerning the requirements and the practices of packaging radioactive wastes for dumping at sea with a view to providing further guidance on this subject. The present report summarizes the results of this meeting

  2. Some historical background to the IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The need for internationally acceptable standards and regulations for preventing pollution of the sea by radioactive materials was recognized by the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, which adopted the Convention on the High Seas in April 1958. Article 25 of the Convention provides that ''every State shall take measures to prevent pollution of the seas from the dumping of radioactive wastes, taking into account any standards and regulations which may be formulated by the competent international organizations.'' The Conference also adopted a resolution recommending that the IAEA pursue studies and take action to assist States in controlling the discharge of radioactive materials into the sea. When the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was adopted at the Intergovernmental Conference in London, 1972, the IAEA was given specific responsibilities to define criteria and standards for dealing with the questions of sea disposal of radioactive wastes. The IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning ''high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea'' identify material, the radioactive content of which is at such a level that the Parties to the Convention would wish to prevent any participating State from issuing a special permit even after a detailed appraisal of the safety of the proposed operation, and even for the sector of the marine environment furthest removed from man, i.e. the deep sea with depth greater than 4000 m. Some historical background to these problems is discussed and some of the Japanese findings of the deep sea survey in the Pacific are introduced for comparison with the North Atlantic data which formed a basis of the IAEA Definition and Recommendations for the London Dumping Convention

  3. Accounting for Impact at Imperial College London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkmann, Markus; Fini, Riccardo; Ross, Jan-Michael

    We report findings of a study of academic engagement and commercialisation at Imperial College London. We detail the extent of collaboration with industry, consulting, patenting and entrepreneurship by Imperial academics, as well as individuals’ motivations and perceived barriers to engagement. T...

  4. Sport psychology consultants’ perceptions of their challenges at the London 2012 Olympic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsborg, Peter; Diment, Gregory; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the challenges sport psychology consultants perceived at the 2012 London Olympic Games. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 sport psychology consultants up to six weeks after the London Games. The interviews were transcribed and inductively content...... analyzed. The results show that consultants perceived a number of challenges important to being successful at the Olympic Games. These challenges were divided into two general themes: Challenges before the Olympics (e.g. negotiating your role) and Challenges during the Olympics (e.g. dealing with the media......). Furthermore, four different Sport psychology consultant roles during the Olympics could be defined. On the one hand, the reported challenges validate and cohere with the challenge descriptions in the literature. On the other hand, the data identifies individual contextual differences between the consultants...

  5. Fast-food, everyday life and health: A qualitative study of 'chicken shops' in East London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Claire; Ponsford, Ruth; Lewis, Daniel; Cummins, Steven

    2018-05-26

    The higher prevalence of fast food outlets in deprived areas has been associated with the production and maintenance of geographical inequalities in diet. In the UK one type of fast food outlet - the 'chicken shop' - has been the focus of intense public health and media interest. Despite ongoing concerns and initiatives around regulating these establishments, the 'chicken shop' is both a commercially successful and ubiquitous feature of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods. However, little is known about how they are perceived by local residents. We report data from a qualitative study of neighbourhood perceptions in a low SES urban setting. Narrative family interviews, go-along interviews and school video focus group workshops with 66 residents of East London were conducted over two waves. The topic of chicken shops was a prolific theme and a narrative analysis of these accounts revealed that local perceptions of chicken shops are complex and contradictory. Chicken shops were depicted as both potentially damaging for the health of local residents and, at the same time, as valued community spaces. This contradiction was discursively addressed in narrative via a series of rhetorical rebuttals that negated their potential to damage health on the grounds of concepts such as trust, choice, balance, food hygiene and compensatory physical activity. In some instances, chicken shops were described as 'healthy' and patronising them constructed as part of a healthy lifestyle. Chicken shops are embedded in the social fabric of neighbourhoods. Successful strategies to improve diet therefore requires context-sensitive environmental interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dumping convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1992-01-01

    Sea dumping of radioactive waste has, since 1983, been precluded under a moratorium established by the London Dumping Convention. Pressure from the nuclear industry to allow ocean dumping of nuclear waste is reported in this article. (author)

  7. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Fourth National Report on Compliance with the Joint Convention Obligations. France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, hereinafter referred to as the 'Joint Convention', is the result of international discussions that followed the adoption of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in 1994. France signed the Joint Convention at the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held on 29 September 1997, the very first day the Joint Convention was opened for signature. She approved it on 22 February 2000 and filed the corresponding instruments with the IAEA on 27 April 2000. The Joint Convention entered into force on 18 June 2001. For many years, France has been taking an active part in the pursuit of international actions to reinforce nuclear safety and considers the Joint Convention to be a key step in that direction. The fields covered by the Joint Convention have long been part of the French approach to nuclear safety. This report is the fourth of its kind. It is published in accordance with Article 32 of the Joint Convention and presents the measures taken by France to meet each of her obligations set out in the Convention. The facilities and radioactive materials covered by the Joint Convention are much diversified in nature and are controlled in France by different regulatory authorities (see Section E). Over and above a specific threshold of radioactive content, a facility is referred to as a 'basic nuclear facility' (installation nucleaire de base - INB) and placed under the control of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN). Below that threshold and provided that the facility involved falls under a category of the nomenclature of classified facilities for other purposes than their radioactive materials, any facility may be considered as a 'classified facility on environmental-protection grounds' (installation classee pour la protection de l'environnement - ICPE) and placed under the control of the Ministry for the

  8. Environmental safety evaluation in test sea disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The study results on the environmental safety in the test sea disposal of low-level wastes by Subcommittee on Radioactive Waste Safety Technology in Nuclear Safety Commission are given in connection with the test disposal of radioactive wastes into sea reported by the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Subcommittee concludes that the effect of the test disposal of radioactive wastes into sea on the environment is extremely small. The contents are as follows. The full text of the report; attached data, (1) prediction of the concentrations of radioactive nuclides in sea, (2) calculation of the concentrations of radioactive nuclides in marine life with biological paths, and (3) estimation of exposure dose in general people; references (1) radiation exposure of the personnel engaged in sea disposal, (2) the effect of a sea disaster during ocean transport. (J.P.N.)

  9. Patients' and families' perspectives of patient safety at the end of life: a video-reflexive ethnography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Aileen; Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients' and families' perspectives of safety and quality in the setting of a life-limiting illness. Data reported here were generated from a qualitative study using video-reflexive ethnographic methodology. Data were collected over 18 months and generated through participant observation, shadowing of clinicians, field-interviews and semi-structured interviews with patients and families. The study was conducted at two hospital sites in Sydney, Australia and in patients' homes. Patients with an advanced life-limiting illness (n = 29) ranging in age between 27 and 89 years and family members (n = 5) participated in the study. Patient safety remains important to dying patients and families. For dying people, iatrogenic harm is not regarded as 'one off' incidents. Rather, harm is experienced as a result of an unfolding series of negative events. Critically, iatrogenic harm is emotional, social and spiritual and not solely technical-clinical misadventure and is inextricably linked with feeling unsafe. Thus, patient safety extends beyond narrowly defined technical-clinical parameters to include interpersonal safety. Current approaches to patient safety do not address fully the needs of dying patients and their families. Patients and their families regard poor communication with and by health professionals to be harmful in and of itself. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  10. Announcement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic has been announcemented that from September 20, 1994 up to acquirement of its validity was opened in Vienna for signature Convention on nuclear safety. Instead of Slovak Republic the convention September 20, 1994 was signed. National Council of the Slovak Republic with the convention expressed the consent by its resolution No. 75 from January 25, 1995 and the president of the Slovak Republic February 23, 1995 its ratified. Ratification document at the depository of this convention was deposited, the director general of the International Agency for Atomic Energy, March 7, 1995. The validity of the Convention October 24, 1996, on the article section 1, was acquired. The text of the Convention on nuclear safety continued [sk

  11. Outcomes of domestic violence screening at an acute London trust: are there missed opportunities for intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Bartley, Angela; Bayly, Jude; Dutey-Magni, Peter; Edwards, Sarah; Madge, Sara; Miller, Charlotte; Nicholas, Rachel; Radhakrishnan, Sheila; Sathia, Leena; Swarbrick, Helen; Blaikie, Dee; Rodger, Alison

    2016-01-04

    Domestic violence screening is advocated in some healthcare settings. Evidence that it increases referral to support agencies or improves health outcomes is limited. This study aimed to (1) investigate the proportion of hospital patients reporting domestic violence, (2) describe characteristics and previous hospital attendances of affected patients and (3) assess referrals to an in-house domestic violence advisor from Camden Safety Net. A series of observational studies. Three outpatient clinics at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust. 10,158 patients screened for domestic violence in community gynaecology, genitourinary medicine (GUM) and HIV medicine clinics between 1 October 2013 and 30 June 2014. Also 2253 Camden Safety Net referrals over the same period. (1) Percentage reporting domestic violence by age group gender, ethnicity and clinic. (2) Rates of hospital attendances in the past 3 years for those screening positive and negative. (3) Characteristics, uptake and risk assessment results for hospital in-house domestic violence referrals compared with Camden Safety Net referrals from other sources. Of the 10,158 patients screened, 57.4% were female with a median age of 30 years. Overall, 7.1% reported ever-experiencing domestic violence, ranging from 5.7% in GUM to 29.4% in HIV services. People screening positive for domestic violence had higher rates of previous emergency department attendances (rate ratio (RR) 1.63, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.48), emergency inpatient admissions (RR 2.27, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.84) and day-case admissions (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.43) than those screening negative. The 77 hospital referrals to the hospital-based domestic violence advisor during the study period were more likely to be taken up and to be classified as high risk than referrals from elsewhere. Selective screening for domestic violence in high-risk hospital clinic populations has the potential to identify affected patients and promote good uptake of referrals for in

  12. "Chase CRP", "Review patient": Improving the Quality of Weekend Medical Handover at a London Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifuddin, Aamir; Magee, Lucia; Barrett, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Clinical handover has been identified as a "major preventable cause of harm" by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP). Whilst working at a London teaching hospital from August 2013, we noted substandard weekend handover of medical patients. The existing pro forma was filled incompletely by day doctors so it was difficult for weekend colleagues to identify unwell patients, with inherent safety implications. Furthermore, on-call medical staff noted that poor accessibility of vital information in patients' files was affecting acute clinical management. We audited the pro formas over a six week period (n=83) and the Friday ward round (WR) entries for medical inpatients over two weekends (n=84) against the RCP's handover guidance. The results showed poor documentation of several important details on the pro formas, for example, ceiling of care (4%) and past medical history (PMH) (23%). Problem lists were specified on 62% of the WR entries. We designed new handover pro formas and 'Friday WR sheets' to provide prompts for this information and used Medical Meetings and emails to explain the project's aims. Re-audit demonstrated significant improvement in all parameters; for instance, PMH increased to 52% on the pro formas. Only 10% of Friday WR entries used our sheet. However, when used, outcomes were much better, for example, problem list documentation increased to 100%. In conclusion, our interventions improved the provision of crucial information needed to prioritise and manage patients over the weekend. Future work should further highlight the importance of safe handover to all doctors to induce a shift in culture and optimise patient care.

  13. Convention on Nuclear Safety. Second national report on the implementation by france of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    The first national report on the implementation by france of the obligation under the Convention is structured along its Articles. the french Nuclear safety Authority ensured the co ordination of the report, with contributions from other regulators and nuclear operators. this report was distributed at the middle of April 2003 to the other Contracting party (on 3 november to 14, 2003 at the IAEA headquarters. (author)

  14. IAEA Director General's concluding remarks. Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Vienna, 26 April 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety is considered as a part of the overall nuclear safety regime. That regime has many components, but they all have one single objective - to make sure that safety is at as high a level as possible. The Convention is a living process, a process which should eventually lead to increasingly greater safety. The Meting has focused on a number of issues that are also priorities for the Agency; one such issue is safety culture. The effectiveness and transparency are key issues. A second issue which is highlighted is management of nuclear knowledge. Other high priority issues which were identified include: planned life extension; the need during life extension to look into the ageing of equipment and structures; deregulation and its impact on safety; and the question of periodic safety reviews. The question of co-operation between regulatory bodies is one that was given emphasis to over the last few years. It is very important that there be exchange of experience and exchange of expertise between regulatory bodies, and between the manufacturers of power reactors and the countries where the reactors are operated. Also of importance in terms of international co-operation is the development of adequate emergency response everywhere. A major point that which is left to the participating countries is that although safety is a national responsibility - there is absolutely no question about that -many issues need international co-operation

  15. China and the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea: Operational Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincent, Steven D

    2005-01-01

    ...), and has made maritime claims citing historic waters. China asserts that these actions are consistent with the provisions of the United Nations Convention On The Law Of the Sea (UNCLOS) Treaty...

  16. Imaging services at the Paralympic Games London 2012: analysis of demand and distribution of workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethapudi, Sarath; Campbell, Robert S D; Budgett, Richard; Willick, Stuart E; Van de Vliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Very little data have been published on medical imaging services at disability games. 7.9 million euros (£6.6 million, US$11 million) were invested in setting up radiology facilities within purpose built polyclinics at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games. This paper details imaging services at the 2012 Paralympic Games. Data analysis on imaging at 2012 Olympics has been published in a separate paper. To analyse the workload on the polyclinics' radiology services, provided for the Paralympic athletes during the London 2012 Paralympic Games. Data were prospectively collected during the period of the Paralympic games from the Picture Archive Communications System (PACS) and the Radiological Information System (RIS). Data were correlated with the medical encounter database (ATOS). 655 imaging episodes were recorded, which comprised 38.8% (n=254) MRI, 33% (n=216) plain radiographs, 24% (n=157) ultrasound scans and 4.2% (n=28) CT scans. Investigations on the Paralympic athletes accounted for 65.2% of workload, with the remainder divided between Paralympic family and workforce. MRI was the most used imaging resource and CT was the least used imaging modality at the Paralympic village polyclinic. Analysis of demographic data provides a useful index for planning radiology infrastructure and manpower at future international competitions for athletes with a disability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. The reality of life safety consequence classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, D.N.D.; Assaf, H.; Kerr, I.R.

    1999-01-01

    Because empirical methods of consequence estimation were not designed for application in risk analysis for dam safety, BC Hydro developed its own method for determining loss of life due to dam failures as part of the development of the risk analysis process. Because loss of life estimation for consequence classification entails the generation of essentially the same information, the method can also be used to determine the consequence category of the dam for life safety considerations, and the model can be extended to third party property damage. The methodology adopted for dealing with life safety differs considerably from the empirical approach by modelling the response of the downstream population to a dam failure flood. The algorithm simulates the response of various groups of populations to the warnings of dam failure and the physical process of fleeing from the areas of potential innundation. Assessing the life safety consequences of dam failure is a first step in estimating dam safety in terms of CDA Guidelines, and empirical methods in use are not suitable for determining loss of life due to dam failures. The process described herein is the only physically based method available for estimating loss of life due to dam failures required by the Dam Safety Guidelines. The model is transparent, logically sound, and has been peer reviewed. The method provides a rational basis for the first step in performing safety assessments of dams in terms of the Guidelines, particularly high consequence dams. 8 refs., 3 figs

  18. Sweden's second national report under the Convention on nuclear safety. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    organisations, such as downsizing, outsourcing and merging, need to be followed closely, by the licensees as well as by the regulatory bodies, and methods need to be further developed to assess the safety consequences of such changes. The ongoing dialogue between the licensees and the regulator regarding development of safety in existing reactors needs to be concluded, in order to define reasonable requirements for back-fitting during the remaining operating time. The general concern expressed in the first report to the Convention about the shortage of qualified, university trained engineers and researchers in specific nuclear fields, still remains in the longer perspective. A plan is also under discussion to ensure financing of nuclear education and research at several universities for at least a three year period. Taking into account all these efforts, an action plan should be developed to ensure the necessary long-term nuclear competence in Sweden. At the first review meeting in April 1999, Sweden accepted to report on the following issues in particular, in its next report: 1. measures to upgrade the older reactors and how these comply with the safety regulations, 2. measures within the industry and the regulatory bodies to improve the safety culture, 3. monitoring of the effects, if any, on safety as a consequence of deregulation of the electricity market, 4. experience gained from the new safety regulations, especially with regard to the higher requirements placed on the licensees own control over safety. These reports do not indicate any concerns as to the Swedish compliance with the obligations under the Convention

  19. Sweden's third national report under the the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The national reports to the review meetings according to Article 5 of the Convention call for a self-assessment of each Contracting Party with regard to compliance with the obligations of the Convention. For Sweden this self-assessment has demonstrated full compliance with all the obligations of the Convention, as shown in detail in part B of this national report. There is an open and constructive dialogue between the regulatory bodies and the licensees. The owner companies are well established with good corporate financial records. They demonstrate a commitment to maintain a high level of safety in their nuclear power plants. Not withstanding the increased competition, the licensees continue to co-operate in solving important safety issues. The regulators in Sweden are assessed as well qualified for their tasks and their resources have been maintained. The international co-operation networks of both regulators and utilities are well developed. From the safety and environmental impact point of view, the Swedish nuclear power plants are competitive internationally. However, Sweden would like to point out the following issues, where further development should be given special attention in relation to the obligations under the Convention: The compatibility of the Act on Nuclear Activities with the Environmental Code needs to be followed up in order to assure that the licensing process is fully consistent. The future supply of radiation protection specialists needs to be further investigated and measures may need to be taken, as has been done to ensure the supply or nuclear safety specialists. The ongoing concentration of vendors and service companies needs to be assessed, from the safety and availability point of view, and the licensees may need to implement their own joint solutions if the market can not supply the necessary services at acceptable conditions. The operating organisations need to assess their consolidation after several organisational changes following

  20. SeaRAM: an evaluation of the safety of RAM transport by sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.; Carter, M.H.; Keane, M.P.; Keith, V.F.; Heid, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    SeaRAM is a multi-year Department of Energy (DOE) project designed to validate the safety of shipping radioactive materials (RAM) by sea. The project has an ultimate goal of developing and demonstrating analytic tools for performing comprehensive analyses to evaluate the risks to humans and the environment due to sea transport of plutonium, vitrified high-level waste (VHLW), and spent fuel associated with reprocessing and research reactors. To achieve this end, evaluations of maritime databases and structural an thermal analyses of particular severe collision and fire accidents have been and will continue to be conducted. Program management for SeaRAM is based at the DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration. Technical activities for the project are being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Several private organizations are also involved in providing technical support, notably Engineering Computer Optecnomics, Inc. (ECO). The technical work performed for SeaRAM also supports DOE participation in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Cooperative Research Program (CRP) entitled Accident Severity at Sea During Transport of Radioactive Material. This paper discusses activities performed during the first year of the project

  1. The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risoluti, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention) is the only legally binding international treaty in the area of radioactive waste management. It was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference in September 1997 and opened for signature on 29 September 1997. The Convention entered into force on 18 June 1998, and to date (September 04) has been signed by 42 States, of which 34 have formally ratified, thus becoming Contracting Parties. The Joint Convention applies to spent fuel and radioactive waste resulting from civilian application. Its principal aim is to achieve and maintain a high degree of safety in their management worldwide. The Convention is an incentive instrument, not designed to ensure fulfillment of obligations through control and sanction, but by a peer pressure. The obligations of the Contracting Parties are mainly based on the international safety standards developed by the IAEA in past decades. The Convention is intended for all countries generating radioactive waste. Therefore it is relevant not only for those using nuclear power, but for any country where application of nuclear energy in medicine, conventional industry and research is currently used. Obligations of Contracting Parties include attending periodic Review Meetings and prepare National Reports for review by the other Contracting Parties. The National Reports should describe how the country is complying with the requirements of the Articles of the Convention. The first such meeting was held at the IAEA headquarters in November 2003. This paper will describe the origin of the Convention, present its content, the expected outcome for the worldwide safety, and the benefits for a country to be part of it

  2. Maritime supply chain security: navigating through a sea of compliance requirements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maspero, EL

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available MTSA Maritime Transportation Security Act RFID Radio Frequency Identification SAFE Security and Accountability For Every port SOLAS Safety Of Life At Sea SST Smart and Secure Tradelane UNCTAD United Nations Conference on Trade and Development... for increased security within maritime shipping and so the SOLAS (the Safety of Lives at Sea) Convention Chapter 11 was amended to provide for the inclusion of the International Ships and Port Facilities Security Code (ISPS Code), which was internationally...

  3. The impact of the future Nuclear Safety Convention on the Spanish licensing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripol Carulla, S.

    1995-01-01

    The adoption of the 1994 Nuclear Safety Convention should not affect Spanish law. Nevertheless, the coming into force of the Nuclear Safety Convention in Spain will represent an opportunity for Spanish nuclear authorities to clarify one of the aspects of the Spanish nuclear legislation that has become oldfashioned. It would be important to adopt a general rule on nuclear safety which, at the highest level, would clearly establish the prerequisites which have to be fulfilled in order to get a licence as well as the competences of the supervision authorities, including the (criminal and) administrative penalties that can be imposed. (orig./HP)

  4. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. First national report on the implementation by France of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management is supplementing the Convention of Nuclear Safety. it was approved by France on february 22, 2000 and it entered into force on June 18,2001. Article 32 obliges each contracting Party to present at the review meetings (every three years) a report on the way in which it implements the obligations of the Convention (full text of the Convention and additional information on the web site of the IAEA, its director General being the depository of the Convention. (author)

  5. Carrier’s liability under the international conventions for the carriage of goods by sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anežka GROBARČÍKOVÁ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available As is well known, there is no international convention for the carriage of goods in general. Each mode of transport counts on one or several international conventions that specifically regulate the provision of international transport by sea, rail, road or air. Thus, multimodal freight transport are characterised by a patchwork of different legal regimes that represents a huge challenge for the growth of multimodal transport industry. The paper aims to analyse the latest, but still not in force Convention on Contracts for the International Carriage of Goods Wholly or Partly by Sea (the Rotterdam rules that should provide global solution for multimodal carrier liability. Comparison of the carrier’s liability in the former conventions relating to the international carriage of goods by sea and other rules are also discussed.

  6. London-born black Caribbean children are at increased risk of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H C; Pembroke, A C; Forsdyke, H; Boodoo, G; Hay, R J; Burney, P G

    1995-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that atopic dermatitis is more common in black Caribbean children born in the United Kingdom than in white children. It is unclear whether these differences are caused by selection bias or variations in the use of the word "eczema" in the groups studied. Our objective was to explore ethnic group differences in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in London schoolchildren. A cross-sectional prevalence survey of 693 junior school children in three schools was performed. Atopic dermatitis was defined in three ways: (1) by a dermatologist, (2) by visible flexural dermatitis as recorded by an independent observer, and (3) by a history of flexural dermatitis according to the child's parents. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis according to examination by a dermatologist was 16.3% in black Caribbean children and 8.7% in white children. This increased risk was present for different methods of defining of a atopic dermatitis and persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. London-born black Caribbean children appear to be at an increased risk of having atopic dermatitis.

  7. The future of nuclear power: The role of the IAEA. Address at the Uranium Institute: 24th annual symposium, London, 9 September 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the Twenty-fourth Annual Symposium of the Uranium Institute (London, 9 September 1999), the Director General of the IAEA presented a survey of the prospects for nuclear power as seen from the perspective of the IAEA. The speech focussed on the following aspects: nuclear power and world energy needs, nuclear safety, economic performance and competitiveness of nuclear power, public confidence, and the year 2000 computer systems problem

  8. Impact of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services at the Public Health Laboratory London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K; Sinclair, C; McEwan, R; Fleet, K; Balasegaram, S; Manuel, R

    2014-07-01

    Planning for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games at the Public Health Laboratory London was based on the requirement to meet potential increased demand with scalable capacity. The aim of this study was to determine the impact on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services during the Games period. Retrospective cross-sectional time-series data analysis was used to assess the number of gastrointestinal specimens received in the laboratory and the number of positive results. There was no increase in the number of gastrointestinal specimens received during the Games period, thus the Games had no impact on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services at the laboratory. There was a decrease in the number of public health specimens received for culture [incidence rate ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.13-0.86, P = 0.02] and a decrease in the number of culture positive community specimens (odds ratio = 0.59, 95 % CI = 0.40-0.85, P = 0.005), suggesting a decrease in gastrointestinal illness during the Games period. As previous planning assumptions were not based on actual specimen activity, the results of this study may modify the extent of additional planning for microbiological services required for mass gatherings. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. The Making of London Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Claudia; Toft, Anne Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Den følgende tekst består af to dele. Begge dele omhandler workshoppen The Making of London Narratives, der var et undervisningsforløb for 52 studerende fra Arkitektskolen Aarhus og School of Architecture and the Visual Arts University of East London. I den første del perspektiveres workshoppens...

  10. Sport psychology consultants’ perceptions of their challenges at the London 2012 Olympic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsborg, Peter; Diment, Greg; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore how sport psychology consultants perceive the challenges they face at the Olympic Games. Post-Olympics semistructured interviews with 11 experienced sport psychology consultants who worked at the London Games were conducted. The interviews were transcribed...... and inductively content analyzed. Trustworthiness was reached through credibility activities (i.e., member checking and peer debriefing). The participants perceived a number of challenges important to being successful at the Olympic Games. These challenges were divided into two general themes: Challenges Before...... the Olympics (e.g., negotiating one’s role) and Challenges During the Olympics (e.g., dealing with the media). The challenges the sport psychology consultants perceived as important validate and cohere with the challenge descriptions that exist in the literature. The findings extend the knowledge on sport...

  11. 47 CFR 80.305 - Watch requirements of the Communications Act and the Safety Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and the Safety Convention. 80.305 Section 80.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Ship Station Safety Watches § 80.305 Watch requirements of the Communications Act and the Safety...

  12. Imaging of plantar fascia and Achilles injuries undertaken at the London 2012 Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, David A; Carne, Andrew; Bethapudi, Sarath; Engebretsen, Lars; Budgett, Richard; O'Connor, Philip

    2013-12-01

    Plantar fascia and distal Achilles injuries are common in elite athletes. Acute athletic injuries of the plantar fascia include acute plantar fasciopathy and partial or complete tears. Underlying most acute injuries is a background of underlying chronic plantar fasciopathy. Injuries may affect the central or less commonly lateral portions of the fascia and acute tears are generally proximal. Athletic Achilles injuries may occur at the mid tendon or the distal insertion, and there may be an underlying chronic tendinopathy. Acute or chronic paratendinopathy may occur as a separate entity or combined with Achilles injury. In this article, the spectrum of athletic injuries of the plantar fascia and Achilles is described, illustrated by imaging findings from the London 2012 Olympic games.

  13. Convention on nuclear safety. Signature, ratification, acceptance, approval or accession. Status as of 17 March 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The document presents the status as of 17 March 1997 of signature, ratification, acceptance, approval or accession by Member States of the Convention on Nuclear Safety adopted on 17 June 1994 by the Diplomatic Conference convened by the IAEA at its Headquarters between 14-17 June 1994. The Convention entered into force on 24 October 1996. There are 65 signatories and 35 parties. Reservations/declarations deposited upon signature are also included

  14. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  15. Tower of London test: a comparison between conventional statistic approach and modelling based on artificial neural network in differentiating fronto-temporal dementia from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Massimo; Caffarra, Paolo; Savarè, Rita; Cerutti, Renata; Grossi, Enzo

    2011-01-01

    The early differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from frontotemporal dementia (FTD) may be difficult. The Tower of London (ToL), thought to assess executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial working memory, could help in this purpose. Twentytwo Dementia Centers consecutively recruited patients with early FTD or AD. ToL performances of these groups were analyzed using both the conventional statistical approaches and the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) modelling. Ninety-four non aphasic FTD and 160 AD patients were recruited. ToL Accuracy Score (AS) significantly (p advanced ANNs developed by Semeion Institute. The best ANNs were selected and submitted to ROC curves. The non-linear model was able to discriminate FTD from AD with an average AUC for 7 independent trials of 0.82. The use of hidden information contained in the different items of ToL and the non linear processing of the data through ANNs allows a high discrimination between FTD and AD in individual patients.

  16. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, N.; Yanagi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured

  17. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, H. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured.

  18. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Football at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webborn, Nick; Cushman, Daniel; Blauwet, Cheri A; Emery, Carolyn; Derman, Wayne; Schwellnus, Martin; Stomphorst, Jaap; Van de Vliet, Peter; Willick, Stuart E

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiology of injury in Paralympic football has received little attention. A study of all sports at the London 2012 Paralympic Games identified football 5-a-side as the sport with the highest injury rate, meriting further detailed analysis, which may facilitate the development of strategies to prevent injuries. To examine the injury rates and risk factors associated with injury in Paralympic football. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of injuries to football 5-a-side and football 7-a-side athletes. London 2012 Paralympic Games. Participants included 70 football 5-a-side athletes and 96 football 7-a-side athletes. Athletes from all but one country chose to participate in this study. The Paralympic Injury and Illness Surveillance System was used to track injuries during the Games, with data entered by medical staff. Injury incidence rate (IR) and injury incidence proportion (IP). The overall IR for football 5-a-side was 22.4 injuries/1000 athlete-days (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.1-33.8) with an IP of 31.4 injuries per 100 athletes (95% CI, 20.9-43.6). In 5-a-side competition, 62.5% of injuries were associated with foul play. The overall IR for football 7-a-side was 10.4 injuries/1000 athlete-days (95% CI, 5.4-15.5), with an IP of 14.6 injuries per 100 athletes (95% CI, 7.5-21.6). The most commonly injured body region in both sports was the lower extremity. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine IR and risk factors associated with injury in Paralympic football. Future studies are needed to determine mechanisms of injury and independent risk factors for injury, thus informing prevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lighting of roads outside built-up areas. Paper presented at the International Road Safety Congress London 1964, Theme III 'Ways of reducing the frequency of accidents', discussed at the Seventh International Study Week in Traffic Engineering, London, 21-26 September 1964.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmussen, E.

    1964-01-01

    Before talking about the specific problems of lighting roads outside built-up areas, I would like to discuss some general problems of fixed lighting. To answer the question of how and when the system of fixed lighting started, we have to go back far in history. In Holland, for example, in the 17th

  20. ‘Playing Deaf’: Jewish Women at the Medical Missions of East London, 1880–1920s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ross

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizations whose fundamentalist eschatology inspired them to attempt to convert Jews to Christianity had existed from early in the nineteenth century, but with the intensification of Jewish emigration to Britain in the 1880s dozens opened stations in East London. Historians today correctly continue to stress the insult and annoyance the missionaries represented to the struggling Jewish immigrants. This essay focuses on the specialized medical missions - at least a dozen, at times more - attached to the major East London missionary organizations, and designed to exchange good health care (for free for a hearing of the ‘Gospel truth’. These have received less attention from historians than have the general missions, though they proved extremely popular with poor Jews, so much so that many urged the Jewish Board of Guardians to provide rival dispensaries. This study thus places the medical missions within the extensive health care systems of the district. ‘Playing Deaf’ also seeks to position the medical missions within Jewish immigrant social and family life. Mission dispensaries were among the several Christian spaces that Jewish women would have to negotiate as they tried to organize work and family life in a state with an established Protestant church, so women’s behaviour in mission spaces may exemplify other kinds of interactions with the Christian world. Jewish mothers used the missions’ free doctors and nurses to stretch their household budgets, so the majority of patients were women and children - yet women as a group were less susceptible to conversionist rhetoric than men, especially single men. A major primary source for this study is the missionary press, with its extensive coverage of the largest of the medical missions, the Mildmay Medical Mission to the Jews. Mildmay’s reports depict encounters inside the medical missions and provide insight into the subjective lives of the mission doctors, whose efforts to

  1. On the Regulation of Life Safety Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    . Starting point is taken in a short outline of what is considered to comprise the present best practice rationale for life safety and health risk regulation. Thereafter, based on selected principal examples from different application areas, inconsistencies in present best practice risk quantification...... absolute level of individual life safety risk subject to assessment of acceptability. It is highlighted that a major cause of inconsistency in risk quantifications and comparisons originates from the fact that present regulations partly address societal activities and partly address applied technologies...

  2. Safety and security in acute admission psychiatric wards in Ireland and London: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowman, Seamus; Bowers, Len

    2009-05-01

    The comparative element of this study is to describe safety and security measures in psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London; to describe differences and similarities in terms of safety and security patterns in the Republic of Ireland and London; and to make recommendations on safety and security to mental health services management and psychiatric nurses. Violence is a serious problem in psychiatric services and staff experience significant psychological reactions to being assaulted. Health and Safety Authorities in the UK and Ireland have expressed concern about violence and assault in healthcare, however, there remains a lack of clarity on matters of procedure and policy pertaining to safety and security in psychiatric hospitals. A descriptive survey research design was employed. Questionnaires were circulated to all acute wards in London and in Ireland and the resulting data compared. A total of 124 psychiatric wards from London and 43 wards from Ireland were included in this study and response rates of 70% (London) and 86% (Ireland) were obtained. Differences and similarities in safety and security practices were identified between London and Ireland, with Irish wards having generally higher and more intensive levels of security. There is a lack of coherent policy and procedure in safety and security measures across psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London. Given the trends in European Union (EU) regulation, there is a strong argument for the publication of acceptable minimum guidelines for safety and security in mental health services across the EU. There must be a concerted effort to ensure that all policy and procedure in safety and security is founded on evidence and best practice. Mental health managers must establish a review of work safety and security procedures and practices. Risk assessment and environmental audits of all mental health clinical environments should be mandatory.

  3. The Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. An instrument to achieve a global safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risoluti, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention) is the first legally binding international treaty in the area of radioactive material management. It was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference in September 1997 and opened for signature on 29 September 1997. The Convention entered into force on 18 June 1998, and to date (May 2006) has been ratified by 41 countries. The Joint Convention applies to spent fuel and radioactive waste resulting from civilian application. Its principal aim is to achieve and maintain a high degree of safety in their management worldwide. The Convention is an incentive instrument, not designed to ensure fulfilment of obligations through control and sanction, but by a volunteer peer review mechanism. The obligations of the Contracting Parties are mainly based on the international safety standards developed by the IAEA in past decades. The Convention is of interest of all countries generating radioactive waste. Therefore it is relevant not only for those using nuclear power, but for any country where application of nuclear energy in education, agriculture, medicine and industry is currently used. Obligations of Contracting Parties include attending a Review Meeting held every three years and prepare National Reports for review by the other Contracting Parties. In the National Reports basic information on inventory and facilities for management of radioactive materials has to be provided. Countries with small nuclear power and/or research programs or countries having radioactive materials only from nuclear application on medicine, agriculture or conventional industry, can benefit from the exchange of information and the technical knowledge gained by the reporting procedure set up by the Convention. The second Review Meeting is to be held at IAEA headquarters from 15 to 26 May 2006. This paper presents the objectives and the implementation status of the Convention, the

  4. 77 FR 32898 - Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... 1625-AA00; AA87 Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT AGENCY... 20, 2012 the Coast Guard published a notice of proposed rulemaking entitled Safety & Security Zones... Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1, which collectively authorize the Coast Guard to define safety and...

  5. The social impact of dizziness in London and Siena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Adolfo M; Golding, John F; Gresty, Michael A; Mandalà, Marco; Nuti, Daniele; Shetye, Anu; Silove, Yvonne

    2010-02-01

    Although dizziness is a common presenting symptom in general and hospital practice, its social cost is not known. We assessed the social and work life impact of dizziness on patients in two contrasting European cities, Siena and London. First, we developed the 'Social life & Work Impact of Dizziness questionnaire' (SWID), which was validated by administering it to 43 patients with dizziness and 45 normal controls and by correlating the results with the EQ-5D (Europe quality of life) questionnaire. The SWID and EQ-5D scores were worse in patients than controls (p work as a result of the dizziness. Over 50% of patients felt that their efficiency at work had dropped considerably. The mean number of days off work attributed to the dizziness in the previous 6 months was 7.15 days. Social life was disrupted in 57% of all 400 patients. Factor analysis identified that detrimental effects on work, travel, social and family life combine to create a single factor accounting for much of the overall impact of their dizziness. Significant differences in some measures of handicap between London and Siena emerged, with London patients often faring worse. Reasons for these location differences include, as expected, a higher proportion of neurological patients in London than in Siena. However, factors related to city demographics and social cohesion may also modulate the impact on quality of life and working practice. Regardless of inter-city differences, these findings highlight the high social and economic impact of dizziness.

  6. Second review meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafferty, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    identified that require special attention, particularly, with regard to safety management, safety culture, plant ageing, upgrading and effectiveness of regulatory practices, as well as maintaining competence and knowledge in the industry, regulatory bodies and research institutions. The review process highlighted factors and circumstances, external to nuclear safety as such, which nevertheless may impact on nuclear safety. Contracting Parties were invited to provide further information in their next national reports on maintaining competence and motivation of staff needed for safe regulation and operation of nuclear installation. Since the 1999 Review Meeting, several Contracting Parties have restructured their regulatory bodies and adopted new legislation or improved existing legislation to more closely meet the requirements of the Convention. Examples of areas of new legislation are: establishing independent regulatory bodies; emergency preparedness; decommissioning; and radiation protection provisions consistent with the International Commission on Radiological Protection's 1990 Recommendations (ICRP 60) and the International Basic Safety Standards published by the IAEA (BSS). Full implementation of the ICRP 60 recommendations and BSS is not complete in some countries. Contracting Parties reported on their individual national regulatory strategies. Some Contracting Parties use probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) as an additional tool in optimizing their regulatory or inspection activities, and some use performance indicators, whether they be quantitative or qualitative, to monitor the safety of their nuclear installations. In discussions, comparison was made of the advantages and disadvantages of regulations that are detailed and prescriptive in nature as compared to less prescriptive, goal-oriented approaches and the complementary use of risk assessments. Contracting Parties agreed to review their experience and report at the next Review Meeting. All Contracting

  7. Sector Identification in a Set of Stock Return Time Series Traded at the London Stock Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronnello, C.; Tumminello, M.; Lillo, F.; Micciche, S.; Mantegna, R. N.

    2005-09-01

    We compare some methods recently used in the literature to detect the existence of a certain degree of common behavior of stock returns belonging to the same economic sector. Specifically, we discuss methods based on random matrix theory and hierarchical clustering techniques. We apply these methods to a portfolio of stocks traded at the London Stock Exchange. The investigated time series are recorded both at a daily time horizon and at a 5-minute time horizon. The correlation coefficient matrix is very different at different time horizons confirming that more structured correlation coefficient matrices are observed for long time horizons. All the considered methods are able to detect economic information and the presence of clusters characterized by the economic sector of stocks. However, different methods present a different degree of sensitivity with respect to different sectors. Our comparative analysis suggests that the application of just a single method could not be able to extract all the economic information present in the correlation coefficient matrix of a stock portfolio.

  8. Analysis of the Convention on Nuclear Safety and Suggestions for Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K. S.; Viet, Phuong Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    The innovative approach of the Convention, which is based on incentive after than legal binding, had been considered successful in strengthening the nuclear safety worldwide. However, the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (Japan) in March 2011 has exposed a number of weaknesses of the Convention. Given that context, this paper will analyse the characteristics of the CNS in order to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the Convention, and finally to suggest some possible improvements. The analysis in this paper shows that the incentive approach of the CNS has succeeded in facilitating the active roles of its Contracting Parties in making the National Reports and participating in the peer review of these reports. However, the incoherent quality of the National Reports, the different level of participation in the peer review process by different Contracting Parties, and the lack of transparency of the peer review have undermined the effectiveness of the Convention in strengthening the international safety regime as well as preventing serious regulatory errors that had happened in Japan before the Fukushima accident. Therefore, the peer review process should be reformed into a more transparent and independent direction, while an advisory group of regulators within the CNS might also be useful in improving the effectiveness of the Convention as already proven by the good practice in the European Union. Only with such effective change, the CNS can maintain its pivotal role in the international safety regime

  9. Convention on nuclear safety. Final act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Diplomatic Conference, which was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994, adopted the Convention on Nuclear Safety reproduced in document INFCIRC/449 and the Final Act of the Conference. The text of the Final Act of the Conference, including an annexed document entitled ''Some clarification with respect to procedural and financial arrangements, national reports, and the conduct of review meetings, envisaged in the Convention on Nuclear Safety'', is reproduced in the Attachment hereto for the information of all Member States

  10. Implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.; Tonkay, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The Joint Convention: establishes a commitment with respect to safe management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; requires the Parties to ''take appropriate steps'' to ensure the safety of their spent fuel and waste management activities, but does not delineate standards the Parties must meet; and seeks to attain, through its Contracting Parties, a higher level of safety with respect to management of their spent nuclear fuel, disused sealed sources, and radioactive waste

  11. Sweden's fourth national report under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The national reports to the review meetings according to Article 5 of the Convention call for a self-assessment of each Contracting Party with regard to compliance with the obligations of the Convention. For Sweden this self-assessment has demonstrated compliance with all the obligations of the Convention, as shown in part B of this national report. The Swedish existing nuclear power programme is currently under strong development since a few years. Large amounts are being invested in the 10 remaining operating reactors to prepare for long term operation. The licensees as well as the regulatory bodies have also been challenged over the last years by events, especially the Forsmark event in July 2006, demonstrating the importance of having strong safety management in place and maintaining of a vital safety culture. Of particular importance is not only to develop good formal management systems, but also to monitor and follow up how the systems function in the daily work at the plants. The need for this attention is reinforced by the major programmes going on during a limited time period to upgrade and uprate the plants. These programmes will require a full effort of the operating organisations as well as of the regulatory bodies. An additional challenge is, during the same time period, to manage the transfer of knowledge to a new generation of engineers and specialists. A large number of key staff is due to retire within the next 10 years. The generally positive impression reported to earlier review meetings under the Convention still stands. Therefore, Sweden would like to point out the following as strong features in its national nuclear practice: The Swedish legal framework is well developed and the responsibility for safety is very well defined. The nuclear law also provides for public insight into the activities of the licensees. The regulatory bodies have maintained and increased their resources and are further developing their regulatory practices. There is an

  12. Life Management and Safety of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, S.; Diluch, A.; Vega, G., E-mail: fabbri@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-10-15

    The nuclear programme in Argentina includes: nuclear power and related supplies, medical and industrial applications, waste management, research and development and human training. Nuclear facilities require life management programs that allow a safe operation. Safety is the first priority for designers and operators. This can be attained with defence in depth: regular inspections and maintenance procedures to minimize failure risks. CNEA objectives in this area are to possess the necessary capability to give safe and fast technical support. Within this scheme, one of the main activities undertaken by CNEA is to provide technological assistance to the nuclear plants and research reactors. As a consequence of an increasing concern about safety and ageing a Life Management Department for safe operation was created to take care of these subjects. The goal is to elaborate a Safety Evaluation Process for the critical components of nuclear plants and other facilities. The overall objectives of a safety process are to ensure a continuous safe, reliable and effective operation of nuclear facilities and it means the implementation of the defence in deep concept to enhance safety for the protection of the public, the workers and the environment. (author)

  13. Evaluation of food provision and nutrition support at the London 2012 Olympic Games: the opinion of sports nutrition experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelly, Fiona; Meyer, Nanna L; Pearce, Jeni; Burkhart, Sarah J; Burke, Louise M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the food provision and nutrition support at the London 2012 Olympic (OG) and Paralympic Games (PG) from the perspective of sports nutrition experts attending the event. Participants (n = 15) were asked to complete an online survey and rate on a Likert scale menu qualities, food safety, sustainability practices, nutrition labeling, and provision for cultural needs, dietary regimes and specific situations. Open-ended responses were incorporated to explore expert opinion and areas for improvement. Participants rated their overall experience of the food provision as 7.6 out of 10 (range 5 to 10), with the majority (n = 11) rating it greater than 7. The variety, accessibility, presentation, temperature, and freshness of menu items rated as average to good. A below average rating was received for recovery food and beverages, provision of food for traveling to other venues, taking suitable snacks out of the dining hall and provision of food at other venues. However, the variety and accessibility of choices for Ramadan, and provision of post-competition food were rated highly. A number of comments were received about the lack of gluten free and lower energy/fat items. The inclusion of allergens on nutrition labeling was considered more important than nutrient content. While dietetic review of the menu in advance of the OG and PG is clearly a valuable process that has resulted in improvements in the food supply, there are still areas that need to be addressed that are currently not implemented during the event.

  14. Spectator Consumer Behaviors at the 2012 London Paralympic Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridvan Ekmekci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Paralympics are the world’s second largest sporting event after the Olympics and continue to grow in popularity, there is little available research regarding spectators of sport competitions for disabled athletes. The purpose of this study was to profile spectators’ consumer behaviors in order to understand what factors explain spectators’ spending, length of stay, and attendance at the London Paralympic Games. Data was collected in a six-day period from a sample of 504 people present in London at three Paralympic sport facilities during the 2012 Paralympic Games. The results of the regression analyses revealed that nationality, attended contests, group size, having a connection with a Paralympic athlete, length of stay, gender and London Olympics’ spectators were significant determinants of Paralympics spectators’ spending in London. The data also indicated that spending, being from England (or not, gender, and being a friend/relative of a Paralympic athlete significantly affected spectators’ length of stay in London. Additionally, spectators’ attendance at the London Paralympic contests was predicted by spending, the size of the travel group, Beijing Paralympics’ spectators and age.

  15. Conception of the Maritime Transport Safety in the Baltic Sea in 2009 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caban Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The maritime transport is particularly exposed to danger due to the environment of its operations. These are the threat dependent and independent of human e.g. environmental, safety health and life of humans or belongings. In spite of attempts to limit the risk of danger, it is impossible to completely eliminate it. The article presents some aspects of the state of transportation safety in the Baltic Sea from Statistical Yearbook of Maritime Economy and Helcom as well as attempt the undertaken to analyses the security state of this sea area in 2009 to 2015.

  16. Life in the shadow of the 2012 olympics: an ethnography of the host borough of the London games

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Iain

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. On 6th July 2005 the London Olympic bidding committee won the right to host the 2012 Olympic Games. Some seven years later London’s Olympic venues were built on time, Team GB accumulated an unprecedented medal haul and no significant security incidents occurred. These outcomes facilitated an understandable positive evaluation of the 2012 Games. It would be churlish not to be positive; Olympic...

  17. Impact of mandibular conventional denture and overdenture on quality of life and masticatory efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gomes CARDOSO

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this non-randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life and masticatory efficiency of patients rehabilitated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with immediate loading or conventional dentures. Fifty completely edentulous patients wearing bimaxillary conventional dentures, for at least one year, were recruited. The patients were then assigned to either two treatment groups: mandibular overdentures supported by two implants with bar-clip system and a maxillary conventional denture (n = 25, and new maxillary and mandibular conventional complete dentures (n = 25. Masticatory efficiency and oral health-related quality of life were assessed before and 3 months after denture insertion. The Brazilian version of OHIP-Edent questionnaire was used to assess the oral health-related quality of life. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated with chewing capsules through a colorimetric method. The results revealed fewer oral health–related quality of life problems in patients wearing mandibular two-implant overdentures compared to the conventional dentures group. In addition, the implant overdenture group presented statistically significant improvement in masticatory efficiency (p = 0.001. There was no correlation between masticatory efficiency and OHIP in the implant group (p > 0.05, however a correlation was found in the conventional denture group (p < 0.05. Therefore, these short-term results suggest that mandibular overdenture retained by 2 implants with immediate loading combined with maxillary conventional dentures provide better masticatory efficiency and oral health–related quality of life than mandibular conventional dentures.

  18. Convention on Nuclear Safety. Second national report on the implementation by france of the obligations of the Convention; Convention sur la surete nucleaire. Deuxieme rapport national sur la mise en oeuvre par la France des obligations de la Convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-15

    The first national report on the implementation by france of the obligation under the Convention is structured along its Articles. the french Nuclear safety Authority ensured the co ordination of the report, with contributions from other regulators and nuclear operators. this report was distributed at the middle of April 2003 to the other Contracting party (on 3 november to 14, 2003 at the IAEA headquarters. (author)

  19. National nuclear safety report 2004. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The second National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the second review meeting of the Nuclear Safety Convention. At that time it was concluded that Argentina met the obligations of the Convention. This third National Nuclear Safety Report is an updated report which includes all safety aspects of the Argentinian nuclear power plants and the measures taken to enhance the safety of the plants. The present report also takes into account the observations and discussions maintained during the second review meeting. The conclusion made in the first review meeting about the compliance by Argentina of the obligations of the Convention are included as Annex I and those belonging to the second review meeting are included as Annex II. In general, the information contained in this Report has been updated since March 31, 2001 to April 30, 2004. Those aspects that remain unchanged were not addressed in this third report. As a result of the detailed analysis of all the Articles, it can be stated that the country fulfils all the obligations imposed by the Nuclear Safety Convention. The questions and answers originated at the Second Review Meeting are included as Annex III

  20. Life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems for alternative legacy scenarios of the London Olympic Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkes, Olga, E-mail: o.parkes@ucl.ac.uk; Lettieri, Paola, E-mail: p.lettieri@ucl.ac.uk; Bogle, I. David L.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of LCA in planning integrated waste management systems. • Environmental valuation of 3 legacy scenarios for the Olympic Park. • Hot-spot analysis highlights the importance of energy and materials recovery. • Most environmental savings are achieved through materials recycling. • Sensitivity analysis shows importance of waste composition and recycling rates. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) of 10 integrated waste management systems (IWMSs) for 3 potential post-event site design scenarios of the London Olympic Park. The aim of the LCA study is to evaluate direct and indirect emissions resulting from various treatment options of municipal solid waste (MSW) annually generated on site together with avoided emissions resulting from energy, materials and nutrients recovery. IWMSs are modelled using GaBi v6.0 Product Sustainability software and results are presented based on the CML (v.Nov-10) characterisation method. The results show that IWMSs with advanced thermal treatment (ATT) and incineration with energy recovery have the lowest Global Warming Potential (GWP) than IWMSs where landfill is the primary waste treatment process. This is due to higher direct emissions and lower avoided emissions from the landfill process compared to the emissions from the thermal treatment processes. LCA results demonstrate that significant environmental savings are achieved through substitution of virgin materials with recycled ones. The results of the sensitivity analysis carried out for IWMS 1 shows that increasing recycling rate by 5%, 10% and 15% compared to the baseline scenario can reduce GWP by 8%, 17% and 25% respectively. Sensitivity analysis also shows how changes in waste composition affect the overall result of the system. The outcomes of such assessments provide decision-makers with fundamental information regarding the environmental impacts of different waste treatment options necessary for

  1. 46 CFR 176.910 - Passenger Ship Safety Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. 176.910 Section 176... 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as Amended (SOLAS) § 176.910 Passenger Ship Safety Certificate. (a) A vessel, which carries more than...

  2. National Nuclear Safety Report 2001. Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The First National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the first review meeting of the Nuclear Safety Convention. At that time it was concluded that Argentina met the obligations of the Convention. This second National Nuclear Safety Report is an updated report which includes all safety aspects of the Argentinian nuclear power plants and the measures taken to enhance the safety of the plants. The present report also takes into account the observations and discussions maintained during the first review meeting. The conclusion made in the first review meeting about the compliance by Argentina of the obligations of the Convention are included as Annex 1. In general, the information contained in this Report has been updated since March 31, 1998 to March 31, 2001. Those aspects that remain unchanged were not addressed in this second report with the objective of avoiding repetitions and in order to carry out a detailed analysis considering article by article. As a result of the above mentioned detailed analysis of all the Articles, it can be stated that the country fulfils all the obligations imposed by the Nuclear Safety Convention

  3. A cross-sectional study of knife injuries at a London major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallett, J R; Sutherland, E; Glucksman, E; Tunnicliff, M; Keep, J W

    2014-01-01

    No national recording systems for knife injuries exist in the UK. Understanding the true size and nature of the problem of knife injuries is the first stage in reducing the burden of this injury. The aim of this study was to survey every knife injury seen in a single inner city emergency department (ED) over a one-year period. A cross-sectional observational study was performed of all patients attending with a knife injury to the ED of a London major trauma centre in 2011. Demographic characteristics, patterns of injury, morbidity and mortality data were collected. A total of 938 knife injuries were identified from 127,191 attendances (0.77% of all visits) with a case fatality rate of 0.53%. A quarter (24%) of the major trauma team's caseload was for knife injuries. Overall, 44% of injuries were selfreported as assaults, 49% as accidents and 8% as deliberate self-harm. The highest age specific incident rate occurred in the 16-24 year age category (263/100,000). Multiple injuries were seen in 19% of cases, of which only 81% were recorded as assaults. The mean length of stay for those admitted to hospital was 3.04 days. Intrathoracic injury was seen in 26% of cases of chest trauma and 24% of abdominal injuries had a second additional chest injury. Violent intentional injuries are a significant contributory factor to the workload of the major trauma team at this centre. This paper contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the nature of these injuries seen in the ED.

  4. Sweden's fourth national report under the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and the safety of radioactive waste management. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Joint Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Sweden signed Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) September 29, 1997. Sweden ratified the Joint Convention about two years later and is a Contracting Party to the Joint Convention since July 29, 1999. The Joint Convention entered into force on June 18, 2001. Each member nation having ratified the Joint Convention (Contracting Party) is obligated to prepare a National Report covering the scope of the Joint Convention and subject it to review by other Contracting Parties at Review Meetings held in Vienna, Austria. Sweden participated in the First Review Meeting in November 2003, the Second Review Meeting in May 2006 and the Third Review Meeting in May 2009. This report is the fourth Swedish National Report under the Joint Convention. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within Sweden. It constitutes an updated document with basically the same structure as the previous national reports under the terms of the Joint Convention and reflects developments in Sweden through December 2010. It will be subject to review at the Fourth Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties in Vienna, Austria, in May 2012

  5. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. National Report from Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    This report is the Norwegian report to the second review meeting to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The comments, questions and remarks given to Norway's initial national report and Norway's presentation given at the first review meeting have been incorporated in this report. The second report is a full revision of the first report. This report concludes that Norway meets the obligations of the Joint Convention. However, Norwegian authorities will aim for development in the waste management policy and Norway will continue to improve its existing systems to further enhance safety, in line with the aims of the Joint Convention

  6. The specific tasks of RF TSO - FSUE VO 'Safety', related with Implementation of obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kapralov, E.

    2010-01-01

    It was more than 20 years ago that IAEA discussed the issue pertaining to the need in scientific and engineering support to the regulatory body. The Convention on Nuclear Safety being the keystone in assurance of the global nuclear safety and security regime was adopted in 1994. It is pointed out that two independent organizations supervised by Rostechnadzor have been established within the Russian TSO system, FSUE VO 'Safety' being one of them. The tasks of the organization comprise obligatory certification of equipment as well as acceptance of equipment before its delivery to the NPP both in Russia and in the countries constructing the power units based on the Russian designs. The acceptance procedure has been set forth in the new Russian document at the level of the federal rules and regulations for nuclear safety assurance. As far as its implementation decision is concerned, a task for selection and training of personnel has been set and allocated on the Training and Methodological Center of Nuclear and Radiation Safety established with the support of FSUE VO 'Safety', which provides training programmes and specific lecture courses in the wide range of the relevant topics. (author)

  7. Norwegian national report. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This report contains the national report from Norway to the fourth review meeting of the JointConvention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management to be held 14-23 May 2012. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of the safety of vitrified high level waste shipments from the UK to continental Europe by sea. Annex 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, F.; Fett, H.J.; Hoermann, E.; Roewekamp, M.; Cheshire, R.; Elston, B.; Slawson, G.; Raffestin, D.; Schneider, T.; Armingaud, F.; Laurent, B.

    2001-01-01

    The return of vitrified high level waste arising from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at Sellafield to continental Europe, e.g. Germany, will start around the end of the century. The shipment of the specific flasks will include transportation via the Irish Sea, the English Channel and the North Sea with ships of the Pacific Nuclear Transport Limited (PNTL) classified to the INF 3 standard. The assessment approach is to analyse the severity and the frequency of mechanical impacts, fires and explosions with the potential to affect the package. The results show that there is a high safety margin due to the special safety features of the INF 3 ships compared to conventional ships. The remaining accident probability for a trans-port of vitrified high level waste from UK to the continent is very low. No realistic severe accident scenarios that could seriously affect the flasks and could lead to a radioactivity re-lease have been identified. (author)

  9. Safety during sea transport of radioactive materials. Probabilistic safety analysis of package fro sea surface fire accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Obara, Isonori; Akutsu, Yukio; Aritomi, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    The ships carrying irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive wastes(INF materials) are designed to keep integrity of packaging based on the various safety and fireproof measures, even if the ship encounters a maritime fire accident. However, granted that the frequency is very low, realistic severe accidents should be evaluated. In this paper, probabilistic safety assessment method is applied to evaluate safety margin for severe sea fire accidents using event tree analysis. Based on our separate studies, the severest scenario was estimated as follows; an INF transport ship collides with oil tanker and induces a sea surface fire. Probability data such as ship's collision, oil leakage, ignition, escape from fire region, operations of cask cooling system and water flooding systems were also introduced from above mentioned studies. The results indicate that the probability of which packages cannot keep their integrity during the sea surface fire accident is very low and sea transport of INF materials is carried out very safely. (author)

  10. Survey of gaseous air pollutants at selected UK sites: XX. Data digest for Central London Laboratory, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broughton, G.F.J.; Bower, J.; Drury, V.J.; Lilley, K.; Powell, K.

    1987-01-01

    Ambient air-quality measurements of six gaseous pollutants plus black smoke and particulate lead continued during 1984 at the Central London Laboratory. The data are presented here in the form of frequency distributions, averages, and other parameters for winter, summer, annual and monthly periods. Time-series graphs of pollutant concentrations for 1984 and of the historical data base between July 1972 and December 1984 are also included.

  11. Introduction to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management and Canada's participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecke, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) is the first and the only legally binding international instrument to address safety issues concerning the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste on a global scale. It entered into force on June 18, 2001. The Government of Canada strongly supported international efforts to bring into force the Joint Convention and was the second country to ratify it. The Joint Convention is an 'incentive instrument' that is based on peer review (similar in that respect to the Convention on Nuclear Safety) and devised to encourage countries that are Contracting Parties to report and to foster open and frank discussions on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management. Being an incentive convention, it is not designed to mandate Contracting Parties to fulfill its obligation through control and sanction, but it is based on the common objectives of Contracting Parties to achieve and maintain a high level of safety in spent fuel and radioactive waste management, protect individuals, society and the environment from ionizing radiation and prevent accidents and if necessary mitigating the consequences of such accidents. The following paper will provide an introduction to the Joint Convention and provide a summary of Canada's peer review at the most recent Review Meeting which was held on May 11-20, 2009, at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) headquarters in Vienna, Austria. (author)

  12. Tracker electronics testing at Imperial College London

    CERN Multimedia

    PPARC, UK

    2006-01-01

    Jonathon Fulcher and Rob Bainbridge testing a rack of CMS Tracker readout electronics at Imperial College London. The signals from the front end APV chips will be transmitted optically to racks of electronics ~100m away in an adjacent underground cavern where they are fed into ~20 crates where 500 CMS Front End Driver boards (FEDs) are located. The FED inputs are 8 fibre ribbons, each ribbon consisting of 12 fibres, each fibre carrying the serially multiplexed data originating from 2 APVs. To test the FEDs special tester boards have been designed to produce simulated APV data in optical form. In the picture the yellow cables are the fibres, which originate from the FED tester boards on the left hand side of the crate as 96 individual fibres, which are then combined into the 8 fibre ribbons feeding the FED board on the right hand side of the crate. Fig. 2 shows an APV25 test board mounted in the X-ray irradiation setup, Fig. 3 the X-ray machine where the chips are irradiated and Fig. 4 the MGPA (Multi-Gain Pre...

  13. Temporal trends in health-related quality of life after stroke: analysis from the South London Stroke Register 1995-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldenkar, Anita; Crichton, Siobhan; Douiri, Abdel; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A; Chen, Ruoling

    2014-08-01

    Survival after stroke has dramatically increased in the last two decades as the treatment of stroke has improved. However, time-trend analyses of health-related quality of life in stroke patients covering this time period are still not well investigated. The study aims to examine temporal trends in mental and physical health-related quality of life of stroke survivors between the period of 1995 and 2011. First in a lifetime strokes were registered in the South London Stroke Register between 1995 and 2011. Using the Short Form-12 Health Survey, trends in self-reported health-related quality of life at one-year after stroke were assessed over a 17-year period using linear regression, adjusting for socio-demographics, risk factors, and case-mix variables. Analyses stratifying by age, gender, race-ethnicity, and functional impairment were also performed. The overall trends of mental and physical health-related quality of life scores at one-year after stroke remained relatively unchanged over the period 1995-2011. However, mental health-related quality of life scores significantly improved between the period of 1995-2007 [β = 0·94 (95% CI; 0·15 to 1·74), P = 0·02], after which scores deteriorated [β = -2·02 (-3·82 to -0·22), P = 0·03]. Physical health-related quality of life scores remained stable until 2007, after which scores declined [β = -1·63 (-3·25 to -0·01), P = 0·05]. Despite declining health-related quality of life trends within the general population, stroke survivors' overall health-related quality of life remained unchanged, possibly due to lower expectations of health among stroke survivors. However, in recent years there has been a significant unexplained decline in both physical and mental health-related quality of life, suggesting that despite stroke policy aims to improve health-related quality of life, more needs to be done to target this decline. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2014 World

  14. Waste disposal into the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlers, P.; Kunig, P.

    1987-01-01

    The waste disposal at sea is regulated for the most part by national administrative law, which mainly is based on international law rules supplemented by EC-law. The dumping of low-level radioactive waste into the sea is more and more called into question. The disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the subsoil of the sea does not correspond to the London Convention. (WG) [de

  15. A Critical Analysis of the Conventionally Employed Creep Lifing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Zakaria; Gray, Veronica; Whittaker, Mark; Perkins, Karen

    2014-04-29

    The deformation of structural alloys presents problems for power plants and aerospace applications due to the demand for elevated temperatures for higher efficiencies and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The materials used in such applications experience harsh environments which may lead to deformation and failure of critical components. To avoid such catastrophic failures and also increase efficiency, future designs must utilise novel/improved alloy systems with enhanced temperature capability. In recognising this issue, a detailed understanding of creep is essential for the success of these designs by ensuring components do not experience excessive deformation which may ultimately lead to failure. To achieve this, a variety of parametric methods have been developed to quantify creep and creep fracture in high temperature applications. This study reviews a number of well-known traditionally employed creep lifing methods with some more recent approaches also included. The first section of this paper focuses on predicting the long-term creep rupture properties which is an area of interest for the power generation sector. The second section looks at pre-defined strains and the re-production of full creep curves based on available data which is pertinent to the aerospace industry where components are replaced before failure.

  16. 46 CFR 189.60-15 - Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate. 189.60-15 Section... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 189.60-15 Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate. Every vessel equipped with a radio installation...

  17. 46 CFR 91.60-5 - Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate. 91.60-5... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 91.60-5 Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage...

  18. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage...

  19. 46 CFR 91.60-15 - Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate. 91.60-15 Section 91... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 91.60-15 Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate. Every vessel equipped with a radio installation on...

  20. 46 CFR 189.60-5 - Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate. 189.60-5... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 189.60-5 Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage...

  1. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are...

  2. Second national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention - September 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This National Report was prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities in the field of nuclear safety, aiming the fulfilling the Convention of Nuclear Energy obligations. The Report contains a description of the Brazilian policy and programme on the safety of nuclear installations, and an article by article description of the measures Brazil is undertaking in order to implement the obligations described in the Convention. The chapter 6 describes plans and future activities to further enhance the safety of nuclear installations in Brazil.

  3. Second national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention - September 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This National Report was prepared by a group composed of representatives of the various Brazilian organizations with responsibilities in the field of nuclear safety, aiming the fulfilling the Convention of Nuclear Energy obligations. The Report contains a description of the Brazilian policy and programme on the safety of nuclear installations, and an article by article description of the measures Brazil is undertaking in order to implement the obligations described in the Convention. The chapter 6 describes plans and future activities to further enhance the safety of nuclear installations in Brazil

  4. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Hao Kuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at the retail level in Malaysia. A total of 152 organic and conventional vegetables were purchased at retail markets in Malaysia. Samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms using conventional microbiological methods. Combination methods of most probable number-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPN-mPCR were used to detect and quantify foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that most types of organic and conventional vegetables possessed similar microbial count (P > 0.05 of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium were not detected in any sample analyzed in this study. Among the 152 samples tested, only the conventional lettuce and organic carrot were tested positive for STEC and S. Enteritidis, respectively. L. monocytogenes were more frequently detected in both organic (9.1% and conventional vegetables (2.7% as compared to E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. Enteritidis. Overall, no trend was shown that either organically or conventionally grown vegetables have posed greater microbiological risks. These findings indicated that one particular type of farming practices would not affect the microbiological profiles of fresh produce. Therefore, regardless of farming methods, all vegetables should be

  5. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee-Hao; Rukayadi, Yaya; Ahmad, Siti H; Wan Mohamed Radzi, Che W J; Thung, Tze-Young; Premarathne, Jayasekara M K J K; Chang, Wei-San; Loo, Yuet-Ying; Tan, Chia-Wanq; Ramzi, Othman B; Mohd Fadzil, Siti N; Kuan, Chee-Sian; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2017-01-01

    Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at the retail level in Malaysia. A total of 152 organic and conventional vegetables were purchased at retail markets in Malaysia. Samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms using conventional microbiological methods. Combination methods of most probable number-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPN-mPCR) were used to detect and quantify foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that most types of organic and conventional vegetables possessed similar microbial count ( P > 0.05) of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms. E. coli O157:H7 and S . Typhimurium were not detected in any sample analyzed in this study. Among the 152 samples tested, only the conventional lettuce and organic carrot were tested positive for STEC and S . Enteritidis, respectively. L. monocytogenes were more frequently detected in both organic (9.1%) and conventional vegetables (2.7%) as compared to E. coli O157:H7, S . Typhimurium, and S . Enteritidis. Overall, no trend was shown that either organically or conventionally grown vegetables have posed greater microbiological risks. These findings indicated that one particular type of farming practices would not affect the microbiological profiles of fresh produce. Therefore, regardless of farming methods, all vegetables should be subjected to

  6. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee-Hao; Rukayadi, Yaya; Ahmad, Siti H.; Wan Mohamed Radzi, Che W. J.; Thung, Tze-Young; Premarathne, Jayasekara M. K. J. K.; Chang, Wei-San; Loo, Yuet-Ying; Tan, Chia-Wanq; Ramzi, Othman B.; Mohd Fadzil, Siti N.; Kuan, Chee-Sian; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2017-01-01

    Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at the retail level in Malaysia. A total of 152 organic and conventional vegetables were purchased at retail markets in Malaysia. Samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms using conventional microbiological methods. Combination methods of most probable number-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPN-mPCR) were used to detect and quantify foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that most types of organic and conventional vegetables possessed similar microbial count (P > 0.05) of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium were not detected in any sample analyzed in this study. Among the 152 samples tested, only the conventional lettuce and organic carrot were tested positive for STEC and S. Enteritidis, respectively. L. monocytogenes were more frequently detected in both organic (9.1%) and conventional vegetables (2.7%) as compared to E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. Enteritidis. Overall, no trend was shown that either organically or conventionally grown vegetables have posed greater microbiological risks. These findings indicated that one particular type of farming practices would not affect the microbiological profiles of fresh produce. Therefore, regardless of farming methods, all vegetables should be subjected to

  7. Fourth national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention. Sep. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    This Fourth National Report of Brazil is a new update to include relevant information of the period of 2004-2007. This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  8. Fourth national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention. Sep. 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-09-01

    This Fourth National Report of Brazil is a new update to include relevant information of the period of 2004-2007. This document represents the national report prepared as a fulfillment of the brazilian obligations related to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. In chapter 2 some details are given about the existing nuclear installations. Chapter 3 provides details about the legislation and regulations, including the regulatory framework and the regulatory body. Chapter 4 covers general safety considerations as described in articles 10 to 16 of the Convention. Chapter 5 addresses to the safety of the installations during siting, design, construction and operation. Chapter 6 describes planned activities to further enhance nuclear safety. Chapter 7 presents the final remarks related to the degree of compliance with the Convention obligations

  9. Challenges in access to health services and its impact on quality of life: a randomised population-based survey within Turkish speaking immigrants in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topal Kenan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim There are a significant number of Turkish speaking immigrants living in London. Their special health issues including women's health, mental health, and alcohol and smoking habits has been assessed. The aim of this study was to explore the ongoing challenges in access to health care services and its impact on Quality of Life of immigrants. Material and methods This cross-sectional population-based study was conducted between March and August 2010 with Turkish immigrants (n = 416 living in London. Of these, 308 (74% were Turkish and 108 (26% were Turkish Cypriots. All healthy or unhealthy adults of 17-65 years of age were enrolled. A structured questionnaire with 44 items in five subcategories and 26-items WHOQOL BREF were used. Results Mean duration of stay for Turkish Cypriots (26.9 ± 13.9 years was significantly longer than Turkish immigrants (13.3 ± 7.5 (p Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate how the health and well-being of members of the Turkish speaking community living in London are affected by social aspects of their lives. Providing culturally competent care and interpretation services and advocacy may improve the accessibility of the health care.

  10. France - Convention on nuclear safety. Fourth national report established in view of the 2008 examination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This report is the fourth one established in compliance with the article 5 of the international Convention on nuclear safety, and presents measures implemented by France to meet each of the Convention requirements. It addresses electro-nuclear reactors as well as research reactors. After an overview of the main evolutions since the third French report, and a general presentation of the French national nuclear policy, the report addresses the different articles of the Convention. These articles deal with general arrangements (application arrangements, presentation of reports, existing nuclear installations with their safety assessments and main safety improvements brought to the different nuclear reactors), law and regulation (legal and regulatory framework, regulation bodies, responsibility of an authorization holder), general safety considerations (priority for safety, human and financial resources, human factors, quality insurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection, organisation in case of emergency), and installation safety (site selection, design and construction, exploitation, activities planned to improve safety). Appendices propose a list and locations of French nuclear reactors, a list of the main legal and regulatory texts, presentations of nuclear reactor operators (EDF, CEA, ILL), and an overview of practices of control of the environment

  11. IAEA supports regional seas conventions and action plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs about the 3rd Global Meeting of Regional Seas Conventions and Action Plans held in Monaco in November 2000 at the IAEA's Marine Environmental Laboratory (IAEA-MEL). The meeting assembled a number of marine environmental experts from several UN bodies to reinforce activities to protect the marine environment

  12. Modelling changes in small area disability free life expectancy: trends in London wards between 2001 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Peter

    2014-12-20

    Existing analyses of trends in disability free life expectancy (DFLE) are mainly at aggregate level (national or broad regional). However, major differences in DFLE, and trends in these expectancies, exist between different neighbourhoods within regions, so supporting a small area perspective. However, this raises issues regarding the stability of conventional life table estimation methods at small area scales. This paper advocates a Bayesian borrowing strength technique to model trends in mortality and disability differences across 625 small areas in London, using illness data from the 2001 and 2011 population Censuses, and deaths data for two periods centred on the Census years. From this analysis, estimates of total life expectancy and DFLE are obtained. The spatio-temporal modelling perspective allows assessment of whether significant compression or expansion of morbidity has occurred in each small area. Appropriate models involve random effects that recognise correlation and interaction effects over relevant dimensions of the observed deaths and illness data (areas, ages), as well as major spatial trends (e.g. gradients in health and mortality according to area deprivation category). Whilst borrowing strength is a primary consideration (and demonstrated by raised precision for estimated life expectancies), so also is model parsimony. Therefore, pure borrowing strength models are compared with models allowing selection of random age-area interaction effects using a spike-slab prior, and in fact borrowing strength combined with random effects selection provides better fit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Achievements and Perspectives of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvat, D.; Lacoste, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management is the first legal instrument to directly address the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management on a global scale. The Joint Convention entered into force in 2001. This paper describes its process and its main achievements to date. The perspectives to establish of a Global Waste Safety Regime based on the Joint Convention are also discussed. (authors)

  14. The public component of sea basins radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agutov, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The sea is the key and essential element of the basin although the bigger share of the basin consists of the river ecosystems. The classical theory of sustainable basin development implies that the one of the main indicator of sustainable development is the river ecosystem biodiversity and especially the sturgeon kind of fish with long life cycle. The fish biodiversity and stocks of valuable fish were totally destroyed. One of the most serious causes for that was the inadequate water policy aimed at the construction of the river dam complexes and the construction of the huge water reservoirs. These water reservoirs were used for different purposes, but the main danger is coming from their usage as nuclear power plant cooling ponds. The wide public has received the opportunity to learn about the ecological danger of such objects. The modern Russian society doesn't fully believe to the results of monitoring by state agencies. In order to propel these activities the creation of non-governmental ecological organizations is needed within the all the key elements of river ecosystems. The information skeleton throughout the whole basin needed for successful and effective functioning of these organizations can be constructed only under the condition of having good and modern means of communication such as electronic ones (e-mail, Internet) and publishing of own newspapers and bulletins. Our regional non-governmental organization has created already such a network within the Don and accepting existing local organizations as members. The activities on the creation of the same networks have been already induced in the Volga and Ural rivers basins. Now the networks are more or less shaped and we start equipping the local NGOs with radiation detection devices of 'Inspector'class for measuring the beta and gamma radiation. Having the needed experts and specialists the independent networked organizations will be able not only to monitor the radiological situation

  15. National Differences in Reporting of Work Accidents at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse; Knudsen, Fabienne

    National Differences in Reporting of Work Accidents at Sea Grøn, S and Knudsen, F Centre for Maritime Health and Safety, University of Southern Denmark Filipinos working on Danish ships experience less work accidents than their Danish colleagues if we are to believe the various statistics available...... notification practices, and whether there are special conditions applicable to seafarers of other nationality than Danish. It will also explore the multicultural element of safety culture in selected Danish ships. There are different ways and channels for notification of an accident at sea, which means....... There are indications suggesting that this is due to differences in reporting and safety culture alike. In a new project, Safety Culture and Reporting Practice on Danish ships in the Danish International Ship Register (SADIS), we will therefore seek answers to what factors act as incentives or barriers for proper...

  16. NUNS’ DAILY LIFE AND RELIGIOUS IN THE MODERN SPAIN ACROSS HIS ACCOUNTINGS. THE CONVENT NATIVE OF CORDOBA OF HOLY ANA AT THE END OF THE FORMER REGIME.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Gómez Navarro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current effervescence of the studies on the feminine monasticism in the Modern Spain, this article approaches how his intrahistoria can be known, collaborating this way to filling a certain still existing emptiness in this plot, from the analysis of the documentation deprived of a monastic economy and of the compared history, with the objective double of presenting the possibilities and weaknesses of the above mentioned source and the panorama that his contest offers for different facets of the collective life cenobítica. Real, so, scientific contribution to the knowledge of the modernist historiography in this area for the nature of the analyzed and, documentation especially, the originality of his approach.;

  17. Experiences of Fatigue at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiwei; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Chen, Zhonglong

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue has negative impacts on the general working population as well as on seafarers. In order to study seafarers’ fatigue, a questionnaire-base survey was conducted to gain information about potential risk factors for fatigue and construct indexes indicating fatigue. The study applies T-test t......-test to compare strata of seafarers to analyse work and sleep patterns in global seafaring. Qualitative analysis are also employed to explore the impacts of fatigue on seafarer’s occupational health and safety.......Fatigue has negative impacts on the general working population as well as on seafarers. In order to study seafarers’ fatigue, a questionnaire-base survey was conducted to gain information about potential risk factors for fatigue and construct indexes indicating fatigue. The study applies T...

  18. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled in terms of the convention on nuclear safety. May 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaj, J.; Konecny, L.; Rovny, J.; Metke, E.; Zemanova, D.; Turner, M.; Pospisil, M.; Jurina, V.; Rivny, I.; Soltes, L.; Petrik, T.; Petrovic, J.; Fazekasova, H.; Kobzova, D.; Trcka, T.; Maudry, J.; Betak, A.; Capkovic, J.

    2007-05-01

    A brief national safety report of the Slovak Republic compiled in terms of the joint convention on nuclear safety in 2007 is presented. This safety report consists of following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in terms of the Convention; (C) Scope of application; (3) Legislation and regulation; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia; (6) Annexes

  19. Risk and safety in the nuclear industry and conventional norms of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1977-01-01

    The societal acceptance of various risks is analyzed and rules of risk acceptance as a function of different parameters (e. g., expected benefit, intensity of effect) are spelled out. The monetary value of a human life is estimated, based on investments in safety of different human activities. The acceptable risks and safety investments in different human activities are then compared with risks and safety investments of the nuclear industry. Safety investments required to reduce radioactivity releases and risks from nuclear power stations to ALAP (as low as practiable) levels are taken as a study case. It is found that risks in the nuclear industry are several orders of magnitude lower and safety investments per human life saved are several orders of magnitude higher, as compared with risks and safety investments in other human activities

  20. National Convention on Family Life Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-12-01

    This secretarial report gives brief comments on some discussion of topics at the National Convention on Family Life Education. Discussion included: 1) legalized prostitution as a means to reduce venereal disease; 2) family life education promotion by government and civic groups; 3) more authority for the Population Council; 4) more liberal abortion legislation than previously; 5) statutory notification of veneral disease by medical practitioners; 6) compensatory measures for working women with young children, and 7) the need for modernization of legislation pertaining to child health, adoption, paternity, the Persons Act, infant life preservation, drugs, age of consent, and the age of minority.

  1. Safety aspects in life extension of NPPs. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Due to current social and economical framework, in last years many Member States (MS) started a process of Plant Life Extension (PLEX) for their older nuclear facilities. The process followed many different approaches, being intrinsically dependent on the national regulatory framework and technical tradition. This process has many nuclear safety implications, other than strategic and political ones, and therefore a need for tailoring the available safety assessment tools to such applications has become urgent in recent years. Typical safety assessment processes such as the Periodic Safety Review has been used already and can be used in the future as a framework for a PLEX. Also the review of regular maintenance and ageing management programs and the continuous upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report are tools widely used in a life extension context in many MS. However, recently some MS highlighted the need to identify in a clear way the technical aspects more directly affecting the decision for a long-term operation of a nuclear facility. Many Technical Cooperation projects have been requested for the year 2003-2004 on this subject and a generic task in Nuclear Safety proved necessary as a background activity. Therefore, on May 6-10, 2002, a Consultant Meeting dealing with Safety Aspects of life extension for NPPs was convened at the Nuclear Safety Dept. of the IAEA. It was attended by representatives of Regulatory Bodies and Utilities, both from countries with experience of life extension of NPPs and countries where the process is at the beginning. The main application problems were identified and discussed and a first attempt was carried out to define the key elements of the life extension process, isolating peculiar technical items, LTO related, from generic safety related tasks. The result was a preliminary technical document with a collection of basic experience and information for the implementation of a PLEX program. Therefore the draft document was thought

  2. The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, University of London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E H

    1995-01-01

    The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, London has arisen from need and from opportunity. The need is due to the relative neglect nationally and internationally of the most common serious brain disorder with important physical, psychological, and social complications. The relative neglect is reflected in services, research, charitable donations, public profile, and stigma and in a serious lack of professional education. The opportunity arose because of the existence in several medical institutions at Denmark Hill, London, of a group of medical and related colleagues with a special interest covering almost every aspect of this multidisciplinary disorder who agreed to combine their expertise in this initiative. The idea was born and developed in 1991-1992 and was supported by all the parent institutions: The Maudsley and King's College Hospitals, St. Piers Lingfield, The Institute of Psychiatry, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Life, Basic Medical and Health Sciences, all under the umbrella of King's College, University of London. Further stimulus and help came from a group of dedicated supporters in private and public life. There are three strands to this initiative: (a) a charity, The Fund for Epilepsy; (b) the clinical Centre for Epilepsy, which was formally opened at the Maudsley Hospital in July 1994; and (c) the academic Institute of Epileptology for research and teaching, which was launched on November 15, 1994.

  3. Third national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-15

    This document presents an activity report during the year of 2004, covering the following activities: corporate governance, sustainable development, internal control, controls and procedures for official financial information, evaluation of the controls and procedures by the internal audit, and financial statements.

  4. Third national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This document presents an activity report during the year of 2004, covering the following activities: corporate governance, sustainable development, internal control, controls and procedures for official financial information, evaluation of the controls and procedures by the internal audit, and financial statements

  5. Auditory localisation of conventional and electric cars : laboratory results and implications for cycling safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A. Hagenzieker, M.P. Commandeur, J.J.F. Agterberg, M.J.H. & Wee, B. van

    2016-01-01

    When driven at low speeds, cars operating in electric mode have been found to be quieter than conventional cars. As a result, the auditory cues which pedestrians and cyclists use to assess the presence, proximity and location oncoming traffic may be reduced, posing a safety hazard. This laboratory

  6. Auditory localisation of conventional and electric cars: laboratory results and implications for cycling safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A.; Hagenzieker, M.P.; Commandeur, J.J.F.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; van Wee, B.

    2016-01-01

    When driven at low speeds, cars operating in electric mode have been found to be quieter than conventional cars. As a result, the auditory cues which pedestrians and cyclists use to assess the presence, proximity and location oncoming traffic may be reduced, posing a safety hazard. This laboratory

  7. The IAEA nuclear safety conventions: an example of successful ''treaty management''?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, G.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear safety conventions represent an advance in bringing national nuclear power activities within the ambition of international legal safety norms. They introduce a novel measure of international legal accountability for the safety of commercial nuclear power operations. But whether this system represents a successful example of treaty management defies an easy answer. Certainly, it is beyond doubt that the peer review process combines aspects of law application(enforcement/control of implementation and compliance) with lawmaking. The nuclear safety convention bear the characteristics of a political compromise that affects effectiveness. For the time being it remains unclear whether this compromise will prove acceptable in the long run or how the tension between the two contending perspectives is likely to resolve itself. (N.C.)

  8. Some of the bases of the IAEA definition and recommendations concerning high-level radioactive waste unsuitable for dumping at sea and some of the Japanese findings of deep sea survey in the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The Provisional Definition and Recommendations Concerning Radioactive Wastes and Other Radioactive Matter referred to in Annexes I and II to the London Convention of 1972 on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter have been reviewed and revised by the IAEA during 1975-1978. The Revised Definition and Recommendations and of the Annex thereto for the purposes of the Convention emphasize that the definition and recommendations set forth by the IAEA should not be interpreted as precluding the adoption of more restrictive requirements by any Party to the Convention or appropriate national authorities, and that nothing in the document shall be construed as encouraging the dumping at sea of radioactive waste or other radioactive matter. With these reservations, the Definition of High-Level Radioacive Wastes or Other High-Level Radioactive Matter Unsuitable for Dumping at Sea is given, distinguishing between α-emitters, β/γ-emitters with half-lives of at least 0.5 years and of unknown half-lives; and tritium and β/γ-emitters with half-lives of less than 0.5 years. Bases of the IAEA definition and recommendations concerning high level radioactive waste unsuitable for dumping at sea and reservations attached to the given concentration limits are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Safety analysis of sea transportation of solidified reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Edlund, O.; Kjellbert, N.; Grundfelt, B.; Milchert, T.

    1980-06-01

    A central handling and storage facility (ALMA) for low- and medium-level reactor waste from Swedish nuclear power plants is being planned and the transportation to it will be by sea. A safety assessment devoted to the potential environmental impacts from the transportation is presented. (Auth.)

  10. Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was drawn up at the Inter-Governmental Conference on the Dumping of Wastes at Sea, held in London from 30 October to 10 November 1972. The Governments of Mexico, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America are the Depository Governments for instruments of ratification of, and accession to, the Convention, pursuant to Articles XVII and XVIII respectively

  11. Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was drawn up at the Inter-Governmental Conference on the Dumping of Wastes at Sea, held in London from 30 October to 10 November 1972. The Governments of Mexico, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America are the Depository Governments for instruments of ratification of, and accession to, the Convention, pursuant to Articles XVII and XVIII respectively [es

  12. Dumping at Sea Act 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Act enables the United Kingdom Government to ratify both the Oslo Convention of 1972 for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping from Ships and Aircraft and the London Convention of 1972 on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter. (NEA) [fr

  13. Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Third review meeting. Questions asked to France and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, referred to as the 'Joint Convention', is the result of international discussions that followed the adoption of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in 1994. France signed the Joint Convention at the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held on 29 September 1997, the very first day the Joint Convention was opened for signature. She approved it on 22 February 2000 and filed the corresponding instruments with the IAEA on 27 April 2000. The Joint Convention entered into force on 18 June 2001. For many years, France has been taking an active part in the pursuit of international actions to reinforce nuclear safety and considers the Joint Convention to be a key step in that direction. The fields covered by the Joint Convention have long been part of the French approach to nuclear safety. For his third report, France presented a document reflecting the viewpoints of the various stakeholders (regulatory authorities and operators). Thus, for each of the chapters in which the regulatory authority is not the only party to express its point of view, a three-stage structure was adopted: first of all a description by the regulatory authority of the regulations, followed by a presentation by the operators of the steps taken to meet the regulations and finally, an analysis by the regulatory authority of the steps taken by the operators. This third report was distributed in October 2008 to all Contracting Parties who asked 213 questions on the French report. France answered each of them in the present document

  14. National nuclear safety report 1998. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Argentine Republic subscribed the Convention on Nuclear Safety, approved by a Diplomatic Conference in Vienna, Austria, in June 17th, 1994. According to the provisions in Section 5th of the Convention, each Contracting Party shall submit for its examination a National Nuclear Safety Report about the measures adopted to comply with the corresponding obligations. This Report describes the actions that the Argentine Republic is carrying on since the beginning of its nuclear activities, showing that it complies with the obligations derived from the Convention, in accordance with the provisions of its Article 4. The analysis of the compliance with such obligations is based on the legislation in force, the applicable regulatory standards and procedures, the issued licenses, and other regulatory decisions. The corresponding information is described in the analysis of each of the Convention Articles constituting this Report. The present National Report has been performed in order to comply with Article 5 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, and has been prepared as much as possible following the Guidelines Regarding National Reports under the Convention on Nuclear Safety, approved in the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties, held in Vienna in April 1997. This means that the Report has been ordered according to the Articles of the Convention on Nuclear Safety and the contents indicated in the guidelines. The information contained in the articles, which are part of the Report shows the compliance of the Argentine Republic, as a contracting party of such Convention, with the obligations assumed

  15. Risk and safety in the nuclear industry and conventional norms of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    In the present study the societal acceptance of various risks is analyzed and rules of risk acceptance as a function of different parameters are spelled out. The monetary value of a human life is estimated, based on investments in safety of different human activities. The acceptable risks and safety investments in different human activities are then compared with risks and safety investments of the nuclear industry. Safety investments required to reduce the radioactivity releases and risks from nuclear power stations to ALAP levels are taken as a study case. It is found that risks in the nuclear industry are several orders of magnitude lower and safety investments per human life saved are several orders of magnitude higher, as compared with risks and safety investments in other human activities. It is also shown that the incremental safety investments needed to further reduce the radiation doses in the environment during normal and continuous operation of nuclear plants are extravagantly high as compared to safety investments in other human activities and in other facets of human life. Considering that there is a limit to the economic means available, societal expenditures for reducing risks should by spread, as much as possible, over all human activities to get the maximum return from investments. (B.G.)

  16. Second national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention - introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document was prepared for fulfilling the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Chapter 1 presents some historical aspects of the Brazilian nuclear policy, targets to be attained for increasing the nuclear energy contribution for the national production of electric energy

  17. Second national report of Brazil for the nuclear safety convention - introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document was prepared for fulfilling the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Chapter 1 presents some historical aspects of the Brazilian nuclear policy, targets to be attained for increasing the nuclear energy contribution for the national production of electric energy.

  18. Study on transport safety of refresh MOX fuel. Radiation dose from package hypothetically submerged into sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Suzuki; Hiroshi; Saegusa, Toshiari; Maruyama, Koki; Ito, Chihiro; Watabe, Naoto

    1999-01-01

    The sea transport of fresh MOX fuel from Europe to Japan is under planning. For the structure and equipment of transport ships for fresh MOX fuels, there is a special safety standard called the INF Code of IMO (International Maritime Organization). For transport of radioactive materials, there is a safety standard stipulated in Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material issued by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Under those code and standard, fresh MOX fuel will be transported safely on the sea. However, a dose assessment has been made by assuming that a fresh MOX fuel package might be sunk into the sea by unexpected reasons. In the both cases for a package sunk at the coastal region and for that sunk at the ocean, the evaluated result of the dose equivalent by radiation exposure to the public are far below the dose equivalent limit of the ICRP recommendation (1 mSv/year). (author)

  19. The epidemiology of injuries in powerlifting at the London 2012 Paralympic Games: An analysis of 1411 athlete-days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, S E; Cushman, D M; Blauwet, C A; Emery, C; Webborn, N; Derman, W; Schwellnus, M; Stomphorst, J; Van de Vliet, P

    2016-10-01

    Sport injury epidemiology has received increased recognition as a field of sport medicine research that can improve the health and safety of athletes. Injuries among Paralympic powerlifters have not previously been systematically studied. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to characterize injuries among Paralympic powerlifters. Athletes competing in the sport of powerlifting were followed over the 7-day competition period of the 2012 London Paralympic Games. The main outcome measurements were injury incidence rate (IR; number of injuries per 1000 athlete-days) and injury incidence proportion (IP; injuries per 100 athletes). A total of 38 injuries among 163 powerlifters were documented. The overall IR was 33.3 injuries/1000 athlete-days (95% CI 24.0-42.6) and the overall IP was 23.3 injuries per 100 athletes (95% CI 16.8-29.8). The majority of injuries were chronic overuse injuries (61%). The most commonly injured anatomical region was the shoulder/clavicle (32% of all injuries), followed by the chest (13%) and elbow (13%). The information obtained in this study opens the door for future study into the mechanisms and details of injuries into powerlifters with physical impairments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Replenishment at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Pac

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Replenishment at sea is a process which plays the key role in the contemporary naval logistics during military and crisis operations. As the last element of the supply chain, it must use specific standards within the areas of procedures, technical equipment, logistic assets and resources, as well as safety, especially in multinational operations. The methods applied enable ships to operate at sea in the long term without logistic support provided by sea ports. The paper explains all the methods of the solids and liquids replenishment, and also gives an idea how to estimate the resupply process, using the measures. The level of standardization of procedures and assets implemented by NATO, the EU and other willing states has been described.

  1. Development of the national report of the Mexican United States for the Convention on Nuclear Safety of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz L, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the content of the National Report of the Mexican United States in it revision 2 is presented, which was presented for it exam by the member countries of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in April, 2005. The conclusion of this Report, with base in the existent objective evidence, is that the Laguna Verde Central continues maintaining a level of similar safety to that of other nuclear power plants of its type, not existing conditions at the moment that they can be identified as adverse for a sure operation and that, therefore, plans don't exist to advance the closing of this installation, before the end of its useful life. The questions that the member countries formulated to the Report of Mexico, the answers that were provided to these questions, as well as the conclusions of the 3 Exam Meeting of April, 2005 are also included. The next National Report, in it revision 3, it will cover the period from the January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006, it was developed from January to August, 2007, it delivered to the IAEA on September of the same year and it was presented in the IAEA Headquarters (IAEA) in the 4 Exam Meeting on April, 2008. (Author)

  2. The Evolution of System Safety at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Homayoon; Everett, Chris; Groen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The NASA system safety framework is in the process of change, motivated by the desire to promote an objectives-driven approach to system safety that explicitly focuses system safety efforts on system-level safety performance, and serves to unify, in a purposeful manner, safety-related activities that otherwise might be done in a way that results in gaps, redundancies, or unnecessary work. An objectives-driven approach to system safety affords more flexibility to determine, on a system-specific basis, the means by which adequate safety is achieved and verified. Such flexibility and efficiency is becoming increasingly important in the face of evolving engineering modalities and acquisition models, where, for example, NASA will increasingly rely on commercial providers for transportation services to low-earth orbit. A key element of this objectives-driven approach is the use of the risk-informed safety case (RISC): a structured argument, supported by a body of evidence, that provides a compelling, comprehensible and valid case that a system is or will be adequately safe for a given application in a given environment. The RISC addresses each of the objectives defined for the system, providing a rational basis for making informed risk acceptance decisions at relevant decision points in the system life cycle.

  3. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety - 6th national report of Switzerland to the Convention in accordance with its article 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    After a short description of Switzerland as a state in the middle of Europe and of its political organization, the report explains the development of the nuclear power from the first experimental reactor in 1957. Presently five nuclear power plants (NPP) are operating in Switzerland, producing about 40% of the electricity consumption of the country, the rest being produced essentially by hydroelectric plants. As the first regulatory authority, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission was set up in 1960, which evolved to the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) which came into force at the end of 1996. Since there, Switzerland has prepared and submitted the country reports for the regular Review Meetings of Contracting Countries. This 6th report by ENSI provides an update on compliance with CNS obligations. It gives consideration to issues that aroused particular interest at the 5th meeting and at the extraordinary meeting dedicated to the consequences of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi. Shortly after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi, the Swiss government has decided to phase out nuclear energy; existing plants will continue to operate as long as they are safe. In Switzerland, on-going activities regarding safety assessment of the different stages in the lifetime of nuclear installations consist of periodic assessments and assessments of long-term operation for existing Swiss NPPs. Such assessments have been performed for two Swiss NPPs (Beznau NPP and Muehleberg NPP) which have been in commercial operation for over 40 years. A detailed examination demonstrated that the conditions for the taking out of service of an NPP are not and will not be reached by these two plants within the next 10 years. Nevertheless, it is mandatory to continue with the scheduled ageing management, maintenance and backfitting activities. After the Fukushima accident, additional safety reviews were performed. All Swiss

  4. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety - 6th national report of Switzerland to the Convention in accordance with its article 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-08-01

    After a short description of Switzerland as a state in the middle of Europe and of its political organization, the report explains the development of the nuclear power from the first experimental reactor in 1957. Presently five nuclear power plants (NPP) are operating in Switzerland, producing about 40% of the electricity consumption of the country, the rest being produced essentially by hydroelectric plants. As the first regulatory authority, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission was set up in 1960, which evolved to the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) which came into force at the end of 1996. Since there, Switzerland has prepared and submitted the country reports for the regular Review Meetings of Contracting Countries. This 6th report by ENSI provides an update on compliance with CNS obligations. It gives consideration to issues that aroused particular interest at the 5th meeting and at the extraordinary meeting dedicated to the consequences of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi. Shortly after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi, the Swiss government has decided to phase out nuclear energy; existing plants will continue to operate as long as they are safe. In Switzerland, on-going activities regarding safety assessment of the different stages in the lifetime of nuclear installations consist of periodic assessments and assessments of long-term operation for existing Swiss NPPs. Such assessments have been performed for two Swiss NPPs (Beznau NPP and Muehleberg NPP) which have been in commercial operation for over 40 years. A detailed examination demonstrated that the conditions for the taking out of service of an NPP are not and will not be reached by these two plants within the next 10 years. Nevertheless, it is mandatory to continue with the scheduled ageing management, maintenance and backfitting activities. After the Fukushima accident, additional safety reviews were performed. All Swiss

  5. Implementation of the obligations of the joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management - Sixth national report of Switzerland in accordance with article 32 of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-10-01

    This comprehensive, illustrated Sixth Swiss National Report in accordance with Article 32 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety reports on Swiss policies and practices with respect to the management of various categories of radioactive waste. The scope of application is looked at. This includes reprocessing and the processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Further sections of the report present notes on inventories and lists, along with a review of legislative and regulatory systems. Other general safety provisions discussed include the responsibility of licence holders, human and financial resources, quality assurance, operational radiation protection, emergency preparedness and decommissioning. Safety aspects of spent fuel management and the design, location and operation of disposal facilities are discussed. General efforts to improve safety are looked at, as is the global transport of wastes. An annex provides information on national laws, regulations and associated guidelines

  6. Geographically varying associations between personality and life satisfaction in the London metropolitan area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokela, M.; Bleidorn, W.; Lamb, M.E.; Gosling, S.D.; Rentfrow, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Residential location is thought to influence people’s well-being, but different individuals may value residential areas differently. We examined how life satisfaction and personality traits are geographically distributed within the UK London metropolitan area, and how the strength of associations

  7. Radiation safety study for conventional facility and siting pre project phase of International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Ban, Syuichi; Sasaki, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed high-energy collider consisting of two linear accelerators, two dumping rings, electron and positron sources, and a single colliding hall with two detectors. The total length and CMS energy of the ILC will be 31 km and 500 GeV, respectively (and 50 km and 1 TeV after future upgrade). The design of the ILC has entered the pre-project phase, which includes site-dependent design. Radiation safety design for the ILC is on-going as a part of conventional facility and siting activities of the pre-project phase. The thickness of a central wall of normal concrete is designed to be 3.5 m under a pessimistic assumption of beam loss. The beam loss scenario is under discussion. Experience and knowledge relating to shielding design and radiation control operational work at other laboratories are required. (authors)

  8. Assessment of safety levels in operation rooms at two major tertiary care public hospitals of Karachi. Safe surgery saves life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minhas, M.S.; Muzzammil, M.; Effendi, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the knowledge and attitude towards surgical safety among the health care professionals including surgeons, anaesthetist, hospital administrators, and operation room personnel and raise awareness towards the importance of safe surgery. Method: A pilot cross- sectional study of 543 healthcare providers working in the operating rooms and the surgical intensive care units was conducted in two tertiary care hospitals, within a study period of one month. A structured questionnaire was constructed and an informed verbal consent was taken. The questionnaire was then distributed; data collected and analysed on SPSS 20.0. Results: A total of 543 respondents participated in the study out of which there were 375 (69%) men and 168 (31%) women. The ages ranged between 23-58 years, mean 40.5+-24.74. There were 110 (20.25%) surgeons, 58 (10.68%) anaesthetist, 132 (24.30%) trainees, 125 (23.02%) technicians, and were 118 (21.73%) nurses. The question regarding briefing operation room personnel is important for patient safety was agreed by 532 (98%) respondents. Amongst the respondents, 239 (44%) did not feel safe to be operated in their own setup. Team communication improvement through the check list implementation was agreed by 483 (89%) respondents. 514 (94.7%) opted for the checklist to be used while they are being operated. That operation room personnel frequently disregard established protocols was agreed by 374 (69%) respondents. 193 (35.54%) of the respondents stated that it is difficult for them to speak up in the or if they perceive a problem with patient care. Conclusion: Operation room personnel were not aware of several important areas related to briefing, communication, safety attitude, following standard protocols and use of WHO Surgical Safety check list. A pre-post intervention study should be conducted after formal introduction of the Checklist. Successful implementation will require taking all stake holders on board

  9. Tendency of quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Weiwei; Lu Taixiang; Li Jiaxin; Liu Qing; Zhao Chong; Han Fei; Wang Hanyu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tendency of quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy. Methods: Quality of life in NPC patients was assessed using FACT-H and N and NPC-QOL Patients were divided into nine groups according to the treatment period :before treatment group, 0 -20 Gy group, 20 -50 Gy group, > 50 Gy group, 0 -6 months after treatment group, 6 - 12 mouths group, 1 -2 years group, 2 -3 years group and 3 -5 years group. Scores of FACT-H and N and NPC-QOL were compared between the either two groups. Results: 450 NPC patients were assessed. The total score of FACT-H and N decreased during the treatment and then increased six months after the treatment. The tendencies of physical and functional well-being were similar. The social/family and emotional well-being did not change significantly along with the treatment but the scores of head and neck well-being and NPC-QOL decreased obviously. Xerotomia was aggravated from the initiation of treatment and became the most severe at 6 - 12 months after treatment. 50% - 60% of the patients with disease-free reported severe xerotomia at 3 -5 years after radiotherapy. Incidence of severe trismus increased up to 14% at 3 -5 years after treatment. Conclusions: Quality of life of NPC patients with conventional radiotherapy deteriorates during the treatment period, but recovers to the normal level six months after the treatment. Xerotomia and trismus can affect the quality of life of NPC patients. (authors)

  10. ECOLOGICAL SAFETY OF CITIZENS OF RECREATIONAL ZONES OF THE BLACK SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. Білявський

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to meaningfulness estimation of ecological control of sea aquatory in forming ofsafety ecological conditions for citizens of the Black Sea. The pecularity and the role of technogenic pollution ofsea aquatory of the Black Sea are estimated. The degrees of ecological safety and negative influences of technogenicobjects on people living in the Black Sea coast are defined. The reccomendations for ecologization of recreationalzones of the Black Seat are characterized. The main goal of the work is the ecological estimation of livingconditions for sitizens in the Black Sea on the bases of using of methodology of complex searching andmarking of protecting laws

  11. The Perilous Life of a Linguistic Genre Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchmann, Simon

    2014-01-01

    , the descriptions are more informative than the structures hitherto described by text linguistics. Secondly, as historical norms, they are a testimony to the development and change of language use. Thirdly, the descriptions contribute to language users’ awareness of the origin of standards, their understanding......The primary, theoretical aim of the article is to present a linguistic text analysis that differs from standard text linguistic approaches by being informative with regard to the linguistic choices and textual organisation that characterise a text as a social act. The analysis is exemplified...... by using texts of a relatively new Danish journalistic genre nyhedsanalyse (news analysis). The secondary, empirical aim of the article is to present a corpus-based, linguistic analysis of central elements of the genre nyhedsanalyse within the Danish system of newspaper genres. Text linguistics is based...

  12. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10 Section 31.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship...

  13. 46 CFR 31.40-5 - Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-5 Section 31.40-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-5 Cargo Ship...

  14. 46 CFR 31.40-15 - Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-15 Section 31.40-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-15 Cargo Ship...

  15. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation

  16. Agrichemical safety practices on farms in the western Cape | London ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agrichemical safety practices on farms in the western Cape. ... a lesser extent the presence of empty containers, are identified as important problems. ... particularly in the light of statutory requirements for occupational safety and health under ...

  17. Higher Education Governance as Language Games: A Wittgensteinian Case Study of the Breakdown of Governance at the London School of Economics 2004-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2015-01-01

    This paper calls for a more detailed study of social practices in the analysis of governance failures. Using the Woolf report on the breakdown of governance at the London School of Economics as a case study and Wittgenstein's notion of language games as an analytic lens, the author argues that widely used institutional and structural theories of…

  18. Spinal cordd biological safety comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xilinbaoleri; Xu Wanlong; Chen Gang; Liu Hao; Wang Ruozheng; Bai Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the spine intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and the conventional radiation therapy on the beagle spinal cord neurons, in order to prove the biological safety of IMRT of the spinal cord. Methods: Twelve selected purebred beagles were randomly divided into 2 groups. A beagle clinical model of tumor was mimiced in the ninth and tenth thoracic vertebrae. Then the beagles were irradiated by 2 different models of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy, with the total irradiation doses of 50 and 70 Gy. The samples of spinal cord were taken out from the same position of the nine and tenth thoracic vertebrae at the third month after radiation.All the samples were observed by the electron microscope, and the Fas and HSP70 expression in spinal cord neurons were evaluated by immunohistochemistry method. Terminal deoxynucleatidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL) technique was used to examine the apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. Results: The neurons in the spinal cord of IMRT group were mainly reversible injury, and those in the conventional radiation therapy were mainly apoptosis. Compared with the conventional radiation therapy group [50 Gy group, (7.3 ± 1.1)%; 70 Gy group, (11.3 ± 1.4)%], the apoptosis rate of the spinal cord neurons of the intensity modulated radiotherapy group [50 Gy group, (1.2 ± 0.7)%; 70 Gy group (2.5 ± 0.8)%] was much lower[(50 Gy group, t=0.022, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.017, P<0.05)]. The expression levels of Fas in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 4.6 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.4 ± 1.1) were also much lowerthan those in the other group (50 Gy group, 15.1 ± 6.4; 70 Gy group, 19.3 ± 7.6. 50 Gy group, t=0.231, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.457, P<0.05), while the expression levels of HSP70 in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 9.1 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.3 ± 1.4)were much higher than those in the conventional radiation therapy group (50 Gy group, 2.1 ± 0.9; 70 Gy group, 1.7 ± 0

  19. Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Third national report on the implementation of obligations of the Joint Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    This report is published in compliance with the Joint Convention and presents the measures implemented by France to comply with each of the obligations defined by this convention. The structure of the report refers to the articles of the Convention. Therefore, after a presentation of the main evolutions since France's previous report, the following themes are addressed: policies and practices, scope of application, inventories and lists, legislative and regulatory system, other general safety provisions, safety of spent fuel management, trans-boundary movement, disused sealed sources, and planned activities to improve safety

  20. Art engagement and mental health: experiences of service users of a community-based arts programme at Tate Modern, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Eamonn; Weir, Hannele; Berridge, Emma-Jane; Ellis, Liz; Kyratsis, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    To examine the experiences of mental health service users who took part in an arts-based programme at Tate Modern, a major London art gallery. Exploratory qualitative design. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews with 10 mental health service users who had taken part in a community-based programme at Tate Modern. Additionally, six art educators from Tate Modern were interviewed. Concepts that emerged from the text were identified using thematic analysis. All participants valued the gallery-based programme. The three overarching thematic areas were: the symbolic and physical context in which the programme workshops were located; the relational and social context of the programme workshops; and reflections on the relationship between the arts-based programme and subsequent mental health. Art galleries are increasingly seen to function as vehicles for popular education with mental health service users. This study adds to the growing body of evidence related to how mental health service users experience and reflect on arts-related programmes targeted at them. This study indicates that emphasis on how users experience gallery-based programmes may contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between art and mental health. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional MR study of a motor task and the Tower of London task at 1.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghi, A.; Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.; Bergui, M.; Coriasco, M.; Bradac, G.B.; Avidano, F.; Manzone, C.; Mortara, P.; Orsi, L.

    2006-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for clinical applications and basic neuroscience is constantly increasing. The discussion about minimum performance requirement for a correct implementation of fMRI is still open, and one of the critical points is the magnetic field strength. We tested the feasibility of fMRI at 1.0 T during motor and cognitive tasks. Fourteen healthy subjects were scanned during a motor task and 12 while performing the Tower of London task. In the activated areas, the percentage signal change due to BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) contrast was analysed. To check basic image quality of the acquisition system we measured quality indices in a temporal series of images of a phantom. Motor and cognitive brain activations matched previous results obtained at higher field strengths. The mean percentage change over subjects in the motor task was in the range 1.3-2.6% for the primary motor area and 0.8-6.7% for the cerebellum. In the cognitive task, the mean percentage change over subjects was 0.7-1.2% for a frontal area and 0.6-2.8% for a parietal area. The percentage noise of the phantom temporal series was less than 0.4%. Percentage changes and signal to noise ratio, although lower than that obtained with high-field systems, allowed activation maps to be obtained in all subjects. (orig.)

  2. Promoting Diversity in Creative Art Education: The Case of Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Annette Ruth; Haste, Polly; Jones, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Students studying art at university in the United Kingdom tend to be female, from higher social classes and from majority ethnic groups. This paper considers some of the complex and deeply-rooted social and economic factors that militate against wider participation in the arts and describes how we started to tackle under-representation at…

  3. Real-Life Efficacy, Immunogenicity and Safety of Biosimilar Infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the use of biosimilar infliximab (IFX) in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases has become widespread in some European and non-European countries. Data on the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity from real-life cohorts are accumulating. The first reports showed similar outcomes in the induction and maintenance of remission, mucosal healing, safety and immunogenicity profile to the originator IFX. In the present review, we aimed to summarize the existing knowledge on the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity profile of biosimilar IFX reported from real-life cohorts. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Quality assurance grading of conventional equipment at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Li Shichang

    2006-01-01

    Equipment QA grading with the systematic and standardized approach will benefit the concerned organizations by effective allocating of limited resources to guarantee the quality of essential equipment. This paper presents a new quality assurance grading system for the convention systems/equipment of nuclear power station, which is operative and at the same time could help the owner to allot resource reasonably through the analysis of the purpose of grading and the experience and lessons of LINGAO Phase I project. (authors)

  5. Case studies of transport for London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This project was motivated by the election of Ken Livingston as Mayor of London in : 2000. Mayor Livingston campaigned on a platform of improving transportation service through : such innovative means as congestion pricing. Mayor Livingston relied on...

  6. Literature review on future development of the Baltic Sea and recommendations for safety modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahdenperae, A.-M.

    2006-12-01

    The report represents the summary of the main factors, which affects the future development and state of the Baltic Sea. The emphasis is on land uplift, shoreline displacement, and physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea. In addition, historical evolution of the Baltic Sea after the last ice age and potential impacts of the different climate scenarios are presented. The Baltic Sea has an important influence on the development of the geospherebiosphere interface zone at Olkiluoto. Thus, it is important to take account all these factors in the Safety Modelling of the nuclear waste repository. Different models have been used to evaluate land uplift at Olkiluoto and changes in the sea and land area, especially in the interface zone. The main parameters have been monitored satisfactory way at the Olkiluoto offshore. Based on the present sea sediment stratigraphy, overburden, topography and vegetation it has been fairly well estimated coming future land and sea areas of the Olkiluoto Island and its surroundings. According to the results, Olkiluoto will be part of the continent during the next decade. In the shallow shores of Olkiluoto, the amounts of common reed are increasing naturally, resulting in paludification. The spatial and temporal changes at Olkiluoto can be estimated and modelled more detailed by using the well focused research sites and more accurate results. In addition, more information is needed on development of the watershed areas, lakes, rivers and vegetation and on sedimentation and erosion processes, hydrology, quality and quantity of seabed sediments and stratigraphy, element budgets and recharge and discharge areas, especially at the geosphere-biosphere interface zones. (orig.)

  7. Life extension decision making of safety critical systems: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiee, Mahmood; Animah, I.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of “asset life extension” has become increasingly important to safety critical industries including nuclear power, offshore oil and gas, petrochemical, renewable energy, rail transport, aviation, shipping, electricity distribution and transmission, etc. Extending the service life of industrial assets can offer a broad range of economic, technical, social and environmental benefits as compared to other end-of-life management strategies such as decommissioning and r...

  8. Teaching the History of Astronomy On Site in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn of 2014, the author had the opportunity to teach a class on the history of astronomy in England as part of a study abroad experience for students at Illinois Wesleyan University. The philosophy of the program is to use the rich cultural environment of London as a setting for active learning. In the classroom, students read and discussed selected works by Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Herschel. We visited Stonehenge, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the London Science Museum, the London Monument, and the library of the Royal Astronomical Society. Lessons learned from the experience will be shared.

  9. The Great London Smog of 1952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Barbara J

    2018-04-01

    : The Great London Smog of December 1952 lasted five days and killed up to 12,000 people. The smog developed primarily because of extensive burning of high-sulfur coal. The health effects were both immediate and long lasting, with a recent study revealing an increased likelihood of childhood asthma development in those exposed to the Great Smog while in utero or during their first year of life. Subsequent pollution legislation-including the U.S. Clean Air Act and its amendments-have demonstrably reduced air pollution and positively impacted health outcomes. With poor air quality events like the Great Smog continuing to occur today, nurses need to be aware of the impact such environmental disasters can have on human health.

  10. Towards a sociological analysis of London 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Within this article, I focus on a number of productive scholarly avenues to which sociological analysis of London 2012 might want to attend. Understanding major sporting events - and thus the Olympic Games - as inextricably entangled with the media-industrial complex, I suggest London 2012 as a commodity spectacle that will emphasize gleaming aesthetics, a (sporting) city and nation collapsed into (simple) tourist images, and the presentation of a particular expression of self within the logi...

  11. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. National Report of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    On 10 March 1999, the Netherlands signed the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, which was subsequently formally ratified on 26 April 2000 and entered into force on 18 June 2001. The Joint Convention obliges each contracting party to apply widely recognized principles and tools in order to achieve and maintain high standards of safety during management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. The Joint Convention also requires each party to report on the national implementation of these principles to review meetings of the parties to this Convention. This report describes the manner in which the Netherlands is fulfilling its obligations under the Joint Convention

  12. A case of industrial safety appraisal for extension of service life of GTK-10-4 gas turbines used at gas transmission stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybnikov, A. I.; Kovalev, A. G.; Kryukov, I. I.; Leont'ev, S. A.; Moshnikov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    It is shown that the extended life and enhanced operational reliability of parts and subassemblies of the most popular GTK-10-4 gas transmission plants are determined by the enhanced efficiency of the control over technical condition and operational safety of turbine plants in conformity with industrial safety requirements imposed on gas pipeline compressor stations. It has been established that the materials of parts and subassemblies of gas turbine plants with different, especially with maximal operating time, shall be exposed to NDT for the purpose of determining the actual mechanical characteristics of these materials with different operating time and calculating residual life. The analysis of damageability and operating conditions has helped to identify parts and subassemblies for repair or replacement with the highest frequency of unacceptable defects. These parts and subassemblies have been shown to include base members of the axial compressor (AC), a turbine housing, an axial compressor rotor, high- and low-pressure turbine (HPT and LPT) discs, a 12-part holder, the housing of the holder of HPT and LPT guiding blades, a sealed baffler, and working and guiding AC, LPT and HPT blades. The most typical operational defects have been enumerated and analyzed. It has been determined that the primary task of the industrial safety appraisal for extending the life of GTK-10-4 with limit-exceeding operating time is to thoroughly examine HPT and LPT discs with more than 130,000 hours of operating time and establish by DT methods characteristics of materials for evaluation, taking account of their degradation, and residual life of critical turbine elements. In addition, it has been shown that the service life of HP turbine discs can be extended by replacing the disc material (EP-428 12% chromium steel) with a material with a higher linear expansion factor that somewhat exceeds the expansion factor of EI-893 nickel alloy used to melt out working blades.

  13. Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Second national report on implementation by France of its obligations under the convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    installation containing radioactive materials can be an 'installation classified on environmental protection grounds' (ICPEs) and is placed under the supervision of the Ministry for the Environment. In France there are about 600,000 industrial facilities in the ICPE category, including nearly 65,000 subject to issue of an authorization. If we consider only those ICPEs which are classified owing to the radioactive substances they contain or use, we obtain about 800 facilities. Facilities only containing small quantities of radioactive materials are not subject to regulatory supervision in this respect. The radioactive sources they use may nonetheless be subject to supervision, as mentioned in this report and remain subject to the general radiation protection regulations. For this second report, France took account of the experience acquired with its first report on the subject and on the three reports for the Convention on Nuclear Safety: this report is a stand-alone document based on existing documents and reflecting the viewpoints of the various stakeholders (regulatory authorities and operators). Thus, for each of the chapters in which the regulatory authority is not the only party to express its point of view, we adopted a three-stage structure: first of all a description by the regulatory authority of the regulations, followed by a presentation by the operators of the steps taken to meet the regulations and finally, an analysis by the regulatory authority of the steps taken by the operators. This report is structured according to the 'guidelines regarding national reports' for this Convention, in other words with an 'article by article' presentation. Each article is the subject of a separate chapter at the beginning of which the corresponding text of the Convention article is recalled in a shaded box. After this introduction (section A) the various sections deal with the following topics, in the order proposed in the 'guidelines': - section B: policy and practices in the

  14. London's historic ''pea-soupers''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbinato, D.

    1994-01-01

    Americans may think smog was invented in Los Angeles. Not so. In fact, a Londoner coined the term ''smog'' in 1905 to describe the city's insidious combination of natural fog and coal smoke. By then, the phenomenon was part of London history, and dirty, acrid smoke-filled ''pea-soupers'' were as familiar to Londoners as Big Ben and Westminster Abby. Smog in London predates Shakespeare by four centuries. Until the 12th century, most Londoners burned wood for fuel. But as the city grew and the forests shrank, wood became scarce and increasingly expensive. Large deposits of ''sea-coal'' off the northeast coast provided a cheap alternative. Soon, Londoners were burning the soft, bituminous coal to heat their homes and fuel their factories. Sea-coal was plentiful, but it didn't burn efficiently. A lot of its energy was spent making smoke, not heat. Coal smoke drifting through thousands of London chimneys combined with clean natural fog to make smog. If the weather conditions were right, it would last for days. Early on, no one had the scientific tools to correlate smog with adverse health effects, but complaints about the smoky air as an annoyance date back to at least 1272, when King Edward I, on the urging of important noblemen and clerics, banned the burning of sea-coal. Anyone caught burning or selling the stuff was to be tortured or executed. The first offender caught was summarily put to death. This deterred nobody. Of necessity, citizens continued to burn sea-coal in violation of the law, which required the burning of wood few could afford

  15. Sweden's first national report under the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Joint Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This report is issued according to Article 32 of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Sweden signed the Joint Convention September 29, 1997 and the Joint Convention entered into force on June 18, 2001. The areas covered by the Joint Convention have been incorporated in the Swedish system for spent fuel and radioactive waste management for a long time. The Swedish Government considered at the time of signing of the Joint Convention that the safety philosophy, legislation and the safety work conducted by the licensees and the authorities in Sweden complied with the obligations of the Convention. This is confirmed in the present report. The Swedish Government directed the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) to prepare this report in co-operation with the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). A working group of five persons, with representatives from SKI, SSI and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), has prepared this report. The report has been discussed in the boards of SKI and SSI. The Swedish Government adopted the report in April 2003. Section A of this report provides an overview of the Swedish nuclear waste programme, including a brief historical review, in order to give the reader a background to the current programme for the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. Sections B to J provide information on which the conclusions are drawn about the compliance with the obligations of the Joint Convention. By necessity this information is rather brief and strongly focused on those aspects which are addressed in the articles. Too many details and additional information would over-load the report and make the review process difficult. The goal has been to provide enough details to make the Swedish practices understandable. Data that might be missing will be added on request as a part of the review process. Article 32 of the Joint Convention calls for a self

  16. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety CNS - Switzerland’s seventh national report to the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    In the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011, the Swiss government decided to phase out nuclear energy. Existing plants will continue to operate as long as they are considered safe by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) and as long as they fulfil all legal and regulatory requirements in this respect. In Switzerland, on-going activities regarding safety assessment of the different stages in the lifetime of nuclear installations consist of periodic assessments and assessments of long-term operation for existing Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs). Assessments of long-term operation have been performed for two Swiss NPPs (Beznau and Muehleberg) which have been in commercial operation for over 40 years. A detailed examination demonstrated that the conditions for taking a NPP out of service have not yet been reached and will not be reached by these two plants within the next 10 years. Nevertheless, it is mandatory to continue with the scheduled ageing management, maintenance and backfitting activities. In late 2013, BKW Energy Ltd announced that Muehleberg NPP will be decommissioned at the end of 2019. The plant will shut down on December 20 th , 2019.The single 373 MWe boiling water reactor began operating in 1972. It will be the first Swiss nuclear power plant to be decommissioned. The preparatory work for decommissioning is well under way. In April 2015, a follow-up mission was conducted by the Integrated Regulatory Review Service in Switzerland. The Swiss government should give ENSI the ability to issue legally binding technical safety requirements and license conditions concerning nuclear safety, nuclear security and radiation safety. A follow-up mission by the Operational Safety Review Team on the Muehleberg NPP was completed in June 2014. Switzerland participated in the European Stress Test and its follow-up activities. During 2014, the necessary measures to achieve continuous improvement in the supervisory culture were defined. The

  17. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety CNS - Switzerland’s seventh national report to the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-07-15

    In the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011, the Swiss government decided to phase out nuclear energy. Existing plants will continue to operate as long as they are considered safe by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) and as long as they fulfil all legal and regulatory requirements in this respect. In Switzerland, on-going activities regarding safety assessment of the different stages in the lifetime of nuclear installations consist of periodic assessments and assessments of long-term operation for existing Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs). Assessments of long-term operation have been performed for two Swiss NPPs (Beznau and Muehleberg) which have been in commercial operation for over 40 years. A detailed examination demonstrated that the conditions for taking a NPP out of service have not yet been reached and will not be reached by these two plants within the next 10 years. Nevertheless, it is mandatory to continue with the scheduled ageing management, maintenance and backfitting activities. In late 2013, BKW Energy Ltd announced that Muehleberg NPP will be decommissioned at the end of 2019. The plant will shut down on December 20{sup th}, 2019.The single 373 MWe boiling water reactor began operating in 1972. It will be the first Swiss nuclear power plant to be decommissioned. The preparatory work for decommissioning is well under way. In April 2015, a follow-up mission was conducted by the Integrated Regulatory Review Service in Switzerland. The Swiss government should give ENSI the ability to issue legally binding technical safety requirements and license conditions concerning nuclear safety, nuclear security and radiation safety. A follow-up mission by the Operational Safety Review Team on the Muehleberg NPP was completed in June 2014. Switzerland participated in the European Stress Test and its follow-up activities. During 2014, the necessary measures to achieve continuous improvement in the supervisory culture were defined

  18. Time-driven activity based costing of total knee replacement surgery at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Akhtar, Kashif; Makaram, Navnit; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a time-driven activity based costing (TDABC) analysis of the clinical pathway for total knee replacement (TKR) and to determine where the major cost drivers lay. The in-patient pathway was prospectively mapped utilising a TDABC model, following 20 TKRs. The mean age for these patients was 73.4 years. All patients were ASA grade I or II and their mean BMI was 30.4. The 14 varus knees had a mean deformity of 5.32° and the six valgus knee had a mean deformity of 10.83°. Timings were prospectively collected as each patient was followed through the TKR pathway. Pre-operative costs including pre-assessment and joint school were £ 163. Total staff costs for admission and the operating theatre were £ 658. Consumables cost for the operating theatre were £ 1862. The average length of stay was 5.25 days at a total cost of £ 910. Trust overheads contributed £ 1651. The overall institutional cost of a 'noncomplex' TKR in patients without substantial medical co-morbidities was estimated to be £ 5422, representing a profit of £ 1065 based on a best practice tariff of £ 6487. The major cost drivers in the TKR pathway were determined to be theatre consumables, corporate overheads, overall ward cost and operating theatre staffing costs. Appropriate discounting of implant costs, reduction in length of stay by adopting an enhanced recovery programme and control of corporate overheads through the use of elective orthopaedic treatment centres are proposed approaches for reducing the overall cost of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Game prototype for understanding safety issues of life boat launching process.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Min; Chang, Jian; Dodwell, M.; Jekins, J.; Yang, H.J.; Zhang, Jian J.

    2016-01-01

    Novel advanced game techniques provide us with new possibilities to mimic a complicated training process, with the benefit of safety enhancement. In this paper, we design and implement a 3D game which imitates the lifeboat launching process. Lifeboat launching is such a complex but vital process which can on one side saving people's life on sea and on the other side associating many potential hazards. It involves both the tractor manoeuvres and boat operations. The primary objective of the ga...

  20. Co-ordinated research and environmental surveillance programme related to sea disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The co-ordinated Research and Environmental Surveillance Programme relevant to sea disposal of radioactive waste (CRESP) was created in 1981 in the framework of the 1977 Decision of the OECD Council establishing a Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. CRESP was essentially a scientific research programme. Its main objective was to increase the knowledge of processes controlling the transfer of radionuclides in the marine environment, so that safety assessments could be based on more accurate and comprehensive scientific data. From 1986, in response to a request from the Paris Commission, CRESP also considered the scientific aspects of coastal releases. CRESP made it possible to co-ordinate national research activities and generated an important international co-operation in its areas of work. The vast amount of scientific information gathered in this framework increased strongly our knowledge of the impact of radionuclides introduced to the deep sea environment. In particular, CRESP provided the basis for a comprehensive safety analysis of sea dumping operations. This study, published by the NEA in 1985, is still e reference on the subject. In November 1993, the Sixteenth Consultative Meeting of Contracting Parties to the London Convention 1972 voted a total ban on the disposal at sea of radioactive wastes and other radioactive matter. Considering this decision, the conclusions of the 1985 safety analysis, and CRESP's view that new scientific findings are unlikely to alter these conclusions, the NEA Steering Committee for nuclear Energy decided in October 1995 to terminate the programme. The present report summarises the knowledge accumulated within CRESP over its fifteen years of existence. (author)

  1. Special national report of the Slovak Republic compiled under the convention on nuclear safety. April 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    A Special safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2012 is presented. An account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (0) Introduction; (0.1) Purpose of the report; (0.2) Brief description of the site characteristics and units; (1) Executive summary; (2) External events; (2.1) Seismic; (2.2) Flooding; (2.3) Extreme weather conditions; (3) Design issues; (3.1) Loss of electrical power; (3.2) Loss of the decay heat removal capability/ultimate heat sink; (3.3) Loss of the primary ultimate heat sink, combined with station black out (see stress tests specifications); (4) Severe accident management; (4.1) Organization and arrangements of the licensee to manage accidents; (4.2) Accident management measures in place at the various stages of a scenario of loss of the core cooling function; (4.3) Maintaining the containment integrity after occurrence of significant fuel damage (up to core meltdown) in the reactor core; (4.4) Accident management measures to restrict the radioactive releases; (5) National organizations (regulator, technical support organizations, operator, government); (5.1) Legislative and regulatory framework; (6) Emergency preparedness and response and post--accident management (off-site); (6.1) Implementation of legislation in the field of emergency preparedness; (7) International cooperation; (7.1) Conventions and communications; (7.2) Cooperation with the international organizations; (7.3) Providing feedback including occurrences at nuclear installations of other nuclear power plants abroad.

  2. ‘Liminal learners’ in a global city: the aspirations of young British Bangladeshi women at an east London secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    Young British Bangladeshi women are often perceived as a marginalised, vulnerable group unlikely to succeed within the UK education system. Although achievement at GCSE level has improved significantly in recent years, female British Bangladeshis continue to be identified as an under-performing group at A-level and in higher education (Dale, 2002; Hussain, 2005). This article examines the educational experiences of a group of young British Bangladeshi women at one east London secondary school...

  3. Results of 6th Review Meeting and Perspective of the 7th Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sukho; Kim, Manwoong; You, Jeongwon; Lee, Youngeal

    2017-01-01

    This paper highlighted the objective and role of the Convention on Nuclear Safety organized by the IAEA. The Convention provides Member States to demonstrate and share how to maintain and improve the level of nuclear safety. The results of the 6 th review meeting were implemented for safety improvements and to prepare for 7 th national report. Seven and a half months before the 7 th Review Meeting, the National Report has submitted on steps and measures taken to implement Convention obligations. The Contracting Parties reviewed each other’s reports, and exchanged written questions, written answers and comments. The discussions in the Country Group sessions were generally good with a lively and frank exchange of information. The Country Groups noted the significant measures taken by Contracting Parties to improve nuclear safety and identified a number of good practices to be shared with all Contracting Parties.

  4. Statement to Second Extraordinary Meeting of Contracting Parties to Convention on Nuclear Safety, 27 August 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text: I am pleased to address this Second Extraordinary Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. This important meeting will be closely watched by the global nuclear community. I know you will make good use of this opportunity to consider further measures to strengthen nuclear safety throughout the world in the light of the lessons which we are still learning from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. One year after the adoption of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, significant progress has been made in several key areas. These include the assessment of safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants, strengthening IAEA peer review services, improving emergency preparedness and response capabilities and reviewing IAEA safety standards. Your work this week will address the request to Contracting Parties, expressed in the Action Plan, to explore mechanisms to enhance the effective implementation of Safety Conventions and to consider proposals to amend the Convention on Nuclear Safety. You will recall that last year's Ministerial Declaration stressed 'the importance of universal adherence to, and the effective implementation and continuous review of, the relevant international instruments on nuclear safety'. The Action Plan encouraged Member States to work cooperatively to maximize the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to produce concrete results as soon as possible. The IAEA has reported periodically to Member States about its work to implement the Action Plan. We have also organised a number of international expert meetings to analyse technical aspects of the accident and ensure that the right lessons are learned. The results of this Extraordinary Meeting will provide an important input to future considerations of implementation of the Action Plan. Our Member States will review implementation at the Agency's 56th General Conference next month, while the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in

  5. Mind the gap: 11 years of train-related injuries at the Royal London Hospital Major Trauma Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, J; Pafitanis, G; Alamouti, R; Brohi, K; Patel, H

    2018-06-18

    Introduction This study presents an extensive retrospective database of patients with polytrauma following train-related injuries and highlights the key lessons learnt in this rare clinical presentation. Materials and methods We retrospectively collected data from 127 patients who presented to Royal London Hospital after sustaining train related trauma. We analysed demographics, accident report data, aetiologies and clinical management interventions. All data were screened and injuries were mapped to various anatomical regions. The revised trauma score, injury severity score and new injury severity scores were used to quantify injury extent. Results Mean patient age was 41 years (range 16-81 years) with a 73% to 27% male to female ratio. Deliberate injuries occurred in 71% of patients, with accidental injury accounting for 29%. The mean new injury severity score was 26.48 (range 1-75), with the most common injuries sustained to the chest and the extremities. Pneumothorax, haemothorax or tension pneumothorax occurred in 44% of patients, with 11% suffering a flail chest injury. Traumatic amputations occurred in 33% of patients and 56% of patients required admission to intensive care. Total mortality rates were 19%, with 12% of patients dying at day 0 and 18% at day 7, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated the significant impact of train-related polytrauma and provided a comprehensive injury patterns. It was observed that deliberate polytrauma is related to psychiatric deliberate harm but there is no significant difference in the patterns of injuries between accidental and deliberately caused injuries. Overall injuries to the thorax and extremities were the most severe, demonstrating the highest mean injury scores.

  6. Operational safety and reactor life improvements of Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.; Nishihara, H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent important experience in improving the operational safety and life of a reactor are described. The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is a 25-year-old 5 MW light water reactor provided with two thermal columns of graphite and heavy water as well as other kinds of experimental facilities. In the graphite thermal column, noticeable amounts of neutron irradiation effects had accumulated in the graphite blocks near the core. Before the possible release of the stored energy, all the graphite blocks in the column were successfully replaced with new blocks using the opportunity provided by the installation of a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in the column. At the same time, special seal mechanisms were provided for essential improvements to the problem of radioactive argon production in the column. In the heavy-water thermal column we have accomplished the successful repair of a slow leak of heavy water through a thin instrumentation tube failure. The repair work included the removal and reconstructions of the lead and graphite shielding layers and welding of the instrumentation tube under radiation fields. Several mechanical components in the reactor cooling system were also exchanged for new components with improved designs and materials. On-line data logging of almost all instrumentation signals is continuously performed with a high speed data analysis system to diagnose operational conditions of the reactor. Furthermore, through detailed investigations on critical components, operational safety during further extended reactor life will be supported by well scheduled maintenance programs

  7. Use of reactor plants of enhanced safety for sea water desalination, industrial and district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Yu.; Polunichev, V.; Zverev, K.

    1997-01-01

    Russian designers have developed and can deliver nuclear complexes to provide sea water desalination, industrial and district heating. This paper provides an overview of these designs utilizing the ABV, KLT-40 and ATETS-80 reactor plants of enhanced safety. The most advanced nuclear powered water desalination project is the APVS-80. This design consists of a special ship equipped with the distillation desalination plant powered at a level of 160 MW(th) utilizing the type KLT-40 reactor plant. More than 20 years of experience with water desalination and reactor plants has been achieved in Aktau and Russian nuclear ships without radioactive contamination of desalinated water. Design is also proceeding on a two structure complex consisting of a floating nuclear power station and a reverse osmosis desalination plant. This new technology for sea water desalination provides the opportunity to considerably reduce the specific consumption of power for the desalination of sea water. The ABV reactor is utilized in the ''Volnolom'' type floating nuclear power stations. This design also features a desalinator ship which provides sea water desalination by the reverse osmosis process. The ATETS-80 is a nuclear two-reactor cogeneration complex which incorporates the integral vessel-type PWR which can be used in the production of electricity, steam, hot and desalinated water. (author). 9 figs

  8. Increased oxidative burden associated with traffic component of ambient particulate matter at roadside and urban background schools sites in London.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal J Godri

    Full Text Available As the incidence of respiratory and allergic symptoms has been reported to be increased in children attending schools in close proximity to busy roads, it was hypothesised that PM from roadside schools would display enhanced oxidative potential (OP. Two consecutive one-week air quality monitoring campaigns were conducted at seven school sampling sites, reflecting roadside and urban background in London. Chemical characteristics of size fractionated particulate matter (PM samples were related to the capacity to drive biological oxidation reactions in a synthetic respiratory tract lining fluid. Contrary to hypothesised contrasts in particulate OP between school site types, no robust size-fractionated differences in OP were identified due high temporal variability in concentrations of PM components over the one-week sampling campaigns. For OP assessed both by ascorbate (OP(AA m(-3 and glutathione (OP(GSH m(-3 depletion, the highest OP per cubic metre of air was in the largest size fraction, PM(1.9-10.2. However, when expressed per unit mass of particles OP(AA µg(-1 showed no significant dependence upon particle size, while OP(GSH µg(-1 had a tendency to increase with increasing particle size, paralleling increased concentrations of Fe, Ba and Cu. The two OP metrics were not significantly correlated with one another, suggesting that the glutathione and ascorbate depletion assays respond to different components of the particles. Ascorbate depletion per unit mass did not show the same dependence as for GSH and it is possible that other trace metals (Zn, Ni, V or organic components which are enriched in the finer particle fractions, or the greater surface area of smaller particles, counter-balance the redox activity of Fe, Ba and Cu in the coarse particles. Further work with longer-term sampling and a larger suite of analytes is advised in order to better elucidate the determinants of oxidative potential, and to fuller explore the contrasts between

  9. Mapping the knowledge base for maritime health: 4 safety and performance at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There is very little recent investigative work on the contribution of health related impairment and disability to either accident risks or to reduced performance at sea, the only exception being studies on fatigue and parallel data on sleep related incidents. Incidents where health related impairment, other than fatigue, has contributed are very rarely found in reports of maritime accident investigations. This may either indicate the irrelevance of these forms of impairment to accidents or alternatively point to the effectiveness of existing control measures. The main approach to risk reduction is by the application of fitness criteria to seafarers during medical examinations. Where there is a knowledge base it is either, as in the case of vision, a very old one that relates to patterns of visual task that differ markedly from those in modern shipping or, as with hearing, is based on untested assumptions about the levels of impairment that will prevent effective communications at sea. There are practical limitations to the assessment of cognitive functions as these encompass such a wide range of impairments from those associated with fatigue, medication, or substance abuse to those relating to age or to the risks of sudden incapacitation from a pre-existing illness. Physical capability can be assessed but only in limited ways in the course of a medical examination. In the absence of clear evidence of accident risks associated with health-related impairments or disabilities it is unlikely that there will be pressure to update criteria that appear to be providing satisfactory protection. As capability is related to the tasks performed, investigations need to integrate information on ergonomic and organizational aspects with that on health and impairment. Criteria that may select seafarers with health- -related impairment need to be reviewed wherever the task demands in modern shipping have changed, in order to relax or modify them where indicated in order to reduce

  10. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The first Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This report is issued according to Article 5 of the International Convention on Nuclear Safety. It has been produced by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. Before submission to the Federal Department of Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication, the report has been commented by the Federal Office of Energy (BFE/OFEN), the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission (KSA/CSA), and the Swiss nuclear power plants of Beznau, Leibstadt and Muehleberg. The Goesgen nuclear power plant has chosen not to comment on the report. The introduction to the report provides general information about Switzerland, a brief political history of nuclear power and an overview of the nuclear facilities in Switzerland. In the subsequent sections, numbered after the Articles 6 to 19 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, key aspects are commented on in such a way as to give a clear indication on how the various duties imposed by the Convention are fulfilled in Switzerland.

  11. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The first Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This report is issued according to Article 5 of the International Convention on Nuclear Safety. It has been produced by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. Before submission to the Federal Department of Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication, the report has been commented by the Federal Office of Energy (BFE/OFEN), the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission (KSA/CSA), and the Swiss nuclear power plants of Beznau, Leibstadt and Muehleberg. The Goesgen nuclear power plant has chosen not to comment on the report. The introduction to the report provides general information about Switzerland, a brief political history of nuclear power and an overview of the nuclear facilities in Switzerland. In the subsequent sections, numbered after the Articles 6 to 19 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, key aspects are commented on in such a way as to give a clear indication on how the various duties imposed by the Convention are fulfilled in Switzerland

  12. Nuclear safety: an international approach: the convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a general presentation of the IAEA Convention on Nuclear Safety which has already be signed by 50 countries and which is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The paper gives a review of its development and some key provisions for a better understanding of how this agreement will operate in practice. The Convention consists of an introductory preamble and four chapters consisting of 35 articles dealing with: the principal objectives, definitions and scope of application; the various obligations (general provisions, legislation, responsibility and regulation, general safety considerations taking into account: the financial and human resources, the human factors, the quality assurance, the assessment and verification of safety, the radiation protection and the emergency preparedness; the safety of installations: sitting, design and construction, operation); the periodic meetings of the contracting parties to review national reports on the measures taken to implement each of the obligations, and the final clauses and other judicial provisions common to international agreements. (J.S.). 1 append

  13. Stability of the Black Sea Littoral Region: Focus on the Montreux Convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    relationships (if seen as monopolistic ) during crisis’s such as; harsh winters when Russian energy companies have admitted to lowering or shutting off...Exxon to build a LNG plant in the Kara Sea in hopes of future oil and gas explorations discoveries. Tourism is expected to be an increasing market ...in this fertile area and Caspian countries are anxious to connect with global markets , especially Europe. CHALLENGES FOR STABILITY PERCEIVED

  14. Sweden's second national report under the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Joint Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Article 32 of the Joint Convention calls for a self-assessment by each Contracting Party regarding compliance with the obligations of the Convention. Sweden's self-assessment has demonstrated compliance with all the obligations of the Convention, as shown in detail in sections B to K of this report. Having taken a very active part in the creation of the Joint Convention, Sweden wishes to emphasise the incentive character of the Convention. In Sweden's opinion, the Convention implies a commitment to continuous improvement of safety whenever operating experience, safety research or technical development indicates that there is room for such improvement. Continuous learning from experience and a proactive approach to safety are in fact corner stones of the current Swedish nuclear and radiation safety work, both for the industry and the regulatory bodies. Therefore, Sweden has found it important that its National Report highlights strong features in national practices, as well as areas in which improvements are justified. Implementation of such improvements should then be followed up in the National Reports to subsequent Review Meetings. The major events in the Swedish nuclear programme since the first report to the Convention was issued are: - The general safety regulations of SKI have been revised and issued as SKIFS 2004:1. - A commission of inquiry has been carried out in order to review and suggest improvements to the financing system. - The second unit of the twin nuclear power plant unit at Barsebaeck (Barsebaeck 2) was permanently shut down 31 May 2005. The first unit (Barsebaeck 1) was closed in 1999. - The research reactors R2 and R2-0 at the Studsvik site were permanently shut down 16 June 2005. - The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) has announced its decision to take over operation of the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (Clab). The operation of Clab is currently contracted out to OKG, who operates the three nuclear power

  15. Implementation of the obligations of the convention on nuclear safety. Fourth Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    conducted at regular intervals. The international alerting system is also in a mature stage. The first generation of NPPs in Switzerland has been the subject of progressive back-fitting. The second generation of NPPs incorporated various safety and operating improvements in their initial design. All Swiss NPPs have undergone the safety review process required under the Convention and have incorporated the improvements identified in the respective safety review reports. The Swiss policy of continuous improvements to NPPs ensures a high level of safety. The legislation and regulatory framework for nuclear installations is well established. It provides the formal basis for the supervision and the continuous improvement of nuclear installations. The supervisory authority conducts inspections and technical discussions with the utilities to ensure that operators assume full responsibility for the safety of their installations. All NPPs have implemented programmes to improve their safety culture. Plant-specific full scope replica simulators are operating at all Swiss NPPs. The Inspectorate's organisation includes staff members dealing with human aspects, NPP organisation, and safety culture. Considerable attention is paid to human factor aspects of operator support systems, including procedures, guidelines and checklists. The review and assessment procedure includes an evaluation of the safety analysis report, safety-relevant systems, design-basis accident analyses, probabilistic safety analysis and reports on ageing surveillance programmes. An Ageing Surveillance Programme is in place for all NPPs in order to maintain safety margins and safety functions of structures, systems and components throughout the plant lifetime. Concerning the radiation protection, the supervisory and control methods currently applied by the inspectorate are in compliance with the Convention's requirement to keep radioactive doses to the public and the environment as low as reasonably achievable and also

  16. Implementation of the obligations of the convention on nuclear safety. Fourth Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-15

    . Emergency drills are conducted at regular intervals. The international alerting system is also in a mature stage. The first generation of NPPs in Switzerland has been the subject of progressive back-fitting. The second generation of NPPs incorporated various safety and operating improvements in their initial design. All Swiss NPPs have undergone the safety review process required under the Convention and have incorporated the improvements identified in the respective safety review reports. The Swiss policy of continuous improvements to NPPs ensures a high level of safety. The legislation and regulatory framework for nuclear installations is well established. It provides the formal basis for the supervision and the continuous improvement of nuclear installations. The supervisory authority conducts inspections and technical discussions with the utilities to ensure that operators assume full responsibility for the safety of their installations. All NPPs have implemented programmes to improve their safety culture. Plant-specific full scope replica simulators are operating at all Swiss NPPs. The Inspectorate's organisation includes staff members dealing with human aspects, NPP organisation, and safety culture. Considerable attention is paid to human factor aspects of operator support systems, including procedures, guidelines and checklists. The review and assessment procedure includes an evaluation of the safety analysis report, safety-relevant systems, design-basis accident analyses, probabilistic safety analysis and reports on ageing surveillance programmes. An Ageing Surveillance Programme is in place for all NPPs in order to maintain safety margins and safety functions of structures, systems and components throughout the plant lifetime. Concerning the radiation protection, the supervisory and control methods currently applied by the inspectorate are in compliance with the Convention's requirement to keep radioactive doses to the public and the environment as low as

  17. Comparison of the quality of life after conventional versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Stamou, Sotiris C; Petro, Kathleen R; Hill, Peter C; Boyce, Steven W; Bafi, Ammar S; Corso, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (off-pump CABG) morbidity and mortality outcomes, but few looked at the patient's perception of the technique and its effect on postoperative quality of life (QOL). We investigated and compared postoperative QOL in patients who had undergone either conventional or off-pump CABG myocardial revascularization. During a six-month period, 191 patients who underwent CABG surgery were prospectively studied through preoperative and six-month postoperative short-form 36 (SF-36) general health status surveys. One hundred-sixteen (60.7%) off-pump CABG patients and 75 (39.3%) conventional on-pump CABG patients were enrolled. Sixteen (13.8%) off-pump patients reported improvement in physical score QOL, 84 (72.4%) reported no change, and 16 (13.8%) reported a decrease. In comparison, 20 (80.0%) patients in the on-pump CABG group reported an improvement in QOL, 42 (56.0%) were unchanged, and 13 (17.3%) reported deterioration (p = 0.28). For postoperative change in mental score, 19 (16.4%) off-pump patients reported an improvement, 85 (73.3%) stayed unchanged, and 12 (10.3%) reported a decrease compared with 8 (10.7%) conventional CABG patients reporting improvement, 60 (80.0%) showing no change, and 7 (9.3%), having a score decline (p = 0.52). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 2.2, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.08 to 4.40, p = 0.03) and multivessel coronary artery disease (OR 2.1, 95% CI, 1.11 to 4.13, p = 0.02) emerged as independent predictors of worse physical score component score. Diabetes was associated with an improved physical score component score after CABG (OR 0.4, 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.76, p = 0.01), regardless of the surgical approach. This prospective study reveals no significant differences in the expected QOL at six months after either on-pump or off-pump CABG. Patients with hypertension and multivessel coronary artery disease were more likely to have

  18. Radioactive wastes. Commune convention about the safety of spent fuel management and about the radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This common convention do not give detailed safety standards but general obligations whom objective is the development of a safety culture in the world. It concerns the spent fuels (valuable and valued by the reprocessing) and radioactive wastes (matter without any later use). (N.C.)

  19. ONRL Workshop Proceedings - Role of Surfactant Films on the Interfacial Properties of the Sea Surface Held in London on 9-11 April 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-21

    calming using oil’, History of Technology, 3, 163-186 (1978) 2. Plutarch , ’What is the reason for the clearness and calm produced when the sea is...waves has been noted in the ltteratuit with references going back to Pliny (77 C.E.) and Plutarch (95 C.E.). In modern times, two major reA’s of

  20. Comparison of conventional Injection Mould Inserts to Additively Manufactured Inserts using Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Bey, Niki; Mischkot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Polymer Additive Manufacturing can be used to produce soft tooling inserts for injection moulding. Compared to conventional tooling, the energy and time consumption during production are significantly lower. As the life time of such inserts is significantly shorter than the life time of traditional...... of their potential environmental impact and yield throughout the development and pilot phase. Insert geometry is particularly advantageous for pilot production and small production sizes. In this research, Life Cycle Assessment is used to compare the environmental impact of soft tooling by Additive Manufacturing...... (using Digital Light Processing) and three traditional methods for the manufacture of inserts (milling of brass, steel, and aluminium) for injection moulds during the pre-production phase....

  1. Assessment of safety culture at INPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesin, S.

    2002-01-01

    Safety Culture covers all main directions of plant activities and the plant departments involved through integration into the INPP Quality Assurance System. Safety Culture is represented by three components. The first is the clear INPP Safety and Quality Assurance Policy. Based on the Policy INPP is safely operated and managers' actions firstly aim at safety assurance. The second component is based on personal responsibility for safety and attitude of each employee of the plant. The third component is based on commitment to safety and competence of managers and employees of the plant. This component links the first two to ensure efficient management of safety at the plant. The above mentioned components including the elements which may significantly affect Safety Culture are also presented in the attachment. The concept of such model implies understanding of effect of different factors on the level of Safety Culture in the organization. In order to continuously correct safety problems, self-assessment of the Safety Culture level is performed at regular intervals. (author)

  2. Guidelines regarding National Reports under the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These Guidelines, established by the Contracting Parties pursuant to Article 22 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter called the Convention), are intended to be read in conjunction with the text of the Convention. Their purpose is to provide guidance to the Contracting Parties regarding material that may be useful to include in the National Reports required under Article 5 of the Convention and thereby to facilitate the most efficient review of implementation by the Contracting Parties of their obligations under the Convention.

  3. National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovsky, V.; Betak, A.; Balaj, J.; Bystricka, S.; Grebeciova, J.; Husarcek, J.; Metke, E.; Pospisil, M.; Smrtnik, I.; Turner, M.; Uhrik, P.; Zemanova, D.; Bulla, R.; Filip, A.; Jurina, V.; Sedlak, M.; Tomek, J.; Zimermann, M.

    2013-06-01

    A brief safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2013 is presented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in Slovak Republic in terms of the convention; (3) Legislation and regulation; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; ((6) Annexes; (6.1) List of nuclear installations and technical and economic indicators; (6.2) Selected generally binding legal regulations and safety guidelines in relation to nuclear and radiation safety; (6.3) List of selected national and international documents applicable to safety of nuclear installations; (6.4) Limits for radioactive discharges; (6.5) IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety; (6.6) Team of authors.

  4. Management of construction safety at KKNPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    Construction is considered as one of the most hazardous activities owing to the number of accidents and injuries. At KKNPP, management of industrial safety has been envisaged since the preliminary stage of construction planning, including design aspects. The governing principles of safety management are evolved from the Factories Act, 1948, the Atomic Energy(Factories) Rules, 1996, AERB safety guidelines on Control of works (2011) and Corporate HSE policy of NPCIL (2014). Numerous risk assessment and hazard control measures are adopted consistently to ensure a safe work environment during the construction, which includes Job Hazard Analysis, work permit through Computerized Maintenance Management System, safety procedures, exclusive safety training facility for the contractor's workmen, safety motivational measures, safety surveillance and reporting through Safety Related Deficiencies Management System. Assessment of efficacy of safety management system is continuously done through safety audits and observations are being circulated and discussed in committee meetings. Fire safety is also being taken care of since inception of project work. Well-equipped fire station with trained fire fighters was made available since the beginning as per AERB safety standard on fire protection system for Nuclear facilities. Fire prevention measures specific to the work are implemented during all activities. (author)

  5. Applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety: New development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Turgis, M.; Borsa, J.; Millette, M.; Salmieri, S.; Caillet, S.; Han, J.

    2009-01-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils (Eos) were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative bacterial radiosensitivity (RBR) of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonellatyphi in culture media under different atmospheric conditions. The selected Eos were tested for their ability to reduce the dose necessary to eliminate E. coli and S.typhi in medium fat ground beef (23% fat) and Listeria in ready-to-eat carrots when packed under air or under atmosphere rich in oxygen (MAP). Results have demonstrated that depending of the compound added and the combined treatment used, the RBR increased from 2 to 4 times. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility, EOs were added in ground beef at a concentration which does not affect the taste and treated at a dose of 1.5 kGy. The content of total mesophilic aerobic, E. coli, Salmonella, total coliform, lactic acid bacteria, and Pseudomonas was determined during 28 days. The results showed that the combined treatment (radiation and EOs) can eliminate Salmonella and E. coli when done under air. When done under MAP, Pseudomonas could be eliminated and a shelf life of more than 28 days was observed. An active edible coating containing EOs was also developed and sprayed on ready-to-eat carrots before radiation treatment and Listeria was evaluated. A complete inhibition of Listeria was obtained at a dose of 0.5 kGy when applied under MAP. Our results have shown that the combination of an edible coating, MAP, and radiation can be used to maintain the safety of meat and vegetables.

  6. Applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety: New development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, M. [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Sciences Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: monique.lacroix@iaf.inrs.ca; Turgis, M. [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Sciences Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Borsa, J. [MDS Nordion, 447 March Road, Kanata, Ontario, K2K 2P7 (Canada); Millette, M.; Salmieri, S.; Caillet, S. [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Sciences Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Han, J. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils (Eos) were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative bacterial radiosensitivity (RBR) of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonellatyphi in culture media under different atmospheric conditions. The selected Eos were tested for their ability to reduce the dose necessary to eliminate E. coli and S.typhi in medium fat ground beef (23% fat) and Listeria in ready-to-eat carrots when packed under air or under atmosphere rich in oxygen (MAP). Results have demonstrated that depending of the compound added and the combined treatment used, the RBR increased from 2 to 4 times. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility, EOs were added in ground beef at a concentration which does not affect the taste and treated at a dose of 1.5 kGy. The content of total mesophilic aerobic, E. coli, Salmonella, total coliform, lactic acid bacteria, and Pseudomonas was determined during 28 days. The results showed that the combined treatment (radiation and EOs) can eliminate Salmonella and E. coli when done under air. When done under MAP, Pseudomonas could be eliminated and a shelf life of more than 28 days was observed. An active edible coating containing EOs was also developed and sprayed on ready-to-eat carrots before radiation treatment and Listeria was evaluated. A complete inhibition of Listeria was obtained at a dose of 0.5 kGy when applied under MAP. Our results have shown that the combination of an edible coating, MAP, and radiation can be used to maintain the safety of meat and vegetables.

  7. Applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety: New development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, M.; Turgis, M.; Borsa, J.; Millette, M.; Salmieri, S.; Caillet, S.; Han, J.

    2009-11-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils (Eos) were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative bacterial radiosensitivity (RBR) of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonellatyphi in culture media under different atmospheric conditions. The selected Eos were tested for their ability to reduce the dose necessary to eliminate E. coli and S.typhi in medium fat ground beef (23% fat) and Listeria in ready-to-eat carrots when packed under air or under atmosphere rich in oxygen (MAP). Results have demonstrated that depending of the compound added and the combined treatment used, the RBR increased from 2 to 4 times. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility, EOs were added in ground beef at a concentration which does not affect the taste and treated at a dose of 1.5 kGy. The content of total mesophilic aerobic, E. coli, Salmonella, total coliform, lactic acid bacteria, and Pseudomonas was determined during 28 days. The results showed that the combined treatment (radiation and EOs) can eliminate Salmonella and E. coli when done under air. When done under MAP, Pseudomonas could be eliminated and a shelf life of more than 28 days was observed. An active edible coating containing EOs was also developed and sprayed on ready-to-eat carrots before radiation treatment and Listeria was evaluated. A complete inhibition of Listeria was obtained at a dose of 0.5 kGy when applied under MAP. Our results have shown that the combination of an edible coating, MAP, and radiation can be used to maintain the safety of meat and vegetables.

  8. Safety evaluation of traces of nickel and chrome in cosmetics: The case of Dead Sea mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'or, Ze'evi; Halicz, Ludwik; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Russo, Matteo Zanotti; Robino, Federica; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Metal impurities such as nickel and chrome are present in natural ingredients-containing cosmetic products. These traces are unavoidable due to the ubiquitous nature of these elements. Dead Sea mud is a popular natural ingredient of cosmetic products in which nickel and chrome residues are likely to occur. To analyze the potential systemic and local toxicity of Dead Sea mud taking into consideration Dead Sea muds' natural content of nickel and chrome. The following endpoints were evaluated: (Regulation No. 1223/20, 21/12/2009) systemic and (SCCS's Notes of Guidance) local toxicity of topical application of Dead Sea mud; health reports during the last five years of commercial marketing of Dead Sea mud. Following exposure to Dead Sea mud, MoS (margin of safety) calculations for nickel and chrome indicate no toxicological concern for systemic toxicity. Skin sensitization is also not to be expected by exposure of normal healthy skin to Dead Sea mud. Topical application, however, is not recommended for already nickel-or chrome-sensitized persons. As risk assessment of impurities present in cosmetics may be a difficult exercise, the case of Dead Sea mud is taken here as an example of a natural material that may contain traces of unavoidable metals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of extended half-life versus conventional factor product on hemophilia caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Carolyn E; Powell, Victoria E; Su, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Eldar-Lissai, Adi

    2018-05-01

    Extended half-life factor products have reduced annualized bleeding rates in hemophilia patients. The impact of extended half-life versus conventional factor products on hemophilia caregiver burden has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate caregiver burden in extended half-life versus conventional factor products for hemophilia A and B. This cross-sectional web-based study of caregivers of people with hemophilia A or B was recruited from a panel research company and by word of mouth. Participants completed the Hemophilia Caregiver Impact measure, the PedsQL Family Impact Module (PedsQL), and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI). We also collected demographic, insurance coverage, and medical information related to the hemophilia patient(s). Burden differences were assessed using linear regression and matched cohort analyses. The sample (n = 448) included 49 people who were caring for people on extended half-life factor products. Worse caregiver burden was associated with more infusions per week and more bleeds in the past 6 months. Regression analyses suggested that caring for someone who is on a extended half-life factor product is associated with lower emotional impact (β = - 0.11, p factor product had lower Emotional Impact and Practical Impact scores (t = - 2.95 and - 2.94, respectively, p factor product infusions of extended half-life factor products appears to reduce the emotional distress and practical burden of caregiving. Future work should evaluate the longitudinal impact.

  10. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-01-01

    The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University) in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions...

  11. Monitoring of conventional environmental parameters at CERN Annual Report 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, S

    2004-01-01

    The monitoring programme for conventional environmental parameters at CERN comprises the control of water released from CERN installations, checks of water quality in rivers receiving water from CERN and monitoring of ambient air quality at places close to the CERN sites. The control of released water includes continuous monitoring of pH and temperature at six CERN water outlets and periodical sampling and analysis campaigns to check in more details the quality of the water released from the CERN sites. Regular measurements of pH, temperature, concentration of dissolved oxygen and conductivity were performed in the water of the rivers Nant d'Avril (CH) and Le Lion (F) as well as in the water of the streams around the seven LHC sites PA2 − PA8. The concentrations of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the ambient air, which may be produced in accelerator facilities and released into the environment, were measured at two off-site monitoring stations in Maisonnex (CH) and Cessy (F). The report summarises the results ...

  12. Monitoring of conventional environmental parameters at CERN Annual Report 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Dziewa, A

    2005-01-01

    The monitoring programme for conventional environmental parameters at CERN comprises the control of water released from CERN installations, checks of water quality in rivers receiving water from CERN and monitoring of ambient air quality at places close to the CERN sites. The control of released water includes continuous monitoring of pH and temperature at six CERN water outlets and periodical sampling and analysis campaigns to check in more details the quality of the water released from the CERN sites. Sporadic river-water analyses and regular measurements of pH, temperature, concentration of dissolved oxygen and conductivity, were performed in the water of the rivers Nant d'Avril (CH) and Le Lion (F) as well as in the water of the streams around the seven LHC sites PA2 − PA8. The concentrations of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the ambient air, which may be produced in accelerator facilities and released into the environment, were measured at two off-site monitoring stations in Maisonnex (CH) and Cessy (F)....

  13. Quality of Life and Unmet Need in People with Psychosis in the London Borough of Haringey, UK

    OpenAIRE

    Lambri, Maria; Chakraborty, Apu; Leavey, Gerard; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Deinstitutionalization of long-term psychiatric patients produced various community-based residential care facilities. However, inner-city areas have many patients with severe mental illness (SMI) as well as deprivation, unemployment, and crime. This makes meeting their community needs complex. We undertook a needs assessment of service provision and consonance between service users’ evaluation of need and by care workers. Design. Cross-sectional study with random sample of SMI s...

  14. Constructing and Contesting City of London Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Andrew; Wigan, Duncan

    2017-01-01

    Existing literature on the City of London has tended to focus on its ‘structural power’, while neglecting political and narrative agency. This paper acts as a corrective by presenting evidence to show that since the financial crash of 2008 the political terrain the City operates on has become more...... contested, crowded and noisier. The contribution develops a middle course between a positive assessment of the role of civil society in relation to global finance, and a more pessimistic reading. We demonstrate how macro-narratives and public story-telling both construct and contest City and financial...... sector power. In a new pattern since the financial crash, NGOs have moved from campaigns of limited duration and narrow focus, to a more sustained presence on macro-structural issues. Adopting a supply–demand framework for assessing governance and regulatory change, we look at the emergence of TheCity...

  15. A report on the environmental safety evaluation in sea disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In October 1976, the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan decided its policy regarding radioactive wastes. It is stated that the sea disposal of low-level solid wastes as test will be made from about 1978, and after the confirmation of the safety, full-scale sea disposal will then follow. In this field, studies have long been made in Japan and international organizations. Based on these results, the present report describes on the following matters: the amount of radioactive wastes and the activities for disposal, the safety of disposal packages, the state of prospective sites for sea disposal, the models of the sea, the estimation of radionuclide concentrations in the ocean, and the exposure doses of general people. (Mori, K.)

  16. The U.S. continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles. Legal questions arising from non-accession to the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Longtain, Shay

    2015-01-01

    The elaborate legal framework contained in Part VI of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC) resembles both codification and progressive development of the law of the sea as it relates to the continental shelf. As a non-party to the Convention, the United States is only bound to those provisions which now reflect customary rules of international law or have otherwise created rights or obligations for third states. This thesis identifies several distinct components o...

  17. Implementation of the obligations of the convention on nuclear safety. Fifth Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS). In accordance with Article 5 of CNS, Switzerland has submitted 4 country reports for Review Meetings of Contracting Parties. This 5{sup th} report by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an update on compliance with CNS obligations. The report attempts to give appropriate consideration to issues that aroused particular interest at the 4{sup th} Review Meeting. It starts with general political information on Switzerland, a brief history of nuclear power and an overview of Swiss nuclear facilities. This is followed by a comprehensive overview of the status of nuclear safety in Switzerland (as of July 2010) which indicates how Switzerland complies with the key obligations of the Convention. ENSI updated a substantial proportion of its guidelines which are harmonised with the safety requirements of the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) based on IAEA Safety Standards. On 1{sup st} January 2009, ENSI became formally independent of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. It is now a stand-alone organisation controlled by its own management board. Switzerland recently started a process to select a site for the disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological formations. The first generation of NPPs in Switzerland has been the subject of progressive back-fitting. The second generation of NPPs incorporated various safety and operating improvements in their initial design. All Swiss NPPs have undergone the safety review process required under the Convention and have incorporated the improvements identified in the respective safety review reports. The Swiss policy of continuous improvements to NPPs ensures a high level of safety. The legislation and regulatory framework for nuclear installations is well established. It provides the formal basis for the supervision and the continuous improvement of nuclear installations. The Nuclear Energy Act and its ordinance came into force

  18. Implementation of the obligations of the convention on nuclear safety. Fifth Swiss report in accordance with Article 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS). In accordance with Article 5 of CNS, Switzerland has submitted 4 country reports for Review Meetings of Contracting Parties. This 5 th report by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an update on compliance with CNS obligations. The report attempts to give appropriate consideration to issues that aroused particular interest at the 4 th Review Meeting. It starts with general political information on Switzerland, a brief history of nuclear power and an overview of Swiss nuclear facilities. This is followed by a comprehensive overview of the status of nuclear safety in Switzerland (as of July 2010) which indicates how Switzerland complies with the key obligations of the Convention. ENSI updated a substantial proportion of its guidelines which are harmonised with the safety requirements of the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) based on IAEA Safety Standards. On 1 st January 2009, ENSI became formally independent of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. It is now a stand-alone organisation controlled by its own management board. Switzerland recently started a process to select a site for the disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological formations. The first generation of NPPs in Switzerland has been the subject of progressive back-fitting. The second generation of NPPs incorporated various safety and operating improvements in their initial design. All Swiss NPPs have undergone the safety review process required under the Convention and have incorporated the improvements identified in the respective safety review reports. The Swiss policy of continuous improvements to NPPs ensures a high level of safety. The legislation and regulatory framework for nuclear installations is well established. It provides the formal basis for the supervision and the continuous improvement of nuclear installations. The Nuclear Energy Act and its ordinance came into force in 2005

  19. Dumping of radioactive waste in the Artic Seas - The International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.; Sjoeblom, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The IAEA has initiated the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) to address the widespread concern over the possible health and environmental impacts of the dumped radioactive wastes in the shallow waters the Arctic seas. The work is being carried out as part of IAEA responsibilities to the London Convention 1972. It is envisaged that the project will last for four years and be run by the IAEA in co-operation with the Norwegian and Russian Governments and with the involvement, through the IAEA, of experts from relevant IAEA member states. The project is aimed at producing an assessment of the potential radiological implications of the dumping and at addressing the question of possible remedial measures. At the same time, it is intended to provide a focus for the reporting of national research and assessment work and a mechanism for encouraging international co-operation and collaboration

  20. Probing safety of nanoparticles by outlining sea urchin sensing and signaling cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijagic, Andi; Pinsino, Annalisa

    2017-10-01

    Among currently identified issues presenting risks and benefits to human and ocean health, engineered nanoparticles (ENP) represent a priority. Predictions of their economic and social impact appear extraordinary, but their release in the environment at an uncontrollable rate is in striking contrast with the extremely limited number of studies on environmental impact, especially on the marine environment. The sea urchin has a remarkable sensing environmental system whose function and diversity came into focus during the recent years, after sea urchin genome sequencing. The complex immune system may be the basis wherefore sea urchins can adapt to a dynamic environment and survive even in hazardous conditions both in the adult and in the embryonic life. This review is aimed at discussing the literature in nanotoxicological/ecotoxicological studies with a focus on stress and innate immune signaling in sea urchins. In addition, here we introduce our current development of in vitro-driven probes that could be used to dissect ENP aftermaths, suggesting their future use in immune-nanotoxicology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled according to the terms of the convention on nuclear safety, June 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaj, J.; Homola, J.; Rovny, J.; Metke, E.; Zemanova, D.; Grebeciova, J.; Turner, M.; Pospisil, M.; Bystricka, S.; Jurina, V.; Rovny, I.; Soltes, L.; Husarova, M.; Petrovic, J.; Fazekasova, H.; Zizkova, D.; Vagac, M.; Maudry, J.; Hacaj, A.; Betak, A.; Barbaric, M.

    2010-06-01

    A brief safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2010 is presented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented.These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in Slovak Republic in terms of the convention; (3) Legislation and regulation; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia; ((6) Annexes; (6.1) List of nuclear installations and technical and economic indicators; (6.2) Selected generally binding legal regulations and safety guidelines in relation to nuclear and radiation safety; (6.3) List of selected national and international documents applicable to safety of nuclear installations; (6.4) Limits for radioactive discharges; (6.5) Team of authors.

  2. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan, Chee-Hao; Rukayadi, Yaya; Ahmad, Siti H.; Wan Mohamed Radzi, Che W. J.; Thung, Tze-Young; Premarathne, Jayasekara M. K. J. K.; Chang, Wei-San; Loo, Yuet-Ying; Tan, Chia-Wanq; Ramzi, Othman B.; Mohd Fadzil, Siti N.; Kuan, Chee-Sian; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2017-01-01

    Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at t...

  3. Safety and efficacy of venom immunotherapy: a real life study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczek, Agnieszka; Skorupa, Dawid; Antczak-Marczak, Monika; Kuna, Piotr; Kupczyk, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is recommended as the first-line treatment for patients allergic to Hymenoptera venom. To analyze the safety and efficacy of VIT in a real life setting. One hundred and eighty patients undergoing VIT were studied to evaluate the safety, efficacy, incidence and nature of symptoms after field stings and adverse reactions to VIT. Significantly more patients were allergic to wasp than bee venom (146 vs. 34, p bees, and were not associated with angiotensin convertase inhibitors (ACEi) or β-adrenergic antagonists use. Systemic reactions were observed in 4 individuals on wasp VIT (2.7%) and in 6 patients allergic to bees (17.65%). The VIT was efficacious as most patients reported no reactions (50%) or reported only mild local reactions (43.75%) to field stings. The decrease in sIgE at completion of VIT correlated with the dose of vaccine received ( r = 0.53, p = 0.004). Beekeeping (RR = 29.54, p venom allergy. Venom immunotherapy is highly efficacious and safe as most of the adverse events during the induction and maintenance phase are mild and local. Side effects of VIT are more common in subjects on bee VIT. Beekeeping and female sex are associated with a higher risk of allergy to Hymenoptera venom.

  4. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions of networking.Purpose – present the results of the joint development of a network of the basic educational program (BEP, to identify the stages of networking, to design a generalized scheme of development and implementation of a network of educational training program for master’s education in the field of life safety.Results generalized model of networking partner institutions to develop and implement the basic educational program master.Practical implications: the education process for Master of Education in the field of health and safety in Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University.

  5. Lichen flora of London: effects of air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laundon, J R

    1967-01-01

    There is good, but not conclusive, evidence that sulfur dioxide is the pollutant which deleteriously affects lichens. The distribution of many lichens in London corresponds closely with the concentrations of sulfur dioxide. Low humidity is also a factor. Apart from actually killing lichens, increasing air pollution can render certain species incapable of colonizing new surfaces, although the old thalli themselves are able to survive as relicts. Until the early nineteenth century air pollution affected the lichen flora only in the small built-up area of London. The halting of building around London since 1938 has brought stability to the lichen vegetation of the area, and since then changes have been minor ones. Recent changes in pollution emissions have had little effect on the lichen flora between 1950 and 1967. This is to be expected as sulfur dioxide concentrations have remained fairly constant at ground level.

  6. The evolution and future direction of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, namely the Joint Convention, had been established in 1997. The objective of the Convention is to achieve and maintain a high level of safety worldwide in that fields to ensure that there are effective defenses against potential hazards so that individuals, society and the environment are protected from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and to prevent accidents with radiological consequences and to mitigate their consequences. The Parties to the Convention intend to achieve this objective by international cooperation, peer reviews of each other's performance, assistance when needed for states with less developed programmes and capabilities and the use of internationally accepted standards of safety. The Joint Convention is rooted in the discussions held previously to the establishment of the Convention of the Nuclear Safety that had taken place in the period 1993-1994. The idea of a Convention on the Safety of waste management evolved since then, getting its final status in November 1997 after seven meetings of a specially appointed working group of outstanding specialists on the subject. After that, it was needed three years more until the number of the ratifying States, that then became Contracting Parties, to get the condition that let the Convention to enter into force: ninety days after the date of deposit with the Depository of the twenty-fifth instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval, including the instruments of fifteen States having an operational nuclear power plant. The First Review Meeting was held three years after it entered into force, in November 2003, with the attendance of 33 Parties that presented their National Reports. The second review meeting was held in May 2006. Forty-one Contracting Parties participated in the Second Review Meeting. There is then, a constant evolution in the number of Contracting Parties

  7. The safety of high activity long life nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    The article concerns the deep geological storage for managing high activity long life nuclear waste. He puts forward a context giving a structure to the discussions of those involved concerning an assessment of the safety of a deep geological deposit project. Three main aspects are put forward. The risks for future generations and the time scales to be considered: briefly, the deposit needs to satisfy two functions for protecting man and the environment, namely firstly isolating high activity radionuclides from the biosphere during the time required for their radioactive decay (about ten thousands years), and secondly delay and dilute long life radionuclides without any a priori time limit so as to reduce their effects in the biosphere to extremely low levels. The risks are linked to possible failures of the containment barriers whose causes need to be analysed and be provided against by suitable provisions concerning their design. The definition of these design provisions requires an in depth examination of uncertain elements. The main causes of uncertainty are listed according to the scale of time in question, that is O-10,000 years, 10,000-100,000 years and beyond 100,000 years, stressing the importance of selecting a stable geological site and more generally a solid concept that is not very sensitive in uncertainties. Beyond 100,000 years the extent of uncertainties no longer makes it possible to make realistic predictions. It is thus necessary to consider the alternative scenarios concerning geological and climatic changes and the corresponding increasing risks of radionuclides. The risks in question may be relativized by realizing that on this time scale, the residual activities of soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitters are comparable to those of a storage centre located on the surface at the end of the monitoring period. Finally, the article considers the approach put forward concerning the safety of a deep geological storage advocated by the French

  8. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled according to the terms of the convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchac, A.; Konecny, L.; Lipar, M.; Metke, E.; Novak, S.; Rohar, S.; Turner, M.; Zemanova, D.; Zlatnansky, J.; Gies, F.; Lipar, B.; Parimucha, F.; Pospisil, P.; Tomek, J.; Toth, A.; Jurina, V.; Kmosena, M.; Marcin, S.; Silny, M.

    1998-09-01

    A brief safety report of the Slovak Republic in 1998 is presented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented.These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in Slovakia accords to the convention definition; (3) Legislation and supervision; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia; ((6) Annexes; (7) Act of National Council of the Slovak Republic No. 130/1998 Coll. LL. Contents and list of abbreviations used are included

  9. Diurnal variations of serum erythropoietin at sea level and altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Poulsen, T D; Fogh-Andersen, N

    1996-01-01

    in 2, 3 diphosphoglycerate. After 64 h at altitude, six of the nine subjects had down-regulated their serum-EPO concentrations so that median values were three times above those at sea level. These six subjects had significant diurnal variations of serum-EPO concentration at sea level; the nadir...

  10. Total life-cycle cost analysis of conventional and alternative fueled vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardullo, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    Total Life-Cycle Cost (TLCC) Analysis can indicate whether paying higher capital costs for advanced technology with low operating and/or environmental costs is advantageous over paying lower capital costs for conventional technology with higher operating and/or environmental costs. While minimizing total life-cycle cost is an important consideration, the consumer often identifies non-cost-related benefits or drawbacks that make more expensive options appear more attractive. The consumer is also likely to heavily weigh initial capital costs while giving limited consideration to operating and/or societal costs, whereas policy-makers considering external costs, such as those resulting from environmental impacts, may reach significantly different conclusions about which technologies are most advantageous to society. This paper summarizes a TLCC model which was developed to facilitate consideration of the various factors involved in both individual and societal policy decision making. The model was developed as part of a US Department of Energy Contract and has been revised to reflect changes necessary to make the model more realistic. The model considers capital, operating, salvage, and environmental costs for cars, vans, and buses using conventional and alternative fuels. The model has been developed to operate on an IBM or compatible personal computer platform using the commercial spreadsheet program MicroSoft Excell reg-sign Version 4 for Windows reg-sign and can be easily kept current because its modular structure allows straightforward access to embedded data sets for review and update

  11. Reflexivity over and above convention: the new orthodoxy in the sociology of personal life, formerly sociology of the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilding, Michael

    2010-12-01

    There is a new orthodoxy in the field that was once understood as the sociology of the family, and is increasingly understood as the sociology of 'personal life', 'intimacy', 'relationships' and 'families'. The orthodoxy highlights the open-endedness of intimate relations at the expense of the family as an institution; that is, reflexivity over and above convention. This article argues that the new orthodoxy not only overstates reflexivity at the expense of convention, but abdicates understanding to frameworks grounded in biologistic and economistic understandings of human behaviour. The article makes its point through attention to three areas of research at odds with the new orthodoxy: paternity uncertainty, inheritance and family business. It then proposes that conceptualization of the family as an institutional regime gives due weight to the reflexive reconfiguration of family relationships and practices on the one hand, and their institutional embeddedness on the other.

  12. Guidelines regarding National Reports under the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines, established by the Contracting Parties pursuant to Article 22 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter called the Convention), are intended to be read in conjunction with the text of the Convention. Their purpose is to provide guidance to the Contracting Parties regarding material that it may be useful to include in the National Reports required under Article 5 and thereby to facilitate the most efficient review of implementation by the Contracting Parties of their obligations under the Convention [es

  13. Guidelines regarding National Reports under the Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines, established by the Contracting Parties pursuant to Article 22 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter called the Convention), are intended to be read in conjunction with the text of the Convention. Their purpose is to provide guidance to the Contracting Parties regarding material that it may be useful to include in the National Reports required under Article 5 and thereby to facilitate the most efficient review of implementation by the Contracting Parties of their obligations under the Convention

  14. National nuclear safety report 2005. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the 3rd. Review meeting. In general the information contained in the report are: Highlights / Themes; Follow-up from 2nd. Review meeting; Challenges, achievements and good practices; Planned measures to improve safety; Updates to National report to 3rd. Review meeting; Questions from peer review of National Report; and Conclusions

  15. National report of the Slovak Republic compiled in terms of the join convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurina, V.; Viktory, D.; Petrik, T.; Sovcik, J.; Suess, J.; Tomek, J.; Lukacovic, J.; Ivan, J.; Ziakova, M.; Metke, E.; Pospisil, M.; Turner, M.; Homola, J.; Vaclav, J.; Bystricka, S.; Barbaric, M.; Horvath, J.; Betak, J.; Mihaly, B.; Adamovsky, V.; Baloghova, A.; Orihel, M.; Vasina, D.; Balaz, J.; Misovicova, D.; Vrtoch, M.; Mlcuch, J.; Granak, P.; Meleg, J.; Bardy, M.; Gogoliak, J.

    2011-08-01

    The National safety report of the Slovak Republic on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radwaste management in 2011 is presented. These activities in the safety of spent fuel management and radioactive waste management in the Slovak Republic are reported under the headings: (A) Introduction; B) Concept for spent nuclear fuel management (SNF) and radwaste management (RAW); (C) Scope of application of the convention; (D) Spent fuel management and radioactive waste (RAW) management facilities; (E) Legislation and regulation; (F) General safety provisions; (G) Safety of spent fuel management; (H) Safety of radioactive waste (RAW) management; (I) Transboundary movement of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; (J) Disused sealed sources; (K) Planned measures to improve safety; (L) Communication with the public; (M) Annexes. Annexes consists of following parts: I. List of nuclear facilities for spent fuel and RAW management. II. Limits of radioactive material discharges into atmosphere and hydrosphere. III. List of nuclear installations in decommissioning. IV. Inventory of stored spent nuclear fuel. V. Inventory of stored RAW. VI. List of national laws, decrees and guidelines. VII. List of international expert reports (including safety reports). VIII. List of authors.

  16. Convention on nuclear safety. Questions posted to Switzerland in 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) on 31 October 1995. It ratified the Convention on 12 September 1996, which came into force on 11 December 1996. In accordance with Article 5 of the Convention, Switzerland has prepared and submitted 4 country reports for Review Meetings of Contracting Parties organised in 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2006. These meetings at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna were attended by a Swiss delegation. Most of the requirements of the articles of the Convention were already standard practice in Switzerland. In the last years, all Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs) as well as the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) built up documented quality management systems. The independence of HSK from licensing authorities is fulfilled on a technical level. In 2005, a new Nuclear Energy Act came into force requiring formal independence of the supervisory authorities from the licensing authorities. A separate act to legally settle the Inspectorate's fully independent status was adopted by Parliament. HSK participates in international co-operation and is represented in numerous nuclear safety working groups in order to ensure the exchange of scientific, technical and regulatory know-how. The regulatory processes applied to the licensing and safety surveillance of nuclear installations and their operation are up to date with the current state of science and technology. Deterministic and probabilistic safety evaluations guide and prioritise inspections and provide the basis for a graded approach to safety review and assessment. The surveillance of the NPPs' operating, control and safety systems, their component performance and integrity, their organisational and human aspects as well as the management, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste are permanent features of the supervisory authority's activities. Within the frame of a new integrated oversight process there is an annual systematic assessment of

  17. Convention on nuclear safety. Questions posted to Switzerland in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) on 31 October 1995. It ratified the Convention on 12 September 1996, which came into force on 11 December 1996. In accordance with Article 5 of the Convention, Switzerland has prepared and submitted 4 country reports for Review Meetings of Contracting Parties organised in 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2006. These meetings at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna were attended by a Swiss delegation. Most of the requirements of the articles of the Convention were already standard practice in Switzerland. In the last years, all Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs) as well as the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) built up documented quality management systems. The independence of HSK from licensing authorities is fulfilled on a technical level. In 2005, a new Nuclear Energy Act came into force requiring formal independence of the supervisory authorities from the licensing authorities. A separate act to legally settle the Inspectorate's fully independent status was adopted by Parliament. HSK participates in international co-operation and is represented in numerous nuclear safety working groups in order to ensure the exchange of scientific, technical and regulatory know-how. The regulatory processes applied to the licensing and safety surveillance of nuclear installations and their operation are up to date with the current state of science and technology. Deterministic and probabilistic safety evaluations guide and prioritise inspections and provide the basis for a graded approach to safety review and assessment. The surveillance of the NPPs' operating, control and safety systems, their component performance and integrity, their organisational and human aspects as well as the management, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste are permanent features of the supervisory authority's activities. Within the frame of a new integrated oversight process there is an annual systematic assessment of nuclear safety

  18. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled according to the terms of the convention on nuclear safety. September 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaj, J.; Bezak, S.; Gies, F.

    2001-09-01

    A brief national safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2001 is presented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in Slovakia accords to the convention definition; (3) Legislation and regulation; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia; ((6) Annexes: (a) List of nuclear installations and technical and economic parameters; (b) 6.2 Some generally binding legal regulations concerning nuclear and radiation safety; (c) 6.3 List of some national and international documents relating to safety of WWER type reactors; 6.4 Limits of radioactive substance discharges; 6.5 Author team. Contents, list of abbreviations used as well as reference index are included

  19. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  20. A new era of safety at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    CERN is modernising its safety policy and organisational structure in matters of Safety with the introduction of new reference documents that have come into force on 29 September. These texts adapt the Organization’s safety policy to take account of how the Laboratory has evolved and to include best practice in Safety matters.   Safety is a priority at CERN, so it’s no coincidence that the Organization’s anniversary has been chosen as the time to launch a modernised approach to its Safety policy and how Safety matters are organised. On the day of CERN’s 60th anniversary, the SAPOCO 42 document, which covered both policy and organisational aspects, was replaced by a more concise general policy statement. The organisational structure and responsibilities in matters of Safety are now set out in a Safety Regulation, that is supplemented by subsidiary documents. Together these documents will replace the corresponding parts of the former SAPOCO 42 as well as Saf...

  1. 20th Westminster lecture on transport safety : Putting people at the centre : how to enhance road safety in the 21st century. Lecture given in London, 1st December 2009.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom has been a good example for improving road safety for decades and a source of inspiration for many countries. A low mortality rate and a low fatality rate have not prevented it from making further progress. The UK was, and still is, a leading country with a reputation for

  2. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilley, Leigh; Bloss, William; Yin, Jianxin; Beddows, David; Harrison, Roy; Zotter, Peter; Prevot, Andre; Green, David

    2014-05-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke in large urban centres such as London is becoming increasingly important with the changing nature of domestic heating partly due to the installation of biomass burning heaters to meet renewable energy targets imposed by the EU and also a rise in so-called recreational burning for aesthetic reasons (Fuller et al., 2013). Recent work in large urban centres (London, Paris and Berlin) has demonstrated an increase in the contribution of wood smoke to ambient particles during winter that can at times exceed traffic emissions. In Europe, biomass burning has been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits during winter (Fuller et al., 2013). In light of the changing nature of emissions in urban areas there is a need for on-going measurements to assess the impact of biomass burning in cities like London. Therefore we aimed to determine quantitatively the contribution of biomass burning in London and surrounding rural areas. We also aimed to determine whether local emissions or regional sources were the main source of biomass burning in London. Sources of wood smoke during winter in London were investigated at an urban background site (North Kensington) and two surrounding rural sites (Harwell and Detling) by analysing selected wood smoke chemical tracers. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated, indicating a similar source of these species at the three sites. Based on the conversion factor for levoglucosan, mean wood smoke mass at Detling, North Kensington and Harwell was 0.78, 0.87 and 1.0 µg m-3, respectively. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest source of OC and EC found to be secondary organic aerosols and traffic emissions, respectively. Peaks in levoglucosan concentrations at the sites were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, suggesting domestic heating as

  3. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eKyselkova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks, likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W, tet(Q and tet(M in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O, tet(Q and tet(W representing a ‘core TC-resistome’ of the farm, and tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. US Pharmacopeial Convention safety evaluation of menaquinone-7, a form of vitamin K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marles, Robin J; Roe, Amy L; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A

    2017-07-01

    Vitamin K plays important biological roles in maintaining normal blood coagulation, bone mineralization, soft tissue physiology, and neurological development. Menaquinone-7 is a form of vitamin K2 that occurs naturally in some animal-derived and fermented foods. It is also available as an ingredient of dietary supplements. Menaquinone-7 has greater bioavailability than other forms of vitamin K, which has led to increasing sales and use of menaquinone-7 supplements. This special article reviews the chemistry, nomenclature, dietary sources, intake levels, and pharmacokinetics of menaquinones, along with the nonclinical toxicity data available and the data on clinical outcomes related to safety (adverse events). In conclusion, the data reviewed indicate that menaquinone-7, when ingested as a dietary supplement, is not associated with any serious risk to health or with other public health concerns. On the basis of this conclusion, US Pharmacopeia monographs have been developed to establish quality standards for menaquinone-7 as a dietary ingredient and as a dietary supplement in various dosage forms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The Crisis at Christmas Dental Service: a review of an annual volunteer-led dental service for homeless and vulnerably housed people in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, J; Stagnell, S; Shah, N; Vasey, A; Gillard, C

    2018-01-01

    Background The UK charity Crisis originated in 1967 as a response to the increasing numbers of homeless people in London, and the first Crisis at Christmas event for rough sleepers was established in 1971. Since then, Crisis has provided numerous services over the Christmas period to the most vulnerable members of society. One of these is the Crisis at Christmas Dental Service (CCDS) which provides emergency and routine dental care from 23-29 of December each year. The charity is entirely dependent on voluntary staffing and industry donations including materials and facilities. This paper aims to assess the impact of the service over the last six years of clinical activity from 2011-2016.Method Anonymised data were collected from the annual CCDS delivered over the last six consecutive years. Services included: dental consultations; oral hygiene instruction; scale and polishes; permanent fillings; extractions; and fluoride varnish applications. In addition, anonymised patient feedback was collected after each dental attendance.Results On average, 80-85% of the patients were male and the majority were between 21 and 60 years of age. The most common nationality was British (46%). Over the six-year data collection period intervention treatments (restorations and extractions) remained fairly consistent, while the number of fluoride varnish applications and oral hygiene instruction have increased. The majority of patients reported positive satisfaction with their treatment and would have recommended the service to others. Approximately 75% of patients did not regularly attend a dentist outside of Crisis and a similar proportion were given information on where to access year round dental services for homeless people in London. The majority of dental volunteers felt that they enjoyed the experience and would consider volunteering again for Crisis in the future.Conclusion The Crisis at Christmas Dental Service has emerged as a valuable asset to the portfolio of resources

  6. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  7. Implementation of the obligations of the Convention on Nuclear Safety CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    On 11 March 2011 a massive earthquake of magnitude 9 followed by a devastating tsunami hit the east coast of Japan's main island Honshu. Those natural events triggered a series of malfunctioning and equipment failures that led to the severe nuclear accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi. The consequences of the accident have been dramatic for the Japanese population and the staff involved, and had a major impact on the public opinion as well. In Switzerland in particular the government and the parliament have decided to suspend the licensing process for the new builds and committed to a nuclear phase-out. In the global nuclear community the reaction to the accident has led to the adoption of the IAEA Action Plan by all member states. Within this framework, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) advocates an effective strengthening of the global nuclear safety regime, including mandatory international review missions and enhanced transparency in reporting. The European Union (EU) initiated a so-called stress test for its member countries with nuclear power plants in which also Switzerland participates. The EU stress tests is a focused reassessment of the European nuclear facilities on their protection against extreme external events (namely earthquakes, flooding and extreme weather conditions), against the loss of safety functions (namely in the case of prolonged station blackouts and loss of ultimate heat sink) and severe accident management in general. The reassessment aims at identifying safety margins beyond design and cliff edge effects. Beside the various international efforts which Switzerland actively supported, there has been a series of national actions taken by ENSI with the goal of understanding the event sequence in Fukushima and its causes so as to draw consequences for nuclear safety in Switzerland. In fact lessons have been identified, analyses performed and concrete measures adopted. In general terms the safety of the Swiss nuclear power

  8. Reliability Evaluation of Structure at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    value and not a lower fractile as is usually the case in other civil engineering fields. The only contribution to a safety margin in the design is then the one inherent in the choice of the return period for the design load. It is now more common to choose the return period with due consideration...

  9. Overview of applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, M.; Turgis, M, E-mail: monique.lacroix@iaf.inrs.ca [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Laval, QC (Canada); Severino, R. [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Laval, QC (Canada); Univ. of Salerno, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, Fisciano, SA (Italy); Vu, K.D. [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Laval, QC (Canada); Donsi, F. [Univ. of Salerno, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, Fisciano, SA (Italy); Salmieri, S. [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Laval, QC (Canada); Ferrari, G. [Univ. of Salerno, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, Fisciano, SA (Italy); ProdAl Scarl, Competence Center on Agro-Food Productions, Fisciano, SA (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Natural antimicrobials (NA) were tested for their efficiency at increasing bacterial relative radiosensitivity (BRR) and, therefore, reducing the radiation dose necessary to eliminate pathogens in meat and vegetables. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility of using NA in combination to radiation to increase food shelf life, NA were added to food at low concentrations (which do not affect the sensory properties). Then, a bioactive coating formulation was developed to allow retention of the bioactivity of the NA during storage time. Results showed that NA, can increase BRR from 2 to 4 times and lower the dose necessary to eliminate a pathogen by a factor of 3 to 4. (author)

  10. Overview of applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Turgis, M; Severino, R.; Vu, K.D.; Donsi, F.; Salmieri, S.; Ferrari, G.

    2014-01-01

    Natural antimicrobials (NA) were tested for their efficiency at increasing bacterial relative radiosensitivity (BRR) and, therefore, reducing the radiation dose necessary to eliminate pathogens in meat and vegetables. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility of using NA in combination to radiation to increase food shelf life, NA were added to food at low concentrations (which do not affect the sensory properties). Then, a bioactive coating formulation was developed to allow retention of the bioactivity of the NA during storage time. Results showed that NA, can increase BRR from 2 to 4 times and lower the dose necessary to eliminate a pathogen by a factor of 3 to 4. (author)

  11. Borders of life: lessons from Microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D.

    Thirty years ago, the deep-sea was known as a low density biotope due to coldness, darkness and famine-like conditions. The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific in 1977 and the associated black smokers in 1979 considerably changed our views about life on Earth. For the first time, an ecosystem almost independent (at least for tens of years) of solar nergy was discovered. Besides the spectacular and unexpected communities of invertebrates based on symbiotic associations with chemo-litho-autotrophic bacteria, prokaryotic communities associated with high temperature black smokers fascinated microbiologists of extreme environments. Within mineral structures where temperature gradients may fluctuate from ambient seawater temperatures (2°C) up to 350°C, thermophilic (optimal growth above 60°C) and hyperthermophilic (optimal growth above 80°C) microorganisms thrived under very severe conditions due to elevated hydrostatic pressure, toxic compounds or strong ionizing radiations. These organisms belong to both domains of Bacteria and Archaea and live aerobically but mostly anaerobically, using a variety of inorganic and organic carbon sources, and a variety of electron donnors and acceptors as well. The most thermophilic organism known on Earth was isolated from a mid-Atlantic-Ridge hydrotermal vent: Pyrolobus fumarii grows optimally at 110°c and its upper temperature limit for life is 113°C. Such an organism survived to autoclaving conditions currently used for sterilization procedures. Many other hyperthermophilic organisms were isolated and described, including fermenters, sulphate and sulphur reducers, hydrogen oxidizers, nitrate reducers, methanogens, etc. Although most of anaerobes are killed when exposed to oxygen, several deep-sea hyperthermophiles appeared to survive to both oxygen and starvation exposures, indicating that they probably can colonize rather distant environments Because of elevated hydrostatic pressure that exists at

  12. Playing Sport In The Stormy Sea Of Street Life | Human | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, there are many street children in South Africa (SA). They have been robbed from the safe harbour of family life and on a daily basis experience the stormy sea of street life. Society has an obligation to intervene in the lives of these street children through, for example, quality education, basic health services and ...

  13. Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. France's answers to questions and comments received from other Contracting Parties on its second report for the JC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, referred to as the 'Joint Convention', is the result of international discussions that followed the adoption of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in 1994. France signed the Joint Convention at the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held on 29 September 1997, the very first day the Joint Convention was opened for signature. She approved it on 22 February 2000 and filed the corresponding instruments with the IAEA on 27 April 2000. The Joint Convention entered into force on 18 June 2001. For many years, France has been taking an active part in the pursuit of international actions to reinforce nuclear safety and considers the Joint Convention to be a key step in that direction. The fields covered by the Joint Convention have long been part of the French approach to nuclear safety. For his second report, France presented a document reflecting the viewpoints of the various stakeholders (regulatory authorities and operators). Thus, for each of the chapters in which the regulatory authority is not the only party to express its point of view, a three-stage structure was adopted: first of all a description by the regulatory authority of the regulations, followed by a presentation by the operators of the steps taken to meet the regulations and finally, an analysis by the regulatory authority of the steps taken by the operators. France received questions and comments from the other contracting parties of the joint convention and answered them in the present document

  14. Nautilus pompilius life history and demographics at the Osprey Reef Seamount, Coral Sea, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Dunstan

    Full Text Available Nautiloids are the subject of speculation as to their threatened status arising from the impacts of targeted fishing for the ornamental shell market. Life history knowledge is essential to understand the susceptibility of this group to overfishing and to the instigation of management frameworks. This study provides a comprehensive insight into the life of Nautilus in the wild. At Osprey Reef from 1998-2008, trapping for Nautilus was conducted on 354 occasions, with 2460 individuals of one species, Nautilus pompilius, captured and 247 individuals recaptured. Baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS were deployed on 15 occasions and six remotely operated vehicle (ROV dives from 100-800 m were conducted to record Nautilus presence and behavior. Maturity, sex and size data were recorded, while measurements of recaptured individuals allowed estimation of growth rates to maturity, and longevity beyond maturity. We found sexual dimorphism in size at maturity (males: 131.9±SD = 2.6 mm; females: 118.9±7.5 mm shell diameter in a population dominated by mature individuals (58%. Mean growth rates of 15 immature recaptured animals were 0.061±0.023 mm day(-1 resulting in an estimate of around 15.5 years to maturation. Recaptures of mature animals after five years provide evidence of a lifespan exceeding 20 years. Juvenile Nautilus pompilius feeding behavior was recorded for the first time within the same depth range (200-610 m as adults. Our results provide strong evidence of a K-selected life history for Nautilus from a detailed study of a 'closed' wild population. In conjunction with population size and density estimates established for the Osprey Reef Nautilus, this work allows calculations for sustainable catch and provides mechanisms to extrapolate these findings to other extant nautiloid populations (Nautilus and Allonautilus spp. throughout the Indo-Pacific.

  15. The nuclear safety convention. Results for Argentine as contracting party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    A powerful mechanism for increasing safety worldwide is through the development and adoption of legally binding Safety Conventions. Since 1986 four Conventions were ratified in the areas of Nuclear, Radiation and Waste Safety. The Nuclear Safety Convention establishes an international co-operation mechanism to maintain safety nuclear installations, focused on: to achieve and maintain a high level of nuclear safety worldwide through the enhancement of national measures and international co-operation including, where appropriate, safety-related technical co-operation; to establish and maintain effective defences in nuclear installations against potential radiological hazards in order to protect individuals, society and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation from such installations and to prevent accidents with radiological consequences and to mitigate such consequences should they occur. Each contracting party shall take, within the framework of its national law, the legislative, regulatory and administrative measures and other steps necessary for implementing its obligations under this Convention. Moreover, each contracting parties shall submit for review prior to each review meeting, a National Report on the measures it has taken to implement each of the obligations of the Convention. The contracting parties concluded that the review process had proven to be of great value to their national nuclear safety programmes. (author)

  16. Integrating RAMS engineering and management with the safety life cycle of IEC 61508

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundteigen, Mary Ann; Rausand, Marvin; Utne, Ingrid Bouwer

    2009-01-01

    This article outlines a new approach to reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety (RAMS) engineering and management. The new approach covers all phases of the new product development process and is aimed at producers of complex products like safety instrumented systems (SIS). The article discusses main RAMS requirements to a SIS and presents these requirements in a holistic perspective. The approach is based on a new life cycle model for product development and integrates this model into the safety life cycle of IEC 61508. A high integrity pressure protection system (HIPPS) for an offshore oil and gas application is used to illustrate the approach.

  17. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled in terms of the convention on nuclear safety. September 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaj, J.; Jurina, V.; Kasana, A.

    2004-09-01

    A brief national safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2004 is presented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Nuclear installations in Slovakia according to the convention; (3) Legislation and regulation; (4) General safety aspects; (5) Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia; (6) Annexes: 6.1 List of nuclear installations and technical and economic parameters; 6.2 Some generally binding legal documents concerning nuclear and radiation safety; 6.3 Limits of radioactive discharges; 6.4 Author team. Contents, list of abbreviations used as well as reference index are included

  18. Status of criticality safety research at NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Two critical facilities, named STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) and TRACY (Transient Experiment Critical Facility), at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility (NUCEF) started their hot operations in 1995. Since then, basic experimental data for criticality safety research have been accumulated using STACY, and supercritical experiments for the study of criticality accident in a reprocessing plant have been performed using TRACY. In this paper, the outline of those critical facilities and the main results of TRACY experiments are presented. (author)

  19. Global mapping of nonseismic sea level oscillations at tsunami timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka

    2017-01-18

    Present investigations of sea level extremes are based on hourly data measured at coastal tide gauges. The use of hourly data restricts existing global and regional analyses to periods larger than 2 h. However, a number of processes occur at minute timescales, of which the most ruinous are tsunamis. Meteotsunamis, hazardous nonseismic waves that occur at tsunami timescales over limited regions, may also locally dominate sea level extremes. Here, we show that nonseismic sea level oscillations at tsunami timescales (sea level extremes, up to 50% in low-tidal basins. The intensity of these oscillations is zonally correlated with mid-tropospheric winds at the 99% significance level, with the variance doubling from the tropics and subtropics to the mid-latitudes. Specific atmospheric patterns are found during strong events at selected locations in the World Ocean, indicating a globally predominant generation mechanism. Our analysis suggests that these oscillations should be considered in sea level hazard assessment studies. Establishing a strong correlation between nonseismic sea level oscillations at tsunami timescales and atmospheric synoptic patterns would allow for forecasting of nonseismic sea level oscillations for operational use, as well as hindcasting and projection of their effects under past, present and future climates.

  20. Statement to Sixth Review Meeting of Contracting Parties to Convention on Nuclear Safety, 4 April 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Good afternoon, Dear Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen, I am pleased to say a few words to you at the end of the Sixth Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Convention is a very important mechanism which has contributed a lot to strengthening nuclear safety in the countries which are party to it. In the last two weeks, you have addressed some very important issues. During your productive and lively discussions, a number of challenges were identified for consideration by Contracting Parties. These included: how to achieve harmonized emergency plans and response measures; how to make better use of operating and regulatory experience and international peer review services; and how to strengthen regulators' independence, safety culture, transparency and openness. The Agency will continue to work closely with you in addressing all of these issues. The Fifth Review Conference, which took place in 2011 just after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was the first opportunity for Contracting Parties to address the accident in an international conference. The fact that you devoted a special session to the Fukushima Daiichi accident this time demonstrates the continued resolve of the Contracting Parties to ensure that the right lessons are learned everywhere. The Agency continues to work with all our Member States to implement the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, about which you received a briefing. I know you will agree with me that it is vitally important that all the measures that have been agreed to strengthen global nuclear safety are actually implemented. Work continues on the IAEA report on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, which will be finalised this year. I understand that you decided to submit a proposal to amend the text of the Convention, addressing design and construction objectives for both existing and new nuclear power plants, to a Diplomatic Conference to be convened within one year. I am aware that a clear

  1. Hearings before the Ad Hoc Committee on Maritime Education and Training of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, Ninety-Third Congress; Second Session on Officer Requirements, and Session on Maritime Education Regarding Safety at Sea. Serial No. 93-44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

    The publication consists of Congressional hearings before the Ad Hoc Committee on Maritime Education and Training: (1) June 26, 1974 hearing pertaining to officer requirements and (2) November 19, 1974 hearing on maritime education regarding safety at sea. Estimated cost per graduate for the U. S. Merchant Marine 1973 class was $31,100. Supply and…

  2. Occurrence and distribution of conventional and new classes of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Karen Y; Wang, Xin-Hong; Ya, Miaolei; Li, Yongyu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2015-03-21

    Concentrations of 23 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including new classes of PFASs, in seawater samples were investigated for their occurrence and the interaction of the ocean currents with the distribution of PFASs in the South China Sea. This study revealed that socio-economic development was associated with the PFAS contamination in coastal regions of South China. Significant correlations between concentration of total PFASs with gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and population density were found in the areas, suggesting that the influence of intense human activities in these areas may have resulted in higher PFAS contamination to the adjacent environment. Di-substituted polyfluoroalkyl phosphate (diPAP), one of the potential replacements for PFASs, was only detected in the heavily developed region, namely Pearl River Delta (PRD). Total PFAS concentrations, ranging from 195 to 4925 pg/L, were detected at 51 sampling stations of the South China Sea. The results also confirmed that PFAS contamination in the South China Sea is strongly affected by the ocean currents. In comparison to perfluoroactane sulfonate (PFOS) concentrations measured nine years ago at the same locations, the concentrations in this study were found to be two times higher. This indicated that the use and production of perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) has been continuing in the region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk comparisons relevant to sea disposal of low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document contains estimates of, and comparisons among, risks to human health posed by exposures to radionuclides, including those associated with low level radioactive wastes dumping at sea, and organic chemical contaminants resulting from seafood consumption. This study was conducted at the request of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (the London Convention 1972, formerly referred to as the London Dumping Convention) as a component of a review of the wider political, legal, economic and social aspects of sea dumping of radioactive wastes. The highest potential risks associated with seafood consumption are generally those resulting from exposures to naturally occurring radionuclides. In some representations, the potential risks associated with polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB) and dieldrin in seafood are of the same order as those arising from naturally occurring radionuclides. The peak annual risks resulting from low level radioactive waste dumping at sea, assessed on any rational basis, are at least two orders of magnitude lower than those associated with the ingestion of common organic chemical contaminants in seafood. 47 refs, 4 figs, 13 tabs

  4. National Report presented by the Mexican United States to satisfy the compromises of the Nuclear Safety Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In order to satisfy to the compromises derived of the ratification by part of the Mexican Government for the Nuclear Safety Convention it is presented this National Report which is based on the directives proposed as a result of the preparatory meetings held in the IAEA Headquarters in the city of Vienna, Austria. This National Report represents a document summary and activities realized at present in relation with the only nuclear facility in Mexico: the Nuclear Power Plant in Laguna Verde, Veracruz. This report consists of two parts: In the first one it is described how have been satisfied each one of the compromises. The second one talks about the Laws and Regulations on nuclear activities in the country. (Author)

  5. Safety aspect of long-life small safe power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, S.; Sekimoto, H.

    1995-01-01

    Safety aspects of several design options of long-life small safe fast power reactors using nitride fuel and lead-bismuth as coolant are discussed. In the present study hypothetical accidents are simulated for these reactors, i.e., unprotected simultaneous ULOF (total loss of primary pumping system) and UTOP (rod run out transient over power) accidents, caused by the simultaneous withdrawal of all control rods. The proposed designs have some important safety characteristics as low reactivity swing (only 0.2-0.25$), and negative coolant void coefficient over whole burnup period. Effectively negative value of all components of reactivity during an accident is observed. The safety performances of the balance, pancake, and tall slender type of core, each of them satisfy reactivity and negative coolant void coefficient constraint, against the above accident are compared. The simulation results show that all of the design options can survive the above accidents without the help of reactor scram and without the need of operator actions. (author)

  6. A prospective comparison of postoperative pain and quality of life in robotic assisted vs conventional laparoscopic gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmeister, Jenna R; Pua, Tarah L; Boyd, Leslie R; Blank, Stephanie V; Curtin, John P; Pothuri, Bhavana

    2015-02-01

    We sought to compare robotic vs laparoscopic surgery in regards to patient reported postoperative pain and quality of life. This was a prospective study of patients who presented for treatment of a new gynecologic disease requiring minimally invasive surgical intervention. All subjects were asked to take the validated Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form at 3 time points to assess pain and its effect on quality of life. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson x(2) and Student's t test. One hundred eleven were included in the analysis of which 56 patients underwent robotic assisted surgery and 55 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. There was no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. There was a statistically significant difference found at the delayed postoperative period when evaluating interference of sleep, favoring laparoscopy (ROB 2.0 vs LSC 1.0; P = .03). There were no differences found between the robotic and laparoscopic groups of patients receiving narcotics (56 vs 53, P = .24, respectively), route of administration of narcotics (47 vs 45, P > .99, respectively), or administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications (27 vs 21, P = .33, respectively). Our results demonstrate no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. Furthermore, pain did not appear to interfere consistently with any daily activity of living. Interference of sleep needs to be further evaluated after controlling for bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fritz London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavroglu, Kostas

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. From Philosophy to Physics: The years that left nothing unaffected; 1. The appeal of ideas; 2. Goëthe as a scientist; 3. How absolute is our knowledge?; 4. How do we come to know things?; 5. London's teachers in philosophy; 6. Husserl's teachings; 7. Expectations of things to come; 8. The thesis in philosophy; 9. Tolman's principle of similitude; 10. The necessary clarifications; 11. Work on quantum theory; 12. Transformation theory; 13. Unsuccessful attempts at unification; Part II. The Years in Berlin and the Beginnings of Quantum Chemistry: The mysterious bond; 14. London in Zürich; 15. Binding forces; 16. The Pauli principle; 17. Reactions to the Heitler-London paper; 18. Polyelectronic molecules and the application of group theory to problems of chemical valence; 19. Chemists as physicists?; 20. London's first contacts in Berlin; 21. Marriage; 22. Job offers; 23. Intermolecular forces; 24. The book which could not be written; 25. Leningrad and Rome; 26. Difficulties with group theory; 27. Linus Pauling's resonance structures; 28. Robert Mulliken's molecular orbitals; Part III. Oxford and Superconductivity: The rise of the Nazis; 29. Going to Oxford; 30. Lindemann, Simon and Heinz London; 31. Electricity in the very cold; 32. The end of old certainties; 33. The thermodynamic treatment; 34. The theory of Fritz and Heinz London; 35. Initial reactions by von Laue; 36. The discussion at the Royal Society; 37. Termination of the ICI fellowship; Part IV. Paris and Superfluidity: The Front Populaire; 38. The article in Nature 1937 and 'Nouvelle Conception'; 39. Laue again; 40. The structure of solid helium; 41. The peculiar properties of helium; 42. Bose-Einstein condensation; 43. The note in Nature; 44. The two-fluid model; 45. The trip to Jerusalem; 46. Leaving again; 47. The observer in quantum mechanics; Part V. United States and the Typing up of Loose Ends: Duke University, North Carolina; 48. The Soviet Union, Kapitza and

  8. Software Safety Life cycle and Method of POSAFE-Q System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jang-Soo; Kwon, Kee-Choon

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the relationship between the overall safety life cycle and the software safety life cycle during the development of the software based safety systems of Nuclear Power Plants. This includes the design and evaluation activities of components as well as the system. The paper also compares the safety life cycle and planning activities defined in IEC 61508 with those in IEC 60880, IEEE 7-4.3.2, and IEEE 1228. Using the KNICS project as an example, software safety life cycle and safety analysis methods applied to the POSAFE-Q are demonstrated. KNICS software safety life cycle is described by comparing to the software development, testing, and safety analysis process with international standards. The safety assessment of the software for POSAFE-Q is a joint Korean German project. The assessment methods applied in the project and the experiences gained from this project are presented

  9. Reliability Evaluation of a Structure at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    Conventional design practice for coastal structures is deterministic in nature and is based on the concept of a design load, which should not exceed the resistance (carrying capacity) of the structure. The design load is usually defined on a probabilistic basis as a characteristic value of the load......, e.g. the expectation (mean) value of the lOO-year return period event, however, often without consideration of the involved uncertainties. The resistance is in most cases defined in terms of the load which causes a certain design impact or damage to the structure and is not given as an ultimate...... formulae are semi-empirical being based mainly on central fitting to model test results. The often considerable scatter in test results is not considered in general because the formulae normally express only the mean values. Consequently, the applied characteristic value of the resistance is then the mean...

  10. Reliability Evaluation of a Structure at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional design practice for coastal structures is deterministic in nature and is based on the concept of a design load, which should not exceed the resistance (carrying capacity) of the structure. The design load is usually defined on a probabilistic basis as a characteristic value of the load......, e.g. the expectation (mean) value of the 100-year return period event, however, often without consideration of the involved uncertainties. The resistance is in most cases defined in terms of the load which causes a certain design impact or damage to the structure and is not given as an ultimate...... formulae are semi-empirical being based mainly on central fitting to model test results. The often considerable scatter in test results is not considered in general because the formulae normally express only the mean values. Consequently, the applied characteristic value of the resistance is then the mean...

  11. Convention on Nuclear Safety. Second National Report, October 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present document is the second Spanish national report prepared in order to comply with the obligations deriving from the convention on Nuclear Safety, made in Vienna on 20th September 1994. This convention was signed by Spain on 15th October 1994 and ratified by way of an instrument issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, signed by H. M. the King on 19th June 1995. The convention, which entered into force on 24th October 1996, following ratification by a minimum number of countries, as set out in articles 20, 21 and 22 includes 51 countries and Euratom, in addition to Spain. The first review meeting, organised in accordance with chapter 3 of the Convention, was held in vienna in April 1999. Spain was represented by the CSN, the State organisation solely responsible for nuclear safety, both for the drawing up of the national report and for participation in the meeting held between the parties. In accordance with article 21, the second review meeting has been scheduled for April 2002, also in Vienna. At the review meeting, the countries party to the Convention review the national reports required by article 5, Spain submitted its first national report in September 1998. The present document is an update of that first report, and is to be submitted by 15th October 2001, as agreed on during the first review meeting. This report will be reviewed by the interested countries, which will forward their comments and questions. In April 2002, the Spanish report and the questions received will be subjected to the review process contemplated by the convention, along with the reports submitted by the other countries

  12. London limit for lattice model of superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ktitorov, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenological approach to the strong-bond superconductor, which is based on the Ginzburg-Landau equation in the London limit, is considered. The effect of the crystalline lattice discreteness on the superconductors electromagnetic properties is studied. The classic problems on the critical current and magnetic field penetration are studied within the frames of the lattice model for thin superconducting films. The dependence of the superconducting current on the thin film order parameter is obtained. The critical current dependence on the degree of deviation from the continual approximation is calculated [ru

  13. A proposal for an international convention on radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, J.U.

    1998-01-01

    One century has passed since harmful effects of radiation on living tissues were recognized. Organized efforts to reduce radiation hazards began in early 1920s. Major efforts by the ICRP since 1928, aided by ICRU, greatly helped in formulating principles, policies and guidance for radiation protection. The WHO formally recognized ICRP in 1956 and began implementing ICRP recommendations and guidance throughout the world. The IAEA, after it took office in 1957, began to establish or adopt standards of safety based on ICRP recommendations and provide for application of these standards in the field of atomic energy. Later on, other pertinent international organizations joined IAEA in establishing the Basic Safety Standards on radiation safety. The IAEA has issued, until now, nearly couple of hundred safety related documents on radiation safety and waste management. However, in spite of all such international efforts for three quarter of a century, there has been no effective universal control in radiation safety. Problems exist at the user, national, international and manufacturers and suppliers levels. Other problems are management of spent sources and smuggling of sources across international borders. Although, radiation and radionuclides are used by all countries of the world, regulatory and technical control measures in many countries are either lacking or inadequate. The recommendations and technical guidance provided by the international organizations are only advisory and carry no mandatory force to oblige countries to apply them. Member States approve IAEA safety standards and guides at the technical meetings and General Conference, but many of them do not apply these. An International Convention is, therefore, essential to establish international instrument to ensure universal application of radiation safety. (author)

  14. Nonthermal physical technologies to decontaminate and extend the shelf-life of fruits and vegetables: Trends aiming at quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinela, José; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2017-07-03

    Minimally processed fruits and vegetables are one of the major growing sectors in food industry. This growing demand for healthy and convenient foods with fresh-like properties is accompanied by concerns surrounding efficacy of the available sanitizing methods to appropriately deal with food-borne diseases. In fact, chemical sanitizers do not provide an efficient microbial reduction, besides being perceived negatively by the consumers, dangerous for human health, and harmful to the environment, and the conventional thermal treatments may negatively affect physical, nutritional, or bioactive properties of these perishable foods. For these reasons, the industry is investigating alternative nonthermal physical technologies, namely innovative packaging systems, ionizing and ultraviolet radiation, pulsed light, high-power ultrasound, cold plasma, high hydrostatic pressure, and dense phase carbon dioxide, as well as possible combinations between them or with other preservation factors (hurdles). This review discusses the potential of these novel or emerging technologies for decontamination and shelf-life extension of fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Advantages, limitations, and challenges related to its use in this sector are also highlighted.

  15. Life Cycle Assessment and Water Footprint of Hydrogen Production Methods: From Conventional to Emerging Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Mehmeti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A common sustainability issue, arising in production systems, is the efficient use of resources for providing goods or services. With the increased interest in a hydrogen (H2 economy, the life-cycle environmental performance of H2 production has special significance for assisting in identifying opportunities to improve environmental performance and to guide challenging decisions and select between technology paths. Life cycle impact assessment methods are rapidly evolving to analyze multiple environmental impacts of the production of products or processes. This study marks the first step in developing process-based streamlined life cycle analysis (LCA of several H2 production pathways combining life cycle impacts at the midpoint (17 problem-oriented and endpoint (3 damage-oriented levels using the state-of-the-art impact assessment method ReCiPe 2016. Steam reforming of natural gas, coal gasification, water electrolysis via proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM, solid oxide electrolyzer cell (SOEC, biomass gasification and reforming, and dark fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass were analyzed. An innovative aspect is developed in this study is an analysis of water consumption associated with H2 production pathways by life-cycle stage to provide a better understanding of the life cycle water-related impacts on human health and natural environment. For water-related scope, Water scarcity footprint (WSF quantified using Available WAter REmaining (AWARE method was applied as a stand-alone indicator. The paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each production pathway, identify the drivers of environmental impact, quantify midpoint environmental impact and its influence on the endpoint environmental performance. The findings of this study could serve as a useful theoretical reference and practical basis to decision-makers of potential environmental impacts of H2 production systems.

  16. Recent Extreme Marine Events at Southern Coast of Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Kirezci, Cagil; Baykal, Cuneyt; Gokhan Guler, Hasan; Erol, Onur; Zaytsev, Andrey; Kurkin, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The utilization at the coastal areas of Black Sea basin has increased in the recent years with the projects such as large commercial ports, international transportation hubs, gas and petrol pipelines, touristic and recreational infrastructures both along surrounding shoreline. Although Black Sea is a closed basin, extreme storms and storm surges have also been observed with an increasing frequency in the recent years. Among those events, February 1999, March 2013 and September 2014 storms impacted Southern coast of Black sea have clearly shown that the increasing economic value at the coastal areas caused the increasing cost of damages and loss of property by natural hazards. The storm occurred on February 19-20, 1999 is one of the most destructive storm in the last decades. The 1999 event (1999 Southern Black sea storm) caused destruction at all harbors and coastal protection structures along the Black Sea coast of Turkey. The complete damage of the breakwater of Giresun Harbor and damage on the harbor structures and cargo handling equipment were the major impacts of the 1999 Southern Black sea storm. Similar coastal impact have also been observed during the September 24, 2014 storm at 500m East of Giresun harbor. Although there are considerable number of destructive storms observed at southern coast of Black sea recently, data on these events are limited and vastly scattered. In this study the list of recent extreme marine events at South coast of the Black sea compiled and related data such as wind speed, wave height, period, and type of damages are cataloged. Particular attention is focused on the 1999 and 2014 storm events. The meteorological and morphological characteristics which may be considered as the reasons of the generation and coastal amplification of these storms are discussed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This study is partly supported by Turkish Russian Joint Research Grant Program by TUBITAK (Turkey) and RFBR (Russia), and TUBITAK 213M534 Research Project.

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of Biofertilizer Production and Use Compared with Conventional Liquid Digestate Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, David; Adams, Paul; Thelin, Gunnar; Vaneeckhaute, Céline; Chadwick, David; Withers, Paul J A

    2018-06-12

    Handling of digestate produced by anaerobic digestion impacts the environment through emission of greenhouse gases, reactive nitrogen, and phosphorus. Previous life cycle assessments (LCA) evaluating the extraction of nutrients from digestate using struvite precipitation and ammonia stripping did not relate synthetic fertilizer substitution (SFS) to nutrient use efficiency consequences. We applied an expanded LCA to compare the conventional management of 1 m 3 of liquid digestate (LD) from food waste against the production and use of digestate biofertilizer (DBF) extracted from LD, accounting for SFS efficacy. Avoidance of CH 4 , N 2 O, and NH 3 emissions from LD handling and enhanced SFS via more targeted use of nutrients in the versatile DBF product could generate environmental savings of up to 0.129 kg Sb eq, 4.16 kg SO 2 eq, 1.22 kg PO 4 eq, 33 kg CO 2 eq, and 20.6 MJ eq per m 3 LD, for abiotic resource depletion, acidification, eutrophication, global warming, and cumulative energy demand burdens, respectively. However, under worst-case assumptions, DBF extraction could increase global warming and cumulative energy demand by 7.5 kg CO 2 e and 251 MJ eq per m 3 LD owing to processing inputs. Normalizing these results against per capita environmental loadings, we conclude that DBF extraction is environmentally beneficial.

  18. Enhancement of safety at nuclear facilities in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.A.; Hayat, T.; Azhar, W.

    2006-01-01

    Pakistan is benefiting from nuclear technology mostly in health and energy sectors as well as agriculture and industry and has an impeccable safety record. At the national level uses of nuclear technology started in 1955 resulting in the operation of Karachi Radioisotope Center, Karachi, in December 1960. Pakistan Nuclear Safety Committee (PNSC) was formulated in 1964 with subsequent promulgation of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) Ordinance in 1965 to cope with the anticipated introduction of a research reactor, namely PARR-I, and a nuclear power plant, namely KANUPP. Since then Pakistan's nuclear program has expanded to include numerous nuclear facilities of varied nature. This program has definite economic and social impacts by producing electricity, treating and diagnosing cancer patients, and introducing better crop varieties. Appropriate radiation protection includes a number of measures including database of sealed radiation sources at PAEC operated nuclear facilities, see Table l, updated during periodic physical verification of these sources, strict adherence to the BSS-115, IAEA recommended enforcement of zoning at research reactors and NPPs, etc. Pakistan is party to several international conventions and treaties, such as Convention of Nuclear Safety and Early Notification, to improve and enhance safety at its nuclear facilities. In addition Pakistan generally and PAEC particularly believes in a blend of prudent regulations and good/best practices. This is described in this paper. (Author)

  19. Life cycle analysis of energy supply infrastructure for conventional and electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Alexandre; Alexandra Silva, Carla; Costa Neto, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Electric drive vehicle technologies are being considered as possible solutions to mitigate environmental problems and fossil fuels dependence. Several studies have used life cycle analysis technique, to assess energy use and CO 2 emissions, addressing fuels Well-to-Wheel life cycle or vehicle's materials Cradle-to-Grave. However, none has considered the required infrastructures for fuel supply. This study presents a methodology to evaluate energy use and CO 2 emissions from construction, maintenance and decommissioning of support infrastructures for electricity and fossil fuel supply of vehicles applied to Portugal case study. Using Global Warming Potential and Cumulative Energy Demand, three light-duty vehicle technologies were considered: Gasoline, Diesel and Electric. For fossil fuels, the extraction well, platform, refinery and refuelling stations were considered. For the Electric Vehicle, the Portuguese 2010 electric mix, grid and the foreseen charging point's network were studied. Obtained values were 0.6–1.5 gCO 2eq /km and 0.03–0.07 MJ eq /km for gasoline, 0.6–1.6 gCO 2eq /km and 0.02–0.06 MJ eq /km for diesel, 3.7–8.5 gCO 2eq /km and 0.06–0.17 MJ eq /km for EV. Monte Carlo technique was used for uncertainty analysis. We concluded that EV supply infrastructures are more carbon and energetic intensive. Contribution in overall vehicle LCA does not exceed 8%. - Highlights: ► ISO 14040 was applied to evaluate fuel supply infrastructures of ICE and EV. ► CED and GWP are used to assess the impact on WTW and CTG stages. ► EV chargers rate and ICE stations' lifetime influence uncertainty the most. ► EV facilities are more carbon and energetic intense than conventional fuels. ► Contribution of infrastructures in overall vehicle LCA does not exceed 8%.

  20. Pseudoislets as primary islet replacements for research: report on a symposium at King's College London, London UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Shanta J; Arden, Catherine; Bergsten, Peter; Bone, Adrian J; Brown, James; Dunmore, Simon; Harrison, Moira; Hauge-Evans, Astrid; Kelly, Catriona; King, Aileen; Maffucci, Tania; Marriott, Claire E; McClenaghan, Neville; Morgan, Noel G; Reers, Christina; Russell, Mark A; Turner, Mark D; Willoughby, Emma; Younis, Mustafa Y G; Zhi, Z L; Jones, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory-based research aimed at understanding processes regulating insulin secretion and mechanisms underlying β-cell dysfunction and loss in diabetes often makes use of rodents, as these processes are in many respects similar between rats/mice and humans. Indeed, a rough calculation suggests that islets have been isolated from as many as 150,000 rodents to generate the data contained within papers published in 2009 and the first four months of 2010. Rodent use for islet isolation has been mitigated, to a certain extent, by the availability of a variety of insulin-secreting cell lines that are used by researchers world-wide. However, when maintained as monolayers the cell lines do not replicate the robust, sustained secretory responses of primary islets which limits their usefulness as islet surrogates. On the other hand, there have been several reports that configuration of MIN6 β-cells, derived from a mouse insulinoma, as three-dimensional cell clusters termed ‘pseudoislets’ largely recapitulates the function of primary islet β-cells. The Diabetes Research Group at King’s College London has been using the MIN6 pseudoislet model for over a decade and they hosted a symposium on “Pseudoislets as primary islet replacements for research”, which was funded by the UK National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), in London on 15th and 16th April 2010. This small, focused meeting was conceived as an opportunity to consolidate information on experiences of working with pseudoislets between different UK labs, and to introduce the theory and practice of pseudoislet culture to laboratories working with islets and/or β-cell lines but who do not currently use pseudoislets. This short review summarizes the background to the development of the cell line-derived pseudoislet model, the key messages arising from the symposium and emerging themes for future pseudoislet research.

  1. Ocean disposal of radioactive waste: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the seas have been used as a place to dispose of wastes resulting from human activities and although no high level radioactive waste (HLW) has been disposed of into the sea, variable amounts of packaged low level radioactive waste (LLW) have been dumped at more than 50 sites in the northern part of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. So far, samples of sea water, sediments and deep sea organisms collected on the various sites have not shown any excess in the levels of radionuclides above those due to nuclear weapons fallout except on certain occasions where caesium and plutonium were detected at higher levels in samples taken close to packages at the dumping site. Since 1957, the date of its first meeting to design methodologies to assess the safety of ''radioactive waste disposal into the sea'', the IAEA has provided guidance and recommendations for ensuring that disposal of radioactive wastes into the sea will not result in unacceptable hazards to human health and marine organisms, damage to amenities or interference with other legitimate uses of the sea. Since the Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (referred to as the London Dumping Convention) came into force in 1975, the dumping of waste has been regulated on a global scale. The London Dumping Convention entrusted IAEA with specific responsibilities for the definition of high level radioactive wastes unsuitable for dumping at sea, and for making recommendations to national authorities for issuing special permits for ocean dumping of low level radioactive wastes. This paper presents a status report of immersion operations of low-level radioactive waste and the current studies the IAEA is undertaking on behalf of the LDC

  2. [Precarity, vulnerability, anticipating end-of-life care at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneval, Camille

    2016-02-01

    Many patients want to end their life at home. Care teams adapt to these wishes and organise a form of treatment which blends safety of care and the respect of the expectations of the patients and family members. When factors of precarity increase the vulnerability inherent to the end of life, caregivers anticipate and support as best as they can the difficulties encountered as testified by a hospital at home team in Dax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in the West Korea Bay–North Yellow Sea Basin, North Korea and China, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Finn, Thomas M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Woodall, Cheryl A.

    2017-07-11

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional resources of 1.1 billion barrels of oil and 2.2 trillion cubic feet of gas in the West Korea Bay–North Yellow Sea Basin, North Korea and China.

  4. The announcement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic about Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic amends that in 30 September 1997 in Vienna was undersigned the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. This Joint Convention came into force on June 18, 2001

  5. Safety of type and screen method compared to conventional antiglobulin crossmatch procedures for compatibility testing in Indian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past 30 years, pretransfusion tests have undergone considerable modification. In 1984, AABB recommended that the full cross match could be replaced by an abbreviated cross match in patients with negative antibody screen. However, before implementation of such a policy, issue regarding safety of T & S needs to be evaluated. Objectives: The aim of pretransfusion testing (PTT is to ensure that enough red blood cells (RBCs in the selected red cell components will survive when transfused. Results and Conclusion: We have, therefore in this study; evaluated safety of T & S procedure for PTT in comparison with conventional test tube cross match. The T & S procedure gave a safety of 91.6%. Also, the usefulness of the T & S was shown through the detection of unexpected antibodies in 0.75% (15 out of 2026 of cases.

  6. Report of the independent review of disposal of radioactive waste in the northeast Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, F.G.T.; Clark, R.

    1984-01-01

    This report reviews the scientific evidence, including the environmental implications, relevant to the safety of disposal of radioactive waste at 'the designated North Atlantic site'. It falls under the headings: aims and background; the nature of the problem (what is pollution; what is radiation; radioactive half-life; radioactivity in the sea; hazards of radioactivity; transfer mechanisms from sea to man; standards for radiation exposure to man); past and present practices (the London Dumping Convention; the OECD mechanism; sources and composition of the waste; structure of responsibility; authorisation; practical arrangements; packaging; present practices by other countries); the oceanography of the dump site (location; topography; biology; currents and water circulation; dilution and adsorption on to sediments); estimation of doses (why modelling; modelling techniques; the waste package model; models of dispersion in the ocean; a box model of ocean dispersion; a model of transfer through a food chain; dose assessment); alternatives (land-based alternatives; sea-based alternatives; storage); discussion (reliability of assessment; public acceptability of perceived risk; collective doses); conclusions (hazard to health; present scientific evidence; future dumping; storage; future research and monitoring; public and social factors; buoyant materials); recommendations. (U.K.)

  7. Psychoanalysis of Jack London's "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang" both are masterpieces of Jack London. The protagonists Buck and White Fang are the incarnation of Jack himself to some extent for the two novels reveal a great deal of the writer. This essay aims at psychoanalyzing Jack London's creative process, the Oedipus complex and the confliction…

  8. Microbiological safety of street vended fresh fruit juices, drinks and conventional blends in multan-pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, S.; Riaz, M.; Ismail, T.; Farooq, U.

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the safety of various fresh fruit juices, blends and drinks sold in the streets of Multan, Pakistan. The city was divided into 4 zones for the purpose of sample collection. Bacteriological analysis of 72 samples of fresh fruit juices, blends and drinks indicated the presence of total viable counts (2.48 +- 0.16 to 7.91 +- 0.62 log CFU/mL), total coliforms (0.70 +- 0.04 to 4.86 +- 0.29 log CFU/mL) and Escherichia coli (0.6 +- 0.03 to 3.83 +- 0.32 log CFU/mL). Qualitative data depicted apple juice to be highly contaminated with fecal coliforms and Salmonella spp. Coliforms prevalence was highest in Zone IV and Zone II while that of Salmonella spp., in Zone IV and Zone III. The pragmatic levels of contaminants elucidate poor sanitary status of major entities deployed in juice manufacturing process adopted by the street vendors. (author)

  9. NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, D W

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply

  10. Early life developmental effects of marine persistent organic pollutants on the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs Anselmo, H.M.R.; Koerting, L.; Devito, S.; Berg, van den J.H.J.; Dubbeldam, M.; Kwadijk, C.J.A.F.; Murk, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new 16-day echinoid early life stage (ELS) bioassay was developed to allow for prolonged observation of possible adverse effects during embryogenesis and larval development of the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris. Subsequently, the newly developed bioassay was applied to study the effects of key

  11. Impact of conventional radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and critical functions of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Cohen, Stacy B. M.A.; Kammer, Rachael E.; Sullivan, Paula A.; Brewer, Kathryn A.; Hong, Theodore S.; Chappell, Richard J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with significant morbidities. Our purpose was to document impact of morbidities by use of multiple objective measures and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). Methods and Materials: Ten head-and-neck cancer patients were evaluated before receiving conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy and at 1 month and 6 months after treatment. We evaluated weight, saliva production, diet, swallow function, auditory function, and HR-QOL. Results: After radiotherapy, weight was reduced in 89% of subjects. Salivary function was significantly reduced and did not resolve by 6 months. Diet impairment and abnormalities in swallowing function persisted at 6 months. Perception of physical functioning was reduced after treatment, and swallowing, coughing, and dry-mouth symptoms increased. Very few changes were observed in auditory function. Conclusions: Conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with substantial functional deficits and diminished HR-QOL. Deficits reported here can serve as a baseline for comparison with results derived from new radiotherapy-treatment techniques

  12. CITY OF LONDON: THE SECRETS OF STABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    M. K. Belyaev

    2010-01-01

    Reasons why the City, oldest London global financial centre, keeps to hold up leading positions in the financial world, are thoroughly discussed. Initially, this phenomenon was explained by dominating position England held as world industrial power. However, the City has not lost its leadership over last decades when England economics suffered bad times. This is explained by traditions, by the history as well as by specific position London holds as place where «business is made» as well as by...

  13. Plan for safety case of spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Ikonen, A.T.K.

    2005-02-01

    Posiva aims to present the Safety Case supporting the construction license application of the spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto by 2012. An outline and preliminary assessments will be presented in 2009. Interim reporting and an update of the Safety Case plan will be presented in 2006, as required by the authorities. The KBS-3 disposal concept aims at long-term isolation and containment of spent fuel assemblies in durable copper-iron canisters emplaced in a repository to be constructed at a depth between 400 and 600 metres in crystalline bedrock. By 2012, studies on the KBS-3 disposal concept and site investigations at Olkiluoto will have been continued over about thirty years. The construction of an underground rock characterisation facility (called ONKALO) was started in June 2004. The investigations are carried out in close cooperation with the Swedish SKB developing and assessing the same disposal concept at candidate sites, resembling Olkiluoto, at the other side of the Baltic Sea. A safety case is the synthesis of evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety, and the level of expert confidence in the safety, of a planned repository. Posiva's Safety Case will be organised in a portfolio including ten main reports, which will be periodically updated according the overall schedule presented in the plan. The Site report describing the present state and past evolution of the Olkiluoto site, as well as the disturbances caused by the construction of ONKALO and the first stage of the repository, forms the geoscientific basis of the Safety Case. The engineering basis is provided by the reports on the Characteristics of spent fuel, Canister design, and Repository design. The Process report containing descriptions and analyses of features, events and processes potentially affecting the disposal system, and the report on the Evolution of site and repository form the scientific basis of the Safety Case. The latter report will describe and

  14. Hemoglobin mass after 21 days of conventional altitude training at 1816 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottgiesser, Torben; Ahlgrim, Christoph; Ruthardt, Sebastian; Dickhuth, Hans-Hermann; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

    2009-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms of altitude training are still a matter of controversial discussion but erythropoietic adaptations with an increase of total haemoglobin mass (tHb) have been shown in several studies, partly depending on an adequate hypoxic dose. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate if a 3 weeks sojourn at moderate altitude (1816 m) with conventional training sessions (live and train at moderate altitude), especially under real and uncontrolled conditions, results in an increased tHb. tHb was measured in seven male cyclists competing at elite level (German national cycling team, U23 category) prior to the ascent to altitude and immediately after descent to sea-level. The athletes completed a 21 days altitude training camp living at 1816 m and training at 1800-2400 m during the competitive season. No significant difference was found in tHb after the altitude sojourn (prior 927+/-109g vs. 951+/-113g post, 95% CI -13-61g). Additionally, the analysis of red cell volume, plasma volume and blood volume or haemoglobin concentration [Hb] as well as haematocrit (Hct) did not reveal any significant changes. The data supports the theory that an adequate hypoxic dose is required for adaptations of the erythropoietic system with an increase of tHb and a threshold of approximately 2100-2500 m has to be exceeded.

  15. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Attar, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare Family Archive of Walter de la Mare's Printed Oeuvre at Senate House Library, University of London, as an example of a modern author collections in an institutiona...

  16. Sorption of radionuclides on London clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bourke, P.J.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1989-02-01

    Techniques for studying the sorption of radionuclides on London clay have been investigated. This work involved the use of through-diffusion, in-diffusion, high-pressure convection and batch methods to study the sorption of iodide, strontium, caesium and americium. Through-diffusion and high-pressure convection methods were found to be most useful for investigating weakly and moderately sorbing nuclides and give realistic values for sorptivity. The batch technique remains the most practical method of obtaining large quantities of data within a relatively short timescale but gives very high sorptivity values. It is however very useful for intercomparisons of nuclides or geological media. The in-diffusion method requires further refinement for use with strongly sorbing nuclides. Good agreement between through-diffusion and high-pressure convection methods was obtained for the sorptivity of strontium, whilst trends observed for caesium by through-diffusion were confirmed by batch measurements. (author)

  17. A landslide on a mudslide? Natural hazards and the right to life under the European Convention of Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Rytter, Jens Elo

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the protection of individuals’ lives against natural hazards under the European Convention on Human Rights. In 2008, the European Court of Human Rights decided to include natural hazards in a well-established doctrine developed to protect individuals from life-threatening ...

  18. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Report of the Federal Republic of Germany for the sixth review meeting in May 2018

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management covers the following topics: historical development and actual status of the civil use of nuclear power, politics and the spent fuel management, inventories and listing, legislation and executive systems, other safeguard regulations, safety during spent fuel handling, safety during radioactive waste processing, transport across national borders, disused enclosed radioactive sources, general regulations for safety enhancement.

  19. Proteomic profiles reveal age-related changes in coelomic fluid of sea urchin species with different life spans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Sea urchins have a different life history from humans and traditional model organisms used to study the process of aging. Sea urchins grow indeterminately, reproduce throughout their life span and some species have been shown to exhibit negligible senescence with no increase in mortality rate at advanced ages. Despite these properties, different species of sea urchins are reported to have very different natural life spans providing a unique model to investigate cellular mechanisms underlying life span determination and negligible senescence. To gain insight into the biological changes that accompany aging in these animals, proteomic profiles were examined in coelomic fluid from young and old sea urchins of three species with different life spans: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate life span. The proteomic profiles of cell-free coelomic fluid were complex with many proteins exhibiting different forms and extensive post-translational modifications. Approximately 20% of the protein spots on 2-D gels showed more than two-fold change with age in each of the species. Changes that are consistent with age in all three species may prove to be useful biomarkers for age-determination for these commercially fished marine invertebrates and also may provide clues to mechanisms of negligible senescence. Among the proteins that change with age, the ectodomain of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) was significantly increased in the coelomic fluid of all three sea urchin species suggesting that the Wnt signaling pathway should be further investigated for its role in negligible senescence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Probabilistic Safety Analysis of High Speed and Conventional Lines Using Bayesian Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande Andrade, Z.; Castillo Ron, E.; O' Connor, A.; Nogal, M.

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian network approach is presented for probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) of railway lines. The idea consists of identifying and reproducing all the elements that the train encounters when circulating along a railway line, such as light and speed limit signals, tunnel or viaduct entries or exits, cuttings and embankments, acoustic sounds received in the cabin, curves, switches, etc. In addition, since the human error is very relevant for safety evaluation, the automatic train protection (ATP) systems and the driver behavior and its time evolution are modelled and taken into account to determine the probabilities of human errors. The nodes of the Bayesian network, their links and the associated probability tables are automatically constructed based on the line data that need to be carefully given. The conditional probability tables are reproduced by closed formulas, which facilitate the modelling and the sensitivity analysis. A sorted list of the most dangerous elements in the line is obtained, which permits making decisions about the line safety and programming maintenance operations in order to optimize them and reduce the maintenance costs substantially. The proposed methodology is illustrated by its application to several cases that include real lines such as the Palencia-Santander and the Dublin-Belfast lines. (Author)

  1. PSA methodology including new design, operational and safety factors, 'Level of recognition of phenomena with a presumed dominant influence upon operational safety' (failures of conventional as well as non-conventional passive components, dependent failures, influence of operator, fires and external threats, digital control, organizational factors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.

    2001-10-01

    The document represents a specific type of discussion of existing methodologies for the creation and application of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in light of the EUR document summarizing requirements placed by Western European NPP operators on the future design of nuclear power plants. A partial goal of this discussion consists in mapping, from the PSA point of view, those selected design, operational and/or safety factors of future NPPs that may be entirely new or, at least, newly addressed. Therefore, the terms of reference for this stage were formulated as follows: Assess current level of knowledge and procedures in the analysis of factors and phenomena with a dominant influence upon operational safety of new generation reactors, especially in the following areas: (1) Phenomenology of failure types and mechanisms and reliability of conventional passive safety system components; (2) Phenomenology of failure types and mechanisms and reliability of non-conventional passive components of newly designed safety systems; (3) Phenomenology of types and mechanisms of dependent failures; (4) Human factor role in new generation reactors and its effect upon safety; (5) Fire safety and other external threats to new nuclear installations; (6) Reliability of the digital systems of the I and C system and their effect upon safety; and (7) Organizational factors in new nuclear installations. (P.A.)

  2. 15 CFR 970.205 - Vessel safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vessel safety. 970.205 Section 970.205... safety. In order to provide a basis for the necessary determinations with respect to the safety of life... Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLAS 74) possesses current valid SOLAS 74 certificates; (2) That any...

  3. AFSC/REFM: Movement of Alaska skates (Bathyraja parmifera) in the Bering Sea , determined through conventional tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains the results of a tagging study being conducted on the Alaska skate (Bathyraja parmifera) in the eastern Bering Sea. The purpose of the study is...

  4. 3. French national report on implementation of the obligations of the Convention on nuclear safety - Issued for the 2005 Peer review meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Conduct on the safety of research reactors, which incorporates most of the provisions of the present Convention. This report was produced by the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), which ensured the necessary coordination, together with the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) as well as the nuclear power reactor operators, Electricite de France (EDF), the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the Laue - Langevin Institute (ILL). The final version was completed in July 2004 after consultation with the French parties concerned. For this report, France took account of the experience acquired with its first two reports: this report is a stand-alone document based mainly on existing documents and reflecting the viewpoints of the various stakeholders (Regulatory authority and operators). Thus, for each of the chapters in which the regulatory authority is not the only party to express its point of view, we adopted a three-stage structure: first of all a description by the regulatory body of the regulations, followed by a presentation by the operators of the steps taken to meet the regulations and finally, an analysis by the regulator of the steps taken by the operators. The report is structured according to the guidelines for national reports, as modified during the 2002 peer review meeting. The presentation is made 'Article by Article', each being the subject of a different chapter, at the beginning of which the corresponding text of the Convention is repeated in a shadow box. The current introduction highlights the main changes since the second national report together with France's nuclear energy policy. Part A deals with the general provisions (Articles 4 to 6). Part B summarizes the legislation and regulations (Articles 7 to 9). Part C is devoted to general safety considerations (Articles 10 to 16). Part D discusses the safety of the installations (Articles 17 to 19). Finally, the conclusion gives indications on future trends in the field of nuclear safety

  5. EDUCATION IN THE FIELD safety of human life AND THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kartavykh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication purpose - pedagogical design of education of bachelors in the field safety of human life in the context of ideas of a sustainable development as one of the modern and perspective directions of the higher education. Philosophical and methodological, scientific and technical and pedagogical aspects of provisions of the concept of a sustainable development are opened. It is shown that the greatest potential for realization of ideas of a sustainable development the invariant subject matter the " Safety of human life " studied by future bachelors irrespective of the direction and a profile of preparation possesses. The fundamental principles of education in the field safety of human life of future bachelors are formulated. Key functions of education of bachelors in the field of health and safety are defined: valuable and orientation, teoretiko-world outlook, it is constructive - activity, it is reflexive - estimated. The methodical tasks approaching the project to specific sociocultural and pedagogical conditions are opened: definition of target reference points, modular structuring content of education, development of procedural and technological features of creation of educational activity; diagnostics of results. The idea of a didactic cycle at development of the content of education in the field safety of human life is proved and opened. The educations of future bachelors got in the course of approbation results in the field safety of human life in the context of ideology of sustainable (safe development allow to speak about efficiency of the chosen scientific and methodological and organizational and technological bases and to project new models of practical experience in conditions of providing optimum ways of productive pedagogical interaction.

  6. "Mothering through Islam": Narratives of Religious Identity in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Ryan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws upon research with mothers of diverse Muslim backgroundsin London to explore how these women use ‘conservative’ interpretations ofIslamic beliefs and practices to underpin their parenting strategies. In particularthe paper looks at how mothers use religion as a frame to make sense of andgive meaning to their experiences and encounters in Britain. We suggest thatthe women use Islam in four key ways: (i as a framework for teaching theirchildren right and wrong, (ii as a means of protecting children from the ‘moral’dangers of British society, (iii as an authoritative voice that reinforces parentingand (iv as a means of critiquing specific aspects of both the traditional andBritish culture in which they live and daily negotiate their different cultural andreligious belonging. In attempting to instil religious values in their London-basedchildren, these mothers have to negotiate the hostility that Islam increasinglyprovokes in British society’s public arenas.

  7. Carbon footprints of crops from organic and conventional arable crop rotations – using a life cycle assessment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Meyer-Aurich, A; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    Many current organic arable agriculture systems are challenged by a dependency on imported livestock manure from conventional agriculture. At the same time organic agriculture aims at being climate friendly. A life cycle assessment is used in this paper to compare the carbon footprints of different....... The results showed significantly lower carbon footprint of the crops from the ‘Biogas’ rotation (assuming that biogas replaces fossil gas) whereas the remaining crop rotations had comparable carbon footprints per kg cash crop. The study showed considerable contributions caused by the green manure crop (grass......-clover) and highlights the importance of analysing the whole crop rotation and including soil carbon changes when estimating carbon footprints of organic crops especially where green manure crops are included....

  8. London, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth.This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring

  9. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews…

  10. 47 CFR 74.23 - Interference jeopardizing safety of life or protection of property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference jeopardizing safety of life or... SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.23 Interference jeopardizing safety of life or protection of property. (a) The licensee of any station authorized under this part that causes...

  11. Steady as he goes: at-sea movement of adult male Australian sea lions in a dynamic marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Lowther

    Full Text Available The southern coastline of Australia forms part of the worlds' only northern boundary current system. The Bonney Upwelling occurs every austral summer along the south-eastern South Australian coastline, a region that hosts over 80% of the worlds population of an endangered endemic otariid, the Australian sea lion. We present the first data on the movement characteristics and foraging behaviour of adult male Australian sea lions across their South Australian range. Synthesizing telemetric, oceanographic and isotopic datasets collected from seven individuals enabled us to characterise individual foraging behaviour over an approximate two year time period. Data suggested seasonal variability in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes that could not be otherwise explained by changes in animal movement patterns. Similarly, animals did not change their foraging patterns despite fine-scale spatial and temporal variability of the upwelling event. Individual males tended to return to the same colony at which they were tagged and utilized the same at-sea regions for foraging irrespective of oceanographic conditions or time of year. Our study contrasts current general assumptions that male otariid life history strategies should result in greater dispersal, with adult male Australian sea lions displaying central place foraging behaviour similar to males of other otariid species in the region.

  12. Considerations about the impact of the Convention on Nuclear Safety on the regulatory action of the CNEN in Brazilian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Claudio; Pontedeiro, Auro

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary discussion is conducted about the impact of the terms of the Convention on Nuclear safety, adopted by Diplomatic Conference in September 1994 in the International Atomic Energy Agency, on the regulatory action of Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Body - CNEN. Following the Convention articles structure, the paper emphasizes technical aspects of the nuclear safety standards adopted in the licensing process of Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants. The recent experience in the issuance of Angra-1 NPP Permanent Operation Authorization is used to demonstrate that current safety standards in Brazil are in compliance with the international compromises and in agreement with what is expected by the so called Safety Culture. (author). 9 refs

  13. Oceanic fronts in the Sargasso Sea control the early life and drift of Atlantic eels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Hansen, Michael Møller; Maas, Gregory E.

    2010-01-01

    Anguillid freshwater eels show remarkable life histories. In the Atlantic, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and American eel (Anguilla rostrata) undertake extensive migrations to spawn in the oceanic Sargasso Sea, and subsequently the offspring drift to foraging areas in Europe and North......, during a field expedition to the eel spawning sites in the Sargasso Sea, we carried out a wide range of dedicated bio-physical studies across areas of eel larval distribution. Our findings suggest a key role of oceanic frontal processes, retaining eel larvae within a zone of enhanced feeding conditions...

  14. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of

  15. Lessons for climate policy from The Great Stink of London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuce, A.

    2012-12-01

    A rapidly growing population and the introduction of the flush toilet in nineteenth-century London caused a crisis with sewage pollution in the River Thames (Halliday, 1999). There were decades of delays in implementing solutions owing to: inadequate governance institutions; political inertia; difficulties with financing; opposition from vested interests; scientific uncertainties; and technological challenges. Effective counter-measures were started only once the problem arose, quite literally, under the noses of parliamentarians. There are parallels, some of them pointed out earlier by Alley et al (2010), between the sewage crisis in Victorian London and the current problem with climate change. Both involve the unsustainable use of a common resource (a river, the atmosphere) for the unconstrained disposal of human waste products. Alley (2011) estimated that the costs of providing clean water and sanitation are comparable to the expected costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Despite the similarities, the climate change issue is actually much more difficult because of: a) the unequal and uncertain global distribution of cause and effect; b) its long, intergenerational time lines; c) the insufficiency of adequate institutions, conventions or the tools— political, moral or economic—for tackling the climate crisis. This analysis is consistent with the model proposed by Gardiner (2011) in his book A Perfect Moral Storm. The three "storms" he identifies, the global, intergenerational and theoretical storms, combine in a powerful synergy to create a challenge of unprecedented intractability, providing opportunities for what Gardiner calls moral corruption: the obscuring of the buck-passing and procrastination that characterizes climate policy today. In Victorian London, the crucial steps to solve the sewage crises were not taken until the stench from the River Thames during the hot summer of 1858 rendered the House of Commons uninhabitable. A greater stink of a

  16. Safety of Oversize Cargo in Ports and in the Sea Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Chmielinski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Author of the paper analyzes problems related to the safety of the oversize cargo in ports and in the sea transport. Various modes of transport are used to carry oversized units that often include maritime transport. Transport of oversized cargo includes non-standard large and heavy pieces of cargo, such as electric transformers, reactor vessels, wind turbines, airplane fuselage or nuclear power plant components. The above paper is based on results of research oversized cargo in the Elpo Service Company and Pol-Mare Ltd. forwarding consulting agency.

  17. Enhancing Resilience of London by Learning from Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Atun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of resilience was introduced at the beginning of the 70s to indicate the capability of natural systems to absorb perturbations, preserving their structure and keeping the system functioning. The paper considers London as an example to a resilient city by focusing on some remarkable disasters in the history of London, such as the Great Fire of 1666, the air raids during the World War 2, 18 December 1987 Kings Cross Fire, terrorist attack to tube network on the 7th of July 2005, 1928 flooding and 1953 storm surge. The paper starts by giving short descriptions of these disasters and continues by discussing the lessons learned. In this paper, the concept of resilience has been studied in three phases: prepare for, respond to and recover from a disaster. Besides, actions that have to be taken according to these three phases are going to be explored in detail. In conclusion, the notable effects of the mentioned disasters on the structural and non-structural tools for disaster prevention have been revealed by considering resilience of London.

  18. Inventory of accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    The present report describes the content of the inventory of accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material. It covers accidents and losses resulting in the actual release of radioactive materials into the marine environment and also those which have the potential for release. For completeness, records of radioactive materials involved in accidents but which were recovered intact from the sea are also reported. Information on losses of sealed sources resulting in actual or potential release of activity to the marine environment nad of sealed sources that were recovered intact is also presented

  19. Evaluation of the impact of 1983 east sea tsunami at the site of Ulchin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. K.; Lee, D. S.; Choi, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, we carried out the safety assessment study at the site of Ulchin NPP against tsunamis on the basis of maximum earthquake magnitude 7 3/4 and available tsunamigenic earthquake fault parameters. But, recently, based on the seismic gap theory some geologists and seismologists warned that the earthquakes with larger magnitude than was expected might occur in the East Sea region. And, the need of re-evaluation of safety is suggested. In this study, to investigate the applicability of a finite difference model, we simulated the 1983 East Sea Tsunami at the Imwon Harbor where the maximum run-up height of tsunami was observed. The general agreement was obtained in the viewpoint of maxium wave run-up height. Finally, we evaluated the rise and drop of sea water level at the site of Ulchin NPP and concluded that the site of Ulchin NPP is safe against tsunami of the same magnitude of 1983 East Sea Tsunami

  20. Sweden's third national report under the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Joint Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Article 32 of the Joint Convention calls for a self-assessment by each Contracting Party regarding compliance with the obligations of the Convention. Sweden's self-assessment has demonstrated compliance with all the obligations of the Convention, as shown in detail in sections B to J of this report. The Swedish existing nuclear power programme is since a few years under strong development. Large amounts are being invested in the 10 remaining operating reactors to prepare for long term operation and major programmes are going on to upgrade and uprate the plants. The former regulatory authorities, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI), was merged into a new regulatory body, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, July 01, 2008. The new authority has been tasked with the responsibility and tasks from SKI and SSI. These developments create new challenges for the safety work of the licensees as well as for the regulatory authority. Even though comprehensive and very active programmes for the management and disposal of spent fuel and radioactive waste have been established, many challenges remain. Over the next 5-15 years several new facilities will be sited, constructed and taken into operation, e.g. an encapsulation plant and a repository for spent fuel. These activities will require substantial efforts for both the nuclear industry and the regulatory bodies. The generally positive impression reported to earlier review meetings under the Joint Convention still stands. Therefore, Sweden would like to point out the following as strong features in its national nuclear practice: The responsibility for safety is clearly defined in the Swedish legal framework. In order not to dilute the responsibility of the licence holders, the Swedish regulations are designed to define requirements to be achieved, not the detailed means to achieve them. Within the framework given by the regulations, the licence holders have to

  1. Diurnal variations of serum erythropoietin at sea level and altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Poulsen, T D; Fogh-Andersen, N

    1996-01-01

    in 2, 3 diphosphoglycerate. After 64 h at altitude, six of the nine subjects had down-regulated their serum-EPO concentrations so that median values were three times above those at sea level. These six subjects had significant diurnal variations of serum-EPO concentration at sea level; the nadir......This study tested the hypothesis that the diurnal variations of serum-erythropoietin concentration (serum-EPO) observed in normoxia also exist in hypoxia. The study also attempted to investigate the regulation of EPO production during sustained hypoxia. Nine subjects were investigated at sea level...... and during 4 days at an altitude of 4350 m. Median sea level serum-EPO concentration was 6 (range 6-13) U.l-1. Serum-EPO concentration increased after 18 and 42 h at altitude, [58 (range 39-240) and 54 (range 36-340) U.l-1, respectively], and then decreased after 64 and 88 h at altitude [34 (range 18...

  2. Treaty implementation applied to conventions on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montjoie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Given that safety is the number one priority for the nuclear industry, it would seem normal that procedures exist to ensure the effective implementation of the provisions of the conventions on nuclear safety, as already exist for numerous international treaties. Unfortunately, these procedures are either weak or even nonexistent. Therefore, consideration must be given to whether this weakness represents a genuine deficiency in ensuring the main objective of these conventions, which is to achieve a high level of nuclear safety worldwide. But, before one can even address that issue, a prior question must be answered: does the specific nature of the international legal framework on nuclear safety automatically result in a lack of non-compliance procedures in international conventions on the subject? If so, the lack of procedures is justified, despite the drawbacks. The specific nature of the international law on nuclear safety, which in 1994 shaped the content of the CNS by notably not 'allowing' (even today) the incorporation of precise international rules have been taken into account. The next step is to examine whether the absence of non-compliance procedures (which could have been integrated into the text) is a hindrance in ensuring the objectives of the conventions on nuclear safety, and to examine the procedures that could have been used, based on existing provisions in other areas of international law (environmental law, financial law, disarmament law, human rights, etc.). International environmental law will be the main source of this study, as it has certain similarities with the international law on nuclear safety due to the sometimes vague nature of its obligations and irrespective of the fact that one of the purposes of nuclear safety is in particular to protect the environment from radiological hazards. Indeed, the provisions of the law on nuclear safety are mainly technical and designed to guarantee the normal operation of nuclear facilities

  3. The European single market of energy faced with conventional supply safety concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyi, A.

    2004-01-01

    By analysing the context of the creation of the Single Energy Market, this article tries to understand the logic behind the coexistence of two energy safety concepts: (1) the financial gains of international trading; (2) the protection against supply shortage risks using domestic self-sufficiency policies. Both concepts are based on an informative context conditioned by the two crises, which mainly impact the security perceptions of today: the oil crisis in the seventies and the Californian crisis in 2001. They are based on opposite factors: anti-market behaviour in the first case and excessive competition in the second case. The nature of liberalization, of the relation-ship with non-EU producing countries and the perception of the dangers are inherent to such an informative context. (author)

  4. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CATTLE MILK IN AN INTENSIVE SILVOPASTORAL SYSTEM AND A CONVENTIONAL SYSTEM IN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Esteban Rivera Herrera

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, cattle systems have the challenge of improving their efficiency in order to satisfy the growing demand of livestock products while at the same time reducing their emissions. In order to estimate the main environmental impacts of bovine milk production and identify mitigation alternatives, a life cycle analysis (LCA was conducted to compare an intensive silvopastoral systems (ISS and a conventional system (CS in Colombia. The structure of ISO 14044 was followed, with four functional units (FU; the estimated environmental impacts were: land use (LU, use of non-renewable energy (UNRE and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG. For all FU, the ISS had lower emissions of GHGs than the conventional system. To produce one kg of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM the ISS emitted 1 less GHG than the CS (2.05 vs. 2.34 kg CO2-eq. Regarding the use of non-renewable energy, the ISS required only 63% of the energy used in the CS to produce one kg FPCM (3.64 vs. 5.81 kg Mj-1 whilst for land use, the CS was more efficient in all UF compared to the ISS. We conclude that in ISS there are lower environmental impacts per unit of product, emitting less GHG and having lower UNRE.

  5. The Expenditure Impacts of London's Higher Education Institutions: The Role of Diverse Income Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannsson, Kristinn; Lisenkova, Katerina; McGregor, Peter G.; Swales, J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of London-based higher education institutions (HEIs) on the English economy. When we treat each of the HEIs as separate sectors in conventional input-output analysis, their expenditure impacts appear rather homogenous, with the apparent heterogeneity of their overall impacts being primarily driven by scale. However,…

  6. Safety at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Safety is an integral part of our working lives, and should be in our minds whatever job we do at CERN. Ultimately, safety is the responsibility of the Director General – your safety is my concern. That’s why I have this week appointed a new Safety Policy Committee (SAPOCO) that reflects the new Organizational structure of CERN. CERN’s Staff Rules and Regulations clearly lay out in chapter 3 the scope of safety at CERN as well as my responsibilities and yours in safety matters. At CERN, safety is considered in the broadest sense, encompassing occupational Health and Safety, environmental protection, and the safety of equipment and installations. It is my responsibility to put appropriate measures in place to ensure that these conditions are met. And it is the responsibility of us all to ensure that we are fully conversant with safety provisions applicable in our areas of work and that we comply with them. The appointment of a n...

  7. Persuasive History: A Critical Comparison of Television's "Victory at Sea" and "The World at War."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheisen, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the television series "Victory at Sea" and "The World at War" and their use in teaching about World War II. Contrasts that war's glorious portrayal in "Victory at Sea" with the more ambiguous presentation of "The World at War." Suggests that students can learn a great deal about war and film itself…

  8. Monthly Variations in Sea Level at the Island of Zanzibar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The trend in sea level. (9%) appeared ... There is a strong likelihood that physical processes other .... a bell-shaped curve. To avoid erroneous conclusions, residual analysis tests were carried ..... prediction of sea level, regardless of the units ...

  9. Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) the Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Dehal, Paramvir; Fuerstenberg, Susan I.

    2006-01-09

    High throughput genome sequencing centers that were originally built for the Human Genome Project (Lander et al., 2001; Venter et al., 2001) have now become an engine for comparative genomics. The six largest centers alone are now producing over 150 billion nucleotides per year, more than 50 times the amount of DNA in the human genome, and nearly all of this is directed at projects that promise great insights into the pattern and processes of evolution. Unfortunately, this data is being produced at a pace far exceeding the capacity of the scientific community to provide insightful analysis, and few scientists with training and experience in evolutionary biology have played prominent roles to date. One of the consequences is that poor quality analyses are typical; for example, orthology among genes is generally determined by simple measures of sequence similarity, when this has been discredited by molecular evolutionary biologists decades ago. Here we discuss the how genomes are chosen for sequencing and how the scientific community can have input. We describe the PhIGs database and web tools (Dehal and Boore 2005a; http://PhIGs.org), which provide phylogenetic analysis of all gene families for all completely sequenced genomes and the associated 'Synteny Viewer', which allows comparisons of the relative positions of orthologous genes. This is the best tool available for inferring gene function across multiple genomes. We also describe how we have used the PhIGs methods with the whole genome sequences of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human to conclusively demonstrate that two rounds of whole genome duplication occurred at the base of vertebrates (Dehal and Boore 2005b). This evidence is found in the large scale structure of the positions of paralogous genes that arose from duplications inferred by evolutionary analysis to have occurred at the base of vertebrates.

  10. Evaluation of stream discharges measurement using radioisotope and conventional method at Sungai Weng catchment area, Kedah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazrul Hizam Yusoff and Wan Zakaria Wan MuhdTahir

    2006-01-01

    A number of discharge measurements using radioisotope and current metering techniques at selected streams in Sg. Weng Experimental Catchment were conducted by MINT and JPS gauging teams starting from 2003-2005. This study aims to prepare stage-discharge relationships or rating curves of the selected streams during variable flow conditions. The rating curve of the stream is one of the important parameters and usually appraised in certain routine operations of hydrological studies. It may be used in the planning of water resources management and flood control scheme. The radioisotope method employed in this study involved the injection of short-lived radioisotope tracer, that is, technetium-99m ( 99m Tc having its half-life ∼ 6.023 hrs) which was supplied from a high activity technetium generator (55.5 Gbq). Measurement of stream discharges were concurrently undertaken by JPS staff using a current meter type 0TT-C2 mounted on a wading rod at selected gauging stations for comparison purposes. Methodologies from the two methods of discharge measurements, comparison of results and identifying the uncertainties (errors) in performing the measurement during low, medium and high turbulent flows were explained in this paper. Generally, the entire results of streamflow data (2003-2005) measured by both methods during low flows (Q 3 /s) exhibit almost comparable values to each other. However, for moderate flows (1.0 m 3 /s 3 /s), the different in gauging results are slightly higher using radioisotope method ( i.e. Q isotope > Q current meter and may goes up to 40%) , and during high turbulent flows (Q>6.0 m 3 /s) the radioisotope method presented more than 40% higher discharge values as compared to the measurement made by the conventional current-meter. Observation made on site anticipated that inaccurate gauging data measured by conventional means during high flow and turbulent conditions are expected. The average estimated measurement error associated with isotope method

  11. Reflections on a future international convention on safety in radioactive waste management - September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Canete, A.

    1995-01-01

    This probably is a suitable moment for work to begin on an international Convention in this area, although it is a difficult task. Generally speaking, the RADWASS (Radioactive Waste Safety Standards) Programme has achieved sufficient consensus, and might serve as an important basis for work in relation to the Convention. The Convention should not go into highly technical details since consensus at this level is more difficult at the present moment, although this will undoubtedly be achieved in the medium term. An important element of the Convention should be the regulation of movements of radioactive wastes at international level. (orig./HP)

  12. Safety at sea: oil spills, the tanker business and international regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golomer, Olivier

    1994-02-01

    The tanker industry has been assailed in recent years with regulations, inspections, and many, many criticisms. The official objective of these pressures - the preservation of the environment from oil spills and oil contamination - is praiseworthy. However, many of these measures have proved inefficient or have led to ludicrous situations due in large part to them being targeted on crisis situations. Instead of emergency regulations spurred by sporadic disasters, both the tanker industry and protection of the environment need a set of economic instruments relying on a systematic assessment of risks. This paper focuses on these issues in the Very Large Crude Carrier segment of the tanker business. We start with a description of the industry and the actors in place, and then review the measures and policies adopted so far and their influence on the industry, especially in relation to freight rates. By analogy with other industries, a comprehensive approach to environmental hazards is then proposed. (Author)

  13. Risk of Injuries in Paralympic Track and Field Differs by Impairment and Event Discipline: A Prospective Cohort Study at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauwet, Cheri A; Cushman, Daniel; Emery, Carolyn; Willick, Stuart E; Webborn, Nick; Derman, Wayne; Schwellnus, Martin; Stomphorst, Jaap; Van de Vliet, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The incidence rates (IRs) and factors associated with injuries in the sport of Paralympic athletics (track and field) have not been comprehensively and prospectively studied. To determine injury IRs, characteristics of injuries, and associated factors in the sport of athletics at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 977 athletes competing in the sport of athletics were followed over a total 10-day competition period of the Paralympic Games. Daily injury data were obtained via 2 databases: (1) a custom-built, web-based injury and illness surveillance system (WEB-IISS), maintained by team medical personnel; and (2) the organizing committee database, maintained by medical providers in the medical stations operated by the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Athlete impairment and event discipline were obtained via the International Paralympic Committee athlete database. IRs (injuries per 1000 athlete-days) by impairment, event discipline, sex, and age were examined. The overall IR was 22.1 injuries per 1000 athlete-days (95% CI, 19.5-24.7). In track disciplines, ambulant athletes with cerebral palsy experienced a lower incidence of injuries (IR, 10.2; 95% CI, 4.2-16.2) when compared with ambulant athletes from other impairment categories. Athletes in seated throwing experienced a higher incidence of injuries (IR, 23.7; 95% CI, 17.5-30.0) when compared with athletes in wheelchair racing (IR, 10.6; 95% CI, 5.5-15.6). In both track and field disciplines, the majority of injuries did not result in time loss from competition or training. Ambulant athletes experienced the greatest proportion of injuries to the thigh (16.4% of all injuries; IR, 4.0), observed predominantly in track athletes. Wheelchair or seated athletes experienced the greatest proportion of injuries to the shoulder/clavicle (19.3% of all injuries; IR, 3.4), observed predominantly in field athletes. This is the first prospective cohort

  14. Professor Daniel M Segal and studies of collision and `half-collision' complexes at Imperial College London and Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Keith

    2018-03-01

    We discuss Danny Segal's key roles in the development of the spectroscopy of collision complexes at Imperial College and Oxford. We explain how his work lead to a number of new insights into collision dynamics in external fields.

  15. Clear progress in nuclear safety worldwide: Convention on nuclear safety concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    It has been concluded that a significant progress has been observed in a number of key areas, such as strengthened legislation, regulatory independence, the availability of financial resources, enhanced emergency preparedness and safety improvements at nuclear power plants built to earlier standards. The objective of the Convention is to achieve and maintain a high level of nuclear safety worldwide. During the two week Review Meeting, parties engaged in a 'peer review' process in which the National Reports from individual States were collectively examined and discussed, with written replies provided to all the questions raised. Clear improvement was noted in the quality of the National Reports, the number of questions and the openness and quality of discussion and answers. The Contracting Parties praised the IAEA's various safety review missions and services, which they use widely to help enhance the effectiveness of their national safety arrangements. Forty-six contracting parties participated at the Review Meeting with over 400 delegates attending, including many heads and senior officers from regulatory bodies and experts from industry. To date, the Convention has been signed by sixty-five States and ratified by fifty-four, representing 428 of the 448 nuclear power reactors worldwide

  16. National report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled in terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekel, P.; Ivan, J.; Lukacovic, K.; Parimucha, F.; Suss, J; Tomek, J.; Jurina, V.; Kobzova, D.; Konecny, L.; Homola, J.; Zavazanova, A.; Metke, E.; Turner, M.; Vaclav, J.; Ziakova, M.; Pospisil, M.; Petrik, T.

    2005-09-01

    The National Report (Compiled in terms of the Joint Convention - September 2005) contains information how each of the obligations of the Joint Convention have been implemented. A account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) and other Slovak organisations are presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (A) Introduction; (B) Spent fuel and radioactive waste management; C) Scope of application; (D) Inventories and lists; (E) Legislation and regulation; (F) Other general safety provisions; (G) Safety of spent fuel management; (H) Safety of RAW management; (I) Transboundary movement of SF and RAW; (J) Disused sealed sources; (K) planned activiries to improve safety; (L) Annexes

  17. Experience in determining the residual life expectancy of conventional thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1990-01-01

    A combination of computer analysis, degree of damage and approximate conversion to residual life expectancy gives acceptable results. There is considerable uncertainty in converting degree of damage to residual life expectancy, since structural component characteristics play a major role here. Structure damages play a major part in establishing the degree of damage. Damage categories are given, together with action if operations are to continue. Exhaustion calculations to TRD 508 are to be taken as conservative and as possible evidence of trends. 14 figs., 12 refs

  18. Variation among conventional cultivars could be used as a criterion for environmental safety assessment of Bt rice on nontarget arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Dang, Cong; Chang, Xuefei; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zengbin; Chen, Yang; Ye, Gongyin

    2017-02-01

    The current difficulty facing risk evaluations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops on nontarget arthropods (NTAs) is the lack of criteria for determining what represents unacceptable risk. In this study, we investigated the biological parameters in the laboratory and field population abundance of Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) on two Bt rice lines and the non-Bt parent, together with 14 other conventional rice cultivars. Significant difference were found in nymphal duration and fecundity of N. lugens fed on Bt rice KMD2, as well as field population density on 12 October, compared with non-Bt parent. However, compared with the variation among conventional rice cultivars, the variation of each parameter between Bt rice and the non-Bt parent was much smaller, which can be easily seen from low-high bar graphs and also the coefficient of variation value (C.V). The variation among conventional cultivars is proposed to be used as a criterion for the safety assessment of Bt rice on NTAs, particularly when statistically significant differences in several parameters are found between Bt rice and its non-Bt parent. Coefficient of variation is suggested as a promising parameter for ecological risk judgement of IRGM rice on NTAs.

  19. Management of construction safety at RR site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, B.C.; Khatsuriya, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Construction industries are one of the most hazardous industries and hence, promotion of safety remains one of the greatest challenges facing construction industry today. According to ILO estimates: Each year at least 60,000 fatal accidents occur on construction sites around the world or one fatal accident every ten minutes. One in six fatal accidents at work occurs on a construction site. In industrialized countries, as many as 25-40 per cent of work related deaths occur on construction sites, even though the sector employs only 6-10 per cent of the workforce. The number of fatalities occurring from construction work in India is also quite disturbing. Though, the fall of person from height and through openings were the major causes for fatal /serious accidents, the risk of fatal accident involving material handling equipment, either during handling or its maintenance is also significantly high due to use of large number of material handling equipments during construction work. (author)

  20. Survey of gaseous air pollutants at selected UK sites: XXI. Data digest for Cromwell Road, London, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broughton, G.F.J.; Bower, J.; Drury, V.J.; Lilley, K.; Powell, K.

    1987-01-01

    Ambient air-quality measurements of four gaseous pollutants plus black smoke and particulate lead continued during 1984 at the Cromwell Road kerbside site sponsored by the Department of the Environment. These data are presented here in the form of frequency distributions, averages, and other parameters for winter, summer, annual and monthly periods. Time-series graphs of pollutant concentrations for 1984 and of the historical data base between March 1973 and December 1984 are also included.

  1. Autonomous Refueling of Unmanned Vehicles at Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    As seen in Figure 3, a floating sponson, similar to the outside flotation collar on a RIB, is towed off the stern of the parent ship with a tow...V. Minnick, Thomas G. Beukema, Wojciech Kauczynski, Andrew L. Silver , and Christopher Cleary, “Stern Boat Deployment Systems and Operability

  2. Exploration of the Energy Efficiency of the Greater London Authority ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GLA Building/City Hall) ... Journal Home > Vol 11, No 2 (2007) > ... The Greater London Authority building was acclaimed as being energy efficient, with claims of 75 % reduction in its annual energy consumption compared to a high specification ...

  3. Pharmacotherapy at the end-of-life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2011-07-01

    Older people reaching end-of-life status are particularly at risk from inter-related adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, including polypharmacy, inappropriate medications and adverse drug events. These adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be highly detrimental, as well as highly expensive. End-of-life pharmacotherapy is sometimes perceived to be complex and challenging, probably unnecessarily. This relates in part to the poorly developed evidence base and lack of high-quality research in this area. In this article, we deal with some of the key issues relating to pharmacotherapy in end-of-life patients, namely (i) the guiding principles of drug selection, (ii) the main drugs and drug classes that are best avoided, (iii) the benefits of \\'oligopharmacy\\' (i.e. deliberate avoidance of polypharmacy) in end-of-life patients.

  4. Life Cycle Assessment of Functionally Enhanced Polymers-Engineered Nanomaterials or Conventional Additives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2016-01-01

    used to enhance material properties. The aim of this study is to perform life cycle assessments (LCAs) on 5 polymer products (polypropylene air-conditioner part for cars, polypropylene garden chair, polypropylene small electrical box for houses, polyvinylchloride-wood outdoor flooring and polystyrene...

  5. Survey of community pharmacists' perception of electronic cigarettes in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Gomes, Ana C N; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Kayyali, Reem; Buonocore, Federico; Calabrese, Gianpiero

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To seek community pharmacists' perception on use, safety and possible effectiveness of e-cigarettes as quit smoking tools, and their future regulation. Setting A survey of a sample of 154 community pharmacies across London, UK. Context E-cigarettes have exclusively established themselves in the market through consumers-led demand. To date, e-cigarettes still remain unregulated and can be easily purchased in shops, over the internet, but more controversially also in pharmacies in the UK. Pharmacists find themselves with a shortage of information on their safety and efficacy, and may experience an ethical dilemma when consulted by patients/customers. Key findings Response rate: 60% (n=92). Independent pharmacies accounted for 90% of the sample. The majority of participants (73%) sell e-cigarettes. A minority of participants (20%) have been presented with adverse effects such as cough and dry mouth. As possible reasons for their use, pharmacists ranked ‘aid in stop smoking’ as the most important (56%), with ‘cheaper alternative’ (43%) and ‘social/recreational use’ (31%) being the least important ones. Safety issues were raised as statements such as ‘e-liquid in cartridges may be toxic’ were agreed by 52% of respondents. The majority of pharmacists (97%) were supportive of e-cigarettes being regulated, expressing current concerns regarding excipients (42%) and nicotine content (34%). Participants indicated that they would require training in the form of information packs (88%), online tutorials (67%), continuous professional development (CPD) workshops (43%) to cover safety, counselling, dosage instructions, adverse effects and role in the smoking cessation care pathway in the future. Conclusions Pharmacists expressed concerns about the safety of e-cigarettes, especially regarding the amounts of excipients and nicotine as these still remain unregulated. Currently, there are no guidelines for pharmacists regarding e-cigarettes. Community

  6. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Rules of procedure and financial rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001, three documents were adopted concerning the rules and arrangements for conducting meetings of Contracting Parties to the Convention. As announced in the Report on the Preparatory Meeting (GOV/INF/2002/3), these three documents are being made available as INFCIRCs. Accordingly, herewith attached are the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules. Also being made available are Guidelines regarding the Review Process (INFCIRC/603) and Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports (INFCIRC/604)

  7. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the form and structure of national reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001, three documents were adopted concerning the rules and arrangements for conducting meetings of Contracting Parties to the Convention. As announced in the Report on the Preparatory Meeting (GOV/INF/2002/3), these three documents are being made available as INFCIRCs. Accordingly, herewith attached are the Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports. Also being made available are the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules (INFCIRC/602) and Guidelines regarding the Review Process (INFCIRC/603)

  8. General Concerns Life-Cycle Design of Economical Ice-Resistant Structures in the Bohai Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Da-yong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In China, the oil and natural gas resources of Bohai Bay are mainly marginal oil fields. It is necessary to build both iceresistant and economical offshore platforms. However, there are many risks during the life cycle of offshore platforms due to the imperfect preliminary design for the Bohai Sea economical ice-resistant structures. As a result, the whole life-cycle design should be considered, including plan, design, construction, management and maintenance design. Based on the demand of existing codes and research of the basic design, structural ice-resistant performance and the reasonable management and maintenance, the life-cycle design theory is discussed. It was concluded that the life-cycle cost-effective optimum design proposed will lead to a minimum risk.

  9. numerical assessment of conventional regulation effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benkoussas B, Djedjig R, and Vauquelin O

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... The effectiveness of an underground smoke control system mainly depends on fire safety engineering that is ... In the same context, this work aims firstly, at investigating the effectiveness of conventional regulation applied to .... 5a). Fig.4. Station smoke behavior for conventional ventilation regulation. Fig.5a.

  10. Occurrence of organohalogens at the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbesing, Christoph; Kotte, Karsten; Keppler, Frank; Krause, Torsten; Bahlmann, Enno; Schöler, Heinfried

    2013-04-01

    Most arid and semi-arid regions are characterized by evaporites, which are assured sources for volatile organohalogens (VOX) [1]. These compounds play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. The Dead Sea between Israel and Jordan is the world's most famous and biggest all-season water covered salt lake. In both countries chemical plants like the Dead Sea Works and the Arab Potash Company are located at the southern part of the Dead Sea and mine various elements such as bromine and magnesium. Conveying sea water through constructed evaporation pans multifarious salts are enriched and precipitated. In contrast, the Northern basin and main part of the Dead Sea has remained almost untouched by industrial salt production. Its fresh water supply from the Jordan River is constantly decreasing, leading to further increased salinity. During a HALOPROC campaign (Natural Halogenation Processes in the Environment) we collected various samples including air, soils, sediments, halophytic plants, ground- and seawater from the Northern and Southern basin of the Israeli side of the Dead Sea. These samples were investigated for the occurrence of halocarbons using different analytical techniques. Most samples were analyzed for volatile organohalogens such as haloalkanes using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Interestingly, there is a strong enrichment of trihalomethanes (THM), especially all chlorinated and brominated ones and also the iodinated compound dichloroiodomethane were found in the Southern basin. In addition, volatile organic carbons (VOC) such as ethene and some other alkenes were analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) to obtain further information about potential precursors of halogenated compounds. Halophytic plants were investigated for their potential to release chloromethane and bromomethane but also for their stable carbon and hydrogen isotope composition. For this purpose, a plant chamber was

  11. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib following inadequate response to conventional synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Burmester, Gerd; Nash, Peter; Zerbini, Cristiano A F; Soma, Koshika; Kwok, Kenneth; Hendrikx, Thijs; Bananis, Eustratios; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have shown diminished clinical response following an inadequate response (IR) to ≥1 previous bDMARD. Here, tofacitinib was compared with placebo in patients with an IR to conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs; bDMARD-naive) and in patients with an IR to bDMARDs (bDMARD-IR). Data were taken from phase II and phase III studies of tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily, or placebo, as monotherapy or with background methotrexate or other csDMARDs. Efficacy endpoints and incidence rates of adverse events (AEs) of special interest were assessed. 2812 bDMARD-naive and 705 bDMARD-IR patients were analysed. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were generally similar between treatment groups within subpopulations. Across subpopulations, improvements in efficacy parameters at month 3 were generally significantly greater for both tofacitinib doses versus placebo. Clinical response was numerically greater with bDMARD-naive versus bDMARD-IR patients (overlapping 95% CIs). Rates of safety events of special interest were generally similar between tofacitinib doses and subpopulations; however, patients receiving glucocorticoids had more serious AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, serious infection events and herpes zoster. Numerically greater clinical responses and incidence rates of AEs of special interest were generally reported for tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily versus tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (overlapping 95% CIs). Tofacitinib demonstrated efficacy in both bDMARD-naive and bDMARD-IR patients with RA. Clinical response to tofacitinib was generally numerically greater in bDMARD-naive than bDMARD-IR patients. The safety profile appeared similar between subpopulations. (NCT00413660, NCT00550446, NCT00603512, NCT00687193, NCT00960440, NCT00847613, NCT00814307, NCT00856544, NCT00853385). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  12. Nutritional Value and Potential Chemical Food Safety Hazards of Selected Traditional and Conventional Pork Hams from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Halagarda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumers no longer look for food characterized only by health safety and proper nutritional value. As a result, an increased interest in traditional and regional food can be observed. The aim of this paper is to analyze the results of a comparative analysis of three types of hams: traditional products registered on the List of Traditional Products of the Polish Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, then products whose names, retail prices, appearance, and manufacturer’s description suggest traditional methods of production, and finally conventional hams. The results show that traditional hams are characterized by the highest nutritional value among the analyzed groups of products. They have the lowest water and a high protein content. In addition, traditional hams are distinguished by a low concentration of sodium chloride and no addition of phosphates. The residues of nitrites and nitrates indicate their moderate use in manufacturing processes.

  13. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Guidelines regarding the review process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    At the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001, three documents were adopted concerning the rules and arrangements for conducting meetings of the Contracting Parties to the Convention. As announced in the Report on the Preparatory Meeting (GOV/INF/2002/3), these three documents are being made available as INFCIRCs. Accordingly, herewith attached are the Guidelines regarding the Review Process. Also being made available are the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules (INFCIRC/602) and Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports (INFCIRC/604)

  14. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Guidelines regarding the review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001, three documents were adopted concerning the rules and arrangements for conducting meetings of the Contracting Parties to the Convention. As announced in the Report on the Preparatory Meeting (GOV/INF/2002/3), these three documents are being made available as INFCIRCs. Accordingly, herewith attached are the Guidelines regarding the Review Process. Also being made available are the Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules (INFCIRC/602) and Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports (INFCIRC/604)

  15. Guidelines for sea dumping packages of radioactive waste. Revised version.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-04-01

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to establish general requirements and provide practical information for the design and manufacture of packages for sea dumping of radioactive waste, in accordance with the terms of the OECD Council Decision establishing a Multilateral Consultation and Surveillance Mechanism for Sea Dumping of Radioactive Waste. These Guidelines are in compliance with the IAEA Revised Definition and Recommendations of 1978, for applying the London Dumping Convention to radioactive waste, and are intended for application under the responsibility of the appropriate national authorities of countries participating in the NEA Mechanism

  16. Reducing risks and increasing safety in everyday life: the role of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enander, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: in social science risk research more attention has been paid to examining how people in general perceive risks than to how they perceive possible measures to reduce risks and to increase their own safety. The latter area is, however, becoming increasingly important to understand, particularly in the light of current emphasis on individual responsibility in risk prevention and emergency preparedness. For example, in Sweden a major effort to increase safety awareness among the general public and to increase knowledge and skills in a number of safety-related areas is at present being planned. This effort is being undertaken as a cooperative effort between different authorities and institutions and is coordinated by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency. The intentions behind this and similar programmes raise a number of questions concerning how people view risks and safety measures in their own immediate environment. Knowledge of the factors affecting willingness to take precautions is important in the design of communication and information. The factors which are of significance may be risk-related and concern perceptions of personal risk, but may also be related to attitudes an beliefs concerning different precautionary measures, to perception of social norms and conventions as well as to personal experiences and values. This paper presents some data concerning views and actions among lay groups in relation to reducing risks and increasing safety. Factors affecting these views are discussed in the light of previous research and of empirical data from some recent studies. (author)

  17. Report of the twenty-first session, London, 18-22 February 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Pollution (GESAMP) held its twenty-first session at the Headquarters of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), London, from 18 to 22 February 1991. Marine pollution is primarily linked to coastal development. The most serious problems are those associated with inadequately controlled coastal development and intensive human settlement of the coastal zone. GESAMP emphasizes the importance of the following problems and issues: State of the marine environment; comprehensive framework for the assessment and regulation of waste disposal in the marine environment; information on preparations for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development; review of potentially harmful substances: 1. Carcinogenic substances. 2. Mutagenic substances. 3. Teratogenic substances. 4. Organochlorine compounds. 5. Oil, and other hydrocarbons including used lubricating oils, oil spill dispersants and chemicals used in offshore oil exploration and exploitation; environmental impacts of coastal aquaculture; global change and the air/sea exchange of chemicals; future work programme

  18. Noise-proof bubbles to protect sea life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboutte, G.

    2012-01-01

    The construction of wind turbines in shallow sea might jeopardize the life of mammals living nearby. The wave sound generated by each hammer impact to drive the pillars deep in the sea bottom can reach up to 200 decibels at 750 m away from the construction site. Repeated noises at this sound level is thought to be damaging for audition systems of sea mammals. The German authorities have launched a 4-year long program to find efficient technical solutions to damp sound waves. Various techniques have been tested in the Baltic sea and it appears that most techniques are efficient but some seem more relevant like the bubble curtain in which air bubbles generated around the site disturb the propagation of sound waves, or the balloon curtain in which air balloons plays the role of the bubbles, or the network of vertical pipes set around the construction site, or the sound-proofed sheath set around the pillar and hammer. (A.C.)

  19. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules' adopted at the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001 were modified at the First Review Meeting of Contracting Parties held from 3 to 14 November 2003 and the Extraordinary Meeting of Contracting Parties held on 7 November 2005. The modified 'Rules of Procedure and Financial Rules' are set forth in the Attachment hereto

  20. The History of Neurosurgery at the National Hospital, Queen Square, London, with Some Personal Recollections from 1948 Onwards: The Early Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael P

    2017-07-01

    The National Hospital, Queen Square, London was founded as a charitable institution in 1860, becoming the first dedicated neuroscience hospital in the world. Sir Victor Horsley, the first neurosurgeon was appointed in 1886, and since that time, Queen Square neurosurgeons have been prominent on the World neurosurgical stage, including Sir Wylie McKissock and Prof Lindsay Symon, inter alia. This article gives the history taken from both published records and personal stories, recorded by a neurosurgeon who has worked at the hospital for thirty five years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. IMCO: Making the seas safer and cleaner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Since 1959, when the IMCO Assembly met for the first time, the Organization has had two main objectives: the introduction of measures designed to improve safety at sea and to prevent pollution of the sea from ships. But during its twenty-year history IMCO has also adopted a number of Conventions and other measures which are aimed specifically at tankers and the problem of pollution. The 1954 Oil Pollution Convention (for which IMCO became depositary in 1959) was the first major attempt by the maritime nations to curb the impact of oil pollution, but since then the problem has become even more serious today The amount of oil carried by sea has risen by 700 per cent in 20 years - to around 1,700 million tons. The world tanker fleet has increased from 37 million deadweight tons in 1954 to around 340 million deadweight tons today, and the size of the tankers themselves has also grown amazingly. The second Convention deals with liability of the ship or cargo owner for damage suffered as a result of an oil pollution casualty. The Convention is intended to ensure that adequate compensation is available to victims and places the liability for the damage on the shipowner. As a result, another Conference was convened by IMCO in 1971 which resulted in the adoption of a Convention establishing the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage The Convention came into force in 1978 and the Fund has now been established with its headquarters in London These three Conventions all deal with what one might call the legal aspects of oil pollution. But the continuing boom in the transportation of oil showed that more work needed to be done on the technical side as well: the scale of oil pollution was so great in some areas that there was serious concern for the marine environment, not only as a result of accidents but through normal tanker operations, notably the cleaning of cargo tanks. In 1973 a major conference was called to discuss the whole problem of marine

  2. Dynamic Safety Cases for Through-Life Safety Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Ewen; Pai, Ganesh; Habli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    We describe dynamic safety cases, a novel operationalization of the concept of through-life safety assurance, whose goal is to enable proactive safety management. Using an example from the aviation systems domain, we motivate our approach, its underlying principles, and a lifecycle. We then identify the key elements required to move towards a formalization of the associated framework.

  3. Answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. April 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In this publication detail answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management of April 2009 are published

  4. Answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    In this publication detail answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management of April 2014 are published.

  5. Answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. April 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    In this publication detail answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management of April 2011 are published.

  6. Answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. April 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    In this publication detail answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management of April 2011 are published.

  7. Answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. April 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    In this publication detail answers to questions on National report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management of April 2011 are published.

  8. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports' adopted at the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001 were modified at the Second Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties held from 15 to 24 May 2006. The modified 'Guidelines regarding the Form and Structure of National Reports' are set forth in the Attachment hereto

  9. The Spillover Effects on Employees’ Life of Construction Enterprises’ Safety Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Organizational safety climate will produce spillover effects and thus affect the individuals’ performance in their family life. As a mainstay industry in many countries, the construction industry has a considerable number of employees and the research on the spillover effects from the safety climate of construction enterprises has important theoretical and practical significance to improve the safety behavior of construction employees in their family life. In this study, we thoroughly reviewed the literature to identify the dimensions of the safety climate spillover, obtain empirical data of the construction employees through a questionnaire survey, and use the data analysis method to study the spillover effects of the safety climate of the construction enterprises from the perspective of work–family integration, and reveal its influence mechanism. This study developed a questionnaire to measure the safety climate spillover of the construction enterprises including two dimensions, namely values and behaviors, with nine measured items. Management commitment and safety attitude in the safety climate were positively related to the spillover, and management commitment had the greatest impact on the spillover, while the other components were not significantly related to the spillover. The two forms of spillover, values and behaviors, were mutually influential, and the safety climate had a more significant impact on the values. This paper contributes to the current safety research by developing a factor structure of spillover effects of the safety climate on the lives of construction employees, thus providing a more profound interpretation of this crucial construct in the safety research domain. The spillover effects of the safety climate’s measurement questionnaire serve as an important tool for spillover among construction enterprises. Findings can facilitate improvement in both theories and practices related to the spillover effects of the

  10. Comparison of the microbiological quality of environmentally friendly and conventionally grown vegetables sold at retail markets in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Minju; Kim, Eun-Gyeong; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Hoikyung

    2014-09-01

    Fresh produce is usually eaten raw without cooking or heating, which may increase the probability of foodborne infection. The microbiological quality of 11 types of fresh, raw vegetables (romaine lettuce, sesame leaves, crown daisy, garlic chives, iceberg lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, leek, chili pepper, capsicum, and zucchini) purchased at retail markets in Iksan, Korea as affected by cultivation method (environmentally friendly vegetables [organic, pesticide-free, and low-pesticide vegetables] and conventionally grown vegetables) and harvest season was determined. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella were not detected in all samples of vegetables tested. Aerobic mesophiles (>6 log cfu/g) were detected in environmentally friendly romaine lettuce and crown daisy and environmentally friendly and conventionally grown garlic chives, which also contained coliforms (>3 log cfu/g). Sesame leaf and crown daisy (regardless of cultivation method), as well as conventionally grown romaine lettuce and leek, contained >1 log cfu/g of E. coli. The overall microbiological quality of environmentally friendly and conventionally grown vegetables was not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, there were seasonal effects on populations of coliforms and generic E. coli on vegetables. The greatest numbers of microorganisms were isolated from environmentally friendly or conventionally grown vegetables purchased in winter. The vegetables, regardless of cultivation method or season, should be subjected to appropriate antimicrobial treatment to enhance their microbial safety. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Mothering through Islam: narratives of religious identity in London

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Louise; Vacchelli, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws upon research with mothers of diverse Muslim backgrounds in London to explore how these women use ‘conservative’ interpretations of Islamic beliefs and practices to underpin their parenting strategies. In particular the paper looks at how mothers use religion as a frame to make sense of and give meaning to their experiences and encounters in Britain. We suggest that the women use Islam in four key ways: (i) as a framework for teaching their children right and wrong, (ii) as a...

  12. RATIONALE OF KUYALNIK ESTUARY FILLING ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY BY THE BLACK SEA WATERS. CHEMICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Antonovich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It was found that currently sulphate and calcium ions content in Kuyalnik brine close to the solubility product of CaSO4. If brine will not by dilute precipitation of gypsum may be expect in prospectstive. It is shown that the dilution of the Kuyalnik brine by seawater willreduces the concentration of calcium and sulfate ions reducing their solubility product and making it impossible the formation of calcium sulfate and precipitation of gypsum. On the basis of established the contents of some heavy metals, polyarenes, chlorinated pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls which were in water and sediments of the Gulf of Odessa , brine and peloids Kuyalnik estuary pronounced more pollution by priority toxicants of estuary compared with seawater. Concluded tht environmental safety of Kuyalnik estuary filling by the Black Sea waters.

  13. Elements of seismic imaging and velocity analysis – Forward modeling and diffraction analysis of conventional seismic data from the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    comprises important oil and gas reservoirs. By application of well-established conventional velocity analysis methods and high-quality diffraction imaging techniques, this study aims to increase the resolution and the image quality of the seismic data. In order to analyze seismic wave propagation......-outs and salt delineations, which can be extracted from the diffractions. The potential of diffraction imaging techniques was studied for 2D seismic stacked data from the North Sea. In this approach, the applied plane-wave destruction method was successful in order to suppress the reflections from the stacked....... This improved seismic imaging is demonstrated for a salt structure as well as for Overpressured Shale structures and the Top Chalk of the North Sea....

  14. On Optimum Safety Levels of Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents results from numerical simulations performed with the objective of identifying optimum design safety levels of conventional rubble mound and caisson breakwaters, corresponding to the lowest costs over the service life of the structures. The work is related to the PIANC Working...... Group 47 on "Selection of type of breakwater structures". The paper summaries results given in Burcharth and Sorensen (2005) related to outer rubble mound breakwaters but focus on optimum safety levels for outer caisson breakwaters on low and high rubble foundations placed on sea beds strong enough...... to resist geotechnical slip failures. Optimum safety levels formulated for use both in deterministic and probabilistic design procedures are given. Results obtained so far indicate that the optimum safety levels for caisson breakwaters are much higher than for rubble mound breakwaters....

  15. Ectosymbionts of the Sea Anemone Stichodactyla gigantea at Kosrae, Micronesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes, Floyd E.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the ectosymbionts associating with the sea anemone Stichodactyla gigantea at Kosrae, Micronesia. Ectosymbionts of seven species associated with 60.7% of S. gigantea (n=28, with a mean of 2.4 per anemone and 3.9 per occupied anemone. Anemones hosting one or more ectosymbionts did not differ significantly in size from anemones lacking ectosymbionts and there was no significant correlation between anemone size and the number of ectosymbionts. Of 67 ectosymbionts observed, the sea cucumber Stichopus vastus comprised 23.9%, followed by the shrimp Thor amboinensis (20.9%, unidentified hermit crabs (Paguroidea; 20.9%, the cardinalfish Ostorhinchus novemfasciatus (20.9%, the shrimp Periclimenes brevicarpalis (9.0%, the sea cucumber Holothuria hilla (3.0%, and an unidentified brachyuran crab (1.5%. This study documents the first records of S. vastus, H. hilla, and O. novemfasciatus associating with S. gigantea, and the first locality records of S. gigantea, T. amboinensis, P. brevicarpalis, and S. vastus for Kosrae. Because humans often harvest S. gigantea for food at Kosrae, we recommend protecting the symbiotic assemblage of S. gigantea by establishing a sustainable system of harvesting.

  16. Dose reduction in diagnostic radiology. Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association meeting on 8th December 1983 at Birbeck College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, S.E.; Putney, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nine chapters review the Proceedings of the Hospital Physicists' Association Meeting held in London in 1983 on 'Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology'. Among the topics discussed were the balance between dose reduction and image quality, various procedures and techniques for keeping the dose to the patient to a minimum including the use of K-edge filtration and rare-earth intensifying screens, equipment for assessing the area exposure product in patients and the balance between radiation risk and benefit from radiographic examinations. All nine chapters are indexed separately. (U.K.)

  17. Communication through music : The education system and the environment at the Royal College of Music in London

    OpenAIRE

    近藤, 綾子; Ayako, KONDO; 鈴鹿国際大学短期大学部

    2006-01-01

    Music is art that can expresses one's feelings through each and every note. That is the same compositions, or those of the great composers, such as Bach's Partitas and Mozart's Sonatas. If performers do not feel and truly enjoy the music they play, then it is natural that the experience for the listener will also be empty. This is because music through the medium of sounds is one way that humans interact and ultimately communicate. In this article, I examine, "The education system and the env...

  18. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the Review Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Guidelines regarding the Review Process' adopted at the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001 were modified at the First Review Meeting of Contracting Parties held from 3 to 14 November 2003 and the Extraordinary Meeting of the Contracting Parties held on 7 November 2005. The modified 'Guidelines regarding the Review Process' are set forth in the Attachment hereto

  19. A Biogeochemical Oceanographer at Sea: My Life with Nitrogen and a Nod to Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Richard C.

    2018-01-01

    My evolution from electrical engineering student to limnologist and then to oceanographer was a consequence of generous mentoring, which led to my use of the 15N tracer technique to measure nitrogen fixation in aquatic systems. The concept of new and regenerated production arose when I applied this method to measure nitrate and ammonium uptake in marine ecosystems. I then showed that enzyme kinetics could be applied to algal nitrogen uptake and used a silicate pump to explain silicate limitation of diatoms in coastal and equatorial upwelling systems. These concepts are now recognized as modern nutrient paradigms in biogeochemical oceanography. My interest in nutrients required field studies and led to my passion for the study of upwelling ecosystems and the establishment of two major international programs, with numerous advisors, collaborators, and students helping along the way.

  20. National report of the Slovak Republic - proposal. Compiled in terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Jun 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurina, V.; Viktory, D.; Kobzova, D.; Petrik, T.; Sovcik, J.; Hekel, P.; Suess, J.; Tomek, J.; Lukacovic, J.; Hekel, P.; Ivan, J.; Ziakova, M.; Metke, E.; Pospisil, M.; Turner, M.; Homola, J.; Konecny, L.; Parimucha, F.; Vaclav, J.; Horvath, J.; Soos, F.; Betak, A.; Pospisil, P.; Mihaly, B.; Kubala, M.; Schmidtova, B.; Orihel, M.; Vasina, D.; Balaz, J.; Ehn, L.; Micovicova, D.; Vrtoch, M.; Mlcuch, L.; Granak, P.; Meleg, J.; Sedliak, D.; Bardy, M.; Gogoliak, J.; Prazska, M.; Burslova, J.

    2008-06-01

    A brief national safety report of the Slovak Republic compiled in terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management in 2008 is presented. This safety report consists of following chapters: (A) Introduction; (B) Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RAW) management conception; (C) Scope of application; (D) Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RAW) management; (E) Legislation and regulatory framework; (F) General safety provisions; (G) Safety of spent nuclear fuel management; (H) Safety of radioactive waste management; (I) Transboundary movement of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; (J) Discussed sealed radioactive sources; (K) Planned measures to improve safety; (L) Annexes

  1. Well-to-wheel life cycle assessment of transportation fuels derived from different North American conventional crudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Md. Mustafizur; Canter, Christina; Kumar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of data-intensive bottom-up life cycle assessment model. • Quantification of well-to-wheel GHG emissions for five North American crudes. • Allocation of emissions to transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel). • California’s Kern County heavy oil is the most GHG intensive of the crudes. - Abstract: A life cycle assessment (LCA) is an extremely useful tool to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with all the stages of a crude oil’s life from well-to-wheel (WTW). All of the WTW life cycle stages of crude oil consume energy and produce significant amounts of GHG emissions. The present study attempts to quantify the WTW life cycle GHG emissions for transportation fuels derived from five North American conventional crudes through the development of an LCA model called FUNNEL-GHG-CCO (FUNdamental Engineering PrinciplEs-based ModeL for Estimation of GreenHouse Gases in Conventional Crude Oils). This model estimates GHG emissions from all the life cycle stages from recovery of crude to the combustion of transportation fuels in vehicle engines. The contribution of recovery emissions in the total WTW GHG emissions ranges from 3.12% for Mars crude to 24.25% for California’s Kern County heavy oil. The transportation of crude oil and refined fuel contributes only 0.44–1.73% of the total WTW life cycle GHG emissions, depending on the transportation methods and total distance transported. The GHG emissions for refining were calculated from the amount of energy use in the refining of crude oil to produce transportation fuels. All the upstream GHG emissions were allocated to gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Refining GHG emissions vary from 13.66–18.70 g-CO 2 eq/MJ-gasoline, 9.71–15.33 g-CO 2 eq/MJ-diesel, and 6.38–9.92 g-CO 2 eq/MJ-jet fuel derived from Alaska North Slope and California’s Kern County heavy oil, respectively. The total WTW life cycle GHG emissions range from 97.55 g-CO 2 eq

  2. Recent research in DNA repair, mutation and recombination: a report of the DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on 18 December 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N J; Strike, P

    1996-09-02

    The now traditional one day Christmas DNA Repair meeting was held at City University, London for the third year in succession. With over 130 participants and a programme consisting of a total of 24 pre-offered presentations the meeting reached record dimensions. Attendees were from 24 institutions throughout the United Kingdom, and with several distinct research groups contained within the large contingents from the ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories and the MRC Cell Mutation Unit in Brighton, this indicates the increasing interest and depth of UK research in DNA repair. One slight disappointment of the meeting was the fall in the numbers of non-UK participants. Although the meeting in 1994 (Strike, 1995) saw an increase in presentations from Continental Europe (six countries including France, Germany. The Netherlands and Switzerland), the trend did not continue this year, with only Denmark being represented. The 24 contributors consisted of approximately equal numbers of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and more "established' scientists reflecting the continuing policy of encouraging younger members of the repair community to present their work. The mix of presenters was particularly well illustrated by two excellent and consecutive talks by Professor Bryn Bridges (MRC Cell Mutation Unit) and Alison Mitchell, a postgraduate student in Stephen West's laboratory (ICRF, Clare Hall). The organisms under study were as equally disparate and included Archaebacteria, Escherichia coli. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus, mice and men. The range of topics was also varied and included bacterial mutagenesis, NMR studies of Ada protein, preferential DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint genes, reconstitution of nucleotide excision repair and V(D)J recombination in vitro, creation of repair deficient transgenic mice and mismatch defects in human cells. The result was a very successful meeting which was characterized by the consistently high

  3. Considerations concerning ''de minimis'' quantities of radioactive waste suitable for dumping at sea under a general permit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Following the principles proposed by the ICRP of balancing the costs and detriments of any practice involving radioactivity, there must be some level of radioactivity below which considerations other than those of the radioactivity itself are of overriding importance. For very low-level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to define a quantitative criterion which allows practical implementation of these principles within the terms of the London Dumping Convention. It will be necessary therefore to consider how these requirements can be met by defining material that can be regarded as non-radioactive for the purposes of the London Dumping Convention, defining a category of radioactivity in wastes whose content is sufficiently low (de minimis) that it can be dumped under a general permit if its other characteristics so permit. It is stressed that even if a material has been deemed to contain less than de minimis quantities of radioactive materials its suitability for dumping due to it's other constituents must still be carried out. The question of defining such a de minimis level of radioactivity was considered by an Advisory Group meeting convened at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 6 July 1979

  4. Improving the patient booking service to reduce the number of missed appointments at East London NHS Foundation Trust Community Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Elizabeth; Shah, Amar; De Souza, Warren; Harrison, Mark; Chettur, Chris; Onathukattil, Maimoona; Smart, Michelle; Mata, Marlon; Chitewe, Auzewell; Binley, Emma

    2017-01-01

    The East London National Health Service Foundation Trust (ELFT) Community Musculoskeletal (MSK) Physiotherapy Service had reported a high rate of non-attendance at scheduled appointments. This was leading to delayed access to treatment for patients and a reduced capacity for service users, as well as a waste of clinical resources. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to reduce the percentage of missed appointments within this department. This study was undertaken by the ELFT community MSK service, with support from the ELFT Quality Improvement team. To begin with, patient complaints were explored; these indicated that the main reason for missing appointments was due to issues with the patient booking service. Baseline data were initially collected for both new referrals and follow-up patients. The proposed changes were then introduced, which included text message reminders, first via a manual platform and then via an automated system. Ongoing data were recorded to note the effectiveness of these changes. Following the intervention, non-attendance of newly referred patients reduced by 43.35% (23.76%-13.46%) after both cycles. Non-attendance of follow-up patients reduced by 44.14% (23.74%-13.26%) after the second cycle alone. By listening to the opinions of service users, it was possible to improve the patient booking system and the flexibility of appointments. This resulted in a reduction in the percentage of appointments missed. These changes will continue to be monitored within this department to ensure sustainability but there is also now potential for similar interventions to be trialled in other health service departments.

  5. Comparison of parallel temperature measurements from conventional and automatic weather stations at Fabra Observatory (Barcelona).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Enric; Gilabert, Alba; Prohom, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Fabra Observatory , located in a promontory at 411 meters above sea level in the outskirts of Barcelona, hosts a continuous climate record since 1913. Additionally, it has been recording since 1996 simultaneous temperature and precipitation data with conventional instruments and automated systems. The automatization of recording sites employed with climatological purposes is happening elsewhere in the country and across the globe. Unfortunately, in most cases long lasting parallel measurements, are not kept. Thereafter, this site offers an excellent opportunity to study the impact of the introduction of Automatic Weather Stations (AWS). The conventional station (CON) equips a liquid in glass thermometer, located inside a standard Stevenson screen. The automatic measurements (AWS) have been taken using MCV-STA sensors sheltered in a MCV small plate-like ventilated screen between 1996 and the end of July 2007. For our analysis, this MCV period is split in two (T1, T2) due to an obvious jump in the differences AWS-CON in October 2002, produced by unknown reasons. From August 2007 to the present (T3), a Vaisala HMP45AL sensor was placed inside a Stevenson Screen and used for automatic measurements. For daily maximum temperatures, the median differences reach 3.2°C in T1, 1.1°C in T2 and merely -0.1°C in T3. In this later period, 94% of the differences are comprised in a ±0.5°C range, compared to 23% in T2 and only 6% in T1. It is interesting to note how the overheating of the MCV screen dominates the difference series, as 85% of the AWS values taken in T1 and T2 are warmer than the conventional measurements, contrasting with only 27% of cases during T3, when the automated measurements were taken inside a Stevenson screen. These differences are highly temperature dependent: low (high) AWS temperatures are associated with small (large) differences with the CON series. This effect is also evident if temperatures are analyzed by seasons: summer differences are much

  6. Norwegian national report. Joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. [National report from Norway, fourth review meeting, 14-23 May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This report contains the national report from Norway to the fourth review meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management to be held 14 to 23 May 2012. (Author)

  7. Effects and practices on nuclear safety convention promoting nuclear safety in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Cheng Jianxiu; Chen Maosong

    2010-01-01

    By the means of peer review and self-review, the Contracting Parties are reviewed on obligations under the Convention. In order to implementation these, the State Department established the specific group, under the efforts of departments together, the China fulfilled the obligations successfully. The international society affirmed the good practices on nuclear safety in China, at the same time, they pointed out some fields that China pay close attention to. On the basis of analyzing questions, we point out some aspects which are combined the common questions put forward by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the 4th reviewing meeting that the Chinese government pay close attention to on the next review meeting. Meanwhile, we also put forward some suggestions on how to do better on fulfilling the convention. (authors)

  8. Life-cycle Analysis of Bioproducts and Their Conventional Counterparts in GREET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Adom, Felix [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sather, Norm [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, Seth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); He, Chang [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Gong, Jian [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Yue, Dajun [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); You, Fengqi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    To further expand upon the literature in this field and to develop a platform for bioproduct LCA, we developed LCA results for ten bioproducts produced either from algal glycerol or from corn stover-derived sugars. We used Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREETTM) model as the platform for this study. The data and calculations reported herein are available to GREET users in a bioproducts module included in the fall 2015 GREET release. This report documents our approach to this analysis and the results. In Chapter 2, we review the process we underwent to select the bioproducts for analysis based on market and technology readiness criteria. In Chapter 3, we review key parameters for production of the two feedstocks we considered: corn stover and algae. Given the lack of publicly available information about the production of bioproducts, which is caused in large part by the emerging nature of the industry, we developed Aspen Plus® simulations of the processes that could be used to produce each bioproduct. From these simulations, we extracted the energy and material flows of these processes, which were important inputs to the GREET bioproducts module. Chapter 4 provides the details of these Aspen Plus simulations. It is important to compare the LCA results for bioproducts to those for their petroleum counterparts. We therefore also developed material and energy flow data for conventional products based mostly on the literature. These data are described in Chapter 5 and are also included in the GREET bioproducts module. In Chapter 6, we present results from this analysis and examine areas for refinement and future research.

  9. Implementation of the obligations of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Fourth national report of Switzerland in accordance with Article 32 of the convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    Fukushima the Federal Council announced to abandon plans to build new nuclear reactors. The existing reactors would be allowed to continue operating, but would not be replaced at the end of their life span. The major part of nuclear research in Switzerland is performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). These include research related to spent fuel and radioactive waste management. PSI operates several nuclear facilities: the research reactor PROTEUS, a hot laboratory, and waste management facilities. The former research reactors DIORIT and SAPHIR are in the state of decommissioning. Two small research reactors exist at the University of Basel (Uni BS) and at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) for teaching purposes. The former Lucens experimental NPP was decommissioned and dismantled after experiencing a loss of coolant accident in 1969. This site was declassified and released for non-nuclear activities, as well as the one of the small research reactor at the University of Geneva. Each NPP has facilities for the conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste. PSI operates the National Collection Centre for all non-NPP radioactive waste coming from medicine, industry and research. In Wuerenlingen, the Central Storage Facility for Radioactive Waste (ZZL) has been constructed by the utility-owned company ZWILAG. The application for the general licence for a repository for low and intermediate level waste at the Wellenberg site was rejected by the citizens. Concerning the disposal of high level and long-lived intermediate level waste, the work was concentrated on the demonstration of the feasibility of such a repository in Switzerland. The feasibility study based on a repository in the crystalline basement of Northern Switzerland did not fully succeed in providing the required demonstration. The Federal Council then ordered that research should be extended to sedimentary rocks. As a result of a broad selection process, the Opalinus clay formation

  10. Implementation of the obligations of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Fourth national report of Switzerland in accordance with Article 32 of the convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    nuclear accident in Fukushima the Federal Council announced to abandon plans to build new nuclear reactors. The existing reactors would be allowed to continue operating, but would not be replaced at the end of their life span. The major part of nuclear research in Switzerland is performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). These include research related to spent fuel and radioactive waste management. PSI operates several nuclear facilities: the research reactor PROTEUS, a hot laboratory, and waste management facilities. The former research reactors DIORIT and SAPHIR are in the state of decommissioning. Two small research reactors exist at the University of Basel (Uni BS) and at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) for teaching purposes. The former Lucens experimental NPP was decommissioned and dismantled after experiencing a loss of coolant accident in 1969. This site was declassified and released for non-nuclear activities, as well as the one of the small research reactor at the University of Geneva. Each NPP has facilities for the conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste. PSI operates the National Collection Centre for all non-NPP radioactive waste coming from medicine, industry and research. In Wuerenlingen, the Central Storage Facility for Radioactive Waste (ZZL) has been constructed by the utility-owned company ZWILAG. The application for the general licence for a repository for low and intermediate level waste at the Wellenberg site was rejected by the citizens. Concerning the disposal of high level and long-lived intermediate level waste, the work was concentrated on the demonstration of the feasibility of such a repository in Switzerland. The feasibility study based on a repository in the crystalline basement of Northern Switzerland did not fully succeed in providing the required demonstration. The Federal Council then ordered that research should be extended to sedimentary rocks. As a result of a broad selection process, the

  11. Safety and performance of a long life lithium-thionyl chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, W. R.; Street, H. K.

    A Li/SOCl2 'D' cell for applications requiring 10 to 15 years life at very low drain rates, typically less than 150 microA, were developed. Maximizing cell safety and reliability, while delivering very good energy density, were the goals. These goals were achieved by designing the cell to be application specific. The low-rate cell was optimized to deliver up to 16 Ah at drain rates of less than 70 mA. By virtue of its low surface area, 145 cm(sup 2), the cell demonstrated excellent safety behavior. Safety testing was performed on individual cells as well as on two-cell and four-cell batteries. Single cells did not vent when short-circuited. Benign venting in a two cell string was produced, but only when the string was partially discharged before shorting. The vent mechanism is a 300 psi rupture pressure burst disc manufactured by BS&B Safety Systems. Benign venting is defined as full opening of the 3/8 in. dia vent hole without deformation of the case. Material is expelled from the cell without flame, and the cell stack remains largely intact. Venting of the Sandia-designed low rate cell was not produced under any other abuse test conditions. The vent functions as an ultimate safety mechanism in the case of severe abuse, but resistance to venting under normal use and mild abuse conditions is key to the achievement of high reliability.

  12. Econometric analysis of ship life cycles - are safety inspections effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Bijwaard (Govert); S. Knapp (Sabine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDue to the shipping industry’s international legal framework and the existence of loopholes in the system, an estimated 5-10 percent of substandard ships exist which are more likely to have incidents with high economic cost. This article uses ship life cycles to provide insight into

  13. Impact of life history traits on gene flow: A multispecies systematic review across oceanographic barriers in the Mediterranean Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pascual, Marta

    2017-05-10

    Marine species can demonstrate strong genetic differentiation and population structure despite the hypothesis of open seas and high connectivity. Some suggested drivers causing the genetic breaks are oceanographic barriers and the species\\' biology. We assessed the relevance of seven major oceanographic fronts on species connectivity while considering their dispersal capacity and life strategy.We systematically reviewed the scientific articles reporting population genetic differentiation along the Mediterranean Sea and across the Atlantic-Mediterranean transition. We retained those considering at least one sampling locality at each side of an oceanographic front, and at least two localities with no-front between them to correctly assess the effect of the front. To estimate the impact of life history characteristics affecting connectivity we considered the planktonic larval duration (PLD) and adult life strategy.Oceanographic barriers in the Mediterranean Sea seem to reduce gene flow globally; however, this effect is not homogeneous considering the life history traits of the species. The effect of the oceanographic fronts reduces gene flow in highly mobile species with PLD larger than 2-4 weeks. Benthic sessile species and/or with short PLD (< 2 weeks) have more significant genetic breaks between localities than species with higher motility; however, genetic differentiation occurs independently of the presence of a front.Genetic connectivity is important for populations to recover from anthropogenic or natural impacts. We show that species with low mobility, mostly habitat-formers, have high genetic differentiation but low gene flow reduction mediated by the front, therefore, considering the importance of these species, we emphasize the vulnerability of the Mediterranean ecosystems and the necessity of protection strategies based on the whole ecosystem.

  14. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from two tracer (cyclic perfluorocarbon experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study vertical dispersion profiles and transport times in central London. Vertical gradients are contrasted with the relevant Pasquill stability classes. Estimation of lateral advection and vertical mixing times are made and compared with previous measurements. Data are then compared with a simple operational dispersion model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign. This correlates dosage with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analyses illustrate the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  15. Good Order at Sea in the Gulf of Guinea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Johannes Riber; Lindskov Jacobsen, Katja

    In this chapter, we first outline the maritime security situation in the Gulf of Guinea region at present. It is examined in the context of Good Order at Sea. Second, we describe the most recent maritime security initiative launched during the Yaoundé Summit in 2013. During the summit, West...... and Central African states decided to establish six maritime zones along their coastline in order to improve the maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea. A process heavily supported by UN’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO). Finally, the chapter suggests that maritime security issues in the Gulf...

  16. The Influence of Green Infrastructure on Urban Resilience in Greater London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yukyung

    2017-04-01

    High population densities and diverse economic activities in urban areas create social issues as well as a range of environmental impacts including air pollution, soil contamination, loss of biodiversity and health problems (Alberti et al., 2003; Dobbs, Escobedo, & Zipperer, 2011; Grimm et al., 2008). The concept of urban resilience has been used for increasing the capacity of the entities and players to adapt to rapid changes, and urban green spaces play a crucial role in increasing urban resilience. Greater London has a good case for increasing urban green spaces and resilience under the London Plan. The relevance of urban open spaces and several socioeconomic indicators would provide researchers and policy makers with the information for managing green coverage. The correlation analysis of two quantitative data such as open space and socioeconomic data of Greater London was conducted with SPSS. The data for open spaces in Greater London was gained through Greenspace Information for Greater London. The data was converted from vector to raster in Geographic Information System (GIS), so as to calculate landscape metrics for open spaces in Greater London through a spatial pattern analysis program, FRAGSTATS 4.2. The socioeconomic data was obtained from "London Borough Profile", London Datastore. In addition, data on total carbon emissions from Industry and Commercial, Domestic, Transport, LULUCF Net Emissions, and per capita emissions were gained from UK local authority and regional carbon dioxide emissions national statistics: 2005-2014 released from Department of Energy and Climate Change. The indicators from open spaces are total area of open space and patch density or contagion of open spaces. The latter indicator allows to figure out the level of fragmentation of open spaces. The socioeconomic indicators cover number of jobs by workplace, jobs density, crime rates per thousand population, and several wellbeing indicators such as life satisfaction

  17. Life time estimation of SSCs for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Lee, Kune-Woo; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Jeong, Seong-Young; Lee, Jung-Jun; Kim, Geun-Ho; Choi, Byung-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper suggests the expectation algorithm of SSCs life time for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities. ► The life time of SSCs can be estimated by using fuzzy theory. ► The estimated results depend on the membership functions and performance characteristic functions. - Abstract: This paper suggests the estimation algorithm for life time of structure, system and components (SSCs) for decommissioning safety of nuclear facilities using the performance data of linguistic languages and fuzzy theory. The fuzzy estimation algorithm of life time can be easily applicable but the estimated results depend on the relevant membership functions and performance characteristic functions. This method will be expected to be very useful for maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear facilities’ SSCs as a safety assessment tool.

  18. Conservation of Life as a Unifying Theme for Process Safety in Chemical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, James A.; Davis, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "conservation of life" as a concept and unifying theme for increasing awareness, application, and integration of process safety in chemical engineering education. Students need to think of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of life as equally important in engineering design and analysis.…

  19. Reactors at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Colin

    1988-01-01

    The Greenpeace Nuclear Free Seas Campaign is outlined. The campaign aims to bring the environmental hazards from nuclear submarines and naval ships carrying nuclear weapons to public attention. Worldwide there are 544 nuclear reactor ships or submarines each with the potential to meltdown with serious environmental consequences. One meltdown is known to have occurred. Five reactors have been abandoned on the sea bed. Nuclear powered submarines are based at Rosyth, Faslane, Holy Loch, Plymouth and Portsmouth and routinely come into and out of those harbours. There have also been accidents involving nuclear weapons on board submarines, aircraft carriers or destroyers which carry nuclear depth bombs and free fall bombs. The Royal Navy's accident emergency plans for nuclear naval bases are inadequate. There is a threat to the environment when the reactors are decommissioned. There are no clear plans as to how to deal with the decommissioning of the submarines or ships although the fuel rods have been removed from the first British nuclear submarine, Dreadnought. (U.K.)

  20. Research reactor facilities, recent developments at Imperial College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, S.J.; Goddard, A.J.H.; O Connell, J.

    1998-01-01

    The 100 kW CONSORT pool-type reactor is now the only Research Reactor in the UK. Because of its strategic importance, Imperial College is continuing and accelerating a programme of refurbishment of the control system, and planning for a further fuel charge. These plans are described and the progress to date discussed. To this end, a description of the enhanced Safety Case being written is provided here and refueling plans discussed. The current range of facilities available is described, and future plans highlighted. (author)

  1. How Feelings of Safety at School Affect Educational Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna Lacoe

    2013-01-01

    Persistent racial and ethnic gaps in educational achievement have focused policy attention on school climate and safety as important elements of educational performance. In a special issue of Educational Researcher focused on safety and order in schools, Cornell and Mayer (2010) argue that school safety and school order are fundamental to studies of the achievement gap, teacher attrition, and student engagement. This paper represents the first large-scale analysis of how feelings of safety at...

  2. Management of safety and safety culture at the NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltakov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The report contains general aspects of safety and safety culture. The brief description of operational characteristics and basic indexes of atomic power plants at the Ukraine are represented. The information referring to structure of NPPs of Operation organization license-holder, safety responsibility of both Regulatory and Utility Bodies also is given. The main part of the report include seven sections: 1. Practical application of safety management models; 2. erspective on the relationship between safety management and safety culture; 3. The role of leadership in achieving high standards of safety; 4. Current and future challengers that impact on safety culture and safety management (e.g. the impact of competition, changing, economic and political circumstances, workforce demographics, etc.); 5. Key lessons learned from major events; 6. Practical applications of safety culture concepts (e.g. learning organizations, training staff communications, etc.); 7. dvance in human performance. Some of the main pending safety and safety culture problems that are necessary to achieve in the near future are mentioned

  3. Life cycle and spring phenology of Temora longicornis in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutz, Jörg; Mohrholz, V.; van Beusekom, J. E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The seasonal variation in abundance, biomass and vertical distribution of nauplii and copepodites of Temora longicornis in the Bornholm Basin was studied from March 2002 to May 2003 to understand the overwintering, spring development and life cycle of this species in the Baltic Sea. The analysis...... of the life cycle by means of stage structure, copepodite length and stage duration revealed that T. longicornis produced 5 to 6 generations yr–1. The species overwintered in low abundance as an active, slowly developing generation with adults appearing from February/March onwards. The onset of the spring...... bloom in April triggered reproduction and initiated the first spring generation (G1) with a strong rise in nauplii abundance. The stock biomass increased in May with the occurrence of the copepodites of G1 and remained high during the succeeding generations G2 and G3 until August. The stock...

  4. Comparably improved health-related quality of life after total arterial revascularization versus conventional coronary surgery--Copenhagen arterial revascularization randomized patency and outcome trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Sune; Lund, Jens T; Lilleør, Nikolaj B

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We compared health-related quality of life up to 11 months after coronary artery bypass grafting using total arterial revascularization versus conventional coronary surgery. METHODS: In this randomized single-center trial, 161 patients underwent total arterial revascularization using.......01). For total arterial revascularization, there were also not statistically significant improvements for 'physical component summary' (P=0.09), 'bodily pain' (P=0.07) and 'vitality' (P=0.08). CONCLUSION: Health-related quality of life up to 1 year after total arterial revascularization is equal or slightly...... of the general Danish population. On all scales of the SF-36, there was statistically significant improvement at 3 and 11 months in both groups. For 'social functioning', the improvement following total arterial revascularization was significantly higher than following conventional revascularization (P=0...

  5. Marketing modest fashion or fashioning modesty? HijUp Unveiled at London Fashion Week

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesians came, they saw and we learned more about their spicy blend of fashion and fun, in the streets of London. Here’s a slice of what’s going on in the emerging global Modest Fashion scene.

  6. Health and safety at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeNeveu, D.M.

    1982-04-01

    This report outlines the health and safety program at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. It describes the procedures in place to ensure that a high standard of conventional industrial and radiation safety is maintained in the workplace

  7. The quality of life in residential areas : an introduction to a film made by the Foundation for Film and Science, in co-operation with the Institute for Road Safety Research SWOV, supported by the Royal Dutch Touring Club ANWB. Paper presented at the 13th AIT/FIA/PIARC International Study Week on Traffic Engineering and Safety, Montreux, 11-16 September 1978.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1978-01-01

    The films purpose is to review what is known about housing-quality social activities and road safety. These aspects constitute the so-called quality of life in residential areas. The possible influence is examined of several principles of urban planning on the quality of life in residential areas.

  8. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT

  9. “Vitamin D and Human Health: from the Gamete to the Grave”: Report on a meeting held at Queen Mary University of London, 23rd–25th April 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martineau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The inaugural Vitamin D and Human Health conference was held on the London Whitechapel campus of Queen Mary University’s Barts and The London Medical School, from the 23rd to 25th of April, 2014. This three-day meeting set out to achieve two main aims: to create a forum for researchers to meet and forge new collaborations, and to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the latest findings from clinical research in the field of vitamin D. Over 300 clinical researchers, students and commercial representatives attended. Thirty international experts in the field of clinical vitamin D research presented talks organised into a programme spanning the human life course. Commencing with a session of talks providing overviews of randomised trials of supplementation and global vitamin D status, the meeting proceeded with a session on pre-birth related vitamin D research—evolution, genetics & fertility—which led into several talks in the area of child health. Sessions on respiratory health, immune function, cancer biology, and neurodegenerative diseases preceded an overview of research in the area of ageing-related health outcomes, including musculoskeletal health and metabolic diseases. Finally sessions on the economy of vitamin D and public health, along with future directions for research were held. Several themes emerged during the course of the meeting. The anticipation of results from very large (n > 5000 randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation (“mega-trials” and Individual Patient Data (IPD meta-analyses were hot topics of discussion. Mega-trials have the potential to detect small effect sizes of vitamin D supplementation on end-points such as incidence and mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer. IPD meta-analyses have the potential to investigate the causes of heterogeneity often seen in the results of individual primary trials by allowing clinically important subgroup effects of vitamin D supplementation to be

  10. Survey of community pharmacists' perception of electronic cigarettes in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Gomes, Ana C N; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Kayyali, Reem; Buonocore, Federico; Calabrese, Gianpiero

    2016-11-10

    To seek community pharmacists' perception on use, safety and possible effectiveness of e-cigarettes as quit smoking tools, and their future regulation. A survey of a sample of 154 community pharmacies across London, UK. E-cigarettes have exclusively established themselves in the market through consumers-led demand. To date, e-cigarettes still remain unregulated and can be easily purchased in shops, over the internet, but more controversially also in pharmacies in the UK. Pharmacists find themselves with a shortage of information on their safety and efficacy, and may experience an ethical dilemma when consulted by patients/customers. Response rate: 60% (n=92). Independent pharmacies accounted for 90% of the sample. The majority of participants (73%) sell e-cigarettes. A minority of participants (20%) have been presented with adverse effects such as cough and dry mouth. As possible reasons for their use, pharmacists ranked 'aid in stop smoking' as the most important (56%), with 'cheaper alternative' (43%) and 'social/recreational use' (31%) being the least important ones. Safety issues were raised as statements such as 'e-liquid in cartridges may be toxic' were agreed by 52% of respondents. The majority of pharmacists (97%) were supportive of e-cigarettes being regulated, expressing current concerns regarding excipients (42%) and nicotine content (34%). Participants indicated that they would require training in the form of information packs (88%), online tutorials (67%), continuous professional development (CPD) workshops (43%) to cover safety, counselling, dosage instructions, adverse effects and role in the smoking cessation care pathway in the future. Pharmacists expressed concerns about the safety of e-cigarettes, especially regarding the amounts of excipients and nicotine as these still remain unregulated. Currently, there are no guidelines for pharmacists regarding e-cigarettes. Community pharmacists look forward to regulations so to conduct their duties in a

  11. Management of safety, safety culture and self assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.

    2000-01-01

    Safety management is the term used for the measures required to ensure that an acceptable level of safety is maintained throughout the life of an installation, including decommissioning. The safety culture concept and its implementation are described in part one of the paper. The principles of safety are now quite well known and are implemented worldwide. It leads to a situation where harmonization is being achieved as indicated by the entry into force of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. To go beyond the present nuclear safety levels, management of safety and safety culture will be the means for achieving progress. Recent events which took place in major nuclear power countries have shown the importance of the management and the consequences on safety. At the same time, electricity deregulation is coming and will impact on safety through reductions in staffing and in operation and maintenance cost at nuclear installations. Management of safety as well as its control and monitoring by the safety authorities become a key to the future of nuclear energy.(author)

  12. Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Guidelines regarding the Review Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guidelines regarding the Review Process' adopted at the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Joint Convention held from 10 to 12 December 2001 were modified at the First Review Meeting of Contracting Parties held from 3 to 14 November 2003, the Extraordinary Meeting of the Contracting Parties held on 7 November 2005 and the Second Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties held from 15 to 24 May 2006.' The modified Guidelines regarding the Review Process' are set forth in the Attachment hereto

  13. THE COMPETITIVENESS ASSESSMENT OF THE POLISH AND GERMAN SEA PORTS AT THE SOUTHERN BALTIC SEA USING THE MULTICRITERIA METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Pac

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the research conducted by the scientists of the Baltic Sea Logistics Research Centre in Gdansk Banking School. The aim of the research was to assess the competitiveness level of the indicated Polish and German sea ports at the Southern Baltic Sea on the base of their identified logistic capabilities. As the tool to make the assessment the Analitic Hierarchic Process (AHP method has been implemented. The sea port competitiveness has been directly referred to the total sea port logistic capabilities and presented as the number value. The research was focused on the logistics areas that is why it is difficult to take it as the interdisciplinary solution.

  14. Managing dredged material in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Marta; Boniecka, Helena

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the legal and practical recommendations for the management of dredged material in the riparian countries of the Baltic Sea. The recommendations are contained in three conventions: LC, 2000. London Convention (1972), Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea area (Helsinki Convention) (1992), the OSPAR Convention (1972). Different approaches to evaluating the contamination level of dredge spoils, used by the Baltic Sea riparian countries, have been characterized. The differences in those approaches manifest themselves by various concentration limits for contaminants, which form a basis for the classification of dredged material as either contaminated or non-contaminated, and thus determine how the spoils will be processed further. Based on the collected information about the concentration limits for contaminants of surface sediments in the coastal ports, it was pointed out that it is necessary to conduct routine monitoring of heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, tributyltin, and petroleum hydrocarbons in dredged sediments in all the Baltic Sea states. On the other hand, the monitoring of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans, organochlorine, and organophosphoric pesticides is only needed in locations that are suspected of historical or being the local contamination sources. Due to significant economic limitations of chemical determinations, it is important to consider a simple screening test of sediment that would say whether sediment may be "contaminated" and qualifies for more detailed and costly chemical research. It may be typical basic physical-chemical analysis of sediments or ecotoxicological classification of sediments.Despite environmentally friendly tendencies, the practical application of dredged material within the Baltic Sea area is very limited. Dredged material is most frequently stored at the specifically designated sites. From among the practical uses of

  15. The international law the sea disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasceno, E.

    1988-01-01

    The International Law, that throughout its treaties and conventions, seeks to regulate matters concerning mankind's interests, rarely attains its basic end, due to quick dynamics of the envolved facts, and the complexity of the questions dealt with. The conflict of interests so becomes of difficult solution. The sea disposal of radioactive wastes, ever sincre put into practice by those countries which make use in large scale of the nuclear energy, is the main subject of this paper, under the International Law focus. Such study gives emphasis to expository remarks, instead of theoretical doctrine, with the undeniable purpose to provoke the debate, under the light of the supremacy of Nature's interests. The London Dumping Convention (1972) and the U.N. Convention on the the Sea Law (1982) receive in this work an objective analysis in view of the theme's unavoidable length. (author) [pt

  16. Advantages of anterior inferior alveolar nerve block with felypressin-propitocaine over conventional epinephrine-lidocaine: an efficacy and safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzaki, Hazuki; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Conventional anesthetic nerve block injections into the mandibular foramen risk causing nerve damage. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of the anterior technique (AT) of inferior alveolar nerve block using felypressin-propitocaine with a conventional nerve block technique (CT) using epinephrine and lidocaine for anesthesia via the mandibular foramen. Forty healthy university students with no recent dental work were recruited as subjects and assigned to two groups: right side CT or right side AT. Anesthesia was evaluated in terms of success rate, duration of action, and injection pain. These parameters were assessed at the first incisor, premolar, and molar, 60 min after injection. Chi-square and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical comparisons, with a P value of nerve block techniques generated comparable success rates for the right mandible, with rates of 65% (CT) and 60% (AT) at both the first molar and premolar, and rates of 60% (CT) and 50% (AT) at the lateral incisor. The duration of anesthesia using the CT was 233 ± 37 min, which was approximately 40 min shorter than using the AT. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Injection pain using the AT was rated as milder compared with the CT. This difference was also statistically significant (P < 0.05). The AT is no less successful than the CT for inducing anesthesia, and has the added benefits of a significantly longer duration of action and significantly less pain.

  17. Answers to questions on National Report of the Slovak Republic. Compiled according to the terms of the joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. October 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    Slovakia is pleased to present to the State Parties of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management the Answers to questions received on the National Report of the Slovak Republic compiled according to the terms of the Joint Convention (April 2003). Slovakia is ready to provide additional explanations to these Answers during the 1 st Review Meeting. In the Annexes the 254/1994 Coll. LL. Act of the National Council of the Slovak Republic of 25 August 1994 on State Fund of Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations and Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuels and Nuclear Wastes is included

  18. Delivering a Paper (and other works) at #LowTechLabLondon2016

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Micheal

    2016-01-01

    Performance 'Delivering a Paper' and screened/presented/exhibited other works such as 'How to Buy Nothing' related to author's interventionist art practice at this three-day event.\\ud \\ud #LowTechLabLondon2016 is a project developed by Raúl Marroquín and coordinated by Daniela Medina Poch for the Educational Program of the Saatchi Gallery that will take place on January 15th, 16th and 17th of 2016.\\ud \\ud “‘LowTech means technology that is cheap or free.”\\ud James Wallback, LowTech Manifest f...

  19. Submission of Republica Oriental del Uruguay to the Commission on the limits of the continental shelf pursuant to provisions of article 76, paragraph 8, of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata Prates, C.; Tajes, J.; Burgos, M.; Caamaño; Lamartheé; Montiel, D.; Preciozzi, F.; De Santa Ana, H.

    2009-01-01

    Pursuant to provisions of article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (hereinafter the Convention), and to article 4 of Annex II of same, República Oriental del Uruguay (Uruguay) hereby submits to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (the Commission) particulars on the outer limit of its continental shelf, extending beyond 200 nautical miles (M) from the baselines from which the breadth of territorial sea is measured. On December 10, 1982 Uruguay signed the Convention, which was subsequently approved by Uruguayan Law Nº 16,287, and ratified on December 10, 1992. The porvisions of article 76 invoked in Uruguay submission fixed points delimiting Uruguay’s Continental Shelf. There exist, at present, no unresolved disputes over the maritime border with either of Uruguay’s neighbouring countries, Argentina or Brazil. It was received assistance in the elaboration of this Submission April 2008, from member of the Commission and also assistance from other, non-member consultants and institutions from Germany, Brazil, Portugal and Norway

  20. Differences in safety margins between nuclear and conventional design standards with regards to seismic hazard definition and design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgohary, M.; Saudy, A.; Orbovic, N.; Dejan, D.

    2006-01-01

    With the surging interest in new build nuclear all over the world and a permanent interest in earthquake resistance of nuclear plants, there is a need to quantify the safety margins in nuclear buildings design in comparison to conventional buildings in order to increase the public confidence in the safety of nuclear power plants. Nuclear (CAN3-N289 series) and conventional (NBCC 2005) seismic standards have different approaches regarding the design of civil structures. The origin of the differences lays in the safety philosophy behind the seismic nuclear and conventional standards. Conventional seismic codes contain the minimal requirement destined primarily to safeguard against major structural failure and loss of life. It doesn't limit damage to a certain acceptable degree or maintain function. Nuclear seismic code requires that structures, systems and components important to safety, withstand the effects of earthquakes. The requirement states that for equipment important to safety, both integrity and functionality should be ascertained. The seismic hazard is generally defined on the basis of the annual probability of exceedence (return period). There is a major difference on the return period and the confidence level for design earthquakes between the conventional and the nuclear seismic standards. The seismic design criteria of conventional structures are based on the use of Force Modification Factors to take into account the energy dissipation by incursion in non-elastic domain and the reserve of strength. The use of such factors to lower intentionally the seismic input is consistent with the safety philosophy of the conventional seismic standard which is the 'non collapse' rather than the integrity and/or the operability of the structures or components. Nuclear seismic standard requires that the structure remain in the elastic domain; energy dissipation by incursion in non-elastic domain is not allowed for design basis earthquake conditions. This is

  1. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with sustained volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics: a phase III open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunami, Masatake; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru

    2011-12-01

    Volume overload is a common complication associated with heart failure (HF) and is recommended to be treated with loop or thiazide diuretics. However, use of diuretics can cause serum electrolyte imbalances and diuretic resistance. Tolvaptan, a selective, oral, non-peptide vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, offers a new option for treating volume overload in HF patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in Japanese HF patients with volume overload. Fifty-one HF patients with volume overload, despite using conventional diuretics, were treated with 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 days. If the response was insufficient at Day 7, tolvaptan was continued for a further 7 days at either 15 mg/day or 30 mg/day. Outcomes included changes in body weight, symptoms and safety parameters. Thirty-six patients discontinued treatment within 7 days, therefore 15 patients entered the second phase of treatment. In two patients, tolvaptan was increased to 30 mg/day after 7 days. Body weight was reduced on Day 7 (-1.95 ± 1.98 kg; n = 41) and Day 14 (-2.35 ± 1.44 kg; n = 11, 15 mg/day). Symptoms of volume overload, including lower limb edema, pulmonary congestion, jugular venous distention and hepatomegaly, were improved by tolvaptan treatment for 7 or 14 days. Neither tolvaptan increased the incidence of severe or serious adverse events when administered for 7-14 days. This study confirms the efficacy and safety of 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7-14 days in Japanese HF patients with volume overload despite conventional diuretics.

  2. Organization and conduct of IAEA fire safety reviews at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The importance of fire safety in the safe and productive operation of nuclear power plants is recognized worldwide. Lessons learned from experience in nuclear power plants indicate that fire poses a real threat to nuclear safety and that its significance extends far beyond the scope of a conventional fire hazard. With a growing understanding of the close correlation between the fire hazard in nuclear power plants and nuclear safety, backfitting for fire safety has become necessary for a number of operating plants. However, it has been recognized that the expertise necessary for a systematic independent assessment of fire safety of a NPP may not always be available to a number of Member States. In order to assist in enhancing fire safety, the IAEA has already started to offer various services to Member States in the area of fire safety. At the request of a Member State, the IAEA may provide a team of experts to conduct fire safety reviews of varying scope to evaluate the adequacy of fire safety at a specific nuclear power plant during various phases such as construction, operation and decommissioning. The IAEA nuclear safety publications related to fire protection and fire safety form a common basis for these reviews. This report provides guidance for the experts involved in the organization and conduct of fire safety review services to ensure consistency and comprehensiveness of the reviews

  3. Safety Aspects